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Sample records for quaking paramagnetic neutron

  1. Spin paramagnetic deformation of a neutron star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Melatos, A.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum mechanical corrections to the hydromagnetic force balance equation, derived from the microscopic Schrödinger-Pauli theory of quantum plasmas, modify the equilibrium structure and hence the mass quadrupole moment of a neutron star. It is shown here that the dominant effect - spin paramagnetism - is most significant in a magnetar, where one typically has μ _B|B|≳ k_B T_e, where μB is the Bohr magneton, B is the magnetic field, and Te is the electron temperature. The spin paramagnetic deformation of a non-barotropic magnetar with a linked poloidal-toroidal magnetic field is calculated to be up to ˜10 times greater than the deformation caused solely by the Lorentz force. It depends on the degree of Pauli blocking by conduction electrons and the propensity to form magnetic domains, processes which are incompletely modelled at magnetar field strengths. The star becomes more oblate, as the toroidal field component strengthens. The result implies that existing classical predictions underestimate the maximum strength of the gravitational wave signal from rapidly spinning magnetars at birth. Turning the argument around, future gravitational-wave upper limits of increasing sensitivity will place ever-stricter constraints on the physics of Pauli blocking and magnetic domain formation under magnetar conditions.

  2. Spin paramagnetic deformation of a neutron star

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorov, A G; Melatos, A

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanical corrections to the hydromagnetic force balance equation, derived from the microscopic Schr\\"{o}dinger-Pauli theory of quantum plasmas, modify the equilibrium structure and hence the mass quadrupole moment of a neutron star. It is shown here that the dominant effect --- spin paramagnetism --- is most significant in a magnetar, where one typically has $\\mu_{B}|\\boldsymbol{B}|\\gtrsim k_B T_e$, where $\\mu_{B}$ is the Bohr magneton, $\\boldsymbol{B}$ is the magnetic field, and $T_e$ is the electron temperature. The spin paramagnetic deformation of a nonbarotropic magnetar with a linked poloidal-toroidal magnetic field is calculated to be up to ${{\\sim 10}}$ times greater than the deformation caused solely by the Lorentz force. It depends on the degree of Pauli blocking by conduction electrons and the propensity to form magnetic domains, processes which are incompletely modelled at magnetar field strengths. The star becomes more oblate, as the toroidal field component strengthens. The result impli...

  3. Gamma ray bursts, neutron star quakes, and the Casimir effect

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, C; Pérez-Mercader, J; Carlson, C; Goldman, T; Perez-Mercader, J

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the dynamic Casimir effect is a mechanism that converts the energy of neutron starquakes into \\gamma--rays. This mechanism efficiently produces photons from electromagnetic Casimir energy released by the rapid motion of a dielectric medium into a vacuum. Estimates based on the cutoff energy of the gamma ray bursts and the volume involved in a starquake indicate that the total gamma ray energy emission is consonant with observational requirements.

  4. Neutron conversion and cascaded cooling in paramagnetic systems for a high-flux source of very cold neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron-cooling mechanism is proposed with potential benefits for novel intense sources of very cold neutrons with wavelengths >2 nm, and for enhancing the production of ultracold neutrons. It employs inelastic magnetic scattering in weakly absorbing, cold paramagnetic systems. Kinetic energy is removed from the neutron stepwise in constant decrements determined by the Zeeman energy of paramagnetic atoms or ions in an external magnetic field, or by zero-field level splittings in magnetic molecules. The stationary neutron transport equation is analyzed for an infinite, homogeneous medium with Maxwellian neutron sources, using inelastic scattering cross sections derived in an appendix. Nonmagnetic inelastic scattering processes are neglected. The solution therefore still underestimates very cold neutron densities that should be achievable in a real medium. Molecular oxygen with its triplet ground state appears particularly promising, notably as a host in fully deuterated O2-clathrate hydrate. Other possibilities are dry O2-4He van der Waals clusters and O2 intercalated in fcc-C60. For conversion of cold to ultracold neutrons, where an incident neutron imparts only a single energy quantum to the medium, the paramagnetic scattering in the clathrate system is found to be stronger, by more than an order of magnitude, than the single-phonon emission in superfluid helium, when evaluated for an incident neutron spectrum with the optimum temperature for the respective medium. Moreover, the multistep paramagnetic cooling cascade leads to further strong enhancements of very cold neutron densities, e.g., by a factor 14 (57) for an initial neutron temperature of 30 K (100 K ), for the moderator held at about 1.3 K . Due to a favorable Bragg cutoff of the O2 clathrate, the cascade-cooling can take effect in a moderator with linear extensions smaller than a meter.

  5. Field-theory calculation of the electric dipole moment of the neutron and paramagnetic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Joel; Blundell, Steven; Sapirstein, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Electric dipole moments (edms) of bound states that arise from the constituents having edms are studied with field-theoretic techniques. The systems treated are the neutron and a set of paramagnetic atoms. In the latter case it is well known that the atomic edm differs greatly from the electron edm when the internal electric fields of the atom are taken into account. In the nonrelativistic limit these fields lead to a complete suppression, but for heavy atoms large enhancement factors are present. A general bound-state field theory approach applicable to both the neutron and paramagnetic atoms is set up. It is applied first to the neutron, treating the quarks as moving freely in a confining spherical well. It is shown that the effect of internal electric fields is small in this case. The atomic problem is then revisited using field-theory techniques in place of the usual Hamiltonian methods, and the atomic enhancement factor is shown to be consistent with previous calculations. Possible application of bound-state techniques to other sources of the neutron edm is discussed.

  6. Magnetization distribution in paramagnetic CoO: a polarized neutron diffraction study

    CERN Document Server

    Kernavanois, N; Brown, P J; Henry, J Y; Lelievre-Berna, E

    2003-01-01

    Unpolarized and polarized neutron diffraction by a single crystal have been used to study the magnetization distribution in the paramagnetic phase of cobalt oxide CoO. Highly accurate magnetic structure factors have been measured using the classical polarized beam method. A detailed description of the magnetization distribution is presented. The magnetization around the cobalt site has a radial distribution which is contracted by approx = 5% with respect to that of the free ion and a symmetry which approximates more closely to e sub g than to the form t sub 2 sub g sup 5 /e sub g sup 2 expected for the Co sup 2 sup + 3d sup 7 configuration. A significant magnetization, corresponding to some 8% of the total moment, is found at the oxygen site.

  7. Comparison of neutron and gamma irradiation effects on KU1 fused silica monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, D. [Department Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: david.bravo@uam.es; Lagomacini, J.C. [Department Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Leon, M.; Martin, P. [Materiales para Fusion, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Martin, A. [Department Fisica e Instalaciones, ETS Arquitectura UPM, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Lopez, F.J. [Department Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, A. [Materiales para Fusion, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies have been carried out on KU1 fused silica irradiated with neutrons at fluences 10{sup 21} and 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2}, and gamma-ray doses up to 12 MGy. The effects of post-irradiation thermal annealing treatments, up to 850 deg. C, have also been investigated. Paramagnetic oxygen-related defects (POR and NBOHC) and E'-type defects have been identified and their concentration has been measured as a function of neutron fluence, gamma dose and post-irradiation annealing temperature. It is found that neutrons at the highest fluence generate a much higher concentration of defects (mainly E' and POR, both at concentrations about 5 x 10{sup 18} spins/cm{sup 3}) than gamma irradiations at the highest dose (mainly E' at a concentration about 4 x 10{sup 17} spins/cm{sup 3}). Moreover, for gamma-irradiated samples a lower treatment temperature (about 400 deg. C) is required to annihilate most of the observed defects than for neutron-irradiated ones (about 600 deg. C)

  8. A hypothesis of earth quake

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Yeong-Shyeong

    2008-01-01

    Without a model, it is impossible for a geophysicist to study the possibility of forecasting earth quakes. In order to make a simple model, we make a hypothesis of earth quakes. The hypothesis is: (i) There are two kinds of earth quakes, one is the triggered breaking (earth quake), the other is spontaneous breaking (earth quake). (ii) Most major quakes in continental plates Eurasian Plate, North America Plate, South America Plate, Africa Plate and Australia Plate are triggered breaking. (iii) These triggered quakes are triggered by the movements of high pressure centers and low pressure centers of the atmosphere on continental plates. (iv) How can the movements of the high pressure centers trigger a quake? It depends on the extent of the high pressure center and the speed of the movement. Here, we stress high pressure center instead of low pressure center because it is dominated by high pressure center mostly. Of course, the boundary of the plates must have stored enough energy to have quakes, that is, near t...

  9. Simultaneous evidence for Pauli paramagnetic effects and multiband superconductivity in KFe2As2 by small-angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, S. J.; Kawano-Furukawa, H.; Jellyman, E.; Riyat, R.; Forgan, E. M.; Ono, M.; Kihou, K.; Lee, C. H.; Hardy, F.; Adelmann, P.; Wolf, Th.; Meingast, C.; Gavilano, J.; Eskildsen, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    We study the intrinsic anisotropy of the superconducting state in KFe2As2 by using small-angle neutron scattering to image the vortex lattice as the applied magnetic field is rotated towards the FeAs crystalline planes. The anisotropy is found to be strongly field dependent, indicating multiband superconductivity. Furthermore, the high-field anisotropy significantly exceeds that of the upper critical field, providing further support for Pauli limiting in KFe2As2 for fields applied in the basal plane. The effect of Pauli paramagnetism on the unpaired quasiparticles in the vortex cores is directly evident from the ratio of scattered intensities due to the longitudinal and transverse vortex lattice field modulation.

  10. CPL从Quake回到Quake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    相见时难

    2005-01-01

    2005年11月22日,总奖金高达50万美元的CPL世界巡回赛总决赛在纽约泰晤士广场的诺基亚剧院举行,历时将近一年、总奖金达100万美元的2005年CPL世界巡回赛终于落下帷幕。而与2005年CPL世界巡回赛一起走入历史的,是今年世界巡回赛的指定项目——PainKiller,因为CPL已经提前宣布刚刚上市的Quake 4将成为明年世界巡回赛的单挑项目。距离Quake 3被Angel Munoz (CPL及CAL的创始人及主席)从CPL逐出将近四年,伟大的雷神之锤终于重回CPL阵营。

  11. Vibration Powered Radiation of Quaking Magnetar

    CERN Document Server

    Bastrukov, S; Xu, R X; Molodtsova, I

    2011-01-01

    In juxtaposition with the standard model of rotation powered pulsar, the model of vibration powered magnetar undergoing quake-induced torsional Alfven vibrations in its own ultra strong magnetic field experiencing decay is considered. The presented line of argument shows that gradual decrease of frequencies (lengthening of periods) of long-periodic pulsed radiation detected from set of X-ray sources can be attributed to magnetic-field-induced energy conversion from seismic vibrations to magneto-dipole radiation of quaking magnetar.

  12. Financial Services for Post-Quake Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhen

    2008-01-01

    @@ The May 12 earthquake in Sichuan caught Chinese people by surprise and took the nation's heart.While mourning the dead and searching for the missing,many services must be provided for the survivors in the wake of the earth quake.Available post-quake financial services have become an important part of the reconstruction effort in the disaster stricken areas of Sichuan province.

  13. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Al'tshuler, S A

    2013-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is a comprehensive text on the field of electron paramagnetic resonance, covering both the theoretical background and the results of experiment. This book is composed of eight chapters that cover theoretical materials and experimental data on ionic crystals, since these are the materials that have been most extensively studied by the methods of paramagnetic resonance. The opening chapters provide an introduction to the basic principles of electron paramagnetic resonance and the methods of its measurement. The next chapters are devoted to the theory of spectra an

  15. RESTORATION OF QUAKING ASPEN WOODLANDS INVADED BY WESTERN JUNIPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaking aspen woodlands are important plant communities in the interior mountains of the western United States, providing essential habitat for many wildlife species and contain a high diversity of understory plants. Western juniper woodlands are rapidly replacing lower elevation (<6800 ft) quaking...

  16. QuakeML 2.0: Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, Fabian; Kästli, Philipp; Heiniger, Lukas; Saul, Joachim; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Clinton, John

    2016-04-01

    QuakeML is a community-backed data model for seismic event parameter description. Its current version 1.2, released in 2013, has become the gold standard for parametric data dissemination at seismological data centers, and has been adopted as an FDSN standard. It is supported by several popular software products and data services, such as FDSN event web services, QuakePy, and SeisComP3. Work on the successor version 2.0 is under way since 2015. The scope of QuakeML has been expanded beyond event parameter description. Thanks to a modular architecture, many thematic packages have been added, which cover peak ground motion, site and station characterization, hydraulic parameters of borehole injection processes, and macroseismics. The first three packages can be considered near final and implementations of program codes and SQL databases are in productive use at various institutions. A public community review process has been initiated in order to turn them into community-approved standards. The most recent addition is a package for single station quake location, which allows a detailed probabilistic description of event parameters recorded at a single station. This package adds some information elements such as angle of incidence, frequency-dependent phase picks, and dispersion relations. The package containing common data types has been extended with a generic type for probability density functions. While on Earth, single station methods are niche applications, they are of prominent interest in planetary seismology, e.g., the NASA InSight mission to Mars. So far, QuakeML is lacking a description of seismic instrumentation (inventory). There are two existing standards of younger age (FDSN StationXML and SeisComP3 Inventory XML). We discuss their respective strengths, differences, and how they could be combined into an inventory package for QuakeML, thus allowing full interoperability with other QuakeML data types. QuakeML is accompanied by QuakePy, a Python package

  17. Dosimetry of an accident in mixed field (neutrons, photons) using the spectrometry by electronic paramagnetic resonance(EPR); Dosimetrie d'accident en champ mixte (neutrons, photons) utilisant la spectrometrie par resonance paramagnetique electronique (RPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, M.L

    2006-03-15

    In a radiological accident, the assessment of the dose received by the victim is relevant information for the therapeutic strategy. Two complementary dosimetric techniques based on physical means are used in routine practice in the laboratory: EPR spectroscopy performed on materials removed from the victim or gathered from the vicinity of the victim and Monte Carlo calculations. EPR dosimetry, has been used successfully several times in cases of photon or electron overexposures. Accidental exposure may also occur with a neutron component. The aim of this work is to investigate the potentiality of EPR dosimetry for mixed photon and neutron field exposure with different organic materials (ascorbic acid, sorbitol, glucose, galactose, fructose, mannose, lactose and sucrose). The influence of irradiation parameters (dose, dose rate, photon energy) and of environmental parameters (temperature of heating, light exposure) on the EPR signal amplitude was studied. To assess the neutron sensitivity, the materials were exposed to a mixed radiation field of experimental reactors with different neutron to photon ratios. The relative neutron sensitivity was found to range from 10% to 43% according to the materials. Prior knowledge of the ratio between the dose in samples measured by EPR spectrometry and organ or whole body dose obtained by calculations previously performed for these different configurations, makes it possible to give a first estimation of the dose received by the victim in a short delay. The second aim of this work is to provide data relevant for a quick assessment of the dose distribution in case of accidental overexposure based on EPR measurements performed on one or several points of the body. The study consists in determining by calculation the relation between the dose to the organs and whole body and the dose to specific points of the body, like teeth, bones or samples located in the pockets of victim clothes, for different external exposures corresponding

  18. QuakeML - An XML Schema for Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, A.; Schorlemmer, D.; Maraini, S.; Baer, M.; Wiemer, S.

    2004-12-01

    We propose an extensible format-definition for seismic data (QuakeML). Sharing data and seismic information efficiently is one of the most important issues for research and observational seismology in the future. The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is playing an increasingly important role in the exchange of a variety of data. Due to its extensible definition capabilities, its wide acceptance and the existing large number of utilities and libraries for XML, a structured representation of various types of seismological data should in our opinion be developed by defining a 'QuakeML' standard. Here we present the QuakeML definitions for parameter databases and further efforts, e.g. a central QuakeML catalog database and a web portal for exchanging codes and stylesheets.

  19. Paramagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Pearson, John E.; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2015-05-01

    We report the observation of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in paramagnetic insulators. By using a microscale on-chip local heater, we generate a large thermal gradient confined to the chip surface without a large increase in the total sample temperature. Using this technique at low temperatures (<20 K ), we resolve the paramagnetic spin Seebeck effect in the insulating paramagnets Gd3Ga5O12 (gadolinium gallium garnet) and DyScO3 (DSO), using either W or Pt as the spin detector layer. By taking advantage of the strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy of DSO, we eliminate contributions from the Nernst effect in W or Pt, which produces a phenomenologically similar signal.

  20. Quakes and tsunamis detected by GOCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Doornbos, Eelco; Bruinsma, Sean; Hebert, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    The aerodynamic accelerations measured by GOCE are used to calculate air density variations and air velocity estimates along GOCE orbit track. The detection of infrasonic waves generated by seismic surface waves and gravity waves generated by tsunamis are presented for earthquakes and tsunamis generated by the great Tohoku quake (11/03/2011). For the seismic/infrasonic waves, a wave propagation modelling is presented and synthetic data are compared to GOCE measurements. The travel time and amplitude discrepancies are discussed in terms of lateral velocity variations in the solid Earth and the atmosphere. For the tsunami/gravity waves, a plane wave analysis is performed and relations between vertical velocity, cross-track velocity and density variations are deduced. From theoretical relations between air density, and vertical and horizontal velocities inside the gravity wave, we demonstrate that the measured perturbations are consistent with a gravity wave generated by the tsunami, and provide a way to estimate the propagation azimuth of the gravity wave. By using these relations, an indicator of gravity wave presence is constructed. It will allow to scan the GOCE data set to search for gravity wave crossings. This study demonstrates that very low earth orbit spacecraft with high-resolution accelerometers are able to detect atmospheric waves generated by the tectonic activity. Such spacecraft may supply additional data to tsunami alert systems in order to validate some tsunami alerts.

  1. Adsorption and collective paramagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Selwood, Pierce W

    1962-01-01

    Adsorption and Collective Paramagnetism describes a novel method for studying chemisorption. The method is based on the change in the number of unpaired electrons in the adsorbent as chemisorption occurs. The method is applicable to almost all adsorbates, but it is restricted to ferromagnetic adsorbents such as nickel, which may be obtained in the form of very small particles, that is to say, to ferromagnetic adsorbents with a high specific surface. While almost all the data used illustratively have been published elsewhere this is the first complete review of the subject. The book is addresse

  2. QuakeML: Status of the XML-based Seismological Data Exchange Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, Fabian; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Kästli, Philipp; Quakeml Working Group

    2010-05-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange standard for seismology that is in its fourth year of active community-driven development. The current release (version 1.2) is based on a public Request for Comments process that included contributions from ETH, GFZ, USC, SCEC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, GNS, ZAMG, BRGM, Nanometrics, and ISTI. QuakeML has mainly been funded through the EC FP6 infrastructure project NERIES, in which it was endorsed as the preferred data exchange format. Currently, QuakeML services are being installed at several institutions around the globe, including EMSC, ORFEUS, ETH, Geoazur (Europe), NEIC, ANSS, SCEC/SCSN (USA), and GNS Science (New Zealand). Some of these institutions already provide QuakeML earthquake catalog web services. Several implementations of the QuakeML data model have been made. QuakePy, an open-source Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit using the QuakeML data model, is being developed at ETH. QuakePy is part of the software stack used in the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) testing center installations, developed by SCEC. Furthermore, the QuakeML data model is part of the SeisComP3 package from GFZ Potsdam. QuakeML is designed as an umbrella schema under which several sub-packages are collected. The present scope of QuakeML 1.2 covers a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Work on additional packages (macroseismic information, seismic inventory, and resource metadata) has been started, but is at an early stage. Contributions from the community that help to widen the thematic coverage of QuakeML are highly welcome. Online resources: http://www.quakeml.org, http://www.quakepy.org

  3. Magnetization distribution in paramagnetic nickel and cobalt oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernavanois, N.; Ressouche, E.; Brown, P.J.; Henry, J.Y.; Lelievre-Berna, E

    2004-07-15

    Unpolarized and polarized neutron-diffraction have been used on single crystals to study the magnetization distribution in the paramagnetic phase of nickel oxide NiO and cobalt oxide CoO. Highly accurate magnetic structure factors have been measured using the classical polarized beam technique. A detailed description of the magnetization distribution is presented, and compared to the previous results obtained in the ordered state.

  4. The Magnetic Structure of Paramagnetic MnO

    OpenAIRE

    Paddison, Joseph A. M.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Stewart, J. Ross; Tucker, Matthew G.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.; Goodwin, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Using a combination of single-crystal neutron scattering and reverse Monte Carlo refinements, we study the magnetic structure of paramagnetic MnO at a temperature (160\\,K) substantially below the Curie-Weiss temperature $|\\theta|\\sim550$\\,K. The microscopic picture we develop reveals a locally-ordered domain structure that persists over distances many times larger than the correlation length implied by direct analysis of the spin correlation function. Moreover, the directional dependence of p...

  5. Spin fluctuations in 3d paramagnetic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Aleksander; Kutepov, Andrey; Antropov, Vladimir

    Spin fluctuations (SFs) in 3d paramagnetic metals were investigated using the linear response formalism within the time dependent density functional theory. An efficient scheme of frequency integration using the Matsubara technique has been implemented and tested. The SFs spectrum in 3d paramagnets is analyzed in real and reciprocal spaces as a function of frequency and temperature. For all materials the SFs are characterized by the coexistence of low and high energy branches which originate from different regions of the Brillouin zone. The low-energy ones can be measured by neutron scattering experiments while the high-energy SFs appear to be more localized. Further, we studied the nature of square of fluctuating magnetic moment in these materials. This work was supported, in part, by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and by the Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials Science and Engineering. The research was performed at Ames Laboratory, which is operated for the U.S. DOE by Iowa State University under contract # DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  6. Cooling neutrons using non-dispersive magnetic excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmer, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    A new method is proposed for cooling neutrons by inelastic magnetic scattering in weakly absorbing, cold paramagnetic systems. Kinetic neutron energy is removed in constant decrements determined by the Zeeman energy of paramagnetic atoms or ions in an external magnetic field, or by zero-field level splittings in magnetic molecules. Analytical solutions of the stationary neutron transport equation are given using inelastic neutron scattering cross sections derived in an appendix. They neglect any inelastic process except the paramagnetic scattering and hence still underestimate very-cold neutron densities. Molecular oxygen with its triplet ground state appears particularly promising, notably as a host in fully deuterated oxygen-clathrate hydrate, or more exotically, in dry oxygen-He4 van der Waals clusters. At a neutron temperature about 6 K, for which neutron conversion to ultra-cold neutrons by single-phonon emission in pure superfluid He4 works best, conversion rates due to paramagnetic scattering in the cl...

  7. Cosesimic landslides and their post-quake effects (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R.; Fan, X.

    2013-12-01

    On May 12, 2008, a devastating earthquake of magnitude Mw 7.9 hit China's Sichuan province. The quake, originating in the Longmen Shan fault zone at the eastern margin of Tibetan Plateau, was the country's largest seismic event in more than 50 years. It triggered more than 60,000 destructive landslides and 828 landslide dams over an area of 35,000 square kilometers, that caused about one third of the total fatalities. The combination of strong and long-lasting ground shaking, steep, rugged topography and a fragile and densely jointed lithology probably controlled the occurrence of landslides during the earthquake, but we found that other two factors (fault type and slip rate during the earthquake), may also have played a role. Landslides were clustered in a much wider corridor along the thrusting part of the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault than the strike-slip part. Large-scale landslides with an area of more than 50,000 m2 were concentrated where fault slip-rates were highest, near the intersections and junctures of individual segments of the fault. After the earthquake, debris flow hazard has become a significant concern. A tremendous amount of loose material from landslides that occurred during the earthquake is suspended on the hillslopes, ready to be eroded and transported by rain. More than 2000 occurrences of debris flow have been recorded by the Land and Resources Department of Sichuan Province following the 2008 quake till 2012. The threshold in hourly rainfall intensity for triggering debris flows was found to be around 60% lower after the earthquake than it had been before, according to the record in Beichuan. How long it will take for the debris flow frequency to return to pre-earthquake levels depends on a large number of factors, including rainfall intensity, natural re-vegetation and self-stabilization processes on slopes. We anticipate that - despite large uncertainties - debris flows that directly result from sediment movement during the 2008 earthquake may

  8. How to build and teach with QuakeCaster: an earthquake demonstration and exploration tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Kelsey; Stein, Ross S.

    2015-01-01

    QuakeCaster is an interactive, hands-on teaching model that simulates earthquakes and their interactions along a plate-boundary fault. QuakeCaster contains the minimum number of physical processes needed to demonstrate most observable earthquake features. A winch to steadily reel in a line simulates the steady plate tectonic motions far from the plate boundaries. A granite slider in frictional contact with a nonskid rock-like surface simulates a fault at a plate boundary. A rubber band connecting the line to the slider simulates the elastic character of the Earth’s crust. By stacking and unstacking sliders and cranking in the winch, one can see the results of changing the shear stress and the clamping stress on a fault. By placing sliders in series with rubber bands between them, one can simulate the interaction of earthquakes along a fault, such as cascading or toggling shocks. By inserting a load scale into the line, one can measure the stress acting on the fault throughout the earthquake cycle. As observed for real earthquakes, QuakeCaster events are not periodic, time-predictable, or slip-predictable. QuakeCaster produces rare but unreliable “foreshocks.” When fault gouge builds up, the friction goes to zero and fault creep is seen without large quakes. QuakeCaster events produce very small amounts of fault gouge that strongly alter its behavior, resulting in smaller, more frequent shocks as the gouge accumulates. QuakeCaster is designed so that students or audience members can operate it and record its output. With a stopwatch and ruler one can measure and plot the timing, slip distance, and force results of simulated earthquakes. People of all ages can use the QuakeCaster model to explore hypotheses about earthquake occurrence. QuakeCaster takes several days and about $500.00 in materials to build.

  9. An outlook on event rates of induced earth quakes in the Netherlands: a preliminary analysis

    CERN Document Server

    van Putten, Maurice H P M

    2013-01-01

    The increasing rate in earth quakes in the Netherlands is attributed to the enhanced depletion of Groningen natural gas, currently at a rate of 50 billion m3 per year. Here, we report on an exponential growth in the earth quake event rate, based on a surprisingly accurate fit to publicly available KNMI data. The data show a doubling in the rate every 6.2 years, leading to a rate of one event per day in 2025. A trend in the magnitude of the quakes is indiscernible.

  10. QuakeML: XML for Seismological Data Exchange and Resource Metadata Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Becker, J.; Heinloo, A.; Kästli, P.; Saul, J.; Weber, B.; QuakeML Working Group

    2007-12-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange format for seismology that is under development. Current collaborators are from ETH, GFZ, USC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, and ISTI. QuakeML development was motivated by the lack of a widely accepted and well-documented data format that is applicable to a broad range of fields in seismology. The development team brings together expertise from communities dealing with analysis and creation of earthquake catalogs, distribution of seismic bulletins, and real-time processing of seismic data. Efforts to merge QuakeML with existing XML dialects are under way. The first release of QuakeML will cover a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Further extensions are in progress or planned, e.g., for macroseismic information, location probability density functions, slip distributions, and ground motion information. The QuakeML language definition is supplemented by a concept to provide resource metadata and facilitate metadata exchange between distributed data providers. For that purpose, we introduce unique, location-independent identifiers of seismological resources. As an application of QuakeML, ETH Zurich currently develops a Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit as a contribution to CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability). We follow a collaborative and transparent development approach along the lines of the procedures of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). QuakeML currently is in working draft status. The standard description will be subjected to a public Request for Comments (RFC) process and eventually reach the status of a recommendation. QuakeML can be found at http://www.quakeml.org.

  11. Sichuan Students Express Sympathy for Schools In Japan’s Quake-hit Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>As the 3rd anniversary of the massive Wenchuan earthquake was approaching,the people of Sichuan sincerely thanked the people of the whole China and other countries for their help in the post-quake reconstruction,and showed concern for the post-disaster reconstruction in northeastern Japan quake-hit area.On April 26,in the Experimental Foreign Language School affiliated to the Beijie Primary School in Dujianyan City,activities jointly

  12. Neuronal avalanches, epileptic quakes and other transient forms of neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, John G

    2012-07-01

    Power-law behaviors in brain activity in healthy animals, in the form of neuronal avalanches, potentially benefit the computational activities of the brain, including information storage, transmission and processing. In contrast, power-law behaviors associated with seizures, in the form of epileptic quakes, potentially interfere with the brain's computational activities. This review draws attention to the potential roles played by homeostatic mechanisms and multistable time-delayed recurrent inhibitory loops in the generation of power-law phenomena. Moreover, it is suggested that distinctions between health and disease are scale-dependent. In other words, what is abnormal and defines disease it is not the propagation of neural activity but the propagation of activity in a neural population that is large enough to interfere with the normal activities of the brain. From this point of view, epilepsy is a disease that results from a failure of mechanisms, possibly located in part in the cortex itself or in the deep brain nuclei and brainstem, which truncate or otherwise confine the spatiotemporal scales of these power-law phenomena.

  13. On the reliability of Quake-Catcher Network earthquake detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Battalgazi; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Chung, Angela I.; Christensen, Carl M.; Lawrence, Jesse F.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there have been several initiatives to create volunteer‐based seismic networks. The Personal Seismic Network, proposed around 1990, used a short‐period seismograph to record earthquake waveforms using existing phone lines (Cranswick and Banfill, 1990; Cranswicket al., 1993). NetQuakes (Luetgert et al., 2010) deploys triaxial Micro‐Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors in private homes, businesses, and public buildings where there is an Internet connection. Other seismic networks using a dense array of low‐cost MEMS sensors are the Community Seismic Network (Clayton et al., 2012; Kohler et al., 2013) and the Home Seismometer Network (Horiuchi et al., 2009). One main advantage of combining low‐cost MEMS sensors and existing Internet connection in public and private buildings over the traditional networks is the reduction in installation and maintenance costs (Koide et al., 2006). In doing so, it is possible to create a dense seismic network for a fraction of the cost of traditional seismic networks (D’Alessandro and D’Anna, 2013; D’Alessandro, 2014; D’Alessandro et al., 2014).

  14. Magic angle spinning NMR of paramagnetic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Michael J; Felli, Isabella C; Pierattelli, Roberta; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2013-09-17

    Metal ions are ubiquitous in biochemical and cellular processes. Since many metal ions are paramagnetic due to the presence of unpaired electrons, paramagnetic molecules are an important class of targets for research in structural biology and related fields. Today, NMR spectroscopy plays a central role in the investigation of the structure and chemical properties of paramagnetic metalloproteins, linking the observed paramagnetic phenomena directly to electronic and molecular structure. A major step forward in the study of proteins by solid-state NMR came with the advent of ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) and the ability to use (1)H detection. Combined, these techniques have allowed investigators to observe nuclei that previously were invisible in highly paramagnetic metalloproteins. In addition, these techniques have enabled quantitative site-specific measurement of a variety of long-range paramagnetic effects. Instead of limiting solid-state NMR studies of biological systems, paramagnetism provides an information-rich phenomenon that can be exploited in these studies. This Account emphasizes state-of-the-art methods and applications of solid-state NMR in paramagnetic systems in biological chemistry. In particular, we discuss the use of ultrafast MAS and (1)H-detection in perdeuterated paramagnetic metalloproteins. Current methodology allows us to determine the structure and dynamics of metalloenzymes, and, as an example, we describe solid-state NMR studies of microcrystalline superoxide dismutase, a 32 kDa dimer. Data were acquired with remarkably short times, and these experiments required only a few milligrams of sample.

  15. QuakeML: status of the XML-based seismological data exchange format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Saul

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange standard for seismology that is in its fourth year of active community-driven development. Its development was motivated by the need to consolidate existing data formats for applications in statistical seismology, as well as setting a cutting-edge, community-agreed standard to foster interoperability of distributed infrastructures. The current release (version 1.2 is based on a public Request for Comments process and accounts for suggestions and comments provided by a broad international user community. QuakeML is designed as an umbrella schema under which several sub-packages are collected. The present scope of QuakeML 1.2 covers a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Work on additional packages (macroseismic information, ground motion, seismic inventory, and resource metadata has been started, but is at an early stage. Several applications based on the QuakeML data model have been created so far. Among these are earthquake catalog web services at the European Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC, GNS Science, and the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC, and QuakePy, an open-source Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit. Furthermore, QuakeML is being used in the SeisComP3 system from GFZ Potsdam, and in the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP testing center installations, developed by Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC. QuakeML is still under active and dynamic development. Further contributions from the community are crucial to its success and are highly welcome.

  16. Nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Dzheparov, F S; Jacquinot, J F

    2002-01-01

    First part of the work contains a calculation of the kinetics of nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities for systems with arbitrary (including fractal) space dimension d basing on ideas, which run current for 3d objects now. A new mean-field-type theory is constructed in the second part of the work. It reproduces all results of the first part for integer d and gives a possibility to describe the process for longer time, when a crossover to Balagurov-Waks asymptotics starts to develop. Solutions of the equations of the new theory are constructed for integer d. To obtain the solutions a method of calculation of the low-energy and long-wave asymptotics for T matrix of potential scattering out of the mass shell for singular repulsive potentials is developed

  17. Fire regimes of quaking aspen in the Mountain West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinneman, Douglas J.; Baker, William L.; Rogers, Paul C.; Kulakowski, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is the most widespread tree species in North America, and it is found throughout much of the Mountain West (MW) across a broad range of bioclimatic regions. Aspen typically regenerates asexually and prolifically after fire, and due to its seral status in many western conifer forests, aspen is often considered dependent upon disturbance for persistence. In many landscapes, historical evidence for post-fire aspen establishment is clear, and following extended fire-free periods senescing or declining aspen overstories sometimes lack adequate regeneration and are succeeding to conifers. However, aspen also forms relatively stable stands that contain little or no evidence of historical fire. In fact, aspen woodlands range from highly fire-dependent, seral communities to relatively stable, self-replacing, non-seral communities that do not require fire for persistence. Given the broad geographic distribution of aspen, fire regimes in these forests likely co-vary spatially with changing community composition, landscape setting, and climate, and temporally with land use and climate – but relatively few studies have explicitly focused on these important spatiotemporal variations. Here we reviewed the literature to summarize aspen fire regimes in the western US and highlight knowledge gaps. We found that only about one-fourth of the 46 research papers assessed for this review could be considered fire history studies (in which mean fire intervals were calculated), and all but one of these were based primarily on data from fire-scarred conifers. Nearly half of the studies reported at least some evidence of persistent aspen in the absence of fire. We also found that large portions of the MW have had little or no aspen fire history research. As a result of this review, we put forth a classification framework for aspen that is defined by key fire regime parameters (fire severity and probability), and that reflects underlying biophysical

  18. Simulation of dam breach development for emergency treatment of the Tangjiashan Quake Lake in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Tangjiashan Quake Lake is the largest quake lake triggered by the 5.12 Wenchuan Earthquake that happened on May 12,2008 in China,posing high risk of catastrophic flash flood hazards to downstream human life and properties.A physics-based numerical simulation approach is proposed for real-time prediction of dam breach development of the Tangjiashan Quake Lake in the case of emergency treatment.Bed erosion and lateral development of the dam breach are represented through accounting for the underlying physics including selective sediment transport and gravitational collapse.Conceptualized breach erosion model that involves few parameters enables quick calibration based on the monitored hydrological data in emergency analysis where fully geotechnical information about the barrier dam is not available.The process of dam breach development is found to be nonlinear in cascades due to the combined effects of headcutting and bank collapse.The agreement between the simulation results and the observed data shows the applicability of the present approach for emergency analysis of quake lakes.Limitations will arise in the situation where the soil composition of barrier dam is significantly inhomogeneous.Incorporation of circular arc failure for cohesive soil and lateral seepage in bank slope will also enhance its applicability to complex situations.

  19. The Quake-Catcher Network: An Innovative Community-Based Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J.; Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J. F.; Christensen, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) is a volunteer computing seismic network that engages citizen scientists, teachers, and museums to participate in the detection of earthquakes. In less than two years, the network has grown to over 1000 participants globally and continues to expand. QCN utilizes Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) accelerometers, in laptops and external to desktop computers, to detect moderate to large earthquakes. One goal of the network is to involve K-12 classrooms and museums by providing sensors and software to introduce participants to seismology and community-based scientific data collection. The Quake-Catcher Network provides a unique opportunity to engage participants directly in the scientific process, through hands-on activities that link activities and outcomes to their daily lives. Partnerships with teachers and museum staff are critical to growth of the Quake Catcher Network. Each participating institution receives a MEMS accelerometer to connect, via USB, to a computer that can be used for hands-on activities and to record earthquakes through a distributed computing system. We developed interactive software (QCNLive) that allows participants to view sensor readings in real time. Participants can also record earthquakes and download earthquake data that was collected by their sensor or other QCN sensors. The Quake-Catcher Network combines research and outreach to improve seismic networks and increase awareness and participation in science-based research in K-12 schools.

  20. The NetQuakes Project - Seeking a Balance Between Science and Citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetgert, J. H.; Oppenheimer, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    The challenge for any system that uses volunteer help to do science is to dependably acquire quality data without unduly burdening the volunteer. The NetQuakes accelerograph and its data acquisition system were created to address the recognized need for more densely sampled strong ground motion recordings in urban areas to provide more accurate ShakeMaps for post-earthquake disaster assessment and to provide data for structural engineers to improve design standards. The recorder has 18 bit resolution with ±3g internal tri-axial MEMS accelerometers. Data are continuously recorded at 200 sps into a 1-2 week ringbuffer. When triggered, a miniSEED file is sent to USGS servers via the Internet. Data can also be recovered from the ringbuffer by a remote request through the NetQuakes servers. Following a power failure, the instrument can run for 36 hours using its internal battery. We rely upon cooperative citizens to host the dataloggers, provide power and Internet connectivity and perform minor servicing. Instrument and battery replacement are simple tasks that can be performed by hosts, thus reducing maintenance costs. Communication with the instrument to acquire data or deliver firmware is accomplished by file transfers using NetQuakes servers. The client instrument initiates all client-server interactions, so it safely resides behind a host's firewall. A connection to the host's LAN, and from there to the public Internet, can be made using WiFi to minimize cabling. Although timing using a cable to an external GPS antenna is possible, it is simpler to use the Network Time Protocol (NTP) to discipline the internal clock. This approach achieves timing accuracy substantially better than a sample interval. Since 2009, we have installed more than 140 NetQuakes instruments in the San Francisco Bay Area and have successfully integrated their data into the near real time data stream of the Northern California Seismic System. An additional 235 NetQuakes instruments have been

  1. QuakeML: Recent Development and First Applications of the Community-Created Seismological Data Exchange Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Kästli, P.; Quakeml Group, T

    2008-12-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based exchange format for seismological data which is being developed using a community-driven approach. It covers basic event description, including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Contributions have been made from ETH, GFZ, USC, SCEC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, GNS, ZAMG, BRGM, and ISTI. The current release (Version 1.1, Proposed Recommendation) reflects the results of a public Request for Comments process which has been documented online at http://quakeml.org/RFC_BED_1.0. QuakeML has recently been adopted as a distribution format for earthquake catalogs by GNS Science, New Zealand, and the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC). These institutions provide prototype QuakeML web services. Furthermore, integration of the QuakeML data model in the CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability, http://www.cseptesting.org) testing center software developed by SCEC is under way. QuakePy is a Python- based seismicity analysis toolkit which is based on the QuakeML data model. Recently, QuakePy has been used to implement the PMC method for calculating network recording completeness (Schorlemmer and Woessner 2008, in press). Completeness results for seismic networks in Southern California and Japan can be retrieved through the CompletenessWeb (http://completenessweb.org). Future QuakeML development will include an extension for macroseismic information. Furthermore, development on seismic inventory information, resource identifiers, and resource metadata is under way. Online resources: http://www.quakeml.org, http://www.quakepy.org

  2. QuakeML: status of the XML-based seismological data exchange format

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange standard for seismology that is in its fourth year of active community-driven development. Its development was motivated by the need to consolidate existing data formats for applications in statistical seismology, as well as setting a cutting-edge, community-agreed standard to foster interoperability of distributed infrastructures. The current release (version 1.2) is based on a public Request for Comments process and accounts for suggestions and comments...

  3. Understanding Earthquake Fault Systems Using QuakeSim Analysis and Data Assimilation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Granat, Robert; Rundle, John; McLeod, Dennis; Al-Ghanmi, Rami; Grant, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    We are using the QuakeSim environment to model interacting fault systems. One goal of QuakeSim is to prepare for the large volumes of data that spaceborne missions such as DESDynI will produce. QuakeSim has the ability to ingest distributed heterogenous data in the form of InSAR, GPS, seismicity, and fault data into various earthquake modeling applications, automating the analysis when possible. Virtual California simulates interacting faults in California. We can compare output from long time history Virtual California runs with the current state of strain and the strain history in California. In addition to spaceborne data we will begin assimilating data from UAVSAR airborne flights over the San Francisco Bay Area, the Transverse Ranges, and the Salton Trough. Results of the models are important for understanding future earthquake risk and for providing decision support following earthquakes. Improved models require this sensor web of different data sources, and a modeling environment for understanding the combined data.

  4. Understanding Earthquake Fault Systems Using QuakeSim Analysis and Data Assimilation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Granat, Robert; Rundle, John; McLeod, Dennis; Al-Ghanmi, Rami; Grant, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    We are using the QuakeSim environment to model interacting fault systems. One goal of QuakeSim is to prepare for the large volumes of data that spaceborne missions such as DESDynI will produce. QuakeSim has the ability to ingest distributed heterogenous data in the form of InSAR, GPS, seismicity, and fault data into various earthquake modeling applications, automating the analysis when possible. Virtual California simulates interacting faults in California. We can compare output from long time history Virtual California runs with the current state of strain and the strain history in California. In addition to spaceborne data we will begin assimilating data from UAVSAR airborne flights over the San Francisco Bay Area, the Transverse Ranges, and the Salton Trough. Results of the models are important for understanding future earthquake risk and for providing decision support following earthquakes. Improved models require this sensor web of different data sources, and a modeling environment for understanding the combined data.

  5. Multifrequency pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance on metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubenova, Sevdalina; Maly, Thorsten; Zwicker, Klaus; Brandt, Ulrich; Ludwig, Bernd; Prisner, Thomas

    2010-02-16

    Metalloproteins often contain metal centers that are paramagnetic in some functional state of the protein; hence electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can be a powerful tool for studying protein structure and function. Dipolar spectroscopy allows the determination of the dipole-dipole interactions between metal centers in protein complexes, revealing the structural arrangement of different paramagnetic centers at distances of up to 8 nm. Hyperfine spectroscopy can be used to measure the interaction between an unpaired electron spin and nuclear spins within a distance of 0.8 nm; it therefore permits the characterization of the local structure of the paramagnetic center's ligand sphere with very high precision. In this Account, we review our laboratory's recent applications of both dipolar and hyperfine pulsed EPR methods to metalloproteins. We used pulsed dipolar relaxation methods to investigate the complex of cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase, a noncovalent protein-protein complex involved in mitochondrial electron-transfer reactions. Hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy (HYSCORE) was used to study the ligand sphere of iron-sulfur clusters in complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and substrate binding to the molybdenum enzyme polysulfide reductase. These examples demonstrate the potential of the two techniques; however, they also highlight the difficulties of data interpretation when several paramagnetic species with overlapping spectra are present in the protein. In such cases, further approaches and data are very useful to enhance the information content. Relaxation filtered hyperfine spectroscopy (REFINE) can be used to separate the individual components of overlapping paramagnetic species on the basis of differences in their longitudinal relaxation rates; it is applicable to any kind of pulsed hyperfine or dipolar spectroscopy. Here, we show that the spectra of the iron-sulfur clusters in complex I can be separated by this

  6. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murugesan; Cook; Devasahayam

    1997-01-01

    Imaging of free radicals by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using time domain acquisition as in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has not been attempted because of the short spin-spin relaxation times, typically under 1 μs, of most biologically relevant paramagnetic species...... to minimize motional artifacts from cardiac and lung motion that cause significant problems in frequency-domain spectral acquisition, such as in continuous wave (cw) EPR techniques...

  7. Multifrequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Sushil K

    2011-01-01

    Filling the gap for a systematic, authoritative, and up-to-date review of this cutting-edge technique, this book covers both low and high frequency EPR, emphasizing the importance of adopting the multifrequency approach to study paramagnetic systems in full detail by using the EPR method. In so doing, it discusses not only the underlying theory and applications, but also all recent advances -- with a final section devoted to future perspectives.

  8. The Quake-Catcher Network: Bringing Seismology to Homes and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Christensen, C. M.; Saltzman, J.; Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) is a collaborative initiative for developing the world's largest, low-cost strong-motion seismic network by utilizing sensors in and attached to volunteer internet-connected computers. QCN is not only a research tool, but provides an educational tool for teaching earthquake science in formal and informal environments. A central mission of the Quake-Catcher Network is to provide scientific educational software and hardware so that K-12 teachers, students, and the general public can better understand and participate in the science of earthquakes and earthquake hazards. With greater understanding, teachers, students, and interested individuals can share their new knowledge, resulting in continued participation in the project, and better preparation for earthquakes in their homes, businesses, and communities. The primary educational outreach goals are 1) to present earthquake science and earthquake hazards in a modern and exciting way, and 2) to provide teachers and educators with seismic sensors, interactive software, and educational modules to assist in earthquake education. QCNLive (our interactive educational computer software) displays recent and historic earthquake locations and 3-axis real-time acceleration measurements. This tool is useful for demonstrations and active engagement for all ages, from K-college. QCN provides subsidized sensors at 49 for the general public and 5 for K-12 teachers. With your help, the Quake-Catcher Network can provide better understanding of earthquakes to a broader audience. Academics are taking QCN to classrooms across the United States and around the world. The next time you visit a K-12 classroom or teach a college class on interpreting seismograms, bring a QCN sensor and QCNLive software with you! To learn how, visit http://qcn.stanford.edu.

  9. QuakeSim: a Web Service Environment for Productive Investigations with Earth Surface Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. W.; Donnellan, A.; Granat, R. A.; Lyzenga, G. A.; Glasscoe, M. T.; McLeod, D.; Al-Ghanmi, R.; Pierce, M.; Fox, G.; Grant Ludwig, L.; Rundle, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    The QuakeSim science gateway environment includes a visually rich portal interface, web service access to data and data processing operations, and the QuakeTables ontology-based database of fault models and sensor data. The integrated tools and services are designed to assist investigators by covering the entire earthquake cycle of strain accumulation and release. The Web interface now includes Drupal-based access to diverse and changing content, with new ability to access data and data processing directly from the public page, as well as the traditional project management areas that require password access. The system is designed to make initial browsing of fault models and deformation data particularly engaging for new users. Popular data and data processing include GPS time series with data mining techniques to find anomalies in time and space, experimental forecasting methods based on catalogue seismicity, faulted deformation models (both half-space and finite element), and model-based inversion of sensor data. The fault models include the CGS and UCERF 2.0 faults of California and are easily augmented with self-consistent fault models from other regions. The QuakeTables deformation data include the comprehensive set of UAVSAR interferograms as well as a growing collection of satellite InSAR data.. Fault interaction simulations are also being incorporated in the web environment based on Virtual California. A sample usage scenario is presented which follows an investigation of UAVSAR data from viewing as an overlay in Google Maps, to selection of an area of interest via a polygon tool, to fast extraction of the relevant correlation and phase information from large data files, to a model inversion of fault slip followed by calculation and display of a synthetic model interferogram.

  10. Paramagnetic atom number and paramagnetic critical pressure of the sc, bcc and fcc Ising nanolattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şarlı, Numan

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic atom number in the unit volume on the magnetic properties are investigated by using sc (n=8), bcc (n=9) and fcc (n=14) Ising NLs within the effective field theory with correlations. We find that the magnetic properties expand as the magnetic atom number increases in the unit volume and this expanding constitutes an elliptical path at TC. The effect of the magnetic atom number (n) in the unit volume on the magnetic properties (mp) appear as nscconstant is directly proportional with the atom number in the unit volume (C α n). Hence, by using the slopes of the paramagnetic hysteresis curves of any nanosystem, it can be predicted that the number of particles in its unit volume. Moreover, the magnetic atoms in the paramagnetic region can be considered as particles in the gas. Because of the absence of an external magnetic field, the spin orientations of these atoms are random and free to rotate. Hence, they act on individually with no mutual interaction between two nearest-neighbor magnetic atoms. Therefore, we use the statistical mechanics form of the ideal gas law in the paramagnetic region and we obtain the critical paramagnetic pressure (PC=npkBTC) of the Ising NLs at TC. We define the paramagnetic magnetic atom number in the unit volume as np=n(1-M(T)).

  11. Surface fluctuations of an aging colloidal suspension: Evidence for intermittent quakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamane, A.; Frétigny, C.; Lequeux, F.; Talini, L.

    2009-12-01

    We present measurements of the thermal fluctuations of the free surface of an aging colloidal suspension, Laponite. The technique consists in measuring the fluctuations of the position of a laser beam that reflects from the free surface. Analysing the data statistics, we show that, as the fluid ages, the dynamics becomes heterogeneous. The intermittent events correspond to large changes in the local slope of the free surface over a few milliseconds. We show that those quakes are uncorrelated, although they are kept in memory by the surface over short time scales.

  12. EPR in characterization of seeds paramagnetic species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luiz, A.P.C.; Mauro, M.F.F.L.; Portugal, K.O.; Barbana, V.M.; Guedes, C.L.B.; Mauro, E. di; Carneiro, C.E.A.; Zaia, D.A.M.; Prete, C.E.C. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text. In Brazil, since 1970s, renewable fuel programs has been developed in order to replace petroleum. Today a program that has been discussed is the bio diesel, which intend to replace diesel fuel, fossil oil, to bio diesel, renewal fuel. As seeds are the basis for production of oil and consequently processed into bio diesel, the goal of this work is to characterize and compare paramagnetic species present in the seeds by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Samples used in this study were seeds of sorghum, barley, corn, peanuts, soy beans, cotton, wheat, oats, mustard, rice, sunflower and turnip. Some paramagnetic species present in soil was also investigated as goethite (FeOOH), hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), and ferrihydrite (Fe{sub 5}HO{sub 8} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O), since, these species present in appreciable quantities in the soil can be present in the seeds and analyzed for comparison. The characterization of these species is essential to understand the EPR seeds spectra. Each sample is placed in a thin quartz tube 4 mm in diameter, and it is inserted into the cavity of the spectrometer at room temperature, at low temperature (77 K) and variable temperature using liquid nitrogen flow and hot flow through a compressor air. It was used as standard Mg O:Mn{sup 2+}, which is also inserted into the cavity. Shortly after the potency is regulated, frequency, amplitude and sweep the field. The spectroscopic analysis by EPR X-band ({approx} 9:5GHz), were performed at the Fluorescence and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Laboratory, Exact Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Parana state, Brazil, through an EPR spectrometer JEOL brand (JES-PE-3X). In the EPR spectra, spectroscopic factor or g factor and line width were determined in paramagnetic species. Studies from several seeds with EPR technique detected in all of them presence of same complex of Fe{sup 3+} present in the goethite at g {approx} 2, and in the seeds

  13. Effectiveness of Disaster-prevention Technologies against Quake-induced Damage of MR Scanners during the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Machida, Yoshio; Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Isoda, Haruo; Noguchi, Takashi; Nakai, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have performed a statistical analysis to investigate damages in magnetic resonance (MR) scanners caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE, magnitude 9.0) and evaluated whether these disaster-prevention technologies contributed to the reduction of damages in the GEJE or not. It was confirmed that the extent of damage was significantly different between seismic scale (SS) 5 and SS over 6. Our survey study demonstrated that anchoring of MR facilities reduced damages due to quakes and demonstrated that anchoring is an efficient method for quake-induced damage prevention. The odds ratio revealed that base isolation was very useful to prevent damages in MR scanners.

  14. Visualizing a protein quake with time-resolved X-ray scattering at a free-electron laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda C.; Wickstrand, Cecilia;

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to measure ultrafast protein structural changes using time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering at an X-ray free-electron laser. We demonstrated this approach using multiphoton excitation of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center, observing an ultrafast global...... conformational change that arises within picoseconds and precedes the propagation of heat through the protein. This provides direct structural evidence for a 'protein quake': the hypothesis that proteins rapidly dissipate energy through quake-like structural motions....

  15. Paramagnetic and Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen

    We report on the observation of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic insulators. By using a microscale on-chip local heater, it is possible to generate a large thermal gradient confined to the chip surface without a large increase in the total sample temperature. This technique allows us to easily access low temperatures (200 mK) and high magnetic fields (14 T) through conventional dilution refrigeration and superconducting magnet setups. By exploring this regime, we detect the spin Seebeck effect through the spin-flop transition in antiferromagnetic MnF2 when a large magnetic field (>9 T) is applied along the easy axis direction. Using the same technique, we are also able to resolve a spin Seebeck effect from the paramagnetic phase of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet Gd3Ga5O12 (gadolinium gallium garnet) and antiferromagnetic DyScO3 (DSO). Since these measurements occur above the ordering temperatures of these two materials, short-range magnetic order is implicated as the cause of the spin Seebeck effect in these systems. The discovery of the spin Seebeck effect in these two materials classes suggest that both antiferromagnetic spin waves and spin excitations from short range magnetic order may be used to generate spin current from insulators and that the spin wave spectra of individual materials are highly important to the specifics of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect. Since insulating antiferromagnets and paramagnets are far more common than the typical insulating ferrimagnetic materials used in spin Seebeck experiments, this discovery opens up a large new class of materials for use in spin caloritronic devices. All authors acknowledge support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. The use of facilities at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, was supported by the U.S. DOE, BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. Recent results on some columnar paramagnetic metallomesogens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W Haase; S Wrobel; K Falk

    2003-08-01

    The liquid crystalline and selected physical properties of some vanadyl and manganese(III)-porphyrin-TCNE complexes are discussed. These materials form linear chains from a magnetic point of view and columnar discotic LC phases. Some of the manganese complexes exhibit a bulk magnetic phase below ∼ 20 K. The discussed materials are studied by means of DSC, X-ray powder diffraction, dielectric spectroscopy, reversal current characterization and magnetic susceptibility measurements. A broader view on some physical properties of columnar paramagnetic metallomesogens is given.

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance of transition ions

    CERN Document Server

    Abragam, A

    2012-01-01

    This book is a reissue of a classic Oxford text, and provides a comprehensive treatment of electron paramagnetic resonance of ions of the transition groups. The emphasis is on basic principles, with numerous references to publications containing further experimental results and more detailed developments of the theory. An introductory survey gives a general understanding, and a general survey presents such topics as the classical and quantum resonance equations, thespin-Hamiltonian, Endor, spin-spin and spin-lattice interactions, together with an outline of the known behaviour of ions of each

  18. Paramagnetic excited vortex states in superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rodolpho Ribeiro; Doria, Mauro M.; Romaguera, Antonio R. de C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider excited vortex states, which are vortex states left inside a superconductor once the external applied magnetic field is switched off and whose energy is lower than of the normal state. We show that this state is paramagnetic and develop here a general method to obtain its Gibbs free energy through conformal mapping. The solution for any number of vortices in any cross-section geometry can be read off from the Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. The method is based on the first-order equations used by Abrikosov to discover vortices.

  19. Paramagnetic response of muscle-type systems

    CERN Document Server

    Caruel, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    We provide a prototypical description of mechanically-induced collective conformational change (folding), relevant in a variety of biological contexts from muscle contraction to hair cell gating and integrin binding. Our study is inspired by the seminal Huxley-Simmons (HS) model which we reinterpret from the perspective of stochastic dynamics involving rigidly coupled bi-stable elements. In this interpretation the HS model can be mapped to a paramagnetic Ising model, however, the equivalence is not complete due to the presence of elastic elements responsible for negative susceptibility and quasi-critical behavior. We go beyond the conventional chemo-mechanical description of such systems, revealing both its strengths and its limitations.

  20. Quake Tech

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO TIANBI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Authorities in charge of rebuilding the area leveled by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan Province are focusing on mitigating future disasters while they are still planning and completing reconstruction projects,an official in charge of the reconstruction work said.

  1. Quake Evacuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    More than 60,000 affected by earthquake and aftershocks in China’s far west An earthquake on March 21 mea- suring 7.3 on the Richter scale forced the relocation of 144 families in a village in Yutian County,Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region,to safe places,according to Xinhua News Agency. The first and strongest jolt occurred at 6:33 a.m.that morning.Then four after- shocks,measuring between 5.2 and 5 on the Richter scale,followed between 7 a.m.and 8

  2. Paramagnetic Liposome Nanoparticles for Cellular and Tumour Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Kamaly

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss the development of paramagnetic liposomes incorporating MRI contrast agents and show how these are utilized in cellular imaging in vitro. Bi-functional, bi-modal imaging paramagnetic liposome systems are also described. Next we discuss the upgrading of paramagnetic liposomes into bi-modal imaging neutral nanoparticles for in vivo imaging applications. We discuss the development of such systems and show how paramagnetic liposomes and imaging nanoparticles could be developed as platforms for future multi-functional, multi-modal imaging theranostic nanodevices tailor-made for the combined imaging of early stage disease pathology and functional drug delivery.

  3. LastQuake: a comprehensive strategy for rapid engagement of earthquake eyewitnesses, massive crowdsourcing and risk reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, R.; Roussel, F.; Mazet-Roux, G.; Steed, R.; Frobert, L.

    2015-12-01

    LastQuake is a smartphone app, browser add-on and the most sophisticated Twitter robot (quakebot) for earthquakes currently in operation. It fulfills eyewitnesses' needs by offering information on felt earthquakes and their effects within tens of seconds of their occurrence. Associated with an active presence on Facebook, Pinterest and on websites, this proves a very efficient engagement strategy. For example, the app was installed thousands of times after the Ghorka earthquake in Nepal. Language barriers have been erased by using visual communication; for example, felt reports are collected through a set of cartoons representing different shaking levels. Within 3 weeks of the magnitude 7.8 Ghorka earthquakes, 7,000 felt reports with thousands of comments were collected related to the mainshock and tens of its aftershocks as well as 100 informative geo-located pics. The QuakeBot was essential in allowing us to be identified so well and interact with those affected. LastQuake is also a risk reduction tool since it provides rapid information. Rapid information is similar to prevention since when it does not exist, disasters can happen. When no information is available after a felt earthquake, the public block emergency lines by trying to find out the cause of the shaking, crowds form potentially leading to unpredictable crowd movement, rumors spread. In its next release LastQuake will also provide people with guidance immediately after a shaking through a number of pop-up cartoons illustrating "do/don't do" items (go to open places, do not phone emergency services except if people are injured…). LastQuake's app design is simple and intuitive and has a global audience. It benefited from a crowdfunding campaign (and the support of the Fondation MAIF) and more improvements have been planned after an online feedback campaign organized in early June with the Ghorka earthquake eyewitnesses. LastQuake is also a seismic risk reduction tools thanks to its very rapid

  4. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Depending on how disease impacts tree exposure to risk, both the prevalence of disease and disease effects on survival may contribute to patterns of mortality risk across a species' range. Disease may accelerate tree species' declines in response to global change factors, such as drought, biotic interactions, such as competition, or functional traits, such as allometry. To assess the role of disease in mediating mortality risk in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), we developed hierarchical Bayesian models for both disease prevalence in live aspen stems and the resulting survival rates of healthy and diseased aspen near the species' southern range limit using 5088 individual trees on 281 United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots in the southwestern United States.

  5. X-ray flares of γ-ray bursts: Quakes of solid quark stars?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU RenXin; LIANG EnWei

    2009-01-01

    A star-quake model is proposed to understand X-ray flares of both long and short γ-ray bursts (GRBs) in a solid quark star regime. Two kinds of central engines for GRBs are available if pulsar-like stars are actually (solid) quark stars, I.e., the SNE-type GRBs and the SGR-type GRBs. It is found that a quark star could be solidified about 103 to 106 s later after its birth if the critical temperature of phase transi-tion is a few Metga-electron-volts, and then s new source of free energy (I.e., elastic and gravitational ones, rather than rotational or magnetic energy) could be possible to power GRB X-ray flares.

  6. X-ray flares of γ-ray bursts: Quakes of solid quark stars?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A star-quake model is proposed to understand X-ray flares of both long and short γ-ray bursts (GRBs) in a solid quark star regime. Two kinds of central engines for GRBs are available if pulsar-like stars are actually (solid) quark stars, i.e., the SNE-type GRBs and the SGR-type GRBs. It is found that a quark star could be solidified about 103 to 106 s later after its birth if the critical temperature of phase transi- tion is a few Metga-electron-volts, and then a new source of free energy (i.e., elastic and gravitational ones, rather than rotational or magnetic energy) could be possible to power GRB X-ray flares.

  7. New Research Results on Mechanism, Surface Rupture, Deep Controlling Factors and Stress Measurements of the Wenchuan Earthquake-Earth Scientists' Post-quake Actions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shuwen

    2009-01-01

    @@ It has been a year since the devastating Wenchuan earthquake struck Sichuan Province, China on May 12, 2008, which caused tremendous casualties, geological disasters and economic losses. With a deep feeling of grief at the sight of the shattered world in quake-stricken areas, geologists and geophysicists once again profoundly felt their heavy responsibilities for geo-hazard prevention and reduction, and resolved to make their due contributions--what we, as scientists, could do for the quake relief efforts and post-quake reconstruction and what scientific explanations we could offer to the public for the occurrence of the devastating natural disaster.

  8. Magnetization oscillations induced by spin current in a paramagnetic disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slachter, Abraham; van Wees, Bart Jan

    2011-01-01

    When electron spins are injected uniformly into a paramagnetic disk, they can precess along the demagnetizing field induced by the resulting magnetic moment. Normally this precession damps out by virtue of the spin relaxation, which is present in paramagnetic materials. We propose a mechanism to exc

  9. Magneto-optical properties of paramagnetic superrotors

    CERN Document Server

    Milner, A A; Floß, J; Averbukh, I Sh; Milner, V

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of paramagnetic molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field. Optical centrifuge is used to create dense ensembles of oxygen molecules in ultra-high rotational states. In the presence of magnetic field, the gas of centrifuged molecules becomes optically birefringent, which indicates preferential alignment of molecular axes along the field direction. The experimental observations are supported by numerical calculations and explained by means of an intuitive qualitative model, in which the effect of the applied magnetic field on the distribution of molecular axes is mediated by the spin-rotation coupling. We show that the induced magneto-rotational birefringence is more robust with respect to collisions than the rotational coherence, and that this robustness increases with increasing angular momentum.

  10. Van Vleck paramagnetism of europium oxyhydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki Samata; Naoki Wada; Tadashi C Ozawa

    2015-01-01

    Europium oxyhydroxide crystals were synthesized by the flux method. The as-grown crystals were transparent and had a plate-like shape with natural flat surfaces. The powder XRD data were refined by assuming a monoclinic structure of the space group P21/m and lattice parameters of a=0.4346 nm, b=0.3744 nm, c=0.6107 nm, and β=108.62°. The magnetic susceptibility of the EuOOH crystals exhibited typical Van Vleck temperature-independent paramagnetism below 120 K. The calculated susceptibility, based on Van Vleck’s theory, agreed with the experimental data to some extent, with the coupling constantλ=458±10 K. The ex-perimental results were in close agreement with the results calculated using a modified formula withλ=505±2 K and a constant term C=4.6×10−4 emu/(mol·Oe).

  11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of Pr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezuka, Keitaro; Hinatsu, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of tetravalent praseodymium ions doped in the cubic perovskite compound BaHfO{sub 3} have been measured at 4.2 K. A very large hyperfine interaction with the {sup 141}Pr nucleus was observed in the spectrum of Pr{sup 4+}/ BaHfO{sub 3}. The results were analyzed based on the weak field approximation, and the g value (|g|=0.619) and a hyperfine coupling constant (A=0.0589 cm{sup {minus}1}) were obtained. The measured g value is much smaller than |-10/7|, which indicates that the crystal field effect on the behavior of a 4f electron is large. These g and A values were compared with the EPR results for other f{sup 1} ions in an octahedral crystal field.

  12. In-situ electron paramagnetic resonance studies of paramagnetic point defects in superconducting microwave resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengke; Kopas, Cameron; Wagner, Brian; Queen, Daniel; Newman, N.

    2016-09-01

    The physical nature and concentration of paramagnetic point defects in the dielectrics of superconducting planar microwave resonators have been determined using in-situ electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. To perform this work, the quality factor of parallel plate and stripline resonators was measured as a function of the magnitude of a magnetic-field applied parallel to the electrode surfaces. YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin film electrodes proved to be a preferred choice over Nb and MgB2 because they are readily available and have a small surface resistance (Rs) up to high temperatures (˜77 K) and magnetic fields (i.e., dielectric, Co2+-doped Ba(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3, are shown to have losses dominated by d-electron spin-excitations in exchange-coupled Co2+ point-defect clusters, even in the absence of an applied magnetic field. A significant enhanced microwave loss in stripline and parallel plate resonators is found to correlate with the presence of paramagnetic Mn2+ dopants in Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3 ceramics and dangling bond states in amorphous Si thin films, although the identification of the dominant loss mechanism(s) in these dielectrics requires further investigation.

  13. The NetQuakes Project - Research-quality Seismic Data Transmitted via the Internet from Citizen-hosted Instruments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetgert, J. H.; Oppenheimer, D. H.; Hamilton, J.

    2010-12-01

    The USGS seeks accelerograph spacing of 5-10 km in selected urban areas of the US to obtain spatially un-aliased recordings of strong ground motions during large earthquakes. These dense measurements will improve our ability to make rapid post-earthquake assessments of expected damage and contribute to the continuing development of engineering standards for construction. To achieve this goal the USGS and its university partners are deploying “NetQuakes” seismographs, designed to record moderate to large earthquakes from the near field to about 100 km. The instruments have tri-axial Colibrys 2005SF MEMS sensors, clip at 3g, and have 18-bit resolution. These instruments are uniquely designed for deployment in private homes, businesses, public buildings and schools where there is an existing Broadband connection to the Internet. The NetQuakes instruments connect to a local network using WiFi and then via the Internet to USGS servers to a) upload triggered accelerograms in miniSEED format, P arrival times, and computed peak ground motion parameters immediately after an earthquake; b) download software updates; c) respond to requests for log files, execute UNIX scripts, and upload waveforms from long-term memory for quakes with peak motions below the trigger threshold; d) send state-of-health (SOH) information in XML format every 10 minutes; and e) synchronize instrument clocks to 1ms accuracy using the Network Time Protocol. NetQuakes instruments cost little to operate and save about $600/yr/site compared to instruments that transmit data via leased telemetry. After learning about the project through press releases, thousands of citizens have registered to host an instrument at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/netquakes using a Google Map interface that depicts where we seek instrument sites. The website also provides NetQuakes hosts access to waveform images recorded by instruments installed in their building. Since 3/2009, the NetQuakes project has installed over 100

  14. Virtual Quake and Tsunami Squares: Scenario Earthquake and Tsunami Simulations for a Pacific Rim GNSS Tsunami Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, K.; Yoder, M. R.; Sachs, M. K.; Heien, E. M.; Donnellan, A.; Rundle, J. B.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Plans for the first operational prototype for a Pacific Rim Tsunami Early Warning (TEW) system utilizing real-time data from the Global Navigational Satellite System (GNSS) are now gaining momentum. The proposed Pacific Rim TEW prototype may resemble the Japanese Meteorological Society's early warning algorithms and use earthquake parameters rapidly determined from GPS data to select the most similar earthquake and tsunami scenario from a database of precomputed scenarios to guide alerts and disaster response. To facilitate the development of this Pacific Rim TEW system, we have integrated tsunami modeling capabilities into the earthquake simulator Virtual Quake (formerly Virtual California). We will present the first results from coupling the earthquake simulator output (seafloor displacements) with the tsunami modeling method called Tsunami Squares. Combining Virtual Quake and Tsunami Squares provides a highly scalable and flexible platform for producing catalogs of tsunami scenarios for a wide range of simulated subduction zone earthquakes.

  15. Room temperature chiral discrimination in paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Soncini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    A recently proposed theory of chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy based on the detection of a molecular electric polarization $\\mathbf{P}$ rotating in a plane perpendicular to the NMR magnetic field [A. D. Buckingham, J. Chem. Phys. $\\mathbf{140}$, 011103 (2014)], is here generalized to paramagnetic systems. Our theory predicts new contributions to $\\mathbf{P}$, varying as the square of the inverse temperature. Ab initio calculations for ten Dy$^{3+}$ complexes, at 293K, show that in strongly anisotropic paramagnetic molecules $\\mathbf{P}$ can be more than 1000 times larger than in diamagnetic molecules, making paramagnetic NMR chiral discrimination amenable to room temperature detection.

  16. Neutron Repulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel, Oliver K.

    2011-01-01

    Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch...

  17. Paramagnetism in NiSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Nozomu; Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Shinji

    1980-03-01

    The magnetic properties of a pyrite compound NiSe2 have been investigated by the 77Se NMR, the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat measurements in the temperature range between 1.6 and 300 K. The electronic specific heat coefficient, γ, is obtained to be (8.5± 1.0) mJ/K2mol. The values of the magnetic susceptibility and the Knight shift are estimated to be 2.17× 10-4 emu/mol and +(1.0± 0.1)%, respectively, both being independent of temperature. The product of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time and temperature, T1T, is found to be constant with a value or 240 msec K. From these results, it is concluded that NiSe2 is one of the typical Pauli paramagnets and the usual Korringa relation holds with a relatively small exchange enhancement effect. Discussions of the origin of the hyperfine coupling constant of 77Se are also given in conjunction with the reported result of CoSe2.

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry using synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kwon; Kim, Hwi Young; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hirata, Hiroshi [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Park, Jong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The victims exposed doses under 3.5-4.0 Gy have chance to survive if treated urgently. To determine the priority of treatment among a large number of victims, the triage – distinguishing patients who need an urgent treatment from who may not be urgent – is necessary based on radiation biodosimetry. A current gold standard for radiation biodosimetry is the chromosomal assay using human lymphocytes. But this method requires too much time and skilled labors to cover the mass victims in radiation emergencies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been known for its capability of quantifying radicals in matters. EPR dosimetry is based on the measurement of stable radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) contained in tooth enamel is a major probe for radiation dose reconstruction. This HAP dosimetry study was performed using a novel EPR spectrometer in Hokkaido University, Japan. The EPR dose-response curve was made using HAP samples. The blind test using 250 cGy samples showed the feasibility of EPR dosimetry for the triage purpose.

  19. Paramagnetism in ion-implanted oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, Torben Esmann; Gíslason, Hafliði Pétur; Ólafsson, Sveinn

    This thesis describes the investigation on para-magnetism in dilute ion-implanted single-crystal oxide samples studied by on- and off-line $^{57}$Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ion-implantation of the radioactive isotopes ( $^{57}$Mn and $^{57}$Co) was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The off-line measurements were performed at Aarhus University, Denmark. Mössbauer spectroscopy is a unique method, giving simultaneously local information on valence/spin state of the $^{57}$Fe probe atoms, site symmetry and magnetic properties on an atomic scale. The utilisation of emission Mössbauer spectroscopy opens up many new possibilities compared with traditional transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy. Among them is the possibility of working with a low concentration below 10$^{-4}$ –10$^{-3}$ at.%, where the implanted Mössbauer $^{57}$Fe probes are truly dilute impurities exclusively interacting with their nearest neighbours and therefore the possibility of crea...

  20. LastQuake app: a tool for risk reduction that focuses on earthquakes that really matter to the public!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, R.; Steed, R.; Mazet-Roux, G.; Roussel, F.; Frobert, L.

    2015-12-01

    Many seismic events are only picked up by seismometers but the only earthquakes that really interest the public (and the authorities) are those which are felt by the population. It is not a magnitude issue only; even a small magnitude earthquake, if widely felt can create a public desire for information. In LastQuake, felt events are automatically discriminated through the reactions of the population on the Internet. It uses three different and complementary methods. Twitter Earthquake detection, initially developed by the USGS, detects surges in the number of tweets containing the word "earthquake" in different languages. Flashsourcing, developed by EMSC, detects traffic surges caused by eyewitnesses on its website - one of the top global earthquake information websites. Both detections happen typically within 2 minutes of an event's occurrence. Finally, an earthquake is also confirmed as being felt when at least 3 independent felt reports (questionnaires) are collected. LastQuake automatically merges seismic data, direct (crowdsourced) and indirect eyewitnesses' contributions, damage scenarios and tsunami alerts to provide information on felt earthquakes and their effects in a time ranging from a few tens of seconds to 90 minutes. It is based on visual communication to erase language hurdles, for instance, it crowdsources felt reports through simple cartoons as well as geo-located pics. It was massively adopted in Nepal within hours of the Gorkha earthquake and collected thousands of felt reports and more than 100 informative pics. LastQuake is also a seismic risk reduction tools thanks to its very rapid information. When such information does not exist, people tend to call emergency services, crowds emerge and rumors spread. In its next release, LastQuake will also have "do/don't do" cartoons popping up after an earthquake to encourage appropriate behavior.

  1. NetQuakes - A new approach to urban strong-motion seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetgert, J. H.; Evans, J. R.; Hamilton, J.; Hutt, C. R.; Jensen, E. G.; Oppenheimer, D. H.

    2009-12-01

    There is a recognized need for more densely sampled strong ground motion recordings in urban areas to provide more accurate ShakeMaps for post-earthquake disaster assessment and to provide data for structural engineers to improve design standards. Ideally, the San Francisco Bay area would have a strong ground motion recorder every 1-2 km to adequately sample the region’s varied geology and built environment. This would require the addition of thousands of instruments to the existing network. There are several fiscal and logistical constraints that prevent us from doing this with traditional strong motion instrumentation and telemetry. In addition to the initial expense of instruments and their installation, there are the continuing costs of telemetry and maintenance. To address these issues, the USGS implemented the NetQuakes project to deploy small, relatively inexpensive seismographs for installation in 1-2 story homes and businesses that utilize the host’s existing Internet connection. The recorder has 18 bit resolution with ±3g internal tri-axial MEMS accelerometers. Data is continuously recorded at 200 sps into a 1-2 week ringbuffer. When triggered, a miniSEED file is sent to USGS servers via the Internet. Data can also be recovered from the ringbuffer by a remote request through the servers. Following a power failure, the instrument can run for 36 hours using its internal battery. All client-server interactions are initiated by the instrument, so it safely resides behind a host’s firewall. Instrument and battery replacement can be performed by hosts to reduce maintenance costs. A connection to the host’s LAN, and thence to the public Internet, can be made using WiFi to minimize cabling. Although timing via a cable to an external GPS antenna is possible, it is simpler to use the Network Time Protocol (NTP) to synchronize the internal clock. NTP achieves timing accuracy generally better than a sample interval. Since February, 2009, we have installed

  2. Rotating neutron stars with exotic cores: masses, radii, stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haensel, P.; Bejger, M.; Fortin, M.; Zdunik, L. [Polish Academy of Sciences, N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    A set of theoretical mass-radius relations for rigidly rotating neutron stars with exotic cores, obtained in various theories of dense matter, is reviewed. Two basic observational constraints are used: the largest measured rotation frequency (716Hz) and the maximum measured mass (2M {sub CircleDot}). The present status of measuring the radii of neutron stars is described. The theory of rigidly rotating stars in general relativity is reviewed and limitations of the slow rotation approximation are pointed out. Mass-radius relations for rotating neutron stars with hyperon and quark cores are illustrated using several models. Problems related to the non-uniqueness of the crust-core matching are mentioned. Limits on rigid rotation resulting from the mass-shedding instability and the instability with respect to the axisymmetric perturbations are summarized. The problem of instabilities and of the back-bending phenomenon are discussed in detail. Metastability and instability of a neutron star core in the case of a first-order phase transition, both between pure phases, and into a mixed-phase state, are reviewed. The case of two disjoint families (branches) of rotating neutron stars is discussed and generic features of neutron-star families and of core-quakes triggered by the instabilities are considered. (orig.)

  3. RANDOM ATTRACTORS FOR A STOCHASTIC HYDRODYNAMICAL EQUATION IN HEISENBERG PARAMAGNET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Boling; Guo Chunxiao; Pu Xueke

    2011-01-01

    This article studies the asymptotic behaviors of the solution for a stochastic hydrodynamical equation in Heisenberg paramagnet in a two-dimensional periodic domain. We obtain the existence of random attractors in H1.

  4. Smooth Solutions for a Stochastic Hydrodynamical Equation in Heisenberg Paramagnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Ke PU; Bo Ling GUO; Yong Qian HAN

    2011-01-01

    In this article,we consider a stochastic hydrodynamical equation in Heisenberg paramagnet driven by additive noise.We prove the existence and uniqueness of smooth solutions to this equation with difference method.

  5. Local orthorhombic distortion and enhanced susceptibility in LaNiO3 paramagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Yano, Shinichiro; Louca, Despina; Marshall, Luke; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Jorg

    2014-03-01

    The perovskite LaNiO3 is metallic, and unlike other systems in this class of materials, it remains paramagnetic where only an enhancement in the magnetic susceptibility (χ) is observed below 200 K. Other rare earth nickelates are antiferromagnetic with an enhancement of χ in paramagnetic metallic state. Using neutron powder diffraction and the pair density function analysis, it is observed that the temperature dependence of the local atomic structure cannot be reproduced assuming the average crystal symmetry which is rhombohedral with the R 3 c space group. With rising temperature, octahedral distortions involving displacements of oxygen set in, and the symmetry is reduced to Pbnm . In this symmetry, the equivalent O site in the R 3 c splits into two and can account for all the features observed in the local lattice. The structural changes occur gradually, between 100 and 200 K. The local Ni-O-Ni bond angles are reduced from 164.5 to 163.5 ° during this transition. Such reduction of Ni-O-Ni bond angles may facilitate antiferromagnetic coupling and responsible for the temperature dependence of χ observed in LaNiO3 below 200 K.

  6. DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH OF THE ECONOMIC ALLOY PARAMAGNETIC STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Alifanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The alloys of Fe-Cr-Ni-C system for the purpose of development the economic alloy paramagnetic (not magnetic steels are investigated. A series of alloys are melted for this purpose, deformation is carried out and a structural state was studied.The area for the selection of the chemical composition of the economic alloy steels with stable paramagnetic properties is defined.

  7. Study of metalloproteins using continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarelli, Serge; Maurel, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is an invaluable tool when studying systems with paramagnetic centers. It is a sensitive spectroscopic method, which can be used with dilute samples in aqueous buffer solutions. Here, we describe the basic procedure for recording an X-band EPR spectrum of a metalloprotein sample at low temperature. We also discuss basic optimization techniques to provide spectra with a high signal to noise ratio and minimum distortion.

  8. QuakeUp: An advanced tool for a network-based Earthquake Early Warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, Aldo; Colombelli, Simona; Caruso, Alessandro; Elia, Luca; Brondi, Piero; Emolo, Antonio; Festa, Gaetano; Martino, Claudio; Picozzi, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    The currently developed and operational Earthquake Early warning, regional systems ground on the assumption of a point-like earthquake source model and 1-D ground motion prediction equations to estimate the earthquake impact. Here we propose a new network-based method which allows for issuing an alert based upon the real-time mapping of the Potential Damage Zone (PDZ), e.g. the epicentral area where the peak ground velocity is expected to exceed the damaging or strong shaking levels with no assumption about the earthquake rupture extent and spatial variability of ground motion. The platform includes the most advanced techniques for a refined estimation of the main source parameters (earthquake location and magnitude) and for an accurate prediction of the expected ground shaking level. The new software platform (QuakeUp) is under development at the Seismological Laboratory (RISSC-Lab) of the Department of Physics at the University of Naples Federico II, in collaboration with the academic spin-off company RISS s.r.l., recently gemmated by the research group. The system processes the 3-component, real-time ground acceleration and velocity data streams at each station. The signal quality is preliminary assessed by checking the signal-to-noise ratio both in acceleration, velocity and displacement and through dedicated filtering algorithms. For stations providing high quality data, the characteristic P-wave period (τ_c) and the P-wave displacement, velocity and acceleration amplitudes (P_d, Pv and P_a) are jointly measured on a progressively expanded P-wave time window. The evolutionary measurements of the early P-wave amplitude and characteristic period at stations around the source allow to predict the geometry and extent of PDZ, but also of the lower shaking intensity regions at larger epicentral distances. This is done by correlating the measured P-wave amplitude with the Peak Ground Velocity (PGV) and Instrumental Intensity (I_MM) and by mapping the measured and

  9. Zoneless and Mixture techniques applied to the Integrated Brazilian PSHA using GEM-OpenQuake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirchiner, M.; Drouet, S.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-12-01

    The main goal of this work is to propose some variations to the classic Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) calculations, on one hand, applying the zoneless methodology to seismic source activity characterization and, on the other hand, using the gaussian mixture models to mix Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE) models onto a mixed model. Our actual knowledge of the Brazilian intraplate seismicity does not allow us to identify the causative neotectonic active faults with confidence. This issue makes difficult the characterization of main seismic sources and the computation of the Gutenberg-Richter relation. Indeed seismic zonings made by different specialist could have big differences, while the zone less approach imposes a quantitative method to seismic source characterization, avoiding the subjective source zone definition. In addition, the low seismicity rate and the limited coverage in space and time of the seismic networks, do not offer enough observations to fit a confident GMPE to this region. In this case, our purpose was use a Gaussian Mixture Model to estimate a composed model from pre-existents well-fitted GMPE models which better describes the observed peak ground motion data. The other methodological evaluation is to use the OpenQuake engine (a Global Earthquake Model's initiative) for the hazard calculation. The logic tree input will allow us, in near future, to combine with weights, other hazard models from different specialists. We expect that these results will offer a new and solid basis to upgrade the brazilian civil engineering seismic rules.

  10. Spin time-relaxation within strongly coupled paramagnetic systems exhibiting paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Chahid, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is a quantitative study of the spin time relaxation within superweak ferrimagnetic materials exhibiting a paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition, when the temperature is changed from an initial value T sub i to a final one T sub f very close to the critical temperature T sub c. From a magnetic point of view, the material under investigation is considered to be made of two strongly coupled paramagnetic sublattices of respective moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and psi. Calculations are made within a Landau mean-field theory, whose free energy involves, in addition to quadratic and quartic terms in both moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and psi, a lowest-order coupling - Cphi (cursive,open) Greek psi, where C<0 stands for the coupling constant measuring the interaction between the two sublattices. We first determine the time dependence of the shifts of the order parameters delta phi (cursive,open) Greek and delta psi from the equilibrium state. We find that this time dependence ...

  11. Field theoretical approach to the paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition in strongly coupled paramagnetic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chahid, M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the investigation of the critical properties of two strongly coupled paramagnetic sublattices exhibiting a paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition, at some critical temperature T sub c greater than the room temperature. In order to take into account the strong fluctuations of the magnetization near the critical point, use is made of the renormalization-group (RG) techniques applied to an elaborated field model describing such a transition, which is of Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson type. The associated free energy or action is a functional of two kinds of order parameters (local magnetizations), which are scalar fields phi (cursive,open) Greek and psi relative to these sublattices. It involves quadratic and quartic terms in both fields, and a lowest-order coupling C sub o phi (cursive,open) Greek psi, where C sub o >0 stands for the coupling constant measuring the interaction between the two sublattices. We first show that the associated field theory is renormalizable at any order of the pertur...

  12. Modelling Active Faults in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) with OpenQuake: Definition, Design and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherill, Graeme; Garcia, Julio; Poggi, Valerio; Chen, Yen-Shin; Pagani, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) has, since its inception in 2009, made many contributions to the practice of seismic hazard modeling in different regions of the globe. The OpenQuake-engine (hereafter referred to simply as OpenQuake), GEM's open-source software for calculation of earthquake hazard and risk, has found application in many countries, spanning a diversity of tectonic environments. GEM itself has produced a database of national and regional seismic hazard models, harmonizing into OpenQuake's own definition the varied seismogenic sources found therein. The characterization of active faults in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is at the centre of this process, motivating many of the developments in OpenQuake and presenting hazard modellers with the challenge of reconciling seismological, geological and geodetic information for the different regions of the world. Faced with these challenges, and from the experience gained in the process of harmonizing existing models of seismic hazard, four critical issues are addressed. The challenge GEM has faced in the development of software is how to define a representation of an active fault (both in terms of geometry and earthquake behaviour) that is sufficiently flexible to adapt to different tectonic conditions and levels of data completeness. By exploring the different fault typologies supported by OpenQuake we illustrate how seismic hazard calculations can, and do, take into account complexities such as geometrical irregularity of faults in the prediction of ground motion, highlighting some of the potential pitfalls and inconsistencies that can arise. This exploration leads to the second main challenge in active fault modeling, what elements of the fault source model impact most upon the hazard at a site, and when does this matter? Through a series of sensitivity studies we show how different configurations of fault geometry, and the corresponding characterisation of near-fault phenomena (including

  13. Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  14. Spin time-relaxation within strongly coupled paramagnetic systems exhibiting paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahid, M.; Benhamou, M. E-mail: benhamou.mabrouk@caramail.com

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of the present work is a quantitative study of the spin time relaxation within superweak ferrimagnetic materials exhibiting a paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition, when the temperature is changed from an initial value T{sub i} to a final one T{sub f} very close to the critical temperature T{sub c}. From a magnetic point of view, the material under investigation is considered to be made of two strongly coupled paramagnetic sublattices of respective moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and {psi}. Calculations are made within a Landau mean-field theory, whose free energy involves, in addition to quadratic and quartic terms in both moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and {psi}, a lowest-order coupling - Cphi (cursive,open) Greek{psi}, where C<0 stands for the coupling constant measuring the interaction between the two sublattices. We first determine the time dependence of the shifts of the order parameters {delta}phi (cursive,open) Greek and {delta}{psi} from the equilibrium state. We find that this time dependence is completely controlled by two kinds of relaxation times {tau}{sub 1} and {tau}{sub 2}. The former is a long time and the second a short one, and they are associated, respectively, with long and local wavelength fluctuations. We find that, only the first relaxation time is relevant for physics, since it drives the system to undergo a phase transition. Spatial fluctuations are also taken into account. In this case, we find an explicit expression of the relaxation times, which are functions of temperature T, coupling constant C and wave vector q. We find that the critical mode is that given by the zero scattering-angle limit, i.e. q=0. Finally, we emphasize that the appearance of these two relaxation times is in good agreement with results reported in recent experimental work dealt with the Curie-Weiss paramagnet compound Li{sub x}Ni{sub 2-x}O{sub 2}, where the composition x is very close to 1.

  15. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  16. Neutron Albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatovich, V K

    2005-01-01

    A new, algebraic, method is applied to calculation of neutron albedo from substance to check the claim that use of ultradispersive fuel and moderator of an active core can help to gain in size and mass of the reactor. In a model of isotropic distribution of incident and reflected neutrons it is shown that coherent scattering on separate grains in the case of thermal neutrons increases transport cross section negligibly, however it decreases albedo from a wall of finite thickness because of decrease of substance density. A visible increase of albedo takes place only for neutrons with wave length of the order of the size of a single grain.

  17. Reconciling divergent interpretations of quaking aspen decline on the northern Colorado Front Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashian, Daniel M; Romme, William H; Regan, Claudia M

    2007-07-01

    Ecologists have debated over the past 65 years whether quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) has or has not declined in abundance, vigor, or regeneration in western North America. Many studies have provided divergent interpretations of the condition of aspen forests, leading to difficulty in translating this ecological information into management recommendations. To reconcile these contrasting conclusions and to test the hypothesis that multiple types of aspen decline and persistence occur simultaneously on heterogeneous landscapes, we assessed 91 aspen stands across the northern Colorado Front Range to determine the range of ecological conditions that underlie aspen decline or persistence. Approximately 15% of aspen forest area in our sample exhibited dieback of mature stems coupled with a lack of young trees indicative of declining stands, most often at lower elevations where elk browsing is heavy and chronic, and where effects of fire exclusion have been most significant. However, 52% of the area sampled had multiple cohorts indicative of self-replacing or persistent stands. Conifer dominance was increasing in over 33% of all aspen forest area sampled, most often at high elevations among lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Englem. ex Wats.) forests. Reconstructions of relative basal area and density of aspen and lodgepole pine in these stands suggest cyclical dominance of these species, where conifers gradually replace aspen over long fire intervals, and aspen vigorously re-establish following stand-replacing fires. The diversity of ecological contexts across the northern Colorado Front Range creates a variety of aspen dynamics leading to decline or persistence, and no single trend describes the general condition of aspen forests in appropriate detail for managers. Active management may be useful in preserving individual stands at fine scales, but management prescriptions should reflect specific drivers of decline in these stands.

  18. Heterozygosity, gender, and the growth-defense trade-off in quaking aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher T; Stevens, Michael T; Anderson, Jon E; Lindroth, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    Although plant growth is generally recognized to be influenced by allocation to defense, genetic background (e.g., inbreeding), and gender, rarely have those factors been addressed collectively. In quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), phenolic glycosides (PGs) and condensed tannins (CTs) constitute up to 30 % of leaf dry weight. To quantify the allocation cost of this chemical defense, we measured growth, defense chemistry, and individual heterozygosity (H obs at 16 microsatellite loci) for male and female trees in both controlled and natural environments. The controlled environment consisted of 12 juvenile genets grown for 3 years in a common garden, with replication. The natural environment consisted of 51 mature genets in wild populations, from which we sampled multiple ramets (trees) per genet. Concentrations of PGs and CTs were negatively correlated. PGs were uncorrelated with growth, but CT production represented a major cost. Across the range of CT levels found in wild-grown trees, growth rates varied by 2.6-fold, such that a 10 % increase in CT concentration occurred with a 38.5 % decrease in growth. H obs had a marked effect on aspen growth: for wild trees, a 10 % increase in H obs corresponded to a 12.5 % increase in growth. In wild trees, this CT effect was significant only in females, in which reproduction seems to exacerbate the cost of defense, while the H obs effect was significant only in males. Despite the lower growth rate of low-H obs trees, their higher CT levels may improve survival, which could account for the deficit of heterozygotes repeatedly found in natural aspen populations.

  19. Defensive effects of extrafloral nectaries in quaking aspen differ with scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Brent; Wagner, Diane; Doak, Patricia

    2011-04-01

    The effects of plant defenses on herbivory can differ among spatial scales. This may be particularly common with indirect defenses, such as extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), that attract predatory arthropods and are dependent on predator distribution, abundance, and behavior. We tested the defensive effects of EFNs in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) against damage by a specialist herbivore, the aspen leaf miner (Phyllocnistis populiella Cham.), at the scale of individual leaves and entire ramets (i.e., stems). Experiments excluding crawling arthropods revealed that the effects of aspen EFNs differed at the leaf and ramet scales. Crawling predators caused similar reductions in the percent leaf area mined on individual leaves with and without EFNs. However, the extent to which crawling predators increased leaf miner mortality and, consequently, reduced mining damage increased with EFN expression at the ramet scale. Thus, aspen EFNs provided a diffuse defense, reducing damage to leaves across a ramet regardless of leaf-scale EFN expression. We detected lower leaf miner damage and survival unassociated with crawling predators on EFN-bearing leaves, suggesting that direct defenses (e.g., chemical defenses) were stronger on leaves with than without EFNs. Greater direct defenses on EFN-bearing leaves may reduce the probability of losing these leaves and thus weakening ramet-scale EFN defense. Aspen growth was not related to EFN expression or the presence of crawling predators over the course of a single season. Different effects of aspen EFNs at the leaf and ramet scales suggest that future studies may benefit from examining indirect defenses simultaneously at multiple scales.

  20. Crowd-Sourcing Seismic Data for Education and Research Opportunities with the Quake-Catcher Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, D. F.; DeGroot, R. M.; Benthien, M. L.; Cochran, E. S.; Taber, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Quake Catcher Network (QCN; quakecatcher.net) uses low cost micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) sensors hosted by volunteers to collect seismic data. Volunteers use accelerometers internal to laptop computers, phones, tablets or small (the size of a matchbox) MEMS sensors plugged into desktop computers using a USB connector to collect scientifically useful data. Data are collected and sent to a central server using the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) distributed computing software. Since 2008, sensors installed in museums, schools, offices, and residences have collected thousands of earthquake records, including the 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile, the 2010 M7.1 Darfield, New Zealand, and 2015 M7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquakes. In 2016, the QCN in the United States transitioned to the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Consortium and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), which are facilities funded through the National Science Foundation and the United States Geological Survey, respectively. The transition has allowed for an influx of new ideas and new education related efforts, which include focused installations in several school districts in southern California, on Native American reservations in North Dakota, and in the most seismically active state in the contiguous U.S. - Oklahoma. We present and describe these recent educational opportunities, and highlight how QCN has engaged a wide sector of the public in scientific data collection, particularly through the QCN-EPIcenter Network and NASA Mars InSight teacher programs. QCN provides the public with information and insight into how seismic data are collected, and how researchers use these data to better understand and characterize seismic activity. Lastly, we describe how students use data recorded by QCN sensors installed in their classrooms to explore and investigate felt earthquakes, and look towards the bright future of the network.

  1. The nature of paramagnetic defects in tin (IV) oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanovskaya, M., E-mail: ivanovskaya@bsu.by [Research Institute for Physical Chemical Problems, Belarusian State University, Leningradskaya Str., 14, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Ovodok, E., E-mail: ovodokea@gmail.com [Research Institute for Physical Chemical Problems, Belarusian State University, Leningradskaya Str., 14, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Golovanov, V. [South-Ukrainian University, Staroportofrankovskaya Str., 26, 65008 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2015-08-18

    Highlights: • EPR signal at g = 1.8–1.9 (D) was studied in SnO{sub 2} prepared under different conditions. • Conditions appropriate for detection of D signal and parameters of them were defined. • Structure of paramagnetic center (PC) attributed to the D signal was proposed. • The PC is a complex of oxygen vacancies with entrapped electrons near SnO{sub 2} surface. - Abstract: The nature of paramagnetic centers which are responsible for the EPR signal at g = 1.8–1.9 in tin (IV) oxide was studied. Polycrystalline SnO{sub 2} samples were obtained by sol–gel method and by thermal treatment of the precursors containing tin atoms in different oxidation states. The parameters of the EPR spectra recorded after heat treatment of the samples in air, oxygen and hydrogen atmospheres, and in vacuum were analyzed. The observed parameters of the EPR spectra do not allow to assign the paramagnetic center with g = 1.8–1.9 to Sn{sup 3+} center. The structure of the paramagnetic center attributed to the EPR signal at g = 1.8–1.9 was proposed. The proposed structure of the paramagnetic center includes a complex of oxygen vacancies at (1 0 1) plane of rutile-type SnO{sub 2} lattice.

  2. Paramagnetism-Based Restraints for Xplor-NIH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano, E-mail: ivanobertini@cerm.unifi.it; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Giachetti, Andrea [University of Florence, CERM and Department of Chemistry (Italy); Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo [University of Florence, CERM and Department of Agricultural Biotechnology (Italy)

    2004-03-15

    Modules that use paramagnetism-based NMR restraints have been developed and integrated in the well known program for solution structure determination Xplor-NIH; the complete set of such modules is called PARArestraints for Xplor-NIH. Paramagnetism-based restraints are paramagnetic relaxation enhancements, pseudocontact shifts, residual dipolar couplings due to metal and overall magnetic anisotropy, and cross correlation between Curie relaxation and nuclear-nuclear dipolar relaxation. The complete program has been tested by back-calculating NOEs and paramagnetism-based restraints from the X-ray structure of cytochrome c{sub 553} from B. pasteurii. Furthermore, the same experimental restraints previously used to determine the solution structure of cytochrome c{sub 553} itself, of cytochrome b{sub 5}, and of calbindin D{sub 9k} with the program PARAMAGNETIC DYANA, have been used for structure calculations by using PARArestraints for Xplor-NIH. The agreement between the two programs is quite satisfactory and validates both protocols.

  3. Quakes Regime In A Heterogeneous Media With Strength Values Obeying The Cauhy Law: Model and Comparison With Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodkin, M. V.

    Earthquake shear zones are known to consist of rigid asperities and weak zones [Das and Kostrov, 1983; et al], i.e. rupture zones can be described as random systems con- sisting of subzones with very different strength values. It seems probably, that the distribution of strength values of elements of geophysical media can be described by the Cauchy law [Kagan, 1994; Rodkin, 2001; et al.]. Below, geophysical media was modeled as a system consisting of elements with strength values obeying the Cauchy law. A simple algorithm was used to model a process of generation of rupture zones in a such media. Catalog of artificial quakes was obtained in result of numerical model- ing. Individual rupture zone is described here by its length and initial strength. Set of rupture zones obtained is characterized by the used stress value and the model b-value. The distributions of length values of rupture zones obtained this way obey the law sim- ilar to power-law taking place in case of real earthquakes. A number of correlations between model stress value, number of quakes and b-value characteristic of this model was exposed. Some of the model regularities agree with well known properties of seis- mic regime. Some others were not revealed before, but were shown to agree with the world Harvard catalog data. Only one result (a positive correlation between the stress value and a number of quakes) seems to contradict with real seismic regime. Actually, a negative correlation was obtained between density of earthquakes and characteristic apparent stress values. This result testifies for an importance of effect of weakening of geophysical media in the process of earthquake generation.

  4. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  5. Earthquake-induced Landslides and Quake Lakes during the great Sichuan Earthquake of May 12, 2008 (Sichuan, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekkas, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Mw 8.0 R earthquake on the 12th of May 2008 that stroke the Sichuan Prefecture of the People's Republic of China caused tenths of thousands of casualties and significant social and economic consequences. The earthquake was triggered by a reverse fault approximately 100 km in length, of NE-SW strike, dipping towards the NW with a reverse-lateral slip character and focal depth of 18 Km. Due to the great height and steepness of the slopes and their loose geotechnical characteristics in the mountainous terrain, thousands of landslides and collapses occurred in the Longmenshan fault zone during the earthquake, resulting in a large amount of geotechnical damages, such as the destruction the roads, villages, towns and bridges. A total of more than 9000 geological disasters occurred, among which there were approximately 4000 landslides, 2300 slop collapses, 800 debris flows, 1700 unstable slopes and more than 80 locations with hidden danger of geological hazard. Approximately 1.000.000 people and their properties in the affected area were under a directly serious threat. Landslides mobilized millions of cubic meters of rock and soil that slid across adjacent rivers, creating large landslide dams. The blockage of rivers was accompanied by the formation of quake lakes that were flooding the upstream river valleys. As water rises, there is potential of overtopping and downstream flooding. In the affected area 32 quake lakes were formed of various scales. Τhe largest one , and most dangerous, is located in Beichuan County. The lake was formed because massive landslide partially blocked Qianjiang River upstream of the devastated Beichuan County seat. It is 40 m deep and contains about 30-40 million m3 of water. The landslide dam had a height of 60 m, the quake lake in the Shitingjiang River direction is more than 900 m long, its largest width is more than 600 m, and its area at the dam crest level is about 300.000 m2. As of June 7, 2008 the reservoir capacity of the quake

  6. Paramagnetic Europium Salen Complex and Sickle-Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynter, Clive I.; Ryan, D. H.; May, Leopold; Oliver, F. W.; Brown, Eugene; Hoffman, Eugene J.; Bernstein, David

    2005-04-01

    A new europium salen complex, Eu(salen)2NH4, was synthesized, and its composition was confirmed by chemical analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Further characterization was carried out by 151 Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements were made at varying temperatures between 9 K and room temperature and a value of Debye temperature of 133 ±5 K was computed. Both Mössbauer and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the paramagnetic behavior of this complex and the trivalent state of the europium ion. In view of the fact that the "odd" paramagnetic molecule NO has been shown to reverse sickling of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia, the interaction between the paramagnetic europium salen complex and sickle cells was examined after incubation with this europium complex and shown to have similar effects.

  7. Neutron reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2014-01-01

    films or films with magnetic properties. The reason is the peculiar property of neutron light since the mass of a neutron is close to the one of a proton, and since it bears a magnetic moment. The optical properties of matter, when interacting with neutrons, are described by a refractive index......Neutron (and X-ray) reflectometry constitute complementary interfacially sensitive techniques that open access to studying the structure within thin films of both soft and hard condensed matter. Film thickness starts oxide surfaces on bulk substrates, proceeding to (pauci-)molecular layers and up...... to hundreds of nanometers. Thickness resolution for flat surfaces is in the range of few Ǻngstrøm, and as a peculiar benefit, the presence and properties of buried interfaces are accessible. Focus here will be on neutron reflectometry, a technique that is unique in applications involving composite organic...

  8. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a paramagnetic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, G. P.; Gorshkov, V. N.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2017-04-01

    We consider theoretically extension of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) replacing a ferromagnetic probe on a cantilever tip (CT) with a paramagnetic one (PMRFM). The dynamics of the interaction between the paramagnetic probe and a local magnetic moment in a sample is analyzed, using a quasi-classical approach. We show that the application of a proper sequence of electromagnetic pulses provides a significant deflection of the CT from the initial equilibrium position. Periodic application of these sequences of pulses results in quasi-periodic CT deflections from the equilibrium, which can be used for detection of the magnetic moment in a sample.

  9. Field theoretical approach to the paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition in strongly coupled paramagnetic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahid, M.; Benhamou, M. E-mail: benhamou.mabrouk@caramail.com

    2000-04-01

    The aim of this paper is the investigation of the critical properties of two strongly coupled paramagnetic sublattices exhibiting a paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition, at some critical temperature T{sub c} greater than the room temperature. In order to take into account the strong fluctuations of the magnetization near the critical point, use is made of the renormalization-group (RG) techniques applied to an elaborated field model describing such a transition, which is of Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson type. The associated free energy or action is a functional of two kinds of order parameters (local magnetizations), which are scalar fields phi (cursive,open) Greek and {psi} relative to these sublattices. It involves quadratic and quartic terms in both fields, and a lowest-order coupling C{sub o}phi (cursive,open) Greek{psi}, where C{sub o}>0 stands for the coupling constant measuring the interaction between the two sublattices. We first show that the associated field theory is renormalizable at any order of the perturbation series in the coupling constants, up to a critical dimension d{sub c}=4, and that, the corresponding counterterms have the same form as those relative to the usual phi (cursive,open) Greek{sup 4}-theory (C{sub o}=0). The existence of the renormalization theory enables us to write the RG-equations satisfied by the correlation functions. We solve these using the standard characteristics method, to get all critical properties of the system under investigation. We first determine the exact shape of the critical line in the (T,C)-plane, along which the system undergoes a phase transition. Second, we determine the scaling laws of the correlation functions, with respect to relevant parameters of the problem, namely, the wave vector q, the (renormalized) coupling C and the temperature shift T-T{sub c}. We find that these scaling laws are characterized by critical exponents, which are the same as those relative to Ising-like magnetic systems.

  10. When Protocols Become Fairy Tales and Gods Remain Buried Under: Excerpts From the Diary of Forensic Experts at Ground Zero During the Mega Quake That Hit Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Jenash; Shrestha, Rijen; Shrestha, Pramod Kumar; Kanchan, Tanuj; Krishan, Kewal

    2017-03-01

    More than a year has passed since the mega quake hit Nepal. Although a lot is written about the lacunae in disaster preparedness, lessons learnt, and public health concerns after the aftermath, nothing much has been written about the fate of the deceased. Although saving takes priority after a disaster, the management of dead bodies also requires immediate attention because the process of identification becomes more difficult and expensive as time passes. This article shares the firsthand experiences of forensic experts at ground zero during the quake that may be useful to forensic experts responsible for handling such situations worldwide.

  11. Elevated Rocky Mountain elk numbers prevent positive effects of fire on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Solance; Fettig, Stephen M.; Bowker, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is the most widespread tree species in North America and has supported a unique ecosystem for tens of thousands of years, yet is currently threatened by dramatic loss and possible local extinctions. While multiple factors such as climate change and fire suppression are thought to contribute to aspen’s decline, increased browsing by elk (Cervus elaphus), which have experienced dramatic population increases in the last ∼80 years, may severely inhibit aspen growth and regeneration. Fires are known to favor aspen recovery, but in the last several decades the spatial scale and intensity of wildfires has greatly increased, with poorly understood ramifications for aspen growth. Here, focusing on the 2000 Cerro Grande fire in central New Mexico – one of the earliest fires described as a “mega-fire” - we use three methods to examine the impact of elk browsing on aspen regeneration after a mega-fire. First, we use an exclosure experiment to show that aspen growing in the absence of elk were 3× taller than trees growing in the presence of elk. Further, aspen that were both protected from elk and experienced burning were 8.5× taller than unburned trees growing in the presence of elk, suggesting that the combination of release from herbivores and stimulation from fire creates the largest aspen growth rates. Second, using surveys at the landscape level, we found a correlation between elk browsing intensity and aspen height, such that where elk browsing was highest, aspen were shortest. This relationship between elk browsing intensity and aspen height was stronger in burned (r = −0.53) compared to unburned (r = −0.24) areas. Third, in conjunction with the landscape-level surveys, we identified possible natural refugia, microsites containing downed logs, shrubs etc. that may inhibit elk browsing by physically blocking aspen from elk or by impeding elk’s ability to move through the forest patch. We did not find any

  12. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  13. Intrinsic electric dipole moments of paramagnetic atoms : Rubidium and cesium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, D.

    2008-01-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of paramagnetic atoms is sensitive to the intrinsic EDM contribution from that of its constituent electrons and a scalar-pseudoscalar (S-PS) electron-nucleus interaction. The electron EDM and the S-PS contributions to the EDMs of these atoms scale as approximate to Z

  14. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  15. Tetrachloridocuprates(II—Synthesis and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Strauch

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids (ILs on the basis of metal containing anions and/or cations are of interest for a variety of technical applications e.g., synthesis of particles, magnetic or thermochromic materials. We present the synthesis and the results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopic analyses of a series of some new potential ionic liquids based on tetrachloridocuprates(II, [CuCl4]2−, with different sterically demanding cations: hexadecyltrimethylammonium 1, tetradecyltrimethylammonium 2, tetrabutylammonium 3 and benzyltriethylammonium 4. The cations in the new compounds were used to achieve a reasonable separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II ions for EPR spectroscopy. The EPR hyperfine structure was not resolved. This is due to the exchange broadening, resulting from still incomplete separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II centers. Nevertheless, the principal values of the electron Zeemann tensor (g║ and g┴ of the complexes could be determined. Even though the solid substances show slightly different colors, the UV/Vis spectra are nearly identical, indicating structural changes of the tetrachloridocuprate moieties between solid state and solution. The complexes have a promising potential e.g., as high temperature ionic liquids, as precursors for the formation of copper chloride particles or as catalytic paramagnetic ionic liquids.

  16. Cancer detection based on Raman spectra super-paramagnetic clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Solís, José Luis; Guizar-Ruiz, Juan Ignacio; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Juárez-López, Héctor Alfonso; Vargas-Rodríguez, Héctor; Gallegos-Infante, Luis Armando; González-Silva, Ricardo Armando; Espinoza-Padilla, Pedro Basilio; Palomares-Anda, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The clustering of Raman spectra of serum sample is analyzed using the super-paramagnetic clustering technique based in the Potts spin model. We investigated the clustering of biochemical networks by using Raman data that define edge lengths in the network, and where the interactions are functions of the Raman spectra's individual band intensities. For this study, we used two groups of 58 and 102 control Raman spectra and the intensities of 160, 150 and 42 Raman spectra of serum samples from breast and cervical cancer and leukemia patients, respectively. The spectra were collected from patients from different hospitals from Mexico. By using super-paramagnetic clustering technique, we identified the most natural and compact clusters allowing us to discriminate the control and cancer patients. A special interest was the leukemia case where its nearly hierarchical observed structure allowed the identification of the patients's leukemia type. The goal of this study is to apply a model of statistical physics, as the super-paramagnetic, to find these natural clusters that allow us to design a cancer detection method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of preliminary results evaluating the usefulness of super-paramagnetic clustering in the discipline of spectroscopy where it is used for classification of spectra.

  17. Design and synthesis of paramagnetic probes for structural biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Wei-Min

    2013-01-01

    The majority of the work presented in this thesis involves the design and synthesis of paramagnetic NMR probes, including lanthanoids caged probes and spin labels. An overview of the development of different types of lanthanoids caged probes is given. Among all of the reported lanthanoid probes, the

  18. Dynamics in photosynthetic transient complexes studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scanu, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on fundamental aspects of protein-protein interactions. A multidisciplinary methodology for the detection and visualization of transient, lowly-populated encounter protein complexes is described. The new methodology combined paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy with computational

  19. A new paramagnetically shifted imaging probe for MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, P. Kanthi; Rogers, Nicola J.; Finney, Katie‐Louise N.A.; Harvey, Peter; Funk, Alexander M.; Wilson, J. Ian; O'Hogain, Dara; Maxwell, Ross; Parker, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and characterize a new paramagnetic contrast agent for molecular imaging by MRI. Methods A contrast agent was developed for direct MRI detection through the paramagnetically shifted proton magnetic resonances of two chemically equivalent tert‐butyl reporter groups within a dysprosium(III) complex. The complex was characterized in phantoms and imaged in physiologically intact mice at 7 Tesla (T) using three‐dimensional (3D) gradient echo and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequences to measure spatial distribution and signal frequency. Results The reporter protons reside ∼6.5 Å from the paramagnetic center, resulting in fast T 1 relaxation (T 1 = 8 ms) and a large paramagnetic frequency shift exceeding 60 ppm. Fast relaxation allowed short scan repetition times with high excitation flip angle, resulting in high sensitivity. The large dipolar shift allowed direct frequency selective excitation and acquisition of the dysprosium(III) complex, independent of the tissue water signal. The biokinetics of the complex were followed in vivo with a temporal resolution of 62 s following a single, low‐dose intravenous injection. The lower concentration limit for detection was ∼23 μM. Through MRSI, the temperature dependence of the paramagnetic shift (0.28 ppm.K−1) was exploited to examine tissue temperature variation. Conclusions These data demonstrate a new MRI agent with the potential for physiological monitoring by MRI. Magn Reson Med 77:1307–1317, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26922918

  20. Neutron scattering from polarised proton domains

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Brandt, B; Kohbrecher, J; Konter, J A; Mango, S; Glattli, H; Leymarie, E; Grillo, I; May, R P; Jouve, H; Stuhrmann, H B; Stuhrmann, H B; Zimmer, O

    2002-01-01

    Time-dependent small-angle polarised neutron scattering from domains of polarised protons has been observed at the onset of dynamic nuclear polarisation in a frozen solution of 98% deuterated glycerol-water at 1 K containing a small concentration of paramagnetic centres (EHBA-Cr sup V). Simultaneous NMR measurements show that the observed scattering arises from protons around the Cr sup V -ions which are polarised to approx 10% in a few seconds, much faster than the protons in the bulk. (authors)

  1. Neutron Scattering Studies of the Anti-ferromagnetic Phase of Cd1-xMnxTe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebultowicz, T.; Minor, W.; Buras, B.;

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the magnetic properties of crystals of the mixed semiconductors Cd1-xMnxTe indicate that: (i) for x ≤ 0.17 the crystals are paramagnetic at all temperatures, (ii) for 0.17 low...... temperatures. Neutron diffraction experiments have shown that for 0.60

  2. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Ruben G; van der Veer, Eric P; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J C; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C; Rabelink, Ton J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M

    2016-02-24

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3'UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity.

  3. Sensitive and specific detection of classical scrapie prions in the brain of goats by real-time quaking-induced conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) is a rapid, specific, and sensitive prion seeding activity detection assay that uses recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen) to detect sub-infectious levels of the abnormal isoforms of the prion protein (PrPSc). Although RT-QuIC has been successfully us...

  4. A review of the potential effects of climate change on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Western United States and a new tool for surveying sudden aspen decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni Lyn Morelli; Susan C. Carr

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a literature review of the effects of climate on the distribution and growth of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in the Western United States. Based on our review, we summarize models of historical climate determinants of contemporary aspen distribution. Most quantitative climate-based models linked aspen presence and growth...

  5. Avaliação da pressão positiva expiratória final utilizando o aparelho fisioterápico Quake Evaluation of positive end expiratory pressure using a physiotherapy device called Quake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Cenachi Coelho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar, em voluntários saudáveis, o valor médio da pressão positiva expiratória final (PEEP na utilização do recurso fisioterápico Quake, relativamente novo no mercado. Participaram 62 indivíduos de ambos os sexos, entre 18 e 30 anos, que foram submetidos a: prova de função pulmonar; avaliação do pico de fluxo expiratório, da sensação subjetiva de esforço (escala de Borg e da saturação de oxigênio; e à utilização do aparelho, acoplado a um manovacuômetro, para efetuar duas seqüências respiratórias, de 10 e 20 incursões por minuto, monitoradas por retroalimentação visual. Os dados foram tratados estatisticamente. Foi observada diferença significativa entre os valores das pressões geradas apenas na seqüência de 10 incursões por minuto (p=0,03. Na comparação das pressões entre as seqüências, os valores foram significativamente menores na de 10 incursões (29,42±8,04 cmH2O; p=0,03. Não foram encontradas correlações entre as pressões e as variáveis da espirometria, idade e pico de fluxo expiratório. Foi observada uma fraca correlação significativa antes (r=0,36; p=0,003 e depois (r=0,31; p=0,014 da seqüência de 20 incursões entre as pressões nessa seqüência e os escores de fadiga na escala de Borg, tendo o mesmo ocorido com a saturação de oxigênio. A PEEP gerada pelo Quake em indivíduos saudáveis varia de acordo com a frequência em incursões por minuto, sendo maior durante a seqüência mais rápida, que também gera maior cansaço.The aim of this study was to assess the mean positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP during use of the Quake, a relatively new device, in healthy volunteers. Participants were 62 subjects of both sexes aged 18 to 30 years old, who were submitted to: pulmonary function tests; expiratory peak flow evaluation; the Borg scale; assessment of oxygen saturation; and use of the device, coupled to a manometer, in two sequences, of 10 and 20

  6. An original approach to fill the gap in the earthquake disaster experience - a proposal for 'the archive of the quake experience' -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y.; Hirayama, Y.; Kuroda, S.; Yoshida, M.

    2015-12-01

    People without severe disaster experience infallibly forget even the extraordinary one like 3.11 as time advances. Therefore, to improve the resilient society, an ingenious attempt to keep people's memory of disaster not to fade away is necessary. Since 2011, we have been caring out earthquake disaster drills for residents of high-rise apartments, for schoolchildren, for citizens of the coastal area, etc. Using a portable earthquake simulator (1), the drill consists of three parts, the first: a short lecture explaining characteristic quakes expected for Japanese people to have in the future, the second: reliving experience of major earthquakes hit Japan since 1995, and the third: a short lecture for preparation that can be done at home and/or in an office. For the quake experience, although it is two dimensional movement, the real earthquake observation record is used to control the simulator to provide people to relive an experience of different kinds of earthquake including the long period motion of skyscrapers. Feedback of the drill is always positive because participants understand that the reliving the quake experience with proper lectures is one of the best method to communicate the past disasters to their family and to inherit them to the next generation. There are several kinds of archive for disaster as inheritance such as pictures, movies, documents, interviews, and so on. In addition to them, here we propose to construct 'the archive of the quake experience' which compiles observed data ready to relive with the simulator. We would like to show some movies of our quake drill in the presentation. Reference: (1) Kuroda, S. et al. (2012), "Development of portable earthquake simulator for enlightenment of disaster preparedness", 15th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering 2012, Vol. 12, 9412-9420.

  7. Neutron Repulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2011-01-01

    Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch that locked together these puzzling space-age observations: 1.) Excess 136Xe accompanied primordial helium in the stellar debris that formed the solar system (Fig. 1); 2.) The Sun formed on the supernova core (Fig. 2); 3.) Waste products from the core pass through an iron-rich mantle, selectively carrying lighter elements and lighter isotopes of each element into the photosphere (Figs. 3-4); and 4.) Neutron repulsion powers the Sun and sustains life (Figs. 5-7). Together these findings offer a framework for understanding...

  8. Correlation dimension of collective versus individual pedestrian movement patterns in crowd-quakes: A case-study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Liping; Song, Weiguo; Ma, Jian; Telesca, Luciano

    2016-06-01

    Video recording right before the Love Parade, Duisburg (Germany) crowd-quake, occurred on 24 July 2010, has been analysed in order to investigate the spatial properties of the crowd (collective case) and those of the single pedestrians in the crowd (individual case). The Grassberger-Procaccia correlation dimension, well known to be able to distinguish patterns in spatial point processes, was used. Our results for this case-study reveal that crowd and single pedestrians are characterized by different spatial behaviour: the whole crowd behaves as a quasi-homogeneous spatial point process through time, with an averaged correlation dimension of about 1.92; while the single pedestrians show a quite large variation of correlation dimensions indicating different spatial patterns, ranging from clustered to quasi-homogeneous.

  9. Grain Alignment: Role of Radiative Torques and Paramagnetic Relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A; Hoang, Thiem

    2015-01-01

    Polarization arising from aligned dust grains presents a unique opportunity to study magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar medium and molecular clouds. Polarization from circumstellar regions, accretion disks and comet atmospheres can also be related to aligned dust.To reliably trace magnetic fields quantitative theory of grain alignment is required. Formulating the theory that would correspond to observations was one of the longstanding problems in astrophysics. Lately this problem has been successfully addressed and in this review we summarize some of the most important theoretical advances in the theory of grain alignment by radiative torques (RATs) that act on realistic irregular dust grains. We discuss an analytical model of RATs and the ways to make RAT alignment more efficient, e.g. through paramagnetic relaxation when grains have inclusions with strong magnetic response. For very small grains for which RAT alignment is inefficient, we also discuss paramagnetic relaxation and a process termed res...

  10. Self-assembling paramagnetic colloids in oscillating magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Koser, Alison E; Arratia, Paulo E

    2013-01-01

    Many fascinating phenomena such as large-scale collective flows, enhanced fluid mixing and pattern formation have been observed in so-called active fluids, which are composed of particles that can absorb energy and dissipate it into the fluid medium. In order to investigate the role of hydrodynamic interactions in the collective behavior of an active fluid, we choose a model system: paramagnetic particles submerged in water and activated by an oscillating magnetic field. The magnetic field induces magnetic attractions among the paramagnetic particles, activating the particles, and injecting energy into the fluid. Over many cycles, the particles aggregate together and form clusters. In order to form clusters, however, the particles must overcome viscous drag. We investigate the relative roles of viscosity and magnetism. When the role of viscosity is important, the particles cannot form large clusters. But when the role of magnetism is important, the particles rapidly form organized, large clusters. Our results...

  11. Paramagnetic defect centres in crystalline Alq{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecu, M N [National Institute for Materials Physics, POB MG-7, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Mirea, A [Experimental Physics II, Bayreuth University, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Ghica, C [National Institute for Materials Physics, POB MG-7, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Coelle, M [Philips Research, Laboratories, NL-5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Schwoerer, M [Experimental Physics II, Bayreuth University, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2005-10-05

    X- and Q-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigation of different crystalline Alq{sub 3} (tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (III)) fractions formed by a train sublimation method are reported. Several paramagnetic defect centres corresponding to 1/2, 1, and 3/2 spin are observed at room temperature. Their intensity is dependent on the temperature, nature of the crystalline phase, and preparation conditions. Spectra simulation and analysis based on the spin Hamiltonian appropriate to a high spin system (S{>=}1) suggest the existence of randomly oriented triplets and quartets in annealed Alq{sub 3} fractions. The crystalline Alq{sub 3} phases responsible for the EPR powder spectra have been identified by transmission electron microscopy measurements performed on these sample fractions.

  12. The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in the study of tissue specimens

    CERN Document Server

    Stefaniuk, Ireneusz; Skrȩt, Andrzej; Skrȩt-Magierło, Joanna; Góra, Tomasz; Szczerba, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The Electron Paramagnetic Spectroscopy (EPR) is the most direct and powerful method for the detection and identification of free radicals and other species with unpaired electrons. Statistics disorders are a common gynaecological disorder occurring in women. The condition afflicts around 15% of women to the extent of impairing the quality of living. According to scientific reports as many as 50% of women experiencing problems related to genital statistics disorders. The aim of this work was to investigate tissue taken from women with genital statistics disorders using the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance method. The studies on the tissue of women is one of the first studies in this area. In this work we observed a close relationship between the observed EPR signal and the consumption of omega 3 acids.

  13. Intrinsic electric dipole moments of paramagnetic atoms: rubidium and cesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, H S; Sahoo, B K; Das, B P; Mukherjee, D

    2008-07-18

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of paramagnetic atoms is sensitive to the intrinsic EDM contribution from that of its constituent electrons and a scalar-pseudoscalar (S-PS) electron-nucleus interaction. The electron EDM and the S-PS contributions to the EDMs of these atoms scale as approximately Z;{3}. Thus, the heavy paramagnetic atoms will exhibit large EDM enhancement factors. However, the sizes of the couplings are so small that they are of interest of high precision atomic experiments. In this work we have computed the EDM enhancement factors of the ground states of Rb and Cs due to both the electron EDM and the S-PS EDM using the relativistic coupled-cluster theory. The importance of determining precise ab initio enhancement factors and experimental results of atomic EDMs in deducing a reliable limit on the electron EDM is emphasized.

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance of material properties and processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper demonstrates, primarily for the non-specialist and within the context of new and recent achievements, the diagnostic value of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the study of material properties and processes. I have selected three EPR studies which demonstrate the elegance and uniqueness of EPR in atomic defect studies and exemplify unusual achievements through the use of new techniques for material measurement and preparation. A brief introduction into the origin, interaction, and detection of unpaired electrons is included.

  15. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging: 1. CW-EPR Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-01

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the article covers aspects of CW(continuous wave) imaging with details of FT (pulsed FourierTransform)-EPR imaging covered in Part 2, to be publishedin the next issue of Resonance.

  16. Chains, clusters, inclusion compounds, paramagnetic labels, and organic rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zanello, P

    1994-01-01

    The role of stereochemistry to elucidate reaction patterns and physico-chemical properties in topical subjects ranging from inorganic to organic chemistry are treated in the fifth and final volume of this series. Detailed accounts are given to study: chaining in polyphosphates, electron-transfers in carbonyl clusters, inclusion of organometallic molecules in cyclodextrins, stereochemistry of paramagnetic metal complexes by labeling with nitroxyl radicals, stereocontrol in organic syntheses assisted by inorganic complexes.

  17. The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in the study of tissue specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Stefaniuk, Ireneusz; Wróbel, Dagmara; Skrȩt, Andrzej; Skrȩt-Magierło, Joanna; Góra, Tomasz; Szczerba, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The Electron Paramagnetic Spectroscopy (EPR) is the most direct and powerful method for the detection and identification of free radicals and other species with unpaired electrons. Statistics disorders are a common gynaecological disorder occurring in women. The condition afflicts around 15% of women to the extent of impairing the quality of living. According to scientific reports as many as 50% of women experiencing problems related to genital statistics disorders. The aim of this work was t...

  18. Chiral Paramagnetic Skyrmion-like Phase in MnSi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pappas, C.; Lelièvre-Berna, E.; Falus, P.; Bentley, P.M.; Moskvin, E.; Grigoriev, S.; Fouquet, P.; Farago, B.

    2009-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of chiral fluctuations in the reference helimagnet MnSi by polarized neutron scattering and neutron spin echo spectroscopy, which reveals the existence of a completely left-handed and dynamically disordered phase. This phase may be identified as a spontaneous Skyrmio

  19. Experimental Study of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Using Paramagnetic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiklashvili, Vladimer; Likhachev, Oleg; Jacobs, Jeffry

    2009-11-01

    Experiments that take advantage of the properties of paramagnetic liquids are used to study Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A gravitationally unstable combination of a paramagnetic salt solution and a nonmagnetic solution is initially stabilized by a magnetic field gradient that is produced by the contoured pole-caps of a large electromagnet. Rayleigh-Taylor instability originates with the rapid removal of current from the electromagnet, which results in the heavy liquid falling into the light liquid due to gravity and, thus, mixing with it. The mixing zone is visualized by back-lit photography and is recorded with a digital video camera. For visualization purposes, a blue-green dye is added to the magnetic fluid. The mixing rate of the two liquids is determined from an averaged dye concentration across the mixing layer by means of the Beer-Lambert law. After removal of the suspending magnetic field, the initially flat interface between the two liquids develops a random surface pattern with the dominant length scale well approximated by the fastest growing wavelength in accordance with the viscous linear stability theory. Several combinations of paramagnetic and nonmagnetic solutions have been considered during the course of the research. A functional dependence of the mixing layer growth constant, α, on the properties of the liquids is a primary subject of the present study.

  20. Neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heger, G. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Inst. fuer Kristallographie, Aachen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (author) 15 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  1. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, N

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, po...

  2. Neutron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, James C., III; Richards, Wade J.; Shields, Kevin C.

    1995-07-01

    The McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center's (MNRC) staff in conjunction with a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRDA) with the U.C. Santa Barbara facility has developed a system that can be used for aircraft inspection of jet engine blades. The problem was to develop an inspection system that can detect very low concentrations of hydrogen (i.e., greater than 100 ppm) in metal matricies. Specifically in Titanium alloy jet engine blades. Entrapment and precipitation of hydrogen in metals is an undesirable phenomenon which occurs in many alloys of steel and titanium. In general, metals suffer a loss of mechanical properties after long exposures to hydrogen, especially at high temperatures and pressures, thereby becoming embrittled. Neutron radiography has been used as a nondestructive testing technique for many years. Neutrons, because of their unique interactions with materials, are especially useful in the detection of hydrogen. They have an extremely high interaction cross section for low atomic number nuclei (i.e., hydrogen). Thus hydrogen in a metal matrix can be visualized using neutrons. Traditional radiography is sensitive to the total attenuation integrated over the path of radiation through the material. Increased sensitivity and quantitative cross section resolution can be obtained using three-dimensional volumetric imaging techniques such as tomography. The solution used to solve the problem was to develop a neutron tomography system. The neutron source is the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center's 1 MW TRIGA reactor. This paper describes the hardware used in the system as well as some of the preliminary results.

  3. Magnetization, electrical resistivity, thermopower, and neutron diffraction in HoCu/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratz, E. (Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria)); Sechovsky, V.; Sima, V.; Smetana, Z. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia). Matematicky Ustav); Stroem-Olson, J.O. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-05-01

    HoCu/sub 2/ shows a Curie-Weiss susceptibility above 15 K. The paramagnetic moment and the paramagnetic Curie temperature is (10.1 +- 0.1) ..mu../sub B//H/sub 0/ and (4 +- 2) K, respectively. Two cusps (at about 7 and 10 K) are seen in the magnetization versus temperature curve. These cusps reflect a change of the magnetic structure and the Neel temperature. The influence of conduction electron scattering on the localized 4f moments is estimated for the resistivity and the thermopower. Neutron diffraction measurements show that the antiferromagnetic structure is incommensurate with the crystal lattice.

  4. Neutron reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2014-01-01

    to hundreds of nanometers. Thickness resolution for flat surfaces is in the range of few Ǻngstrøm, and as a peculiar benefit, the presence and properties of buried interfaces are accessible. Focus here will be on neutron reflectometry, a technique that is unique in applications involving composite organic...... of desired information. In the course, an introduction into the method and an overview on selected instruments at large scale facilities will be presented. Examples will be given that illustrate the potential of the method, mostly based on organic films. Results from the investigation of layered films...... and the detection on nanoscopic roughnesses will be shown. The potential of neutron reflectometry is not only of academic origin. It may turn out to be useful in the design and development of new functional materials even though it will never develop into a standard method to be applied in the product control...

  5. Pressure effect on paramagnet {beta}-US{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: ikeda.shugo@jaea.go.jp; Sakai, H.; Matsuda, T.D.; Tateiwa, N.; Nakamura, A.; Yamamoto, E. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Aoki, D.; Homma, Y.; Shiokawa, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Hedo, M.; Uwatoko, Y.; Haga, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Ounki, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2008-04-01

    Single crystals of paramagnetic semiconductor {beta}-US{sub 2} with the orthorhombic (Pnma) crystal structure were grown by chemical transport method. We measured the electrical resistivity {rho} under high pressure, and magnetization. With increasing pressure, the temperature dependence of {rho} approaches to semimetallic behavior and a kink anomaly appears at T{sub a}. T{sub a} shifts to higher temperature with increasing pressure. From the comparison with ferromagnetic semimetal UTeS having the same crystal structure, it seems that T{sub a} is a ferromagnetic transition.

  6. Electron Paramagnetic Studies Of Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, L A

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) of Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor (DMS) nanostructures. The first chapter studies the appearance of strain-induced magnetic dipole forbidden transitions in the EPR spectrum of highly mismatched DMS superlattices grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). We investigated ZnTe/MnTe, ZnTe/CdTe:Mn and CdTe/ZnTe:Mn superlattices where the lattice mismatch between layers reaches values as large as 6%. We report the appearance of forbidden transitions even at orientations where strain should not produce any mixing, and interpret them as the onset of three dimensional growth of Quantum Dots (QD)...

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance of some {gamma}-irradiated drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeseoglu, R.; Koeseoglu, E.; Koeksal, F. E-mail: koksalf@ttnet.net.tr

    2003-01-01

    Some drugs, used mainly in treatment of some neurological diseases and hypertension were exposed to {gamma}-irradiation, and the samples were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The observed spectra were interpreted in terms of some type of alkyl and amine radical fragments. The spectra were computer simulated and the g values of the radicals and the hyperfine structure constants of the free electron with nearby protons were determined. The species were found to be stable at room temperature for more than a year. The samples were found to display no EPR signal without irradiation.

  8. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy of Polydopamine Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrówczyński, Radosław; Coy, L Emerson; Scheibe, Błażej; Czechowski, Tomasz; Augustyniak-Jabłokow, Maria; Jurga, Stefan; Tadyszak, Krzysztof

    2015-08-13

    A thorough investigation of biomimetic polydopamine (PDA) by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is shown. In addition, temperature dependent spectroscopic EPR data are presented in the range 3.8-300 K. Small discrepancies in magnetic susceptibility behavior are observed between previously reported melanin samples. These variations were attributed to thermally acitivated processes. More importantly, EPR spatial-spatial 2D imaging of polydopamine radicals on a phantom is presented for the first time. In consequence, a new possible application of polydopamine as EPR imagining marker is addressed.

  9. Copper doping of ZnO crystals by transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu: An electron paramagnetic resonance and gamma spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recker, M. C.; McClory, J. W., E-mail: John.McClory@afit.edu; Holston, M. S.; Golden, E. M.; Giles, N. C. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Halliburton, L. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2014-06-28

    Transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu has been observed in a ZnO crystal irradiated with neutrons. The crystal was characterized with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) before and after the irradiation and with gamma spectroscopy after the irradiation. Major features in the gamma spectrum of the neutron-irradiated crystal included the primary 1115.5 keV gamma ray from the {sup 65}Zn decay and the positron annihilation peak at 511 keV. Their presence confirmed the successful transmutation of {sup 64}Zn nuclei to {sup 65}Cu. Additional direct evidence for transmutation was obtained from the EPR of Cu{sup 2+} ions (where {sup 63}Cu and {sup 65}Cu hyperfine lines are easily resolved). A spectrum from isolated Cu{sup 2+} (3d{sup 9}) ions acquired after the neutron irradiation showed only hyperfine lines from {sup 65}Cu nuclei. The absence of {sup 63}Cu lines in this Cu{sup 2+} spectrum left no doubt that the observed {sup 65}Cu signals were due to transmuted {sup 65}Cu nuclei created as a result of the neutron irradiation. Small concentrations of copper, in the form of Cu{sup +}-H complexes, were inadvertently present in our as-grown ZnO crystal. These Cu{sup +}-H complexes are not affected by the neutron irradiation, but they dissociate when a crystal is heated to 900 °C. This behavior allowed EPR to distinguish between the copper initially in the crystal and the copper subsequently produced by the neutron irradiation. In addition to transmutation, a second major effect of the neutron irradiation was the formation of zinc and oxygen vacancies by displacement. These vacancies were observed with EPR.

  10. Neutron scattering study of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernavanois, N.; Grenier, B.; Huxley, A.; Ressouche, E.; Sanchez, J. P.; Flouquet, J.

    2001-11-01

    Unpolarized and polarized neutron scattering experiments have been performed at ambient pressure on a single crystal of the itinerant electron superconductor UGe2 in both the ferromagnetic and the paramagnetic phases. Unpolarized neutrons have confirmed the ZrGa2-type orthorhombic crystal structure of UGe2 and a ferromagnetic ordering below TC=53 K with the moments aligned along the a axis. No evidence of any modulated component for the magnetic structure has been found. Polarized neutron data have shown a large and almost spherical magnetization distribution at the U sites and no induced moment at the Ge sites. Refinements of the magnetic structure factors within the dipolar approximation allow the magnitude of the orbital and spin uranium moments to be quantified, and a comparison to the measured static magnetization reveals that there is no diffuse contribution.

  11. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  12. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-03

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  13. Classical Orbital Paramagnetism in Non-equilibrium Steady State

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Avinash A. Deshpande; N. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    We report the results of our numerical simulation of classical-dissipative dynamics of a charged particle subjected to a non-Markovian stochastic forcing. We find that the system develops a steady-state orbital magnetic moment in the presence of a static magnetic field. Very significantly, the sign of the orbital magnetic moment turns out to be paramagnetic for our choice of parameters, varied over a wide range. This is shown specifically for the case of classical dynamics driven by a Kubo–Anderson type non-Markovian noise. Natural spatial boundary condition was imposed through (1) a soft (harmonic) confining potential, and (2) a hard potential, approximating a reflecting wall. There was no noticeable qualitative difference. What appears to be crucial to the orbital magnetic effect noticed here is the non-Markovian property of the driving noise chosen. Experimental realization of this effect on the laboratory scale, and its possible implications are briefly discussed. We would like to emphasize that the above steady-state classical orbital paramagnetic moment complements, rather than contradicts the Bohr–van Leeuwen (BvL) theorem on the absence of classical orbital diamagnetism in thermodynamic equilibrium.

  14. Tris buffer modulates polydopamine growth, aggregation, and paramagnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Vecchia, Nicola Fyodor; Luchini, Alessandra; Napolitano, Alessandra; D'Errico, Gerardino; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Szekely, Noemi; d'Ischia, Marco; Paduano, Luigi

    2014-08-19

    Despite the growing technological interest of polydopamine (dopamine melanin)-based coatings for a broad variety of applications, the factors governing particle size, shape, and electronic properties of this bioinspired multifunctional material have remained little understood. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of polydopamine growth, particle morphology, and paramagnetic properties as a function of dopamine concentration and nature of the buffer (pH 8.5). Dynamic Light Scattering data revealed an increase in the hydrodynamic radii (Rh) of melanin particles with increasing dopamine concentration in all buffers examined, especially in phosphate buffer. Conversely, a marked inhibition of particle growth was apparent in Tris buffer, with Rh remaining as low as polydopamine samples prepared in Tris buffer, denoting more homogeneous paramagnetic centers with respect to similar samples obtained in phosphate and bicarbonate buffers. Overall, these results disclose Tris buffer as an efficient modulator of polydopamine buildup and properties for the rational control and fine-tuning of melanin aggregate size, morphology, and free radical behavior.

  15. Classical Orbital Paramagnetism in Non-equilibrium Steady State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Avinash A.; Kumar, N.

    2017-09-01

    We report the results of our numerical simulation of classical-dissipative dynamics of a charged particle subjected to a non-Markovian stochastic forcing. We find that the system develops a steady-state orbital magnetic moment in the presence of a static magnetic field. Very significantly, the sign of the orbital magnetic moment turns out to be paramagnetic for our choice of parameters, varied over a wide range. This is shown specifically for the case of classical dynamics driven by a Kubo-Anderson type non-Markovian noise. Natural spatial boundary condition was imposed through (1) a soft (harmonic) confining potential, and (2) a hard potential, approximating a reflecting wall. There was no noticeable qualitative difference. What appears to be crucial to the orbital magnetic effect noticed here is the non-Markovian property of the driving noise chosen. Experimental realization of this effect on the laboratory scale, and its possible implications are briefly discussed. We would like to emphasize that the above steady-state classical orbital paramagnetic moment complements, rather than contradicts the Bohr-van Leeuwen (BvL) theorem on the absence of classical orbital diamagnetism in thermodynamic equilibrium.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance in Cu-doped ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, R.; Acosta-Humánez, F.; Almanza, O.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, ZnO and Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles (Zn1-xCuxO, x = 3%), with a calcination temperature of 500∘C were synthesized using the sol-gel method. The particles were analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at X-band, measurement in a temperature range from 90 K to room temperature. AAS confirmed a good correspondence between the experimental doping concentration and the theoretical value. XRD reveals the presence of ZnO phase in hexagonal wurtzite structure and a nanoparticle size for the samples synthesized. EPR spectroscopy shows the presence of point defects in both samples with g-values of g = 1.959 for shallow donors and g = 2.004 for ionized vacancies. It is important when these materials are required have been used as catalysts, as suggested that it is not necessary prepare them at higher temperature. A simulation of the Cu EPR signal using an anisotropic spin Hamiltonian was performed and showed good coincidence with the experimental spectra. It was shown that Cu2+ ions enter interstitial octahedral sites of orthorhombic symmetry in the wurtzite crystal structure. Temperature dependence of the EPR linewidth and signal intensity shows a paramagnetic behavior of the sample in the measurement range. A Néel temperature TN = 78 ± 19 K was determined.

  17. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  18. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  19. Structure-function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J. [MSKCC; (Rockefeller)

    2013-09-27

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins.

  20. Structural conservation of prion strain specificities in recombinant prion protein fibrils in real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kazunori; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    A major unsolved issue of prion biology is the existence of multiple strains with distinct phenotypes and this strain phenomenon is postulated to be associated with the conformational diversity of the abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QUIC) assay that uses Escherichia coli-derived recombinant prion protein (rPrP) for the sensitive detection of PrP(Sc) results in the formation of rPrP-fibrils seeded with various strains. We demonstrated that there are differences in the secondary structures, especially in the β-sheets, and conformational stability between 2 rPrP-fibrils seeded with either Chandler or 22L strains in the first round of RT-QUIC. In particular, the differences in conformational properties of these 2 rPrP-fibrils were common to those of the original PrP(Sc). However, the strain specificities of rPrP-fibrils seen in the first round were lost in subsequent rounds. Instead, our findings suggest that nonspecific fibrils became the major species, probable owing to their selective growth advantage in the RT-QUIC. This study shows that at least some strain-specific conformational properties of the original PrP(Sc) can be transmitted to rPrP-fibrils in vitro, but further conservation appears to require unknown cofactors or environmental conditions or both.

  1. Pauli Spin Paramagnetism and Electronic Specific Heat in Generalised d-Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muktish Acharyya

    2011-01-01

    The variations of pauli spin paramagnetic susceptibility and the electronic specific heat of solids, are calculated as functions of temperature following the free electron approximation, in generalised d-dimensions.The results are compared and become consistent with that obtained in three dimensions.Interestingly, the Pauli spin paramagnetic susceptibility becomes independent of temperature only in two dimensions.

  2. Lifshitz scaling effects on holographic paramagnetism/ferromagneism phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Jin, Yong-Yi; Chai, Yun-Tian; Hu, Mu-Hong; Zhang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    In the probe limit, we investigate holographic paramagnetism-ferromagnetism phase transition in the four-dimensional (4D) and five-dimensional(5D) Lifshitz black holes by means of numerical and semi-analytical methods, which is realized by introducing a massive 2-form field coupled to the Maxwell field. We find that the Lifshitz dynamical exponent $z$ contributes evidently to magnetic moment and hysteresis loop of single magnetic domain quantitatively not qualitatively. Concretely, in the case without external magnetic field, the spontaneous magnetization and ferromagnetic phase transition happen when the temperature gets low enough, and the critical exponent for the magnetic moment is always $1/2$, which is in agreement with the result from mean field theory. And the increasing $z$ enhances the phase transition and increases the DC resistivity which behaves as the colossal magnetic resistance effect in some materials. Furthermore, in the presence of the external magnetic field, the magnetic susceptibility sa...

  3. Enhanced Wireless Power Transmission Using Strong Paramagnetic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Dukju; Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-03-01

    A method of quasi-static magnetic resonant coupling has been presented for improving the power transmission efficiency (PTE) in near-field wireless power transmission, which improves upon the state of the art. The traditional source resonator on the transmitter side is equipped with an additional resonator with a resonance frequency that is tuned substantially higher than the magnetic field excitation frequency. This additional resonator enhances the magnetic dipole moment and the effective permeability of the power transmitter, owing to a phenomenon known as the strong paramagnetic response. Both theoretical calculations and experimental results show increased PTE due to amplification of the effective permeability. In measurements, the PTE was improved from 57.8% to 64.2% at the nominal distance of 15 cm when the effective permeability was 2.6. The power delivered to load was also improved significantly, with the same 10 V excitation voltage, from 0.38 to 5.26 W.

  4. Holographic paramagnetism-ferromagnetism phase transition with the nonlinear electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Wang, Huan-Yu; Wu, Meng-Meng

    2016-01-01

    In the probe limit, we investigate the nonlinear electrodynamical effects of the both exponential form and the logarithmic form on the holographic paramagnetism-ferromagnetism phase transition in the background of a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole spacetime. Moreover, by comparing the exponential form of nonlinear electrodynamics with the logarithmic form of nonlinear electrodynamics and the Born-Infeld nonlinear electrodynamics which has been presented in Ref.~\\cite{Wu:2016uyj}, we find that the higher nonlinear electrodynamics correction makes the critical temperature smaller and the magnetic moment harder form in the case without external field. Furthermore, the increase of nonlinear parameter b will result in extending the period of the external magnetic field. Especially, the effect of the exponential form of nonlinear electrodynamics on the periodicity of hysteresis loop is more noticeable.

  5. Search for exotic short-range interactions using paramagnetic insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, P -H; Liu, C -Y; Long, J C

    2015-01-01

    We describe a proposed experimental search for exotic spin-coupled interactions using a solid state paramagnetic insulator. The experiment is sensitive to the net magnetization induced by the exotic interaction between the unpaired insulator electrons with a dense, non-magnetic mass in close proximity. An existing experiment has been used to set limits on the electric dipole moment of the electron by probing the magnetization induced in a cryogenic gadolinium gallium garnet sample on application of a strong electric field. With suitable additions, including a movable source mass, this experiment can be used to explore "monopole-dipole" forces on polarized electrons with unique or unprecedented sensitivity. The solid-state, non-magnetic construction, combined with the low-noise conditions and extremely sensitive magnetometry available at cryogenic temperatures leads to a sensitivity over ten orders of magnitude greater than exiting limits in the range below 1 mm.

  6. A paramagnetic CEST agent for imaging glucose by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanrong; Trokowski, Robert; Sherry, A Dean

    2003-12-17

    The europium(III) complex of a DOTA-tetraamide ligand (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N' ',N' ''-tetraacetic acids) containing two phenyl boronate pendent arms binds glucose reversibly with an association constant of 383 M-1 at pH 7. Glucose binding results in slowing of water exchange between a single Eu(III)-bound water molecule and bulk water, and this can be imaged by MRI using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging sequence. This metabolite-responsive paramagnetic CEST agent responds to changes in glucose over the physiologically important range (0-20 mM), and thus it offers the possibility of high-sensitivity MR imaging glucose in tissues using bulk water protons as antenna.

  7. Theoretical model of intravascular paramagnetic tracers effect on tissue relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølby, Birgitte Fuglsang; Østergaard, Leif; Kiselev, Valerij G

    2006-01-01

    that the relaxivity of intravascular contrast agents depends significantly on the host tissue. This agrees with experimental data by Johnson et al. (Magn Reson Med 2000;44:909). In particular, the present results suggest a several-fold increase in the relaxivity of Gd-based contrast agents in brain tissue compared...... with bulk blood. The enhancement of relaxation in tissue is due to the contrast in magnetic susceptibility between blood vessels and parenchyma induced by the presence of paramagnetic tracer. Beyond the perfusion measurements, the results can be applied to quantitation of functional MRI and to vessel size......The concentration of MRI tracers cannot be measured directly by MRI and is commonly evaluated indirectly using their relaxation effect. This study develops a comprehensive theoretical model to describe the transverse relaxation in perfused tissue caused by intravascular tracers. The model takes...

  8. Paramagnetism in Mn/Fe implanted ZnO

    CERN Document Server

    Gunnlaugsson, HP; Weyer, G; Kobayashi, Y; Bharuth-Ram, K; Olafsson, S; Gislason, H P; Gunnlaugsson, H P; Yoshida, Y; Langouche, G; Molholt, T E; Masenda, H; Johnston, K; Sielemann, R; Dlamini, W B; ISOLDE Collaboration; Naidoo, D; Mantovan, R

    2010-01-01

    Prompted by the generally poor understanding of the nature of magnetic phenomena in 3d-metal doped ZnO, we have undertaken on-line Fe-57 Mossbauer spectroscopy on ZnO single crystals in an external magnetic field of 0.6 T, following the implantation of radioactive Mn-57 ions at room temperature. The Mossbauer spectra of the dilute Fe impurities are dominated by sextets whose angular dependence rules out an ordered magnetic state (which had been previously proposed) but are well accounted for on the basis of Fe3+ paramagnetic centers on substitutional Zn sites with unusually long relaxation times (> 20 ns). (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics. {[}doi:10.1063/1.3490708

  9. Egyptian limestone for gamma dosimetry: an electron paramagnetic resonance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, E.

    2014-04-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties of limestone from a certain Egyptian site were investigated in order to propose an efficient and low-cost gamma dosimeter. Radiation-induced free radicals were of one type which was produced in the limestone samples at g=2.0066 after exposure to gamma radiation (60Co). EPR spectrum was recorded and analyzed. The microwave power saturation curve and the effect of changing modulation amplitude on peak-to- peak signal height were investigated. The response of limestone to different radiation doses (0.5-20 kGy) was studied. Except for the decrease in signal intensities during the first five hours following irradiation, over the period of two months fair stabilities of signal intensities were noticed. From the current results, it is possible to conclude that natural limestone may be a suitable material for radiation dosimetry in the range of irradiation processing.

  10. Liquid-state paramagnetic relaxation from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantaharju, Jyrki; Vaara, Juha

    2016-10-01

    We simulate nuclear and electron spin relaxation rates in a paramagnetic system from first principles. Sampling a molecular dynamics trajectory with quantum-chemical calculations produces a time series of the instantaneous parameters of the relevant spin Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonians are, in turn, used to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by studying the aqueous solution of the Ni2 + ion. Taking advantage of Kubo's theory, the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation rates are extracted from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available experimental data is obtained by the method.

  11. The observations of paramagnetic centers in tellurite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prohaska, J.D.; Li, J.; Kannan, S.; Snitzer, E. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Ceramics Science and Engineering; Wang, J.S. [AT and T Bell Labs., Holmdel, NJ (United States); Bartram, R.H. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This is the first report of ESR (electron spin resonance) observations of three distinct paramagnetic centers in TeO{sub 2} glasses. One center is intrinsic to the glass and the other two are induced by KrF-excimer-laser radiation. The intrinsic center with a broad ESR spectrum in tentatively identified as an oxygen-associated hole center. One radiation-induced center fades slowly at room temperature; its proposed structure is than of an electron trapped in a diffuse orbital associated with a modifier ion. The other radiation-induced center is stable at room temperature and corresponds to the V{sub o{sup {sm_bullet}}} center observed in crystalline paratellurite.

  12. Paramagnetic colloidal ribbons in a precessing magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Nodarse, R.; Quintero, N. R.; Mertens, F. G.; Casic, N.; Fischer, Th. M.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a kink in a damped parametrically driven nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation. We show by using a method of averaging that, in the high-frequency limit, the kink moves in an effective potential and is driven by an effective constant force. We demonstrate that the shape of the solitary wave can be controlled via the frequency and the eccentricity of the modulation. This is in accordance with the experimental results reported in a recent paper [Casic et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 168302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.168302], where the dynamic self-assembly and propulsion of a ribbon formed from paramagnetic colloids in a time-dependent magnetic field has been studied.

  13. Paramagnetic colloidal ribbons in a precessing magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Nodarse, R; Quintero, N R; Mertens, F G; Casic, N; Fischer, Th M

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a kink in a damped parametrically driven nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation. We show by using a method of averaging that, in the high-frequency limit, the kink moves in an effective potential and is driven by an effective constant force. We demonstrate that the shape of the solitary wave can be controlled via the frequency and the eccentricity of the modulation. This is in accordance with the experimental results reported in a recent paper [Casic et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 168302 (2013)], where the dynamic self-assembly and propulsion of a ribbon formed from paramagnetic colloids in a time-dependent magnetic field has been studied.

  14. The paramagnetic properties of ferromagnetic mixed-spin chain system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ai-Yuan, E-mail: huaiyuanhuyuanai@126.com; Wu, Zhi-Min; Cui, Yu-Ting; Qin, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-15

    The double-time Green's function method is used to investigate the paramagnetic properties of ferromagnetic mixed-spin chain system within the random-phase approximation and Anderson–Callen's decoupling approximation. The analytic expressions of the transverse susceptibility, longitudinal susceptibility and correlation length are obtained under transverse and longitudinal magnetic field. Using the analytic expressions of the transverse and longitudinal susceptibility to fit the experimental results, our results well agree with experimental data and the results from the high temperature series expansion within a simple Padé approximation. - Highlights: • We investigate the magnetic properties of a ferromagnetic mixed-spin chain system. • We use the double-time temperature-dependent Green's function technique. • Different single-ion anisotropy values for different spin values are considered. • Our results agree with experimental data and the results from the other theoretical methods.

  15. Super-paramagnetic clustering of yeast gene expression profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Getz, G; Domany, E; Zhang, M Q

    2000-01-01

    High-density DNA arrays, used to monitor gene expression at a genomic scale, have produced vast amounts of information which require the development of efficient computational methods to analyze them. The important first step is to extract the fundamental patterns of gene expression inherent in the data. This paper describes the application of a novel clustering algorithm, Super-Paramagnetic Clustering (SPC) to analysis of gene expression profiles that were generated recently during a study of the yeast cell cycle. SPC was used to organize genes into biologically relevant clusters that are suggestive for their co-regulation. Some of the advantages of SPC are its robustness against noise and initialization, a clear signature of cluster formation and splitting, and an unsupervised self-organized determination of the number of clusters at each resolution. Our analysis revealed interesting correlated behavior of several groups of genes which has not been previously identified.

  16. Super-paramagnetic clustering of yeast gene expression profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, G.; Levine, E.; Domany, E.; Zhang, M. Q.

    2000-04-01

    High-density DNA arrays, used to monitor gene expression at a genomic scale, have produced vast amounts of information which require the development of efficient computational methods to analyze them. The important first step is to extract the fundamental patterns of gene expression inherent in the data. This paper describes the application of a novel clustering algorithm, super-paramagnetic clustering (SPC) to analysis of gene expression profiles that were generated recently during a study of the yeast cell cycle. SPC was used to organize genes into biologically relevant clusters that are suggestive for their co-regulation. Some of the advantages of SPC are its robustness against noise and initialization, a clear signature of cluster formation and splitting, and an unsupervised self-organized determination of the number of clusters at each resolution. Our analysis revealed interesting correlated behavior of several groups of genes which has not been previously identified.

  17. Study and development of new dosemeters for thermal neutrons; Estudio y desarrollo de nuevos dosimetros para neutrones termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urena N, F

    1998-12-31

    An alanine-boron compound, alanine hydroborate, was synthesized and chemically characterized to be used for thermal neutrons fluence measurements. The synthesis of the compound was made by reacting the amino acid alanine with boric acid in three different media: acidic, neutral and alkaline. Physicochemical analysis showed that the alkaline medium is favorable for the synthesis of the alanine hydroborate. The compound was evaluated as a thermal neutron fluence detector by the detection of the free radical yield upon neutron thermal irradiation by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The present work also studies the EPR-signal response of the three preparations to thermal neutron irradiation ({phi} = 5 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} -s). The following EPR signal parameters of the samples were investigated: peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. thermal neutron fluence {Phi} = {phi} {Delta}t ; where {Delta}t = 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 90, 100, 110 and 120 h. , peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. microwave power, signal fading; repeatability, batch homogeneity, stability and zero dose response. It is concluded that these new products could be used in thermal neutron fluence estimations. (Author)

  18. Water diffusion-exchange effect on the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in off-resonance rotating frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiming; Xie, Yang; Ji, Tongyu

    2007-06-01

    The off-resonance rotating frame technique based on the spin relaxation properties of off-resonance T1 ρ can significantly increase the sensitivity of detecting paramagnetic labeling at high magnetic fields by MRI. However, the in vivo detectable dimension for labeled cell clusters/tissues in T1 ρ-weighted images is limited by the water diffusion-exchange between mesoscopic scale compartments. An experimental investigation of the effect of water diffusion-exchange between compartments on the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of paramagnetic agent compartment is presented for in vitro/ in vivo models. In these models, the size of paramagnetic agent compartment is comparable to the mean diffusion displacement of water molecules during the long RF pulses that are used to generate the off-resonance rotating frame. The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to qualitatively correlate the effect of water diffusion-exchange with the RF parameters of the long pulse and the rates of water diffusion, (2) to explore the effect of water diffusion-exchange on the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in vitro, and (3) to demonstrate the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in vivo. The in vitro models include the water permeable dialysis tubes or water permeable hollow fibers embedded in cross-linked proteins gels. The MWCO of the dialysis tubes was chosen from 0.1 to 15 kDa to control the water diffusion rate. Thin hollow fibers were chosen to provide sub-millimeter scale compartments for the paramagnetic agents. The in vivo model utilized the rat cerebral vasculatures as a paramagnetic agent compartment, and intravascular agents (Gd-DTPA) 30-BSA were administrated into the compartment via bolus injections. Both in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement is predominant in the T1 ρ-weighted image in the presence of water diffusion-exchange. The T1 ρ contrast has substantially higher sensitivity than the conventional T1

  19. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  20. Neutron Capture Nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Heavy elements (beyond iron) are formed in neutron capture nucleosynthesis processes. We have proposed a simple unified model to investigate the neutron capture nucleosynthesis in arbitrary neutron density environment. We have also investigated what neutron density is required to reproduce the measured abundance of nuclei assuming equilibrium processes. We found both of these that the medium neutron density has a particularly important role at neutron capture nucleosynthesis. About these results most of the nuclei can formed at medium neutron capture density environment e.g. in some kind of AGB stars. Besides these observations our model is capable to use educational purpose.

  1. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  2. The community seismic network and quake-catcher network: enabling structural health monitoring through instrumentation by community participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Monica D.; Heaton, Thomas H.; Cheng, Ming-Hei

    2013-04-01

    A new type of seismic network is in development that takes advantage of community volunteers to install low-cost accelerometers in houses and buildings. The Community Seismic Network and Quake-Catcher Network are examples of this, in which observational-based structural monitoring is carried out using records from one to tens of stations in a single building. We have deployed about one hundred accelerometers in a number of buildings ranging between five and 23 stories in the Los Angeles region. In addition to a USB-connected device which connects to the host's computer, we have developed a stand-alone sensor-plug-computer device that directly connects to the internet via Ethernet or wifi. In the case of the Community Seismic Network, the sensors report both continuous data and anomalies in local acceleration to a cloud computing service consisting of data centers geographically distributed across the continent. Visualization models of the instrumented buildings' dynamic linear response have been constructed using Google SketchUp and an associated plug-in to matlab with recorded shaking data. When data are available from only one to a very limited number of accelerometers in high rises, the buildings are represented as simple shear beam or prismatic Timoshenko beam models with soil-structure interaction. Small-magnitude earthquake records are used to identify the first set of horizontal vibrational frequencies. These frequencies are then used to compute the response on every floor of the building, constrained by the observed data. These tools are resulting in networking standards that will enable data sharing among entire communities, facility managers, and emergency response groups.

  3. Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNR) provides neutron and proton beams for basic, applied, and defense-related research. Neutron beams with energies ranging...

  4. Detectability of f-mode Unstable Neutron Stars by the Schenberg Spherical Antenna

    CERN Document Server

    de Araujo, J C N; Aguiar, O D

    2005-01-01

    The Brazilian spherical antenna (Schenberg) is planned to detect high frequency gravitational waves (GWs) ranging from 3.0 kHz to 3.4 kHz. There is a host of astrophysical sources capable of being detected by the Brazilian antenna, namely: core collapse in supernova events; (proto)neutron stars undergoing hydrodynamical instability; f-mode unstable neutron stars, caused by quakes and oscillations; excitation of the first quadrupole normal mode of 4-9 solar mass black holes; coalescence of neutron stars and/or black holes; exotic sources such as bosonic or strange matter stars rotating at 1.6 kHz; and inspiralling of mini black hole binaries. We here address our study in particular to the neutron stars, which could well become f-mode unstable producing therefore GWs. We estimate, for this particular source of GWs, the event rates that in principle can be detected by Schenberg and by the Dutch Mini-Grail antenna.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid real-time quaking-induced conversion is a robust and reliable test for sporadic creutzfeldt-jakob disease: An international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Lynne I; Poleggi, Anna; Poggiolini, Ilaria; Suardi, Silvia; Grznarova, Katarina; Shi, Song; de Vil, Bart; Sarros, Shannon; Satoh, Katsuya; Cheng, Keding; Cramm, Maria; Fairfoul, Graham; Schmitz, Matthias; Zerr, Inga; Cras, Patrick; Equestre, Michele; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Knox, David; Collins, Steven; Haïk, Stéphane; Parchi, Piero; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Green, Alison

    2016-07-01

    Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) has been proposed as a sensitive diagnostic test for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; however, before this assay can be introduced into clinical practice, its reliability and reproducibility need to be demonstrated. Two international ring trials were undertaken in which a set of 25 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analyzed by a total of 11 different centers using a range of recombinant prion protein substrates and instrumentation. The results show almost complete concordance between the centers and demonstrate that RT-QuIC is a suitably reliable and robust technique for clinical practice. Ann Neurol 2016;80:160-165.

  6. Magnetic resonance studies of isotopically labeled paramagnetic proteins: (2FE-2S) ferredoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H.; Xia, B.; Chae, Y.K.; Westler, W.M.; Markley, J.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Recent developments in NMR spectroscopy, especially multidimensional, multinuclear NMR techniques, have made NMR the most versatile tool available for studying protein structure and function in solution. Unlike diamagnetic proteins, paramagnetic proteins contain centers with unpaired electrons. These unpaired electrons interact with magnetic nuclei either through chemical bonds by a contact mechanism or through space by a pseudocontact mechanism. Such interactions make the acquisition and analysis of NMR spectra of paramagnetic proteins more challenging than those of diamagnetic proteins. Some NMR signals from paramagnetic proteins are shifted outside the chemical shift region characteristic of diamagnetic proteins; these {open_quotes}hyperfine-shifted{close_quotes} resonances originate from nuclei that interact with unpaired electrons from the paramagnetic center. The large chemical shift dispersion in spectra of paramagnetic proteins makes it difficult to excite the entire spectral window and leads to distortions in the baseline. Interactions with paramagnetic centers shorten T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times of nuclei; the consequences are line broadening and lower spectral sensitivity. Scalar (through bond) and dipolar (through space) interactions between pairs of nuclei are what give rise to crosspeak signals in multi-dimensional NMR spectra of small diamagnetic proteins. When such interactions involve a nucleus that is strongly relaxed by interaction with a paramagnetic center, specialized methods may be needed for its detection or it may be completely undetectable by present nD NMR methods.

  7. Superheated drop neutron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Roy, B; Roy, S C; Das, Mala

    2000-01-01

    Superheated drops are known to detect neutrons through the nucleation caused by the recoil nuclei produced by the interactions of neutrons with the atoms constituting the superheated liquid molecule. A novel method of finding the neutron energy from the temperature dependence response of SDD has been developed. From the equivalence between the dependence of threshold energy for nucleation on temperature of SDD and the dependence of dE/dx of the recoil ions with the energy of the neutron, a new method of finding the neutron energy spectrum of a polychromatic as well as monochromatic neutron source has been developed.

  8. Neutron streak camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-09-13

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry and dating potential of whewellite (calcium oxalate monohydrate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J. [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: thompjw@mcmaster.ca; Schwarcz, H.P. [School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2008-08-15

    We use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to demonstrate the presence of radiation-induced paramagnetic species in synthetic whewellite (CaC{sub 2}O{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O), with the primary EPR signal at g=2.0042. The radiosensitive EPR signal has a lifetime of at least 1 year. Freshly synthesized whewellite also displays a paramagnetic signal that increases in intensity upon exposure to fluorescent light. Although the widespread occurrence of natural whewellite suggests applications in geological or archaeological dating, no corresponding radiosensitive EPR signal has been identified in samples of natural whewellite.

  10. Reconstruction of images from radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C M; Stevens, A D

    1994-12-01

    This paper discusses methods for obtaining image reconstructions from electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra which constitute object projections. An automatic baselining technique is described which treats each spectrum consistently; rotating the non-horizontal baselines which are caused by stray magnetic effects onto the horizontal axis. The convolved backprojection method is described for both two- and three-dimensional reconstruction and the effect of cut-off frequency on the reconstruction is illustrated. A slower, indirect, iterative method, which does a non-linear fit to the projection data, is shown to give a far smoother reconstructed image when the method of maximum entropy is used to determine the value of the final residual sum of squares. Although this requires more computing time than the convolved backprojection method, it is more flexible and overcomes the problem of numerical instability encountered in deconvolution. Images from phantom samples in vitro are discussed. The spectral data for these have been accumulated quickly and have a low signal-to-noise ratio. The results show that as few as 16 spectra can still be processed to give an image. Artifacts in the image due to a small number of projections using the convolved backprojection reconstruction method can be removed by applying a threshold, i.e. only plotting contours higher than a given value. These artifacts are not present in an image which has been reconstructed by the maximum entropy technique. At present these techniques are being applied directly to in vivo studies.

  11. A new electron paramagnetic resonance method to identify irradiated soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Bhaskar; Sharma, Arun

    2009-10-01

    Low-dose gamma irradiation causes minimal changes in food matrix making identification of radiation-processed foods a challenging task. In the present study, soybean samples were irradiated with commercially permitted gamma radiation dose in the 0.25 to 1.0 kGy range for insect disinfestations of food. Immediately after irradiation electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the skin part of soybean showed a triplet signal (g = 2.0046, hyperfine coupling constant hfcc = 3.0 mT) superimposed on naturally present singlet. These signals were characterized as cellulose and phenoxyl radicals using EPR spectrum simulation technique. Kernel part of the samples exhibited a short-lived, radiation-induced singlet of carbon-centered radical superimposed on naturally present sextet signal of Mn2+. A detailed study on relaxation and thermal behavior of induced radicals in skin part was carried out using EPR spectroscopy. These findings revealed that progressive saturation and thermal characteristics of the induced radicals may be the most suitable parameters to distinguish soybean subjected to radiation dose as low as 0.25 kGy from thermally treated and nonirradiated samples, even after a prolonged period of storage.

  12. Identification of irradiated cashew nut by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Bhaskar; Sajilata, M G; Chatterjee, Suchandra; Singhal, Rekha S; Variyar, Prasad S; Kamat, M Y; Sharma, Arun

    2008-10-01

    Cashew nut samples were irradiated at gamma-radiation doses of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 kGy, the permissible dose range for insect disinfestation of food commodities. A weak and short-lived triplet (g = 2.004 and hfcc = 30 G) along with an anisotropic signal (g perpendicular = 2.0069 and g parallel = 2.000) were produced immediately after irradiation. These signals were assigned to that of cellulose and CO 2 (-) radicals. However, the irradiated samples showed a dose-dependent increase of the central line (g = 2.0045 +/- 0.0002). The nature of the free radicals formed during conventional processing such as thermal treatment was investigated and showed an increase in intensity of the central line (g = 2.0045) similar to that of irradiation. Characteristics of the free radicals were studied by their relaxation and thermal behaviors. The present work explores the possibility to identify irradiated cashew nuts from nonirradiated ones by the thermal behaviors of the radicals beyond the period, when the characteristic electron paramagnetic resonance spectral lines of the cellulose free radicals have essentially disappeared. In addition, this study for the first time reports that relaxation behavior of the radicals could be a useful tool to distinguish between roasted and irradiated cashew nuts.

  13. Uniform spinning sampling gradient electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David H; Ahmad, Rizwan; Liu, Yangping; Chen, Zhiyu; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L

    2014-02-01

    To improve the quality and speed of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) acquisition by combining a uniform sampling distribution with spinning gradient acquisition. A uniform sampling distribution was derived for spinning gradient EPRI acquisition (uniform spinning sampling, USS) and compared to the existing (equilinear spinning sampling, ESS) acquisition strategy. Novel corrections were introduced to reduce artifacts in experimental data. Simulations demonstrated that USS puts an equal number of projections near each axis whereas ESS puts excessive projections at one axis, wasting acquisition time. Artifact corrections added to the magnetic gradient waveforms reduced noise and correlation between projections. USS images had higher SNR (85.9 ± 0.8 vs. 56.2 ± 0.8) and lower mean-squared error than ESS images. The quality of the USS images did not vary with the magnetic gradient orientation, in contrast to ESS images. The quality of rat heart images was improved using USS compared to that with ESS or traditional fast-scan acquisitions. A novel EPRI acquisition which combines spinning gradient acquisition with a uniform sampling distribution was developed. This USS spinning gradient acquisition offers superior SNR and reduced artifacts compared to prior methods enabling potential improvements in speed and quality of EPR imaging in biological applications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Kinect Technology Game Play to Mimic Quake Catcher Network (QCN) Sensor Deployment During a Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilb, D. L.; Yang, A.; Rohrlick, D.; Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J.; Chung, A. I.; Neighbors, C.; Choo, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Kinect technology allows for hands-free game play, greatly increasing the accessibility of gaming for those uncomfortable using controllers. How it works is the Kinect camera transmits invisible near-infrared light and measures its "time of flight" to reflect off an object, allowing it to distinguish objects within 1 centimeter in depth and 3 mm in height and width. The middleware can also respond to body gestures and voice commands. Here, we use the Kinect Windows SDK software to create a game that mimics how scientists deploy seismic instruments following a large earthquake. The educational goal of the game is to allow the players to explore 3D space as they learn about the Quake Catcher Network's (QCN) Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP). Many of the scenarios within the game are taken from factual RAMP experiences. To date, only the PC platform (or a Mac running PC emulator software) is available for use, but we hope to move to other platforms (e.g., Xbox 360, iPad, iPhone) as they become available. The game is written in programming language C# using Microsoft XNA and Visual Studio 2010, graphic shading is added using High Level Shader Language (HLSL), and rendering is produced using XNA's graphics libraries. Key elements of the game include selecting sensor locations, adequately installing the sensor, and monitoring the incoming data. During game play aftershocks can occur unexpectedly, as can other problems that require attention (e.g., power outages, equipment failure, and theft). The player accrues points for quickly deploying the first sensor (recording as many initial aftershocks as possible), correctly installing the sensors (orientation with respect to north, properly securing, and testing), distributing the sensors adequately in the region, and troubleshooting problems. One can also net points for efficient use of game play time. Setting up for game play in your local environment requires: (1) the Kinect hardware ( $145); (2) a computer

  15. Neutron anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, G.E. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content - the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite - and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilizing distances ranging from 1mm to 10mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals - including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighboring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction for a sample of bone.

  16. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Ballhausen, H.; Abele, H.; Gaehler, R.; Trapp, M.; Van Overberghe, A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-re...

  17. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  18. Pauli paramagnetic effects on mixed-state properties in a strongly anisotropic superconductor: Application to Sr2RuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Yuujirou; Ishihara, Masahiro; Ichioka, Masanori; Nakai, Noriyuki; Machida, Kazushige

    2015-04-01

    We study theoretically the mixed-state properties of a strong uniaxially anisotropic type-II superconductor with the Pauli paramagnetic effect, focusing on their behaviors when the magnetic field orientation is tilted from the conduction layer a b plane. On the basis of Eilenberger theory, we quantitatively estimate significant contributions of the Pauli paramagnetic effects on a variety of physical observables, including transverse and longitudinal components of the flux-line lattice form factors, magnetization curves, Sommerfeld coefficient, field distributions, and magnetic torques. We apply these studies to Sr2RuO4 and quantitatively explain several seemingly curious behaviors, including the Hc 2 suppression for the a b -plane direction, the larger anisotropy ratio and intensity found by the spin-flip small-angle neutron scattering, and the first-order transition observed recently in magnetocaloric, specific-heat, and magnetization measurements in a coherent and consistent manner. Those lead us to conclude that Sr2RuO4 is either a spin-singlet or a spin-triplet pairing with the d -vector components in the a b plane.

  19. Possible nematic spin liquid in spin-1 antiferromagnetic system on the square lattice: Implications for the nematic paramagnetic state of FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shou-Shu; Zhu, W.; Sheng, D. N.; Yang, Kun

    2017-05-01

    The exotic normal state of iron chalcogenide superconductor FeSe, which exhibits vanishing magnetic order and possesses an electronic nematic order, triggered extensive explorations of its magnetic ground state. To understand its novel properties, we study the ground state of a highly frustrated spin-1 system with bilinear-biquadratic interactions using an unbiased large-scale density matrix renormalization group. Remarkably, with increasing biquadratic interactions, we find a paramagnetic phase between Néel and stripe magnetic ordered phases. We identify this phase as a candidate of nematic quantum spin liquid by the compelling evidences, including vanished spin and quadrupolar orders, absence of lattice translational symmetry breaking, and a persistent nonzero lattice nematic order in the thermodynamic limit. The established quantum phase diagram naturally explains the observations of enhanced spin fluctuations of FeSe in neutron scattering measurement and the phase transition with increasing pressure. This identified paramagnetic phase provides a possibility to understand the novel properties of FeSe.

  20. Dosimetry of ionizing radiations by Electron paramagnetic resonance; Dosimetria de radiaciones ionizantes por resonancia paramagnetica electronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin N, J. [UAM-I, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work, some historical and theoretical aspects about the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), its characteristics, the resonance detection, the paramagnetic species, the radiation effects on inorganic and organic materials, the diagrams of the instrumentation for the EPR detection, the performance of an EPR spectrometer, the coherence among EPR and dosimetry and, practical applications as well as in the food science there are presented. (Author)

  1. Optical detection of paramagnetic centres: From crystals to glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogulis, Uldis

    2016-07-01

    An unambiguous attribution of the absorption spectra to definite paramagnetic centres identified by the EPR techniques in the most cases is problematic. This problem may be solved by applying of a direct measurement techniques—the EPR detected via the magnetic circular dichroism, or briefly MCD-EPR. The present survey reports on the advantages and disadvantages applying the MCD-EPR techniques to simple and complex paramagnetic centres in crystals as well as glasses and glass-ceramics.

  2. Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy To Facilitate Problem Solving in Pharmaceutical Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangion, Ian; Liu, Yizhou; Reibarkh, Mikhail; Williamson, R Thomas; Welch, Christopher J

    2016-08-19

    As new chemical methodologies driven by single-electron chemistry emerge, process and analytical chemists must develop approaches to rapidly solve problems in this nontraditional arena. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been long known as a preferred technique for the study of paramagnetic species. However, it is only recently finding application in contemporary pharmaceutical development, both to study reactions and to track the presence of undesired impurities. Several case studies are presented here to illustrate its utility in modern pharmaceutical development efforts.

  3. An electron spin injection driven, paramagnetic solid-state MASER device

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, S. M.; van Wees, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    In response to an external, microwave-frequency magnetic field, a paramagnetic medium will absorb energy from the field that drives the magnetization dynamics. Here we describe a new process by which an external spin injection source, when combined with the microwave field spin-pumping, can drive the paramagnetic medium from one that absorbs microwave energy to one that emits microwave energy. We derive a simple condition for the crossover from absorptive to emissive behavior. Based on this p...

  4. International Neutron Radiography Newsletter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    At the First World Conference on Neutron Radiography i t was decided to continue the "Neutron Radiography Newsletter", published previously by J.P. Barton, as the "International Neutron Radiography Newsletter" (INRNL), with J.C. Doraanus as editor. The British Journal of Non-Destructive Testing...

  5. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  6. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  7. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case.

  8. Spin 1 centers in neutron irradiated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Wun; Newell, G. S.

    1963-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance was used to identify a number of fast-neutron induced defects formed in pile irradiated Si and to follow their concentrations as a function of annealing. Measurements were made at 300, 77, and 4.2 deg K on samples that had attained intrinsic resistivity during irradiation, using superheterodyne spectrometers operating at 24 kMc and 9.4 kMc. Aside from the Si-N center, the most prominent lines of the spectrum arise from the m/sub s/ = O to plus or minus 1 transitions of four spin 1 systems. The distinct symmetry and small production rate ( approximately 0.05 centers per fast neutron collision) indicate a class of well-defined but relatively rare defects. Their g tensors, zero-field splitting tensors, and hfs are compatible with systems having two weakly interacting (1 1 1) dangling bonds separated by about a lattice spacing, giving the S = 1 Hamiltonians in the triplet levels formed by the weak exchange interaction. Low-temperature measurements suggest that the singlet-triplet splitting lies between 3 and 50 cm-1. Comparison with floating zone Si shows Center (11, 111), which is dominant in unannealed samples, to be independent of impurity. The remaining three S = 1 centers, which grow and decay rapidly at higher temperatures, involve O. Precise measurements of the parameters of the spin Hamiltonians are given to permit reproducible identification of the centers. (auth)

  9. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, neutron polarization analysis with tht time-of-flight spectrometer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering with the KWS-1 and KWS-2 diffractometers, the very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractrometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  10. Grazing Incidence Neutron Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20.ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  11. Neutron scatter camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  12. Properties of the lithium carbonate for to be used as thermal neutrons detector; Propiedades del carbonato de litio para ser usado como detector de neutrones termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera A, E.; Urena N, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In this work the dosimetric properties of the lithium carbonate used as detecting of thermal neutrons and by means of free radicals is evaluated and presented. The studied parameters that were carried out for this detector were: intensity of the Electron paramagnetic resonance signal (EPR); reproducibility, fading of the signal to ambient temperature, stability of the signal to low temperature (0 degrees); answer of zero dose and homogeneity or reliability of the data of the detector, humidity, solar light, temperature and radio sensitivity. These parameters indicate the utility that have the detectors for the estimation of fields of neutron fluences that are applicable to capture therapies by neutron-boron and, nuclear reactors. (Author)

  13. Advances in neutron tomography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W Treimer

    2008-11-01

    In the last decade neutron radiography (NR) and tomography (NCT) have experienced a number of improvements, due to the well-known properties of neutrons interacting with matter, i.e. the low attenuation by many materials, the strong attenuation by hydrogenous constituent in samples, the wavelength-dependent attenuation in the neighbourhood of Bragg edges and due to better 2D neutron detectors. So NR and NCT were improved by sophisticated techniques that are based on the attenuation of neutrons or on phase changes of the associated neutron waves if they pass through structured materials. Up to now the interaction of the neutron spin with magnetic fields in samples has not been applied to imaging techniques despite the fact that it was proposed many years ago. About ten years ago neutron depolarization as imaging signal for neutron radiography or tomography was demonstrated and in principle it works. Now one can present much improved test experiments using polarized neutrons for radiographic imaging. For this purpose the CONRAD instrument of the HMI was equipped with polarizing and analysing benders very similar to conventional scattering experiments using polarized neutrons. Magnetic fields in different coils and in samples (superconductors) at low temperatures could be visualized. In this lecture a summary about standard signals (attenuation) and the more `sophisticated' imaging signals as refraction, small angle scattering and polarized neutrons will be given.

  14. Neutronic Reactor Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, Enrico; Zinn, Walter H.

    The argument of the present Patent is a radiation shield suitable for protection of personnel from both gamma rays and neutrons. Such a shield from dangerous radiations is achieved to the best by the combined action of a neutron slowing material (a moderator) and a neutron absorbing material. Hydrogen is particularly effective for this shield since it is a good absorber of slow neutrons and a good moderator of fast neutrons. The neutrons slowed down by hydrogen may, then, be absorbed by other materials such as boron, cadmium, gadolinium, samarium or steel. Steel is particularly convenient for the purpose, given its effectiveness in absorbing also the gamma rays from the reactor (both primary gamma rays and secondary ones produced by the moderation of neutrons). In particular, in the present Patent a shield is described, made of alternate layers of steel and Masonite (an hydrolized ligno-cellulose material). The object of the present Patent is not discussed in any other published paper.

  15. The Community Seismic Network and Quake-Catcher Network: Monitoring building response to earthquakes through community instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M.; Kohler, M. D.; Heaton, T. H.; Clayton, R. W.; Chandy, M.; Cochran, E.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Community Seismic Network (CSN) and Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) are dense networks of low-cost ($50) accelerometers that are deployed by community volunteers in their homes in California. In addition, many accelerometers are installed in public spaces associated with civic services, publicly-operated utilities, university campuses, and high-rise buildings. Both CSN and QCN consist of observation-based structural monitoring which is carried out using records from one to tens of stations in a single building. We have deployed about 150 accelerometers in a number of buildings ranging between five and 23 stories in the Los Angeles region. In addition to a USB-connected device which connects to the host's computer, we have developed a stand-alone sensor-plug-computer device that directly connects to the internet via Ethernet or WiFi. In the case of CSN, the sensors report data to the Google App Engine cloud computing service consisting of data centers geographically distributed across the continent. This robust infrastructure provides parallelism and redundancy during times of disaster that could affect hardware. The QCN sensors, however, are connected to netbooks with continuous data streaming in real-time via the distributed computing Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing software program to a server at Stanford University. In both networks, continuous and triggered data streams use a STA/LTA scheme to determine the occurrence of significant ground accelerations. Waveform data, as well as derived parameters such as peak ground acceleration, are then sent to the associated archives. Visualization models of the instrumented buildings' dynamic linear response have been constructed using Google SketchUp and MATLAB. When data are available from a limited number of accelerometers installed in high rises, the buildings are represented as simple shear beam or prismatic Timoshenko beam models with soil-structure interaction. Small-magnitude earthquake records

  16. Heat capacity of paramagnetic nickelocene: Comparison with diamagnetic ferrocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorai, Michio; Kaneko, Yuki; Hashiguchi, Takao

    2014-05-01

    Nickelocene [bis(η5-cyclopentadienyl)nickel: Ni(C5H5)2, electron spin S=1, the ground state configuration 3A2g] is paramagnetic and belongs to a typical molecule-based magnet. Heat capacities of nickelocene have been measured at temperatures in the 3-320 K range by adiabatic calorimetry. By comparing with those of diamagnetic ferrocene crystal, a small heat capacity peak centered at around 15 K and a sluggish hump centered at around 135 K were successfully separated. The low-temperature peak at 15 K caused by the spin is well reproduced by the Schottky anomaly due to the uniaxial zero-field splitting of the spin S=1 with the uniaxial zero-field splitting parameter D/k=45 K (k: the Boltzmann constant). The magnetic entropy 9.7 J K-1mol-1 is substantially the same as the contribution from the spin-manifold R ln 3=9.13 J K-1mol-1 (R: the gas constant). The sluggish hump centered at around 135 K arises from rotational disordering of the cyclopentadienyl rings of nickelocene molecule. The enthalpy and entropy gains due to this anomaly are 890 J mol-1 and 6.9 J K-1mol-1, respectively. As the hump spreads over a wide temperature region, separation of the hump from the observed heat capacity curve involves a little bit ambiguity. Therefore, these values should be regarded as being reasonable but tentative. The present entropy gain is comparable with 5.5 J K-1mol-1 for the sharp phase transition at 163.9 K of ferrocene crystal. This fact implies that although the disordering of the rings likewise takes place in both nickelocene and ferrocene, it proceeds gradually in nickelocene and by way of a cooperative phase transition in ferrocene. A reason for this originates in loose molecular packing in nickelocene crystal. Molar heat capacity and the standard molar entropy of nickelocene are larger than those of ferrocene beyond the mass effect over the whole temperature region investigated. This fact provides with definite evidences for the loose molecular packing in nickelocene

  17. EPR study of gamma and neutron irradiation effects on KU1, KS-4V and Infrasil 301 silica glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagomacini, Juan C., E-mail: jc.lagomacini@uam.es [Dept. Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Bravo, David [Dept. Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Leon, Monica; Martin, Piedad; Ibarra, Angel [Materiales para Fusion, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Martin, Agustin [Dept. Fisica e Instalaciones, ETS Arquitectura UPM, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Lopez, Fernando J. [Dept. Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies have been carried out on KU1 and KS-4V high purity quartz glasses and commercial silica Infrasil 301, irradiated with gamma rays up to a dose of 11.6 MGy and neutron fluences of 10{sup 21} and 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2}. Gamma irradiations produce a much higher concentration of defect centres (mainly E', POR and NBOHC) for KU1 and I301 than for KS-4V silica. In contrast, neutron irradiation at the highest fluence produces similar concentrations in all silica types. These results agree to a good extent with those obtained in previous optical absorption measurements. Moreover, oxygen-related centres (POR and NBOHC) have been well characterized by means of electron paramagnetic resonance.

  18. Status of spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Existing and planned facilities using proton accelerator driven spallation neutron source are reviewed. These include new project of neutron science proposed from Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The present status of facility requirement and accelerator technology leads us to new era of neutron science such as neutron scattering research and nuclear transmutation study using very intense neutron source. (author)

  19. Mechanical membrane for the separation of a paramagnetic constituent from a fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurice, David

    2017-05-02

    The disclosure provides an apparatus and method for the separation of a paramagnetic component from a mixture using a mechanical membrane apparatus. The mechanical membrane comprises a supporting material having a plurality of pores where each pore is surrounded by a plurality of magnetic regions. The magnetic regions augment a magnetic field on one side of the supporting material while mitigating the field to near zero on the opposite side. In operation, a flow of fluid such as air comprising a paramagnetic component such as O.sub.2 is directed toward the mechanical membrane, and the paramagnetic component is typically attracted toward a magnetic field surrounding a pore while dimagnetic components such as N.sub.2 are generally repelled. As some portion of the fluid passes through the plurality of magnetic apertures to the opposite side of the mechanical membrane, the mechanical membrane generates a fluid enriched in the paramagnetic component. Alternately, the magnetic field may act to repel the paramagnetic component while diamagnetic components such as N.sub.2 are generally unaffected and pass to the opposite side of the mechanical membrane.

  20. Neutron sources and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  1. Prototype Stilbene Neutron Collar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, M. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shumaker, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Snyderman, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Verbeke, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wong, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-26

    A neutron collar using stilbene organic scintillator cells for fast neutron counting is described for the assay of fresh low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies. The prototype stilbene collar has a form factor similar to standard He-3 based collars and uses an AmLi interrogation neutron source. This report describes the simulation of list mode neutron correlation data on various fuel assemblies including some with neutron absorbers (burnable Gd poisons). Calibration curves (doubles vs 235U linear mass density) are presented for both thermal and fast (with Cd lining) modes of operation. It is shown that the stilbene collar meets or exceeds the current capabilities of He-3 based neutron collars. A self-consistent assay methodology, uniquely suited to the stilbene collar, using triples is described which complements traditional assay based on doubles calibration curves.

  2. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Freund, H.-J. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der MPG, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Seiler, A. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der MPG, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Laboratorium für Applikationen der Synchrotronstrahlung, KIT Campus Süd, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bondarchuk, O. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der MPG, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); CIC energiGUNE, Parque Tecnologico, C/Albert Einstein 48, CP 01510 Minano (Alava) (Spain); Risse, T., E-mail: risse@chemie.fu-berlin.de [Fritz-Haber-Institut der MPG, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic

  3. Low-temperature neutron diffraction study of La0.95Nd0.05CrO3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keka R Chakraborty; S M Yusuf; P S R Krishna; M Ramanadham; A K Tyagi

    2004-08-01

    We have synthesized polycrystalline La0.95Nd0.05CrO3 sample by doping the La-site of LaCrO3 with Nd and its magnetic properties have been studied using DC magnetization and neutron diffraction techniques. DC magnetization study shows a paramagnetic to a weak ferromagnetic-like transition at ∼295 K followed by signatures of a spin reorientation phenomenon at 233 and 166 K and, finally a transition to an antiferromagnetic like phase at ∼ 21 K. Low-temperature neutron diffraction measurements confirm a weak ferrimagnetic ordering of Cr3+ moments at all temperatures below 295 K.

  4. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, James Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  5. SPINVERT: a program for refinement of paramagnetic diffuse scattering data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddison, Joseph A M; Stewart, J Ross; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2013-11-13

    We present a program (spinvert; http://spinvert.chem.ox.ac.uk) for refinement of magnetic diffuse scattering data for frustrated magnets, spin liquids, spin glasses, and other magnetically disordered materials. The approach uses reverse Monte Carlo refinement to fit a large configuration of spins to experimental powder neutron diffraction data. Despite fitting to spherically averaged data, this approach allows the recovery of the three-dimensional magnetic diffuse scattering pattern and the spin-pair correlation function. We illustrate the use of the spinvert program with two case studies. First, we use simulated powder data for the canonical antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the kagome lattice to discuss the sensitivity of spinvert refinement to both pairwise and higher-order spin correlations. The effect of limited experimental data on the results is also considered. Second, we re-analyse published experimental data on the frustrated system Y0.5Ca0.5BaCo4O7. The results from spinvert refinement indicate similarities between Y0.5Ca0.5BaCo4O7 and its parent compound YBaCo4O7, which were overlooked in previous analyses using powder data.

  6. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2014-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot-single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi, the three-axis spectrometer PANDA, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, the DNS neutron-polarization analysis, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering at KWS-1 and KWS-2, a very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractometer with focusing mirror, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  7. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  8. Paramagnetic and crystallographic effects of low temperature ashing on human bone and tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochon-Danguy, H J; Very, J M; Geoffroy, M; Baud, C A

    1978-02-28

    Low temperature ashing by excited gas (LTA) causes crystallographic and paramagnetic alterations of the human bone and tooth enamel mineral. On the one hand, LTA induces variations of the alpha lattice parameter. These variations depend upon the nature of the gas used, but are little affected by its degree of excitation. Trapping of gas molecules in the crystal structure is demonstrated. On the other hand, LTA produces two preponderant paramagnetic centers in bone and enamel samples at 20 degrees C. Their inorganic origin clearly indicated. One of the two radicals has been identified as O3- (g1 = 2.002, g2 = 2.010, g3 = 2.016) and the other as (CO3-3 (parallel = 1.996, g = perpendicular 2.003). Variations of the alpha lattice parameter and trapping of paramagnetic gas species do not seem to be directly related.

  9. Following lithiation fronts in paramagnetic electrodes with in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingxue; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Melin, Philippe; Leriche, Jean-Bernard; Ménétrier, Michel; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Deschamps, Michaël; Salager, Elodie

    2016-11-01

    Li-ion batteries are invaluable for portable electronics and vehicle electrification. A better knowledge of compositional variations within the electrodes during battery operation is, however, still needed to keep improving their performance. Although essential in the medical field, magnetic resonance imaging of solid paramagnetic battery materials is challenging due to the short lifetime of their signals. Here we develop the scanning image-selected in situ spectroscopy approach, using the strongest commercially available magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate the 7Li magnetic resonance spectroscopic image of a 5 mm-diameter operating battery with a resolution of 100 μm. The time-resolved image-spectra enable the visualization in situ of the displacement of lithiation fronts inside thick paramagnetic electrodes during battery operation. Such observations are critical to identify the key limiting parameters for high-capacity and fast-cycling batteries. This non-invasive technique also offers opportunities to study devices containing paramagnetic materials while operating.

  10. Paramagnetic alignment of small grains: a novel method for measuring interstellar magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem; Martin, P G

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method to measure the strength of interstellar magnetic fields based on ultraviolet (UV) polarization of starlight, which is in part produced by weakly aligned, small interstellar grains. We begin with calculating degrees of alignment of small (size a~ 0.01 micron) and very small (a ~ 0.001 micron) grains in the interstellar magnetic field by the Davis-Greenstein paramagnetic relaxation and resonance paramagnetic relaxation. We compute the degrees of paramagnetic alignment with the ambient magnetic field B using Langevin equations. In this paper, we take into account various processes essential for the dynamics of small grains, including infrared (IR) emission, electric dipole emission, plasma drag and collisions with ionized species. We find that the alignment of small grains is necessary to reproduce the observed polarization in the UV, although the polarization arising from these small grains is negligible at the optical and IR wavelengths. Based on fitting theoretical models to observed...

  11. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2015-04-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ∼20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags.

  12. Narrowing the conformational space sampled by two-domain proteins with paramagnetic probes in both domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Soumyasri; Hu Xiaoyu [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Keizers, Peter H. J.; Liu Weimin [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands); Luchinat, Claudio, E-mail: luchinat@cerm.unifi.it; Nagulapalli, Malini [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Overhand, Mark [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands); Parigi, Giacomo [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Sgheri, Luca [Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo, Sezione di Firenze, CNR (Italy); Ubbink, Marcellus [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Calmodulin is a two-domain protein which in solution can adopt a variety of conformations upon reorientation of its domains. The maximum occurrence (MO) of a set of calmodulin conformations that are representative of the overall conformational space possibly sampled by the protein, has been calculated from the paramagnetism-based restraints. These restraints were measured after inclusion of a lanthanide binding tag in the C-terminal domain to supplement the data obtained by substitution of three paramagnetic lanthanide ions to the calcium ion in the second calcium binding loop of the N-terminal domain. The analysis shows that the availability of paramagnetic restraints arising from metal ions placed on both domains, reduces the MO of the conformations to different extents, thereby helping to identify those conformations that can be mostly sampled by the protein.

  13. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ~20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags. PMID:25797004

  14. Applications of Natural Radiation-Induced Paramagnetic Defects in Quartz to Exploration in Sedimentary Basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Y M; Botis S; Nokhrin S

    2006-01-01

    Quartz grains in contact with uranium-bearing minerals or fluids are characterized by natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects (e. G. , oxygen vacancy centers, silicon vacancy centers, and peroxy radicals), which are amenable to study by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.These natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects, except for the oxygen vacancy centers, in quartz are concentrated in narrow bands penetrated by α particles: (1) in halos around U- and Th-bearing mineral inclusions and (2) in outer rims or along fractures. The second type of occurrence provides information about uranium mineralization or remobilization (I. E. , sources of uranium, timing of mineralization or remobilization, pathways of uranium-bearing fluids). It can also be used to evaluate sedimentary basins for potential of uranium mineralization. In particular, the peroxy radicals are stable up to 800℃and, therefore, are useful for evaluating metasedimentary rocks (e. G. , Paleoproterozoic metasedimentary sequences in the central zone of the North China craton). EPR study of the Changcheng Series can focus on quartz from the sediment-basement unconformity and faults to determine the presence and types of natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects, with which to identify and prioritize uranium anomalies. Other potential applications of natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in quartz include uranium-bearing hydrocarbon deposits in sedimentary basins. For example, the Junggar, Ordos, and Tarim basins in northwestern China all contain important oil and natural gas fields and are well known for elevated uranium concentrations, including economic sandstone-hosted uranium deposits. Therefore,systematic studies on the distribution of natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in quartz from host sedimentary sequences are expected to provide information about the migration of oil and natural gas in those basins.

  15. A Study on the Relationship between the Color and paramagnetic Impurities in Dolomite—Marble

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    富毓德; 陈权; 等

    1990-01-01

    Dolomite-marble is widely used as a high-grade building material.The color caused by impurities and its stability are important criteria to judge the quality of dolomite-marble and its value in the market.Therefore,the study of the relation between the color and the impurities is of important commercial significance.Up to now,no detailed study on dolomite-marble color has been reported.In this work the relation beween the color of dolomite-marble and the trace paramagnetic ions is studied in detail using electron paramagnetic resonance(EPR),X-ray diffraction,polished section identification and chemical analysis.

  16. Critical Electron-Paramagnetic-Resonance Spin Dynamics in NiCl2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgeneau, R.J.; Rupp, L.W.; Guggenheim, H.J.;

    1973-01-01

    We have studied the critical behavior of the electron-paramagnetic-resonance linewidth in the planar XY antiferromagnet NiCl2; it is found that the linewidth diverges like ξ∼(T-TN)-0.7 rather than ξ5/2 predicted by the current random-phase-approximation theory.......We have studied the critical behavior of the electron-paramagnetic-resonance linewidth in the planar XY antiferromagnet NiCl2; it is found that the linewidth diverges like ξ∼(T-TN)-0.7 rather than ξ5/2 predicted by the current random-phase-approximation theory....

  17. Decoherence effects on the tunneling rate of paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, E H M; Pfannes, H D

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the effects of the environment on the spin tunneling process of paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles and conclude that the non assisted macroscopic tunneling rate is hardly affected in such case, but other more effective (phonon mediated) processes change the magnetization state of the particle. We conclude that for both, paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles, the decoherence time scale is extremely short (~ 10^(-8..-16)seg), indicating thar coherent tunneling should be strongly suppressed in favor of incoherent tunneling, i.e., the population of higher levels with subsequent decay.

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance and quantitative color investigations of various vacuum heat treated wood species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Kondratyeva, K.R. Safiullin, I.G. Motygullin, A.V. Klochkov, M.S. Tagirov, V.V. Kuzmin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the heat treatment duration on the electron paramagnetic resonance signal amplitude of free radicals for various wood species was observed. It was found that the amplitude of the electron paramagnetic resonance signal grows linearly with the vacuum heat treatment duration. The quantitative measurements of color changes for various wood species (pine, spruce, larch, birch and small-leaved lime were performed. It is found that results of EPR experiments and color measurements of heat treated samples correlate with each other.

  19. Paramagnetic NMR chemical shift in a spin state subject to zero-field splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Soncini, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We derive a general formula for the paramagnetic NMR nuclear shielding tensor of an open-shell molecule in a pure spin state, subject to a zero-field splitting (ZFS). Our findings are in contradiction with a previous proposal. We present a simple application of the newly derived formula to the case of a triplet ground state split by an easy-plane ZFS spin Hamiltonian. When $kT$ is much smaller than the ZFS gap, thus a single non-degenerate level is thermally populated, our approach correctly predicts a temperature-independent paramagnetic shift, while the previous theory leads to a Curie temperature dependence.

  20. Calculation of NMR Shielding in Paramagnetic Molecules: Roadmap and Magnetic Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Vaara, Juha; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple derivation of the nuclear shielding in paramagnetic molecules, extendable to strong spin-orbit coupling cases of relevance to lanthanides and actinides, as well as encompassing contributions from excited multiplets. While our general formulation does not need electron paramagnetic resonance parameters, using them a simple and practical expression is obtained for the special case of the zero-field-split ground-state manifold, including magnetic (Zeeman and hyperfine) couplings between the sublevels. The latter method is implemented computationally and applied in the context of first-principles calculations on example Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes.

  1. High-Field Faraday Effect of Tb-Doped Glass Above Paramagnetic Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yoshiaki; Hori, Hidenobu; Yonenobu, Kenji; Yamagishi, Akio; Date, Muneyuki

    1987-08-01

    High-field Faraday effect is investigated in Tb-doped glass under a pulsed high magnetic field up to 40 tesla(T). The nonlinear Faraday effect due to saturation of the paramagnetic moment appears below about 20 T at 4.2 K. A considerably large Faraday rotation with the Verdet constant of -45.0 rad. T-1 m-1 is found above the paramagnetic saturation field, and this is explained by the field-induced level mixing in the multiplet levels.

  2. The use of chemical shift temperature gradients to establish the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor orientation: Implication for structure determination/refinement in paramagnetic metalloproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Zhicheng; Nguyen, Bao D.; La Mar, Gerd N. [University of California, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2000-06-15

    The use of dipolar shifts as important constraints in refining molecular structure of paramagnetic metalloproteins by solution NMR is now well established. A crucial initial step in this procedure is the determination of the orientation of the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility tensor in the molecular frame which is generated interactively with the structure refinement. The use of dipolar shifts as constraints demands knowledge of the diamagnetic shift, which, however, is very often not directly and easily accessible. We demonstrate that temperature gradients of dipolar shifts can serve as alternative constraints for determining the orientation of the magnetic axes, thereby eliminating the need to estimate the diamagnetic shifts. This approach is tested on low-spin, ferric sperm whale cyanometmyoglobin by determining the orientation, anisotropies and anisotropy temperature gradients by the alternate routes of using dipolar shifts and dipolar shift gradients as constraints. The alternate routes ultimately lead to very similar orientation of the magnetic axes, magnetic anisotropies and magnetic anisotropy temperature gradients which, by inference, would lead to an equally valid description of the molecular structure. It is expected that the use of the dipolar shift temperature gradients, rather than the dipolar shifts directly, as constraints will provide an accurate shortcut in a solution structure determination of a paramagnetic metalloprotein.

  3. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  4. Development of Neutron Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Lee, J. S.; Seong, B. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    Neutron spectrometers which are used in the basic researches such as physics, chemistry and materials science and applied in the industry were developed at the horizontal beam port of HANARO reactor. In addition, the development of core components for neutron scattering and the upgrade of existing facilities are also performed. The vertical neutron reflectometer was fabricated and installed at ST3 beam port. The performance test of the reflectometer was completed and the reflectometer was opened to users. The several core parts and options were added in the polarized neutron spectrometer. The horizontal neutron reflectometer from Brookhaven National Laboratory was moved to HANARO and installed, and the performance of the reflectometer was examined. The HIPD was developed and the performance test was completed. The base shielding for TAS was fabricated. The soller collimator, Cu mosaic monochromator, Si BPC monochromator and position sensitive detector were developed and applied in the neutron spectrometer as part of core component development activities. In addition, the sputtering machine for mirror device are fabricated and the neutron mirror is made using the sputtering machine. The FCD was upgraded and the performance of the FCD are improved over the factor of 10. The integration and upgrade of the neutron detection system were also performed.

  5. Neutron Star Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Wambach, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    In this presentation I discuss two aspects of the neutron-matter equation of state. One relates to the symmetry energy of nuclear matter and empirical constraints on its slope parameter at saturation density. The second deals with spatially inhomogeneous chiral phases of deconfined quark matter in the inner core of a neutron star.

  6. Neutron Multiplicity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, Katherine Chiyoko [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-28

    Neutron multiplicity measurements are widely used for nondestructive assay (NDA) of special nuclear material (SNM). When combined with isotopic composition information, neutron multiplicity analysis can be used to estimate the spontaneous fission rate and leakage multiplication of SNM. When combined with isotopic information, the total mass of fissile material can also be determined. This presentation provides an overview of this technique.

  7. Neutron capture therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C. (Cambridge, MA); Shefer, Ruth E. (Newton, MA); Klinkowstein, Robert E. (Winchester, MA)

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  8. Neutron capture therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

    1999-11-02

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  9. Neutron Stars and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact astronomical objects in the universe which are accessible by direct observation. Studying neutron stars means studying physics in regimes unattainable in any terrestrial laboratory. Understanding their observed complex phenomena requires a wide range of scientific disciplines, including the nuclear and condensed matter physics of very dense matter in neutron star interiors, plasma physics and quantum electrodynamics of magnetospheres, and the relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics of electron-positron pulsar winds interacting with some ambient medium. Not to mention the test bed neutron stars provide for general relativity theories, and their importance as potential sources of gravitational waves. It is this variety of disciplines which, among others, makes neutron star research so fascinating, not only for those who have been working in the field for many years but also for students and young scientists. The aim of this book is to serve as a reference work which not only review...

  10. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  11. Pocked surface neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  12. Neutron stars - General review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Canuto, V.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of those properties of neutron stars upon which there is general agreement and of those areas which currently remain in doubt. Developments in theoretical physics of neutron star interiors are summarized with particular attention devoted to hyperon interactions and the structure of interior layers. Determination of energy states and the composition of matter is described for successive layers, beginning with the surface and proceeding through the central region into the core. Problems encountered in determining the behavior of matter in the ultra-high density regime are discussed, and the effects of the magnetic field of a neutron star are evaluated along with the behavior of atomic structures in the field. The evolution of a neutron star is outlined with discussion centering on carbon detonation, cooling, vibrational damping, rotation, and pulsar glitches. The role of neutron stars in cosmic-ray propagation is considered.

  13. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  14. Optical polarizing neutron devices designed for pulsed neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, M.; Kurahashi, K.; Endoh, Y. [Tohoku Univ, Sendai (Japan); Itoh, S. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We have designed two polarizing neutron devices for pulsed cold neutrons. The devices have been tested at the pulsed neutron source at the Booster Synchrotron Utilization Facility of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. These two devices proved to have a practical use for experiments to investigate condensed matter physics using pulsed cold polarized neutrons.

  15. Fail-safe neutron shutter used for thermal neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, R.D.; Morris, R.A.

    1976-11-01

    A fail-safe, reliable, easy-to-use neutron shutter was designed, built, and put into operation at the Omega West Reactor, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The neutron shutter will be used primarily to perform thermal neutron radiography, but is also available for a highly collimated source of thermal neutrons (neutron flux = 3.876 x 10/sup 6/ (neutrons)/(cm/sup 2/.s)). Neutron collimator sizes of either 10.16 by 10.16 cm or 10.16 by 30.48 cm are available.

  16. The Effect of Electronic Paramagnetism on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Frequencies in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, C. H.; Herring, C.; Knight, W. D.

    1950-09-22

    Observations on the shifts of nuclear resonances in metals ( Li{sup 7}, Na{sup 23}, Cu {sup 63}, Be{sup 9}, Pb{sup 207}, Al{sup 27}, and Ca{sup 69} ) due to free electron paramagnetism; comparison with theoretical values.

  17. A solid state paramagnetic maser device driven by electron spin injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watts, S. M.; van Wees, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    In response to an external, microwave-frequency magnetic field, a paramagnetic medium will absorb energy from the field that drives the magnetization dynamics. Here we describe a new process by which an external spin-injection source, when combined with the microwave field spin pumping, can drive

  18. Concentration of paramagnetic centres at low-temperature thermal destruction of asphaltenes of heavy petroleum distillates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolomatov M.U., Rodionov A.A., Gafurov M.R., Petrov A.V., Biktagirov T.B., Bakhtizin R.Z., Makarchikov S.O., Khairudinov I.Z., Orlinskii S.B.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes of paramagnetic centers (PC concentration in dispersed petroleum systems were studied in the process of low-temperature thermolysis. The kinetic model of PC concentration dynamics based on the processes of unpaired electrons formation during singlet-triplet transitions, weak chemical bonds dissociation and recombination of free radicals is proposed.

  19. Paramagnetic properties of noncentrosymmetric superconductors: application to CePt3Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhin, K V

    2005-01-21

    In a noncentrosymmetric crystal, the Zeeman interaction of the band electrons with an external magnetic field is highly anisotropic in the momentum space, vanishing along some high-symmetry planes. One of the consequences is that the paramagnetic susceptibility in superconductors without inversion symmetry, such as CePt3Si, shows an unusual temperature dependence.

  20. A solid state paramagnetic maser device driven by electron spin injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watts, S. M.; van Wees, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    In response to an external, microwave-frequency magnetic field, a paramagnetic medium will absorb energy from the field that drives the magnetization dynamics. Here we describe a new process by which an external spin-injection source, when combined with the microwave field spin pumping, can drive th

  1. RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes for early detection of tumor: In vitro and in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wei; Su Bo; Meng Shuyan; Ju Lixia; Yan Linghua; Ding Yongmei; Song Yin; Zhou Wei; Li Heyan; Tang Liang; Zhao Yinmin [Research Institute of Oncology, Tongji University Medical School, 507 Zhenmin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhou Caicun, E-mail: caicunzhou@yahoo.com.cn [Research Institute of Oncology, Tongji University Medical School, 507 Zhenmin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Magnetic resonance molecular imaging has emerged as a potential approach for tumor diagnosis in the last few decades. This approach consists of the delivery of MR contrast agents to the tumor by specific targeted carriers. For this purpose, a lipopeptide was constructed by using a cyclic RGD peptide headgroup coupled to palmitic acid anchors via a KGG tripeptide spacer. Targeted paramagnetic liposomes were then prepared by the incorporation of RGD-coupled-lipopeptides into lipid bilayers for specific bounding to tumor. In vitro, study demonstrated that RGD-targeted liposomes exhibited a better binding affinity to targeted cells than non-targeted liposomes. MR imaging of mice bearing A549 tumors with the RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes also resulted in a greater signal enhancement of tumor compared to non-targeted liposomes and pure contrast agents groups. In addition, biodistribution study also showed specific tumor targeting of RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes in vivo. Therefore, RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes prepared in the present study may be a more promising method for early tumor diagnosis.

  2. On the influence of heat transport on low- frequency paramagnetic spin-Lattice relaxation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flokstra, Jakob; Gerritsma, G.J.; Hartemink, G.A.; van der Marel, L.C.

    1974-01-01

    In low-frequency relaxation experiments on paramagnetic crystals, placed in liquid helium, often dispersion- and absorption curves are found, strongly deviating from those following from the thermodynamic theory of Casimir and Du Pré. For the relaxation time τabs, related to the maximum in the

  3. Effect of paramagnetic manganese cations on H-1 MRS of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K. S.; Holm, David Alberg; Søgaard, L. V.

    2008-01-01

    Manganese cations (Mn2+) call be used as all intracellular contrast agent for structural, functional and neural pathway imaging applications. However, at high concentrations, Mn2+ is neurotoxic and play influence the concentration of H-1 MR-detectable metabolites. Furthermore, the paramagnetic Mn...

  4. Numerical calculation of interaction forces between paramagnetic colloids in two-dimensional systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Di; Toffoletto, Frank; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2014-04-01

    Typically the force between paramagnetic particles in a uniform magnetic field is described using the dipolar model, which is inaccurate when particles are in close proximity to each other. Instead, the exact force between paramagnetic particles can be determined by solving a three-dimensional Laplace's equation for magnetostatics under specified boundary conditions and calculating the Maxwell stress tensor. The analytical solution to this multi-boundary-condition Laplace's equation can be obtained by using a solid harmonics expansion in conjunction with the Hobson formula. However, for a multibody system, finite truncation of the Hobson formula does not lead to convergence of the expansion at all points, which makes the approximation physically unrealistic. Here we present a numerical method for solving this Laplace's equation for magnetostatics. This method uses a smoothed representation to replace all the boundary conditions. A two-step propagation is used to dramatically accelerate the calculation without losing accuracy. Using this method, we calculate the force between two paramagnetic particles in a uniform and a rotational external field and compare our results with other models. Furthermore, the many-body effects for three-particle, ten-particle, and 24-particle systems are examined using the same method. We also calculate the interaction between particles with different magnetic susceptibilities and particle diameters. The Laplace's equation solver method described in this article that is used to determine the force between paramagnetic particles is shown to be very useful for dynamic simulations for both two-particle systems and a large cluster of particles.

  5. Effect of paramagnetic manganese cations on (1)H MRS of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Holm, David Alberg; Vejby Søgaard, Lise

    2008-01-01

    Manganese cations (Mn(2+)) can be used as an intracellular contrast agent for structural, functional and neural pathway imaging applications. However, at high concentrations, Mn(2+) is neurotoxic and may influence the concentration of (1)H MR-detectable metabolites. Furthermore, the paramagnetic Mn...

  6. Monitoring transport phenomena of paramagnetic metal-ion complexes inside catalyst bodies with magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergwerff, J.A.; Lysova, A.A.; Espinosa Alonso, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837342; Koptyug, I.V.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2008-01-01

    An indirect magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method has been developed to determine in a noninvasive manner the distribution of paramagnetic Co2+ complexes inside Co/Al2O3 catalyst extrudates after impregnation with Co2+/citrate solutions of different pH and citrate concentrations. UV/Vis/NIR

  7. Application of geo-quake to dynamic analysis in earth-rock dam%geo-quake软件在土石坝动力分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常倩倩; 黄松; 韩光

    2010-01-01

    运用GEO-STUDIO软件中QUAKE/W模块,采用等效线彤分析模型,对山东某大型水库土石坝进行动力分析,对该土石坝在地震烈度为Ⅷ度情况下的地震响应和抗液化程度做出评价,以指导土石坝工程设计.

  8. Neutron scattering in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barocchi, F. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica

    1996-12-31

    Together with X-rays, thermal neutrons are the ideal probe to study the microscopic structure of condensed matter, however the precision attainable usually with neutrons for the measurement of atomic position correlation functions in liquids is, at least, one order of magnitude better than for X-rays. In order to measure properly the microscopic dynamics a wide range of momentum transfer with corresponding energy transfer must be available in the range of liquid state excitations. This again is only attainable, with good resolution, with neutrons. (author) 7 figs., 3 refs.

  9. Neutrons in soft matter

    CERN Document Server

    Imae, Toyoko; Furusaka, Michihiro; Torikai, Naoya

    2011-01-01

    Neutron and synchrotron facilities, which are beyond the scale of the laboratory, and supported on a national level in countries throughout the world.  These tools for probing micro- and nano-structure research and on fast dynamics research of atomic location in materials have been key in the development of new polymer-based materials. Different from several existing professional books on neutron science, this book focuses on theory, instrumentation, an applications. The book is divided into five parts: Part 1 describes the underlying theory of neutron scattering. Part 2 desc

  10. Study of the Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as thermal neutrons detector; Estudio del Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} como detector de neutrones termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera A, E.; Urena N, F.; Delfin L, A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)] e-mail: eha@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The use every day but it frequents of the thermal neutrons in the treatment of tumours, using the neutron capture therapy technique in boron, there is generated the necessity to develop a dosimetric system that allows to evaluate in a reliable way the fluence and consequently the dose of neutrons that it is given in the tumours of the patients. One of the techniques but employees to determine the neutron fluence sub cadmic and epi cadmic in an indirect way, it is the activation of thin sheets of gold undress and covered with cadmium respectively that when being exposed to a neutron beam to the nuclear reaction {sup 197}Au (n, {gamma} ) {sup 198} Au, emitting gamma radiation with an energy of 0.4118 MeV, being this, a disadvantage to be used as dosemeter. On the other hand, when exposing the lithium carbonate to a thermal neutron beam, free radicals of CO{sub 3} that are quantified by the electron paramagnetic resonance technique are generated. This work analyzes those basic parameters that determine if those made up of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} complete with the requirements to be used as detectors and/or dosemeters of thermal neutrons. (Author)

  11. Potassium tantalate substrates for neutron experiments on antiferromagnetic perovskite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, H M; MacDougall, G J; Kim, H-S; Kim, D H; Boatner, L A; Bennett, C J Callender; Zarestky, J L; Nagler, S E, E-mail: christenhm@ornl.gov

    2010-11-01

    For the study of antiferromagnetism in thin-film materials, neutron diffraction is a particularly important tool, especially since magnetometry experiments are often complicated by the substrate's strong diamagnetic or paramagnetic contribution. However, the substrate, by necessity, has a lattice parameter that is very similar to that of the film, and in most cases is over 1000 times more massive than the film. Therefore, even weak structural distortions in the substrate crystal may complicate the analysis of magnetic scattering from the film. Here we show that in contrast to most other perovskite substrates (including SrTiO{sub 3}, LaAlO{sub 3}, etc.), KTaO3 provides a uniquely appropriate substrate platform for magnetic diffraction experiments on epitaxial oxide films.

  12. Neutron signal transfer analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pleinert, H; Lehmann, E

    1999-01-01

    A new method called neutron signal transfer analysis has been developed for quantitative determination of hydrogenous distributions from neutron radiographic measurements. The technique is based on a model which describes the detector signal obtained in the measurement as a result of the action of three different mechanisms expressed by signal transfer functions. The explicit forms of the signal transfer functions are determined by Monte Carlo computer simulations and contain only the distribution as a variable. Therefore an unknown distribution can be determined from the detector signal by recursive iteration. This technique provides a simple and efficient tool for analysis of this type while also taking into account complex effects due to the energy dependency of neutron interaction and single and multiple scattering. Therefore this method provides an efficient tool for precise quantitative analysis using neutron radiography, as for example quantitative determination of moisture distributions in porous buil...

  13. Temperature of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Sachiko

    2016-07-01

    We start with a brief introduction to the historical background in the early pioneering days when the first neutron star thermal evolution calculations predicted the presence of neutron stars hot enough to be observable. We then report on the first detection of neutron star temperatures by ROSAT X-ray satellite, which vindicated the earlier prediction of hot neutron stars. We proceed to present subsequent developments, both in theory and observation, up to today. We then discuss the current status and the future prospect, which will offer useful insight to the understanding of basic properties of ultra-high density matter beyond the nuclear density, such as the possible presence of such exotic particles as pion condensates.

  14. Decoherence Free Neutron Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pushin, Dmitry A; Cory, David G

    2016-01-01

    Perfect single-crystal neutron interferometers are adversely sensitive to environmental disturbances, particularly mechanical vibrations. The sensitivity to vibrations results from the slow velocity of thermal neutrons and the long measurement time that are encountered in a typical experiment. Consequently, to achieve a good interference solutions for reducing vibration other than those normally used in optical experiments must be explored. Here we introduce a geometry for a neutron interferometer that is less sensitive to low-frequency vibrations. This design may be compared with both dynamical decoupling methods and decoherence-free subspaces that are described in quantum information processing. By removing the need for bulky vibration isolation setups, this design will make it easier to adopt neutron interferometry to a wide range of applications and increase its sensitivity.

  15. Neutron Stars Recent Developments

    CERN Document Server

    Heiselberg, H

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments in neutron star theory and observation are discussed. Based on modern nucleon-nucleon potentials more reliable equations of state for dense nuclear matter have been constructed. Furthermore, phase transitions such as pion, kaon and hyperon condensation, superfluidity and quark matter can occur in cores of neutron stars. Specifically, the nuclear to quark matter phase transition and its mixed phases with intriguing structures is treated. Rotating neutron stars with and without phase transitions are discussed and compared to observed masses, radii and glitches. The observations of possible heavy $\\sim 2M_\\odot$ neutron stars in X-ray binaries and QPO's require relatively stiff equation of states and restrict strong phase transitions to occur at very high nuclear densities only.

  16. The intense neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W.B

    1966-07-01

    The presentation discusses both the economic and research contexts that would be served by producing neutrons in gram quantities at high intensities by electrical means without uranium-235. The revenue from producing radioisotopes is attractive. The array of techniques introduced by the multipurpose 65 megawatt Intense Neutron Generator project includes liquid metal cooling, superconducting magnets for beam bending and focussing, super-conductors for low-loss high-power radiofrequency systems, efficient devices for producing radiofrequency power, plasma physics developments for producing and accelerating hydrogen, ions at high intensity that are still far out from established practice, a multimegawatt high voltage D.C. generating machine that could have several applications. The research fields served relate principally to materials science through neutron-phonon and other quantum interactions as well as through neutron diffraction. Nuclear physics is served through {mu}-, {pi}- and K-meson production. Isotope production enters many fields of applied research. (author)

  17. Enhancement of T1 and T2 relaxation by paramagnetic silica-coated nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, D; Herberg, J; Gjersing, E; Ramon, E; Maxwell, R; Gray, J W; Budinger, T F; Chen, F F

    2006-08-28

    We present the first comprehensive investigation on water-soluble nanoparticles embedded into a paramagnetic shell and their properties as an MRI contrast agent. The nanoprobes are constructed with an inorganic core embedded into an ultra-thin silica shell covalently linked to chelated Gd{sup 3+} paramagnetic ions that act as an MRI contrast agent. The chelator contains the molecule DOTA and the inorganic core contains a fluorescent CdSe/ZnS qdots in Au nanoparticles. Optical properties of the cores (fluorescence emission or plasmon position) are not affected by the neither the silica shell nor the presence of the chelated paramagnetic ions. The resulting complex is a MRI/fluorescence probe with a diameter of 8 to 15 nm. This probe is highly soluble in high ionic strength buffers at pH ranging from {approx}4 to 11. In MRI experiments at clinical field strengths of 60 MHz, the QDs probes posses spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and a spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxivities of 1018.6 +/- 19.4 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 2438.1 +/- 46.3 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} respectively for probes having {approx}8 nm. This increase in relaxivity has been correlated to the number of paramagnetic ions covalently linked to the silica shell, ranging from approximately 45 to over 320. We found that each bound chelated paramagnetic species contributes by over 23 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 1} and by over 54 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 2} relaxivity respectively. The contrast power is modulated by the number of paramagnetic moieties linked to the silica shell and is only limited by the number of chelated paramagnetic species that can be packed on the surface. So far, the sensitivity of our probes is in the 100 nM range for 8-10 nm particles and reaches 10 nM for particles with approximately 15-18 nm in diameter. The sensitivities values in solutions are equivalent of those obtained with small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of 7 nm diameter clustered into a 100 nm polymeric

  18. Updates of the nuclear equation of state for core-collapse supernovae and neutron Stars: effects of 3-body forces, QCD, and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, G J; Olson, J P; Suh, I-S; Kajino, T; Maruyama, T; Hidaka, J; Ryu, C-Y; Cheoun, M-K; Lan, N Q

    2013-01-01

    We summarize several new developments in the nuclear equation of state for supernova simulations and neutron stars. We discuss an updated and improved Notre-Dame-Livermore Equation of State (NDL EoS) for use in supernovae simulations. This Eos contains many updates. Among them are the effects of 3- body nuclear forces at high densities and the possible transition to a QCD chiral and/or super-conducting color phase at densities. We also consider the neutron star equation of state and neutrino transport in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We study a new quantum hadrodynamic (QHD) equation of state for neutron stars (with and without hyperons) in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The parameters are constrained by deduced masses and radii. The calculated adiabatic index for these magnetized neutron stars exhibit rapid changes with density. This may provide a mechanism for star-quakes and flares in magnetars. We also investigate the strong magnetic field effects on the moments of inertia and spin down...

  19. Low-temperature properties of neutron irradiated CuGeO3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladczuk, L.; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Dabkowska, H.; Baran, M.; Pytel, B.; Szymczak, R.; Szymczak, H.

    2000-07-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the magnetic properties of CuGeO3 single crystal which shows the spin-Peierls transition below T sp=14 K was investigated by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and susceptibility measurements. It was found that the irradiation led to a decrease of the spin-Peierls transition temperature and induced appreciable changes in the EPR signal intensity, resonance linewidth, g-factor and magnetic susceptibility of this material. These changes may be associated with a partial suppression of both the energy gap and the dimerization within the Cu chains.

  20. Introduction to neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    We give here an introduction to the theoretical principles of neutron scattering. The relationship between scattering- and correlation-functions is particularly emphasized. Within the framework of linear response theory (justified by the weakness of the basic interaction) the relation between fluctuation and dissipation is discussed. This general framework explains the particular power of neutron scattering as an experimental method. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  1. Neutron scattering in dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudel, H. U.; Furrer, A.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1986-01-01

    Insulating compounds containing dimers of transition metal and rare earth ions have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Energy splittings can be directly determined, and the corresponding parameters are easily extracted from the experimental data. The intensities of dimer excitati......Insulating compounds containing dimers of transition metal and rare earth ions have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Energy splittings can be directly determined, and the corresponding parameters are easily extracted from the experimental data. The intensities of dimer...

  2. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  3. Early and Non-Invasive Detection of Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Elk Feces by Real-Time Quaking Induced Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yo Ching; Hannaoui, Samia; John, Theodore R.; Dudas, Sandor; Czub, Stefanie; Gilch, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease of wild and captive cervids in North America. Prions are infectious agents composed of a misfolded version of a host-encoded protein, termed PrPSc. Infected cervids excrete and secrete prions, contributing to lateral transmission. Geographical distribution is expanding and case numbers in wild cervids are increasing. Recently, the first European cases of CWD have been reported in a wild reindeer and two moose from Norway. Therefore, methods to detect the infection early in the incubation time using easily available samples are desirable to facilitate effective disease management. We have adapted the real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay, a sensitive in vitro prion amplification method, for pre-clinical detection of prion seeding activity in elk feces. Testing fecal samples from orally inoculated elk taken at various time points post infection revealed early shedding and detectable prion seeding activity throughout the disease course. Early shedding was also found in two elk encoding a PrP genotype associated with reduced susceptibility for CWD. In summary, we suggest that detection of CWD prions in feces by RT-QuIC may become a useful tool to support CWD surveillance in wild and captive cervids. The finding of early shedding independent of the elk’s prion protein genotype raises the question whether prolonged survival is beneficial, considering accumulation of environmental prions and its contribution to CWD transmission upon extended duration of shedding. PMID:27829062

  4. Impact of epidermal leaf mining by the aspen leaf miner (Phyllocnistis populiella) on the growth, physiology, and leaf longevity of quaking aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Diane; DeFoliart, Linda; Doak, Patricia; Schneiderheinze, Jenny

    2008-08-01

    The aspen leaf miner, Phyllocnistis populiella, feeds on the contents of epidermal cells on both top (adaxial) and bottom (abaxial) surfaces of quaking aspen leaves, leaving the photosynthetic tissue of the mesophyll intact. This type of feeding is taxonomically restricted to a small subset of leaf mining insects but can cause widespread plant damage during outbreaks. We studied the effect of epidermal mining on aspen growth and physiology during an outbreak of P. populiella in the boreal forest of interior Alaska. Experimental reduction of leaf miner density across two sites and 3 years significantly increased annual aspen growth rates relative to naturally mined controls. Leaf mining damage was negatively related to leaf longevity. Leaves with heavy mining damage abscised 4 weeks earlier, on average, than leaves with minimal mining damage. Mining damage to the top and bottom surfaces of leaves had different effects on physiology. Mining on the top surface of the leaf had no significant effect on photosynthesis or conductance and was unrelated to leaf stable C isotope ratio (delta(13)C). Mining damage to the bottom leaf surface, where stomata are located, had significant negative effects on net photosynthesis and water vapor conductance. Percent bottom mining was positively related to leaf delta(13)C. Taken together, the data suggest that the primary mechanism for the reduction of photosynthesis by epidermal leaf mining by P. populiella is the failure of stomata to open normally on bottom-mined leaves.

  5. Detection of Atypical H-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and Discrimination of Bovine Prion Strains by Real-Time Quaking-Induced Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masujin, Kentaro; Orrú, Christina D; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Groveman, Bradley R; Raymond, Lynne D; Hughson, Andrew G; Caughey, Byron

    2016-03-01

    Prion diseases of cattle include the classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (C-BSE) and the atypical H-type BSE (H-BSE) and L-type BSE (L-BSE) strains. Although the C- and L-BSE strains can be detected and discriminated by ultrasensitive real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assays, no such test has yet been described for the detection of H-BSE or the discrimination of each of the major bovine prion strains. Here, we demonstrate an RT-QuIC assay for H-BSE that can detect as little as 10(-9) dilutions of brain tissue and neat cerebrospinal fluid samples from clinically affected cattle. Moreover, comparisons of the reactivities with different recombinant prion protein substrates and/or immunoblot band profiles of proteinase K-treated RT-QuIC reaction products indicated that H-, L-, and C-BSE have distinctive prion seeding activities and can be discriminated by RT-QuIC on this basis.

  6. Detection and discrimination of classical and atypical L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy by real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrú, Christina D; Favole, Alessandra; Corona, Cristiano; Mazza, Maria; Manca, Matteo; Groveman, Bradley R; Hughson, Andrew G; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Caramelli, Maria; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Casalone, Cristina; Caughey, Byron

    2015-04-01

    Statutory surveillance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) indicates that cattle are susceptible to both classical BSE (C-BSE) and atypical forms of BSE. Atypical forms of BSE appear to be sporadic and thus may never be eradicated. A major challenge for prion surveillance is the lack of sufficiently practical and sensitive tests for routine BSE detection and strain discrimination. The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) test, which is based on prion-seeded fibrillization of recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen), is known to be highly specific and sensitive for the detection of multiple human and animal prion diseases but not BSE. Here, we tested brain tissue from cattle affected by C-BSE and atypical L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-type BSE or L-BSE) with the RT-QuIC assay and found that both BSE forms can be detected and distinguished using particular rPrPSen substrates. Specifically, L-BSE was detected using multiple rPrPSen substrates, while C-BSE was much more selective. This substrate-based approach suggests a diagnostic strategy for specific, sensitive, and rapid detection and discrimination of at least some BSE forms.

  7. Neutron scattering in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains.

  8. Coded source neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100 m) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100um and 10um aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  9. Coded source neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Philip; Santos-Villalobos, Hector; Tobin, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100μm) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100μm and 10μm aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  10. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination.

  11. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  12. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  13. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  14. Anisotropy in the paramagnetic phase of RAl/sub 2/ cubic intermetallic compounds (R = Tb, Dy, and Er)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Moral, A.; Ibarra, M.R.; Abell, J.S.; Montenegro, J.F.D.

    1987-05-01

    In this paper it is shown that the anisotropy in the paramagnetic phase is a useful characteristic when used to single out high-rank susceptibility tensor components in the paramagnetic regime of cubic crystals. Application of this technique to RAl/sub 2/ compounds (R = Tb,Dy,Er) allows the determination of longitudinal and transverse (in the form of linear combinations) fourth- and sixth-rank paramagnetic susceptibilities. The use of the fourth-rank longitudinal susceptibility allows quadrupolar pair interactions in these compounds to be probed.

  15. Radiography with polarised neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Michael L.

    2010-08-20

    In this thesis I present a new technique for the spatially resolved investigation of the magnetic properties of bulk samples. Standard one dimensional neutron depolarisation analysis is combined with neutron radiography to a method we call Neutron Depolarisation Imaging (NDI). The experimental setup which was installed at the neutron radiography beam line ANTARES at FRM II consists of a double crystal monochromator, neutron polariser, spin flipper, polarisation analyser and a position sensitive CCD detector. A comprehensive discussion of the requirements for these components is given and the limitations of the method are shown. The maximum spatial resolution which can be achieved with a neutron radiography setup is determined by the collimation of the neutron beam and the distance between sample and detector. Different types of polarisers have been tested and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. A double crystal monochromator and a new type of polariser employing polarising neutron supermirrors based on the principle of an optical periscope were developed and tested during this work. Furthermore, NDI measurements on various samples of the weakly ferromagnetic materials Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} and Ni{sub 3}Al are presented. Neutron depolarisation radiography and tomography measurements were conducted with a spatial resolution as high as 0.3 mm on Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} and Ni{sub 3}Al samples. The feasibility of NDI experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 kbar was shown on a sample of Ni{sub 3}Al using a modified Cu:Be clamp cell. A decrease of the ordering temperature by 2 K under hydrostatic pressure was determined from the NDI measurements and shows the potential of the method for further high pressure experiments. Additionally a method was developed which in principle allows to obtain the intrinsic dependence of the ordering temperature T{sub C} on the ordered moment Ms from NDI measurements on inhomogeneous samples containing regions with

  16. Oxygen as a paramagnetic probe for nuclear magnetic resonance: structure and paramagnetic profile of a lipid bilayer/membrane model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abdul Wahid, M.S

    2005-07-01

    Paramagnetic contact shifts and relaxation rate enhancements from molecular oxygen dissolved in a model membrane, were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The model membrane system was an isotropic bicelle formed using 1-myristelaidoyl-2-myristoyl-d27-sn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (MLMPC), a custom phospholipid, and 1-2-dihexanoyl-d22-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC). The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H spectra of MLMPC were assigned. Molecular oxygen was delivered at external pressures of 20 and 50 atm. Paramagnetic contact shifts were found to scale with the oxygen solubility gradient in the lipid bilayer, were found to be invariant to temperature changes in the region studied (288K to 331K), and scaled linearly with changes in oxygen pressure. Relaxation rate enhancements from oxygen were low in the headgroup region and increased to a roughly constant rate in the acyl chain region. Rates were comparable to values predicted by simple thermodynamic theories which take into account the observed gradients in diffusion rates and solubility of oxygen in bilayers. (author)

  17. Aggregation process of paramagnetic particles in fluid in the magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ning; Cheng, Xiaoye; Huang, Zheyong; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Kai; Wang, Ye; Gong, Yongyong

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic targeting is a promising therapeutic strategy for localizing systemically delivered magnetic responsive drugs or cells to target tissue, but excessive aggregation of magnetic particles could result in vascular embolization. To analyze the reason for embolization, the attractive process of magnetic particles in magnetic field (MF) was studied in this paper by analyzing the form of the aggregated paramagnetic particles while the particle suspension flowed through a tube, which served as a model of blood vessels. The effects of magnetic flux density and fluid velocity on the formation of aggregated paramagnetic particles were investigated. The number of large aggregated clusters dramatically increased with increment in the magnetic flux density and decreased with increment in the fluid velocity. The analysis of accumulative process demonstrates the MF around initially attracted particles was focused, which induced the formation of clusters and increased the possibility of embolism. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:323-330, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mechanisms of enhanced orbital dia- and paramagnetism: application to the Rashba semiconductor BiTeI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, G A H; Murakawa, H; Bahramy, M S; Arita, R; Kaneko, Y; Tokura, Y; Nagaosa, N

    2012-06-15

    We study the magnetic susceptibility of a layered semiconductor BiTeI with giant Rashba spin splitting both theoretically and experimentally to explore its orbital magnetism. Apart from the core contributions, a large temperature-dependent diamagnetic susceptibility is observed when the Fermi energy E(F) is near the crossing point of the Rashba spin-split conduction bands at the time-reversal symmetry point A. On the other hand, when E(F) is below this band crossing, the susceptibility turns to be paramagnetic. These features are consistent with first-principles calculations, which also predict an enhanced orbital magnetic susceptibility with both positive and negative signs as a function of E(F) due to band (anti)crossings. Based on these observations, we propose two mechanisms for the enhanced paramagnetic orbital susceptibility.

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance and FT-IR spectroscopic studies of glycine anhydride and betaine hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim Başkan, M.; Kartal, Zeki; Aydın, Murat

    2015-12-01

    Gamma irradiated powders of glycine anhydride and betaine hydrochloride have been investigated at room temperature by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In these compounds, the observed paramagnetic species were attributed to the R1 and R2 radicals, respectively. It was determined that the free electron interacted with environmental protons and 14N nucleus in both radicals. The EPR spectra of gamma irradiated powder samples remained unchanged at room temperature for two weeks after irradiation. Also, the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), FT-Raman and thermal analyses of both compounds were investigated. The functional groups in the molecular structures of glycine anhydride and betaine hydrochloride were identified by vibrational spectroscopies (FT-IR and FT-Raman).

  20. Thermally stimulated luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on uranium doped calcium phosphate

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, V; Veeraraghavan, R; Sastry, M D

    2003-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on uranium doped calcium phosphate yielded mechanistic information on the observed glow peaks at 365, 410 and 450 K. TSL spectral studies of the glow peaks showed that UO sub 2 sup 2 sup + acts as the luminescent center. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies on gamma-irradiated samples revealed that the predominant radiation induced centers are H sup 0 , PO sub 4 sup 2 sup - , PO sub 3 sup 2 sup - and O sup - ion. Studies on the temperature dependence studies of the EPR spectra of samples annealed to different temperatures indicate the role of H sup 0 and PO sub 4 sup 2 sup - ions in the main glow peak at 410 K.

  1. On the Paramagnetic Impurity Concentration of Silicate Glasses from Low-Temperature Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Silvia; Jug, Giancarlo

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of paramagnetic trace impurities in glasses can be determined via precise SQUID measurements of the sample's magnetization in a magnetic field. However, the existence of quasi-ordered structural inhomogeneities in the disordered solid causes correlated tunneling currents that can contribute to the magnetization, surprisingly, also at the higher temperatures. We show that taking into account such tunneling systems gives rise to a good agreement between the concentrations extracted from SQUID magnetization and those extracted from low-temperature heat capacity measurements. Without suitable inclusion of such magnetization contribution from the tunneling currents, we find that the concentration of paramagnetic impurities gets considerably over-estimated. This analysis represents a further positive test for the structural inhomogeneity theory of the magnetic effects in the cold glasses.

  2. Calculation of the paramagnetism of large carbon nanotubes, using a parameter-independent molecular orbital model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, J. R. Alvarez

    A previous self-consistent field molecular orbital method, able to describe systems having a large number of unpaired electrons, n, is reviewed and improved. This method is applied to the study of paramagnetism in large (1,000-16,000 atoms) zigzag carbon nanotubes, represented by their n values. The computational scheme is based on the Hückel neglect differential overlap approach. It is shown that dependence of n on the semiempirical parameters is very small, and so they can be removed from the calculation. Enhancement of the paramagnetism (increase of n), by use of a strong external magnetic field, is also studied. Finally, the dependence of the Fermi one-electron potential energies and the spin atomic densities on both the parameters and the shape of the nanotubes is analyzed.0

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance: a powerful tool to support magnetic resonance imaging research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhier, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the areas where electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has provided unique information to MRI developments. The field of application mainly encompasses the EPR characterization of MRI paramagnetic contrast agents (gadolinium and manganese chelates, nitroxides) and superparamagnetic agents (iron oxide particles). The combined use of MRI and EPR has also been used to qualify or disqualify sources of contrast in MRI. Illustrative examples are presented with attempts to qualify oxygen sensitive contrast (i.e. T1 - and T2 *-based methods), redox status or melanin content in tissues. Other areas are likely to benefit from the combined EPR/MRI approach, namely cell tracking studies. Finally, the combination of EPR and MRI studies on the same models provides invaluable data regarding tissue oxygenation, hemodynamics and energetics. Our description will be illustrative rather than exhaustive to give to the readers a flavour of 'what EPR can do for MRI'.

  4. Temperature dependence of Q-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of nitrosyl heme proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, Marco; Wajnberg, Eliane; Bemski, George

    1997-11-01

    The Q-band (35 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin (Hb N O) and nitrosyl myoglobin (Mb NO) were studied as a function of temperature between 19 K and 200 K. The spectra of both heme proteins show classes of variations as a function of temperature. The first one has previously been associated with the existence of two paramagnetic species, one with rhombic and the other with axial symmetry. The second one manifests itself in changes in the g-factors and linewidths of each species. These changes are correlated with the conformational substates model and associate the variations of g-values with changes in the angle of the N(his)-Fe-N (NO) bond in the rhombic species and with changes in the distance between Fe and N of the proximal (F8) histidine in the axial species. (author) 24 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Magnetic and Magneto-Optical Properties in Paramagnetic NdF3 Under High Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; LIU Gong-Qiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we first theoretically report the magnetic and magneto-optical properties in paramagnetic media under high external magnetic field. Considering the action of the external magnetic field He and indirect exchange interaction Hv, the characteristic of the magnetic saturation and the property of the Faraday rotation to be nonlinear with external magnetic field are presented in paramagnetic NdF3. In terms of our theory, the indirect exchange interaction plays an important role in the magnetization M and the Faraday rotation θ in NdF3 under high external magnetic field. The theory is in good agreement with experimental results. On the other hand, a reasonable explanation for the temperature dependence of the ratio of the Verdet constant to the magnetic susceptibility V/x is obtained.

  6. First-order phase transitions in spin-glass models with multiple paramagnetic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozza, H.F. [Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. I, Ciudad Universitaria - (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: homero@df.uba.ar

    2004-12-31

    The paramagnetic and the one-step replica-symmetry-breaking spin-glass solutions of a p-spin-glass model in the presence of a transverse field are studied in the neighborhood of the phase transition curve. Two qualitatively different regions are found in the phase diagram. For a transition temperature higher than a certain value Tc, the thermodynamic transition is of second order, otherwise it is of first order with latent heat. The temperature Tc is joined to a point in the phase diagram where a transition between two paramagnetic solutions happens. A discussion about the order of the thermodynamic-phase transition in the quantum random orthogonal model is presented.

  7. First-order phase transitions in spin-glass models with multiple paramagnetic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozza, H. F.

    2004-12-01

    The paramagnetic and the one-step replica-symmetry-breaking spin-glass solutions of a p-spin-glass model in the presence of a transverse field are studied in the neighborhood of the phase transition curve. Two qualitatively different regions are found in the phase diagram. For a transition temperature higher than a certain value Tc, the thermodynamic transition is of second order, otherwise it is of first order with latent heat. The temperature Tc is joined to a point in the phase diagram where a transition between two paramagnetic solutions happens. A discussion about the order of the thermodynamic-phase transition in the quantum random orthogonal model is presented.

  8. Paramagnetic molecule induced strong antiferromagnetic exchange coupling on a magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Baker, Collin; D'Angelo, Christopher

    2015-07-31

    This paper reports our Monte Carlo (MC) studies aiming to explain the experimentally observed paramagnetic molecule induced antiferromagnetic coupling between ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Recently developed magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics devices (MTJMSDs) were prepared by chemically bonding the paramagnetic molecules between the FM electrodes along the tunnel junction's perimeter. These MTJMSDs exhibited molecule-induced strong antiferromagnetic coupling. We simulated the 3D atomic model analogous to the MTJMSD and studied the effect of molecule's magnetic couplings with the two FM electrodes. Simulations show that when a molecule established ferromagnetic coupling with one electrode and antiferromagnetic coupling with the other electrode, then theoretical results effectively explained the experimental findings. Our studies suggest that in order to align MTJMSDs' electrodes antiparallel to each other, the exchange coupling strength between a molecule and FM electrodes should be ∼50% of the interatomic exchange coupling for the FM electrodes.

  9. Aggregation of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic atoms at edges of graphenes and graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hai-Qing; Sun Lian-Feng; Yang Huai-Chao; Qiu Cai-Yu; Liu Zheng; Yu Fang; Hu Li-Jun; Xia Xiao-Xiang; Yang Hai-Fang; Gu Chang-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report that when ferromagnetic metals (Fe, Co and Ni) are thermally evaporated onto n-layer graphenes and graphite, a metal nanowire and adjacent nanogaps can be found along the edges regardless of its zigzag or armchair structure. Similar features can also be observed for paramagnetic metals, such as Mn, Al and Pd. Meanwhile, metal nanowires and adjacent nanogaps cannot be found for diamagnetic metals (Au and Ag). An external magnetic field during the evaporation of metals can make these unique features disappear for ferromagnetic and paramagnetic metal; and the morphologies of diamagnetic metal do not change after the application of an external magnetic field. We discuss the possible reasons for these novel and interesting results, which include possible one-dimensional ferromagnets along the edge and edge-related binding energy.

  10. Aggregation of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic atoms at edges of graphenes and graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Haiqing, Zhou; Caiyu, Qiu; Zheng, Liu; Fang, Yu; Lijun, Hu; Xiaoxiang, Xia; Haifang, Yang; Changzhi, Gu; Lianfeng, Sun

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report that when ferromagnetic metals (Fe, Co and Ni) are thermally evaporated onto n-layer graphenes and graphite, a metal nanowire and adjacent nanogaps can be found along the edges regardless of its zigzag or armchair structure. Similar features can also be observed for paramagnetic metals, such as Mn, Al and Pd. Meanwhile, metal nanowires and adjacent nanogaps can not be found for diamagnetic metals (Au and Ag). An external magnetic field during the evaporation of metals can make these unique features disappear for ferromagnetic and paramagnetic metal; and the morphologies of diamagnetic metal do not change after the application of an external magnetic field. We discuss the possible reasons for these novel and interesting results, which include possible one dimensional ferromagnets along the edge and edge-related binding energy.

  11. Effective optical Faraday rotations of semiconductor EuS nanocrystals with paramagnetic transition-metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yasuchika; Maeda, Masashi; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Doi, Yoshihiro; Hinatsu, Yukio; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Koizumi, Hitoshi; Fushimi, Koji

    2013-02-20

    Novel EuS nanocrystals containing paramagnetic Mn(II), Co(II), or Fe(II) ions have been reported as advanced semiconductor materials with effective optical rotation under a magnetic field, Faraday rotation. EuS nanocrystals with transition-metal ions, EuS:M nanocrystals, were prepared by the reduction of the Eu(III) dithiocarbamate complex tetraphenylphosphonium tetrakis(diethyldithiocarbamate)europium(III) with transition-metal complexes at 300 °C. The EuS:M nanocrystals thus prepared were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroanalysis (ICP-AES), and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Enhanced Faraday rotations of the EuS:M nanocrystals were observed around 550 nm, and their enhanced spin polarization was estimated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. In this report, the magneto-optical relationship between the Faraday rotation efficiency and spin polarization is discussed.

  12. Neutron-Induced Failures in Semiconductor Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wender, Stephen Arthur [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-06

    This slide presentation explores single event effect, environmental neutron flux, system response, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) neutron testing facility, examples of SEE measurements, and recent interest in thermal neutrons.

  13. Fermi surface properties in an enhanced Pauli paramagnet NpGe{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, D. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)]. E-mail: aoki@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Yamagami, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Homma, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Shiokawa, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yamamoto, E. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nakamura, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Haga, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Settai, R. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Onuki, Y. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2006-05-01

    We grew high-quality single crystals of an enhanced Pauli paramagnet NpGe{sub 3} and measured the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect. The topology of the Fermi surfaces are well explained by the band calculations based on the 5f-itinerant band model. The cyclotron effective masses are ranging from 2.6 to 16m{sub 0}, which are approximately 3.5 times enhanced from the corresponding band masses.

  14. Electronic correlations at the alpha-gamma structural phase transition in paramagnetic iron

    OpenAIRE

    Leonov, I.; Poteryaev, A. I.; Anisimov, V. I.; Vollhardt, D.

    2010-01-01

    We compute the equilibrium crystal structure and phase stability of iron at the alpha(bcc)-gamma(fcc) phase transition as a function of temperature, by employing a combination of ab initio methods for calculating electronic band structures and dynamical mean-field theory. The magnetic correlation energy is found to be an essential driving force behind the alpha-gamma structural phase transition in paramagnetic iron.

  15. Paramagnetic spin relaxation in Cs/sub 2/NaYbCl/sub 6/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlap, B.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Shenoy, G.K.; Dattagupta, S.; Asch, L.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical line shapes are obtained for Mossbauer spectra in the presence of paramagnetic relaxation effects which do not involve the ''white noise'' approximation. The results are applied to the data for /sup 170/Yb in Cs/sub 2/NaYbCl/sub 6/ to give values for the rms dipolar field and the spin correlation time in this material.

  16. Fermion N-representability for prescribed density and paramagnetic current density

    OpenAIRE

    Tellgren, Erik I; Kvaal, Simen; Helgaker, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    The $N$-representability problem is the problem of determining whether or not there exists $N$-particle states with some prescribed property. Here we report an affirmative solution to the fermion $N$-representability problem when both the density and paramagnetic current density are prescribed. This problem arises in current-density functional theory and is a generalization of the well-studied corresponding problem (only the density prescribed) in density functional theory. Given any density ...

  17. STUDY ON SYNTHESIS AND RELAXIVITY OF PARAMAGNETIC POLYESTER METAL COMPLEXES FOR MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyangming; ZhuoRenxi; 等

    1995-01-01

    Fifteen new polyester ligands were prepared by copolymerization of EDTA (ethylenediaminetertraacetic acid)dianhydride or DTPA (diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) dianhydride and dihydric alcohol or dihydric phenol.Their paramagnetic metal complexes were also synthesized.All polyester ligands and metal complexes were characterized by 1HNMR,IR spectra and elemental analyses.Preliminary study showed that the polyester metal complexes had higher relaxation effectiveness as compared to corresponding small molecular metal complexes.

  18. Scaling craters in carbonates: Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of shock damage

    OpenAIRE

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate samples from the 8.9-Mt nuclear (near-surface explosion) crater, OAK, and a terrestrial impact crater, Meteor Crater, were analyzed for shock damage using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Samples from below the OAK apparent crater floor were obtained from six boreholes, as well as ejecta recovered from the crater floor. The degree of shock damage in the carbonate material was assessed by comparing the sample spectra to spectra of Solenhofen and Kaibab limestone, which had been...

  19. Determining residual impurities in sapphire by means of electron paramagnetic resonance and nuclear activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bletskan, D. I.; Bratus', V. Ya.; Luk'yanchuk, A. R.; Maslyuk, V. T.; Parlag, O. A.

    2008-07-01

    Sapphire (α-Al2O3) single crystals grown using the Verneuil and Kyropoulos methods have been analyzed using electron paramagnetic resonance and γ-ray spectroscopy with 12-MeV bremsstrahlung excitation. It is established that uncontrolled impurities in the final sapphire single crystals grown by the Kyropoulos method in molybdenum-tungsten crucibles are supplied both from the initial materials and from the furnace and crucible materials

  20. Holographic paramagnetism-ferromagnetism phase transition in the Born-Infeld electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Lu, Jun-Wang; Fan, Bi; Shu, Shuang; Liu, Yu-Chen

    2016-09-01

    In the probe limit, we investigate the effects of the Born-Infeld electrodynamics on the holographic paramagnetism-ferromagnetism phase transition in the background of a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole spacetime. We find that the presence of Born-Infeld scale parameter b decreases the critical temperature and makes the magnetic moment harder to form in the case of without external field. Furthermore, the increase of b will result in extending the period of the external magnetic field.

  1. Electron spin resonance study of the demagnetization fields of the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Gimazov, Yu.I. Talanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the electron spin resonance study of the La1-xCaxMnO3 manganite and the diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl thin films for the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to plane of the films are presented. The temperature dependence of the demagnetizing field is obtained. The parameters of the Curie-Weiss law are estimated for the paramagnetic thin film.

  2. On the Flow of a Paramagnetic Fluid in a Differentially Heated Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sadat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigate the flow of a paramagnetic fluid in a two dimensional heated channel when an external magnetic gradient is imposed. In the fully developed regime, an analytical solution shows that a flow reversal may occur; the condition of this is given n terms of the Reynolds number. Numerical simulations are then carried out for more general situations. It is shown that the analytical model gives good qualitative predictions.

  3. Neutron drip transition in accreting and nonaccreting neutron star crusts

    CERN Document Server

    Chamel, N; Zdunik, J L; Haensel, P

    2015-01-01

    The neutron-drip transition in the dense matter constituting the interior of neutron stars generally refers to the appearance of unbound neutrons as the matter density reaches some threshold density $\\rho_\\textrm{drip}$. This transition has been mainly studied under the cold catalyzed matter hypothesis. However, this assumption is unrealistic for accreting neutron stars. After examining the physical processes that are thought to be allowed in both accreting and nonaccreting neutron stars, suitable conditions for the onset of neutron drip are derived and general analytical expressions for the neutron drip density and pressure are obtained. Moreover, we show that the neutron-drip transition occurs at lower density and pressure than those predicted within the mean-nucleus approximation. This transition is studied numerically for various initial composition of the ashes from X-ray bursts and superbursts using microscopic nuclear mass models.

  4. Water exchange in plant tissue studied by proton NMR in the presence of paramagnetic centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacić, G; Ratković, S

    1984-04-01

    The proton NMR relaxation of water in maize roots in the presence of paramagnetic centers, Mn2+, Mn- EDTA2 -, and dextran-magnetite was measured. It was shown that the NMR method of Conlon and Outhred (1972, Biochem. Biophys. Acta. 288:354-361) can be applied to a heterogenous multicellular system, and the water exchange time between cortical cells and the extracellular space can be calculated. The water exchange is presumably controlled by the intracellular unstirred layers. The Mn- EDTA2 - complex is a suitable paramagnetic compound for complex tissue, while the application of dextran-magnetite is probably restricted to studies of water exchange in cell suspensions. The water free space of the root and viscosity of the cells cytoplasm was estimated with the use of Mn- EDTA2 -. The convenience of proton NMR for studying the multiphase uptake of paramagnetic ions by plant root as well as their transport to leaves is demonstrated. A simple and rapid NMR technique (spin-echo recovery) for continuous measurement of the uptake process is presented.

  5. Upcycling : converting waste plastics into paramagnetic, conducting, solid, pure carbon microspheres.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol, V.

    2010-06-15

    The recent tremendous increase in the volume of waste plastics (WP) will have a harmful environmental impact on the health of living beings. Hundreds of years are required to degrade WP in atmospheric conditions. Hence, in coming years, in addition to traditional recycling services, innovative 'upcycling' processes are necessary. This article presents an environmentally benign, solvent-free autogenic process that converts various WP [low density polyethylene (LDPE), high density polyethylene (HDPE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polystyrene (PS), or their mixtures] into carbon microspheres (CMSs), an industrially significant, value-added product. The thermal dissociation of these individual or mixed WP in a closed reactor under autogenic pressure (1000 psi) produced dry, pure powder of CMSs. In this paper, the optimization of process parameters such as the effect of mixing of WP with other materials, and the role of reaction temperature and time are reported. Employing advanced analytical techniques, the atomic structure, composition, and morphology of as-obtained CMSs were analyzed. The room-temperature paramagnetism in CMSs prepared from waste LDPE, HDPE, and PS was further studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The conducting and paramagnetic nature of CMSs holds promise for their potential applications in toners, printers, paints, batteries, lubricants, and tires.

  6. On the explanation of the paramagnetic Meissner effect in superconductor/ferromagnet heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, B.; Khaydukov, Yu.; Efremov, D.; Vasenko, A. S.; Mustafa, L.; Kim, J.-H.; Keller, T.; Zhernenkov, K.; Devishvili, A.; Steitz, R.; Keimer, B.; Bottyán, L.

    2016-10-01

    An increase of the magnetic moment in superconductor/ferromagnet (S/F) bilayers V(40 nm)/F (\\text{F}=\\text{Fe}(1,~3 \\text{nm}) , Co(3 nm), Ni(3 nm)) was observed using SQUID magnetometry upon cooling below the superconducting transition temperature T C in magnetic fields of 10 Oe to 50 Oe applied parallel to the sample surface. A similar increase, often called the paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), was observed before in various superconductors and superconductor/ferromagnet systems. To explain the PME effect in the presented S/F bilayers a model based on a row of vortices located at the S/F interface is proposed. According to the model the magnetic moment induced below T C consists of the paramagnetic contribution of the vortex cores and the diamagnetic contribution of the vortex-free region of the S layer. Since the thickness of the S layer is found to be 3-4 times less than the magnetic-field penetration depth, this latter diamagnetic contribution is negligible. The model correctly accounts for the sign, the approximate magnitude and the field dependence of the paramagnetic and the Meissner contributions of the induced magnetic moment upon passing the superconducting transition of a ferromagnet/superconductor bilayer.

  7. Paramagnetic Salt Pill Design for Magnetic Refrigerators Used In-Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, C.; Benford, D. J.; Richards, P. L.

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is described which was designed for use in the multiband imaging photometer for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). This refrigerator was required to cool bolometric detectors for infrared and millimetre waves to 0.1 K. A paramagnetic salt pill with a number of novel features was developed to meet the stringent requirements for an ADR used in space. An unusual paramagnetic salt, chromic caesium alum (CCA), is used to meet the requirement of thermal stability under the bake-out temperatures used in commissioning space cryogenic vacuum systems. The cycle time for the refrigerator has been reduced to almost-equal-to 30 min by attention to thermal time constants and by growing the CCA salt directly on to an array of gold wires. Crystal growing procedures were developed to overcome problems with the low solubility of CCA in water. The salt pill is sealed in stainless steel to retain water of hydration and is constructed of materials which are not corroded by commonly used paramagnetic salts.

  8. Influence of the neutron transport tube on neutron resonance densitometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitatani Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron Resonance Densitometry (NRD is a non-destructive assay technique of nuclear materials in particle-like debris that contains various materials. An aim of NRD is to quantify nuclear materials in a melting fuel of Fukusima Daiichi plant, spent nuclear fuel and annihilation disposal fuel etc. NRD consists of two techniques of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA and Neutron Resonance Capture Analysis (NRCA or Prompt Gamma-ray Analysis (PGA. A density of nuclear material isotopes is decided with NRTA. The materials absorbing a neutron in a wide energy range such as boron in a sample are identified by NRCA/PGA. The information of NRCA/PGA is used in NRTA analysis to quantify nuclear material isotopes. A neutron time of flight (TOF method is used in NRD measurements. A facility, consisting of a neutron source, a neutron flight path, and a detector is required. A short flight path and a strong neutron source are needed to downsize such a facility and put NRD into practical use. A neutron transport tube covers a flight path to prevent noises. In order to investigate the effect of neutron transport tube and pulse width of a neutron source, we carried out NRTA experiments with a 2-m short neutron transport tube constructed at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute - Linear Accelerator (KURRI-LINAC, and impacts of shield of neutron transport tube and influence of pulse width of a neutron source were examined. A shield of the neutron transport tube reduced a background and had a good influence on the measurement. The resonance dips of 183W at 27 eV was successfully observed with a pulse width of a neutron source less than 2 μs.

  9. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  10. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, V; Cirillo, M; Lucci, M; Ottaviani, I; Scherillo, A; Celentano, G; Pietropaolo, A

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the supercond...

  11. Neutron counting with cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Esch, Patrick; Crisanti, Marta; Mutti, Paolo [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    A research project is presented in which we aim at counting individual neutrons with CCD-like cameras. We explore theoretically a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher counting rates. As such, the hope is to combine the good background rejection properties of standard neutron counting detectors with the absence of dead time of integrating neutron imaging cameras as well as their very good spatial resolution. Compared to Xray detection, the essence of thermal neutron detection is the nuclear conversion reaction. The released energies involved are of the order of a few MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, which is in the 10 KeV range. Thanks to advances in camera technology which have resulted in increased quantum efficiency, lower noise, as well as increased frame rate up to 100 fps for CMOS-type cameras, this more than 100-fold higher available detection energy implies that the individual neutron detection light signal can be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting, which is hard to achieve with X-rays. The time scale of CMOS-type cameras doesn't allow one to consider time-of-flight measurements, but kinetic experiments in the 10 ms range are possible. The theory is next confronted to the first experimental results. (authors)

  12. Neutron whispering gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery V.; Voronin, Alexei Yu.; Cubitt, Robert; Protasov, Konstantin V.

    2010-02-01

    The `whispering gallery' effect has been known since ancient times for sound waves in air, later in water and more recently for a broad range of electromagnetic waves: radio, optics, Roentgen and so on. It consists of wave localization near a curved reflecting surface and is expected for waves of various natures, for instance, for atoms and neutrons. For matter waves, it would include a new feature: a massive particle would be settled in quantum states, with parameters depending on its mass. Here, we present for the first time the quantum whispering-gallery effect for cold neutrons. This phenomenon provides an example of an exactly solvable problem analogous to the `quantum bouncer'; it is complementary to the recently discovered gravitationally bound quantum states of neutrons . These two phenomena provide a direct demonstration of the weak equivalence principle for a massive particle in a pure quantum state. Deeply bound whispering-gallery states are long-living and weakly sensitive to surface potential; highly excited states are short-living and very sensitive to the wall potential shape. Therefore, they are a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects.

  13. Effects of spin-orbit coupling and strong correlation on the paramagnetic insulating state in plutonium dioxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko; Kato, Masato

    2010-10-01

    We perform first-principles calculations taking account of both relativistic and strong correlation effects on plutonium dioxides in order to numerically obtain its observed ground state, i.e., the paramagnetic insulating state and properly calculate the material properties. Generally, it is known for plutonium dioxides that the standard local-density approximation (LDA) calculations give metallic states and even LDA+U considering the strong correlation on Puf orbitals fails to attain the paramagnetic insulating state. In this paper, we clarify that inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling in addition to the strong correlation is responsible for the paramagnetic insulating state. Using the obtained paramagnetic insulating state, we calculate various material properties and claim that the proper state preparation is essential for quantitative evaluation of the material properties.

  14. The quest to find an electric dipole moment of the neutron

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, P

    2016-01-01

    Until now no electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM) has been observed. Why it is so vanishingly small, escaping detection for the last 65 years, is not easy to explain. In general it is considered as one of the most sensitive probes for the violation of the combined symmetry of charge and parity (CP). A discovery could shed light on the poorly understood matter/antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. The neutron EDM might one day help to distinguish different sources of CP-violation in combination with measurements of paramagnetic molecules, diamagnetic atoms and other nuclei. This review presents an overview of the most important concepts in searches for an nEDM as well as a brief overview of the worldwide efforts.

  15. Level-crossing spectroscopy of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond: sensitive detection of paramagnetic defect centers

    CERN Document Server

    Anishchik, S V; Ivanov, K L

    2016-01-01

    We report a magnetic field dependence of fluorescence of diamond single crystals containing NV$^-$ centers. In such spectra, numerous sharp lines are found, which correspond to Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in coupled spins systems comprising an NV$^-$ center. Theoretical modeling of such "LAC-spectra" enables characterization of paramagnetic defect centers and determination of their magnetic resonance parameters, such as zero-field splitting and hyperfine coupling constants. The outlined method thus enables sensitive detection of paramagnetic impurities in diamond crystals.

  16. Two-dimensional NMR measurement and point dipole model prediction of paramagnetic shift tensors in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walder, Brennan J.; Davis, Michael C.; Grandinetti, Philip J. [Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University, 100 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Dey, Krishna K. [Department of Physics, Dr. H. S. Gour University, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh 470003 (India); Baltisberger, Jay H. [Division of Natural Science, Mathematics, and Nursing, Berea College, Berea, Kentucky 40403 (United States)

    2015-01-07

    A new two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment to separate and correlate the first-order quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions is described. This experiment, which we call the shifting-d echo experiment, allows a more precise determination of tensor principal components values and their relative orientation. It is designed using the recently introduced symmetry pathway concept. A comparison of the shifting-d experiment with earlier proposed methods is presented and experimentally illustrated in the case of {sup 2}H (I = 1) paramagnetic shift and quadrupolar tensors of CuCl{sub 2}⋅2D{sub 2}O. The benefits of the shifting-d echo experiment over other methods are a factor of two improvement in sensitivity and the suppression of major artifacts. From the 2D lineshape analysis of the shifting-d spectrum, the {sup 2}H quadrupolar coupling parameters are 〈C{sub q}〉 = 118.1 kHz and 〈η{sub q}〉 = 0.88, and the {sup 2}H paramagnetic shift tensor anisotropy parameters are 〈ζ{sub P}〉 = − 152.5 ppm and 〈η{sub P}〉 = 0.91. The orientation of the quadrupolar coupling principal axis system (PAS) relative to the paramagnetic shift anisotropy principal axis system is given by (α,β,γ)=((π)/2 ,(π)/2 ,0). Using a simple ligand hopping model, the tensor parameters in the absence of exchange are estimated. On the basis of this analysis, the instantaneous principal components and orientation of the quadrupolar coupling are found to be in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A new point dipole model for predicting the paramagnetic shift tensor is proposed yielding significantly better agreement than previously used models. In the new model, the dipoles are displaced from nuclei at positions associated with high electron density in the singly occupied molecular orbital predicted from ligand field theory.

  17. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  18. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  19. Direction sensitive neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlen, Steven; Fisher, Peter; Dujmic, Denis; Wellenstein, Hermann F.; Inglis, Andrew

    2017-01-31

    A neutron detector includes a pressure vessel, an electrically conductive field cage assembly within the pressure vessel and an imaging subsystem. A pressurized gas mixture of CF.sub.4, .sup.3He and .sup.4He at respective partial pressures is used. The field cage establishes a relatively large drift region of low field strength, in which ionization electrons generated by neutron-He interactions are directed toward a substantially smaller amplification region of substantially higher field strength in which the ionization electrons undergo avalanche multiplication resulting in scintillation of the CF.sub.4 along scintillation tracks. The imaging system generates two-dimensional images of the scintillation patterns and employs track-finding to identify tracks and deduce the rate and direction of incident neutrons. One or more photo-multiplier tubes record the time-profile of the scintillation tracks permitting the determination of the third coordinate.

  20. Neutron absorbing alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Masayuki

    1998-12-04

    The neutron absorbing alloy of the present invention comprises Ti or an alloy thereof as a mother material, to which from 2 to 40% by weight of Hf and Gd within a range of from 4 to 50% by weight in total are added respectively. Ti is excellent in specific strength, corrosion resistance and workability, and produces no noxious intermetallic compound with Hf and Gd. In addition, since the alloy can incorporate a great quantity of Hf and Gd, a neutron absorbing material having excellent neutron absorbing performance than usual and excellent in specific strength, corrosion resistance and workability can be manufactured conveniently and economically not by a special manufacturing method. (T.M.)

  1. Carbon neutron star atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Pavlov, G G; Werner, K

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars is limited in particular by uncertainties in chemical composition of their atmospheres. For example, atmospheres of thermally - emitting neutron stars in supernova remnants might have exotic chemical compositions, and for one of them, the neutron star in CasA, a pure carbon atmosphere has recently been suggested by Ho & Heinke (2009). To test such a composition for other similar sources, a publicly available detailed grid of carbon model atmosphere spectra is needed. We have computed such a grid using the standard LTE approximation and assuming that the magnetic field does not exceed 10^8 G. The opacities and pressure ionization effects are calculated using the Opacity Project approach. We describe the properties of our models and investigate the impact of the adopted assumptions and approximations on the emergent spectra.

  2. Uniformly rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Boshkayev, Kuantay

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we review the recent results on the equilibrium configurations of static and uniformly rotating neutron stars within the Hartle formalism. We start from the Einstein-Maxwell-Thomas-Fermi equations formulated and extended by Belvedere et al. (2012, 2014). We demonstrate how to conduct numerical integration of these equations for different central densities ${\\it \\rho}_c$ and angular velocities $\\Omega$ and compute the static $M^{stat}$ and rotating $M^{rot}$ masses, polar $R_p$ and equatorial $R_{\\rm eq}$ radii, eccentricity $\\epsilon$, moment of inertia $I$, angular momentum $J$, as well as the quadrupole moment $Q$ of the rotating configurations. In order to fulfill the stability criteria of rotating neutron stars we take into considerations the Keplerian mass-shedding limit and the axisymmetric secular instability. Furthermore, we construct the novel mass-radius relations, calculate the maximum mass and minimum rotation periods (maximum frequencies) of neutron stars. Eventually, we compare a...

  3. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  4. Paramagnetic moments in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, F.T.; Vieira, V.N.; Silva, D.L. [Instituto de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, C.P. 354, 96010-900 Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Valadão, D.R.B., E-mail: danielavaladao.ufpe@gmail.com [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Obradors, X.; Puig, T. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC, Campus U.A. Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Wolff-Fabris, F.; Kampert, E. [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory, HZ Dresden-Rossendorf , 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The paramagnetic Meissner effect was observed in a nanocomposite YBaCuO thin film. • The paramagnetic moments in FC experiments were observed up to 10 T. • The paramagnetic Meissner effect increases when the magnetic field is increased. • Results may be explained based on the flux compression scenario and vortex pinning. • An apparent saturation tendency of the paramagnetic moments could be observed. - Abstract: We report on magnetization studies in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} thin films with dispersed Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6} nanoparticles. The magnetization measurements were made using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Magnetic moments were measured as functions temperature using zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) prescriptions for magnetic fields up to 10 T applied parallel and perpendicular to the ab planes. A paramagnetic response related to the superconducting state was observed during the FC experiments. This effect, known as paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), apparently increases when the magnetic field is increased. We discuss our PME results in terms of the strong pinning scenario modulated by Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6} nanoparticles dispersed into the superconducting matrix.

  5. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site.

  6. Site-specific tagging proteins with a rigid, small and stable transition metal chelator, 8-hydroxyquinoline, for paramagnetic NMR analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yin; Huang, Feng [Nankai University, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin) (China); Huber, Thomas [Australian National University, Research School of Chemistry (Australia); Su, Xun-Cheng, E-mail: xunchengsu@nankai.edu.cn [Nankai University, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin) (China)

    2016-02-15

    Design of a paramagnetic metal binding motif in a protein is a valuable way for understanding the function, dynamics and interactions of a protein by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy. Several strategies have been proposed to site-specifically tag proteins with paramagnetic lanthanide ions. Here we report a simple approach of engineering a transition metal binding motif via site-specific labelling of a protein with 2-vinyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (2V-8HQ). The protein-2V-8HQ adduct forms a stable complex with transition metal ions, Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). The paramagnetic effects generated by these transition metal ions were evaluated by NMR spectroscopy. We show that 2V-8HQ is a rigid and stable transition metal binding tag. The coordination of the metal ion can be assisted by protein sidechains. More importantly, tunable paramagnetic tensors are simply obtained in an α-helix that possesses solvent exposed residues in positions i and i + 3, where i is the residue to be mutated to cysteine, i + 3 is Gln or Glu or i − 4 is His. The coordination of a sidechain carboxylate/amide or imidazole to cobalt(II) results in different structural geometries, leading to different paramagnetic tensors as shown by experimental data.

  7. Atmospheres around Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Benz, Willy

    1994-12-01

    Interest in the behavior of atmospheres around neutron stars has grown astronomically in the past few years. Some of this interest arrived in the wake of the explosion of Supernova 1987A and its elusive remnant; spawning renewed interest in a method to insure material ``fall-back'' onto the adolescent neutron star in an effort to transform it into a silent black hole. However, the bulk of the activity with atmospheres around neutron stars is concentrated in stellar models with neutron star, rather than white dwarf, cores; otherwise known as Thorne-Zytkow objects. First a mere seed in the imagination of theorists, Thorne-Zytkow objects have grown into an observational reality with an ever-increasing list of formation scenarios and observational prospects. Unfortunately, the analytic work of Chevalier on supernova fall-back implies that, except for a few cases, the stellar simulations of Thorne-Zytkow objects are missing an important aspect of physics: neutrinos. Neutrino cooling removes the pressure support of these atmospheres, allowing accretion beyond the canonical Eddington rate for these objects. We present here the results of detailed hydrodynamical simulations in one and two dimensions with the additional physical effects of neutrinos, advanced equations of state, and relativity over a range of parameters for our atmosphere including entropy and chemical composition as well as a range in the neutron star size. In agreement with Chevalier, we find, under the current list of formation scenarios, that the creature envisioned by Thorne and Zytkow will not survive the enormous appetite of a neutron star. However, neutrino heating (a physical effect not considered in Chevalier's analysis) can play an important role in creating instabilities in some formation schemes, leading to an expulsion of matter rather than rapid accretion. By placing scrutiny upon the formation methods, we can determine the observational prospects for each.

  8. Pixelated neutron image plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  9. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  10. Comparison of the low-cost MEMS accelerometers used by the Quake-Catcher Network and traditional strong motion seismic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J.; Kaiser, A. E.; Fry, B.; Chung, A. I.; Evans, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Accelerometers based on low-cost micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) have improved swiftly, making the rapid deployment of dense seismic arrays possible. For example, the Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) makes use of MEMS-based tri-axial sensors installed in homes and businesses to record earthquakes, with almost 2000 participants worldwide. QCN utilizes an open-source distributed-computing system, called the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC), to retrieve waveforms from continuous or triggered recordings back to the QCN server. Furthermore, the QCN approach can also be used to augment existing seismic networks for rapid-earthquake detection purposes, as well as studies on seismic source- and site-related phenomena. Following the 3 September 2010 Mw7.1 Darfield earthquake, 192 QCN stations were installed in a dense array to record the on-going aftershock sequence in and around the city of Christchurch. We examine the peak ground motions recorded during a M5.1 aftershock and find that peak ground acceleration (PGA) is spatially variable, but with a clear decay in amplitude with distance. In general, closely located GeoNet and QCN stations report similar PGA. Several QCN stations were located within 1 km of existing GeoNet stations, providing an opportunity to compare time series and amplitude spectra. For these closely spaced pairs of stations, the amplitude spectra observed from the horizontal components are highly correlated with average cross-correlation coefficients of 0.9 or higher. In addition, we find the correlation coefficient decreases with increasing distance between station pairs. In future work we will compare the instrumental sensitivity between traditional and MEMS-based sensors by conducting shake table tests of five different types of MEMS sensors at the Albuquerque Seismic Lab.

  11. Sensitive and specific detection of classical scrapie prions in the brains of goats by real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Orrú, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; Caughey, Byron; Graça, Telmo; Zhuang, Dongyue; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Knowles, Donald P; Schneider, David A

    2016-03-01

    Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) is a rapid, specific and highly sensitive prion seeding activity detection assay that uses recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen) to detect subinfectious levels of the abnormal isoforms of the prion protein (PrPSc). Although RT-QuIC has been successfully used to detect PrPSc in various tissues from humans and animals, including sheep, tissues from goats infected with classical scrapie have not yet been tested. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to (1) evaluate whether prion seeding activity could be detected in the brain tissues of goats with scrapie using RT-QuIC, (2) optimize reaction conditions to improve scrapie detection in goats, and (3) compare the performance of RT-QuIC for the detection of PrPSc with the more commonly used ELISA and Western blot assays. We further optimized RT-QuIC conditions for sensitive and specific detection of goat scrapie seeding activity in brain tissue from clinical animals. When used with 200  mM sodium chloride, both full-length sheep rPrPSen substrates (PrP genotypes A136R154Q171 and V136R154Q171) provided good discrimination between scrapie-infected and normal goat brain samples at 10(- )3 dilution within 15  h. Our findings indicate that RT-QuIC was at least 10,000-fold more sensitive than ELISA and Western blot assays for the detection of scrapie seeding activity in goat brain samples. In addition to PRNP WT samples, positive RT-QuIC reactions were also observed with three PRNP polymorphic goat brain samples (G/S127, I/M142 and H/R143) tested. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RT-QuIC sensitively detects prion seeding activity in classical scrapie-infected goat brain samples.

  12. Antemortem detection of chronic wasting disease prions in nasal brush collections and rectal biopsies from white-tailed deer by real time quaking-induced conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Nicholas J.; Siepker, Chris; Walter, William D.; Thomsen, Bruce V.; Greenlee, Justin J.; Lehmkuhl, Aaron D.; Richt, Jürgen a.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cervids, was first documented nearly 50 years ago in Colorado and Wyoming and has since spread to cervids in 23 states, two Canadian provinces, and the Republic of Korea. The expansion of this disease makes the development of sensitive diagnostic assays and antemortem sampling techniques crucial for the mitigation of its spread; this is especially true in cases of relocation/reintroduction of farmed or free-ranging deer and elk or surveillance studies of private or protected herds, where depopulation is contraindicated. This study sought to evaluate the sensitivity of the real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay by using recto-anal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (RAMALT) biopsy specimens and nasal brush samples collected antemortem from farmed white-tailed deer (n = 409). Antemortem findings were then compared to results from ante- and postmortem samples (RAMALT, brainstem, and medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes) evaluated by using the current gold standard in vitro assay, immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. We hypothesized that the sensitivity of RT-QuIC would be comparable to IHC analysis in antemortem tissues and would correlate with both the genotype and the stage of clinical disease. Our results showed that RAMALT testing by RT-QuIC assay had the highest sensitivity (69.8%) compared to that of postmortem testing, with a specificity of >93.9%. These data suggest that RT-QuIC, like IHC analysis, is an effective assay for detection of PrPCWD in rectal biopsy specimens and other antemortem samples and, with further research to identify more sensitive tissues, bodily fluids, or experimental conditions, has potential for large-scale and rapid automated testing for CWD diagnosis.

  13. New compact neutron polarizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krist, Th; Kennedy, S. J.; Hicks, T. J.; Mezei, F.

    A new type of a neutron polarizing bender was developed in co-operation with BENSC and ANSTO. It is based upon bent thin silicon wafers coated on one side with SiFeCo polarizing supermirrors and on the other side with Gd. Initial tests at BENSC in a 300 Oe magnetic field yielded a transmission of spin-up neutrons of about 55% over an angle range of 0.75° and flipping ratios > 30. Subsequent tests at ANSTO at 1200 Oe yielded a transmission of 48% with a flipping ratio > 45.

  14. FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, A.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

  15. Helium 3 neutron precision polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    Measuring neutron polarization to a high degree of precision is critical for the next generation of neutron decay correlation experiments. Polarized neutrons are also used in experiments to probe the hadronic weak interaction which contributes a small portion (˜10-7) of the force between nucleons. Using a beam of cold neutrons at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), we polarized neutrons and measured their absolute polarization to ˜0.1%. Neutrons were polarized by passing them through a ^3He spin filter, relying on the maximally spin dependent 3He neutron absorption cross section. The neutron polarization can be determined by measuring the wavelength-dependent neutron transmission through the ^3He cell. An independent measurement of the neutron polarization was also obtained by passing the polarized beam through an RF spin flipper and a second polarized ^3He cell, used as an analyzer. To measure the efficiency of the spin flipper, the same measurements were made after reversing the ^3He polarization in the polarizer by using NMR techniques (adiabatic fast passage). We will show the consistency of these two measurements and the resulting precision of neutron polarimetry using these techniques.

  16. Neutron storage time measurement for the neutron EDM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, W. Clark; Ito, Takeyasu; Ramsey, John; Makela, Mark; Clayton, Steven; Hennings-Yeomans, Raul; Saidur Rahaman, M.; Currie, Scott; Womack, Todd; Sondheim, Walter; Cooper, Martin

    2010-11-01

    A new experiment to search for the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is under development for installation at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oakridge National Laboratory. The experiment will use ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) stored in superfluid helium, along with ^3He atoms acting as a neutron spin analyzer and comagnetometer. One crucial factor affecting the ultimate sensitivity of the experiment is the neutron storage time that can be obtained in the acrylic measurement cell. The acrylic cell walls will be coated with deuterated polystyrene (dPS), which is expected to give a wall loss factor of ˜room temperature and below 20 K.

  17. Neutron recognition in LAND detector for large neutron multiplicity

    CERN Document Server

    Pawłowski, P; Leifels, Y; Trautmann, W; Adrich, P; Aumann, T; Bacri, C O; Barczyk, T; Bassini, R; Bianchin, S; Boiano, C; Boretzky, K; Boudard, A; Chbihi, A; Cibor, J; Czech, B; De Napoli, M; Ducret, J -E; Emling, H; Frankland, J D; Gorbinet, T; Hellström, M; Henzlova, D; Hlavac, S; Immè, J; Iori, I; Johansson, H; Kezzar, K; Kupny, S; Lafriakh, A; Fèvre, A Le; Gentil, E Le; Leray, S; Łukasik, J; Lühning, J; Lynch, W G; Lynen, U; Majka, Z; Mocko, M; Müller, W F J; Mykulyak, A; Orth, H; Otte, A N; Palit, R; Panebianco, S; Pullia, A; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Rossi, D; Salsac, M -D; Sann, H; Schwarz, C; Simon, H; Sfienti, C; Sümmerer, K; Tsang, M B; Verde, G; Veselsky, M; Volant, C; Wallace, M; Weick, H; Wiechula, J; Wieloch, A; Zwiegliński, B

    2012-01-01

    The performance of the LAND neutron detector is studied. Using an event-mixing technique based on one-neutron data obtained in the S107 experiment at the GSI laboratory, we test the efficiency of various analytic tools used to determine the multiplicity and kinematic properties of detected neutrons. A new algorithm developed recently for recognizing neutron showers from spectator decays in the ALADIN experiment S254 is described in detail. Its performance is assessed in comparison with other methods. The properties of the observed neutron events are used to estimate the detection efficiency of LAND in this experiment.

  18. Neutron beam imaging at neutron spectrometers at Dhruva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Shraddha S.; Rao, Mala N.

    2012-06-01

    A low efficiency, 2-Dimensional Position Sensitive Neutron Detector based on delay line position encoding is developed. It is designed to handle beam flux of 106-107 n/cm2/s and for monitoring intensity profiles of neutron beams. The present detector can be mounted in transmission mode, as the hardware allows maximum neutron transmission in sensitive region. Position resolution of 1.2 mm in X and Y directions, is obtained. Online monitoring of beam images and intensity profile of various neutron scattering spectrometers at Dhruva are presented. It shows better dynamic range of intensity over commercial neutron camera and is also time effective over the traditionally used photographic method.

  19. Some Implications of Neutron Mirror Neutron Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Mohapatra, Rabindra N; Nussinov, S

    2005-01-01

    We comment on a recently discussed possibility of oscillations between neutrons and degenerate mirror neutrons in the context of mirror models for particles and forces. It has been noted by Bento and Berezhiani that if these oscillations occurred at a rate of $\\tau^{-1}_{NN'}\\sim sec^{-1}$, it would help explain putative super GKZ cosmic ray events provided the temperature of the mirror radiation is $\\sim 0.3-0.4$ times that of familiar cosmic microwave background radiation. We discuss how such oscillation time scales can be realized in mirror models and find that the simplest nonsupersymmetric model for this idea requires the existence of a low mass (30-3000 GeV) color triplet scalar or vector boson. A supersymmetric model, where this constraint can be avoided is severely constrained by the requirement of maintaining a cooler mirror sector. We also find that the reheat temperature after inflation in generic models that give fast $n-n'$ oscillation be less than about 100 GeV in order to maintain the required ...

  20. Neutron Scattering Investigations of Correlated Electron Systems and Neutron Instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sonja Lindahl

    are a unique probe for studying the atomic and molecular structure and dynamics of materials. Even though neutrons are very expensive to produce, the advantages neutrons provide overshadow the price. As neutrons interact weakly with materials compared to many other probes, e.g. electrons or photons......, it is possible to make a neutron scattering experiment through sample environment equipment like cryostats or pressure cells. Another advantage of neutron experiments is that the wavelength and energy of the neutron match the inter-atomic distances and basic excitations of solid materials. The scattering cross...... is not taken into account in previous reports on the field effect of magnetic scattering, since usually only L 0 is probed. A paper draft submitted for publication describing the results of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed on the oxygen-doped La2CuO4+y HTSC is appended (Tc 40 K...

  1. Neutronic studies of the coupled moderators for spallation neutron sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Wen; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the neutronic performance of coupled moderators to be implemented in spallation neutron sources by Monte-Carlo simulation and give the slow neutron spectra for the cold and thermal moderators. CH4 moderator can provide slow neutrons with highly desirable characteristics and will be used in low-power spallation neutron soureces. The slow neutron intensity extracted from different angles has been calculated. The capability of moderation of liquid H2 is lower than H2O and liquid CH4 due to lower atomic number density of hydrogen but we can compensate for this disadvantage by using a premoderator. The H2O premoderator of 2cm thickness can reduce the heat deposition in the cold moderator by about 33% without spoiling the neutron pulse.

  2. A review on neutron reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Soo; Lee, Chang Hee; Shim, Hae Seop; Seong, Baek Seok

    1999-03-01

    This report contains principle and characteristic of neutron reflectometry. Therefore, in case of operating neutron reflectometer at HANARO in future, it will be a reference to the user who wishes to use the instrument effectively. Also, the current situation of neutron reflectometer operating in the world was examined. The detail of neutron reflectometer such as GANS(MURR), ADAM(ILL), POSY II(ANL), ROG(IRI) was described. The recent research situation on neutron reflectometry was also examined and it helps us to determine research field. (author)

  3. Neutron proton crystallography station (PCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kovalevsky, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Hannah [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The PCS (Protein Crystallography Station) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a unique facility in the USA that is designed and optimized for detecting and collecting neutron diffraction data from macromolecular crystals. PCS utilizes the 20 Hz spallation neutron source at LANSCE to enable time-of-flight measurements using 0.6-7.0 {angstrom} neutrons. This increases the neutron flux on the sample by using a wavelength range that is optimal for studying macromolecular crystal structures. The diagram below show a schematic of PCS and photos of the detector and instrument cave.

  4. Neutron detection efficiency determinations for the TUNL neutron-neutron and neutron-proton scattering-length measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trotter, D.E. Gonzalez [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)], E-mail: crowell@tunl.duke.edu; Meneses, F. Salinas [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Tornow, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)], E-mail: tornow@tunl.duke.edu; Crowell, A.S.; Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Schmidt, D. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, D-38116, Braunschweig (Germany); Walter, R.L. [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)

    2009-02-11

    The methods employed and the results obtained from measurements and calculations of the detection efficiency for the neutron detectors used at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) in the simultaneous determination of the {sup 1}S{sub 0} neutron-neutron and neutron-proton scattering lengths a{sub nn} and a{sub np}, respectively, are described. Typical values for the detector efficiency were 0.3. Very good agreement between the different experimental methods and between data and calculation has been obtained in the neutron energy range below E{sub n}=13MeV.

  5. Cooling of Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorian H.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the theoretical basis for modeling the cooling evolution of compact stars starting from Boltzmann equations in curved space-time. We open a discussion on observational verification of different neutron star models by consistent statistics. Particular interest has the question of existence of quark matter deep inside of compact object, which has to have a specific influence on the cooling history of the star. Besides of consideration of several constraints and features of cooling evolution, which are susceptible of being critical for internal structure of hot compact stars we have introduced a method of extraction of the mass distribution of the neutron stars from temperature and age data. The resulting mass distribution has been compared with the one suggested by supernove simulations. This method can be considered as an additional checking tool for the consistency of theoretical modeling of neutron stars. We conclude that the cooling data allowed existence of neutron stars with quark cores even with one-flavor quark matter.

  6. New Neutron Dosimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN has been operating an Individual Dosimetry Service for neutrons for about 35 years. The service was based on nuclear emulsions in the form of film packages which were developed and scanned in the Service. In 1999, the supplier of theses packages informed CERN that they will discontinue production of this material. TIS-RP decided to look for an external service provider for individual neutron dosimetry. After an extensive market survey and an invitation for tender, a supplier that met the stringent technical requirements set up by CERN's host states for personal dosimeters was identified. The new dosimeter is based on a track-etching technique. Neutrons have the capability of damaging plastic material. The microscopic damage centres are revealed by etching them in a strong acid. The resulting etch pits can be automatically counted and their density is proportional to dose equivalent from neutrons. On the technical side, the new dosimeter provides an improved independence of its response from energy and th...

  7. Neutron protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    X-ray diffraction of single crystal has enriched the knowledge of various biological molecules such as proteins, DNA, t-RNA, viruses, etc. It is difficult to make structural analysis of hydrogen atoms in a protein using X-ray crystallography, whereas neutron diffraction seems usable to directly determine the location of those hydrogen atoms. Here, neutron diffraction method was applied to structural analysis of hen egg-white lysozyme. Since the crystal size of a protein to analyze is generally small (5 mm{sup 3} at most), the neutron beam at the sample position in monochromator system was set to less than 5 x 5 mm{sup 2} and beam divergence to 0.4 degree or less. Neutron imaging plate with {sup 6}Li or Gd mixed with photostimulated luminescence material was used and about 2500 Bragg reflections were recorded in one crystal setting. A total of 38278 reflections for 2.0 A resolution were collected in less than 10 days. Thus, stereo views of Trp-111 omit map around the indol ring of Trp-111 was presented and the three-dimensional arrangement of 696H and 264D atoms in the lysozyme molecules was determined using the omit map. (M.N.)

  8. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeweg, T. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4π BaF2 array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (>~100 μg) and/or radioactive (DANCE we have performed neutron capture cross section measurements on a wide array of medium to heavy mass nuclides. Measurements to date include neutron capture cross sections on 241,243Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio (α = σγ/σf) for 235U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data.

  9. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  10. The crystal structure of paramagnetic copper(II) oxalate (CuC₂O₄): formation and thermal decomposition of randomly stacked anisotropic nano-sized crystallites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Axel Nørlund; Lebech, Bente; Andersen, Niels Hessel; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2014-11-28

    Synthetic copper(II) oxalate, CuC2O4, was obtained in a precipitation reaction between a copper(II) solution and an aqueous solution of oxalic acid. The product was identified from its conventional X-ray powder patterns which match that of the copper mineral Moolooite reported to have the composition CuC2O4·0.44H2O. Time resolved in situ investigations of the thermal decomposition of copper(II) oxalate using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction showed that in air the compound converts to Cu2O at 215 °C and oxidizes to CuO at 345 °C. Thermo gravimetric analysis performed in an inert Ar-gas reveals that the material contains no crystal water and reduces to pure Cu at 295 °C. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in the temperature range from 2 K to 300 K show intriguing paramagnetic behaviour with no sign of magnetic order down to 2 K. A crystal structure investigation is made based on powder diffraction data using one neutron diffraction pattern obtained at 5 K (λ = 1.5949(1) Å) combined with one conventional and two synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns obtained at ambient temperature using λ = 1.54056, 1.0981 and λ = 0.50483(1) Å, respectively. Based on the X-ray synchrotron data the resulting crystal structure is described in the monoclinic space group P2₁/c (#14) in the P12₁/n1 setting with unit cell parameters a = 5.9598(1) Å, b = 5.6089(1) Å, c = 5.1138 (1) Å, β = 115.320(1)°. The composition is CuC2O4 with atomic coordinates determined by FullProf refinement of the neutron diffraction data. The crystal structure consists of a random stacking of CuC2O4 micro-crystallites where half the Cu-atoms are placed at (2a) and the other half at (2b) positions with the corresponding oxalate molecules centred around the corresponding (2b) and (2a) site positions, respectively. The diffraction patterns obtained for both kinds of radiation show considerable broadening of several Bragg peaks caused by highly anisotropic microstructural size and strain

  11. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklyn, C. B. [Radiation Science Department, Necsa, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  12. Neutron logging tool readings and neutron parameters of formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czubek, Jan A.

    1995-03-01

    A case history of the calibration of neutron porosity tools is given in the paper. The calibration of neutron porosity tools is one of the most difficult, complicated, and time consuming tasks in the well logging operations in geophysics. A semi empirical approach to this problem is given in the paper. It is based on the correlation of the tool readings observed in known environments with the apparent neutron parameters sensed by the tools. The apparent neutron parameters are functions of the true neutron parameters of geological formations and of the borehole material, borehole diameter, and the tool position inside the borehole. The true integral neutron transport parameters are obtained by the multigroup diffusion approximation for slowing down of neutrons and by one thermal neutron group for the diffusion. In the latter, the effective neutron temperature is taken into account. The problem of the thermal neutron absorption cross section of rocks is discussed in detail from the point of view of its importance for the well logging results and for the experimental techniques being used.

  13. Infrared spectroscopic and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on Dy substituted magnesium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamzai, K.K., E-mail: kkbamz@yahoo.com [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu (India); Kour, Gurbinder; Kaur, Balwinder [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu (India); Arora, Manju; Pant, R.P. [National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi (India)

    2013-11-15

    Dysprosium substituted magnesium ferrite with composition MgDy{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} with 0.00≤x≤0.07 synthesized by the solid state reaction technique was subjected to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. Infrared spectrum analysis were carried out to confirm the spinel phase formation and to ascertain the cation distribution in the ferrite phase. The absorption spectra show two significant absorption bands between 400 and 1000 cm{sup −1} which are attributed to tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) sites of the spinel phase. The positions of bands were found to be composition dependent. Splitting of bands as well as appearance of shoulders shows the presence of Fe{sup 2+} ions in the system. The force constants for tetrahedral and octahedral sites were calculated and found to vary with Dy{sup 3+} ions content. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of these samples exhibit broad, asymmetric resonance signal due to Fe{sup 3+}/Dy{sup 3+} ions present in the host lattice. The spectra become broader with Dy{sup 3+} ions substitution in pure Mg-ferrite and this broadening is attributed to surface spin disorder (spin frustration) possibly coming from mainly antiferromagnetic interactions between the neighbouring spins in the magnetic grains. The weak superexchange interactions results in the broadening of the resonance line width and large g-value as compared to the free electron value. - Highlights: • Absorption bands between 400 and 1000 cm{sup −1} reveal the formation of spinel phase. • The force constant on tetrahedral and octahedral site is used to explain the bond length. • Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra exhibit broad, asymmetric resonance peaks. • Spin frustration in spinel ferrites is explained by the broadening of line width.

  14. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-07

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T(2), which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/T(n) with n = 2 and higher.

  15. Al-doped MgB2 materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateni, Ali; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan; Somer, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB2) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB2. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB2 disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  16. Stern-Gerlach deflection of field-free aligned paramagnetic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gershnabel, E; Averbukh, I Sh

    2011-01-01

    The effects of laser-induced prealignment on the deflection of paramagnetic molecules by inhomogeneous static magnetic field are studied. Depending on the relevant Hund's coupling case of the molecule, two different effects were identified: either suppression of the deflection by laser pulses (Hund's coupling case (a) molecules, such as ClO), or a dramatic reconstruction of the broad distribution of the scattering angles into several narrow peaks (for Hund's coupling case (b) molecules, such as O2 or NH). These findings are important for various applications using molecular guiding, focusing and trapping with the help of magnetic fields.

  17. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, S.A. (Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics); Fawcett, E. (Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics); Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  18. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, S.A. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Fawcett, E. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  19. Effect of pH on Paramagnetic Centers in Cladosporium cladosporioides Melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilawa, B.; Buszman, E.; Gondzik, A.; Wilczyński, S.; Zdybel, M.; Witoszyńska, T.; Wilczok, T.

    2006-07-01

    Paramagnetic centers in melanin existing in pigmented soil fungi Cladosporium cladosporioides cultured at acidic (4, 5, 6), neutral (7), and alkaline (8) pH were studied by EPR method. o-semiquinone free radicals (g: 2.0032-2.0040) concentration in melanin biopolymer increased for pH from 4 to 6, decreased at pH 7, and reached the maximum value at pH 8. It may be expected that melanin free radicals reactions with small molecules (metal ions, drugs) are the most effective at pH between 6 and 8. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes exist in the all studied melanin samples.

  20. Transforming from paramagnetism to room temperature ferromagnetism in CuO by ball milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqiang Gao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we experimentally demonstrate that it is possible to induce ferromagnetism in CuO by ball milling without any ferromagnetic dopant. The magnetic measurements indicate that paramagnetic CuO is driven to the ferromagnetic state at room temperature by ball milling gradually. The saturation magnetization of the milled powders is found to increase with expanding the milling time and then decrease by annealing under atmosphere. The fitted X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate that the observed induction and weaken of the ferromagnetism shows close relationship with the valence charged oxygen vacancies (Cu1+-VO in CuO.

  1. Retrospective dosimetry of nail by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance; Dosimetria retrospectiva de unha por Ressonancia Paramagnetica Eletronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannoni, Ricardo A., E-mail: giannoni@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues Junior, Orlando, E-mail: rodrijr@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize samples of human nails, subjected to irradiation of high doses through Technical Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The goal is to establish a dose/response relationship in order to assess dose levels absorbed by individuals exposed in radiation accidents situations, retrospectively. Samples of human nails were irradiated with gamma radiation, and received a dose of 20 Gy. EPR measurements performed on samples before irradiation identified EPR signals associated with defects caused by the mechanical action of the sample collection. After irradiation other species of free radicals, associated with the action of gamma radiation, have been identified.

  2. Ordering of PCDTBT revealed by time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of its triplet excitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskup, Till; Sommer, Michael; Rein, Stephan; Meyer, Deborah L; Kohlstädt, Markus; Würfel, Uli; Weber, Stefan

    2015-06-22

    Time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) spectroscopy is shown to be a powerful tool to characterize triplet excitons of conjugated polymers. The resulting spectra are highly sensitive to the orientation of the molecule. In thin films cast on PET film, the molecules' orientation with respect to the surface plane can be determined, providing access to sample morphology on a microscopic scale. Surprisingly, the conjugated polymer investigated here, a promising material for organic photovoltaics, exhibits ordering even in bulk samples. Orientation effects may significantly influence the efficiency of solar cells, thus rendering proper control of sample morphology highly important.

  3. Low temperature electron paramagnetic resonance anomalies in Fe-based nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koksharov, Yu. A.; Gubin, S. P.; Kosobudsky, I. D.; Beltran, M.; Khodorkovsky, Y.; Tishin, A. M.

    2000-08-01

    A study of the electron paramagnetic resonance of Fe-based nanoparticles embedded in polyethylene matrix was performed as a function of temperature ranging from 3.5 to 500 K. Nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were prepared by the high-velocity thermodestruction of iron-containing compounds. A temperature-driven transition from superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic resonance was observed for samples with different Fe content. The unusual behavior of the spectra at about 25 K is considered evidence of a spin-glass state in iron oxide nanoparticles.

  4. Strong Paramagnetism of Gold Nanoparticles Deposited on a Sulfolobus acidocaldarius S Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, J.; Bartolomé, F.; García, L. M.; Figueroa, A. I.; Repollés, A.; Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Luis, F.; Magén, C.; Selenska-Pobell, S.; Pobell, F.; Reitz, T.; Schönemann, R.; Herrmannsdörfer, T.; Merroun, M.; Geissler, A.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic properties of Au nanoparticles deposited on an archaeal S layer are reported. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometries demonstrate that the particles are strongly paramagnetic, without any indication of magnetic blocking down to 16 mK. The average magnetic moment per particle is Mpart=2.36(7) μB. This contribution originates at the particle’s Au 5d band, in which an increased number of holes with respect to the bulk value is observed. The magnetic moment per Au atom is 25 times larger than any measured in other Au nanoparticles or any other configurations up to date.

  5. Single-ion anisotropy in the gadolinium pyrochlores studied by electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazkov, V. N.; Zhitomirsky, M. E.; Smirnov, A. I.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Loidl, A.; Marin, C.; Sanchez, J.-P.

    2005-07-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance is used to measure the single-ion anisotropy of Gd3+ ions in the pyrochlore structure of (Y1-xGdx)2Ti2O7 . A rather strong easy-plane-type anisotropy is found. The anisotropy constant D is comparable to the exchange integral J in the prototype Gd2Ti2O7 , D≃0.75J , and exceeds the dipolar energy scale. Physical implications of an easy-plane anisotropy for a pyrochlore antiferromagnet are considered. We calculate the magnetization curves at T=0 and discuss phase transitions in a magnetic field.

  6. Low-temperature specific heat of YMn{sub 2} in the paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.A.; Emerson, J.P.; Phillips, N.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Ballou, R.; Lelievre-Berna, E. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France). Lab. Louis Neel

    1992-07-01

    The low-temperature specific heat of YMn{sub 2} has been measured at applied pressures of 0 to 7.7 kbar. A paramagnetic state is stabilized for moderate values of the applied pressure (of the order of 1.6 kbar). A large linear term in the specific heat, which decreases regularly with increasing pressure, is observed in this phase. It is ascribed to giant spin fluctuations associated with a magnetic-non magnetic instability and a strong geometrical spin frustration.

  7. Low-temperature specific heat of YMn sub 2 in the paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.A.; Emerson, J.P.; Phillips, N.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Ballou, R.; Lelievre-Berna, E. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France). Lab. Louis Neel)

    1992-07-01

    The low-temperature specific heat of YMn{sub 2} has been measured at applied pressures of 0 to 7.7 kbar. A paramagnetic state is stabilized for moderate values of the applied pressure (of the order of 1.6 kbar). A large linear term in the specific heat, which decreases regularly with increasing pressure, is observed in this phase. It is ascribed to giant spin fluctuations associated with a magnetic-non magnetic instability and a strong geometrical spin frustration.

  8. Neutron beam design for low intensity neutron and gamma-ray radioscopy using small neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Two small neutron sources of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be radioisotopes were used for design of neutron beams applicable to low intensity neutron and gamma ray radioscopy (LINGR). In the design, Monte Carlo code (MCNP) was employed to generate neutron and gamma ray beams suited to LINGR. With a view to variable neutron spectrum and neutron intensity, various arrangements were first examined, and neutron-filter, gamma-ray shield and beam collimator were verified. Monte Carlo calculations indicated that with a suitable filter-shield-collimator arrangement, thermal neutron beam of 3,900 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with neutron/gamma ratio of 7x10 sup 7 , and 25 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with very large neutron/gamma ratio, respectively, could be produced by using sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf(122 mu g) and a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be(37GBq)radioisotopes at the irradiation port of 35 cm from the neutron sources.

  9. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetoresistance of neutron-irradiated doped SI whiskers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druzhinin, A.A., E-mail: druzh@polynet.lviv.ua [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera Str., 12, Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Wroclaw (Poland); Ostrovskii, I.P.; Khoverko, Yu.M. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera Str., 12, Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Wroclaw (Poland); Rogacki, K. [International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Wroclaw (Poland); Litovchenko, P.G.; Pavlovska, N.T. [Institute of Nuclear Researches, NAS of Ukraine, 47, Prospect Nauky, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Pavlovskyy, Yu.V.; Ugrin, Yu.O. [Ivan Franko Drohobych State Pedagogical University, 24, Franko str., 82100 Drohobych (Ukraine)

    2015-11-01

    The effect of 8.6·10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2} fast neutron irradiation on the magnetic susceptibility and magnetoresistance of Si whiskers with impurity concentration near metal–insulator transition (MIT) has been studied. Neutron irradiated specimens with boron concentration away of MIT are mainly diamagnetic with a small amount of paramagnetic centers originated from dangling bonds on the whisker surface. It has been established that at temperatures near 4.2 K, a significant contribution to the conductivity is made by light charge carriers of low concentration but with high mobility. The as grown whiskers with impurity concentration correspondent to MIT showed hysteresis loops in magnetization at temperature of liquid helium. Besides hysteresis loops in magnetoresistance was observed for whiskers under compression stress at low temperature up to 7 K. The possible reason of the effect can be magnetic interaction between impurities centers in subsurface region of the whisker with the orbital moment of dangle bounds in the whisker core–shell interstices. - Highlights: • Neutron irradiation influence on magnetic susceptibility of Si whiskers is studied. • Neutron irradiated Si whiskers with boron concentration away of MIT are diamagnetic. • Whiskers in the vicinity to MIT showed hysteresis loops in magnetoresistance. • Whiskers in the vicinity to MIT showed hysteresis loops in magnetic susceptibility.

  10. Neutron irradiation and damage assessment of plastic scintillators of the Tile Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdhluli, J. E.; Mellado, B.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2017-01-01

    Following the comparative study of proton induced radiation damage on various plastic scintillator samples from the ATLAS-CERN detector, a study on neutron irradiation and damage assessment on the same type of samples will be conducted. The samples will be irradiated with different dose rates of neutrons produced in favourable nuclear reactions using a radiofrequency linear particle accelerator as well as from the SAFARI nuclear reactor at NECSA. The MCNP 5 code will be utilized in simulating the neutron transport for determining the dose rate. Light transmission and light yield tests will be performed in order to assess the radiation damage on the scintillators. In addition, Raman spectroscopy and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) analysis will be used to characterize the samples after irradiation. The project aims to extent these studies to include radiation assessment damage of any component that processes the scintillating light and deteriorates the quantum efficiency of the Tilecal detector, namely, photomultiplier tubes, wavelength shifting optical fibres and the readout electronics. They will also be exposed to neutron irradiation and the damage assessed in the same manner.

  11. Neutron Scattering Investigations of Correlated Electron Systems and Neutron Instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sonja Lindahl

    are a unique probe for studying the atomic and molecular structure and dynamics of materials. Even though neutrons are very expensive to produce, the advantages neutrons provide overshadow the price. As neutrons interact weakly with materials compared to many other probes, e.g. electrons or photons......, it is possible to make a neutron scattering experiment through sample environment equipment like cryostats or pressure cells. Another advantage of neutron experiments is that the wavelength and energy of the neutron match the inter-atomic distances and basic excitations of solid materials. The scattering cross...... magnetism. This is in contrast to what is observed as the critical temperature is slightly lower for this system compared to other co-doped systems, suggesting that the magnetic and superconducting phases co-exist. A published manuscript describes the study of magnetic and superconducting properties of Ba...

  12. Neutron-gamma competition for $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Mumpower, Matthew; Moller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We present a coupled Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation and Hauser-Feshbach (QRPA+HF) model for calculating delayed particle emission. This approach uses microscopic nuclear structure information which starts with Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the daughter nucleus, and then follows the statistical decay until the initial available excitation energy is exhausted. Explicitly included at each particle emission stage is $\\gamma$-ray competition. We explore this model in the context of neutron emission of neutron-rich nuclei and find that neutron-gamma competition can lead to both increases and decreases in neutron emission probabilities, depending on the system considered. A second consequence of this formalism is a prediction of more neutrons on average being emitted after $\\beta$-decay for nuclei near the neutron dripline compared to models that do not consider the statistical decay.

  13. Paramagnetism-based versus classical constraints: An analysis of the solution structure of Ca Ln calbindin D9k

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, Ivano [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) and Department of Chemistry (Italy); Donaire, Antonio; Jimenez, Beatriz [Universidad Cardenal Herrera-CEU, Department of Chemistry (Spain); Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) and Department of Agricultural Biotechnology (Italy); Piccioli, Mario; Poggi, Luisa [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) and Department of Chemistry (Italy)

    2001-10-15

    The relative importance of paramagnetism-based constraints (i.e. pseudocontact shifts, residual dipolar couplings and nuclear relaxation enhancements) with respect to classical constraints in solution structure determinations of paramagnetic metalloproteins has been addressed. The protein selected for the study is a calcium binding protein, calbindin D{sub 9k}, in which one of the two calcium ions is substituted with cerium(III). From 1823 NOEs, 191 dihedral angles, 15 hydrogen bonds, 769 pseudocontact shifts, 64 orientational constraints, 26 longitudinal relaxation rates, plus 969 pseudocontact shifts from other lanthanides, a final family with backbone r.m.s.d. from the average of 0.25 A was obtained. Then, several families of structures were generated either by removing subsets of paramagnetism-based constraints or by removing increasing numbers of NOEs. The results show the relative importance of the various paramagnetism-based constraints and their good complementarity with the diamagnetic ones. Although a resolved structure cannot be obtained with paramagnetism-based constraints only, it is shown that a reasonably well resolved backbone fold can be safely obtained by retaining as few as 29 randomly chosen long-range NOEs using the standard version of the program PSEUDYANA.

  14. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  15. Progress of Neutron Bubble Detectors in CIAE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Neutron bubble detector is the only personal neutron dosimeter which has adequate neutronsensitivity to meet the implications of the ICRP 60 recommendations for neutron dosimetry. It canmonitor the wide range of neutron energy, for example 100 eV to 10 MeV And it becomes a significanttool for neutron dose monitoring at the environment of nuclear energy.

  16. Measurement of neutron scattering lengths using neutron interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Chandra B.

    This thesis describes the details on building a new Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOFa), the measurement of the incoherent neutron scattering length bi of 3He, and the measurement of the coherent neutron scattering length bc of 4He at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). A new monochromatic beamline and facility has been installed at the NCNR devoted to neutron interferometry in the research areas of spin control, spin manipulation, quantum mechanics, quantum information science, spintronics, and material science. This facility is possible in part because of advances in decoherence free subspace interferometer designs that have demonstrated consistent contrast in the presence of vibrational noise; a major environmental constraint that has prevented neutron interferometry from being applied at other neutron facilities. This new facility, NIOFa, is located in the guide hall of the NCNR upstream of the existing Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOF) and has several advantages over the NIOF including higher incident flux, better neutron polarization, and increased accessibility. The measurement of the incoherent neutron scattering length bi of 3He was done using a (220) single silicon crystal skew symmetric interferometer. This experiment requires both a polarized beam and a polarized target. We report bi = -2.35 +/- 0.014 (stat.) +/- 0.014 (syst.). This experiment is a revision of the previous experiment which was done in 2008, and partially explains the non-zero phase shift seen in 2008 experiment even if target cell was completely unpolarized. The measurement of the coherent neutron scattering length b c of the 4He was done using a (111) single silicon crystal interferometer. The neutron interferometry and optics facility at NIST had been used previously to determine the coherent scattering lengths for n- 1H, n-2H, and n-3He to less than 1% relative uncertainty. We report bc of the 4He

  17. Neutron electric polarizability

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandru, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    We use the background field method to extract the "connected" piece of the neutron electric polarizability. We present results for quenched simulations using both clover and Wilson fermions and discuss our experience in extracting the mass shifts and the challenges we encountered when we lowered the quark mass. For the neutron we find that as the pion mass is lowered below $500\\MeV$, the polarizability starts rising in agreement with predictions from chiral perturbation theory. For our lowest pion mass, $m_\\pi=320\\MeV$, we find that $\\alpha_n = 3.8(1.3)\\times 10^{-4}\\fm^3$, which is still only one third of the experimental value. We also present results for the neutral pion; we find that its polarizability turns negative for pion masses smaller than $500\\MeV$ which is puzzling.

  18. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, C.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  19. Neutron Scattering Stiudies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegel, Gunter H.R.; Egan, James J

    2007-04-18

    This project covers four principal areas of research: Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in odd-A terbium, thulium and other highly deformed nuclei near A=160 with special regard to interband transitions and to the investigation of the direct-interaction versus the compound-nucleus excitation process in these nuclei. Examination of new, fast photomultiplier tubes suitable for use in a miniaturized neutron-time-of-flight spectrometer. Measurement of certain inelastic cross sections of 238U. Determination of the multiplicity of prompt fission gamma rays in even-A fissile actinides. Energies and mean lives of fission isomers produced by fast fission of even-Z, even-A actinides. Study of the mean life of 7Be in different host matrices and its possible astro-physical significance.

  20. Neutrons from Antiproton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    Background: Radiotherapy with Antiprotons is currently investigated by the AD-4/ACE collaboration. The hypothesis is that the additional energy released from the antiprotons annihilating at the target nuclei can enable a reduced dose in the entry channel of the primary beam. Furthermore an enhanced...... relative biological effect (RBE) has already been beam measured in spread out Bragg peaks of antiprotons, relative to that found in the plateau region. However, the antiproton annihilation process is associated with a substantial release of secondary particles which contribute to the dose outside...... the neutron spectrum. Additionally, we used a cylindrical polystyrene loaded with several pairs of thermoluminescent detectors containing Lithium-6 and Lithium-7, which effectively detects thermalized neutrons. The obtained results are compared with FLUKA imulations. Results: The results obtained...

  1. Neutron Transport Simulations for NIST Neutron Lifetime Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangchen; BL2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrons in stable nuclei can exist forever; a free neutron lasts for about 15 minutes on average before it beta decays to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino. Precision measurements of the neutron lifetime test the validity of weak interaction theory and provide input into the theory of the evolution of light elements in the early universe. There are two predominant ways of measuring the neutron lifetime: the bottle method and the beam method. The bottle method measures decays of ultracold neutrons that are stored in a bottle. The beam method measures decay protons in a beam of cold neutrons of known flux. An improved beam experiment is being prepared at the National Institute of Science and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD) with the goal of reducing statistical and systematic uncertainties to the level of 1 s. The purpose of my studies was to develop computer simulations of neutron transport to determine the beam collimation and study the neutron distribution's effect on systematic effects for the experiment, such as the solid angle of the neutron flux monitor. The motivation for the experiment and the results of this work will be presented. This work was supported, in part, by a Grant to Gettysburg College from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program.

  2. High-resolution neutron microtomography with noiseless neutron counting detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McPhate, J.B.; Vallerga, J.V.; Siegmund, O.H.W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Feller, W.B. [Nova Scientific Inc., 10 Picker Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States); Lehmann, E. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Butler, L.G. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Dawson, M. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy (Germany)

    2011-10-01

    The improved collimation and intensity of thermal and cold neutron beamlines combined with recent advances in neutron imaging devices enable high-resolution neutron radiography and microtomography, which can provide information on the internal structure of objects not achievable with conventional X-ray imaging techniques. Neutron detection efficiency, spatial and temporal resolution (important for the studies of dynamic processes) and low background count rate are among the crucial parameters defining the quality of radiographic images and tomographic reconstructions. The unique capabilities of neutron counting detectors with neutron-sensitive microchannel plates (MCPs) and with Timepix CMOS readouts providing high neutron detection efficiency ({approx}70% for cold neutrons), spatial resolutions ranging from 15 to 55 {mu}m and a temporal resolution of {approx}1 {mu}s-combined with the virtual absence of readout noise-make these devices very attractive for high-resolution microtomography. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of an MCP-Timepix detection system applied to microtomographic imaging, performed at the ICON cold neutron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. The high resolution and the absence of readout noise enable accurate reconstruction of texture in a relatively opaque wood sample, differentiation of internal tissues of a fly and imaging of individual {approx}400 {mu}m grains in an organic powder encapsulated in a {approx}700 {mu}m thick metal casing.

  3. Neutrons in the moon. [neutron flux and production rate calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblum, J. J.; Fireman, E. L.; Levine, M.; Aronson, A.

    1973-01-01

    Neutron fluxes for energies between 15 MeV and thermal at depths of 0 to 300 g/sq cm in the moon are calculated by the discrete ordinate mathod with the ANISN code. With the energy spectrum of Lingenfelter et al. (1972). A total neutron-production rate for the moon of 26 plus or minus neutrons/sq cm sec is determined from the Ar-37 activity measurements in the Apollo 16 drill string, which are found to have a depth dependence in accordance with a neutron source function that decreases exponentially with an attenuation length of 155 g/sq cm.

  4. Are there good probes for the di-neutron correlation in light neutron-rich nuclei?

    CERN Document Server

    Hagino, K

    2015-01-01

    The di-neutron correlation is a spatial correlation with which two valence neutrons are located at a similar position inside a nucleus. We discuss possible experimental probes for the di-neutron correlation. This includes the Coulomb breakup and the pair transfer reactions of neutron-rich nuclei, and the direct two-neutron decays of nuclei beyond the neutron drip-line.

  5. Magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of phosphine- and thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, E.; Muñoz-Márquez, M. A.; Fernández, A.; Crespo, P.; Hernando, A.; Lucena, R.; Conesa, J. C.

    2010-03-01

    In the last years, the number of studies performed by wholly independent research groups that confirm the permanent magnetism, first observed in our research lab, for thiol-capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) has rapidly increased. Throughout the years, the initial magnetometry studies have been completed with element-specific magnetization measurements based on, for example, the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique that have allowed the identification of gold as the magnetic moment carrier. In the research work here presented, we have focused our efforts in the evaluation of the magnetic behavior and iron impurities content in the synthesized samples by means of superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry, respectively. As a result, hysteresis cycles typical of a ferromagnetic material have been measured from nominally iron-free gold NPs protected with thiol, phosphine, and chlorine ligands. It is also observed that for samples containing both, capped gold NPs and highly diluted iron concentrations, the magnetic behavior of the NPs is not affected by the presence of paramagnetic iron impurities. The hysteresis cycles reported for phosphine-chlorine-capped gold NPs confirm that the magnetic behavior is not exclusively for the metal-thiol system.

  6. Theoretical studies of the paramagnetic perovskites MTaO{sub 3} (M = Ca, Sr and Ba)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Zahid, E-mail: zahidf82@gmail.com [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara, Dir (Lower) (Pakistan); Khan, Imad; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, M. Salman [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara, Dir (Lower) (Pakistan); Asadabadi, S. Jalali [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Hezar Gerib Avenue, Isfahan, 81744 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    In the present density functional studies, structural, mechanical and magneto-electronic properties of CaTaO{sub 3,} SrTaO{sub 3} and BaTaO{sub 3} perovskites have been investigated. The calculated structural parameters by DFT and analytical methods are found consistent with the experiments. The analytically calculated tolerance factors of these compounds as well as their mechanical properties show that they are stable in the cubic phase. Furthermore elastic properties show that these materials are ductile in nature and confirm that BaTaO{sub 3} is harder than the rest compounds. The calculated spin dependent magneto-electronic properties reveal the paramagnetic metallic nature of these compounds. The electrical conductivity curve demonstrates significant conductivity above room temperature. On the basis of the presented properties it is expected that these compounds could be efficient electrode materials and need experimental investigations. - Highlights: • MTaO{sub 3} (M = Ca, Sr and Ba) perovskites are investigated theoretically in the frame work of density functional theory. • Mechanical properties explain the stability of these compounds and show that BaTaO{sub 3} is more ductile. • The magneto-electronic studies reveal the paramagnetic metallic nature of these compounds. • Significant electrical conductivity is observed above room temperature.

  7. Redox-dependent conformational changes in eukaryotic cytochromes revealed by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander N; Vanwetswinkel, Sophie; Van de Water, Karen; van Nuland, Nico A J

    2012-03-01

    Cytochrome c (Cc) is a soluble electron carrier protein, transferring reducing equivalents between Cc reductase and Cc oxidase in eukaryotes. In this work, we assessed the structural differences between reduced and oxidized Cc in solution by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy. First, we have obtained nearly-complete backbone NMR resonance assignments for iso-1-yeast Cc and horse Cc in both oxidation states. These were further used to derive pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) arising from the paramagnetic haem group. Then, an extensive dataset comprising over 450 measured PCSs and high-resolution X-ray and solution NMR structures of both proteins were used to define the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility tensor, Δχ. For most nuclei, the PCSs back-calculated from the Δχ tensor are in excellent agreement with the experimental PCS values. However, several contiguous stretches-clustered around G41, N52, and A81-exhibit large deviations both in yeast and horse Cc. This behaviour is indicative of redox-dependent structural changes, the extent of which is likely conserved in the protein family. We propose that the observed discrepancies arise from the changes in protein dynamics and discuss possible functional implications.

  8. Paramagnetic decoration of DNA origami nanostructures by Eu³⁺ coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opherden, Lars; Oertel, Jana; Barkleit, Astrid; Fahmy, Karim; Keller, Adrian

    2014-07-15

    The folding of DNA into arbitrary two- and three-dimensional shapes, called DNA origami, represents a powerful tool for the synthesis of functional nanostructures. Here, we present the first approach toward the paramagnetic functionalization of DNA origami nanostructures by utilizing postassembly coordination with Eu(3+) ions. In contrast to the usual formation of toroidal dsDNA condensates in the presence of trivalent cations, planar as well as rod-like DNA origami maintain their shape and monomeric state even under high loading with the trivalent lanthanide. Europium coordination was demonstrated by the change in Eu(3+) luminescence upon binding to the two DNA origami. Their natural circular dichroism in the Mg(2+)- and Eu(3+)-bound state was found to be very similar to that of genomic DNA, evidencing little influence of the DNA origami superstructure on the local chirality of the stacked base pairs. In contrast, the magnetic circular dichroism of the Mg(2+)-bound DNA origami deviates from that of genomic DNA. Furthermore, the lanthanide affects the magnetic properties of DNA in a superstructure-dependent fashion, indicative of the existence of superstructure-specific geometry of Eu(3+) binding sites in the DNA origami that are not formed in genomic DNA. This simple approach lays the foundation for the generation of magneto-responsive DNA origami nanostructures. Such systems do not require covalent modifications and can be used for the magnetic manipulation of DNA nanostructures or for the paramagnetic alignment of molecules in NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of beta-alumina, a prototype glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Steven Ross

    1980-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance techniques are used to study single crystal Na, K, and Li beta-alumina. Color centers are introduced into this material by irradiating the samples with electrons at liquid nitrogen temperature. Using electron paramagnetic resonance and electron nuclear double resonance, the color centers generated in this manner are identified, and their location within the material is determined. For one of these centers, an F/sup +/ center, the electron spin relaxation rate is measured over the range 2 to 20/sup 0/K using the pulse saturation and recovery technique. These measurements reveal an exceptionally fast relaxation rate with anomalous temperature and microwave frequency dependence. Beta-alumina is a structurally unique system. It is partially disordered and consists of ordered blocks of aluminum oxide separated by planar disordered regions. Extensive measurements have shown that beta-alumina displays properties identical to those observed for glasses at low temperature as a result of this limited structural disorder. These glass-like properties have been explained by proposing that atomic tunneling occurs in beta-alumina at low temperature producing a system of localized two level states. A model is developed which quantitatively describes the electron spin relaxation data. The proposed relaxation mechanism couples the color center spin to the phonon induced relaxation of a nearby localized two level tunneling state. A detailed comparison shows that this model is in good agreement with earlier heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and dielectric susceptibility measurements in beta-alumina.

  10. Investigating lanthanide dopant distributions in Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) using solid state paramagnetic NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Ryan J; Stebbins, Jonathan F

    2016-10-01

    This paper demonstrates the approach of using paramagnetic effects observed in NMR spectra to investigate the distribution of lanthanide dopant cations in YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet, Y3Al5O12) optical materials, as a complimentary technique to optical spectroscopy and other standard methods of characterization. We investigate the effects of Ce(3+), Nd(3+), Yb(3+), Tm(3+), and Tm(3+)-Cr(3+) on (27)Al and (89)Y NMR spectra. We note shifted resonances for both AlO4 and AlO6 sites. In some cases, multiple shifted peaks are observable, and some of these can be empirically assigned to dopant cations in known configurations to the observed nuclides. In many cases, AlO6 peaks shifted by more than one magnetic neighbor can be detected. In general, we observe that the measured intensities of shifted resonances, when spinning sidebands are included, are consistent with predictions from models with dopant cations that are randomly distributed throughout the lattice. In at least one set of (27)Al spectra, we identify two sub-peaks possibly resulting from two paramagnetic cations with magnetically coupled spin states neighboring the observed nucleus. We identify systematic changes in the spectra related to known parameters describing the magnetic effects of lanthanide cations, such as larger shift distances when the expectation value of electron spins is greater. We lastly comment on the promise of this technique in future analyses of laser and other crystalline oxide materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Nonasulfated Tetrahyaluronan with a Paramagnetic Tag for Studying Its Complex with Interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhling, Sebastian; Künze, Georg; Lemmnitzer, Katharina; Bermudez, Marcel; Wolber, Gerhard; Schiller, Jürgen; Huster, Daniel; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-04-11

    Implants and artificial biomaterials containing sulfated hyaluronans have been shown to improve the healing of injured skin and bones. It is hypothesized that these effects are mediated by the binding of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) to growth factors and cytokines, resulting in the sequestering of proteins to the wound healing site and in modulated protein activity. Given that no direct synthetic access to sulfated oligohyaluronans has been available, little is known about their protein binding and the structure of the resulting protein complexes. Here, the chemoenzymatic preparation of oligohyaluronans on the gram scale is described. Oligohyaluronans are converted into anomeric azides at the reducing end, enabling the attachment of analytical labels through an anomeric ligation reaction. A nonasulfated tetrahyaluronan-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid derivative has been produced and used as a paramagnetic tag for the elucidation of the complex of this ligand with interleukin-10 using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR analysis. The metal ion position is resolved with 1.0 Å, enabling a refined structural model of the complex.

  12. Thin chitosan films containing super-paramagnetic nanoparticles with contrasting capability in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjadian, Fatemeh; Moradi, Sahar; Hosseini, Majid

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have found application as MRI contrasting agents. Herein, chitosan thin films containing super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are evaluated in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To determine their contrasting capability, super-paramagnetic nanoparticles coated with citrate (SPIONs-cit) were synthesized. Then, chitosan thin films with different concentrations of SPIONs-cit were prepared and their MRI data (i.e., r 2 and r 2*) was evaluated in an aqueous medium. The synthesized SPIONs-cit and chitosan/SPIONs-cit films were characterized by FTIR, EDX, XRD as well as VSM with the morphology evaluated by SEM and AFM. The nanoparticle sizes and distribution confirmed well-defined nanoparticles and thin films formation along with high contrasting capability in MRI. Images revealed well-dispersed uniform nanoparticles, averaging 10 nm in size. SPIONs-cit's hydrodynamic size averaged 23 nm in diameter. The crystallinity obeyed a chitosan and SPIONs pattern. The in vitro cellular assay of thin films with a novel route was performed within Hek293 cell lines showing that thin films can be biocompatible.

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of a Single NV Nanodiamond Attached to an Individual Biomolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeling-Smith, Richelle M.; Jung, Young Woo; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Cardellino, Jeremy; Rampersaud, Isaac; North, Justin A.; Šimon, Marek; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Rampersaud, Arfaan; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Poirier, Michael G.; Hammel, P. Chris

    2016-05-01

    A key limitation of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), an established and powerful tool for studying atomic-scale biomolecular structure and dynamics is its poor sensitivity, samples containing in excess of 10^12 labeled biomolecules are required in typical experiments. In contrast, single molecule measurements provide improved insights into heterogeneous behaviors that can be masked by ensemble measurements and are often essential for illuminating the molecular mechanisms behind the function of a biomolecule. We report EPR measurements of a single labeled biomolecule that merge these two powerful techniques. We selectively label an individual double-stranded DNA molecule with a single nanodiamond containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, and optically detect the paramagnetic resonance of NV spins in the nanodiamond probe. Analysis of the spectrum reveals that the nanodiamond probe has complete rotational freedom and that the characteristic time scale for reorientation of the nanodiamond probe is slow compared to the transverse spin relaxation time. This demonstration of EPR spectroscopy of a single nanodiamond labeled DNA provides the foundation for the development of single molecule magnetic resonance studies of complex biomolecular systems.

  14. Stability of functionalized C{sub 60} paramagnetic dimers and monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael [Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny, NJ 07806-5000 (United States); Owens, Frank J., E-mail: owensfj@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Hunter College, City University of New York, 695 Park Ave., NY 10065 (United States)

    2012-02-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DFT is used to calculate the bond dissociation energy of functionalized C{sub 60} dimers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results show the dimers would not be stable above room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculations indicate the observed magnetism cannot be due to C{sub 60} dimers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Because of their higher stability the ferromagnetism is likely due to X-C{sub 60} monomers. - Abstract: Density functional theory is used to calculate the bond dissociation energy to cleave the C{sub 60}=C{sub 60} bond of the paramagnetic X-C{sub 60}=C{sub 60}-X and X-C{sub 60}=C{sub 60} dimers where X is F, OH, O and H. The results show that these dimers would not be stable much above room temperature and therefore cannot constitute the paramagnetic phase needed to form the observed ferromagnetism which has been shown to be stable up to 800 K. The calculated bond dissociation energies to remove an F, OH or H from a single C{sub 60} are large suggesting that they could be the source of the unpaired spin needed for the high temperature ferromagnetism.

  15. How Ions Arrange in Solution: Detailed Insight from NMR Spectroscopy of Paramagnetic Ion Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanović, Marko; Morita, Takaumi; Horii, Yoji; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Enders, Markus

    2016-11-04

    Ion pairing between the paramagnetic anion [Tb(obPc)2 ](-) (obPc=2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octabutoxyphthalocyaninato), which has a very large magnetic anisotropy, with various diamagnetic counterions [P(Ph)4 ](+) (1 a), [As(Ph)4 ](+) (1 b), bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium ([PPN](+) , 1 c) and tetra-n-butylammonium ([TBA](+) , 1 d) was studied by means of (1) H, (13) C, (14) N, and (31) P NMR spectroscopy in solution at various temperatures. The influence of the paramagnetic anion on the NMR spectroscopy properties of the diamagnetic cations allowed a detailed insight into the distances and relative orientations of the paired ions. Isotropic tumbling models for the description of the quaternary cations are inaccurate, particularly for [TBA](+) with its flexible butyl chains. The effects of temperature and concentration were also assessed. The advantage of this technique is that relatively large distances and the orientation between molecules or ions in solution can be studied. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Spin S = 1 centers: a universal type of paramagnetic defects in nanodiamonds of dynamic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Vul', A. Ya

    2012-06-01

    Intrinsic paramagnetic defects in ˜5 nm sized nanodiamonds, produced by various dynamic synthesis (DySND) techniques (detonation, shock-wave, pulsed laser ablation of solid carbon containing targets), have been studied by multi-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). X-band (9-10 GHz) EPR spectra of DySND, in addition to the main intensive singlet Lorentzian-like EPR signal, reveal a low intensity doublet pattern within the half-field (HF) region (g ˜ 4). On transferring spectra to the Q-band (34 GHz) the shape of the HF pattern changes and splitting between doublet components is reduced from 10.4 to 2.6 mT. The HF patterns observed are attributed to the ‘forbidden’ ΔMS = 2 transitions between the Zeeman levels of some spin-triplet (S = 1) centers. The model of two triplet centers with g ˜ 2.003 and zero-field splitting parameters D1 = 0.095 cm-1 (TR1) and D2 = 0.030 cm-1 (TR2) satisfactorily describes experimental results at both microwave frequencies. The spin-triplet-type defects are observed in a wide variety of DySND samples irrespective of industrial supplier, cooling and carbon soot refinement methods, initial purity, disintegration, or subsequent targeted chemical modification. This indicates that the intrinsic defects with S = 1 in DySND systems are of universal origin.

  17. Paramagnetic properties of the low- and high-spin states of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanwetswinkel, Sophie; Nuland, Nico A. J. van; Volkov, Alexander N., E-mail: ovolkov@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Jean Jeener NMR Centre, Structural Biology Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-09-15

    Here we describe paramagnetic NMR analysis of the low- and high-spin forms of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), a 34 kDa heme enzyme involved in hydroperoxide reduction in mitochondria. Starting from the assigned NMR spectra of a low-spin CN-bound CcP and using a strategy based on paramagnetic pseudocontact shifts, we have obtained backbone resonance assignments for the diamagnetic, iron-free protein and the high-spin, resting-state enzyme. The derived chemical shifts were further used to determine low- and high-spin magnetic susceptibility tensors and the zero-field splitting constant (D) for the high-spin CcP. The D value indicates that the latter contains a hexacoordinate heme species with a weak field ligand, such as water, in the axial position. Being one of the very few high-spin heme proteins analyzed in this fashion, the resting state CcP expands our knowledge of the heme coordination chemistry in biological systems.

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance of double perovskite Ba{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Gomez, Pablo [Dept. Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Almanza, Ovidio [Dept. Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Bogota D.C. (Colombia)

    2007-07-01

    In this work we present electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurement of double perovskite Ba{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6}. This type of materials are of great interest due to their simultaneous conducting and ferrimagnetic properties, being them able to use in practical devices for their giant magnetoresistance effect at room temperature The samples have been synthesized with standard ceramic route, with sintering temperature of 1200 C in a reducing He/H{sub 2} atmosphere. EPR measurements have been carried out in a Bruker spectrometer operating in X band, in the temperature range 80 to 400 K. Below Curie temperature the single line becomes asymmetric, broadens and shifts to lower fields with decreasing temperature. In the paramagnetic region the peak-to-peak intensity decreases sharply and the line broadens up to 340 K. The experimental data are compared with similar results of other double perovskites analyzed previously by other authors. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Magnetization at the interface of Cr2O3 and paramagnets with large stoner susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shi; Street, M.; Wang, Junlei; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Binek, Ch; Dowben, P. A.

    2017-03-01

    From the Cr 2p3/2 x-ray magnetic circular dichroism signal, there is clear evidence of interface polarization with overlayers of both Pd and Pt on chromia (Cr2O3). The residual boundary polarization of chomia is stronger for a Pt overlayer than in the case of a Pd overlayer. The reduction of chromia boundary magnetization with a paramagnetic metal overlayer, compared to the free surface, is interpreted as a response to the induced spin polarization in Pt and Pd. Magnetization induced in a Pt overlayer, via proximity to the chromia boundary magnetization, is evident in the polar magneto-optical Kerr measurements. These results are essential to explainations why Pt and Pd are excellent spacer layers for voltage controlled exchange bias, in the [Pd/Co] n /Pd/Cr2O3 and [Pt/Co] n /Pt/Cr2O3 perpendicular magneto-electric exchange bias systems. The findings pave the way to realize ultra-fast reversal of induced magnetization in a free moment paramagnetic layer, with possible application in voltage-controlled magnetic random access memory.

  20. Magnetization at the interface of Cr2O3 and paramagnets with large stoner susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shi; Street, M; Wang, Junlei; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Binek, Ch; Dowben, P A

    2017-03-15

    From the Cr 2p3/2 x-ray magnetic circular dichroism signal, there is clear evidence of interface polarization with overlayers of both Pd and Pt on chromia (Cr2O3). The residual boundary polarization of chomia is stronger for a Pt overlayer than in the case of a Pd overlayer. The reduction of chromia boundary magnetization with a paramagnetic metal overlayer, compared to the free surface, is interpreted as a response to the induced spin polarization in Pt and Pd. Magnetization induced in a Pt overlayer, via proximity to the chromia boundary magnetization, is evident in the polar magneto-optical Kerr measurements. These results are essential to explainations why Pt and Pd are excellent spacer layers for voltage controlled exchange bias, in the [Pd/Co] n /Pd/Cr2O3 and [Pt/Co] n /Pt/Cr2O3 perpendicular magneto-electric exchange bias systems. The findings pave the way to realize ultra-fast reversal of induced magnetization in a free moment paramagnetic layer, with possible application in voltage-controlled magnetic random access memory.

  1. Four-component relativistic density functional theory calculations of NMR shielding tensors for paramagnetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Malkina, Olga L; Malkin, Vladimir G

    2013-12-27

    A four-component relativistic method for the calculation of NMR shielding constants of paramagnetic doublet systems has been developed and implemented in the ReSpect program package. The method uses a Kramer unrestricted noncollinear formulation of density functional theory (DFT), providing the best DFT framework for property calculations of open-shell species. The evaluation of paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) tensors reduces to the calculation of electronic g tensors, hyperfine coupling tensors, and NMR shielding tensors. For all properties, modern four-component formulations were adopted. The use of both restricted kinetically and magnetically balanced basis sets along with gauge-including atomic orbitals ensures rapid basis-set convergence. These approaches are exact in the framework of the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, thus providing useful reference data for more approximate methods. Benchmark calculations on Ru(III) complexes demonstrate good performance of the method in reproducing experimental data and also its applicability to chemically relevant medium-sized systems. Decomposition of the temperature-dependent part of the pNMR tensor into the traditional contact and pseudocontact terms is proposed.

  2. Paramagnetic defects induced by electron irradiation in barium hollandite ceramics for caesium storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin-Chevaldonnet, V; Gourier, D; Caurant, D; Esnouf, S; Charpentier, T; Costantini, J M

    2006-04-26

    We have studied by electron paramagnetic resonance the mechanism of defect production by electron irradiation in barium hollandite, a material used for immobilization of radioactive caesium. The irradiation conditions were the closest possible to those occurring in Cs storage waste forms. Three paramagnetic defects were observed, independently of the irradiation conditions. A hole centre (H centre) is attributed to a superoxide ion O(2)(-) originating from hole trapping by interstitial oxygen produced by electron irradiation. An electron centre (E(1) centre) is attributed to a Ti(3+) ion adjacent to the resulting oxygen vacancy. Another electron centre (E(2) centre) is attributed to a Ti(3+) ion in a cation site adjacent to an extra Ba(2+) ion in a neighbouring tunnel, originating from barium displacement by elastic collisions. Comparison of the effects of external irradiations by electrons with the β-decay of Cs in storage waste forms is discussed. It is concluded that the latter would be dominated by E(1) and H centres rather than E(2) centres.

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy characterization of wheat grains from plants of different water stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabanowska, Maria; Filek, Maria; Kurdziel, Magdalena; Bednarska, Elżbieta; Dłubacz, Aleksandra; Hartikainen, Helina

    2012-09-01

    Grains of five genotypes of wheat (four Polish and one Finnish), differing in their tolerance to drought stress were chosen for this investigation. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy allowed observation of transition metal ions (Mn, Fe, Cu) and different types of stable radicals, including semiquinone centers, present in seed coats, as well as several types of carbohydrate radicals found mainly in the inner parts of grains. The content of paramagnetic metal centers was higher in sensitive genotypes (Radunia, Raweta) than in tolerant ones (Parabola, Nawra), whereas the Finnish genotype (Manu) exhibited intermediate amounts. Similarly, the concentrations of both types of radicals, carbohydrates and semiquinone were significantly higher in the grains originating from more sensitive wheat genotypes. The nature of carbohydrate radicals and their concentrations were confronted with the kinds and amounts of sugars found by the biochemical analyses and microscopy observations. It is suggested that some long lived radicals (semiquinone and starch radicals) occurring in grains could be indicators of stress resistance of wheat plants.

  4. Development of Single-side Magnet Array for Super Paramagnetic Nano-particle Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Permanent magnets are interesting for the use in magnetic drug targeting devices. The magnetic fields and forces with distances from magnets have limited the depth of targeting. Producing greater forces at deep depth by optimally designed magnet arrays would allow treatment of a wider class of patients. In this study, we present a design of a permanent magnet array for deep magnetic capture of super paramagnetic iron oxide nano-particles, which consists of an array of 3 individual bar permanent magnet positioned to achieve a reasonably magnitude magnetic field and its gradient within a deeply region. These configurations were simulated with two-dimensional finite-element methods. The super paramagnetic iron oxide nano-particles were adopted Fe3O4 particles with diameter 40 nm by chemical co-precipitation method. Performance factors were defined to relate magnetic field force with mass. The field strength and gradient were measured by a Hall probe and agreed well with the simulations.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of surface-modified Fe3O4 super-paramagnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhan-jie; Ma, Jia; Xu, Shuang-bing; Ren, Jing-hua; Qin, You; Huang, Jing; Yang, Kun-yu; Zhang, Zhi-ping; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Aqueous dispersion and stability of Fe3O4 nanoparticles remain an issue unresolved since aggregation of naked iron nanoparticles in water. In this study, we successfully synthesized different Fe3O4 super-paramagnetic nanoparticles which were modified by three kinds of materials [DSPE-MPEG2000, TiO2 and poly acrylic acid (PAA)] and further detected their characteristics. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly showed sizes and morphology of the four kinds of nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD) proved successfully coating of the three kinds of nanoparticles and their structures were maintained. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) verified that their magnetic properties fitted for the super-paramagnetic function. More importantly, the particle size analysis indicated that Fe3O4@PAA had a better size distribution, biocompatibility, stability and dispersion than the other two kinds of nanoparticles. In addition, using CNE2 cells as a model, we found that all nanoparticles were nontoxic. Taken together, our data suggest that Fe3O4@PAA nanoaparticles are superior in the application of biomedical field among the four kinds of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the future.

  6. Solid-state NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement immersion depth studies in phospholipid bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Shidong

    2010-11-01

    A new approach for determining the membrane immersion depth of a spin-labeled probe has been developed using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. A DOXYL spin label was placed at different sites of 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PSPC) phospholipid bilayers as paramagnetic moieties and the resulting enhancements of the longitudinal relaxation (T1) times of 31P nuclei on the surface of the bilayers were measured by a standard inversion recovery pulse sequence. The 31P NMR spin-lattice relaxation times decrease steadily as the DOXYL spin label moves closer to the surface as well as the concentration of the spin-labeled lipids increase. The enhanced relaxation vs. the position and concentration of spin-labels indicate that PRE induced by the DOXYL spin label are significant to determine longer distances over the whole range of the membrane depths. When these data were combined with estimated correlation times τc, the r-6-weighted, time-averaged distances between the spin-labels and the 31P nuclei on the membrane surface were estimated. The application of using this solid-state NMR PRE approach coupled with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) may be a powerful method for measuring membrane protein immersion depth. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein fold determined by paramagnetic magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Helmus, Jonathan J.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Biomacromolecules that are challenging for the usual structural techniques can be studied with atomic resolution by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. However, the paucity of >5 Å distance restraints, traditionally derived from measurements of magnetic dipole-dipole couplings between protein nuclei, is a major bottleneck that hampers such structure elucidation efforts. Here we describe a general approach that enables the rapid determination of global protein fold in the solid phase via measurements of nuclear paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) in several analogs of the protein of interest containing covalently-attached paramagnetic tags, without the use of conventional internuclear distance restraints. The method is demonstrated using six cysteine-EDTA-Cu2+ mutants of the 56-residue B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G, for which ~230 longitudinal backbone 15N PREs corresponding to ~10-20 Å distances were obtained. The mean protein fold determined in this manner agrees with the X-ray structure with a backbone atom root-mean-square deviation of 1.8 Å. PMID:22522262

  8. Neutrons are flying

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    View of the n_TOF tube with members of the design and construction team of the facility(from left to right: R. Magnin/LHC, E. Radermacher/EP, P. Cennini/EP and R. Cappi/PS). A new experimental facility was inaugurated at CERN on Wednesday 8 November. The neutron Time Of Flight (n_TOF) facility received its first protons from the PS at 10:55. With an intensity of 1 x 1011 protons per cycle on the n_TOF target, an intense neutron beam has been produced at CERN for the first time, opening the door to many new avenues of research including, for example, neutron induced cross-section measurements. The facility is an offspring of the work by Carlo Rubbia and his group on the novel idea of an Energy Amplifier. The basic idea was successfully tested at the PS with the FEAT experiment and later with the TARC experiment, where the feasibility of transmutation of long-lived products by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) was confirmed. This led to the possibility of radio-isotope production for medical applications, fo...

  9. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, S.A. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  10. 四川芦山地震灾害调查与灾后重建的相关问题分析%Investigation of Lushan Earthquake Disasters and Analysis of Related Problems During Post-quake Reconstruction in Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢和平; 邓建辉; 李碧雄

    2013-01-01

    2013年4月20日四川省芦山县发生Ms7.0级地震,发震断层为龙门山前山断裂,即大川-双石断裂.这是继2008年汶川地震后发生在龙门山断裂带的又一次强震.自4月25日起,笔者先后3次前往地震灾区进行地震灾害调查.本文小结主要的地震灾害情况,并简要讨论了灾后重建可能面临的问题.结果表明:相对于汶川地震,芦山地震的灾害相对较轻;沿发震断裂未发现明显的地表破裂带;崩塌滑坡的总体规模较小,也未出现明显的堰塞湖;滑坡点主要沿发震断层分布,岩性以三叠系上统须家河组地层为主;崩塌点主要出现在河流的峡谷段,岩性以砾岩为主,少量为侵入岩;建筑物损坏严重的基本上为砖木结构以及无圈梁或构造柱的砖混结构民居;灾后重建面临的主要地质灾害问题是主要公路的崩塌灾害以及宝兴县城的泥石流防治.%In April 20,2013,a strong earthquake measured Ms 7.0 hitted Lushan county,Sichuan province,which was induced by Longmenshan front fault,i.e.Dachuan-Shuangshi fault.It was the second large earthquake occurred along Longmenshan fault zone since Wenchuan earthquake in 2008.From April 25 on,the authors made three field visits to the quake-hit area.The disasters were summarized,and the potential problems during post-quake reconstruction were discussed.The results showed that compared with Wenchuan earthquake,the quake-induced disasters were lighter; no obvious surface ruptures were ever witnessed along the quake-inducing fault; both landslide and rockfall happened in small scale,so no large barrier lake was ever formed; landslide distributed along the seismogenic fault,and the rock types were Xujiahe Formation of Upper Triassic; rockfall appeared mainly in the gorge segment of rivers,and the rock types were mainly conglomerate and secondly intrusive rock; severe building damages were mainly brick-wood structured residential housings or brick

  11. Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    In 1979 a Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) was constituted within Buratom with the participation of all centers within the European Community at which neutron facilities were available. The main purpose of NRWG was to standardize methods and procedures used in neutron radiography of nuclear...... reactor fuel as well as establish standards for radiographic image quality of neutron radiographs. The NRWG meets once a year in each of the neutron radiography centers to review the progress made and draw plans for the future. Besides, ad-hoc sub-groups or. different topics within the field of neutron...... radiography are constituted. This paper reviews the activities and achievements of the NRWG and its sub-groups....

  12. Neutron background estimates in GESA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The SIMPLE project looks for nuclear recoil events generated by rare dark matter scattering interactions. Nuclear recoils are also produced by more prevalent cosmogenic neutron interactions. While the rock overburden shields against (μ,n neutrons to below 10−8 cm−2 s−1, it itself contributes via radio-impurities. Additional shielding of these is similar, both suppressing and contributing neutrons. We report on the Monte Carlo (MCNP estimation of the on-detector neutron backgrounds for the SIMPLE experiment located in the GESA facility of the Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit, and its use in defining additional shielding for measurements which have led to a reduction in the extrinsic neutron background to ∼ 5 × 10−3 evts/kgd. The calculated event rate induced by the neutron background is ∼ 0,3 evts/kgd, with a dominant contribution from the detector container.

  13. Neutron Imaging by Boric Acid

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, Fabio; Perconti, Walter; Petrucci, Andrea; Rosada, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a new type of passive neutron detector based on the already existing one, CR39, is described. Its operation was verified by three different neutron sources: an Americium-Beryllium (Am241-Be) source; a TRIGA type nuclear reactor; and a fast neutron reactor called TAPIRO. The obtained results, reported here, positively confirm its operation and the accountability of the new developed detecting technique.

  14. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy study of fluence dependence of paramagnetic relaxation in Mn/Fe implanted ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masenda, H.; Geburt, S.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Naidoo, D.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T. E.; Ncube, M.; Shayestehaminzadeh, S.; Gislason, H. P.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Ronning, C.

    2016-12-01

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive precursor isotope 57Mn+ ( T 1/2= 1.5 min) into ZnO single crystals at ISOLDE/CERN shows that a large fraction of 57Fe atoms produced in the 57Mn beta decay is created as paramagnetic Fe3+ with relatively long spin-lattice relaxation times. Here we report on ZnO pre-implanted with 56Fe to fluences of 2×1013, 5×10 13 and 8 × 1013 ions/cm2 in order to investigate the dependence of the paramagnetic relaxation rate of Fe3+ on fluence. The spectra are dominated by magnetic features displaying paramagnetic relaxation effects. The extracted spin-lattice relaxation rates show a slight increase with increasing ion fluence at corresponding temperatures and the area fraction of Fe3+ at room temperature reaches a maximum contribution of 80(3)% in the studied fluence range.

  15. Application of Flow Focusing to the Break-Up of a Magnetite Suspension Jet for the Production of Paramagnetic Microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Martín-Banderas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Paramagnetic particles offer an extensive improvement in the magnetic separation or purification of a wide variety of protein molecules. Most commercial paramagnetic particles are synthesized by laborious and costly procedures. A straightforward production of paramagnetic microparticles with homogeneous and selectable sizes using flow focusing (FF technology is described in this work. The development of an initial formulation of a stable iron oxide suspension compatible with the FF requirements is also reported. The obtained particles, below 10 microns in diameter and presenting smooth and reactive surface, were codified with an organic fluorophore and showed excellent properties for covalent attachment of biomolecules such as proteins and its subsequent recognition by flow cytometry. Furthermore, particles with suitable magnetite content resulted as well-suited for commercial magnet separators for these purposes.

  16. NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMITH,G.C.

    2002-03-01

    Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

  17. Centrifugal quantum states of neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Petukhov, A. K.; Protasov, K. V.; Voronin, A. Yu.

    2008-09-01

    We propose a method for observation of the quasistationary states of neutrons localized near a curved mirror surface. The bounding effective well is formed by the centrifugal potential and the mirror Fermi potential. This phenomenon is an example of an exactly solvable “quantum bouncer” problem that can be studied experimentally. It could provide a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, as well as quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. We develop a formalism that describes quantitatively the neutron motion near the mirror surface. The effects of mirror roughness are taken into account.

  18. Ukraine experimental neutron source facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Bolshinsky, I.; Nekludov, I.; Karnaukhov, I. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (INL); (Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology)

    2008-01-01

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an experimental neutron source facility. The facility has been developed for producing medical isotopes, training young nuclear professionals, supporting the Ukraine nuclear industry, providing capability for performing reactor physics, material research, and basic science experiments. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA is collaborating with KIPT on developing this facility. A driven subcritical assembly utilizing the KIPT electron accelerator with a target assembly is used to generate the neutron source. The target assembly utilizes tungsten or uranium for neutron production through photonuclear reactions with 100-KW of electron beam power. The neutron source intensity, spectrum, and spatial distribution have been studied to maximize the neutron yield and satisfy different engineering requirements. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux intensity with a subcriticality of 0.98. Low enrichment uranium is used for the fuel material because it enhances the neutron source performance. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. Horizontal neutron channels are incorporated for performing basic research including cold neutron source. This paper describes the conceptual design and summarizes some of the related analyses.

  19. Ultra-Cold Neutrons (UCN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Researchers working at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and eight other member institutions of an international collaboration are constructing the most intense...

  20. Reactor neutrons in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifarth, René; Glorius, Jan; Göbel, Kathrin; Heftrich, Tanja; Jentschel, Michael; Jurado, Beatriz; Käppeler, Franz; Köster, Ulli; Langer, Christoph; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Weigand, Mario

    2017-09-01

    The huge neutron fluxes offer the possibility to use research reactors to produce isotopes of interest, which can be investigated afterwards. An example is the half-lives of long-lived isotopes like 129I. A direct usage of reactor neutrons in the astrophysical energy regime is only possible, if the corresponding ions are not at rest in the laboratory frame. The combination of an ion storage ring with a reactor and a neutron guide could open the path to direct measurements of neutron-induced cross sections on short-lived radioactive isotopes in the astrophysically interesting energy regime.

  1. Measurement of neutron diffraction with compact neutron source RANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Y.; Takamura, M.; Taketani, A.; Sunaga, H.; Otake, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Kumagai, M.; Oba, Y.; Hama, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffraction is used as a measurement technique for crystal structure. X-rays or electron beam with wavelength that is close to the lattice constant of the crystal is often used for the measurement. They have sensitivity in surface (0.01mm) of heavy metals due to the mean free path for heavy ions. Neutron diffraction has the probe of the internal structure of the heavy metals because it has a longer mean free path than that of the X-rays or the electrons. However, the neutron diffraction measurement is not widely used because large facilities are required in the many neutron sources. RANS (Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source) is developed as a neutron source which is usable easily in laboratories and factories. In RANS, fast neutrons are generated by 7MeV protons colliding on a Be target. Some fast neutrons are moderated with polyethylene to thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons of 10meV which have wavelength of 10nm can be used for the diffraction measurement. In this study, the texture evolution in steels was measured with RANS and the validity of the compact neutron source was proved. The texture of IF steel sheets with the thickness of 1.0mm was measured with 10minutes run. The resolution is 2% and is enough to analyze a evolution in texture due to compression/tensile deformation or a volume fraction of two phases in the steel sample. These results have proven the possibility to use compact neutron source for the analysis of mesoscopic structure of metallic materials.

  2. T-violation in neutron optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Y. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    Experimental method to detect a T-odd correlation term in neutron propagation through a nuclear target is discussed. The correlation term is between the neutron spin, neutron momentum and nuclear spin. (author)

  3. Fundamental physics research and neutron interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioffe, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    The possibility of the use of an extremely sensitive neutron interferometry technique for the study of electromagnetic structure of the neutron and the parity non-conservative effects in neutron spin rotation is discussed. (author)

  4. NASA Response to Nepal Quake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, E.; Webb, F.; Green, D. S.; Stough, T.; Kirschbaum, D.; Goodman, H. M.; Molthan, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the hours following the magnitude 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake on April 25, 2015, NASA and its partners began the process of assessing their ability to provide actionable data from a variety of space resources and scientific capabiltiies in order to provide responders with actionable information to assist in the relief and humanitarian operations. Working with the USGS, NGA, ASI, and JAXA, in the hours and days following the event, the team generated a number of scientific data products that were distributed to organizations responding to the event. Data included, ground based geodetic observations, optical and radar data from international and domestic partners, to compile a variety of products, including "vulnerability maps," used to determine risks that may be present, and "damage proxy maps," used to determine the type and extent of existing damage. This talk will focus on the response process, highlighting some of the products generated and distributed and lessons learned that would be useful for responding to future events that would improve the effectiveness of such a broad, agency wide response.

  5. Double-exchange driven ferromagnetic metal-paramagnetic insulator transition in Mn-doped CuO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippetti, Alessio; Fiorentini, Vincenzo

    2006-12-01

    Employing ab initio self-interaction-corrected local-spin-density calculations, we explain the nature of the ferromagnetic, metallic phase of Mn-doped CuO (an antiferromagnetic insulator when undoped), and of its concurrent transitions to a paramagnetic, insulating phase. Mn-induced donor levels enable conduction through ferromagnetically aligned Mn centers and ferromagnetic CuO planes via double exchange. In the paramagnetic insulating phase, a polaron hopping mechanism consistent with the experiments is envisaged. Our results suggest the intriguing possibility of designing double-exchange driven ferromagnetic cuprates.

  6. Improved quantification of alite and belite in anhydrous Portland cements by 29Si MAS NMR: Effects of paramagnetic ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Lundsted; Kocaba, Vanessa; Le Saoût, Gwenn;

    2009-01-01

    The applicability, reliability, and repeatability of 29Si MAS NMR for determination of the quantities of alite (Ca3SiO5) and belite (Ca2SiO4) in anhydrous Portland cement was investigated in detail for 11 commercial Portland cements and the results compared with phase quantifications based...... on powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld analysis and with Taylor-Bogue calculations. The effects from paramagnetic ions (Fe3+) on the spinning sideband intensities, originating from dipolar couplings between 29Si and the spins of the paramagnetic electrons, were considered and analyzed in spectra...

  7. Application of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy for validation of the novel (AN+DN) solvent polarity scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Luciana; Poletti, Erick F; Silva, Elias H; Schreier, Shirley; Nakaie, Clovis R

    2008-06-01

    Based on solvation studies of polymers, the sum (1:1) of the electron acceptor (AN) and electron donor (DN) values of solvents has been proposed as an alternative polarity scale. To test this, the electron paramagnetic resonance isotropic hyperfine splitting constant, a parameter known to be dependent on the polarity/proticity of the medium, was correlated with the (AN+DN) term using three paramagnetic probes. The linear regression coefficient calculated for 15 different solvents was approximately 0.9, quite similar to those of other well-known polarity parameters, attesting to the validity of the (AN+DN) term as a novel "two-parameter" solvent polarity scale.

  8. Calculating and measuring thermal neutrons exiting from neutron diffractometers collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Tafazolee, K

    2000-01-01

    process, effectiveness of them are studied for the enhancement of the available system. Final conclusion from the simulation process, indicates that the heavy water with the thickness of 50 to 60 cm. is the best moderator for gaining the better thermal neutrons flux for enhancement of P.N.D. in the T.R.R. Powder Neutron Diffractometer y (P.N.D.) is relatively good and practical way for identification of the 3 dimensional construction of materials. In order to exploit the capabilities of this method, in one of the neutron beam of the Tehran Research Reactor (T.R.R.), a collimator embedded inside the concrete wall, direct the neutrons produced in the core reactor towards a monochromator e. Neutrons having been monochromated by 2 nd collimator are then directed towards the sample. Then the pattern of diffracted neutrons from the sample are studied. In order to make the best out of it, neutrons coming to sit on the sample must be of the thermal type. That means the number/amount of thermal neutrons flux in compar...

  9. Probing neutron star physics using accreting neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patruno A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We give an obervational overview of the accreting neutron stars systems as probes of neutron star physics. In particular we focus on the results obtained from the periodic timing of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars in outburst and from the measurement of X-ray spectra of accreting neutron stars during quiescence. In the first part of this overview we show that the X-ray pulses are contaminated by a large amount of noise of uncertain origin, and that all these neutron stars do not show evidence of spin variations during the outburst. We present also some recent developments on the presence of intermittency in three accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars and investigate the reason why only a small number of accreting neutron stars show X-ray pulsations and why none of these pulsars shows sub-millisecond spin periods. In the second part of the overview we introduce the observational technique that allows the study of neutron star cooling in accreting systems as probes of neutron star internal composition and equation of state. We explain the phenomenon of the deep crustal heating and present some recent developments on several quasi persistent X-ray sources where a cooling neutron star has been observed.

  10. Sequential measurements of environmental neutron energy spectrum and neutron dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunomiya, Tomoya; Nakamura, Takashi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Terunuma, Kazutaka; Hirabayashi, Naoya; Sato, Youichi; Abe, Sigeru; Rasolonjatovo A.H, Danielle [Tohoku Univ., Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    From April 2001, neutron energy spectra and neutron dose were sequentially measured using 5'' -rem counter and {sup 3}He multi-moderator spectrometer (Boner boll) at Kawauchi-campus of Tohoku University. These data were collected about the relation between the dose level and the solar activities. (author)

  11. Magnetic correlations in oxides: Neutron diffraction and neutron depolarization study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S M Yusuf

    2008-10-01

    We have studied magnetic correlations in several oxide materials that belong to colossal magnetoresistive, naturally occurring layered oxide showing low-dimensional magnetic ordering, solid oxide fuel cell interconnect materials, and magnetic nanoparticles using neutron diffraction and neutron depolarization techniques. In this paper, an overview of some of these results is given.

  12. Synovectomy by Neutron capture; Sinovectomia por captura de neutrones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Torres M, C. [Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    The Synovectomy by Neutron capture has as purpose the treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis, illness which at present does not have a definitive curing. This therapy requires a neutron source for irradiating the articulation affected. The energy spectra and the intensity of these neutrons are fundamental since these neutrons induce nuclear reactions of capture with Boron-10 inside the articulation and the freely energy of these reactions is transferred at the productive tissue of synovial liquid, annihilating it. In this work it is presented the neutron spectra results obtained with moderator packings of spherical geometry which contains in its center a Pu{sup 239} Be source. The calculations were realized through Monte Carlo method. The moderators assayed were light water, heavy water base and the both combination of them. The spectra obtained, the average energy, the neutron total number by neutron emitted by source, the thermal neutron percentage and the dose equivalent allow us to suggest that the moderator packing more adequate is what has a light water thickness 0.5 cm (radius 2 cm) and 24.5 cm heavy water (radius 26.5 cm). (Author)

  13. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Tremsin, A S; Tittelmeier, K; Schillinger, B; Schulz, M; Lerche, M; Feller, W B

    2015-01-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and...

  14. Application of imaging plate neutron detector to neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Fujine, S; Kamata, M; Etoh, M

    1999-01-01

    As an imaging plate neutron detector (IP-ND) has been available for thermal neutron radiography (TNR) which has high resolution, high sensitivity and wide range, some basic characteristics of the IP-ND system were measured at the E-2 facility of the KUR. After basic performances of the IP were studied, images with high quality were obtained at a neutron fluence of 2 to 7x10 sup 8 n cm sup - sup 2. It was found that the IP-ND system with Gd sub 2 O sub 3 as a neutron converter material has a higher sensitivity to gamma-ray than that of a conventional film method. As a successful example, clear radiographs of the flat view for the fuel side plates with boron burnable poison were obtained. An application of the IP-ND system to neutron radiography (NR) is presented in this paper.

  15. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Sarah [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Uhoya, Walter [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Tsoi, Georgiy [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Wenger, Lowell E [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Vohra, Yogesh [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Chesnut, Gary Neal [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Weir, S. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Tulk, Christopher A [ORNL; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Neel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  16. Small angle neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ∼ 1 nm up to ∼ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ∼ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area… through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer, form factor analysis (I(q→0, Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system, structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates, and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast. It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of

  17. Handbook of neutron optics

    CERN Document Server

    Utsuro, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    Written by authors with an international reputation, acknowledged expertise and teaching experience, this is the most up-to-date resource on the field. The text is clearly structured throughout so as to be readily accessible, and begins by looking at scattering of a scalar particle by one-dimensional systems. The second section deals with the scattering of neutrons with spin in one-dimensional potentials, while the third treats dynamical diffraction in three-dimensional periodic media. The final two sections conclude with incoherent and small angle scattering, and some problems of quantum mech

  18. Advanced Neutron Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christl, Mark; Dobson, Chris; Norwood, Joseph; Kayatin, Matthew; Apple, Jeff; Gibson, Brian; Dietz, Kurt; Benson, Carl; Smith, Dennis; Howard, David; hide

    2013-01-01

    Energetic neutron measurements remain a challenge for space science investigations and radiation monitoring for human exploration beyond LEO. We are investigating a new composite scintillator design that uses Li6 glass scintillator embedded in a PVT block. A comparison between Li6 and Boron 10 loaded scintillators are being studied to assess the advantages and shortcomings of these two techniques. We present the details of the new Li6 design and results from the comparison of the B10 and Li6 techniques during exposures in a mixed radiation field produced by high energy protons interacting in a target material.

  19. On Magnetized Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, Luiz L

    2014-01-01

    In this work we review the formalism normally used in the literature about the effects of density-dependent magnetic fields on the properties of neutron stars, expose some ambiguities that arise and propose a way to solve the related problem. Our approach uses a different prescription for the calculation of the pressure based on the chaotic field formalism for the stress tensor and also a different way of introducing a variable magnetic field, which depends on the energy density rather than on the baryonic density.

  20. Crystal field splittings of PrX 2 compounds (X=Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Ni) studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; De Jongh, L. J.; Huiskamp, W. J.; Furrer, A.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron inelastic scattering experiments have been performed on polycrystalline samples of the cubic Laves phase compounds PrX 2(X=Pt, Rh, Ir, Ni). Measurements in the paramagnetic state yield LLW parameters 0.6< x<1 and W<0. In this region various levels cross at an x value 0.86 and as a consequence the electronic ground state in the paramagnetic regime is either the singlet Γ 1, or the non-magnetic doublet Γ 3. Measurements in the ferromagnetic state support these conclusions. The crystal-field parameters obtained can be used in model calculations of some macroscopic quantities, in particular the specific heat and the spontaneous magnetization. The variation of the x values in the present series of Laves phase compounds evidences the presence of a contribution by conduction electrons to the crystal field.

  1. High power neutron production targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wender, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  2. Neutron imaging of radioactive sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, F.; Karimzadeh, S.; Zawisky, M.

    2008-08-01

    Isotopic neutron sources have been available for more than six decades. At the Atomic Institute in Vienna, operating a 250 kW TRIGA reactor, different neutron sources are in use for instrument calibration and fast neutron applications but we have only little information about their construction and densities. The knowledge of source design is essential for a complete MCNP5 modeling of the experiments. Neutron radiography (NR) and neutron tomography (NT) are the best choices for the non-destructive inspection of the source geometry and homogeneity. From the transmission analysis we gain information about the shielding components and the densities of the radio-isotopes in the cores. Three neutron sources, based on (alpha, n) reaction, have been investigated, two 239PuBe sources and one 241AmBe source. In the NR images the internal structure was clearly revealed using high-resolving scintillation and imaging plate detectors. In one source tablet a crack was detected which causes asymmetric neutron emission. The tomography inspection of strong absorbing materials is more challenging due to the low beam intensity of 1.3x105 n/cm2s at our NT instrument, and due to the beam hardening effect which requires an extension of reconstruction software. The tomographic inspection of a PuBe neutron source and appropriate measures for background and beam hardening correction are presented.

  3. Physics of Neutron Star Crusts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamel Nicolas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The physics of neutron star crusts is vast, involving many different research fields, from nuclear and condensed matter physics to general relativity. This review summarizes the progress, which has been achieved over the last few years, in modeling neutron star crusts, both at the microscopic and macroscopic levels. The confrontation of these theoretical models with observations is also briefly discussed.

  4. Axion emission from neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, N.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that axion emission from neutron stars is the dominant energy-loss mechanism for a range of values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry-breaking scale (F) not excluded by previous constraints. This gives the possibility of obtaining a better bound on F from measurements of surface temperature of neutron stars.

  5. Neutrons for technology and science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeppli, G.

    1995-10-01

    We reviewed recent work using neutrons generated at nuclear reactors an accelerator-based spallation sources. Provided that large new sources become available, neutron beams will continue to have as great an impact on technology and science as in the past.

  6. Neutron and P, T symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Y. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    New ideas for experiments to improve the T-violation limit by a factor of 10 to 100 is discussed for a intensive spallation neutron source. The methods to improve the limit of the right-handed current and the neutron lifetime are also discussed. (author)

  7. Neutron Absorption in Geological Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvhøiden, G.; Andersen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal neutron absorption cross section of geological samples is determined with the steady state neutron source method. Cross section measurements of North Sea sediments demonstrate that also materials with high contents of clay minerals may be investigated with the steady state method.

  8. Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushan Konar

    2017-09-01

    This article briefly reviews our current understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in neutron stars, which basically defines the evolutionary pathways between different observational classes of neutron stars. The emphasis here is on the evolution in binary systems and the newly emergent classes of millisecond pulsars.

  9. Measurement of natural background neutron

    CERN Document Server

    Li Jain, Ping; Tang Jin Hua; Tang, E S; Xie Yan Fong

    1982-01-01

    A high sensitive neutron monitor is described. It has an approximate counting rate of 20 cpm for natural background neutrons. The pulse amplitude resolution, sensitivity and direction dependence of the monitor were determined. This monitor has been used for natural background measurement in Beijing area. The yearly average dose is given and compared with the results of KEK and CERN.

  10. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Paramagnetic Macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    Since A. Kowalsky's first report of the spectrum of cytochrome c in 1965, interest in the detection, assignment and interpretation of paramagnetic molecules has surged, especially in the last decade. Two classes of systems have played a key role in the development of the field: heme proteins and iron-sulfur proteins. These two systems are unique in many respects, one of which is that they contain well-defined chromophores, each of which can be studied in detail outside the protein matrix. They are the most successfully studied macromolecules, and the first eight and last six of the seventeen contributions to this book deal with heme and/or iron-sulfur proteins. The middle three chapters survey the progress on, and significant promise of, more difficult systems which do not possess a chromophore, but which have nevertheless yielded remarkable insights into their structure.

  11. An electron paramagnetic resonance study of PP and PP/SBS blends irradiated with gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Pedro E-mail: silva@ivic.ve; Albano, Carmen; Perera, Rosestela; Gonzalez, Jeanette; Ichazo, Miren

    2004-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of Polypropylene (PP) and its blends with a Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene (SBS) copolymer in 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt.% of SBS were carried out. The samples were irradiated in the 0{<=}D{<=}100 kGy range at a dose rate of 4.8 kGy/h. Typical spectra indicative of the formation of peroxy and alkyl radicals were obtained. The dynamics of formation and recombination of radicals in these samples could be explained using a mixed zero and first order generation-recombination fit of the total spin concentration as a function of the integral dose. The time dependence of the spin concentration was studied assuming a mixed first order fit in the decay process. The parameters obtained from the fitting are interpreted in terms of the rate of formation of free radicals at the irradiation time and in terms of the decay time of the total free radical concentration.

  12. Preparation and mechanism of Fe3O4/Au core/shell super-paramagnetic microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the presence of Fe3O4 nano-particles, a new type of super-paramagnetic Fe3O4/Au microspheres with core/shell structures was prepared by reduction of Au3+ with hydroxylamine. The formation mechanism of the core/shell microspheres was studied in some detail. It was shown that the formation of the complex microspheres can be divided into two periods, that is, surface reaction-controlled process and diffusion-controlled process. The relative time lasted by either process depends upon the amount of Fe3O4 added and the initial concentration of Au3+. XPS analysis revealed that along with increasing in coating amount, the strength of the characteristic peaks of Au increased, and the Auger peaks of Fe weakened and even disappeared. Size distribution analysis showed that the core/shell microspheres are of an average diameter of 180 nm, a little bit larger than those before coating.

  13. Age of an Indonesian Fossil Tooth Determined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogard, JS

    2004-04-07

    The first fossil hominid tooth recovered during 1999 excavations from the Cisanca River region in West Java, Indonesia, was associated with a series of bovid teeth from a single individual that was recovered 190 cm beneath the hominid tooth. The age of the fossil bovid teeth was determined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis as part of an effort to bracket the age of the hominid tooth. The EPR-derived age of the bovid teeth is (5.16 {+-} 2.01) x 10{sup 5} years. However, the age estimate reported here is likely an underestimate of the actual age of deposition since evidence of heating was detected in the EPR spectra of the bovid teeth, and the heating may have caused a decrease in the intensity of EPR components on which the age calculation is based.

  14. Imaging thiol redox status in murine tumors in vivo with rapid-scan electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Sundramoorthy, Subramanian V.; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Maggio, Matthew C.; Tseytlin, Mark; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Halpern, Howard J.

    2017-03-01

    Thiol redox status is an important physiologic parameter that affects the success or failure of cancer treatment. Rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance (RS EPR) is a novel technique that has shown higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional continuous-wave EPR in in vitro studies. Here we used RS EPR to acquire rapid three-dimensional images of the thiol redox status of tumors in living mice. This work presents, for the first time, in vivo RS EPR images of the kinetics of the reaction of 2H,15N-substituted disulfide-linked dinitroxide (PxSSPx) spin probe with intracellular glutathione. The cleavage rate is proportional to the intracellular glutathione concentration. Feasibility was demonstrated in a FSa fibrosarcoma tumor model in C3H mice. Similar to other in vivo and cell model studies, decreasing intracellular glutathione concentration by treating mice with L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) markedly altered the kinetic images.

  15. Paramagnetic behaviour of silver nanoparticles generated by decomposition of silver oxalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Trong, Hoa; Kiryukhina, Kateryna; Gougeon, Michel; Baco-Carles, Valérie; Courtade, Frédéric; Dareys, Sophie; Tailhades, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Silver oxalate Ag2C2O4, was already proposed for soldering applications, due to the formation when it is decomposed by a heat treatment, of highly sinterable silver nanoparticles. When slowly decomposed at low temperature (125 °C), the oxalate leads however to silver nanoparticles isolated from each other. As soon as these nanoparticles are formed, the magnetic susceptibility at room temperature increases from -3.14 10-7 emu.Oe-1.g-1 (silver oxalate) up to -1.92 10-7 emu.Oe-1.g-1 (metallic silver). At the end of the oxalate decomposition, the conventional diamagnetic behaviour of bulk silver, is observed from room temperature to 80 K. A diamagnetic-paramagnetic transition is however revealed below 80 K leading at 2 K, to silver nanoparticles with a positive magnetic susceptibility. This original behaviour, compared to the one of bulk silver, can be ascribed to the nanometric size of the metallic particles.

  16. Prospects for Quantum Computing with an Array of Ultracold Polar Paramagnetic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Karra, Mallikarjun; Friedrich, Bretislav; Kais, Sabre; Herschbach, Dudley

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of trapped ultracold molecules represent a promising platform for implementing a universal quantum computer. DeMille has detailed a prototype design based on Stark states of polar $^1\\Sigma$ molecules as qubits. Herein, we consider an array of polar $^2\\Sigma$ molecules which are, in addition, inherently paramagnetic and whose Hund's case (b) free-rotor states are Bell states. We show that by subjecting the array to combinations of concurrent homogeneous and inhomogeneous electric and magnetic fields, the entanglement of the array's Stark and Zeeman states can be tuned and the qubit sites addressed. Two schemes for implementing an optically controlled CNOT gate are proposed and their feasibility discussed in the face of the broadening of spectral lines due to dipole-dipole coupling and the inhomogeneity of the electric and magnetic fields.

  17. Comparison of pulse sequences for R1-based electron paramagnetic resonance oxygen imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2015-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) oxygen imaging has proven to be an indispensable tool for assessing oxygen partial pressure in live animals. EPR oxygen images show remarkable oxygen accuracy when combined with high precision and spatial resolution. Developing more effective means for obtaining SLR rates is of great practical, biological and medical importance. In this work we compared different pulse EPR imaging protocols and pulse sequences to establish advantages and areas of applicability for each method. Tests were performed using phantoms containing spin probes with oxygen concentrations relevant to in vivo oxymetry. We have found that for small animal size objects the inversion recovery sequence combined with the filtered backprojection reconstruction method delivers the best accuracy and precision. For large animals, in which large radio frequency energy deposition might be critical, free induction decay and three pulse stimulated echo sequences might find better practical usage.

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) by electronic paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña-Núñez, F.; Dávila Ballesteros, M. R.

    This work presents the possibility to use the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of gamma-irradiated sodium carbonate for dosimetric purposes. The dosimeters were irradiated in a 60Co source. The process induced in sodium carbonate by gamma rays results in the formation of carboxil radical anions img style="vertical-align: text-bottom;" class="inlinematheqn" src="/ampp/image?path=/713648881/910447398/grad_a_327316_o_ilm0001.gif" alt="./GRAD_A_327316_O_XML_IMAGES/GRAD_A_327316_O_ILM0001.gif" border="0" /> . This way, the method is based on the evaluation of the EPR signal of these radical anions in the material. The aspects studied were peak-to-peak signal amplitude as a function of received dose, signal fading, signal repeatability, sample homogeneity, zero response and environmental effects. It has been concluded that sodium carbonate can be used as a sensitive material to gamma radiation.

  19. High-Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Nitroxide-Functionalized Nanodiamonds in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiel, R D; Stepanov, V; Takahashi, S

    2016-06-21

    Nanodiamond (ND) is an attractive class of nanomaterial for fluorescent labeling, magnetic sensing of biological molecules, and targeted drug delivery. Many of those applications require tethering of target biological molecules on the ND surface. Even though many approaches have been developed to attach macromolecules to the ND surface, it remains challenging to characterize dynamics of tethered molecule. Here, we show high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HF EPR) spectroscopy of nitroxide-functionalized NDs. Nitroxide radical is a commonly used spin label to investigate dynamics of biological molecules. In the investigation, we developed a sample holder to overcome water absorption of HF microwave. Then, we demonstrated HF EPR spectroscopy of nitroxide-functionalized NDs in aqueous solution and showed clear spectral distinction of ND and nitroxide EPR signals. Moreover, through EPR spectral analysis, we investigate dynamics of nitroxide radicals on the ND surface. The demonstration sheds light on the use of HF EPR spectroscopy to investigate biological molecule-functionalized nanoparticles.

  20. Paramagnetic Nanocrystals: Remarkable Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles with Varied Shape, Size, and Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Rebecca J; Aharen, Tomoko; Murugesu, Muralee

    2012-12-20

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been developed in recent years with applications in unique and crucial areas such as biomedicine, data storage, environmental remediation, catalysis, and so forth. NaYF4 nanoparticles were synthesized and isolated with lanthanide dopant percentages, confirmed by ICP-OES measurements, of Er, Yb, Tb, Gd, and Dy that were in agreement with the targeted ratios. SEM images showed a distinct variation in particle size and shape with dopant type and percentage. HRTEM and XRD studies confirmed the particles to be crystalline, possessing both α and β phases. Magnetic measurements determined that all of the nanoparticles were paramagnetic and did not exhibit a blocking temperature from 2 to 300 K. The multifunctional properties of these nanoparticles make them suitable for many applications, such as multimodal imaging probes, up-conversion fluorescent markers, as well as MRI contrast agents.

  1. Ion exchange in alginate gels--dynamic behaviour revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, Gabriela; Ariciu, Ana Maria; Smith, David K; Chechik, Victor

    2015-12-14

    The formation of alginate gel from low molecular weight alginate and very low molecular weight alginate in the presence of divalent cations was investigated using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The transition from sol to gel in the presence of divalent cations was monitored by the changes in the dynamics of spin labelled alginate. The immobilisation of the spin labelled alginate in the gel reflects the strength of interaction between the cation and alginate chain. Diffusion experiments showed that both the cation and alginate polyanion in the gel fibres can exchange with molecules in solution. In particular, we showed that dissolved alginate polyanions can replace alginates in the gel fibres, which can hence diffuse through the bulk of the gel. This illustrates the surprisingly highly dynamic nature of these gels and opens up the possibility of preparing multicomponent alginate gels via polyanion exchange process.

  2. On-chip immunomagnetic separation of bacteria by in-flow dynamic manipulation of paramagnetic beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shakil; Noh, Jong Wook; Hoyland, James; de Oliveira Hansen, Roana; Erdmann, Helmut; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2016-11-01

    Every year, millions of people all over the world fall ill due to the consumption of unsafe food, where consumption of contaminated and spoiled animal origin product is the main cause for diseases due to bacterial growth. This leads to an intense need for efficient methods for detection of food-related bacteria. In this work, we present a method for integration of immunomagnetic separation of bacteria into microfluidic technology by applying an alternating magnetic field, which manipulates the paramagnetic beads into a sinusoidal path across the whole microchannel, increasing the probability for bacteria capture. The optimum channel geometry, flow rate and alternating magnetic field frequency were investigated, resulting in a capture efficiency of 68 %.

  3. Strength and scales of itinerant spin fluctuations in 3 d paramagnetic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Aleksander L.; Kutepov, Andrey; Antropov, Vladimir P.

    2016-10-01

    The full spin density fluctuations (SDF) spectra in 3 d paramagnetic metals are analyzed from first principles using the linear response technique. Using the calculated complete wave vector and energy dependence of the dynamic spin susceptibility, we obtain the most important, but elusive, characteristic of SDF in solids: on-site spin correlator (SC). We demonstrate that the SDF have a mixed character consisting of interacting collective and single-particle excitations of similar strength spreading continuously over the entire Brillouin zone and a wide energy range up to femtosecond time scales. These excitations cannot be adiabatically separated and their intrinsically multiscale nature should always be taken into account for a proper description of metallic systems. Overall, in all studied systems, despite the lack of local moment, we found a very large SC resulting in an effective fluctuating moment of the order of several Bohr magnetons.

  4. Paramagnetic Cellulose DNA Isolation Improves DNA Yield and Quality Among Diverse Plant Taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson R. Moeller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: The chemical diversity of land plants ensures that no single DNA isolation method results in high yield and purity with little effort for all species. Here we evaluate a new technique originally developed for forensic science, based on MagnaCel paramagnetic cellulose particles (PMC, to determine its efficacy in extracting DNA from 25 plant species representing 21 families and 15 orders. Methods and Results: Yield and purity of DNA isolated by PMC, DNeasy Plant Mini Kit (silica column, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB methods were compared among four individuals for each of 25 plant species. PMC gave a two-fold advantage in average yield, and the relative advantage of the PMC method was greatest for samples with the lowest DNA yields. PMC also produced more consistent sample purity based on absorbance ratios at 260 : 280 and 260 : 230 nm. Conclusions: PMC technology is a promising alternative for plant DNA isolation.

  5. New Experimental Limit on the Electric Dipole Moment of the Electron in a Paramagnetic Insulator

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y J; Lamoreaux, S K; Visser, G; Kunkler, B; Matlashov, A V; Kunkler, B

    2011-01-01

    We report results of an experimental search for the intrinsic Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of the electron using a solid-state technique. The experiment employs a paramagnetic, insulating gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) that has a large magnetic response at low temperatures. The presence of the eEDM would lead to a small but non-zero magnetization as the GGG sample is subject to a strong electric field. We search for the resulting Stark-induced magnetization with a sensitive magnetometer. Recent progress on the suppression of several sources of background allows the experiment to run free of spurious signals at the level of the statistical uncertainties. We report our first limit on the eEDM of $(-5.57 \\pm 7.98 \\pm 0.12)\\times10^{-25}$e$\\cdot$cm with 5 days of data averaging.

  6. Folate receptor-targeted fluorescent paramagnetic bimodal liposomes for tumor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding N

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nan Ding1,2, Yao Lu1, Robert J Lee3, Chang Yang1, Lei Huang1, Jian Liu1, Guangya Xiang1,41School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 3Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; 4Hubei Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China The first three authors contributed equally to this work. Rationale and objective: Receptor-targeted delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents can lead to enhanced efficacy for both. Multimodality imaging offers unique advantages over traditional single modality imaging. Tumor marker folate receptor (FR-targeted fluorescent paramagnetic bimodal liposomes were synthesized to co-deliver paramagnetic and fluorescence agents for magnetic resonance (MR and optical bimodal imaging contrast enhancement. Materials and methods: Fluorescent and paramagnetic bimodal liposomes were synthesized with a mean diameter of 136 nm and a low polydispersity index. The liposomes incorporated folate-PEG3350-CHEMS for FR targeting, Gd(III[N,N-Bis-stearylamidomethyl-N’-amidomethyl]diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid (Gd-DTPA-BSA for MR contrast, and calcein for fluorescence. To determine the specificity and efficiency of delivery, the liposomes were evaluated in FR-positive KB and HeLa cells and FR-negative A549 cells, which were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and flow cytometry (FCM. Results: FR-specific and efficient cellular uptake of the FR-targeted bimodal liposomes was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and by FCM. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of KB cells treated with FR

  7. Nature of short-range order in the paramagnetic state of manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Fabian E.N.; Francisquini, Elton; Souza, José Antonio, E-mail: joseantonio.souza@ufabc.edu.br

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •The Curie–Weiss law is redefined in the studied temperature range. •This will lead to a homogeneous macroscopic electronic state picture. •It is in contrast with the coexistence of insulating and metallic regions. -- Abstract: We study the nature of short-range magnetic interactions observed in the paramagnetic phase of colossal magnetoresistance compounds. Our results reveal that ferromagnetic-like interaction between Mn ions cannot be explained by the conventional double exchange mechanism. The results show evidence that the e{sub g} electrons are localized in Mn{sup 3+} ions regardless the introduction of holes leading to ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic superexchange-like interactions.

  8. Local structure and paramagnetic properties of the nanostructured carbonaceous material shungite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnovyd, Serhii Volodymyrovich; Konchits, Andriy Andriyovich; Shanina, Bela Dmytrivna; Valakh, Mykhaylo Yakovych; Yanchuk, Igor Bogdanovich; Yukhymchuk, Volodymyr Olexsandrovych; Yefanov, Andriy Volodymyrovich; Skoryk, Mykola Andriyovich

    2015-02-01

    Using a scanning electron microscopy, elemental analysis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and Raman scattering methods, two types of the shungite materials (Sh-II from Zazhogino deposit and shungite from a commercial filter (ShF)), with different carbon content and porosity, are studied in this work. It was established by scanning electron microscopy data that the structure of the shungite samples is formed by a micron-size agglomeration of carbon and silicon dioxide clusters. It is found from the Raman data that carbon fraction is formed from sp2-hybridized clusters, size of which increases from 9 up to 12 nm after annealing of the samples. High conductivity of shungite is found to belong to the carbon nanoclusters of different sizes. Big clusters give the conduction electron spin resonance signal with a Dysonian line shape with variable g-factor and line width.

  9. Prospects for quantum computing with an array of ultracold polar paramagnetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, Mallikarjun; Sharma, Ketan; Friedrich, Bretislav; Kais, Sabre; Herschbach, Dudley

    2016-03-07

    Arrays of trapped ultracold molecules represent a promising platform for implementing a universal quantum computer. DeMille [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 067901 (2002)] has detailed a prototype design based on Stark states of polar (1)Σ molecules as qubits. Herein, we consider an array of polar (2)Σ molecules which are, in addition, inherently paramagnetic and whose Hund's case (b) free-rotor pair-eigenstates are Bell states. We show that by subjecting the array to combinations of concurrent homogeneous and inhomogeneous electric and magnetic fields, the entanglement of the array's Stark and Zeeman states can be tuned and the qubit sites addressed. Two schemes for implementing an optically controlled CNOT gate are proposed and their feasibility discussed in the face of the broadening of spectral lines due to dipole-dipole coupling and the inhomogeneity of the electric and magnetic fields.

  10. Magnetic properties, water proton relaxivities, and in-vivo MR images of paramagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gang Ho; Chang, Yongmin

    2015-07-01

    In this mini review, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on lanthanideoxide (Ln2O3) nanoparticles are described. Ln2O3 (Ln = Gd, Dy, Ho, and Er) nanoparticles are paramagnetic, but show appreciable magnetic moments at room temperature and even at ultrasmall particle diameters. Among Ln2O3 nanoparticles, Gd2O3 nanoparticles show larger longitudinal water proton relaxivity (r1) values than Gd-chelates because of the large amount of Gd in the nanoparticle, and the other Ln2O3 nanoparticles (Ln = Dy, Ho, and Er) show appreciable transverse water proton relaxivity (r2) values. Therefore, Gd2O3 nanoparticles are potential T1 MRI contrast agents while the other Ln2O3 nanoparticles are potential T2 MRI contrast agents at high MR fields.

  11. Identification and Quantification of Copper Sites in Zeolites by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Anita; Vennestrøm, Peter N. R.; Rasmussen, Søren Birk

    2016-01-01

    Recent quantitative electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) data on different copper species present in copper exchanged CHA zeolites are presented and put into context with the literature on other copper zeolites. Results presented herein were obtained using ex situ and in situ EPR...... on copper ion exchanged into a CHA zeolite with Si/Al = 14 ± 1 to obtain Cu/Al = 0.46 ± 0.02. The results shed light on the identity of different copper species present after activation in air. Since the EPR signal is quantifiable, the content of the different EPR active species has been elucidated and Cu2...... information about the reactivity and the quantity of some of the otherwise EPR silent species. In this way the [Cu–OH]+ species in copper substituted low-Al zeolites has been indirectly observed and quantified. EPR active Cu2+ species have been followed under reduction and oxidation with gas mixtures relevant...

  12. Growth Kinetics of the S Sub H Center on Magnesium Oxide Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayne, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study the growth of S sub H centers on magnesium oxide powder which had hydrogen adsorbed on its surface. The centers were produced by ultraviolet radiation. The effects of both radiation intensity and hydrogen pressure were also studied. At constant hydrogen pressure and radiation dose, the initial S sub H center growth rate was found to be zero order. Beyond the initial region the growth rate deviated from zero order and finally approached saturation. The results are interpreted in terms of a model which assumes that the S sub H center is a hydrogen atom associated with a surface vacancy. Saturation appears to result from a limited supply of surface vacancies.

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in radiation research: Current status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to radiation leads to a number of health-related malfunctions. Ionizing radiation is more harmful than non-ionizing radiation, as it causes both direct and indirect effects. Irradiation with ionizing radiation results in free radical-induced oxidative stress. Free radical-mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in a plethora of diseased states, including cancer, arthritis, aging, Parkinson′s disease, and so on. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR spectroscopy has various applications to measure free radicals, in radiation research. Free radicals disintegrate immediately in aqueous environment. Free radicals can be detected indirectly by the EPR spin trapping technique in which these forms stabilize the radical adduct and produce characteristic EPR spectra for specific radicals. Ionizing radiation-induced free radicals in calcified tissues, for example, teeth, bone, and fingernail, can be detected directly by EPR spectroscopy, due to their extended stability. Various applications of EPR in radiation research studies are discussed in this review.

  14. Spin Labeling and Characterization of Tau Fibrils Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Virginia; Margittai, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Template-assisted propagation of Tau fibrils is essential for the spreading of Tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease. In this process, small seeds of fibrils recruit Tau monomers onto their ends. The physical properties of the fibrils play an important role in their propagation. Here, we describe two different electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques that have provided crucial insights into the structure of Tau fibrils. Both techniques rely on the site-directed introduction of one or two spin labels into the protein monomer. Continuous-wave (CW) EPR provides information on which amino acid residues are contained in the fibril core and how they are stacked along the long fibril axis. Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) determines distances between two spin labels within a single protein and hence provides insights into their spatial arrangement in the fibril cross section. Because of the long distance range accessible to DEER (~2-5 nm) populations of distinct fibril conformers can be differentiated.

  15. Study of free radicals in gamma irradiated cellulose of cultural heritage materials using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yasko; Rodrigues, Orlando, Jr.; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Santos, Paulo de Souza; Vasquez, Pablo A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Main subject of this article was to study room temperature stable radicals in Co-60 gamma irradiated contemporary paper using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectrometer (EPR). XRD was used to study the effect of ionizing radiation on the morphology of book paper. SEM images presented regions with cellulose fibers and regions with particles agglomeration on the cellulose fibers. Those agglomerations were rich in calcium, observed by EDS. XRD analysis confirmed presence of calcium carbonate diffraction peaks. The main objective of this study was to propose a method using conventional kinetics chemical reactions for the observed radical formed by ionizing radiation. Therefore, further analyses were made to study the half-life and the kinetics of the free radical created. This method can be suitably applied to study radicals on cultural heritage objects.

  16. Preliminary study for precision dosimetry using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in radiotherapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehzadi, N. N.; Kim, I. J.; Yi, C. Y. [Center for Ionizing Radiation, Korea Research for Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    EPR (Electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry for radiotherapy dose range (1-10 Gy) is still being established.Alanine is an important material for EPR dosimetry because in terms of density and radiation absorption properties, it is water equivalent. High repeatability and high reproducibility of alanine spectrum measurement makes it possible to estimate the irradiation dose accurately. This baseline study has been carried out to establish precision EPR dosimetry in therapeutic photon range. For that purpose, an EPR dosimetry system has been setup and repeatability as well as reproducibility of measurements using alanine dosimeter have been evaluated. Effect of anisotropy of alanine dosimeter in spectrometer cavity has also been observed. EPR dosimetry system is set up at KRISS. It is found that reproducibility of the system at therapeutic photon range is 1.5 % - 6.6 %.

  17. Design of a low temperature translation balance for the measurement of paramagnetic and diamagnetic susceptibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowry, G.S.

    1979-05-01

    A modified Foex and Forrer Translation Balance has been designed for measuring the paramagnetic and diamagnetic properties of materials over the temperature range 77-300/sup 0/K. The systems' temperature range can eventually be extended to 4.2/sup 0/K. The apparatus incorporates a vertical Dewar of Standard variety in addition to a horizontal Dewar for cooling the sample holder and adjacent horizontal supports. The design also allows for the placement of a thermocouple junction in direct contact with a sample. The balance sensitivity, defined as the change in displacement per unit applied force, is 0.0044 cm/dyne. The precision of the balance is +- .5% with an accuracy of 1.5%.

  18. Isolation of Cyclospora oocysts from fruits and vegetables using lectin-coated paramagnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, L J; Gjerde, B; Campbell, A T

    2000-10-01

    Published techniques for recovering parasites from fruit and vegetables are generally inadequate, with low and variable recovery efficiencies. Herein, we describe an improved method for analyzing fruit and vegetables for Cyclospora oocysts. The technique includes washing procedures, sonication, and separation using lectin-coated paramagnetic beads. Identification is by microscopy (differential interference contrast and fluorescence). Oocyst recovery efficiencies from mushrooms, lettuce, and raspberries were approximately 12%. Recovery efficiencies from bean sprouts were approximately 4%. Although no significant difference in recovery efficiency could be detected between samples processed using the lectin-coated beads and samples processed without this procedure, distinct advantages were apparent when the lectin-coated beads were used. A considerably smaller, cleaner final volume remained for microscopy, which increases the sensitivity of the technique and reduces operator time.

  19. Bulk Quantum Computation with Pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Simulations of Single-Qubit Error Correction Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmuratov, I. K.; Baibekov, E. I.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the possibility to restore transient nutations of electron spin centers embedded in the solid using specific composite pulse sequences developed previously for the application in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We treat two types of systematic errors simultaneously: (i) rotation angle errors related to the spatial distribution of microwave field amplitude in the sample volume, and (ii) off-resonance errors related to the spectral distribution of Larmor precession frequencies of the electron spin centers. Our direct simulations of the transient signal in erbium- and chromium-doped CaWO4 crystal samples with and without error corrections show that the application of the selected composite pulse sequences can substantially increase the lifetime of Rabi oscillations. Finally, we discuss the applicability limitations of the studied pulse sequences for the use in solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  20. Influence of a strong magnetic field on paramagnetic fluid's flow in cubical enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewska, A.; Pyrda, L.; Donizak, J.

    2016-10-01

    The fluid behaviour in thermo-magnetic convection of paramagnetic fluid in a strong magnetic field was studied. The fluid was 50% volume aqueous solution of glycerol with an addition of gadolinium nitrate hexahydrate (Gd(NO3)3-6H2O). Experimental enclosure - a vessel with aspect ratio (AR=height/width) equal to 1.0 - was heated from the bottom, and cooled from the top. Temperature difference between top and bottom walls was kept constant at ΔT = 5 and 11 [°C]. The magnetic induction was increased stepwise from 1 to 10 [T] and thermocouples placed inside the enclosures measured temperature changes of the fluid. On the basis of temperature measurements, analysis of the fluid flow was performed.