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Sample records for quadrupole drift tube

  1. Laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Behrsing, G.U.; Halbach, K.; Marks, J.S.; Morrison, M.E.; Nelson, D.H.

    1988-10-01

    A laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnet has been constructed for a proof-of-principle test. The magnet is a conventional tape-wound quadrupole electromagnet, using iron pole- pieces, with the addition of permanent magnet material (neodymium iron) between the poles to reduce the effects of saturation. The iron is preloaded with magnetic flux generated by the permanent magnet material, resulting in an asymmetrical saturation curve. Since the polarity of the quadrupole magnets in a drift tube linac is not reversed we can take advantage of this asymmetrical saturation to provide greater focusing strength. The magnet configuration has been optimized and the vanadium permendur poles needed in a conventional quadrupole have been replaced with iron poles. The use of permanent magnet material has allowed us to increase the focusing strength of the magnet by about 20% over that of a conventional tape-wound quadrupole. Comparisons will be made between this magnet and the conventional tape-wound quadrupole. 3 refs., 5 figs

  2. Drift tube with an electro-quadrupole magnet made with a conventional enamel wire for the proton engineering frontier project drift tube linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. H.; Kwon, H. J.; Cho, Y. S.

    2006-12-01

    The proton engineering frontier project (PEFP) drift tube linac (DTL) chose the new type of electro-quadrupole magnet (EQM) using an enameled wire for a drift tube. By using this kind of EQM, we could simplify the drift tube structure. We verified the structural stability and thermal stability of this drift tube structure through a computational analysis and a simple experiment. We also verified the stability of the enameled wire regarding corrosion through a long period test of about 1 year. It was concluded that the design and fabrication of the drift tube and the EQM were successful.

  3. Drift tube with an electro-quadrupole magnet made with a conventional enamel wire for the proton engineering frontier project drift tube linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.H. [PEFP, KAERI, DaeJeon (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: yhkim72@kaeri.re.kr; Kwon, H.J. [PEFP, KAERI, DaeJeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Y.S. [PEFP, KAERI, DaeJeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-21

    The proton engineering frontier project (PEFP) drift tube linac (DTL) chose the new type of electro-quadrupole magnet (EQM) using an enameled wire for a drift tube. By using this kind of EQM, we could simplify the drift tube structure. We verified the structural stability and thermal stability of this drift tube structure through a computational analysis and a simple experiment. We also verified the stability of the enameled wire regarding corrosion through a long period test of about 1 year. It was concluded that the design and fabrication of the drift tube and the EQM were successful.

  4. Drift tube with an electro-quadrupole magnet made with a conventional enamel wire for the proton engineering frontier project drift tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.H.; Kwon, H.J.; Cho, Y.S.

    2006-01-01

    The proton engineering frontier project (PEFP) drift tube linac (DTL) chose the new type of electro-quadrupole magnet (EQM) using an enameled wire for a drift tube. By using this kind of EQM, we could simplify the drift tube structure. We verified the structural stability and thermal stability of this drift tube structure through a computational analysis and a simple experiment. We also verified the stability of the enameled wire regarding corrosion through a long period test of about 1 year. It was concluded that the design and fabrication of the drift tube and the EQM were successful

  5. Comparison of conventional and novel quadrupole drift tube magnets inspired by Klaus Halbach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Quadrupole drift tube magnets for a heavy-ion linac provide a demanding application of magnet technology. A comparison is made of three different solutions to the problem of providing an adjustable high-field-strength quadrupole magnet in a small volume. A conventional tape-wound electromagnet quadrupole magnet (conventional) is compared with an adjustable permanent-magnet/iron quadrupole magnet (hybrid) and a laced permanent-magnet/iron/electromagnet (laced). Data is presented from magnets constructed for the SuperHILAC heavy-ion linear accelerator, and conclusions are drawn for various applications.

  6. Study on pulsed-operation of the drift tube quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutou, M.

    1982-01-01

    The heavy ion linac for NUMATRON project is designed not only as a injector for a synchrotron but also as a supplier of heavy ion beams for experiments with linac beam. In one repetition cycle of the synchrotron (1sec), the linac injects nearly 25 beam pulses with pulse width of 300 μsec and pulse interval of 30 msec. And the ion species can be varied every repetition. On the other hand, when it is off duty of injection to the synchrotron, the linac accelerates the beams that are directly used for the experiments. Also in this case, the ion species should be varied according to the requests of the experiments, for instance every 1 sec. Therefore, the quadrupole magnets installed in the drift tubes of the linac must be excited with pulse mode. The power supply of the quadrupole magnets will consists of two parts, namely pulse-excitation and dc-excitation power sources. The report describes the posibilities on the pulse-operation of the quadrupole magnets with the field gradient of asymptotically equals 10 KG/cm, and the analysis of the power supply of the quadrupole magnets. (author)

  7. The development of magnetic field measurement system for drift-tube linac quadrupole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianxin; Kang, Wen; Yin, Baogui; Peng, Quanling; Li, Li; Liu, Huachang; Gong, Keyun; Li, Bo; Chen, Qiang; Li, Shuai; Liu, Yiqin

    2015-06-01

    In the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac, a conventional 324 MHz drift-tube linac (DTL) accelerating an H- ion beam from 3 MeV to 80 MeV has been designed and manufactured. The electromagnetic quadrupoles (EMQs) are widely used in a DTL accelerator. The main challenge of DTLQ's structure is to house a strong gradient EMQ in the much reduced space of the drift-tube (DT). To verify the DTLQ's design specifications and fabrication quality, a precision harmonic coil measurement system has been developed, which is based on the high precision movement platform, the harmonic coil with ceramic frame and the special method to make the harmonic coil and the quadrupoles coaxial. After more than one year's continuous running, the magnetic field measurement system still performs accurately and stably. The field measurement of more than one hundred DTLQ has been finished. The components and function of the measurement system, the key point of the technology and the repeatability of the measurement results are described in this paper.

  8. Study of the variation of maximum beam size with quadrupole gradient in the FMIT drift tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.; Jameson, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity of maximum beam size to input mismatch is studied as a function of quadrupole gradient in a short, high-current, drift-tube linac (DTL), for two presriptions: constant phase advance with constant filling factor; and constant strength with constant-length quads. Numerical study using PARMILA shows that the choice of quadrupole strength that minimizes the maximum transverse size of the matched beam through subsequent cells of the linac tends to be most sensitive to input mismatch. However, gradients exist nearby that result in almost-as-small beams over a suitably broad range of mismatch. The study was used to choose the initial gradient for the DTL portion of the Fusion Material Irradiation Test (FMIT) linac. The matching required across quad groups is also discussed

  9. Rectangular drift tube characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, D.S.; Musienko, Yu.V.

    1985-01-01

    Results on the study of the characteristics of a 50 x 100 mm aluminium drift tube are presented. The tube was filled with argon-methane and argon-isobutane mixtures. With 16 per cent methane concentration the largest deviation from a linear relation between the drift time and the drift path over 50 mm is less than 2 mm. The tube filled with argon-isobutane mixture is capable of operating in a limited streamer mode

  10. Precision alignment of permanent-magnet drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.; Dauelsberg, L.B.; Spalek, G.

    1986-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) technique of drift-tube alignment has been resurrected at Los Alamos for the precision alignment of 1-cm-bore drift tubes that carry high-gradient rare-earth-cobalt quadrupole. Because the quadrupole cannot be switched off, this technique is not applicable to a drift-tube assembly, but tests indicate that individual magnetic centers can be detected with a precision of +- 0.003 mm. Methods of transferring this information to machined alignment flats on the sides of the drift-tube body are discussed. With measurements of drift tubes designed for a 100-mA. 425-MHz drift-tube linac, we have detected offsets between the geometric and magnetic axes of up to +- 0.05 mm following final assembly and welding. This degree of offset is serious if not accommodated, because it represents the entire alignment tolerance for the 40-cell tank. The measurement equipment and technique are described

  11. Engineering Design of a Drift Tube for PEFP DTL II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Heok Jung; Kim, Kui Young; Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Keong Tae; Song, Young Gi; Jang, Ji Ho; Hong, In Seok; Choi, Hyun Mi; Han, Sang Hyo; Cho, Yong Sub

    2005-01-01

    As the second stage of the PEFP(Proton Engineering Frontier Project) whose final goal is to develop 100MeV, 20mA proton accelerator, Engineering design of the DTL(Drift Tube Linac) II is in proceeding. In this paper, the details of design of the DT(Drift Tube) and EQM(Electro-Quadrupole Magnet) will be reported

  12. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1977-01-01

    Being redied for installation, those at the right are for tank 1, those on the left for tank 2. Contrary to Linac 1, which had drift-tubes supported on stems, here the tubes are suspended, for better mechanical stability.

  13. Electronics for proportional drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremont, G.; Friend, B.; Mess, K.H.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Tarle, J.C.; Verweij, H.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Geske, K.; Riege, H.; Schuett, J.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Semenov, Y.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration)

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for the read-out of a large number of proportional drift tubes (16,000) has been designed. This system measures deposited charge and drift-time of the charge of a particle traversing a proportional drift tube. A second event can be accepted during the read-out of the system. Up to 40 typical events can be collected and buffered before a data transfer to a computer is necessary. (orig.)

  14. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  15. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Y [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation, Tsukuba (Japan); Ball, B; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Gregory, J [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Beretta, M [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Boterenbrood, H; Jansweijer, P P M [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brandenburg, G W; Fries, T; Costa, J Guimaraes da; Harder, S; Huth, J [Harvard University, Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ceradini, F [INFN Roma Tre and Universita Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Hazen, E [Boston University, Physics Department, Boston, MA (United States); Kirsch, L E [Brandeis University, Department of Physics, Waltham, MA (United States); Koenig, A C [Radboud University Nijmegen/Nikhef, Dept. of Exp. High Energy Physics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lanza, A [INFN Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Mikenberg, G [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics, Rehovot (Israel)], E-mail: brandenburg@physics.harvard.edu (and others)

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 {mu}m, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at p{sub T}= 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  16. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Y; Beretta, M; Boterenbrood, H; Brandenburg, G W; Ceradini, F; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Fries, T; Gregory, J; Guimarães da Costa, J; Harder, S; Hazen, E; Huth, J; Jansweijer, P P M; Kirsch, L E; König, A C; Lanza, A; Mikenberg, G; Oliver, J; Posch, C; Richter, R; Riegler, W; Spiriti, E; Taylor, F E; Vermeulen, J; Wadsworth, B; Wijnen, T A M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 microns, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at pT = 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  17. Variable-energy drift-tube linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.; Potter, J.M.; Stovall, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Practical applications of ion linacs are more viable now than ever before because of the recent development of the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerating structure, as well as other technological advances developed under the Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations program. This report describes a practical technique for varying the energy of drift-tube linacs and thus further broadening the possibilities for linac applications. This technique involves using the post couplers (normally used to flatten and stabilize the electric fields) to create a step in the fields, thus terminating the acceleration process. In the examples given for a 70-MeV accelerator design, when using this technique the energy is continually variable down to 20 MeV, while maintaining a small energy spread

  18. Low Power Measurements on a Finger Drift Tube Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Schempp, A

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency of RFQs decreases at higher particle energies. The DTL structures used in this energy regions have a defocusing influence on the beam. To achieve a focusing effect, fingers with quadrupole symmetry were added to the drift tubes. Driven by the same power supply as the drift tubes, the fingers do not need an additional power source or feedthrough. Beam dynamics have been studied with PARMTEQ . Detailed analysis of the field distribution was done and the geometry of the finger array has been optimized with respect to beam dynamics. A spiral loaded cavity with finger drift tubes was built up and low power measurements were done. In this contribution, the results of the rf simulating with Microwave Studio are shown in comparison with bead pertubation measurement on a prototype cavity.

  19. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  20. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhiltsov, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. (orig.)

  1. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. N.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Novikov, E. A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Shafranov, M. D.; Zhiltsov, V. E.

    1995-12-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented.

  2. Sealed drift tube cosmic ray veto counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, R.; Tatar, E.; Bacon, J.D.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Green, J.A.; Hogan, G.E.; Ito, T.M.; Makela, M.; Morris, C.L.; Mortenson, R.; Pasukanics, F.E.; Ramsey, J.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S.J.; Sondheim, W.E.; Teasdale, W.; Saltus, M.; Back, H.O.; Cottrell, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a simple drift tube counter that has been used as a cosmic ray veto for the UCNA experiment, a first-ever measurement of the neutron beta-asymmetry using ultra-cold neutrons. These detectors provide an inexpensive alternative to more conventional scintillation detectors for large area cosmic ray anticoincidence detectors.

  3. Autocalibration of high precision drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacci, C.; Bini, C.; Ciapetti, G.; De Zorzi, G.; Gauzzi, P.; Lacava, F.; Nisati, A.; Pontecorvo, L.; Rosati, S.; Veneziano, S.; Cambiaghi, M.; Casellotti, G.; Conta, C.; Fraternali, M.; Lanza, A.; Livan, M.; Polesello, G.; Rimoldi, A.; Vercesi, V.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results on MDT (monitored drift tubes) autocalibration studies obtained from the analysis of the data collected in Summer 1995 on the H8B Muon Test Beam. In particular we studied the possibility of autocalibration of the MDT using four or three layers of tubes, and we compared the calibration obtained using a precise external tracker with the output of the autocalibration procedure. Results show the feasibility of autocalibration with four and three tubes and the good accuracy of the autocalibration procedure. (orig.)

  4. Optimization of drift gases for accuracy in pressurized drift tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchner, J J; Dinner, A R; Fidkowski, K J; Wyatt, J H

    2001-01-01

    Modern detectors such as ATLAS use pressurized drift tubes to minimize diffusion and achieve high coordinate accuracy. However, the coordinate accuracy depends on the exact knowledge of converting measured times into coordinates. Linear space-time relationships are best for reconstruction, but difficult to achieve in the $E \\propto \\frac{1}{r}$ field. Previous mixtures, which contained methane or other organic quenchers, are disfavored because of ageing problems. From our studies of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, two mixtures with only small deviations from linearity were determined and measured. Scaling laws for different pressures and magnetic fields are also given.

  5. Optimization of drift gases for accuracy in pressurized drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.J.; Becker, U.J.; Dinner, R.B.; Fidkowski, K.J.; Wyatt, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Modern detectors such as ATLAS use pressurized drift tubes to minimize diffusion and achieve high coordinate accuracy. However, the coordinate accuracy depends on the exact knowledge of converting measured times into coordinates. Linear space-time relationships are best for reconstruction, but difficult to achieve in the E∝1/r field. Previous mixtures, which contained methane or other organic quenchers, are disfavored because of ageing problems. From our studies of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, two mixtures with only small deviations from linearity were determined and measured. Scaling laws for different pressures and magnetic fields are also given

  6. Clean industrial room for drift tube assembling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glonti, G.L.; Gongadze, A.L.; Evtukhovich, P.G.

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volume (∼ 190 m 3 ), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2%). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer. (author)

  7. Clean Industrial Room for Drift Tube Assembling

    CERN Document Server

    Glonti, GL; Evtoukhovitch, P G; Kroa, G; Manz, A; Potrap, I N; Rihter, P; Stoletov, G D; Tskhadadze, E G; Chepurnov, V F; Chirkov, A V; Shelkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has been confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volum (\\sim 190 m^3), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2 %). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer.

  8. Cathode Readout with Stripped Resistive Drift Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhil'tsov, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with carbon layer of resistivity 0.5, 30 and 70 k Ohm/sq. The gas mixture used was Ar/CH 4 . Both the anode wire and cathode signals were detected in order to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  9. Gamma sensitivity of pressurized drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, S.A.; Bojko, I.R.; Shelkov, G.A.; Ignatenko, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Using a set of commonly used radioactive sources, the efficiency of pressurized drift tubes for gammas with energy from 5.9 keV up to 1.3 MeV has been measured. The tube was made of aluminium and filled with Ar, 15%CO 2 and 2.5%iC 4 H 10 gas mixture at 3 atm. The measured efficiency is compared with the results of the calculations in the frame of our simple model as well as with that of the Monte Carlo simulation using GEANT code. The results of our calculations are in agreement with experimental data, while GEANT simulation tends to give lower efficiency in the energy range of 200 keV γ <1300 keV. The average efficiency of the tube in the field of ATLAS gamma background is about 0.45%. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  10. Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1

    CERN Document Server

    Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

    2014-01-01

    Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

  11. Electro-mechanics of drift tube wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milburn, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The position and stability of the sense wires in very long drift tubes are affected by both gravitational and electrostatic forces, as well as by the wire tension. For a tube to be used as an element of a high-resolution detector all these forces and their effects must be understood in appropriately precise detail. In addition, the quality control procedures applied during manufacture and detector installation must be adequate to ensure that the internal wire positions remain within tolerances. It may be instructive to practitioners to review the simple theory of a taut wire in the presence of anisotropic gravitational and electrostatic fields to illustrate the conditions for stability, the equilibrium wire displacement from straightness, and the effect of the fields on the mechanical vibration frequencies. These last may be used to monitor the wire configuration externally. A number of practical formulae result and these are applied to illustrative examples. (orig.)

  12. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H.O.; Rust, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls. (orig.)

  13. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H. O.; Rust, D. R.

    1987-03-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls.

  14. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.C.; Frank, J.A.; Liska, D.J.; Potter, R.C.; Schamaun, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder

  15. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liska, Donald J.; Schamaun, Roger G.; Clark, Donald C.; Potter, R. Christopher; Frank, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  16. Variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.; Potter, James M.; Stovall, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear accelerator system includes a plurality of post-coupled drift-tubes wherein each post coupler is bistably positionable to either of two positions which result in different field distributions. With binary control over a plurality of post couplers, a significant accumlative effect in the resulting field distribution is achieved yielding a variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator.

  17. Non-linear coupling of drift modes in a quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.A.; Sandeman, J.C.; Tessema, G.Y.

    1990-01-01

    We report continuing experimental studies of non-linear interactions of drift waves, with direct evidence of a growth saturation mechanism by transfer of energy to lower frequency modes. Wave launching experiments show that the decay rate of drift waves can be strongly amplitude dependent. (author) 9 refs., 5 figs

  18. Tracking chamber made of 15-mm mylar drift tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhin, A.; Borisov, A.; Bozhko, N.; Fakhrutdinov, R.; Plotnikov, I.

    2017-05-01

    We are presenting a drift chamber composed from three layers of mylar drift tubes with outer diameter 15 mm. The pipe is made of strip of mylar film 125 micrometers thick covered with aluminium from the both sides. A strip of mylar is wrapped around the mandrel. Pipe is created by ultrasonic welding. A single drift tube is self-supported structure withstanding 350 g wire tension without supports and internal overpressure. About 400 such tubes were assembled. Design, quality control procedures of the drift tubes are described. Seven chambers were glued from these tubes of 560 mm length. Each chamber consists of 3 layers, 16 tubes per layer. Several chambers were tested with cosmic rays. Results of the tests, counting rate plateau and coordinate resolution are presented.

  19. Tracking chamber made of 15-mm mylar drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozhin, A.; Borisov, A.; Bozhko, N.; Fakhrutdinov, R.; Plotnikov, I.

    2017-01-01

    We are presenting a drift chamber composed from three layers of mylar drift tubes with outer diameter 15 mm. The pipe is made of strip of mylar film 125 micrometers thick covered with aluminium from the both sides. A strip of mylar is wrapped around the mandrel. Pipe is created by ultrasonic welding. A single drift tube is self-supported structure withstanding 350 g wire tension without supports and internal overpressure. About 400 such tubes were assembled. Design, quality control procedures of the drift tubes are described. Seven chambers were glued from these tubes of 560 mm length. Each chamber consists of 3 layers, 16 tubes per layer. Several chambers were tested with cosmic rays. Results of the tests, counting rate plateau and coordinate resolution are presented.

  20. Drift chambers on the basis of Mylar tube blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagov, Yu.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.; Golovanov, L.; Khazins, D.; Kuritsin, A.; Pukhov, O.; Zhukov, V.

    1993-06-01

    Prototypes of drift chambers constructed of Mylar tube blocks were tested. The purpose of developing tube blocks technology was to create long chambers (up to 3-4 m). Counting and drift characteristics of the chambers for different values of the gas pressure and different diameters of sense wires are presented. The lifetime of the chambers is determined. A photoeffect in the visible spectrum on the surface of the thin film aluminium cathode, which covers the Mylar tubes was observed.

  1. Drift chambers on the basis of Mylar tube blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.; Golovanov, L.; Khazins, D.; Kuritsin, A.; Pukhov, U.; Zhukov, V.

    1993-01-01

    Prototypes of drift chambers constructed of Mylar tube blocks were tested. The purpose of developing tube blocks technology was to create chambers (up to 3-4 m). Counting and drift chracteristics of the chambers for different values of the gas pressure and different diameters of sense wires are presented. The lifetime of the chambers is determined. A photoeffect in the visible spectrum on the surface of the thin film aluminium cathode, which covers the Mylar tubes was observed. (orig.)

  2. Design and performance of a straw tube drift chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. H.; Wesson, D. K.; Cooke, J.; Goshaw, A. T.; Robertson, W. J.; Walker, W. D.

    1991-06-01

    The design and performance of the straw drift chambers used in E735 is reported. The chambers are constructed from 2.5 cm radius aluminized mylar straw tubes with wall thickness less than 0.2 mm. Also, presented are the results of tests with 2 mm radius straw tubes. The small tube has a direct detector application at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  3. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

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    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  4. Design and performance of a straw tube drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.H.; Wesson, D.K.; Cooke, J.; Goshaw, A.T.; Robertson, W.J.; Walker, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance of the straw drift chambers used in E735 is reported. The chambers are constructed from 2.5 cm radius aluminized mylar straw tubes with wall thickness less than 0.2 mm. Also, presented are the results of tests with 2 mm radius straw tubes. The small tube has a direct detector application at the Superconducting Super Collider. (orig.)

  5. Precise muon drift tube detectors for high background rate conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engl, Albert

    2011-08-04

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS-experiment at the Large Hadron Collider consists of drift tube chambers, which provide the precise measurement of trajectories of traversing muons. In order to determine the momentum of the muons with high precision, the measurement of the position of the muon in a single tube has to be more accurate than {sigma}{<=}100 {mu}m. The large cross section of proton-proton-collisions and the high luminosity of the accelerator cause relevant background of neutrons and {gamma}s in the muon spectrometer. During the next decade a luminosity upgrade to 5.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned, which will increase the background counting rates considerably. In this context this work deals with the further development of the existing drift chamber technology to provide the required accuracy of the position measurement under high background conditions. Two approaches of improving the drift tube chambers are described: - In regions of moderate background rates a faster and more linear drift gas can provide precise position measurement without changing the existing hardware. - At very high background rates drift tube chambers consisting of tubes with a diameter of 15 mm are a valuable candidate to substitute the CSC muon chambers. The single tube resolution of the gas mixture Ar:CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} in the ratio of 96:3:1 Vol %, which is more linear and faster as the currently used drift gas Ar:CO{sub 2} in the ratio of 97:3 Vol %, was determined at the Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility at Garching and at high {gamma}-background counting rates at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The alternative gas mixture shows similar resolution without background. At high background counting rates it shows better resolution as the standard gas. To analyse the data the various parts of the setup have to be aligned precisely to each other. The change to an alternative gas mixture allows the use of the existing hardware. The second approach are drift tubes

  6. Thirty-five years of drift-tube linac experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, H.B.

    1984-10-01

    The history of the drift-tube linear accelerator (linac) for the first 35 years of its existence is briefly reviewed. Both US and foreign experience is included. Particular attention is given to technological improvements, operational reliability, capital investment, and number of personnel committed to drift-tube linac (DTL) development. Preliminary data indicate that second- and third-generation (post-1960) DTLs have, in the US alone, operated for a combined total period of more than 75 machine-years and that very high reliability (>90%) has been achieved. Existing US drift-tube linacs represent a capital investment of at least $250 million (1983). Additional statistical evidence, derived from the proceedings of the last 11 linear accelerator conferences, supports the view that the DTL has achieved a mature technological base. The report concludes with a discussion of important recent advances in technology and their applications to the fourth generation of DTLs, many of which are now becoming operational

  7. Drift chambers on the basis of mylar tubing blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.A.; Golovanov, L.B.; Kuritsin, A.A.; Pukhov, O.E.; Khazins, D.M.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.E.; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna; Zhukov, V.Yu.

    1992-01-01

    We tested the models of the drift chambers, which are constructed of mylar tubing blocks. The purpose of the tubing block forming technology is to create long chambers (up to 3-4 meters). There are count and drift characteristics of the chambers for different gas pressures and different diameters of sense wires. The service time of the chambers is defined. We registered a photoeffect in the visible spectrum area, which is displayed on the surface of the mylar film cathode, covered by aluminium. 8 refs.; 5 figs

  8. Characteristics of rectangular drift tube for muon identifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, D.S.; Musienko, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study of an aluminum drift tube with a cross section of 50 x 100 mm are presented. Argon-methane and argon-isobutane mixtures were used as fillers. For a 16% methane concentration, the nonlinearity of the time-coordinate dependence does not exceed 2 mm. The tube can operate in the self-quenched streamer mode when filled with a mixture of argon with isobutane

  9. Drift tube alignment and beam emittance codes in use at the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, D.A.

    1974-01-01

    Two Fortran-IV codes in use at the SuperHILAC are of significant value in optimizing the geometry of the accelerator and in evaluating the performance of the heavy ion beams. The first routine described is used to determine the existing root mean square deviation of the 210 internal drift tube quadrupoles fitted to a straight line or to a second-order quadratic. It then predicts the minimum number of drift tubes, and their identities, to be moved in order to attain a user-elected margin of error fit. Brief mention is made of the pulsed-wire alignment technique for the quadrupole positioning. The second program described is part of a data system which utilizes a PDP-8/I as a control device for the manipulation of beam-scanning hardware and a CDC-6600 in an off-line interactive mode which gives the user maximum versatility in treating the raw data and displaying the results of calculations. The code portrays the transverse beam emittance figures and their transmission through the accelerator and transport lines. Also discussed are future plans which include on-line data reduction and CRT display by the PDP-8/I to enable the operators to optimize the tuning of the HILAC. (U.S.)

  10. Study of drift tube resolution using numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundin, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    The results off a simulation of straw tube detector response are presented. These gas ionization detectors and the electronics which must presumably go along with them are characterized in a simple but meaningful manner. The physical processes which comprise the response of the individual straw tubes are broken down and examined in detail. Different parameters of the simulation are varied and resulting predictions of drift tube spatial resolution are shown. In addition, small aspects of the predictions are compared to recent laboratory results, which can be seen as a measure of the simulation's usefulness. 10 refs., 8 figs

  11. Noncontact measurement of electrostatic fields: Verification of modeled potentials within ion mobility spectrometer drift tube designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    The heart of an ion mobility spectrometer is the drift region where ion separation occurs. While the electrostatic potentials within a drift tube design can be modeled, no method for independently validating the electrostatic field has previously been reported. Two basic drift tube designs were modeled using SIMION 7.0 to reveal the expected electrostatic fields: (1) A traditional alternating set of electrodes and insulators and (2) a truly linear drift tube. One version of the alternating electrode/insulator drift tube and two versions of linear drift tubes were then fabricated. The stacked alternating electrodes/insulators were connected through a resistor network to generate the electrostatic gradient in the drift tube. The two linear drift tube designs consisted of two types of resistive drift tubes with one tube consisting of a resistive coating within an insulating tube and the other tube composed of resistive ferrites. The electrostatic fields within each type of drift tube were then evaluated by a noncontact method using a Kelvin-Zisman type electrostatic voltmeter and probe (results for alternative measurement methods provided in supplementary material). The experimental results were then compared with the electrostatic fields predicted by SIMION. Both the modeling and experimental measurements reveal that the electrostatic fields within a stacked ion mobility spectrometer drift tube are only pseudo-linear, while the electrostatic fields within a resistive drift tube approach perfect linearity

  12. CesrTA Retarding Field Analyzer Measurements in Drifts, Dipoles, Quadrupoles and Wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvey, J.R.; Li, Y.; Livezey, J.A.; Makita, J.; Meller, R.E.; Palmer, M.A.; Schwartz, R.M.; Strohman, C.R.; Harkay, K.; Calatroni, S.; Rumolo, G.; Kanazawa, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the course of the CesrTA program, the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been instrumented with several retarding field analyzers (RFAs), which measure the local density and energy distribution of the electron cloud. These RFAs have been installed in drifts, dipoles, quadrupoles, and wigglers; and data have been taken in a variety of beam conditions and bunch configurations. This paper will provide an overview of these results, and give a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of cloud mitigation techniques implemented in the instrumented vacuum chambers.

  13. Assembly of Drift Tubes (DT) Chambers at CIEMAT (Madrid)

    CERN Multimedia

    Jesus Puerta-Pelayo

    2003-01-01

    The construction of muon drift tube chambers (DT) has been carried out in four different european institutes: Aachen (Germany), CIEMAT-Madrid (Spain), Legnaro and Turin (Italy), all of them following similar procedures and quality tests. Each chamber is composed by three or two independent units called superlayers, with four layers of staggered drift cells each. The assembly of a superlayer is a succesive glueing of aluminium plates and I-beams with electrodes previously attached, forming a rectangular and gas-tight volume. These pictures illustrate the various processes of material preparation, construction, equipment and assembly of full chambers at CIEMAT (Madrid).

  14. Performance of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

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Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; 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Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the performance of the CMS drift tube barrel muon system are described, with results based on data collected during the CMS Cosmic Run at Four Tesla. For most of these data, the solenoidal magnet was operated with a central field of 3.8 T. The analysis of data from 246 out of a total of 250 chambers indicates a very good muon reconstruction capability, with a coordinate resolution for a single hit of about 260 microns, and a nearly 100% efficiency for the drift tube cells. The resolution of the track direction measured in the bending plane is about 1.8 mrad, and the efficiency to reconstruct a segment in a single chamber is higher than 99%. The CMS simulation of cosmic rays reproduces well the performance of the barrel muon detector.

  15. Some characteristics of the long straw drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Ivanov, A.B.; Livinskij, V.V.; Lobastov, S.P.; Lysan, V.M.; Mishin, S.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.

    1998-01-01

    This article represents the construction and testing of the long straw drift tubes of different types. The diameter and the length of each straw were equal to 15 mm and 3 m respectively. The cathode resistance of these straws has a small value, i.e. about 100 Ohm/m. Thus, they do not have a large attenuation length. Installation of the spacers reduces the effective straw length by 0.5 % per meter, at least

  16. Development of a 352 MHz Cell-Coupled Drift Tube Linac Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Cuvet, Y; Völlinger, C; Vretenar, M; Gerigk, F

    2004-01-01

    At linac energies above 40 MeV, alternative structures to the conventional Drift Tube Linac can be used to increase efficiency and to simplify construction and alignment. In the frame of the R&D activities for the CERN SPL and Linac4, a prototype of Cell-Coupled Drift Tube Linac (CCDTL) at 352 MHz has been designed and built. This particular CCDTL concept is intended to cover the energy range from 40 to 90 MeV and consists of modules of ~5 m length made of 3-gap DTL tanks linked by coupling cells. The focusing quadrupoles are placed between tanks, and are aligned independently from the RF structure. The CCDTL prototype consists of two half tanks connected by a coupling cell and requires an RF power of 120 kW to achieve the design gradient. RF tests will be made at low and high power, the latter up to a 20% duty cycle. This paper introduces the main features of this CCDTL design and describes the RF and mechanical design of the prototype.

  17. Offline calibration procedure of the CMS Drift Tube detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbiendi, G; Battilana, C; Cavallo, F R; Giunta, M; Guiducci, L; Amapane, N; Bolognesi, S; Cerminara, G; Bellan, R; Biallass, P; Frangenheim, J; Biasotto, M; Tazon, A Calderon; Cepeda, M; Cruz, B De La; Pardos, C Diez; Bedoya, C Fernandez; Iglesias, M C Fouz; Menendez, J Fernandez; Gresele, A

    2009-01-01

    The barrel region of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is instrumented with Drift Tube (DT) detectors. This paper describes in full details the calibration of the DT hit reconstruction algorithm. After inter-channel synchronization has been verified through the appropriate hardware procedure, the time pedestals are extracted directly from the distribution of the recorded times. Further corrections for time-of-flight and time of signal propagation are applied as soon as the three-dimensional hit position within the DT chamber is known. The different effects of the time pedestal miscalibration on the two main hit reconstruction algorithms are shown. The drift velocity calibration algorithm is based on the meantimer technique. Different meantimer relations for different track angles and patterns of hit cells are used. This algorithm can also be used to determine the uncertainty on the reconstructed hit position.

  18. Precise muon drift tube detectors for high background rate conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Engl, Albert; Dünnweber, Wolfgang

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS-experiment at the Large H adron Collider consists of drift tube chambers, which provide the precise m easurement of trajec- tories of traversing muons. In order to determine the moment um of the muons with high precision, the measurement of the position of the m uon in a single tube has to be more accurate than σ ≤ 100 m. The large cross section of proton-proton-collisions and th e high luminosity of the accelerator cause relevant background of neutrons and γ s in the muon spectrome- ter. During the next decade a luminosity upgrade [1] to 5 10 34 cm − 2 s − 1 is planned, which will increase the background counting rates consider ably. In this context this work deals with the further development of the existing drift chamber tech- nology to provide the required accuracy of the position meas urement under high background conditions. Two approaches of improving the dri ft tube chambers are described: • In regions of moderate background rates a faster and more lin ear ...

  19. Simulation study of time-walk issues for drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Yuzo; Itoh, Setsuo; Mori, Shigeki; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Manobu.

    1991-01-01

    Time walk is evaluated for a drift tube of 2.9 cm in diameter filled with P10 gas, with an anode wire of 70 μm in diameter. Its magnitude, if the shaping is of Poisson type and a leading-edge discriminator is used, is found to be 2-10 ns when 50 % gain variation is allowed in the gas multiplication. On the other hand, the use of a constant fraction timing discriminator is expected to reduce this to the order of 0.1 ns. (author)

  20. Determination of residence times of ions in a resistive glass selected ion flow-drift tube using the Hadamard transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-09-15

    Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, used for trace gas analyses has certain fundamental limitations that could be alleviated by adding a facility that allows reaction times and ion interaction energies to be varied. Thus, a selected ion flow-drift tube, SIFDT, has been created to explore the influence of an embedded electric field on these parameters and on reaction processes. The new SIFTD instrument was constructed using a miniature resistive glass drift tube. Arrival times of ions, t, analysed by a downstream quadrupole mass spectrometer over the m/z range 10-100 were studied by modulating the injected ion current using a gate lens. Single pulse modulation was compared with pseudorandom time multiplexing exploiting the Hadamard transformation. A simple model involving analysis of ethanol and water vapour mixture in air was used to explore the advantages of the SIFDT concept to SIFT-MS analysis. It is shown that the resistive glass drift tube is suitable for SIFDT experiments. The Hadamard transformation can be used to routinely determine reagent ion residence time in the flow-drift tube and also to observe differences in arrival times for different product ions. Two-dimensional data combining arrival time and mass spectra can be obtained rapidly. The calculated ion drift velocities vary with the reduced field strength, E/N, and the calculated ion mobilities agree with theoretical and previous literature values. This study has provided evidence that the SIFDT-MS technique can be implemented in a miniature and low-cost instrument and two- or three-dimensional data can be obtained (product ion count rates as functions of m/z, t and E/N) using the Hadamard transformation thus providing exciting possibilities for further analytical additions and extensions of the SIFT-MS technique. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. High-Rate Performance of Muon Drift Tube Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schwegler, Philipp

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. In parallel with the first LHC run from 2009 to 2012, which culminated in the discovery of the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson, planning of upgrades of the LHC for higher instantaneous luminosities (HL-LHC) is already progressing. The high instantaneous luminosity of the LHC puts high demands on the detectors with respect to radiation hardness and rate capability which are further increased with the luminosity upgrade. In this thesis, the limitations of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at the high background counting rates at the LHC and performance of new small diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) detectors at the even higher background rates at HL-LHC are stud...

  2. MUON DETECTOR: BARREL DRIFT TUBES (DT) AND ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    After months of cosmics data taking the drift tube (DT) detector is in good shape, ready for LHC beams. Several hundreds of millions of cosmics events have been recorded; out of those, more than 90% were triggered by the DT system. Data integrity analyses have shown a very reliable read-out system, also during high rate tests. With a 98% of the detector operational, only awaiting the arrival of some low voltage modules and for the completion of the DT Track Finder system, data taking is starting to become routine job. These continuous running exercises have been very useful to study performance and reliability of the detector in a medium term period, allowing understanding and fixing failures that have occurred with low frequency. Drift tubes have become a very stable system, becoming a service of muon triggering for the tracker after its final installation. During the last months, major efforts have taken place in synchronization tasks, within the DT system (250 chambers) and also with the rest of the CMS su...

  3. Rf quadrupole beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, R.H.; Crandall, K.R.; Stovall, J.E.; Swenson, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method has been developed to analyze the beam dynamics of the radiofrequency quadrupole accelerating structure. Calculations show that this structure can accept a dc beam at low velocity, bunch it with high capture efficiency, and accelerate it to a velocity suitable for injection into a drift tube linac

  4. Twin-tubes: 3D tracking based on the ATLAS muon drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woudstra, M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Eldik, N. van; Graaf, H. van der; Kluit, P.; Koutsman, A.; Limper, M.; Linde, F.; Massaro, G.; Snuverink, J.; Vreeswijk, M.; Groenstege, H.; Koopstra, J.; Mos, S.; Rewiersma, P.; Timmermans, C.; Dijkema, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer have been paired to form so-called twin-tubes to measure the coordinate which runs along the wire direction. This modification endows the MDTs with full 3D track reconstruction using specially designed electronic boards. The performance of the twin-tubes has been measured for an equipped MDT chamber at the ATLAS Muon Cosmic Ray Test Stand at NIKHEF. The efficiency of a twin-tube has been determined to be 99.8%, and the measured resolution 17 cm per hit. By equipping one multilayer consisting of three layers and combining the measurements a resolution of 10 cm has been obtained

  5. Local Trigger Electronics for the CMS Drift Tubes Muon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Travaglini, R

    2003-01-01

    In the CMS detector in preparation for the CERN LHC collider, the Drift Tubes Muon Chambers are equipped with mini-crates hosting custom electronics for fast data processing and local trigger generation. In particular the Trigger Server of a DTC consists of Track Sorter Slave ASICs and a Track Sorter Master system. The trigger electronics boards are in production, to be ready for the muon detector installation in the CMS barrel starting at the end of 2003.In this work, the performance of the Trigger Server will be discussed, on the basis both of high-statistics tests with predefined patterns and of test beam data collected at CERN, where a DTC was exposed to a muon beam having an LHC-like bunch structure. Finally, some system performance expectations, concerning radiation tolerance and signal transmission issues during LHC running, will be also discussed.

  6. Linac drift tube tank upgrade engineering - cooling solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.; Heilbrunn, W.; Potter, J.

    1999-01-01

    Components from the injector of the canceled SSC project are being modified by JPAW to make a commercial radioisotope production linac for I 3 in Denton, TX. The biggest challenge of the upgraded design is the increased average power of the DTL, 40 times the original. With the thermo-mechanical analysis backed by a thorough understanding of the thermal physics, 156 drift tubes have been redesigned according to the RF power deposition. Increasing flow rate in the original cooling channels and adding four flow paths reduces the average tank temperature to an acceptable level. The Δf tolerance budget is controlled without the use of additional temperature control units. The unfinished SSC endwall parts have been modified for additional cooling of the nose and the wall. The different LINAC cooling subsystems are connected to a manifold in parallel through independent flow control valves to balance the required flow rate for each branch

  7. High-rate performance of muon drift tube detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwegler, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. In parallel with the first LHC run from 2009 to 2012, which culminated in the discovery of the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson, planning of upgrades of the LHC for higher instantaneous luminosities (HL-LHC) is already progressing. The high instantaneous luminosity of the LHC puts high demands on the detectors with respect to radiation hardness and rate capability which are further increased with the luminosity upgrade. In this thesis, the limitations of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at the high background counting rates at the LHC and performance of new small diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) detectors at the even higher background rates at HL-LHC are studied. The resolution and efficiency of sMDT chambers at high γ-ray and proton irradiation rates well beyond the ones expected at HL-LHC have been measured and the irradiation effects understood using detailed simulations. The sMDT chambers offer an about an order of magnitude better rate capability and are an ideal replacement for the MDT chambers because of compatibility of services and read-out. The limitations of the sMDT chambers are now in the read-out electronics, taken from the MDT chambers, to which improvements for even higher rate capability are proposed.

  8. Optimization of curved drift tubes for ultraviolet-ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kai; Ou, Guangli; Zhang, Xiaoguo; Yu, Zhou; Yu, Quan; Qian, Xiang; Wang, Xiaohao

    2015-08-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a key trace detection technique for toxic pollutants and explosives in the atmosphere. Ultraviolet radiation photoionization source is widely used as an ionization source for IMS due to its advantages of high selectivity and non-radioactivity. However, UV-IMS bring problems that UV rays will be launched into the drift tube which will cause secondary ionization and lead to the photoelectric effect of the Faraday disk. So air is often used as working gas to reduce the effective distance of UV rays, but it will limit the application areas of UV-IMS. In this paper, we propose a new structure of curved drift tube, which can avoid abnormally incident UV rays. Furthermore, using curved drift tube may increase the length of drift tube and then improve the resolution of UV-IMS according to previous research. We studied the homogeneity of electric field in the curved drift tube, which determined the performance of UV-IMS. Numerical simulation of electric field in curved drift tube was conducted by SIMION in our study. In addition, modeling method and homogeneity standard for electric field were also presented. The influences of key parameters include radius of gyration, gap between electrode as well as inner diameter of curved drift tube, on the homogeneity of electric field were researched and some useful laws were summarized. Finally, an optimized curved drift tube is designed to achieve homogenous drift electric field. There is more than 98.75% of the region inside the curved drift tube where the fluctuation of the electric field strength along the radial direction is less than 0.2% of that along the axial direction.

  9. Development of Fast High-Resolution Muon Drift-Tube Detectors for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00287945; Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Legger, F.; Richter, R.; Adomeit, S.; Biebel, O.; Engl, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Rauscher, F.; Zibell, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized drift-tube chambers are e?cient detectors for high-precision tracking over large areas. The Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers of the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) reach a spatial resolution of 35 micons and almost 100% tracking e?ciency with 6 layers of 30 mm diameter drift tubes operated with Ar:CO2 (93:7) gas mixture at 3 bar and a gas gain of 20000. The ATLAS MDT chambers are designed to cope with background counting rates due to neutrons and gamma-rays of up to about 300 kHz per tube which will be exceeded for LHC luminosities larger than the design value of 10-34 per square cm and second. Decreasing the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm while keeping the other parameters, including the gas gain, unchanged reduces the maximum drift time from about 700 ns to 200 ns and the drift-tube occupancy by a factor of 7. New drift-tube chambers for the endcap regions of the ATLAS muon spectrometer have been designed. A prototype chamber consisting of 12 times 8 l...

  10. Track chambers based on precision drift tubes housed inside 30 mm mylar pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, A; Bozhko, N; Fakhrutdinov, R; Kozhin, A; Leontiev, B; Levin, A

    2014-01-01

    We describe drift chambers consisting of 3 layers of 30 mm (OD) drift tubes made of double sided aluminized mylar film with thickness 0.125 mm. A single drift tube is self-supported structure withstanding 350 g tension of 50 microns sense wire located in the tube center with 10 microns precision with respect to end-plug outer surface. Such tubes allow to create drift chambers with small amount of material, construction of such chambers doesn't require hard frames. Twenty six chambers with working area from 0.8 × 1.0 to 2.5 × 2.0 m 2 including 4440 tubes have been manufactured for experiments at 70-GeV proton accelerator at IHEP(Protvino)

  11. Track chambers based on precision drift tubes housed inside 30 mm mylar pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A.; Bozhko, N.; Fakhrutdinov, R.; Kozhin, A.; Leontiev, B.; Levin, A.

    2014-06-01

    We describe drift chambers consisting of 3 layers of 30 mm (OD) drift tubes made of double sided aluminized mylar film with thickness 0.125 mm. A single drift tube is self-supported structure withstanding 350 g tension of 50 microns sense wire located in the tube center with 10 microns precision with respect to end-plug outer surface. Such tubes allow to create drift chambers with small amount of material, construction of such chambers doesn't require hard frames. Twenty six chambers with working area from 0.8 × 1.0 to 2.5 × 2.0 m2 including 4440 tubes have been manufactured for experiments at 70-GeV proton accelerator at IHEP(Protvino).

  12. Mechanical features of a 700 MHz bridge-coupled drift tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.; Smith, P.; Carlisle, L.; Larkin, T.; Lawrence, G.; Garnett, R.

    1992-01-01

    Modem linac designs for treating radioactive waste achieve high proton currents through funneling at low energy, typically around 20 MeV. The resulting switch to a high-frequency accelerating structure poses severe performance and fabrication difficulties below 100 MeV. Above 100 MeV, proven coupled-cavity linacs (CCLS) are available. However, at 20 MeV one must choose between a high-frequency drift-tube linac (DTL) or a coupled-cavity linac with very short cells. Potential radiation damage from the CW beam, excessive RF power losses, multipactoring, and fabricability all enter into this decision. At Los Alamos, we have developed designs for a bridge-coupled DTL (BCDTL) that, like a CCL, uses lattice focusing elements and bridge couplers, but that unlike a CCL, accelerates the beam in simple, short, large-aperture DTL modules with no internal quadrupole focusing. Thus, the BCDTL consumes less power than the CCL linac without beam performance and is simpler and cheaper to fabricate in the 20 to 100 MeV range

  13. Mechanical features of a 700-MHz bridge-coupled drift-tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.; Smith, P.; Carlisle, L.; Larkin, T.; Lawrence, G.; Garnett, R.

    1992-01-01

    Modern linac designs for treating radioactive waste achieve high proton currents through funneling at low energy, typically around 20 MeV. The resulting switch to a high-frequency accelerating structure poses severe performance and fabrication difficulties below 100 MeV. Above 100 MeV, proven coupled-cavity linacs (CCLs) are available. However, at 20 MeV one must choose between a high-frequency drift-tube linac (DTL) or a coupled-cavity linac with very short cells. Potential radiation damage from the CW beam, excessive RF power losses, multipactoring, and fabricability all enter into this decision. At Los Alamos, we have developed designs for a bridge-coupled DTL (BCDTL) that, like a CCL, uses lattice focusing elements and bridge couplers, but that unlike a CCL, accelerates the beam in simple, short, large-aperture DTL modules with no internal quadrupole focusing. Thus, the BCDTL consumes less power than the CCL linac without beam performance and is simpler and cheaper to fabricate in the 20 to 100 MeV range. (Author) ref., tab., 3 figs

  14. Quasi-static drift-tube accelerating structures for low-speed heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed drift-tube accelerating structure for use in Heavy Ion Fusion applications is described. Possible arrangements of components in such a structure, the injector design needs, and the influence of the existing state of component technology on drift-tube structure design are considered. It is concluded that the major attractions of the pulsed drift tubes are that they are nonresonant structures and that they appear suitable for accelerating a very high current bunch at low energies. The mechanical tolerances of the nonresonant structure are very loose and the cost per meter should be low; the cost of the transport system is expected to be the major cost. The pulse-power modulators used to drive the drift tubes are inexpensive compared with rf sources of equivalent peak power. The longitudinal emittance of the beam emerging from the structure could be extremely low. (U.K.)

  15. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, G. D.; Glonti, L. N.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Malyshev, V. L.; Piskun, A. A.; Potrbenikov, Yu. K.; Rodionov, V. K.; Samsonov, V. A.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Shkarovskiy, S. N.

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. "Self-centering" spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum.

  16. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeev, G.D.; Glonti, L.N.; Kekelidze, V.D.; Malyshev, V.L.; Piskun, A.A.; Potrbenikov, Yu.K.; Rodionov, V.K.; Samsonov, V.A.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Shkarovskiy, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. “Self-centering” spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum

  17. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, G.D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Glonti, L.N., E-mail: glonti@sunse.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kekelidze, V.D.; Malyshev, V.L.; Piskun, A.A.; Potrbenikov, Yu.K.; Rodionov, V.K.; Samsonov, V.A.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Shkarovskiy, S.N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. “Self-centering” spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum.

  18. Drift of a flat particle at longitudinal oscillations of gas in an open tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaripov, R G; Tkachenko, L A; R, Shaydullin L

    2014-01-01

    The particle motion is experimentally investigated at nonlinear oscillations of gas in the tube and in the external field near the open end in the shock-free mode. Dependence is obtained for the coordinates of the particle along the tube from time for various frequencies and amplitudes of displacement of the piston. Drift is set for a particle from the open end of the tube to the piston. It is determined that the particle moves into an external field at the open end outside the tube without appreciable oscillations. Detected position of the particle at the open end, wherein the particle does not perform drift towards the inside and outside of the tube

  19. Investigations of single-electron avalanches in a proportional drift tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, W.S.; Armitage, J.C.; Chevreau, P.; Heinrich, J.G.; Lu, C.; McDonald, I.; McDonald, K.T.; Miller, B.; Secrest, D.; Weckel, J.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed information on single-electron drift and avalanche behavior has a basic interest in an investigation of gas-chamber performance. Its timing, avalanche distribution, attachment by the working gas mixtures, etc., provide various criteria for choosing the best suitable gas mixture under a specific experimental circumstance. Investigations of single-electron avalanches in a proportional drift tube have been carried out with a pulsed N 2 laser. The study consists of two aspects: timing properties, and fluctuations in the gas avalanche

  20. Resolution and Efficiency of the ATLAS Muon Drift-Tube Chambers at High Background Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Deile, M.; Horvat, S.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Manz, A.; Mohrdieck-Mock, S.; Rauscher, F.; Richter, Robert; Staude, A.; Stiller, W.

    2016-01-01

    The resolution and efficiency of a precision drift-tube chamber for the ATLAS muon spectrometer with final read-out electronics was tested at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN in a 100 GeV muon beam and at photon irradiation rates of up to 990 Hz/square cm which corresponds to twice the highest background rate expected in ATLAS. A silicon strip detector telescope was used as external reference in the beam. The pulse-height measurement of the read-out electronics was used to perform time-slewing corrections which lead to an improvement of the average drift-tube resolution from 104 microns to 82 microns without irradiation and from 128 microns to 108 microns at the maximum expected rate. The measured drift-tube efficiency agrees with the expectation from the dead time of the read-out electronics up to the maximum expected rate.

  1. An experimental investigation of the propagation of a compact toroid along curved drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, N.; Inoo, Y.; Nomura, M.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.; Ogawa, H.; Kimura, H.; Uehara, U.; Shibata, T.; Kashiwa, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Kasai, S.

    2004-01-01

    Compact toroid (CT) injection is a viable technology for fuelling large tokamak reactors in the future. Experimental demonstration of CT injection has thus far been conducted using horizontal injection in the midplane of tokamak devices. However, recent analyses indicate adverse effects of the toroidal magnetic field on CT injection. In order to avoid these adverse effects, the CT would need to be injectable in any direction. We have therefore devised a curved drift tube to change the direction of CT propagation and have experimentally demonstrated its efficacy. It has been observed that a CT can be transported smoothly through curved drift tubes with 45 deg. and 90 deg. bends without any appreciable change in the CT parameters. The magnetic field, electron density and speed of CTs transported through both 45 deg. and 90 deg. bends are similar to those observed in a linear drift tube. (author)

  2. Fine Synchronization of the CMS Muon Drift-Tube Local Trigger using Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; 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Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS experiment uses self-triggering arrays of drift tubes in the barrel muon trigger to perform the identification of the correct bunch crossing. The identification is unique only if the trigger chain is correctly synchronized. In this paper, the synchronization performed during an extended cosmic ray run is described and the results are reported. The random arrival time of cosmic ray muons allowed several synchronization aspects to be studied and a simple method for the fine synchronization of the Drift Tube Local Trigger at LHC to be developed.

  3. Quasi-static drift-tube accelerating structures for low-speed heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1977-01-01

    The major attractions of the pulsed drift-tubes are that they are non-resonant structures and that they appear suitable for accelerating a very high current bunch at low energies. The mechanical tolerances of the non-resonant structure are very loose and the cost per meter should be low; the cost of the transport system is expected to be the major cost. The pulse power modulators used to drive the drift-tubes are inexpensive compared to r.f. sources with equivalent peak-power. The longitudinal emittance of the beam emerging from the structure could be extremely low

  4. Note: Buffer gas temperature inhomogeneities and design of drift-tube ion mobility spectrometers: Warnings for real-world applications by non-specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Maestre, R.

    2017-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separates gas phase ions moving under an electric field according to their size-to-charge ratio. IMS is the method of choice to detect illegal drugs and explosives in customs and airports making accurate determination of reduced ion mobilities (K0) important for national security. An ion mobility spectrometer with electrospray ionization coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to study uncertainties in buffer gas temperatures during mobility experiments. Differences up to 16°C were found in the buffer gas temperatures in different regions of the drift tube and up to 42°C between the buffer gas and the drift tube temperatures. The drift tube temperature is used as an approximation to the buffer gas temperature for the calculation of K0 because the buffer gas temperature is hard to measure. This is leading to uncertainties in the determination of K0 values. Inaccurate determination of K0 values yields false positives that delay the cargo and passengers in customs and airports. Therefore, recommendations are issued for building mobility tubes to assure a homogeneous temperature of the buffer gas. Because the temperature and other instrumental parameters are difficult to measure in IMS, chemical standards should always be used when calculating K0. The difference of 42°C between the drift tube and buffer gas temperatures found in these experiments produces a 10.5% error in the calculation of K0. This large inaccuracy in K0 shows the importance of a correct temperature measurement in IMS.

  5. Drift tubes for the SAMUS muon spectrometer of the DO detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, Yu.M.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Denisov, D.S.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Pishal'nikov, Yu.M.; Stoyanova, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The construction and manufacturing procedure of 6000 drift tubes for the SAMUS muon spectrometer of the DO detector are described in detail. The diameter of the stainless steel tubes is 30mm, their length varies within the range from 0.2 to 3.8 m. A testing procedure of the main parameters of the tubes is proposed and the results of testing all the tubes after manufacturing are given. With the pure methane filling the maximum drift time for electrons is 0.16 μs, the plateau of effective detection of minimum ionizing particles is equal to 1.0 kV and the coordinate resolution is 0.3 mm. 12 refs.; 9 figs.; 4 tabs

  6. Development and characterisation of new high-rate muon drift tube detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittner, Bernhard

    2012-07-25

    With the increase of the LHC luminosity above the design value and the higher background counting rates, detectors in the ATLAS muon spectrometer have to be replaced because the limits of the radiation tolerance will be exceeded. Therefore drift tube chambers with 15 mm tube diameter were developed. The required construction accuracy was verified and the limits of the resolution and efficiency were determined in a muon beam and under gamma irradiation and compared to model expectations.

  7. RIA Superconducting Drift Tube Linac R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popielarski, J.; Bierwagen, J.; Bricker, S.; Compton, C.; DeLauter, J.; Glennon, P.; Grimm, T.; Hartung, W.; Harvell, D.; Hodek, M.; Johnson, M.; Marti, F.; Miller, P.; Moblo, A.; Norton, D.; Popielarski, L.; Wlodarczak, J.; York, R.C.; Zeller, A.

    2009-01-01

    Cavity and cryomodule development work for a superconducting ion linac has been underway for several years at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The original application of the work was the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator. At present, the work is being continued for use with the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The baseline linac for FRIB requires 4 types of superconducting cavities to cover the velocity range needed to accelerate an ion beam to (ge) 200 MeV/u: 2 types of quarter-wave resonator (QWR) and 2 types of half-wave resonator (HWR). Superconducting solenoids are used for focusing. Active and passive shielding is required to ensure that the solenoids field does not degrade the cavity performance. First prototypes of both QWR types and one HWR type have been fabricated and tested. A prototype solenoid has been procured and tested. A test cryomodule has been fabricated and tested. The test cryomodule contains one QWR, one HWR, one solenoid, and one super-ferric quadrupole. This report covers the design, fabrication, and testing of this cryomodule

  8. Design of a 10 MeV, 352.2 MHz drift tube Linac

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    diameter, BR – bore radius, g – gap length, L – cell length. ... it leads to excessive surface electric field on the drift tubes leading to sparking. A ... DT stem diameter .... and the effect of the tuners, post couplers and vacuum ports on the field and ...

  9. Construction of monitored drift tube chambers for ATLAS end-cap muon spectrometer at IHEP (Protvino)

    CERN Document Server

    Bensinger, J; Borisov, A; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Goryatchev, S; Goryachev, V N; Gushchin, V; Hashemi, K S; Kojine, A; Kononov, A I; Larionov, A; Paramoshkina, E; Pilaev, A; Skvorodnev, N; Tchougouev, A; Wellenstein, H

    2002-01-01

    Trapezoidal-shaped Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers will be used in end-caps of ATLAS muon spectrometer. Design and construction technology of such chambers in IHEP (Protvino) is presented. X-ray tomography results confirm desirable 20 mum precision of wire location in the chamber.

  10. Quality control results of the drift tubes for the ATLAS MDT-BIS chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Avramidou, R.; Dris, M.; Filippas, T.A.; Gazis, E.N.; Katsoufis, E.; Maltezos, S.; Savva, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tzamariudaki, E.

    2006-01-01

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is a general purpose experiment, which will start its operation at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in 2007. The ATLAS detector is designed to study the products of proton-proton collisions at c.m.s. energies of up to 14 TeV. Three Greek Universities have taken the responsibility to construct 112 BIS-MDT (Barrel Inner Small) chambers using 29 000 drift tubes of 170 cm length and 3 cm diameter that have been quality tested before assembly. This work describes the Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA Q C) procedures for the drift tubes, followed at the High Energy Physics Laboratory of the National Technical University of Athens, while emphasis is given on the obtained results for the above mentioned number of tubes

  11. Performance of Drift-Tube Detectors at High Counting Rates for High-Luminosity LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bittner, Bernhard; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Manfredini, Alessandro; Nowak, Sebastian; Ott, Sebastian; Richter, Robert; Schwegler, Philipp; Zanzi, Daniele; Biebel, Otmar; Hertenberger, Ralf; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The performance of pressurized drift-tube detectors at very high background rates has been studied at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN and in an intense 20 MeV proton beam at the Munich Van-der-Graaf tandem accelerator for applications in large-area precision muon tracking at high-luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS muon drifttube (MDT) chambers with 30 mm tube diameter have been designed to cope with and neutron background hit rates of up to 500 Hz/square cm. Background rates of up to 14 kHz/square cm are expected at LHC upgrades. The test results with standard MDT readout electronics show that the reduction of the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm, while leaving the operating parameters unchanged, vastly increases the rate capability well beyond the requirements. The development of new small-diameter muon drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for LHC upgrades is completed. Further improvements of tracking e?ciency and spatial resolution at high counting rates will be achieved with ...

  12. Design and operation of large straw-tube drift chamber planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, C; Brown, D; Huston, J; Maul, A; Miller, R; Nyugen, A; Sorrell, L; Yosef, C [Physics and Astronomy Dept., Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Mani, S [Physics Dept., Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Choudhary, B C; Kapoor, V; Shivpuri, R [Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi Univ. (India); Baker, W; DeSoi, W; Johnstone, C; Kourbanis, I; Lukens, P; Skow, D; Wu, G H [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Alverson, G; Chang, P; Dlugosz, W; Faissler, W; Garelick, D; Glaubman, M; Lirakis, C; Pothier, E; Yasuda, T [Dept. of Physics, Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Gutierrez, P [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Hartman, K; Oh, B Y; Toothacker, W; Whitmore, J [Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Blusk, S R; Chung, W H; Engels, E Jr; Shepard, P F; Weerasundara, D D.S. [Dept. of Physics and

    1991-10-01

    We describe the design, construction and operation of a straw-tube drift chamber consisting of four X and four Y planes of 16 mm diameter straw-tubes, each 280 cm long. Straws were glued together for rigidity and were mounted into a frame which served as a gas manifold and maintained wire-to-wire precision. A novel conductive gasket was used to seal the tubes and provide electrical contact to the aluminized surface of the straws. The chamber has been successfully used in a high rate experiment (E706 at Fermilab) and has achieved its design resolution of better than 250 {mu}m per tube averaged over the whole chamber. (orig.).

  13. Drift tube measurements of mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of ions in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelf, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The zero-field mobilities of Br - and NH 4+ in O 2 were determined as a function of gas temperature in a high pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of the ion-gas combinations Br - in Ne and Kr, Li + in Xe, and Tl/ + in Kr and Xe were determined as a function of E/N, where E is the electric field strength and N is the gas number density in a low pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The measured longitudinal diffusion coefficients were used for a test and comparison of the generalized Einstein relations of Viehland-Mason and Waldman-Mason theories. The measured mobilities of Br - in Kr and Tl/ + in Kr were used in an iterative-inversion scheme from which the ion-neutral interaction potentials were determined

  14. First joint test beam of CMS Drift Tubes (DT) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC)

    CERN Multimedia

    Paolo Giacomelli

    2001-01-01

    The first full size muon drift tube chamber ever built for the CMS barrel with the final cell design (constructed at CIEMAT, Madrid) was succesfully tested with a muon beam in September 2001 at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN. For the first time also both muon detectors for the CMS barrel (DT + RPC) were coupled together. The results of this test were fully succesful and confirmed the excellent performance of both detectors together in a radiation environment.

  15. Large-Scale Production of Monitored Drift Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, F.; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Manz, A; Mohrdieck, S; Richter, R; Zhuravlov, V

    2016-01-01

    Precision drift tube chambers with a sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 20 microns are under construction for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. 70% of the 88 large chambers for the outermost layer of the central part of the spectrometer have been assembled. Measurements during chamber construction of the positions of the sense wires and of the sensors for the optical alignment monitoring system demonstrate that the requirements for the mechanical precision of the chambers are fulfilled.

  16. Construction and test of new precision drift-tube chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroha, H., E-mail: kroha@mpp.mpg.de; Kortner, O.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Takasugi, E.

    2017-02-11

    ATLAS muon detector upgrades aim for increased acceptance for muon triggering and precision tracking and for improved rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions of the detector with increasing LHC luminosity. The small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half of the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages of the MDTs, but have an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, minimizing construction time and personnel. Sense wire positioning accuracies of 5 μm have been achieved in serial production for large-size chambers comprising several hundred drift tubes. The construction of new sMDT chambers for installation in the 2016/17 winter shutdown of the LHC and the design of sMDT chambers in combination with new RPC trigger chambers for replacement of the inner layer of the barrel muon spectrometer are in progress.

  17. Construction and test of new precision drift-tube chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroha, H.; Kortner, O.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Takasugi, E.

    2017-02-01

    ATLAS muon detector upgrades aim for increased acceptance for muon triggering and precision tracking and for improved rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions of the detector with increasing LHC luminosity. The small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half of the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages of the MDTs, but have an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, minimizing construction time and personnel. Sense wire positioning accuracies of 5 μm have been achieved in serial production for large-size chambers comprising several hundred drift tubes. The construction of new sMDT chambers for installation in the 2016/17 winter shutdown of the LHC and the design of sMDT chambers in combination with new RPC trigger chambers for replacement of the inner layer of the barrel muon spectrometer are in progress.

  18. Electronics for the CMS muon drift tube chambers the read-out minicrate

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Oller, Juan Carlos; Willmott, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    On the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experimentat the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory, the drift tube chambers are responsible for muon detection and precise momentum measurement. In this paper the first level of the read out electronics for these drift tube chambers is described. These drift tube chambers will be located inside the muon barrel detector in the so-called minicrates (MCs), attached to the chambers. The read out boards (ROBs) are the main component of this first level data acquisition system, and they are responsible for the time digitalization related to Level 1 Accept (L1A) trigger of the incoming signals from the front-end electronics, followed by a consequent data merging to the next stages of the data acquisition system. ROBs' architecture and functionality have been exhaustively tested, as well as their capability of operation beyond the expected environmental conditions inside the CMS detector. Due to the satisfactory results obtained, final production of ROBs and their a...

  19. Construction and Test of New Precision Drift-Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00218480

    2017-02-11

    ATLAS muon detector upgrades aim for increased acceptance for muon triggering and precision tracking and for improved rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions of the detector with increasing LHC luminosity. The small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half of the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages of the MDTs, but have an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, minimizing construction time and personnel. Sense wire positioning accuracies of 5 ?micons have been achieved in serial production for large-size chambers comprising several hundred drift tubes. The construction of new sMDT chambers for installation in the 2016/17 winter shutdown of the LHC and the design of sMDT chambers in combination with new R...

  20. Modelling of the space-to-drift-time relationship of the ATLAS monitored drift-tube chambers in the presence of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Khartchenko, D.; Kortner, O.; Kotov, S.; Kroha, H.; Manz, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Rauscher, F.; Richter, R.; Staude, A.; Valderanis, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer uses tracking chambers consisting of up to 5m long drift tubes filled with Ar:CO 2 (93:7) at 3bar. The chambers are run in a average toroidal magnetic field of 0.4T created by 8 air core coils. They provide a track-point accuracy of 40μm if the space-to-drift-time relationship r(t) is known with 20μm accuracy. The magnetic field B influences the electron drift inside the tubes: the maximum drift time t max =700ns increases by ∼70ns/T 2 B 2 . B varies by up to +/-0.4T along the tubes of the chambers mounted near the magnet coils which translates into a variation of t max of up to 45ns. The dependence of r(t) on B must be taken into account. Test-beam measurements show that the electron drift in case of B 0 can be modelled with the required accuracy by a Langevin equation with a friction term which is slightly non-linear in the drift velocity

  1. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Drift-Tube Chambers at High Background Rates and in Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00213689; Horvat, S.; Legger, F.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Richter, R.; Valderanis, Ch.; Rauscher, F.; Staude, A.

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer uses drift-tube chambers for precision tracking. The performance of these chambers in the presence of magnetic field and high radiation fluxes is studied in this article using test-beam data recorded in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The measurements are compared to detailed predictions provided by the Garfield drift-chamber simulation programme.

  2. Studies of Read-Out Electronics and Trigger for Muon Drift Tube Detectors at High Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. For precise measurements of the properties of the Higgs-Boson and searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model, the LHC luminosity of $L=10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ is planned to be increased by a factor of ten leading to the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). In order to cope with the higher background and data rates, the LHC experiments need to be upgraded. In this thesis, studies for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer are presented with respect to the read-out electronics of the Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) and the small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers and the Level-1 muon trigger. Due to the reduced tube diameter of sMDT chambers, background occupancy and space charge effects are suppressed by an order of magnitude compar...

  3. Crossbar H-mode drift-tube linac design with alternative phase focusing for muon linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, M.; Futatsukawa, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Kitamura, R.; Kondo, Y.; Kurennoy, S.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a Crossbar H-mode (CH) drift-tube linac (DTL) design with an alternative phase focusing (APF) scheme for a muon linac, in order to measure the anomalous magnetic moment and electric dipole moment (EDM) of muons at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The CH-DTL accelerates muons from β = v/c = 0.08 to 0.28 at an operational frequency of 324 MHz. The design and results are described in this paper.

  4. Test beam analysis of the first CMS drift tube muon chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Albajar, C; Arce, P; Autermann, C; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bontenackels, M; Caballero, J; Cavallo, F R; Cerrada, M; Cirio, R; Colino, N; Conti, E; de la Cruz, B; Dal Corso, F; Dallavalle, G M; Fernández, C; Fernández de Troconiz, J; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; García-Abia, P; García-Raboso, A; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giacomelli, P; Gonella, F; Gulmini, M; Hebbeker, T; Hermann, S; Höpfner, K; Jiménez, I; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Lacaprara, S; Marcellini, S; Mariotti, C; Maron, G; Maselli, S; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Montanari, C; Montecassiano, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Odorici, F; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Peroni, C; Perrotta, A; Puerta, J; Reithler, H; Romero, A; Romero, L; Ronchese, P; Rossi, A; Rovelli, T; Sacchi, R; Sowa, M; Staiano, A; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Vaniev, V; Vanini, S; Ventura, Sandro; Villanueva, C; Willmott, C; Zotto, P L; Zumerle, G

    2004-01-01

    In October 2001 the first produced CMS Barrel Drift Tube (DT) Muon Chamber was tested at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) using a muon beam. A Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was attached to the top of the DT chamber, and, for the first time, both detectors were operated coupled together. The performance of the DT chamber was studied for several operating conditions, and for gamma rates similar to the ones expected at LHC. In this paper we present the data analysis; the results are considered fully satisfactory.

  5. Performance of the CMS drift-tube chamber local trigger with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

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Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The performance of the Local Trigger based on the drift-tube system of the CMS experiment has been studied using muons from cosmic ray events collected during the commissioning of the detector in 2008. The properties of the system are extensively tested and compared with the simulation. The effect of the random arrival time of the cosmic rays on the trigger performance is reported, and the results are compared with the design expectations for proton-proton collisions and with previous measurements obtained with muon beams.

  6. Test beam analysis of the first CMS drift tube muon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albajar, C.; Amapane, N.; Arce, P.; Autermann, C.; Bellato, M.; Benettoni, M.; Benvenuti, A.; Bontenackels, M.; Caballero, J.; Cavallo, F.R.; Cerrada, M.; Cirio, R.; Colino, N.; Conti, E.; Cruz, B. de la; Corso, F. dal; Dallavalle, G.M.; Fernandez, C.; Troconiz, J.F. de; Fouz, M.C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Garcia-Raboso, A.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giacomelli, P.; Gonella, F.; Gulmini, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Hermann, S.; Hoepfner, K.; Jimenez, I.; Josa, I.; Lacaprara, S.; Marcellini, S.; Mariotti, C.; Maron, G.; Maselli, S.; Meneguzzo, A.T.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Montanari, C.; Montecassiano, F.; Navarria, F.L.; Odorici, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peroni, C.; Perrotta, A.; Puerta, J.; Reithler, H.; Romero, A.; Romero, L.; Ronchese, P.; Rossi, A.; Rovelli, T.; Sacchi, R.; Sowa, M.; Staiano, A.; Toniolo, N.; Torassa, E.; Vaniev, V.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Villanueva, C.; Willmott, C.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.

    2004-01-01

    In October 2001 the first produced CMS Barrel Drift Tube (DT) Muon Chamber was tested at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) using a muon beam. A Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was attached to the top of the DT chamber, and, for the first time, both detectors were operated coupled together. The performance of the DT chamber was studied for several operating conditions, and for gamma rates similar to the ones expected at LHC. In this paper we present the data analysis; the results are considered fully satisfactory

  7. Test beam analysis of the first CMS drift tube muon chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albajar, C.; Amapane, N.; Arce, P.; Autermann, C.; Bellato, M.; Benettoni, M.; Benvenuti, A.; Bontenackels, M.; Caballero, J.; Cavallo, F.R.; Cerrada, M.; Cirio, R.; Colino, N.; Conti, E.; Cruz, B. de la; Corso, F. dal; Dallavalle, G.M.; Fernandez, C.; Troconiz, J.F. de E-mail: jorge.troconiz@uam.es; Fouz, M.C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Garcia-Raboso, A.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giacomelli, P.; Gonella, F.; Gulmini, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Hermann, S.; Hoepfner, K.; Jimenez, I.; Josa, I.; Lacaprara, S.; Marcellini, S.; Mariotti, C.; Maron, G.; Maselli, S.; Meneguzzo, A.T.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Montanari, C.; Montecassiano, F.; Navarria, F.L.; Odorici, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peroni, C.; Perrotta, A.; Puerta, J.; Reithler, H.; Romero, A.; Romero, L.; Ronchese, P.; Rossi, A.; Rovelli, T.; Sacchi, R.; Sowa, M.; Staiano, A.; Toniolo, N.; Torassa, E.; Vaniev, V.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Villanueva, C.; Willmott, C.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G

    2004-06-11

    In October 2001 the first produced CMS Barrel Drift Tube (DT) Muon Chamber was tested at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) using a muon beam. A Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was attached to the top of the DT chamber, and, for the first time, both detectors were operated coupled together. The performance of the DT chamber was studied for several operating conditions, and for gamma rates similar to the ones expected at LHC. In this paper we present the data analysis; the results are considered fully satisfactory.

  8. Optimization and Calibration of the Drift-Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067746

    2000-01-01

    The final phase of preparations for the ATLAS experiment at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has begun. In the last decade the collaboration has carried out various test-beam experiments to study and optimize prototypes of all subdetectors under more and more realistic conditions. To enhance the detector-physical understanding, these hardware activities were complemented by detailed simulations. In parallel the development of reconstruction software has made important progress. The present work focusses on some advanced aspects of optimizing the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT) for operation as precision chambers in the Muon Spectrometer. It will be shown how this system has been tuned for maximum performance in order to meet the ambitious goals defined by the objectives of LHC particle physics. After defining the basic detector parameters, the tubes' capability of running in ATLAS's high-rate gamma radiation background was verified. Both tasks necessitated several years of gathering experience in mu...

  9. Application of Deformable Templates for Recognizing Tracks Detected with High Pressure Drift Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baginyan, S.; Baranov, S.; Glazov, A.; Ososkov, G.

    1994-01-01

    The modification of the deformable template method (DTM) application to the problem of track finding and track parameter determination for data detected with high pressure drift tubes (HPDT) in the design of ATLAS for the muon spectrometer experiment is proposed. Our DTM applications consist of two parts, according to two stages of the study. The first part relates to the stage of HPDT study on the CERN muon beam (BEAM-TEST) with the simplest one-prong events without noise signals, where the main obstacle is the left-right ambiguities for each tube. In the second part more complicated HPDT data are to be handled with noise signals. It was shown that the suggested DTM development solves the problem of track recognition and track parameter determination for both noiseless and noise data. Results are obtained on the real beam test data and on data simulating the muon spectrometer on the basis of HPDT. 14 refs., 10 figs

  10. Investigations on KONUS beam dynamics using the pre-stripper drift tube linac at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C.; Du, X. N.; Groening, L.

    2018-04-01

    Interdigital H-mode (IH) drift tube linacs (DTLs) based on KONUS beam dynamics are very sensitive to the rf-phases and voltages at the gaps between tubes. In order to design these DTLs, a deep understanding of the underlying longitudinal beam dynamics is mandatory. The report presents tracking simulations along an IH-DTL using the PARTRAN and BEAMPATH codes together with MATHCAD and CST. Simulation results illustrate that the beam dynamics design of the pre-stripper IH-DTL at GSI is sensitive to slight deviations of rf-phase and gap voltages with impact to the mean beam energy at the DTL exit. Applying the existing geometrical design, rf-voltages, and rf-phases of the DTL were re-adjusted. In simulations this re-optimized design can provide for more than 90% of transmission of an intense 15 emA beam keeping the reduction of beam brilliance below 25%.

  11. Dynamics of spheromak-like compact toroids in a drift tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Hayashi, T.

    2001-01-01

    In order to supply plasma fuel confined in spheromak-like compact toroids (SCTs) to a fusion device, the SCTs must be successfully guided through a drift tube region, in which they might be influenced by the magnetic field leaking from the fusion device. To reveal the SCT dynamics in a drift tube, MHD numerical simulations, where the SCTs are accelerated in a co-axial perfectly conducting cylinder with an external magnetic field, are carried out. In addition, the effect of an extended central electrode is examined by changing the length of the inner conducting cylinder. It is revealed that the SCT penetration depth is shorter than that estimated from the conventional conducting sphere model and that the SCTs are further decelerated by extending the inner conducting cylinder. These results are consistent with the results of the compact toroid injection experiment performed on the TEXT Upgrade tokamak. Finally, the deceleration mechanism of the SCTs is discussed by comparing the simulation result with the proposed theoretical model. (author)

  12. An Interlaboratory Evaluation of Drift Tube Ion Mobility–Mass Spectrometry Collision Cross Section Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stow, Sarah M. [Department; Causon, Tim J. [Division; Zheng, Xueyun [Biological; Kurulugama, Ruwan T. [Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, California 95051, United States; Mairinger, Teresa [Division; May, Jody C. [Department; Rennie, Emma E. [Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, California 95051, United States; Baker, Erin S. [Biological; Smith, Richard D. [Biological; McLean, John A. [Department; Hann, Stephan [Division; Fjeldsted, John C. [Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, California 95051, United States

    2017-08-14

    Collision cross section (CCS) measurements resulting from ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) experiments provide a promising orthogonal dimension of structural information in MS-based analytical separations. As with any molecular identifier, interlaboratory standardization must precede broad range integration into analytical workflows. In this study, we present a reference drift tube ion mobility mass spectrometer (DTIM-MS) where improvements on the measurement accuracy of experimental parameters influencing IM separations provide standardized drift tube, nitrogen CCS values (DTCCSN2) for over 120 unique ion species with the lowest measurement uncertainty to date. The reproducibility of these DTCCSN2 values are evaluated across three additional laboratories on a commercially available DTIM-MS instrument. The traditional stepped field CCS method performs with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.29% for all ion species across the three additional laboratories. The calibrated single field CCS method, which is compatible with a wide range of chromatographic inlet systems, performs with an average, absolute bias of 0.54% to the standardized stepped field DTCCSN2 values on the reference system. The low RSD and biases observed in this interlaboratory study illustrate the potential of DTIM-MS for providing a molecular identifier for a broad range of discovery based analyses.

  13. Aging Studies for the Large Honeycomb Drift Tube System of the Outer Tracker of HERA-B

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, H; Beck, M; Belkov, A; Berkhan, K; Bohm, G; Bruinsma, M; Buran, T; Capeans, M; Chamanina, J; Chen, BX; Deckers, H; Dehmelt, K; Dong, X; Eckmann, R; Emelianov, D; Fourletov, S; Golutvin, I; Hohlmann, M; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Hulsbergen, W; Jia, Y; Jiang, C; Kapitza, H; Karabekyan, S; Ke, Z; Kiryushin, Y; Kolanoski, H; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krucker, D; Lanyov, A; Liu, Y Q; Lohse, T; Loke, R; Mankel, R; Medin, G; Michel, E; Moshkin, A; Ni, J; Nowak, S; Ouchrif, M; Padilla, C; Pose, D; Ressing, D; Saveliev, V; Schmidt, B; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Schreiner, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarz, Andreas S; Siccama, I; Solunin, S; Somov, S; Souvorov, V; Spiridonov, A; Staric, M; Stegmann, C; Steinkamp, O; Tesch, N; Tsakov, I; Uwer, U; Vassiliev, S; Vukotic, I; Walter, M; Wang, J J; Wang, Y M; Wurth, R; Yang, J; Zheng, Z; Zhu, Z; Zimmerman, R

    2003-01-01

    The HERA-B Outer Tracker consists of drift tubes folded from polycarbonate foil and is operated with Ar/CF4/CO2 as drift gas. The detector has to stand radiation levels which are similar to LHC conditions. The first prototypes exposed to radiation in HERA-B suffered severe radiation damage due to the development of self-sustaining currents (Malter effect). In a subsequent extended R&D program major changes to the original concept for the drift tubes (surface conductivity, drift gas, production materials) have been developed and validated for use in harsh radiation environments. In the test program various aging effects (like Malter currents, gain loss due to anode aging and etching of the anode gold surface) have been observed and cures by tuning of operation parameters have been developed.

  14. Studies on the detection characteristics of the OPERA drift tube spectrometer; Studien zu den Nachweiseigenschaften des OPERA-Driftroehrenspektrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldorf, Christian

    2009-07-15

    Within the framework of this diploma thesis the density dependent detection characteristics of the OPERA Precision Tracker are studied at a test set up with two drift tube modules. Measurements of gain, hit efficiency, spatial resolution and time-to-distance relation are presented depending on the density, anode voltage and discriminator thresholds. At a constant anode voltage the gain falls with increasing density. Therefore the hit efficiency and the spatial resolution decrease with increasing density above 1,70 kg/m{sup 3}. Within the temperature-fluctuations of 6 K inside the LNGS, an uncertainty of the spatial resolution up to 75 {mu}m is found. Within these temperature-fluctuations the upper limit for the variation of the drift distance at a drift time of 1200 ns is about 220 {mu}m. Both effects are tolerable for the spatial resolution of the OPERA Drift Tubes. (orig.)

  15. Study of the performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube chambers in magntic fields and at high irradiation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valderanis, Chrysostomos

    2012-07-26

    The performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube (MDT) chambers has been studied in detail using high-energy muon beams. The measurements of the drift tube properties in magnetic fields showed that inelastic collisions of the drifting electrons with the CO{sub 2} molecules in the Ar:CO{sub 2} (93:7) gas mixture of the MDT chambers have to be taken into account in the simulation of the drift properties. Such inelastic collisions are now correctly treated by the Garfield simulation programme from version 9 providing an accurate description of the behaviour of the ATLAS muon drift tubes, in particular in the magnetic field. Measurements at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN were performed to study the performance of the MDT chambers in the presence of high {gamma} ray background fluences. The chambers have a spatial resolution better than 40 {mu}m at the nominal background rates expected at the Large Hadron Collider design luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a resolution better than 50 {mu}m for up to five times higher background rates. Efficient muon detection up to background counting rates of 500 kHz per tube corresponding to 35% occupancy was demonstrated.

  16. New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H + proton beam, and injects H - to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode reg-sign is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed

  17. Construction and test of high precision drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; Kroha, Hubert; Schwegler, Philipp; Sforza, Federico

    2014-01-01

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS muon spectrometer in March 2014 new muon tracking chambers (sMDT) with drift-tubes of 15 mm diameter, half of the value of the standard ATLAS Monitored Drift-Tubes (MDT) chambers, and 10~$\\mu$m positioning accuracy of the sense wires have been constructed. The new chambers are designed to be fully compatible with the present ATLAS services but, with respect to the previously installed ATLAS MDT chambers, they are assembled in a more compact geometry and they deploy two additional tube layers that provide redundant rack information. The chambers are composed of 8 layers of in total 624 aluminium drift-tubes. The assembly of a chamber is completed within a week. A semi-automatized production line is used for the assembly of the drift-tubes prior to the chamber assembly. The production procedures and the quality control tests of the single components and of the complete chambers will be discussed. The wire position in the completed chambers have been measured by using a coordinate me...

  18. Design and Development of a control system for the Drift Tube Chamber High Voltage Power Supply

    CERN Document Server

    Leon Vega, Luis Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper contains information related to the design and development of a control and data acquisition manager implemented in WinCC, a Siemens SCADA system. The goal was to manage a CAEN HV (High Voltage) system for powering a Drift Tube (DT) chamber of the CMS experiment. Basically, this manager consists of two sections: a friendly user interface and powerful scripts to manage the back-end. It is in charge of adjusting the power supply settings to the correct values needed for the DT Chamber operations (ON, OFF, Standby), depending of the requirements of the operator, managing automatically all the transition process. Also, the manager is in charge of configuring the archiving process for acquiring data and providing the history of the system. It also implements the monitoring of the status of each connected channel, alerting in case it is needed.

  19. Drift Tubes Trigger System of the CMS Experiment at LHC : Commissioning and Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Battilana, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis the performances of the CMS Drift Tubes Local Trigger System of the CMS detector are studied. CMS is one of the general purpose experiments that will operate at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Results from data collected during the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla (CRAFT) commissioning exercise, a globally coordinated run period where the full experiment was involved and configured to detect cosmic rays crossing the CMS cavern, are presented. These include analyses on the precision and accuracy of the trigger reconstruction mechanism and measurement of the trigger efficiency. The description of a method to perform system synchronization is also reported, together with a comparison of the outcomes of trigger electronics and its software emulator code.

  20. Spallation Neutron Source Drift Tube Linac Resonance Control Cooling System Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Johnny Y; Champion, Marianne M; Feschenko, Alexander; Gibson, Paul; Kiselev, Yuri; Kovalishin, A S; Kravchuk, Leonid V; Kvasha, Adolf; Schubert, James P

    2005-01-01

    The Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS) for the warm linac of the Spallation Neutron Source was designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The primary design focus was on water cooling of individual component contributions. The sizing the RCCS water skid was accomplished by means of a specially created SINDA/FLUINT model tailored to these system requirements. A new model was developed in Matlab Simulink and incorporates actual operational values and control valve interactions. Included is the dependence of RF input power on system operation, cavity detuning values during transients, time delays that result from water flows through the heat exchanger, the dynamic process of water warm-up in the cooling system due to dissipated RF power on the cavity surface, differing contributions on the cavity detuning due to drift tube and wall heating, and a dynamic model of the heat exchanger with characteristics in close agreement to the real unit. Because of the Matlab Simulink model, investigation of a wide range ...

  1. Setup of a drift tube muon tracker and calibration of muon tracking in Borexino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Daniel

    2011-04-15

    In this work the setup and commissioning of a drift tube based 3D muon tracking detector are described and its use for the solar neutrino experiment Borexino is presented. After a brief introduction to neutrino physics, the general layout of the detector is presented. It is followed by the description of the reconstruction and calibration algorithms. The performance of the muon tracker is presented and results from the commissioning in Hamburg are shown. The detector is currently operated in the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy at the Borexino experiment. After an introduction to Borexino, the modifications of the muon tracker for its setup at LNGS are described. The setup is used as a reference system to determine the resolution of the Borexino muon tracking which is essential for the tagging of cosmogenic induced {sup 11}C background. Finally, first results are presented. (orig.)

  2. Limiting currents of an unneutralized magnetized electron beam in a cylindrical drift tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Sloan, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the steady state injection of a uniform unneutralized, magnetized, relativistic electron beam into a cylindrical drift tube are presented. The space-charge-limited current and the asymptotic kinetic energy of electrons on axis is determined both numerically and analytically as a function of the input kinetic energy (γ 0 -1) mc 2 and of the ratio of beam-to-wall radii. A previously cited ''interpolation formula'' is obtained in the pencil beam limit, but more accurate limiting current expressions are developed for other cases (such as the fat beam limit) where the interpolation formula is as much as 20% in error. The corresponding axial electron energy is also found to be significantly smaller than the previously cited value of (γ/sup 1/3/ 0 -1) mc 2 except in the strong pencil beam limit

  3. Mechanical design, fabrication and initial tests on prototype drift tube linac at IUAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacharias, J.; Mehta, R.; Hariwal, R.V.; Ajithkumar, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    The Drift Tube Linac (DTL) project is a major subsection of High Current Injector project at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC). It has been designed to accelerate ions from 180 keV/u to 1.8 MeV/u, using six IH type RF resonators operating at 97 MHz. The required output energy of the DTL is decided by the minimum input velocity of nearly 6% of velocity of light, required for the existing superconducting LINAC. IH type resonators are the preferred choice for multiple gap DTL applications due to their high shunt impedance values. The mechanical design and CNC machining of parts and assembly of DTL were carried out at IUAC to validate the electrical design. (author)

  4. Setup of a drift tube muon tracker and calibration of muon tracking in Borexino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bick, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    In this work the setup and commissioning of a drift tube based 3D muon tracking detector are described and its use for the solar neutrino experiment Borexino is presented. After a brief introduction to neutrino physics, the general layout of the detector is presented. It is followed by the description of the reconstruction and calibration algorithms. The performance of the muon tracker is presented and results from the commissioning in Hamburg are shown. The detector is currently operated in the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy at the Borexino experiment. After an introduction to Borexino, the modifications of the muon tracker for its setup at LNGS are described. The setup is used as a reference system to determine the resolution of the Borexino muon tracking which is essential for the tagging of cosmogenic induced 11 C background. Finally, first results are presented. (orig.)

  5. Ageing studies for the ATLAS MDT muonchambers and development of a gas filter to prevent drift tube ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, S.

    2008-01-01

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector, which is currently assembled at the LHC accelerator at CERN, uses drift tubes as basic detection elements over most of the solid angle. The performance of these monitored drift tubes (MDTs), in particular their spatial resolution of 80 μm, determines the precision of the spectrometer. If ageing effects occur, the precision of the drift tubes will be degraded. Hence ageing effects have to be minimized or avoided altogether if possible. Even with a gas mixture of Ar:CO 2 =93:7, which was selected for its good ageing properties, ageing effects were observed in test systems. They were caused by small amounts of impurities, in particular volatile silicon compounds. Systematic studies revealed the required impurity levels deteriorating the drift tubes to be well below 1 ppm. Many components of the ATLAS MDT gas system are supplied by industry. In a newly designed ageing experiment in Freiburg these components were validated for their use in ATLAS. With a fully assembled ATLAS gas distribution rack as test component ageing effects were observed. It was therefore decided to install gas filters in the gas distribution lines to remove volatile silicon compounds efficiently from the gas mixture. Finally a filter was designed that can adsorb up to 5.5 g of volatile silicon compounds, hereby reducing the impurities in the outlet gas mixture to less than 30 ppb. (orig.)

  6. Ageing studies for the ATLAS MDT muonchambers and development of a gas filter to prevent drift tube ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, S.

    2008-01-15

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector, which is currently assembled at the LHC accelerator at CERN, uses drift tubes as basic detection elements over most of the solid angle. The performance of these monitored drift tubes (MDTs), in particular their spatial resolution of 80 {mu}m, determines the precision of the spectrometer. If ageing effects occur, the precision of the drift tubes will be degraded. Hence ageing effects have to be minimized or avoided altogether if possible. Even with a gas mixture of Ar:CO{sub 2}=93:7, which was selected for its good ageing properties, ageing effects were observed in test systems. They were caused by small amounts of impurities, in particular volatile silicon compounds. Systematic studies revealed the required impurity levels deteriorating the drift tubes to be well below 1 ppm. Many components of the ATLAS MDT gas system are supplied by industry. In a newly designed ageing experiment in Freiburg these components were validated for their use in ATLAS. With a fully assembled ATLAS gas distribution rack as test component ageing effects were observed. It was therefore decided to install gas filters in the gas distribution lines to remove volatile silicon compounds efficiently from the gas mixture. Finally a filter was designed that can adsorb up to 5.5 g of volatile silicon compounds, hereby reducing the impurities in the outlet gas mixture to less than 30 ppb. (orig.)

  7. Ageing studies for the ATLAS MDT Muonchambers and development of a gas filter to prevent drift tube ageing

    CERN Document Server

    König, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at CERN uses drift tubes as basic detection elements over most of the solid angle. The performance of these monitored drift tubes (MDTs), in particular their spatial resolution of 80 µm, determines the precision of the spectrometer. If ageing effects occur, the precision of the drift tubes will be degraded. Hence ageing effects have to be minimized or avoided altogether if possible. Even with a gas mixture of Ar:CO2 (93:7), which was selected for its good ageing properties, ageing effects were observed in test systems. They were caused by small amounts of impurities, in particular volatile silicon compounds. Systematic studies revealed the required impurity levels deteriorating the drift tubes to be well below 1 ppm. Many components of the ATLAS MDT gas system are supplied by industry. In a newly designed ageing experiment in Freiburg these components were validated for their use in ATLAS. With a fully assembled ATLAS gas distribution rack as test component ageing ...

  8. Competitive Association and Charge Transfer in the Reactions of NO + with some Ketones: a Select Ion Flow Drift Tube Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fairley, D. A.; Milligan, D. B.; Freeman, C. G.; McEwan, M. J.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 1 (1999), s. 35-43 ISSN 1387-3806 Grant - others:Marsden Fund(NZ) - Institutional research plan: CEZ:A54/98:Z4-040-9-ii Keywords : ion-molecule reaction kinetics * selected ion flow drift tube * ternary association Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.086, year: 1999

  9. Upgrade of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube Frontend Electronics for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Junjie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT system is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 μm, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at pT=1 TeV. To cope with large amount of data and high event rate expected from the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade, ATLAS plans to use the MDT detector at the first-trigger level to improve the muon transverse momentum resolution and reduce the trigger rate. The new MDT trigger and readout system will have an output event rate of 1 MHz and a latency of 6 us at the first-level trigger. The signals from MDT tubes are first processed by an Amplifier/Shaper/Discriminator (ASD) ASIC, and the binary differential signals output by the ASDs are then router to the Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) ASIC, where the arrival times of leading and trailing edges are digitized in a time bin of 0.78 ns which leads to an RMS timing error of 0.25 n...

  10. Study and optimization of a LINAC drift tube for high intensity proton acceleration; Etude et optimisation d'un LINAC a tubes de glissement pour acceleration de forts courants de protons en continu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernaudin, P.E

    2002-09-01

    High intensity proton accelerators lead to specific problems related to the need to limit beam losses. The problem is more acute in the low energy part (up to 20 MeV) where the beam transport is the most difficult. The drift tube linac (DTL) remains the reference structure for energies of a few MeV to a few dozens MeV despite the arising of some new cavity types. This thesis purpose is to design such a DTL for a high intensity proton accelerator. Until now, no such continuous wave cavity has ever been operated. To ensure the viability of such an accelerator, a short four cells prototype is designed, built and tested under nominal RF conditions. This prototype is fully representative of a complete machine except for its length. The design complexity comes from the combination of RF electromagnetism, thermal exchanges, mechanics, ultra-vacuum engineering and manufacturing constraints. More specifically, the electromagnets alignment is a primary factor, and reliability, despite being usually of secondary importance in particles accelerator science, is here a major concern considering potential industrial applications of this machine. The prototype design includes the cavity itself, but also quadrupole electromagnets whose feasibility is a limiting factor, considering the very small space available to them. Two different magnet types and associated drift tubes are studied and manufactured, to be tested in the prototype cavity. The experimental part is focused on mechanical and thermal aspects. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also checked. As a conclusion of this thesis, technical and conceptual improvements as suggested by the manufacturing and experimental phases are presented, to be implemented in a complete cavity. (author)

  11. Alignment of the drift tube detector at the neutrino oscillation experiment OPERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goellnitz, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    The present thesis was composed during the course of the OPERA experiment, which aims to give a direct evidence for neutrino oscillations in the channel ν μ → ν τ . The OPERA detector is designed to observe the appearance of tau neutrinos in an originally pure muon neutrino beam, the CNGS beam. As important part of the detector the precision tracker (PT), a drift tube detector, consists of 9504 drift tubes in 198 modules. In this thesis, several parts of the slow control of the PT are developed and implemented to ensure operation during data taking over several years. The main part is the geometric calibration, the alignment of the detector. The alignment procedure contains both hardware and software parts, the software methods are developed and applied. Using straight particle tracks, the detector components are geometrically corrected. A special challenge for the alignment for the PT is the fact that at this kind of low-rate experiment only a small number of particle tracks is available. With software-based corrections of the module rotation, a systematic error of 0.2 mrad has been attained, for corrections of translation, a systematic error of 32 μm is reached. For the alignment between two adjacent PT walls, the statistical error is less than 8 μm. All results of the position monitoring system are considered. All developed methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulations. The detector requirements (Δp/p ≤ 0.25 below 25 GeV) are met. The analysis of the momentum measurement for high energies above 25 GeV demonstrates the resulting improvement. The mean momentum is falling significantly using the new alignment values. The significance of the detector alignment becomes most evident in the analysis of cosmic particles. The muon charge ratio R μ is expected not to be angular dependent. The χ 2 probability of the measured distribution improves up to 58%. The muon charge ratio was also investigated in dependence of particle energy in terms of the alignment

  12. Construction and Test of Muon Drift Tube Chambers for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Schwegler, Philipp; Dubbert, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Since the start of operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on 20 November 2009, the instantaneous luminosity is steadily increasing. The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the LHC is instrumented with trigger and precision tracking chambers in a toroidal magnetic field. Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers are employed as precision tracking chambers, complemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the very forward region where the background counting rate due to neutrons and γ's produced in shielding material and detector components is too high for the MDT chambers. After several upgrades of the CERN accelerator system over the coming decade, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to be raised to about five times the LHC design luminosity. This necessitates replacement of the muon chambers in the regions with the highest background radiation rates in the so-called Small Wheels, which constitute the innermost layers of the muon spectrometer end-caps, by new detectors with higher rate cap...

  13. Performance and Future Upgrades of the CMS Drift Tube Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Redondo Ferrero, David Daniel

    2017-01-01

    A key component of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is its muon system. The tracking and triggering of muons in the central part relies on Drift Tube (DT) chambers. The DT system keeps evolving in order to cope with long term operational challenges, as well as future constraints for rate reduction imposed by future increases of LHC luminosity, maintaining the highest possible efficiency. During the first long LHC shutdown (LS1) a significant number of improvements and upgrades started being implemented, in particular concerning the readout and trigger electronics. Ever since LS1, each LHC winter shutdown is used to install and test these new developments towards HL-LHC.Regarding the long term operation of the DT system, in order to cope with up to a factor 2 nominal LHC luminosity, several modifications will be required. The in-chamber local electronics will be modified to cope with the new environment. Also the second level of the readout system needs to be redesigned to minimize event processing ...

  14. Status and future prospects of the Muon Drift Tubes system of CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Masetti, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    A key component of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is its muon system. The tracking and triggering of muons in the central part relies on Drift Tube (DT) chambers. During the first Long Shutdown of LHC (LS1) a number of improvements and upgrades were implemented, in particular concerning the readout and trigger electronics. The increase of luminosity expected by LHC during phase 1 will impose several constraints for rate reduction while maintaining high efficiency in the CMS Level 1 trigger system.In order to exploit the muon detector redundancy, a new trigger system has been designed. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that combines the primitives information from different subdetectors DT, Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) and Outer Hadron Calorimeter (HO).Regarding the long term operation of the DT system, in order to cope with up to a factor 2 nominal LHC luminosity, several improvements will be implemented. The in-chamber local electronics will be modified to cope wi...

  15. Optimized numerical annular flow dryout model using the drift-flux model in tube geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ji Han; Lee, Un Chul

    2008-01-01

    Many experimental analyses for annular film dryouts, which is one of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) mechanisms, have been performed because of their importance. Numerical approaches must also be developed in order to assess the results from experiments and to perform pre-tests before experiments. Various thermal-hydraulic codes, such as RELAP, COBRATF, MARS, etc., have been used in the assessment of the results of dryout experiments and in experimental pre-tests. These thermal-hydraulic codes are general tools intended for the analysis of various phenomena that could appear in nuclear power plants, and many models applying these codes are unnecessarily complex for the focused analysis of dryout phenomena alone. In this study, a numerical model was developed for annular film dryout using the drift-flux model from uniform heated tube geometry. Several candidates of models that strongly affect dryout, such as the entrainment model, deposition model, and the criterion for the dryout point model, were tested as candidates for inclusion in an optimized annular film dryout model. The optimized model was developed by adopting the best combination of these candidate models, as determined through comparison with experimental data. This optimized model showed reasonable results, which were better than those of MARS code

  16. Numerical studies and measurements on the side-coupled drift tube linac (SCDTL) accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Spataro, B.

    2000-01-01

    The 3 GHz linac section designed for the low energy (7-65 MeV) part of TOP (therapy oncological protons) linac (Picardi et al., 1997, 1996), operating at 3 GHz frequency and in π/2 mode, consists of eight modules of the structure SCDTL (side-coupled drift tube linac). The first module is designed to accelerate 7 MeV protons up to 13.4 MeV, and a prototype is presently under construction. Electromagnetic field calculations of the non-axisymmetric cavities carried out by using MAFIA 3D code (Weiland, 1986) gave the RF wall losses and the full mode spectrum. Two prototypes, an aluminium model of the first quintuplet and a copper model of the last triplet of the module, were built in order to check the complex 3D properties of the structure, and to refine the tuning procedure. This paper reports the results of the 3D numerical simulations about the RF properties of the first module and of some RF measurements on the prototypes. The beam dynamics study results in the SCDTL section are discussed as well

  17. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    CERN Document Server

    Khalvati, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs) is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TS 0 n is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN ’ s Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized succ...

  18. Status and future prospects of the Muon Drift Tubes System of CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masetti, G.

    2017-01-01

    A key component of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is its muon system. The tracking and triggering of muons in the central part relies on Drift Tube (DT) chambers. In 2013 and 2014 a number of improvements and upgrades were implemented, in particular concerning the readout and trigger electronics. The increase of luminosity expected by LHC will impose several constraints for rate reduction while maintaining high efficiency in the CMS Level 1 trigger system. In order to exploit the muon detector redundancy, a new trigger system has been designed. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that combines the primitives information from different subdetectors: DT, Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) and Outer Hadron Calorimeter (HO). Regarding the long term operation of the DT system, in order to cope with up to a factor 2 nominal LHC luminosity, several improvements will be implemented. The in-chamber local electronics will be modified to cope with the new rate and radiation environment. This paper will present, along with the main system improvements implemented in the system, the first performance results from data collected at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy during 2016, confirming the satisfactory operation of both DT performance and the TwinMux system. A review of the present status and plans for the DT system upgrades will be also described.

  19. A capture-gated neutron calorimeter using plastic scintillators and 3He drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher L.; Spaulding, Randy J.; Bacon, Jeffrey D.; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Chung, Kiwhan; Clark, Deborah J.; Green, Jesse A.; Greene, Steven J.; Hogan, Gary E.; Jason, Andrew; Lisowski, Paul W.; Makela, Mark F.; Mariam, Fessaha G.; Miyadera, Haruo; Murray, Matthew M.; Saunders, Alexander; Wysocki, Frederick J.; Gray, Frederick E.

    2010-01-01

    A segmented neutron calorimeter using nine 4-inch x 4-inch x 48-inch plastic scintillators and sixteen 2-inch-diameter 48-inch-long 200-mbar- 3 He drift tubes is described. The correlated scintillator and neutron-capture events provide a means for n/γ discrimination, critical to the neutron calorimetry when the γ background is substantial and the γ signals are comparable in amplitude to the neutron signals. A single-cell prototype was constructed and tested. It can distinguish between a 17 N source and a 252 Cf source when the γ and the thermal neutron background are sufficiently small. The design and construction of the nine-cell segmented detector assembly follow the same principle. By recording the signals from individual scintillators, additional γ-subtraction schemes, such as through the time-of-flight between two scintillators, may also be used. The variations of the light outputs from different parts of a scintillator bar are less than 10%.

  20. Matching the laser generated p bunch into a crossbar-H drift tube linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, A.; Droba, M.; Ratzinger, U.; Hofmann, I.

    2012-05-01

    Proton bunches with energies up to 30 MeV have been measured at the PHELIX laser. Because of the laser-plasma interactions at a power density of about 4×1019W/cm2, a total yield of 1.5×1013protons was produced. For the reference energy of 10 MeV, the yield within ±0.5MeV was exceeding 1010protons. The important topic for a further acceleration of the laser generated bunch is the matching into the acceptance of an rf accelerator stage. With respect to the high space charge forces and the transit energy range, only drift tube linacs seem adequate for this purpose. A crossbar H-type (CH) cavity was chosen as the linac structure. Optimum emittance values for the linac injection are compared with the available laser generated beam parameters. Options for beam matching into a CH structure by a pulsed magnetic solenoid and by using the simulation codes LASIN and LORASR are presented.

  1. Matching the laser generated p bunch into a crossbar-H drift tube linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almomani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Proton bunches with energies up to 30 MeV have been measured at the PHELIX laser. Because of the laser-plasma interactions at a power density of about 4×10^{19}  W/cm^{2}, a total yield of 1.5×10^{13}  protons was produced. For the reference energy of 10 MeV, the yield within ±0.5  MeV was exceeding 10^{10}  protons. The important topic for a further acceleration of the laser generated bunch is the matching into the acceptance of an rf accelerator stage. With respect to the high space charge forces and the transit energy range, only drift tube linacs seem adequate for this purpose. A crossbar H-type (CH cavity was chosen as the linac structure. Optimum emittance values for the linac injection are compared with the available laser generated beam parameters. Options for beam matching into a CH structure by a pulsed magnetic solenoid and by using the simulation codes LASIN and LORASR are presented.

  2. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khalvati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TS_{n}^{′} is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN’s Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100%/MHz down to ±3%/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1%/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  3. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalvati, Mohammad Reza; Ramberger, Suitbert

    2016-04-01

    The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs) is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TSn' is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN's Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100 %/MHz down to ±3 %/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1 %/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  4. A concept of a wide aperture klystron with RF absorbing drift tubes for linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolbilov, G.V.; Azorskij, N.I.; Fateev, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a problem of optimal design of the electrodynamic structure of the X-band klystron for a linear collider. It is shown that optimal design should provide large aperture and a high power gain, about 80 dB. The most severe problem arising here is that of parasitic self-excitation of the klystron, which becomes more complicated at increasing aperture and power gain. Our investigations have shown that traditional methods for suppressing the self-excitation become ineffective at desired technical parameters of the klystron. A novel concept of a wide aperture klystron with distributed suppression of parasitic oscillations is presented. Results of experimental study of the wide-aperture relativistic klystron for VLEPP are presented. Investigations have been performed using the driving beam of the JINR LIA-3000 induction accelerator (E=1 MeV, I=250 A, τ=250 ns). To suppress self-excitation parasitic modes we have used technique of RF absorbing drift tubes. As a result, we have obtained design output parameters of the klystron and achieved level of 100 MW output power

  5. High-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino and ureido compounds using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruo-Jing; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Qi, Wan-Shu; Guan, Qing; Sun, Tuan-Qi; Guo, Yin-Long

    2017-04-08

    The present work focused on the high-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino compounds (GCs) and ureido compounds (UCs) in human thyroid tissues. The strategy employed benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling (BRSIL) for the sample preparation and then detection using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS). A short reversed-phase LC realized an on-line desalting and a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. DTIMS separation enhanced the better specificity and selectivity for the benzil labeled GCs and UCs. The elevated mass resolution of QTOF MS enabled measure of the characteristic ions at accurate mass in MS and tandem MS spectra. Collision cross section (CCS) from DTIMS and accurate mass from QTOF MS were used as two qualifiers for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. In addition, an integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (retention time, drift time, m/z) was applied to quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. The quantitative validation indicated good linearity (coefficient values ≥ 0.9981), good precision (1.0%-12.3% for intra-day and 0.9%-7.8% for inter-day) and good accuracy (91%-109%). The results demonstrated that the developed BRSIL coupled with LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS can be a powerful analysis platform to investigate GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The reconstruction of tracks with the drift tubes in the muon spektrometers of the neutrino experiment OPERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonsak, B.S.

    2007-11-01

    In this thesis the reconstruction of tracks within the OPERA muon spectrometer is described as well as parts of the simulation software concerning the drift tubes. A method minimising the χ 2 of the tracks is used for the fit, which is supported by liklyhood considerations during the pattern recognition. An analytical description of the time to distance relation for the OPERA drift tubes is introduced to be used in the fit. For simulated events of cosmics a resolution of 410±4 μm and an efficiency of more that 93% has been acquired. For real cosmic data from the OPERA detector a resolution o 374±3 μm and an efficiency of up to 84% has been reached. The acquired angular resolution of 1,2 mrad is sufficient to achieve a momentum resolution of 25% up to momentums of 25 GeV. (orig.)

  7. Timing calibration of the trigger system for the drift tube detector of the OPERA neutrino oscillation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenkeit, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The OPERA experiment searches for ν μ → ν τ oscillations in an almost pure ν μ beam. The goal is to observe the oscillations in appearance mode by using a large-scale lead/emulsion target to resolve individual ν τ interactions. Magnetic spectrometers measure the charge and momentum of beam induced muons leaving the target sections. The Precision Tracker, a drift tube detector consisting of almost 10000 drift tubes, provides the tracking information inside the spectrometers. The coordinate measurement in the drift tubes is derived from a time measurement relative to an external trigger signal. In order to reach the required momentum resolution of less than 25 % for particle momenta up to 25 GeV, the uncertainty on the trigger timing must not exceed a value of 5 ns. In this thesis, a procedure for the timing calibration of the trigger system is presented. A step-by-step calibration of the corresponding signal paths is described. Applying all calibration results, a spatial resolution of 255 μm is achieved for the Precision Tracker, meeting the specified requirements. Furthermore, a method using the calibrated trigger system for performing time of flight measurements with atmospheric muons is developed. The average error on the measured flight times is ±4.5 ns.

  8. Drift-tube studies of ion-molecule reactions at low collision energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental studies of ion-molecule reactions at low collision energies using two drift tube mass spectrometer apparatus. The reactions studied are (i) proton transfer from HeH + to ArH + , (ii) charge and ion transfer reactions of O 2 2+ with NO, CO 2 , Ne and O 2 + ( 4 π u ) with CO 2 , (iii) oxidation reactions of Zr + and ZrO + with NO, CO 2 and O 2 , (iv) vibrational quenching reactions of H 3 + with He, (v) termolecular clustering reactions of H 2 CN + and H 2 CN + (HCN) (with He as the third body), (vi) three body association reactions of H + and D + with He (with He as the third body) and (vii) termolecular association reaction of NO + with NO (with Ne as third body). All the reactions were studied at thermal energies (at room temperature), reactions of O 2 2+ with NO and CO 2 , Zr + with NO/CO 2 /O 2 were also studied at center-of-mass energies higher than thermal and the association reactions of H 2 CN + /H 2 CN + (HCN) with HCN and H + /D + with He were studied at low temperatures. In addition, the thesis presents model calculations for the sweep-out effect which is an instrumental effect. A super Langevin rate constant is introduced which is a higher-order correction to the Langevin model. A theoretical model for the three-body ion-atom association rate constant is presented in the appendix of the thesis

  9. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state.

  10. Scanning drift tube measurements of electron transport parameters in different gases: argon, synthetic air, methane and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolov, I; Vass, M; Donkó, Z

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of transport coefficients of electrons in a scanning drift tube apparatus are reported for different gases: argon, synthetic air, methane and deuterium. The experimental system allows the spatio-temporal development of the electron swarms (‘swarm maps’) to be recorded and this information, when compared with the profiles predicted by theory, makes it possible to determine the ‘time-of-flight’ transport coefficients: the bulk drift velocity, the longitudinal diffusion coefficient and the effective ionization coefficient, in a well-defined way. From these data, the effective Townsend ionization coefficient is determined as well. The swarm maps provide, additionally, direct, unambiguous information about the hydrodynamic/non-hydrodynamic regimes of the swarms, aiding the selection of the proper regions applicable for the determination of the transport coefficients. (paper)

  11. Development of Muon Drift-Tube Detectors for High-Luminosity Upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bittner, B; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Legger, F.; Richter, R.; Biebel, O.; Engl, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Rauscher, F.

    2016-01-01

    The muon detectors of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have to cope with unprecedentedly high neutron and gamma ray background rates. In the forward regions of the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector, for instance, counting rates of 1.7 kHz/square cm are reached at the LHC design luminosity. For high-luminosity upgrades of the LHC, up to 10 times higher background rates are expected which require replacement of the muon chambers in the critical detector regions. Tests at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility showed that drift-tube detectors with 15 mm diameter aluminum tubes operated with Ar:CO2 (93:7) gas at 3 bar and a maximum drift time of about 200 ns provide e?cient and high-resolution muon tracking up to the highest expected rates. For 15 mm tube diameter, space charge e?ects deteriorating the spatial resolution at high rates are strongly suppressed. The sense wires have to be positioned in the chamber with an accuracy of better than 50 ?micons in order to achieve the desired spatial...

  12. Electron transport parameters in CO$_2$: scanning drift tube measurements and kinetic computations

    OpenAIRE

    Vass, M.; Korolov, I.; Loffhagen, D.; Pinhao, N.; Donko, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents transport coefficients of electrons (bulk drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization frequency) in CO2 measured under time-of-flight conditions over a wide range of the reduced electric field, 15Td

  13. The Quality Assurance_Quality Control of the Monitored Drift Tubes at the HEP Laboratory of the National Technical University of Athens

    CERN Document Server

    Alexopoulos, T; Dris, M; Filippas, A V; Fokitis, E; Gazis, E N; Katsoufis, E C; Maltezos, A; Maltezos, S; Papadopoulos, E; Papadopoulou, T D; Savva, Panagiota S; Stavropoulos, G D; Tsipolitis, G; Tzamariudaki, E

    2001-01-01

    The description of the Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA_QC) procedures for the Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT's) followed at the HEP Laboratory of NTUA are presented and results of the tested tubes are given. The MDT's are the elements from which muon chambers for the ATLAS/LHC Muon Spectrometer are built..

  14. Development of a time-to-digital converter ASIC for the upgrade of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinhong; Liang, Yu; Xiao, Xiong; An, Qi; Chapman, John W.; Dai, Tiesheng; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zhao, Lei

    2018-02-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS muon spectrometer for the high-luminosity LHC requires new trigger and readout electronics for various elements of the detector. We present the design of a time-to-digital converter (TDC) ASIC prototype for the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) detector. The chip was fabricated in a GlobalFoundries 130 nm CMOS technology. Studies indicate that its timing and power dissipation characteristics meet the design specifications, with a timing bin variation of ±40 ps for all 48 TDC slices and a power dissipation of about 6.5 mW per slice.

  15. FPGA-based algorithms for the new trigger system for the phase 2 upgrade of the CMS drift tubes detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cela-Ruiz, J.-M.

    2017-01-01

    The new luminosity conditions imposed after the LHC upgrade will require a dedicated upgrade of several subdetectors. To cope with the new requirements, CMS drift tubes subdetector electronics will be redesigned in order to achieve the new foreseen response speed. In particular, it is necessary to enhance the first stage of the trigger system (L1A). In this document we present the development of a software algorithm, based on the mean timer paradigm, capable of reconstructing muon trajectories and rejecting spurious signals. It has been initially written in C++ programming language, but designed with its portability to a FPGA VHDL code in mind.

  16. High-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino and ureido compounds using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Ruo-Jing; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Qi, Wan-Shu; Guan, Qing; Sun, Tuan-Qi; Guo, Yin-Long

    2017-01-01

    The present work focused on the high-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino compounds (GCs) and ureido compounds (UCs) in human thyroid tissues. The strategy employed benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling (BRSIL) for the sample preparation and then detection using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS). A short reversed-phase LC realized an on-line desalting and a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. DTIMS separation enhanced the better specificity and selectivity for the benzil labeled GCs and UCs. The elevated mass resolution of QTOF MS enabled measure of the characteristic ions at accurate mass in MS and tandem MS spectra. Collision cross section (CCS) from DTIMS and accurate mass from QTOF MS were used as two qualifiers for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. In addition, an integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (retention time, drift time, m/z) was applied to quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. The quantitative validation indicated good linearity (coefficient values ≥ 0.9981), good precision (1.0%–12.3% for intra-day and 0.9%–7.8% for inter-day) and good accuracy (91%–109%). The results demonstrated that the developed BRSIL coupled with LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS can be a powerful analysis platform to investigate GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. - Highlights: • The separation power of DTIMS-MS enhanced peak capacity, spectral clarity, and specificity of benzil labeled GCs and UCs. • Short-column LC for on-line desalting increased the throughput with a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. • CCS and accurate mass as a pair of qualifiers were used for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. • An integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (RT, DT, m/z) was used as a novel quantifier for quantitation. • The developed method was applied to screen and quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues.

  17. High-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino and ureido compounds using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Ruo-Jing [National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhang, Fang, E-mail: fzhang@sioc.ac.cn [National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, Xiu-Ping; Qi, Wan-Shu [National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Guan, Qing [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Sun, Tuan-Qi, E-mail: tuanqisun@163.com [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Guo, Yin-Long, E-mail: ylguo@sioc.ac.cn [National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2017-04-08

    The present work focused on the high-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino compounds (GCs) and ureido compounds (UCs) in human thyroid tissues. The strategy employed benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling (BRSIL) for the sample preparation and then detection using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS). A short reversed-phase LC realized an on-line desalting and a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. DTIMS separation enhanced the better specificity and selectivity for the benzil labeled GCs and UCs. The elevated mass resolution of QTOF MS enabled measure of the characteristic ions at accurate mass in MS and tandem MS spectra. Collision cross section (CCS) from DTIMS and accurate mass from QTOF MS were used as two qualifiers for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. In addition, an integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (retention time, drift time, m/z) was applied to quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. The quantitative validation indicated good linearity (coefficient values ≥ 0.9981), good precision (1.0%–12.3% for intra-day and 0.9%–7.8% for inter-day) and good accuracy (91%–109%). The results demonstrated that the developed BRSIL coupled with LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS can be a powerful analysis platform to investigate GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. - Highlights: • The separation power of DTIMS-MS enhanced peak capacity, spectral clarity, and specificity of benzil labeled GCs and UCs. • Short-column LC for on-line desalting increased the throughput with a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. • CCS and accurate mass as a pair of qualifiers were used for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. • An integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (RT, DT, m/z) was used as a novel quantifier for quantitation. • The developed method was applied to screen and quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues.

  18. Resolution and Efficiency of Monitored Drift-Tube Chambers with Final Read-out Electronics at High Background Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Dubbert, J; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Manz, A; Mohrdieck-Möck, S; Rauscher, F; Richter, R; Staude, A; Stiller, W

    2003-01-01

    The performance of a monitored drift-tube chamber for ATLAS with the final read-out electronics was tested at the Gamma Irradiation facility at CERN under varyin photon irradiation rates of up to 990~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$ which corresponds to 10 times the highest background rate expected in ATLAS. The signal pulse-height measurement of the final read-out electronics was used to perform time-slewing corrections. The corrections improve the average single-tube resolution from 106~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the nominal discriminator threshold of 44~mV without irradiation, and from 114~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the maximum nominal irradiation rate in ATLAS of 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The reduction of the threshold from 44~mV to 34~mV and the time-slewing corrections lead to an average single-tube resolution of 82~$\\mu$m without photon background and of 89~$\\mu$m at 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The measured muon detection efficiency agrees with the expectation for the final read-out electronics.

  19. Fast track segment finding in the Monitored Drift Tubes of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer using a Legendre transform algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS first-level muon trigger for High- Luminosity LHC foresees incorporating the precise tracking of the Monitored Drift Tubes in the current system based on Resistive Plate Chambers and Thin Gap Chambers to improve the accuracy in the transverse momentum measurement and control the single muon trigger rate by suppressing low quality fake triggers. The core of the MDT trigger algorithm is the segment identification and reconstruction which is performed per MDT chamber. The reconstructed segment positions and directions are then combined to extract the muon candidate’s transverse momentum. A fast pattern recognition segment finding algorithm, called the Legendre transform, is proposed to be used for the MDT trigger, implemented in a FPGA housed on a ATCA blade.

  20. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered.

  1. A high-precision X-ray tomograph for quality control of the ATLAS Muon Monitored Drift Tube Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Schuh, S; Banhidi, Z; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Lampl, W; Marchesotti, M; Rangod, Stephane; Sbrissa, E; Smirnov, Y; Voss, Rüdiger; Woudstra, M; Zhuravlov, V

    2004-01-01

    A dedicated X-ray tomograph has been developed at CERN to control the required wire placement accuracy of better than 20mum of the 1200 Monitored Drift Tube Chambers which make up most of the precision chamber part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. The tomograph allows the chamber wire positions to be measured with a 2mum statistical and 2mum systematic uncertainty over the full chamber cross-section of 2.2 multiplied by 0.6m**2. Consistent chamber production quality over the 4-year construction phase is ensured with a similar to 15% sampling rate. Measurements of about 70 of the 650 MDT chambers so far produced have been essential in assessing the validity and consistency of the various construction procedures.

  2. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered

  3. Alignment of the drift tube detector at the neutrino oscillation experiment OPERA; Alignment des Driftroehrendetektors am Neutrino-Oszillationsexperiment OPERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goellnitz, Christoph

    2012-09-15

    The present thesis was composed during the course of the OPERA experiment, which aims to give a direct evidence for neutrino oscillations in the channel {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}. The OPERA detector is designed to observe the appearance of tau neutrinos in an originally pure muon neutrino beam, the CNGS beam. As important part of the detector the precision tracker (PT), a drift tube detector, consists of 9504 drift tubes in 198 modules. In this thesis, several parts of the slow control of the PT are developed and implemented to ensure operation during data taking over several years. The main part is the geometric calibration, the alignment of the detector. The alignment procedure contains both hardware and software parts, the software methods are developed and applied. Using straight particle tracks, the detector components are geometrically corrected. A special challenge for the alignment for the PT is the fact that at this kind of low-rate experiment only a small number of particle tracks is available. With software-based corrections of the module rotation, a systematic error of 0.2 mrad has been attained, for corrections of translation, a systematic error of 32 {mu}m is reached. For the alignment between two adjacent PT walls, the statistical error is less than 8 {mu}m. All results of the position monitoring system are considered. All developed methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulations. The detector requirements ({Delta}p/p {<=} 0.25 below 25 GeV) are met. The analysis of the momentum measurement for high energies above 25 GeV demonstrates the resulting improvement. The mean momentum is falling significantly using the new alignment values. The significance of the detector alignment becomes most evident in the analysis of cosmic particles. The muon charge ratio R{sub {mu}} is expected not to be angular dependent. The {chi}{sup 2} probability of the measured distribution improves up to 58%. The muon charge ratio was also investigated in

  4. Permanent magnet quadrupole for the 1-ST tank of LINAC-4

    CERN Document Server

    Skachkov, Vl; Sergeeva, O; Lombardi, A; Sargsyan, E; Cornuet, D; Venturini , W; Skachkov , V

    2006-01-01

    A rare-earth (REPM) ∅ 60 mm diameter, 45 mm long quadrupole for the LINAC-4 focusing channel with an integrated gradient of 2.3 T is described. Thin side washers are used for tuning the quad into specified gradient integral with ±0.5 % accuracy. The single washer contribution calculations are discussed. A method for limiting to 30 μ m the magnetic axis offset in the REPM quad is discussed to exclude its compensation by the outer diameter machining before inserting into the drift tube. Nonlinearity of the field is less than 1 % in the reference range of 75 % of beam aperture at the central cross- section near the quad axis . The angular quadrupole arrangement in the drift tube will be provided by machining the main groove on the quad surface in the median plane with 1 mrad accuracy. Calculations of the longitudinal gradient distribution between two...

  5. High-pressure {sup 4}He drift tubes for fissile material detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui, E-mail: zwang@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Morris, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gray, F.E. [Regis University, Denver, CO 80221 (United States); Bacon, J.D.; Brockwell, M.I.; Chang, D.Y.; Chung, K.; Dai, W.G.; Greene, S.J.; Hogan, G.E.; Lisowski, P.W.; Makela, M.F.; Mariam, F.G.; McGaughey, P.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mendenhall, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Milner, E.C.; Miyadera, H.; Murray, M.M.; Perry, J.O.; Roybal, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); and others

    2013-03-01

    A detector efficiency model based on energy extraction from neutrons is described and used to compare {sup 4}He detectors with liquid scintillators (EJ301/NE-213). Detector efficiency can be divided into three regimes: single neutron scattering, multiple neutron scattering, and a transition regime in-between. For an average fission neutron of 2 MeV, the amount of {sup 4}He needed would be about 1/4 of the amount of the mass of EJ301/NE-213 in the single-scattering regime. For about 50% neutron energy extraction (1 MeV out of 2 MeV), the two types of detectors ({sup 4}He in the transition regime, EJ301 still in the single-scattering regime) have comparable mass, but {sup 4}He detectors can be much larger depending on the number density. A six-tube 11-bar-pressure {sup 4}He detector prototype is built and tested. Individual electrical pulses from the detector are recorded using a 12-bit digitizer. Differences in pulse rise time and amplitudes, due to different energy loss of neutrons and gamma rays, are used for neutron/gamma separation. Several energy spectra are also obtained and analyzed.

  6. Optimisation of the Read-out Electronics of Muon Drift-Tube Chambers for Very High Background Rates at HL-LHC and Future Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; Gadow, Philipp; Ecker, Katharina; Fink, David; Fras, Markus; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Müller, Felix; Richter, Robert; Schmid, Clemens; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian; Zhao, Yazhou

    2016-01-01

    In the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers and sMDT chambers with half of the tube diameter of the MDTs are used for precision muon track reconstruction. The sMDT chambers are designed for operation at high counting rates due to neutron and gamma background irradiation expected for the HL-LHC and future hadron colliders. The existing MDT read-out electronics uses bipolar signal shaping which causes an undershoot of opposite polarity and same charge after a signal pulse. At high counting rates and short electronics dead time used for the sMDTs, signal pulses pile up on the undershoot of preceding background pulses leading to a reduction of the signal amplitude and a jitter in the drift time measurement and, therefore, to a degradation of drift tube efficiency and spatial resolution. In order to further increase the rate capability of sMDT tubes, baseline restoration can be used in the read-out electronics to suppress the pile-up effects. A discrete bipolar shaping circuit with baseline...

  7. Accelerator tube construction and characterization for a tandem-electrostatic-quadrupole for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartelli, D.; Thatar Vento, V.; Castell, W.; Di Paolo, H.; Kesque, J.M.; Bergueiro, J.; Valda, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The accelerator tubes are essential components of the accelerator. Their function is to transport and accelerate a very intense proton or deuteron beam through the machine, from the ion source to the neutron production target, without significant losses. In this contribution, we discuss materials selected for the tube construction, the procedures used for their assembly and the testing performed to meet the stringent requirements to which it is subjected.

  8. Accelerator tube construction and characterization for a tandem-electrostatic-quadrupole for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartelli, D; Vento, V Thatar; Castell, W; Di Paolo, H; Kesque, J M; Bergueiro, J; Valda, A A; Erhardt, J; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    The accelerator tubes are essential components of the accelerator. Their function is to transport and accelerate a very intense proton or deuteron beam through the machine, from the ion source to the neutron production target, without significant losses. In this contribution, we discuss materials selected for the tube construction, the procedures used for their assembly and the testing performed to meet the stringent requirements to which it is subjected. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. RF quadrupole beam dynamics design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, K.R.; Stokes, R.H.; Wangler, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator structure is expected to permit considerable flexibility in achieving linac design objectives at low velocities. Calculational studies show that the RFQ can accept a high-current, low-velocity, dc beam, bunch it with high efficiency, and accelerate it to a velocity suitable for injection into a drift-tube linac. Although it is relatively easy to generate a satisfactory design for an RFQ linac for low beam currents, the space-charge effects produced by high currents dominate the design criteria. Methods have been developed to generate solutions that make suitable compromises between the effects of emittance growth, transmission efficiency, and overall structure length. Results are given for a test RFQ linac operating at 425 MHz

  10. Magnetic Measurements of Permanent and Fast-Pulsed Quadrupoles for the CERN LINAC4 Project

    CERN Document Server

    Golluccio, G; Buzio, M; Dunkel, O; Giloteaux, D; Lombardi, A; Mateo, F; Ramberger, S

    2010-01-01

    Linac4 is currently under construction at CERN to improve intensity and reliability for the whole accelerator chain. This machine will include about 120 permanent quadrupoles housed in the Drift Tube tanks, as well as about 80 electromagnetic quadrupoles. This paper describes the magnetic measurements carried out at CERN on the first batch of quadrupoles, including several prototypes from different manufacturers, as well as those done on several spare Linac 2 magnets reused in Linac4's 3 MeV test stand. We first describe a prototype test bench based on technology developed for the LHC and able to carry out high-precision harmonic measurements in both continuously-rotating and stepping-coil mode. Next we present the first results obtained in terms of field strength, harmonics quality and effects of fast eddy current transients. Finally, we discuss the expected impact of these findings on the operation of the machine.

  11. Construction and Test of New Precision Drift-Tube Chambers for Upgrades of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer in 2016/17

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00218480; Kortner, O.; Müller, F.; Nowak, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.

    2016-01-01

    Small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for the ATLAS muon detector upgrade. They possess an improved rate capability and a more compact design with respect to the existing chambers, which allows to equip detector regions uninstrument at present. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, while the sense wire positioning accuracy is improved to below ten microns. The chambers will be ready for installation in the winter shutdown 2016/17 of the Large Hadron Collider. The design and construction of the new sMDT chambers for ATLAS will be discussed as well as measurements of their precision and performance.

  12. Development of a test system for the analysis of the read-out electronic cabling for the CMS drift tube chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Montero, M.; Willmott, C.

    2004-01-01

    A test system has been developed for the analysis of the read-out electronics cabling for the CMS drift tube chambers. The read-out electronics will be placed inside some aluminium boxes, so-called Minicrates, which are going to be produced soon at CIEMAT. Due to the difficulty of detecting and repairing errors in the cables once they have been installed and recalling also to the large number of Minicrates that are going to be produced, it was decided to design and develop a test system for testing the cabling before its installation. (Author)

  13. Design of permanent magnet quadrupole for LEHIPA DTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2011-01-01

    The drift tube linac (DTL) of the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA) has been designed to accelerate 30 mA proton beam from 3 MeV to 20 MeV in a distance of around 13 m. A FFDD lattice structure is selected to provide strong transverse focusing, where each drift tube includes one quadrupole magnet. Beam dynamics simulations specified an effective magnet length of 47 mm, maximum field gradient of 47 T/m, and bore aperture of 24 mm. For these specifications, a detailed design of a very thin permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is presented. Four types of PMQ designs have been compared: a 16-segment trapezoidal design in the Halbach configuration, two 16-segment rectangular designs (with and without gaps), and an 8-segment rectangular design. 2D and 3D modeling codes, POISSON and CST Studio suite are used for the design studies. The good field region is calculated based on field gradient deviation in the transverse plane and integral field homogeneity. The very low aspect ratio of these PMQs leads to edge effects, thereby reducing the central field strength. The 3D simulations are used to study these edge effects. (author)

  14. High-rate irradiation of 15mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Zibell, Andre

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the "Small Wheel" tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of $1 \\times 10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$, and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm$^2$. This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of "New Small Wheel" detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smalle...

  15. RESONANCE CONTROL FOR THE COUPLED CAVITY LINAC AND DRIFT TUBE LINAC STRUCTURES OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE LINAC USING A CLOSED-LOOP WATER COOLING SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardin, J.D.; Brown, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a facility being designed for scientific and industrial research and development. SNS will generate and use neutrons as a diagnostic tool for medical purposes, material science, etc. The neutrons will be produced by bombarding a heavy metal target with a high-energy beam of protons, generated and accelerated with a linear particle accelerator, or linac. The low energy end of the linac consists of two room temperature copper structures, the drift tube linac (DTL), and the coupled cavity linac (CCL). Both of these accelerating structures use large amounts of electrical energy to accelerate the protons to an energy of 185 MeV. Approximately 60-80% of the electrical energy is dissipated in the copper structure and must be removed. This is done using specifically designed water cooling passages within the linac's copper structure. Cooling water is supplied to these cooling passages by specially designed resonance control and water cooling systems

  16. Development of a highly selective muon trigger exploiting the high spatial resolution of monitored drift-tube chambers for the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kortner, Oliver; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC will provide the unique opportunity to explore the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Highly selective first level triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will exceed the LHC design instantaneous luminosity by almost an order of magnitude. The ATLAS first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons, selected due to the moderate momentum resolution of the current system. This first level trigger limitation can be overcome by including data from the precision muon drift tube (MDT) chambers. This requires the fast continuous transfer of the MDT hits to the off-detector trigger logic and a fast track reconstruction algorithm performed in the trigger logic. The feasibility of this approach was studied with LHC collision data and simulated data. Two main options for the hardware implementation will be studied with demonstrators: an FPGA based option with an embedded ARM microprocessor ...

  17. Development of a Highly Selective Muon Trigger Exploiting the High Spatial Resolution of Monitored Drift-Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Experiment at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kortner, Oliver; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC will provide the unique opportunity to explore the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Highly selective first level triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will exceed the LHC design instantaneous luminosity by almost an order of magnitude. The ATLAS first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons, selected due to the moderate momentum resolution of the current system. This first level trigger limitation can be overcome by including data from the precision muon drift tube (MDT) chambers. This requires the fast continuous transfer of the MDT hits to the off-detector trigger logic and a fast track reconstruction algorithm performed in the trigger logic. The feasibility of this approach was studied with LHC collision data and simulated data. Two main options for the hardware implementation are currently studied with demonstrators, an FPGA based option with an embedded ARM microproc...

  18. A long-term aging study of honeycomb drift tubes for the HERA-B Outer Tracker using a circulated and purified CF$_{4}$ gas mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Capéans-Garrido, M; Hohlmann, M; Schmidt, B

    2003-01-01

    The Outer Tracker of HERA-B uses a gas mixture containing CF/sub 4/ to obtain high electron drift velocities. The high cost of this gas makes it necessary to circulate the gas mixture which must then be purified to avoid accumulation of air and pollutants. However, the usage of gas purifiers poses the danger of outgassing pollutants from the purifiers themselves into the gas stream. Purifiers could also be attacked chemically by the aggressive products from the cracking of CF/sub 4/ molecules in the plasma avalanches of the detector. This could potentially release further harmful pollutants into the gas stream. To test for such effects, a long-term irradiation study of about 3000 h was carried out with the honeycomb drift tubes that are used in the Outer Tracker. This provided a check of the long-term stability of the gas purifiers before putting them into operation for the full-size detector. We report on the experimental setup, procedures and the results obtained. (8 refs).

  19. Fast track segment finding in the Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT) of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer using a Legendre transform algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Many of the physics goals of ATLAS in the High Luminosity LHC era, including precision studies of the Higgs boson, require an unprescaled single muon trigger with a 20 GeV threshold. The selectivity of the current ATLAS first-level muon trigger is limited by the moderate spatial resolution of the muon trigger chambers. By incorporating the precise tracking of the MDT, the muon transverse momentum can be measured with an accuracy close to that of the offline reconstruction at the trigger level, sharpening the trigger turn-on curves and reducing the single muon trigger rate. A novel algorithm is proposed which reconstructs segments from MDT hits in an FPGA and find tracks within the tight latency constraints of the ATLAS first-level muon trigger. The algorithm represents MDT drift circles as curves in the Legendre space and returns one or more segment lines tangent to the maximum possible number of drift circles.  This algorithm is implemented without the need of resource and time consuming hit position calcul...

  20. High-rate irradiation of 15 mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zibell, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the ''Small Wheel'' tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of 1 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 , and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm 2 . This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of ''New Small Wheel'' detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smaller diameter of 15 mm. In this work, a prototype sMDT chamber has been tested under the influence of high-rate irradiation with protons, neutrons and photons at the Munich tandem accelerator, simulating the conditions within a high luminosity LHC experiment. Tracking resolution and detection efficiency for minimum ionizing muons are presented as a function of irradiation rate. The experimental muon trigger geometry allows to distinguish between efficiency degradation due to deadtime effects and space charge in the detectors. Using modified readout electronics the analog pulse shape of the detector has been investigated for gain reduction and potential irregularities due to the high irradiation rates and ionization doses. This study shows that the sMDT detectors would fulfill all requirements for successful use in the ATLAS New Small Wheel endcap detector array, with an average spatial resolution of 140 μm and a track reconstruction efficiency

  1. High-rate irradiation of 15 mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibell, Andre

    2014-06-06

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the ''Small Wheel'' tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of 1 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm{sup 2}. This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of ''New Small Wheel'' detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smaller diameter of 15 mm. In this work, a prototype sMDT chamber has been tested under the influence of high-rate irradiation with protons, neutrons and photons at the Munich tandem accelerator, simulating the conditions within a high luminosity LHC experiment. Tracking resolution and detection efficiency for minimum ionizing muons are presented as a function of irradiation rate. The experimental muon trigger geometry allows to distinguish between efficiency degradation due to deadtime effects and space charge in the detectors. Using modified readout electronics the analog pulse shape of the detector has been investigated for gain reduction and potential irregularities due to the high irradiation rates and ionization doses. This study shows that the sMDT detectors would fulfill all requirements for successful use in the ATLAS New Small Wheel endcap detector array, with an average spatial resolution of 140 μm and a track

  2. The reconstruction of tracks with the drift tubes in the muon spektrometers of the neutrino experiment OPERA; Die Spurrekonstruktion fuer das Driftroehren-Myon-Spektrometer des Neutrino-Experiments OPERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wonsak, B.S.

    2007-11-15

    In this thesis the reconstruction of tracks within the OPERA muon spectrometer is described as well as parts of the simulation software concerning the drift tubes. A method minimising the {chi}{sup 2} of the tracks is used for the fit, which is supported by liklyhood considerations during the pattern recognition. An analytical description of the time to distance relation for the OPERA drift tubes is introduced to be used in the fit. For simulated events of cosmics a resolution of 410{+-}4 {mu}m and an efficiency of more that 93% has been acquired. For real cosmic data from the OPERA detector a resolution o 374{+-}3 {mu}m and an efficiency of up to 84% has been reached. The acquired angular resolution of 1,2 mrad is sufficient to achieve a momentum resolution of 25% up to momentums of 25 GeV. (orig.)

  3. Drift velocity monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented.

  4. Identification of V-type nerve agents in vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator and fluoridating conversion tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrui, Y; Nagoya, T; Kurimata, N; Sodeyama, M; Seto, Y

    2017-07-01

    A field-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system (Hapsite ER) was evaluated for the detection of nonvolatile V-type nerve agents (VX and Russian VX (RVX)) in the vapor phase. The Hapsite ER system consists of a Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler, a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary GC column and a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump. The GC-MS system was attached to a VX-G fluoridating conversion tube containing silver nitrate and potassium fluoride. Sample vapors of VX and RVX were converted into O-ethyl methylphosphonofluoridate (EtGB) and O-isobutyl methylphosphonofluoridate (iBuGB), respectively. These fluoridated derivatives were detected within 10 min. No compounds were detected when the VX and RVX samples were analyzed without the conversion tube. A vapor sample of tabun (GA) was analyzed, in which GA and O-ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidofluoridate were detected. The molar recovery percentages of EtGB and iBuGB from VX and RVX vapors varied from 0.3 to 17%, which was attributed to variations in the vaporization efficiency of the glass vapor container. The conversion efficiencies of the VX-G conversion tube for VX and RVX to their phosphonate derivatives were estimated to be 40%. VX and RVX vapors were detected at concentrations as low as 0.3 mg m -3 . Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the analyses of VX and RVX. In the presence of 160 mg m -3 gasoline, the detection limits of VX and RVX vapor were increased to 20 mg m -3 . Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Determination of diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium in Zr–2.5%Nb pressure tube material using hot vacuum extraction-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, Komal Chandra, E-mail: komal@barc.gov.in [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kulkarni, A.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sunil, Saurav [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Saxena, M.K. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Singh, R.N. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tomar, B.S.; Ramakumar, K.L. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-06-15

    The diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium in Zr–2.5%Nb alloy were measured in the temperature range 523 to 673 K, employing hot vacuum extraction-quadrupole mass spectrometry (HVE-QMS). One end of the Zr–2.5%Nb alloy specimens was charged electrolytically with the desired hydrogen isotope. After annealing at different temperatures for a predetermined time, the specimens were cut into thin slices, which were analyzed for their H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} content using the HVE-QMS technique. The depth profile data were fitted into the equation representing the solution of Fick’s second law of diffusion. The activation energy of hydrogen/deuterium diffusion was obtained from the Arrhenius relation between the diffusion coefficient and temperature. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient can be represented as D{sub H} = 1.41 × 10{sup −7} exp(−36,000/RT) and D{sub D} = 6.16 × 10{sup −8} exp(−35,262/RT) for hydrogen and deuterium, respectively.

  6. ISABELLE insertion quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaugerts, J.; Polk, I.; Sampson, W.; Dahl, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Beam focussing and control at the beam intersection regions of ISABELLE is accomplished by a number of superconducting insertion quadrupoles. These magnets differ from the standard ISABELLE quadrupoles in various ways. In particular, the requirements of limited space near the intersections and aperture for beam extraction impose constraints on their configuration. To achieve optimum beam focussing and provide tuning flexibility calls for stronger quadrupole trim windings than those in the standard quadrupoles. The magnetic and mechanical design of the insertion quadrupoles and their associated correction and steering windings to accomplish the above tasks is presented

  7. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers. The differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest drift velocity monitoring results are discussed.

  8. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers because the drift velocity depends on it. Furthermore the differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest pressure monitoring results are discussed.

  9. Stokes drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bremer, T. S.; Breivik, Ø.

    2017-12-01

    During its periodic motion, a particle floating at the free surface of a water wave experiences a net drift velocity in the direction of wave propagation, known as the Stokes drift (Stokes 1847 Trans. Camb. Philos. Soc. 8, 441-455). More generally, the Stokes drift velocity is the difference between the average Lagrangian flow velocity of a fluid parcel and the average Eulerian flow velocity of the fluid. This paper reviews progress in fundamental and applied research on the induced mean flow associated with surface gravity waves since the first description of the Stokes drift, now 170 years ago. After briefly reviewing the fundamental physical processes, most of which have been established for decades, the review addresses progress in laboratory and field observations of the Stokes drift. Despite more than a century of experimental studies, laboratory studies of the mean circulation set up by waves in a laboratory flume remain somewhat contentious. In the field, rapid advances are expected due to increasingly small and cheap sensors and transmitters, making widespread use of small surface-following drifters possible. We also discuss remote sensing of the Stokes drift from high-frequency radar. Finally, the paper discusses the three main areas of application of the Stokes drift: in the coastal zone, in Eulerian models of the upper ocean layer and in the modelling of tracer transport, such as oil and plastic pollution. Future climate models will probably involve full coupling of ocean and atmosphere systems, in which the wave model provides consistent forcing on the ocean surface boundary layer. Together with the advent of new space-borne instruments that can measure surface Stokes drift, such models hold the promise of quantifying the impact of wave effects on the global atmosphere-ocean system and hopefully contribute to improved climate projections. This article is part of the theme issue 'Nonlinear water waves'.

  10. Design, Manufacture and Measurements of Permanent Quadrupole Magnets for Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Tommasini, D; Thonet, P; Vorozhtsov, A

    2012-01-01

    Compact quadrupole magnets are required for the CCDTL (Cell-Coupled Drift Tube Linac) of Linac 4, a 160 MeV linear accelerator of negative hydrogen ions which will replace the old 50 MeV proton Linac2 at CERN. The magnets, of an overall physical length of 140 mm and an aperture diameter of 45 mm, are based on Sm2Co17 blocks and can provide an integrated gradient of up to 1.6 Tesla. The magnetic field quality is determined by 4 ferromagnetic pole tips, aligned together with the permanent magnets blocks inside a structure made in a single piece. Tuning bars allow to individually trim the magnetic flux provided by each pole, to correct possible differences between blocks and to modify the field gradient intensity within about 20% of the nominal value. The paper describes and discusses the design, manufacture and magnetic measurements of a first prototype magnet.

  11. Reducing Pesticide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides information about pesticide spray drift, including problems associated with drift, managing risks from drift and the voluntary Drift Reduction Technology program that seeks to reduce spray drift through improved spray equipment design.

  12. Drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yosuke

    1977-01-01

    Drift chamber is becoming an important detector in high energy physics as a precision and fast position detector because of its high spatial resolution and count-rate. The basic principle is that it utilizes the drift at constant speed of electrons ionized along the tracks of charged particles towards the anode wire in the nearly uniform electric field. The method of measuring drift time includes the analog and digital ones. This report describes about the construction of and the application of electric field to the drift chamber, mathematical analysis on the electric field and equipotential curve, derivation of spatial resolution and the factor for its determination, and selection of gas to be used. The performance test of the chamber was carried out using a small test chamber, the collimated β source of Sr-90, and 500 MeV/C electron beam from the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron in the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Most chambers to date adopted one dimensional read-out, but it is very advantageous if the two dimensional read-out is feasible with one chamber when the resolution in that direction is low. The typical methods of delay line and charge division for two dimensional read-out are described. The development of digital read-out system is underway, which can process the signal of a large scale drift chamber at high speed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  13. Centering of quadrupole family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinayev, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for finding the individual centers for a family of quadrupoles fed with a single power supply is described. The method is generalized for using the correctors adjacent to the quadrupoles. Theoretical background is presented as well as experimental data for the NSLS rings. The method accuracy is also discussed

  14. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  15. Quadrupole Ion Traps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to do precision spectroscopic measurements on these ions. ... Bonn, investigated the non-magnetic quadrupole mass filter, .... the details of which will be discussed in the subse- ... the radial plane the ion undergoes a circular motion with the.

  16. SPS Quadrupole Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    A stack of SPS Quadrupole Magnets ready for installation in the tunnel. The SPS uses a total of 216 laminated normal conducting lattice quadrupoles with a length of 3.13 m for the core, 3.3 m overall. The F and D quads. have identical characteristics: inscribed circle radius 44 mm, core height and width 800 mm, maximum gradient 20 Tesla/m.

  17. Quadrupole moments of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, M.I.

    1985-01-01

    In chiral bag model an expression is obtained for the quark wave functions with account of color and pion interaction of quarks. The quadrupole moments of nonstrange hadrons are calculated. Quadrupole moment of nucleon isobar is found to be Q(Δ)=-6.3x10 -28 esub(Δ)(cm)sup(2). Fredictions of the chiral bag model are in strong disagreement with the non-relativistic quark model

  18. Generalized drift-flux correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Young, M.Y.; Hochreiter, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional drift-flux model with five conservation equations is frequently employed in major computer codes, such as TRAC-PD2, and in simulator codes. In this method, the relative velocity between liquid and vapor phases, or slip ratio, is given by correlations, rather than by direct solution of the phasic momentum equations, as in the case of the two-fluid model used in TRAC-PF1. The correlations for churn-turbulent bubbly flow and slug flow regimes were given in terms of drift velocities by Zuber and Findlay. For the annular flow regime, the drift velocity correlations were developed by Ishii et al., using interphasic force balances. Another approach is to define the drift velocity so that flooding and liquid hold-up conditions are properly simulated, as reported here. The generalized correlation is used to reanalyze the MB-2 test data for two-phase flow in a large-diameter pipe. The results are applied to the generalized drift flux velocity, whose relationship to the other correlations is discussed. Finally, the generalized drift flux correlation is implemented in TRAC-PD2. Flow reversal from countercurrent to cocurrent flow is computed in small-diameter U-shaped tubes and is compared with the flooding curve

  19. Permanent quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A family of quadrupole magnets using a soft iron return yoke and circular cross-section permanent magnet poles were fabricated to investigate the feasibility for use in ion or electron beam focusing applications in accelerators and transport lines. Magnetic field measurements yielded promising results. In fixed-field applications, permanent magnets with sufficient gradients would be a low cost substitute for conventional electromagnets, eliminating the need for power supplies, associated wiring, and cooling. Based on preliminary tests, it was seen that permanent quadrupole magnets can offer a low cost, reliable solution in applications requiring small, fixed-field focusing devices for use in ion or electron-beam transport systems. Permanent magnets do require special considerations in design, fabrication, handling, and service that are different than encountered in conventional quadrupole magnets. If these basic conditions are satisfied, the resulting beam-focusing device would be stable, maintenance free, with virtually an indefinite lifetime

  20. Torques on quadrupoles

    OpenAIRE

    Torres del Castillo, G.F; Méndez Garrido, A

    2006-01-01

    Making use of the fact that a 2l-pole can be represented by means of l vectors of the same magnitude, the torque on a quadrupole in an inhomogeneous external field is expressed in terms of the vectors that represent the quadrupole and the gradient of the external field. The conditions for rotational equilibrium are also expressed in terms of these vectors. Haciendo uso de que un multipolo de orden 2l puede representarse mediante l vectores de la misma magnitud, la torca sobre un cuadripolo...

  1. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed

  2. ISR Superconducting Quadrupoles

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Michel Bouvier is preparing for curing the 6-pole superconducting windings inbedded in the cylindrical wall separating liquid helium from vacuum in the quadrupole aperture. The heat for curing the epoxy glue was provided by a ramp of infrared lamps which can be seen above the slowly rotating cylinder. See also 7703512X, 7702690X.

  3. ISR "Terwilliger" Quadrupole

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    There were 48 of these Quadrupoles in the ISR. They were distributed around the rings according to the so-called Terwilliger scheme. Their aperture was 184 mm, their core length 300 mm, their gradient 5 T/m. Due to their small length as compared to the aperture, the end fringe field errors had to be compensated by suitably shaping the poles.

  4. Survey of radio-frequency quadrupole accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Over the last several years the RFQ has proved to be a very flexible low-energy accelerator for bunching and accelerating both low- and high-current beams. It uses low-voltage dc injectors, has excellent bunching properties and high transmission efficiency. Applications include injectors for higher energy machines, such as drift-tube linacs, cyclotrons, or synchrotrons. The RFQ can also be used alone for applications that require a fixed-energy beam. 41 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  5. Variable Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Kyoto U.; Kumada, M.; NIRS, Chiba; Spencer, C.M.; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is one of the candidates for the final focus lens in a linear collider. An over 120 T/m strong variable permanent magnet quadrupole is achieved by the introduction of saturated iron and a 'double ring structure'. A fabricated PMQ achieved 24 T integrated gradient with 20 mm bore diameter, 100 mm magnet diameter and 20 cm pole length. The strength of the PMQ is adjustable in 1.4 T steps, due to its 'double ring structure': the PMQ is split into two nested rings; the outer ring is sliced along the beam line into four parts and is rotated to change the strength. This paper describes the variable PMQ from fabrication to recent adjustments

  6. Status of radio frequency quadrupole accelerator at IUAC, New Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahuja, Rajeev; Kothari, Ashok; Kumar, Sugam; Safvan, C.P.; Shankar, Ram

    2015-01-01

    As part of the accelerator augmentation program at IUAC, a High Current Injector (HCI) is being developed to inject highly charged ions into the superconducting LINAC. The HCI consists of a superconducting (High TC) ECR source, producing the high currents of highly charged ions. The ion beams produced will be injected into a Radio Frequency Quadrupole Accelerator (RFQ) and be accelerated to 180 keV/u. RF power of about 100 kW at 48.5 MHz will be fed to the RFQ during its actual working. The ions will be further accelerated by a Drift Tube Linac (DTL), before being further velocity matched with a low beta cavity into the superconducting LINAC. RFQ at IUAC is a four rod cavity structure having individual demountable copper vanes held on vane posts with a total vane length of 2.536 m and a minimum aperture of 12mm. The vane posts hold twenty nos. of vanes. Water will flow into vanes through the vane posts. The copper plated stainless steel vacuum housing has been divided into two chambers for the ease of fabrication and copper plating. The RFQ stand has provision for alignment in all the three axes. After successfully validating all the electrical and mechanical design parameters on a prototype RFQ, the fabrication of final RFQ has been completed. Initial assembly to check the mechanical accuracies was carried out. Low power RF tests were conducted to validate the design parameters. The resonance frequency of the RFQ was measured as 44.12 MHz and Q value was measured ∼ 5500. The final assembly is in progress. This paper details the present status and future plan of RFQ. (author)

  7. Permanent quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A family of quadrupole magnets using a soft iron return yoke and circular cross-section permanent magnet poles were fabricated to investigate the feasibility for use in ion or electron beam focusing applications in accelerators and transport lines. Magnetic field measurements yielded promising results. In fixed-field applications, permanent magnets with sufficient gradients would be a low cost substitute for conventional electromagnets, eliminating the need for power supplies, associated wiring, and cooling. (author)

  8. On quantum quadrupole radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Mankoc-Borstnik, N.

    1981-02-01

    In this paper it is shown that for the electromagnetic decay of a quantum system in a coherent rotational state the total quadrupole radiation is proportional to (d 5 Q/dt 5 )(dQ/dt)sup(*)+c.c. For the radiation flux out of a sphere of large radius a different quantity, closer to the classical expression (d 3 Q/dt 3 ) 2 , is found. (author)

  9. Superconducting Panofsky quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    A design for a rectangular aperture quadrupole magnet without pole-tips was introduced by Hand and Panofsky in 1959. This design was quite radical but simple to construct. Few magnets of this design were ever built because of the large power needed. With the advent of superconducting coils there has been a renewed interest in them. The mathematical basis, field characteristics, and present and future construction of these magnets are described

  10. Measurements of quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradie, J.L.; Fourie, D.T.; Cornell, J.C.; Lloyd, G.C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements carried out on quadrupole magnets using a long asymmetric rotating coil are described. Although the method itself is fairly well-known, the introduction of microprocessors has made this once-tedious technique into a useful and simple method of evaluating quadrupole magnets. The rotating-coil device and a variety of coil sizes are now commercially available. The coil contains a large number of extremely fine wires, embedded in a carefully balanced fibre-glass rotor, resulting in a reasonable induced voltage when the coil is rotated. A digital harmonic analyser is then used to obtain the integrated multipole content of the waveform, while the coil is rotating. By integrating over time, one can average out random noise and increase the reliability and repeatability of the measurements. Because the harmonic analysis is done in real time, the method is quick, easy and accurate, and has been extended to locate the precise magnetic centre of the quadrupole magnet by adjusting its position relative to the coil axis so as to minimize the dipole content of the output waveform. Results of these measurements are compared with those obtained with an optical method using a suspension of magnetite. The observed light pattern is explained analytically. (author)

  11. The first LHC insertion quadrupole

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An important milestone was reached in December 2003 at the CERN Magnet Assembly Facility. The team from the Accelerator Technology - Magnet and Electrical Systems group, AT-MEL, completed the first special superconducting quadrupole for the LHC insertions which house the experiments and major collider systems. The magnet is 8 metres long and contains two matching quadrupole magnets and an orbit corrector, a dipole magnet, used to correct errors in quadrupole alignment. All were tested in liquid helium and reached the ultimate performance criteria required for the LHC. After insertion in the cryostat, the superconducting magnet will be installed as the Q9 quadrupole in sector 7-8, the first sector of the LHC to be put in place in 2004. Members of the quadrupole team, from the AT-MEL group, gathered around the Q9 quadrupole at its inauguration on 12 December 2003 in building 181.

  12. Ion trajectories quadrupole mass filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, D.; Lupsa, N.; Muntean, F.

    1994-01-01

    The present paper aims at bringing some contributions to the understanding of ion motion in quadrupole mass filters. The theoretical treatment of quadrupole mass filter is intended to be a concise derivation of the important physical relationships using Mathieu functions. A simple iterative method of numerical computation has been used to simulate ion trajectories in an ideal quadrupole field. Finally, some examples of calculation are presented with the aid of computer graphics. (Author) 14 Figs., 1 Tab., 20 Refs

  13. MQXFS1 Quadrupole Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, Giorgio [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2016-04-14

    This report presents the reference design of MQXFS1, the first 1.5 m prototype of the low-beta quadrupoles (MQXF) for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. The MQXF quadrupoles have 150 mm aperture, coil peak field of about 12 T, and use $Nb_{3}Sn$ conductor. The design is based on the LARP HQ quadrupoles, which had 120 mm aperture. MQXFS1 has 1st generation cable cross-section and magnetic design.

  14. MUON DETECTOR BARREL DRIFT TUBES (DT)

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabrizio Gasparini

    The DT system is made of 250 chambers, installed in the five wheels of the CMS Iron Yoke. Each wheel is subdivided in 10 sectors of four chambers each. Two sectors per wheel, the top and bottom ones, are equipped with 5 chambers, the large outer MB4s being split in two. The electronics for local, i.e. chamber, readout and generation of trigger primitives sits on Minicrates installed on each chamber (on-detector electronics). The data from each chamber are collected and synchronized by the off-detector electronics, sitting on the Wheel towers and organized per sector. HV and LV are organized per sector and per quarter (3 sectors) of each wheel respectively, DAQ and DCS have one branch per wheel. At the end of the February CMS Week the central wheel was fully operational and the two positive wheels, YB+1 and +2, fully commissioned. They were successfully moved over the vacuum tank and closed against YB0. The negative wheels were still open, with DT commissioning and final LV and DCS cabling being completed ...

  15. Quadrupole shunt experiments at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, W.J.; Hettel, R.O.; Nuhn, H.-D.

    1996-05-01

    As part of a program to align and stabilize the SPEAR storage ring, a switchable shunt resistor was installed on each quadrupole to bypass a small percentage of the magnet current. The impact of a quadrupole shunt is to move the electron beam orbit in proportion to the off-axis beam position at the quadrupole, and to shift the betatron tune. Initially, quadrupole shunts in SPEAR were used to position the electron beam in the center of the quadrupoles. This provided readback offsets for nearby beam position monitors, and helped to steer the photon beams with low-amplitude corrector currents. The shunt-induced tune shift measurements were then processed in MAD to derive a lattice model

  16. Quadrupole shunt experiments at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, W.J.; Hettel, R.O.; Nuhn, H.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a program to align and stabilize the SPEAR storage ring, a switchable shunt resistor was installed on each quadrupole to bypass a small percentage of the magnet current. The impact of a quadrupole shunt is to move the electron beam orbit in proportion to the off-axis beam position at the quadrupole and to shift the betatron tune. Initially, quadrupole shunts in SPEAR were used to position the electron beam in the center of the quadrupoles. This provided readback offsets for nearby beam position monitors and helped to steer the photon beams with low-amplitude corrector currents. The shunt-induced tune shift measurements were then processed in MAD to derive a lattice model. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. CLIC Quadrupole Module final report

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Mainaud-Durand, H

    2013-01-01

    Future Linear colliders will need particle beam sizes in the nanometre range. The beam also needs to be stable all along the beam line. The CLIC Main Beam Quadrupole (MBQ) module has been defined and studied. It is meant as a test stand for stabilisation and pre-alignment with a MB Quadrupole. The main topic that has been tackled concerns the Quadrupole magnet stabilisation to 1nm at 1Hz. This is needed to obtain the desired CLIC luminosity of 2.1034 cm-2m-1. The deliverable was demonstrated by procuring a MBQ and by stabilising a powered and cooled CLIC MBQ quadrupole. In addition, the stabilisation system has to be compatible with the pre-alignment procedures. Pre-alignment movement resolution has been demonstrated to 1m. The last step is the combined test of stability with a quadrupole on a CLIC Module with the pre-alignment.

  18. Electric quadrupole strength in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirson, M.W.

    1979-01-01

    Isoscalar electric quadrupole strength distributions in nuclei are surveyed, and it is concluded that the strength is shared, in most cases, roughly equally between low-lying transitions and the giant quadrupole state. The same is not true of the isovector case. A simple extension of the schematic model gives a remarkably successul description of the data, and emphasizes the vital importance of the coupling between high-lying and low-lying quadrupole modes. The standadrd simple representation of the giant quadrupole resonance as produced by operating on the nuclear ground state with the quadrupole transition operator is not applicable to the isoscalar case. It is suggested that giant resonances fall into broad classes of similar states, with considerable qualitative differences between the distinct classes. (author)

  19. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  20. Drift Chambers detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs

  1. Radiofrequency quadrupole-based beam cooler and buncher for the CANREB project at TRIUMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquest, Brad; Pearson, Matt; Ames, Friedhelm; Dilling, Jens; Gwinner, Gerald; Kanungo, Rituparna; Kruecken, Reiner

    2016-09-01

    A new radiofrequency quadrupole-based ion beam cooler and buncher (BCB) and pulsed drift tube (PDT) have been designed as part of the CANREB project at TRIUMF. The BCB is designed to accept continuous 60 keV rare isotope beams from the ARIEL or ISAC production targets and efficiently deliver low-emittance, bunched beams of up to 107 ions per bunch to an electron beam ion source (EBIS) to charge-breed the bunch for post-acceleration. The PDT will adjust the energy of the bunched beam from 60 keV to 10-14 keV for injection into the EBIS. The injection energy is determined by the acceptance of the post-accelerating RFQ. The design of the BCB is nearing completion, and fabrication and assembly effort will proceed shortly. In addition, a PDT prototype is under development to test that the design concept satisfies the voltage and switching time requirements. Design features of the BCB and PDT will be discussed, and an update on BCB assembly and PDT testing progress will be presented. CANREB is funded by CFI, NSRIT, Manitoba Research and Innovation Fund, AAPS, Saint Mary's U, U of Manitoba and TRIUMF. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  2. Quadrupole magnetic lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piskunov, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The following connection of windings of electromagnet is suggested for simplification of the design of qUadrupole magnetic lens intended for use in radiotechnical and electron-optical devices. The mentioned windings are connected with each other by a bridge scheme and the variable resistors are switched in its diagonals in the lens containing four electromagnet with windings connected with two variable resistors the mobile contacts of which are connected with a direct current source. Current redistribution between left windings and right windings takes place at shift of mobile contact of variable resistor, and current redistribution between upper and low coils of electromagnets takes place at shifting mobile contact of the other variable resistor. In this case smooth and independent electron-optical misalignment of lens by two mutually perpendicular directions proceeds. Use of the given design of the lens in the oscillograph permits to use printing assembly for alignment plate and to reduce the number of connections at the expense of decreasing the number of resistors

  3. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  4. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffiney, E.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1)

  5. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  6. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-10-08

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report.

  7. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report

  8. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwayne C. Kicker

    2001-09-28

    A statistical description of the probable block sizes formed by fractures around the emplacement drifts has been developed for each of the lithologic units of the repository host horizon. A range of drift orientations with the drift azimuth varied in 15{sup o} increments has been considered in the static analysis. For the quasi-static seismic analysis, and the time-dependent and thermal effects analysis, two drift orientations have been considered: a drift azimuth of 105{sup o} and the current emplacement drift azimuth of 75{sup o}. The change in drift profile resulting from progressive deterioration of the emplacement drifts has been assessed both with and without backfill. Drift profiles have been determined for four different time increments, including static (i.e., upon excavation), 200 years, 2,000 years, and 10,000 years. The effect of seismic events on rock fall has been analyzed. Block size distributions and drift profiles have been determined for three seismic levels, including a 1,000-year event, a 5,000-year event, and a 10,000-year event. Data developed in this modeling and analysis activity have been entered into the TDMS (DTN: MO0109RDDAAMRR.003). The following conclusions have resulted from this drift degradation analysis: (1) The available fracture data are suitable for supporting a detailed key block analysis of the repository host horizon rock mass. The available data from the north-south Main Drift and the east-west Cross Drift provide a sufficient representative fracture sample of the repository emplacement drift horizon. However, the Tptpln fracture data are only available from a relatively small section of the Cross Drift, resulting in a smaller fracture sample size compared to the other lithologic units. This results in a lower degree of confidence that the key block data based on the Tptpln data set is actually representative of the overall Tptpln key block population. (2) The seismic effect on the rock fall size distribution for all events

  9. An electrodeless drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Duerdoth, I.; Rowe, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    We describe a chamber in which the drift field is controlled by the deposition of electrostatic charge on an insulating surface. The chamber operates with good efficiency and precision for observed drift distances of up to 45 cm, promises to be extremely robust and adaptable and offers a very cheap way of making particle detectors. (orig.)

  10. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.

    2015-01-01

    An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic ...... data set from a Spanish bank....

  11. Time dependent drift Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    The motion of individual charged particles in a given magnetic and an electric fields is discussed. An idea of a guiding center distribution function f is introduced. The guiding center distribution function is connected to the asymptotic Hamiltonian through the drift kinetic equation. The general non-stochastic magnetic field can be written in a contravariant and a covariant forms. The drift Hamiltonian is proposed, and the canonical gyroradius is presented. The proposed drift Hamiltonian agrees with Alfven's drift velocity to lowest non-vanishing order in the gyroradius. The relation between the exact, time dependent equations of motion and the guiding center equation is clarified by a Lagrangian analysis. The deduced Lagrangian represents the drift motion. (Kato, T.)

  12. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport

  13. Electromagnetic design of superconducting quadrupoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rossi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We study how the critical gradient depends on the coil layout in a superconducting quadrupole for particle accelerators. We show that the results relative to a simple sector coil are well representative of the coil layouts that have been used to build several quadrupoles in the past 30 years. Using a semianalytical approach, we derive a formula that gives the critical gradient as a function of the coil cross-sectional area, of the magnet aperture, and of the superconducting cable parameters. This formula is used to evaluate the efficiency of several types of coil layouts (shell, racetrack, block, open midplane.

  14. MQRAD, a computer code for synchrotron radiation from quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Teruhisa.

    1984-01-01

    The computer code, MQRAD, is developed for the calculation of the synchrotron radiation from the particles passing through quadrupole magnets at the straight section of the electron-positron colliding machine. This code computes the distributions of photon numbers and photon energies at any given points on the beam orbit. In this code, elements such as the quadrupole magnets and the drift spaces can be divided into many sub-elements in order to obtain the results with good accuracy. The synchrotron radiation produced by inserted quadrupole magnets at the interaction region of the electron-positron collider is one of the main background sources to the detector. The masking system against the synchrotron radiation at TRISTAN is very important because of the relatively high beam energy and the long straight section, which are 30 GeV and 100 meters, respectively. MQRAD has been used to design the masking system of the TOPAZ detector and the result is presented here as an example. (author)

  15. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-01-01

    The outputs from the drift degradation analysis support scientific analyses, models, and design calculations, including the following: (1) Abstraction of Drift Seepage; (2) Seismic Consequence Abstraction; (3) Structural Stability of a Drip Shield Under Quasi-Static Pressure; and (4) Drip Shield Structural Response to Rock Fall. This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The drift degradation analysis includes the development and validation of rockfall models that approximate phenomenon associated with various components of rock mass behavior anticipated within the repository horizon. Two drift degradation rockfall models have been developed: the rockfall model for nonlithophysal rock and the rockfall model for lithophysal rock. These models reflect the two distinct types of tuffaceous rock at Yucca Mountain. The output of this modeling and analysis activity documents the expected drift deterioration for drifts constructed in accordance with the repository layout configuration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172801])

  16. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatar Vento, V.; Bergueiro, J.; Cartelli, D.; Valda, A.A.; Kreiner, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  17. A Full Front End Chain for Drift Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Panareo, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Pepino, A., E-mail: aurora.pepino@le.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Primiceri, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Tassielli, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois (United States); Università Marconi, Roma (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    We developed a high performance full chain for drift chamber signals processing. The Front End electronics is a multistage amplifier board based on high performance commercial devices. In addition a fast readout algorithm for Cluster Counting and Timing purposes has been implemented on a Xilinx-Virtex 4 core FPGA. The algorithm analyzes and stores data coming from a Helium based drift tube and represents the outcome of balancing between efficiency and high speed performance.

  18. Mechanical structure of the TOPAZ barrel drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, T.; Maruyama, K.; Okuno, H.

    1987-07-01

    A Barrel Drift Chamber (BDC) is constructed for the TOPAZ experiment at TRISTAN, KEK. The BDC has a cylindrical shape with dimensions of 325.2 cm in inner diameter, 347.2 cm in outer diameter and 500 cm long. It consists of 1232 drift tubes made of conductive plastic cathodes, which are staggered in four layers. In this report, a design of the mechanical structure and construction procedures are described in detail. (author)

  19. Collisional drift fluids and drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Correa-Restrepo, D.

    1995-05-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effect of which is extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter is important as concerns charge separation and resulting electric fields which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial for the stability behaviour; it will be discussed via an example. New collisional multispecies drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields in a transparent way conservation of energy and total angular momentum, and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. Their relation to the ideal equations imply, however, also a relation to the ideal Lagrangian of which one can take advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T ν (x)=const. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theories; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. Linear instability is investigated via energy considerations and the implications of taking ohmic resistivity into account are discussed. (orig./WL)

  20. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R.; Coleman, J.; Sharp, W.; Bieniosek, F.; Friedman, A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.M.; Faltens, A.; Vay, J.L.; Prost, L.

    2007-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam

  1. Drift Scale THM Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, J.

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a

  2. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Jose V., E-mail: josev.mathew@gmail.com; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ∼16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ∼20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs. -- Highlights: • An improved permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) design with larger good field region is proposed. • We investigate four PMQ designs, including the widely used Halbach and bullet nosed designs. • Analytical calculations are backed by 2D as well as 3D numerical solvers, PANDIRA and RADIA. • The optimized 16 segment rectangular PMQ design is identified to exhibit the largest good field region. • The effect of easy axis orientation

  3. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ∼16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ∼20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs. -- Highlights: • An improved permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) design with larger good field region is proposed. • We investigate four PMQ designs, including the widely used Halbach and bullet nosed designs. • Analytical calculations are backed by 2D as well as 3D numerical solvers, PANDIRA and RADIA. • The optimized 16 segment rectangular PMQ design is identified to exhibit the largest good field region. • The effect of easy axis orientation

  4. Electron Cloud Generation and Trapping in a Quadrupole Magnet at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, Robert J.; Browman, Andrew A.; Ledford, John E.; TechSource, Santa Fe; Los Alamos; Borden, Michael J.; O'Hara, James F.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Spickermann, Thomas; Zaugg, Thomas J.; Pivi, Mauro T.F.

    2008-01-01

    Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR) have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the 'prompt' electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the 'swept' electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100 (micro)s. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole

  5. Electron cloud generation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Macek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the “prompt” electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the “swept” electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100  μs. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole.

  6. The drift velocity monitoring system of the CMS barrel muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Altenhoefer, Georg Friedrich; Heidemann, Carsten Andreas; Reithler, Hans; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel Francois

    2017-01-01

    The drift velocity is a key parameter of drift chambers. Its value depends on several parameters: electric field, pressure, temperature, gas mixture, and contamination, for example, by ambient air. A dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) with 1-L volume has been built at the III. Phys. Institute A, RWTH Aachen, in order to monitor the drift velocity of all CMS barrel muon Drift Tube chambers. A system of six VDCs was installed at CMS and has been running since January 2011. We present the VDC monitoring system, its principle of operation, and measurements performed.

  7. The drift velocity monitoring system of the CMS barrel muon chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhöfer, Georg; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Reithler, Hans; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    The drift velocity is a key parameter of drift chambers. Its value depends on several parameters: electric field, pressure, temperature, gas mixture, and contamination, for example, by ambient air. A dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) with 1-L volume has been built at the III. Phys. Institute A, RWTH Aachen, in order to monitor the drift velocity of all CMS barrel muon Drift Tube chambers. A system of six VDCs was installed at CMS and has been running since January 2011. We present the VDC monitoring system, its principle of operation, and measurements performed.

  8. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kicker

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  9. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  10. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  11. Nuclear quadrupole resonance of arsenolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarazo, R.

    1988-01-01

    A pulsed Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) spectrometer was constructed using imported Matec units. Peripherical components were specially assembled and tested for the implantation of the spin-echo technique in the Laboratorio de Centros de Cor of IFUSP. The R.F. operation range is from 50 to 1 ) and spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times were carried out at room temperature in arsenolite. The 75 As NQR frequency measured at room temperature is 116.223 MHz. (author) [pt

  12. Radial semiconductor drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions under which the energy resolution of a radial semiconductor drift chamber based detector system becomes dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current have been investigated. To minimise the drift chamber dark current attention should be paid to carrier generation at Si/SiO 2 interfaces. This consideration conflicts with the desire to reduce the signal risetime: a higher drift field for shorter signal pulses requires a larger area of SiO 2 . Calculations for the single shaping and pseudo Gaussian passive filters indicate that for the same degree of signal risetime sensitivity in a system dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current, the pseudo Gaussian filter gives only a 3% improvement in signal/noise and 12% improvement in rate capability compared with the single shaper performance. (orig.)

  13. Nonlinear drift tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyj, L.M.; Kuznetsova, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear study of magnetic perturbation development under single-mode conditions in collision-free plasma in configurations with the magnetic field shear is investigated. Results are obtained with regard of transverse component of electrical field and its effect on ion dynamics within wide range of ion Larmor radius value and values of magnetic field shear. Increments of nonlinear drift tearing mode are obtained and it is shown that excitation drastic conditions of even linearly stable modes are possible. Mechanism of instability nonlinear stabilization is considered and the value of magnetic island at the saturation threshold is estimeted. Energy of nonlinear drift tearing mode is discussed

  14. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the continuous-time Itô semi-martingale model in such a way that the fundamental arbitrage-free property is preserved......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  15. Triangular tube proportional wire chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badtke, D H; Bakken, J A; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B J; Chien, C Y; Madansky, L; Matthews, J A.J.; Pevsner, A; Spangler, W J [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA); Lee, K L [California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    1981-10-15

    We report on the characteristics of the proportional tube chamber system which has been constructed for muon identification in the PEP-4 experiment at SLAC. The mechanical and electrical properties of the extruded aluminum triangular tubes allow these detectors to be used as crude drift chambers.

  16. Tapping with intentional drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardy, A.N.; Daffertshofer, A.; Beek, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    When tapping a desired frequency, subjects tend to drift away from this target frequency. This compromises the estimate of the correlation between inter-tap intervals (ITIs) as predicted by the two-level model of Wing and Kristofferson which consists of an internal timer ('clock') and motor delays.

  17. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.

    2002-01-01

    The design and construction of the large drift chamber of the KLOE experiment is presented. The track reconstruction is described, together with the calibration method and the monitoring systems. The stability of operation and the performance are studied with samples of e + e - , K S K L and K + K - events

  18. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Argus drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, M; Nagovizin, V; Hasemann, H; Michel, E; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Wurth, R; Kim, P

    1983-11-15

    The ARGUS detector came into operation at the DORIS-II e/sup +/s/sup -/ storage ring at the end of 1982. Its two meter long drift chamber contains 5940 sense and 24588 field wires organized in uniform 18x18.8 mm/sup 2/ drift cells filling the whole volume. These cells form 36 layers, 18 of which provide stereo views. Each sense wire is equipped with a single hit TDC and ADC for coordinate and dE/dx measurements. The chamber is operated with propane to improve momentum and dE/dx resolution. The drift chamber design and initial performance are presented. With a very crude space-time relation approximation and without all the necessary corrections applied a spatial resolution of about 200 ..mu..m was obtained for half of the drift cell volume. Further corrections should improve this result. An intrinsic dE/dx resolution of 4.2% and an actual resolution of 5% were obtained for cosmic muons and also for Bhabha scattered electrons. An actual dE/dx resolution of 5.6% was obtained for pions from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation data with almost no track selection. A relativistic rise of 30% was observed in good agreement with theory. The long-term stability is still to be investigated.

  20. Inland drift sand landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanta, J.; Siepel, H.

    2010-01-01

    Man has had a complex relationship with inland drift sands through the ages. For some centuries these landscapes were seen as a threat to society, especially agriculture and housing. At present we conserve these landscapes as important Natura 2000 priority habitats. In this book you may find these

  1. Guiding center drift equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1979-03-01

    The quations for particle guiding center drift orbits are given in a new magnetic coordinate system. This form of the equations not only separates the fast motion along the lines from the slow motion across, but also requires less information about the magnetic field than many other formulations of the problem

  2. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  3. Trigger drift chamber for the upgraded mark II detector at PEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Weber, P.; White, S. L.; Alvarez, M.; Calviño, F.; Fernandez, E.

    1987-04-01

    A small cylindrical track detector was built as an array of single-wire drift cells with aluminized mylar cathode tubes. Point measurement resolution of ˜ 90 μm was achieved with a drift gas of 50% argon-50% ethane at atmospheric pressure. The chamber construction, electronics, and calibration are discussed. Performance results from PEP colliding-beam data are presented.

  4. Trigger drift chamber for the upgraded Mark II detector at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, W.T.; Smith, J.G.; Wagner, S.R.; Weber, P.; White, S.L.; Alvarez, M.; Calvino, F.; Fernandez, E.; Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona

    1987-01-01

    A small cylindrical track detector was built as an array of single-wire drift cells with aluminized mylar cathode tubes. Point measurement resolution of ∝90 μm was achieved with a drift gas of 50% argon-50% ethane at atmospheric pressure. The chamber construction, electronics, and calibration are discussed. Performance results from PEP colliding-beam data are presented. (orig.)

  5. First experimental tests of a lead glass drift calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, A.D.; Bellazzini, R.; Conti, M.; Massai, M.M.; Schwartz, G.; Habel, R.; Mulera, T.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1985-10-01

    We are building a drift collection calorimeter, which has a combined radiator and electric field shaping structure made of fused lead glass tubing, treated in a H 2 reducing atmosphere. We describe the construction detail of the calorimeter and the experimental measurements on several prototypes with radioative sources and minimum ionizing particles. 9 refs., 11 figs

  6. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M and O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M and O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report

  7. Design of an electrostatic magnetic quadrupole accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, M.; Ohara, Y.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of electrostatic acceleration system, electrostatic magnetic quadrupole (ESMQ) acceleration system, is proposed for efficient acceleration of negative ion beams. In this system, permanent magnets are buried in the acceleration electrodes so as to produce a quadrupole magnetic field in the electrode aperture region. Envelope simulation indicates that the quadrupole field can deflect electrons stripped from the negative ions. Beam envelope simulations for deuterium ions and electrons have been carried out using the beam envelope code TRACE. Electrons are largely divergent and most appear likely to hit downstream electrodes. Furthermore, maximum beam divergence of the deuterium ions is reduced to the focusing effect of the quadrupole magnetic field

  8. Nuclear quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in the inelastic scattering of aligned deuterons from deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, H.; Frick, R.; Graw, G.; Schiemenz, P.; Seichert, N.

    1983-01-01

    The 2 1 + -excitation of deformed nuclei by tensor polarized deuterons provides an alignment of both nuclei and thus a means to study specifically the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction between both nuclei. The tensor analyzing power Asub(xz)(theta) has been measured for the elastic and inelastic scattering on 24 Mg and 28 Si. The coupled channel analysis including a deformed tensor potential reveals a clear signature of the quadrupole-quadrupole part of the nuclear projectile-target interaction. (orig.)

  9. MQXFS1 Quadrupole Fabrication Report

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, G; Bossert, R; Cavanna, E; Cheng, D; Chlachidize, G; Cooley, L D; Dietderich, D; Felice, H; Ferracin, P; Ghosh, A; Hafalia, R; Holik, E F; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Juchno, M; Krave, S; Marchevsky, M; Muratore, J; Nobrega, F; Pan, H; Perez, J C; Pong, I; Prestemon, S; Ravaioli, E; Sabbi, G L; Santini, C; Schmalzle, J; Schmalzle, J; Stoynev, S; Strauss, T; Vallone, G; Wanderer, P; Wang, X; Yu, M

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the fabrication and QC data of MQXFS1, the first short model of the low-beta quadrupoles (MQXF) for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. It describes the conductor, the coils, and the structure that make the MQXFS1 magnet. Qualification tests and non-conformities are also presented and discussed. The fabrication of MQXFS1 was started before the finalization of conductor and coil design for MQXF magnets. Two strand design were used (RRP 108/127 and RRP 132/169). Cable and coil cross-sections were “first generation”.

  10. MQXFS1 Quadrupole Fabrication Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Anerella, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bossert, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cavanna, E. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cheng, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chlachidize, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Cooley, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Dietderich, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Felice, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ferracin, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Ghosh, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hafalia, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Holik, E. F. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bermudez, S. Izquierdo [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Juchno, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Krave, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Marchevsky, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Muratore, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nobrega, F. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pan, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Perez, J. C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Pong, I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prestemon, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ravaioli, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sabbi, G. L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Santini, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schmalzle, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stoynev, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Strauss, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Vallone, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Wanderer, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, X. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yu, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-07-16

    This report presents the fabrication and QC data of MQXFS1, the first short model of the low-beta quadrupoles (MQXF) for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. It describes the conductor, the coils, and the structure that make the MQXFS1 magnet. Qualification tests and non-conformities are also presented and discussed. The fabrication of MQXFS1 was started before the finalization of conductor and coil design for MQXF magnets. Two strand design were used (RRP 108/127 and RRP 132/169). Cable and coil cross-sections were “first generation”.

  11. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumming, D.; Fleming, G.; Schwienbacher, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  12. Simulation of a quadrupole resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleindienst, Raphael [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Modern particle accelerators often rely on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology for accelerating cavities. In particular in CW operation, very high quality factors up into the high range are desirable, since one of the main cost drivers of such an accelerator, the cryogenic refrigeration plant, is inversely proportional to Q{sub 0}. Present day superconducting cavities are generally made of solid Niobium. A possibility to increase the quality factor as well as accelerating fields is to use thin film coated cavities. Apart from Niobium thin films, other superconducting materials, such as MgB{sub 2}, NbN and Nb{sub 3}Sn are promising candidates. Measuring and understanding the RF-properties of superconducting thin films, specifically the surface resistance, is needed to drive forward this development. Currently only few facilities exist capable of measuring the surface resistance of thin films samples with a resolution in the nano-ohm range at the operating frequency of typical cavities(e.g. L-band). A dedicated test stand consisting of a quadrupole resonator is therefore being constructed at the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin. This system is based on the 400 MHz quadrupole resonator at CERN, with the design adapted to 433 MHz (making available the higher harmonic mode at 1.3 GHz) and optimized with respect to resolution and maximum achievable fields using simulation data obtained with CST Microwave Studio as well as ANSYS. The simulated design is being manufactured. An outlook for future physics runs is given.

  13. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive)

  14. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  15. Negative Drift in Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    An important step in gaining a better understanding of the stochastic dynamics of evolving populations, is the development of appropriate analytical tools. We present a new drift theorem for populations that allows properties of their long-term behaviour, e.g. the runtime of evolutionary algorithms......, to be derived from simple conditions on the one-step behaviour of their variation operators and selection mechanisms....

  16. Electrostatic quadrupoles for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.; Faltens, A.

    1993-05-01

    Voltage-holding data for three quadrupole electrode sizes and inter-electrode spacings are reported. The dependence of the breakdown voltage on system size and its influence on the optimum quadrupole size for beam transport in a multiple beam array are discussed

  17. A strong focussing cylindrical electrostatic quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Yaochang

    1986-01-01

    The construction and performance of small cylindrical electrostatic quadrupole, which is installed in JM-400 pulse electrostatic accelerator, are described. This electrostatic quadrupole is not only used in neutron generator, but also suitable for ion injector as well as for low energy electron accelerator

  18. Consistent guiding center drift theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1982-04-01

    Various guiding-center drift theories are presented that are optimized in respect of consistency. They satisfy exact energy conservation theorems (in time-independent fields), Liouville's theorems, and appropriate power balance equations. A theoretical framework is given that allows direct and exact derivation of associated drift-kinetic equations from the respective guiding-center drift-orbit theories. These drift-kinetic equations are listed. Northrop's non-optimized theory is discussed for reference, and internal consistency relations of G.C. drift theories are presented. (orig.)

  19. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Ferreira, Ix-B.; Garcia-Herrera, J.; Villasenor, L.

    2006-01-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas

  20. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  1. Tube plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafred, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The tube plug comprises a one piece mechanical plug having one open end and one closed end which is capable of being inserted in a heat exchange tube and internally expanded into contact with the inside surface of the heat exchange tube for preventing flow of a coolant through the heat exchange tube. The tube plug also comprises a groove extending around the outside circumference thereof which has an elastomeric material disposed in the groove for enhancing the seal between the tube plug and the tube

  2. Quadrupole interaction in zinc metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetterling, W.T.; Pound, R.V.

    1977-01-01

    To allow measurement of the quadrupole interaction in zinc metal, the enriched ZnO was reduced to zinc metal powder and compressed into a pill of thickness 1.4 gm/cm 2 . Sources were made by diffusing 20 mCi of 67 Ga into sintered copper pills. The transducer was based on a cylinder of PZT-4 with 1 / 2 -inch length and could cover linearly a velocity range of +-100 μ/s at 200 Hz. The multiscalar was a modified Northern model NS600, with a minimum dwell time of 20 μs, and with a 10-count buffer at the input to eliminate deadtime from memory cycling

  3. Conceptual design of a compact high gradient quadrupole magnet of varying strength using permanent magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Sinha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A concept is presented to design magnets using cylindrical-shaped permanent-magnet blocks, where various types of magnetic fields can be produced by either rotating or varying the size of the magnetic blocks within a given mechanical structure. A general method is introduced to calculate the 3D magnetic field produced by a set of permanent magnets. An analytical expression of the 2D field and the condition to generate various magnetic fields like dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole are derived. Using the 2D result as a starting point, a computer code is developed to get the optimum orientation of the magnets to obtain the user-specific target field profile over a given volume in 3D. Designs of two quadrupole magnets are presented, one using 12 and the other using 24 permanent-magnet blocks. Variation of the quadrupole strength is achieved using tuning coils of a suitable current density and specially designed end tubes. A new concept is introduced to reduce the integrated quadrupole field strength by inserting two hollow cylindrical tubes made of iron, one at each end. This will not affect the field gradient at the center but reduce the integrated field strength by shielding the magnetic field near the ends where the tubes are inserted. The advantages of this scheme are that it is easy to implement, the magnetic axis will not shift, and it will prevent interference with nearby devices. Around 40% integrated field variation is achieved using this method in the present example. To get a realistic estimation of the field quality, a complete 3D model using a nonlinear B-H curve is also studied using a finite-element-based computer code. An example to generate around an 80  T/m quadrupole field gradient is also presented.

  4. Conceptual design of a compact high gradient quadrupole magnet of varying strength using permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Gautam

    2018-02-01

    A concept is presented to design magnets using cylindrical-shaped permanent-magnet blocks, where various types of magnetic fields can be produced by either rotating or varying the size of the magnetic blocks within a given mechanical structure. A general method is introduced to calculate the 3D magnetic field produced by a set of permanent magnets. An analytical expression of the 2D field and the condition to generate various magnetic fields like dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole are derived. Using the 2D result as a starting point, a computer code is developed to get the optimum orientation of the magnets to obtain the user-specific target field profile over a given volume in 3D. Designs of two quadrupole magnets are presented, one using 12 and the other using 24 permanent-magnet blocks. Variation of the quadrupole strength is achieved using tuning coils of a suitable current density and specially designed end tubes. A new concept is introduced to reduce the integrated quadrupole field strength by inserting two hollow cylindrical tubes made of iron, one at each end. This will not affect the field gradient at the center but reduce the integrated field strength by shielding the magnetic field near the ends where the tubes are inserted. The advantages of this scheme are that it is easy to implement, the magnetic axis will not shift, and it will prevent interference with nearby devices. Around 40% integrated field variation is achieved using this method in the present example. To get a realistic estimation of the field quality, a complete 3D model using a nonlinear B -H curve is also studied using a finite-element-based computer code. An example to generate around an 80 T /m quadrupole field gradient is also presented.

  5. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... any of these problems: a dislodged tube a blocked or clogged tube any signs of infection (including redness, swelling, or warmth at the tube site; discharge that's yellow, green, or foul-smelling; fever) excessive bleeding or drainage from the tube site severe abdominal pain lasting ...

  6. Drifting black aurorae?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoute-Vanneck, H.; Scourfield, M.W.J.; Nielsen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Characteristics of eastward drifting forms, previously described in the literature as black aurorae, have been identified in low-light level TV camera data. The TV field of view was within the field of view of STARE and that of an all-sky camera. On the basis of these observations the authors propose that these auroral forms are a manifestation of folds or waves on the borders of auroral bands propagating along the dark regions between neighboring auroral bands. Conditions under which the folds or waves occur are compatible with their formation by the Kelvin-Helmholtz electrostatic instability

  7. ABSTRACTION OF DRIFT SEEPAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Drift seepage refers to flow of liquid water into repository emplacement drifts, where it can potentially contribute to degradation of the engineered systems and release and transport of radionuclides within the drifts. Because of these important effects, seepage into emplacement drifts is listed as a ''principal factor for the postclosure safety case'' in the screening criteria for grading of data in Attachment 1 of AP-3.15Q, Rev. 2, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''. Abstraction refers to distillation of the essential components of a process model into a form suitable for use in total-system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this analysis/model is to put the information generated by the seepage process modeling in a form appropriate for use in the TSPA for the Site Recommendation. This report also supports the Unsaturated-Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report. The scope of the work is discussed below. This analysis/model is governed by the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS MandO 2000a). Details of this activity are in Addendum A of the technical work plan. The original Work Direction and Planning Document is included as Attachment 7 of Addendum A. Note that the Work Direction and Planning Document contains tasks identified for both Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO). Only the PAO tasks are documented here. The planning for the NEPO activities is now in Addendum D of the same technical work plan and the work is documented in a separate report (CRWMS MandO 2000b). The Project has been reorganized since the document was written. The responsible organizations in the new structure are the Performance Assessment Department and the Unsaturated Zone Department, respectively. The work plan for the seepage abstraction calls for determining an appropriate abstraction methodology, determining uncertainties in seepage, and providing

  8. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  9. Effects of Collar Permeability on the Field Quality of the Large Aperture Quadrupoles for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Catalan-Lasheras, N; Kirby, G; Mess, K H; Ostojic, R; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The LHC contains a number of large aperture quadrupoles (MQY) in the insertions. The acceptance of these magnets was based on warm magnetic measurements performed before delivery to CERN. During the series production of the MQY quadrupoles, the permeability of the collars drifted from the nominal value, and effects on the transfer function and multipole components became evident. To study the effects on the magnetic field, variable permeability of the stainless-steel collars as a function of local field and temperature was introduced into a numerical model. Comparing the results with measured data, we could isolate the contribution of permeability deviation on the magnetic field quality. The extrapolation of transfer function and field multipoles to operating temperature and current gives the necessary offsets, which are compared with measurements on a reduced set of magnets.

  10. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  11. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento, V Thatar; Bergueiro, J; Cartelli, D; Valda, A A; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Eight piece quadrupole magnet, method for aligning quadrupole magent pole tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaski, Mark S.; Liu, Jie; Donnelly, Aric T.; Downey, Joshua S.; Nudell, Jeremy J.; Jain, Animesh

    2018-01-30

    The invention provides an alternative to the standard 2-piece or 4-piece quadrupole. For example, an 8-piece and a 10-piece quadrupole are provided whereby the tips of each pole may be adjustable. Also provided is a method for producing a quadrupole using standard machining techniques but which results in a final tolerance accuracy of the resulting construct which is better than that obtained using standard machining techniques.

  13. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danly, C R; Merrill, F E; Barlow, D; Mariam, F G

    2014-08-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL's pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  14. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components

  15. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  16. AA, shims and washers on quadrupole ends

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Due to the fact that much of the field of the quadrupoles was outside the iron (in particular with the wide quadrupoles) and that thus the fields of quadrupoles and bending magnets interacted, the lattice properties of the AA could not be predicted with the required accuracy. After a first running period in 1980, during which detailed measurements were made with proton test beams, corrections to the quadrupoles were made in 1981, in the form of laminated shims at the ends of the poles, and with steel washers. With the latter ones, further refinements were made in an iterative procedure with measurements on the circulating beam. This eventually resulted, amongst other things, in a very low chromaticity, with the Q-values being constant to within +- 0.001 over the total momentum range of 6 %. Here we see the shims and washers on a narrow qudrupole (QFN, QDN). See also 8103203, 8103204, 8103205, 8103206.

  17. Nuclei quadrupole coupling constants in diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Rebane, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    An approximate relationship between the constants of quadrupole interaction of nuclei in a two-atom molecule is found. It enabled to establish proportionality of oscillatory-rotation corrections to these constants for both nuclei in the molecule. Similar results were obtained for the factors of electrical dipole-quadrupole screening of nuclei. Applicability of these relationships is proven by the example of lithium deuteride molecule. 4 refs., 1 tab

  18. AA, wide quadrupole on measurement stand

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Please look up 8101024 first. Shims and washers on the wide quadrupoles (QFW, QDW; located in the lattice where dispersion was large) served mostly for corrections of those lattice parameters which were a function of momentum. After mounting shims and washers, the quadrupoles were measured to determine their magnetic centre and to catalogue the effect of washer constellations. Raymond Brown is busy measuring a wide quad.

  19. On potential distribution in accelerating structure with RF-quadrupole focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymar', A.G.; Martynenko, P.A.; Khizhnyak, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    Results of the calculation of electric potential distribution between electrodes of an accelerating system, which is drift tubes arranged in the form of match boxes are presented. Three-dimensional Laplace equation solved by the finite-difference method has been used in the calculations. 6 refs., 1 fig

  20. The FINUDA straw tube detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zia, A; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Gianotti, P; Giardoni, M; Lucherini, V; Mecozzi, A; Pace, E; Passamonti, L; Qaiser, N; Russo, V; Tomassini, S; Sarwar, S; Serdyouk, V

    2001-01-01

    An array of 2424 2.6- m-long, 15- mm-diameter mylar straw tubes, arranged in two axial and four stereo layers, has been assembled at National Laboratories of Frascati of INFN for the FINUDA experiment. The array covers a cylindrical tracking surface of 18 m sup 2 and provides coordinate measurement in the drift direction and along the wire with a resolution of the order of 100 and 300 mu m, respectively. The array has finished the commissioning phase and tests with cosmic rays are underway. The status straw tubes array and a very preliminary result from cosmic rays test are summarized in this work.

  1. The FINUDA straw tube detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zia, A.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.L.; Gianotti, P.; Giardoni, M.; Lucherini, V.; Mecozzi, A.; Pace, E.; Passamonti, L.; Qaiser, N.; Russo, V.; Tomassini, S.; Sarwar, S.; Serdyouk, V.

    2001-01-01

    An array of 2424 2.6- m-long, 15- mm-diameter mylar straw tubes, arranged in two axial and four stereo layers, has been assembled at National Laboratories of Frascati of INFN for the FINUDA experiment. The array covers a cylindrical tracking surface of 18 m 2 and provides coordinate measurement in the drift direction and along the wire with a resolution of the order of 100 and 300 μm, respectively. The array has finished the commissioning phase and tests with cosmic rays are underway. The status straw tubes array and a very preliminary result from cosmic rays test are summarized in this work

  2. The FINUDA straw tube detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, A.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F. L.; Gianotti, P.; Giardoni, M.; Lucherini, V.; Mecozzi, A.; Pace, E.; Passamonti, L.; Qaiser, N.; Russo, V.; Tomassini, S.; Sarwar, S.; Serdyouk, V.

    2001-04-01

    An array of 2424 2.6- m-long, 15- mm-diameter mylar straw tubes, arranged in two axial and four stereo layers, has been assembled at National Laboratories of Frascati of INFN for the FINUDA experiment. The array covers a cylindrical tracking surface of 18 m 2 and provides coordinate measurement in the drift direction and along the wire with a resolution of the order of 100 and 300 μm, respectively. The array has finished the commissioning phase and tests with cosmic rays are underway. The status straw tubes array and a very preliminary result from cosmic rays test are summarized in this work.

  3. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  4. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gergar, Marcus [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  5. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Pascal H., E-mail: pascal-h.fries@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SCIB, RICC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SCIB, RICC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Belorizky, Elie [Université Grenoble Alpes, LIPHY, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, Leti-Clinatec, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-28

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1} of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R{sub 1} vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S–I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole {sup 14}N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of {sup 27}Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  6. High-Energy Gun-Injected Toroidal Quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammel, J.E.; Henins, I.; Kewish, R.W. Jr.; Marshall, J.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1971-01-01

    A quadrupole device is being used to investigate the trapping and containment of an energetic gun plasma. The quadrupole is designed to contain a peak density of 5 x 10 13 cm -3 at 2.5 keV within the MHD-stable region. At design field there are 5 gyro-radii for 2. 5-keV protons from the separatrix to the ψ crit . The interior conductors are directly driven with a 0.8-MJ capacitor bank. The current to the coils is fed through a single pair of dipole-guarded conductors to each coil. The coils are also supported from the current feed, The dipole guard is in a force-free configuration with 5 gyro-radii for 2. 5-keV protons from the separatrix (between the dipole and quadrupole fields) to the dipole surface. The dipole is designed so that loss of plasma from the dipole region will be directed away from the interior conductors. This feature is necessary for the prevention of contamination by secondary gas produced by plasma lost at the dipole guard. Experiments at one-half design value of magnetic field have shown that the kilovolt energy gun plasma is trapped by depolarization currents around the coils, and that a very high percentage (>50%) of the gun output can be trapped. The plasma density is measured by a unique Michelson interferometer using CO 2 laser light. The energy of the plasma is derived from magnetic pickup loops placed outside the containment region. The leak caused by the dipole guard Held has been examined by double electric probe measurements. The plasma drift thus inferred is an order of magnitude less than that predicted by a model of Meade's or by calculations by us. This casts doubt upon the validity of any such simple model and emphasizes the necessity of further experimental investigation of the matter. New coils which are being built to operate at full design magnetic field strength will allow a check on the containment time of the device for kilovolt energy plasma. (author)

  7. Thin-walled beam tubes for the SIS. Construction and manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malwitz, E.

    1985-06-01

    The vacuum system of the SIS consists essentially of torus-shaped vacuum chamber with an annulus-circumference of 216 m which is composed by several beam-tube and chamber elements. In order to reach the desired final pressure of -11 mbar (5 . 10 -9 Pa) a heating of the whole vacuum system to 300 0 C is required. The beam tubes within magnets have regularly an elliptic tube cross section. Within bending magnets the beam tubes are curved in a plane through the large ellipse axis with a bending radius of 10 m. During the development work for the beam tubes within magnets to construction variants were studied until construction maturity. Generally thin-walled beam tubes with elliptic tube cross section are fabricated similarly to spring bellows as corrugated tubes. In this report however beam tubes with elliptic tube cross section are discussed the tube walls of which are smooth and stabilized against the atmospheric pressure by hard-soldered ribs. The report reproduces mainly the most important know how respectively serves as instruction for new constructions. Such beam tubes are planned for the dipole magnets and the quadrupole group consisting of two long quadrupoles, a short quadrupole, and a sextupole. (orig./HSI) [de

  8. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flauger, Raphael [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); McAllister, Liam [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: flauger@physics.ucsd.edu, E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu, E-mail: evas@stanford.edu, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  9. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flauger, Raphael; Westphal, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  10. SUPERCONDUCTING QUADRUPOLE ARRAYS FOR MULTIPLE BEAM TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainer Meinke Carl Goodzeit Penny Ball Roger Bangerter

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop concepts for affordable, fully functional arrays of superconducting quadrupoles for multi-beam transport and focusing in heavy ion fusion (HIF)accelerators. Previous studies by the Virtual National Laboratory (VNL) collaboration have shown that the multi-beam transport system (consisting of alternating gradient quadrupole magnets, a beam vacuum system, and the beam monitor and control system) will likely be one of the most expensive and critical parts of such an accelerator. This statement is true for near-term fusion research accelerators as well as accelerators for the ultimate goal of power production via inertial fusion. For this reason, research on superconducting quadrupole arrays is both timely and important for the inertial fusion energy (IFE) research program. This research will also benefit near-term heavy ion fusion facilities such as the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE)and/or the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). We considered a 2-prong approach that addresses the needs of both the nearer and longer term requirements of the inertial fusion program. First, we studied the flat coil quadrupole design that was developed by LLNL; this magnet is 150 mm long with a 50 mm aperture and thus is suitable for near term experiments that require magnets of a small length to aperture ratio. Secondly, we studied the novel double-helix quadrupole (DHQ) design in a small (3 x 3) array configuration; this design can provide an important step to the longer term solution of loW--cost, easy to manufacture array constructions. Our Phase I studies were performed using the AMPERES magnetostatic analysis software. Consideration of these results led to plans for future magnet RandD construction projects. The first objective of Phase I was to develop the concept of a superconducting focusing array that meets the specific requirements of a heavy ion fusion accelerator. Detailed parameter studies for such quadrupole arrays were performed

  11. SUPERCONDUCTING QUADRUPOLE ARRAYS FOR MULTIPLE BEAM TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainer Meinke

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this research was to develop concepts for affordable, fully functional arrays of superconducting quadrupoles for multi-beam transport and focusing in heavy ion fusion (HIF)accelerators. Previous studies by the Virtual National Laboratory (VNL) collaboration have shown that the multi-beam transport system (consisting of alternating gradient quadrupole magnets, a beam vacuum system, and the beam monitor and control system) will likely be one of the most expensive and critical parts of such an accelerator. This statement is true for near-term fusion research accelerators as well as accelerators for the ultimate goal of power production via inertial fusion. For this reason, research on superconducting quadrupole arrays is both timely and important for the inertial fusion energy (IFE) research program. This research will also benefit near-term heavy ion fusion facilities such as the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE)and/or the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). We considered a 2-prong approach that addresses the needs of both the nearer and longer term requirements of the inertial fusion program. First, we studied the flat coil quadrupole design that was developed by LLNL; this magnet is 150 mm long with a 50 mm aperture and thus is suitable for near term experiments that require magnets of a small length to aperture ratio. Secondly, we studied the novel double-helix quadrupole (DHQ) design in a small (3 x 3) array configuration; this design can provide an important step to the longer term solution of low-cost, easy to manufacture array constructions. Our Phase I studies were performed using the AMPERES magnetostatic analysis software. Consideration of these results led to plans for future magnet R&D construction projects. The first objective of Phase I was to develop the concept of a superconducting focusing array that meets the specific requirements of a heavy ion fusion accelerator. Detailed parameter studies for such quadrupole arrays were performed

  12. Quadrupole moments measured by nuclear orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchta, H.

    1985-01-01

    Quadrupole interactions between the nuclei and solids have been studied with the low temperature nuclear orientation technique. The first series of measurements have been effected on the orientation of 195H g m and 197 Hg m , long lived daughter states in the 195 Au and 197 Au decay. The lifetimes of these states are of the same order as the spin-lattice relaxation time. The reorientation of the intermediate states has been taken into account extending the dipole relaxation mechanism to non-equidistant relaxing substates. The experimental nuclear quadrupole moments, thus deduced are slightly different from theoretical estimations. A new high precision method accessible to levels with 100 ns to 1 m lifetimes, the level mixing resonance on oriented nuclei (LMR/ON) has been elaborated in collaboration with LEUVEN university (Belgium). In this technique the nucleus is subject to a non colinear electric plus magnetic combined interaction. The quadrupole interaction of Ag[7/2, = 40 s] isomer with the electric field gradient in zinc has been established to better than 1% observing its level mixing resonances; and also the ratio of electric field gradients of silver in zinc to cadmium. The electric quadrupole moments of 106 Ag m , 107 Ag m and 109 Ag m have been established combining the level mixing resonances with classical low temperature quadrupole alignment measurements. The experimental values are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on a semi-microscopical model using Yukawa potential [fr

  13. Electron drift velocities of Ar-CO2-CF4 gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markeloff, R.

    1994-11-01

    The muon spectrometer for the D0 experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory uses proportional drift tubes filled with an Ar-CO 2 -CF 4 gas mixture. Measurements of drift velocity as a function of electric field magnitude for 90%-5%-5% and 90%-4%-6% Ar-CO 2 -CF 4 mixtures are presented, and our operational experiences with these gases at D0 is discussed

  14. A fast readout algorithm for Cluster Counting/Timing drift chambers on a FPGA board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelli, L. [Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale (Italy); Creti, P.; Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Pepino, A., E-mail: Aurora.Pepino@le.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Tassielli, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Università Marconi, Roma (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A fast readout algorithm for Cluster Counting and Timing purposes has been implemented and tested on a Virtex 6 core FPGA board. The algorithm analyses and stores data coming from a Helium based drift tube instrumented by 1 GSPS fADC and represents the outcome of balancing between cluster identification efficiency and high speed performance. The algorithm can be implemented in electronics boards serving multiple fADC channels as an online preprocessing stage for drift chamber signals.

  15. Design of a lead-glass drift calorimeter with MWPC detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; del Guerra, A.; Mulera, T.; Hirayama, H.; Nelson, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    A drift collection calorimeter having a combined radiator and field-shaping structure made of lead-glass tubing is described. A high-resistance metallic layer is formed by reduction of the lead oxide at the surface of the glass and forms a continuous voltage divider for drift-field shaping. The energy resolution of such a calorimeter is modeled, for several configurations, by the Monte Carlo technique

  16. Boson models of quadrupole collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelevinskij, V.G.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of the lecture is the low-lying excitations of even-even (e-e) spherical nuclei. The predominant role of the quadrupole mode, which determines the structure of spectra and transitions, is obvious on the background of shell periodicity and pair correlations. Typical E2-transitions are strengthened Ω ∼ A 2/3 times in comparison with single particle evaluations. Together with the regularity of the whole picture it gives evidence about collectivization of quadrupole motion. The collective states are combined in bands, where the transition probability are especially great; frequencies ω of the strengthened transitions are small in comparison with pair separation energies of 2 E-bar ∼ 2 MeV. Thus, the description of low-lying excitations of spherical nuclei has to be based on three principles: collectivity (Ω >> 1), adiabaticity (τ ≡ ω/2E-bar << 1) and quadrupole symmetry

  17. Drift chamber data readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiladze, S.G.; Lokhonyai, L.

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for processing drift chamber signals is described. The system consists of 4-channel fast amplifier-discriminators of low threshold, 16-channel time-expanders transforming 0.5 μs time intervals to 10 μs and a 9-bit time-to-digital converter (TDC) recording up to 16 expanded time intervals. If the average track multiplicity is small, TDC is capable to process signals from 4 time-expanders (i.e., 64 drift gaps). In order to record multiple tracks per drift gap discriminator outputs can be connected to a number of time-expander channels. The fast clear input enables the system to be cleared within 0.5 μs. Efficient readout from TDC is facilated by reading only those channels which contain non-zero data (9 bits - drift time; 6 bits - wire number)

  18. Magnetic Measurement Results of the LCLS Undulator Quadrupoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott; Caban, Keith; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reese, Ed; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    This note details the magnetic measurements and the magnetic center fiducializations that were performed on all of the thirty-six LCLS undulator quadrupoles. Temperature rise, standardization reproducibility, vacuum chamber effects and magnetic center reproducibility measurements are also presented. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator beam line has 33 girders, each with a LCLS undulator quadrupole which focuses and steers the beam through the beam line. Each quadrupole has main quadrupole coils, as well as separate horizontal and vertical trim coils. Thirty-six quadrupoles, thirty-three installed and three spares were, manufactured for the LCLS undulator system and all were measured to confirm that they met requirement specifications for integrated gradient, harmonics and for magnetic center shifts after current changes. The horizontal and vertical dipole trims of each quadrupole were similarly characterized. Each quadrupole was also fiducialized to its magnetic center. All characterizing measurements on the undulator quads were performed with their mirror plates on and after a standardization of three cycles from -6 to +6 to -6 amps. Since the undulator quadrupoles could be used as a focusing or defocusing magnet depending on their location, all quadrupoles were characterized as focusing and as defocusing quadrupoles. A subset of the undulator quadrupoles were used to verify that the undulator quadrupole design met specifications for temperature rise, standardization reproducibility and magnetic center reproducibility after splitting. The effects of the mirror plates on the undulator quadrupoles were also measured.

  19. On nonlinear periodic drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauschke, U.; Schlueter, H.

    1990-09-01

    Nonlinear periodic drift waves are investigated on the basis of a simple perturbation scheme for both the amplitude and inverse frequency. The coefficients for the generation of the forced harmonics are derived, a nonlinear dispersion relation is suggested and a criterion for the onset of the modulational instability is obtained. The results are compared with the ones obtained with the help of a standard KBM-treatment. Moreover cnoidal drift waves are suggested and compared to an experimental observation. (orig.)

  20. The OPAL vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.R.; Elcombe, P.A.; Hill, J.C.; Roach, C.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Estabrooks, P.; Hemingway, R.; Karlen, D.; McPherson, A.; Pinfold, J.; Roney, J.M.; Routenburg, P.; Waterhouse, J.; Hargrove, C.K.; Klem, D.; Oakham, F.G.; Carter, A.A.; Jones, R.W.L.; Lasota, M.M.B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Pritchard, T.W.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A high precision vertex drift chamber has been installed in the OPAL experiment at LEP. The design of the chamber and the associated readout electronics is described. The performance of the system has been studied using cosmic ray muons and the results of these studies are presented. A space resolution of 50 μm in the drift direction is obtained using the OPAL central detector gas mixture at 4 bar. (orig.)

  1. Tunable high-gradient permanent magnet quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, B J A; Marks, N; Collomb, N A; Stokes, D G; Modena, M; Struik, M; Bartalesi, A

    2014-01-01

    A novel type of highly tunable permanent magnet (PM) based quadrupole has been designed by the ZEPTO collaboration. A prototype of the design (ZEPTO-Q1), intended to match the specification for the CLIC Drive Beam Decelerator, was built and magnetically measured at Daresbury Laboratory and CERN. The prototype utilises two pairs of PMs which move in opposite directions along a single vertical axis to produce a quadrupole gradient variable between 15 and 60 T/m. The prototype meets CLIC's challenging specification in terms of the strength and tunability of the magnet.

  2. Initial value gravitational quadrupole radiation theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winicour, J.

    1987-01-01

    A rigorous version of the quadrupole radiation formula is derived using the characteristic initial value formulation of a general relativistic fluid space-time. Starting from initial data for a Newtonian fluid, an algorithm is presented that determines characteristic initial data for a one-parameter family of general relativistic fluid space-times. At the initial time, a one-parameter family of space-times with this initial data osculates the evolution of the Newtonian fluid and has leading order news function equal to the third time derivative of the transverse Newtonian quadrupole moment

  3. SKEW QUADRUPOLE FOCUSING LATTICES AND APPLICATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, B.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we revisit using skew quadrupole fields in place of traditional normal upright quadrupole fields to make beam focusing structures. We illustrate by example skew lattice decoupling, dispersion suppression and chromatic correction using the neutrino factory Study-II muon storage ring design. Ongoing BNL investigation of flat coil magnet structures that allow building a very compact muon storage ring arc and other flat coil configurations that might bring significant magnet cost reduction to a VLHC motivate our study of skew focusing

  4. Ion-storage in radiofrequency electric quadrupole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheorghe, V.

    1976-01-01

    The confinement of charged particles in a quadrupole radiofrequency electric field are presented. The stability diagrams and phase space trajectories for the quadrupole mass spectrometer and for the ion trap are represented and their main characteristics are discussed. (author)

  5. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  6. Test Station for Measuring Aluminum Tube Geometrical Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Oansea, D; Gongadze, A L; Gostkin, M I; Dedovich, D V; Evtoukhovitch, P G; Comanescu, B; Kotov, S A; Necsoiu, T; Potrap, I N; Rogalev, E V; Tskhadadze, E G; Chelkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    A test station for quality control of aluminum tube outer diameter and wall thickness is presented. The tested tubes are used for drift detector assembly of ATLAS (LHC, CERN) muon system. The outer diameter and wall thickness of aluminium tubes are measured by means of noncontact optical and ultrasonic methods respectively with the accuracy of 3 {\\mu}m. The testing process is automatic and interacts with the production data base.

  7. All systems go for LHC quadrupoles

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The series fabrication of the Main Quadrupole cold masses for the LHC has begun with the delivery of the first unit on February 12th. The superconducting dipole magnets required to bend the proton beams around the LHC are often in the news. Less famous, perhaps, but equally important are the 360 main quadrupole (MQ) magnets, which will perform the principal focusing around the 27 km ring. CERN and CEA-Saclay began collaborating on the development and prototyping of these magnets in 1989. This resulted in five highly successful quadrupole units - also known as short straight sections - one of which was integrated for testing in String 1, and two others of the final design in String 2. Once the tests had confirmed the validity of the design and realization, the fabrication of the 360 cold masses had to be transferred to industry. After highly competitive tendering, the German firm ACCEL Instruments was entrusted both with the construction of the quadrupole magnets themselves, and with their assembly into the co...

  8. Collective Quadrupole Excitations of Transactinide Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zajac, K; Pomorski, K; Rohozinski, S G; Srebrny, J

    2003-01-01

    The quadrupole excitations of transuranic nuclei are described in the frame of the microscopic Bohr Hamiltonian modified by adding the coupling with the collective pairing vibrations. The energies of the states from the ground-state bands in U to No even-even isotopes as well as the B(E2) transition probabilities are reproduced within the model containing no adjustable parameters.

  9. Model of an LHC superconducting quadrupole magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Model of a superconducting quadrupole magnet for the LHC project. These magnets are used to focus the beam by squeezing it into a smaller cross-section, a similar effect to a lens focusing light. However, each magnet only focuses the beam in one direction so alternating magnet arrangements are required to produce a fully focused beam.

  10. AA, wide quadrupole on measurement stand

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Please look up 8101024 and 8103203 first. Wide quadrupole (QFW, QDW) with end-shims and shimming washers on the measurement stand. With the measurement coil one measured the harmonics of the magnetic field, determined the magnetic centre, and catalogued the effect of washer constellations.

  11. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez-Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  12. CFD Modelling of a Quadrupole Vortex Inside a Cylindrical Channel for Research into Advanced Hybrid Rocket Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, B.; Majdalani, J.

    2014-11-01

    This study relies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to analyse a possible method for creating a stable quadrupole vortex within a simulated, circular-port, cylindrical rocket chamber. A model of the vortex generator is created in a SolidWorks CAD program and then the grid is generated using the Pointwise mesh generation software. The non-reactive flowfield is simulated using an open source computational program, Stanford University Unstructured (SU2). Subsequent analysis and visualization are performed using ParaView. The vortex generation approach that we employ consists of four tangentially injected monopole vortex generators that are arranged symmetrically with respect to the center of the chamber in such a way to produce a quadrupole vortex with a common downwash. The present investigation focuses on characterizing the flow dynamics so that future investigations can be undertaken with increasing levels of complexity. Our CFD simulations help to elucidate the onset of vortex filaments within the monopole tubes, and the evolution of quadrupole vortices downstream of the injection faceplate. Our results indicate that the quadrupole vortices produced using the present injection pattern can become quickly unstable to the extent of dissipating soon after being introduced into simulated rocket chamber. We conclude that a change in the geometrical configuration will be necessary to produce more stable quadrupoles.

  13. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  14. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D.

    2000-01-01

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses

  15. Feeding Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding therapies have been exhausted. Please review product brand and method of placement carefully with your physician ... Total Parenteral Nutrition. Resources: Oley Foundation Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation Children’s Medical Nutrition Alliance APFED’s Educational Webinar ...

  16. Three-dimensional quadrupole lenses made with permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of accelerator systems with quadrupole magnets can be improved by using permanent magnets in quadrupole lenses. This requires better methods for treating the three-dimensional nature of the magnetic fields and the nonlinear characteristics of the magnets. A numerical method is described for simulating three-dimensional magnetic fields and used to analyze quadrupole lenses and doublets with permanent magnets. The results, which are confirmed experimentally, indicate that both the quadrupole magnetic gradient and the effective field length are changed in permanent-magnet quadrupole lenses when the pole lengths and the gap between the lenses are varied while the other characteristics of the magnets remain unchanged

  17. Predicting public sector accountability : From agency drift to forum drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillemans, Thomas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229913881; Busuioc, Madalina

    2015-01-01

    Principal-agent theory has been the dominant theory at the heart of public sector accountability research. The notion of the potentially drifting agent-such as independent public agencies, opaque transnational institutions, or recalcitrant street-level bureaucrats-has been the guiding paradigm in

  18. Quadrupole to BPM offset determination in Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jena, Saroj; Ghodke, A.D.; Singh, G.

    2009-01-01

    A feasibility of finding the quadrupole to BPM offset using beam based alignment (BBA) technique in Indus-2 has been studied. The measurements of the offsets between BPM and quadrupoles could be performed by using quadratic fitting for the minima of the orbit response w. r. t. changes in the quadrupole strengths. These offsets will be integrated to the orbit data during closed orbit correction. There are 72 quadrupoles and 56 BPMs in Indus-2. However the assessment of Quad-BPM offsets is not feasible in some cases due to non-availability of BPM adjacent to quadrupole and also in some cases because of a large phase advance between quadrupole and nearby BPM. Here single corrector method is used to obtain these offsets and assumed the current of each quadrupole can be varied independently. A graphical user interface (GUI) is developed in MATLAB for the use of BBA in Indus-2. (author)

  19. Global study of quadrupole correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.; Bertsch, G.F.; Heenen, P.-H.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the systematics of ground-state quadrupole correlations of binding energies and mean-square charge radii for all even-even nuclei, from 16 O up to the superheavies, for which data are available. To that aim we calculate their correlated J=0 ground state by means of the angular-momentum and particle-number projected generator coordinate method, using the axial mass quadrupole moment as the generator coordinate and self-consistent mean-field states restricted only by axial, parity, and time-reversal symmetries. The calculation is performed within the framework of a nonrelativistic self-consistent mean-field model by use of the same Skyrme interaction SLy4 and to a density-dependent pairing force to generate the mean-field configurations and to mix them. These are the main conclusions of our study: (i) The quadrupole correlation energy varies between a few 100 keV and about 5.5 MeV. It is affected by shell closures, but varies only slightly with mass and asymmetry. (ii) Projection on angular momentum J=0 provides the major part of the energy gain of up to about 4 MeV; all nuclei in the study, including doubly magic ones, gain energy by deformation. (iii) The mixing of projected states with different intrinsic axial deformations adds a few 100 keV up to 1.5 MeV to the correlation energy. (iv) Typically nuclei below mass A≤60 have a larger correlation energy than static deformation energy whereas the heavier deformed nuclei have larger static deformation energy than correlation energy. (v) Inclusion of the quadrupole correlation energy improves the description of mass systematics, particularly around shell closures, and of differential quantities, namely two-nucleon separation energies and two-nucleon gaps. The correlation energy provides an explanation of 'mutually enhanced magicity'. (vi) The correlation energy tends to decrease the shell effect on binding energies around magic numbers, but the magnitude of the suppression is not large enough to explain

  20. Collisional drift fluid equations and implications for drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, Dieter; Correa-Restrepo, Dario

    1996-01-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effects of which are extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter law is important in relation to charge separation and the resulting electric fields, which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial to the stability behaviour, it will be discussed by means of an example. New collisional multi-species drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields, in a transparent way, conservation of energy and total angular momentum and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The only restriction involved is the validity of the drift approximation; in particular, there are no assumptions restricting the geometry of the system. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in the drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. However, their relation to the ideal equations also implies a relation to the ideal Lagrangian, which can be used to advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T v (x) = constant. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theory; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. (author)

  1. Steam generator tube extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, H.

    1985-05-01

    To enable tube examination on steam generators in service, Framatome has now developed a process for removing sections of steam generator tubes. Tube sections can be removed without being damaged for treating the tube section expanded in the tube sheet

  2. LARP Long Nb3Sn Quadrupole Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidize, G.; Dietderich, D.; Feher, S.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.; Muratore, J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitsky, I.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Wanderer, P.; Whitson, G.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    A major milestone for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is the test, by the end of 2009, of two 4m-long quadrupole magnets (LQ) wound with Nb 3 Sn conductor. The goal of these magnets is to be a proof of principle that Nb 3 Sn is a viable technology for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. The design of the LQ is based on the design of the LARP Technological Quadrupoles, presently under development at FNAL and LBNL, with 90-mm aperture and gradient higher than 200 T/m. The design of the first LQ model will be completed by the end of 2007 with the selection of a mechanical design. In this paper we present the coil design addressing some fabrication technology issues, the quench protection study, and three designs of the support structure

  3. LARP Long Nb3Sn Quadrupole Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidize, G.; Dietderich, D.; Feher, S.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Fermilab; Brookhaven; LBL, Berkeley; Texas A-M

    2007-01-01

    A major milestone for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is the test, by the end of 2009, of two 4m-long quadrupole magnets (LQ) wound with Nb3Sn conductor. The goal of these magnets is to be a proof of principle that Nb3Sn is a viable technology for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. The design of the LQ is based on the design of the LARP Technological Quadrupoles, presently under development at FNAL and LBNL, with 90-mm aperture and gradient higher than 200 T/m. The design of the first LQ model will be completed by the end of 2007 with the selection of a mechanical design. In this paper we present the coil design addressing some fabrication technology issues, the quench protection study, and three designs of the support structure

  4. LARP Long Nb3Sn Quadrupole Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidize, G.; Dietderich, D.; Feher, S.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.; Muratore, J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitsky, I.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Wanderer, P.; Whitson, G.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    A major milestone for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is the test, by the end of 2009, of two 4m-long quadrupole magnets (LQ) wound with Nb 3 Sn conductor. The goal of these magnets is to be a proof of principle that Nb 3 Sn is a viable technology for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. The design of the LQ is based on the design of the LARP Technological Quadrupoles, presently under development at FNAL and LBNL, with 90-mm aperture and gradient higher than 200 T/m. The design of the first LQ model will be completed by the end of 2007 with the selection of a mechanical design. In this paper we present the coil design addressing some fabrication technology issues, the quench protection study, and three designs of the support structure

  5. The LHC Main Quadrupoles during Series Fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Tortschanoff, Theodor; Durante, M; Hagen, P; Klein, U; Krischel, D; Payn, A; Rossi, L; Schellong, B; Schmidt, P; Simon, F; Schirm, K-M; Todesco, E

    2006-01-01

    By the end of August 2005 about 320 of the 400 main LHC quadrupole magnets have been fabricated and about 220 of them assembled into their cold masses, together with corrector magnets. About 130 of them have been cold tested in their cryostats and most of the quadrupoles exceeded their nominal excitation, i.e. 12,000 A, after no more than two training quenches. During this series fabrication, the quality of the magnets and cold masses was thoroughly monitored by means of warm magnetic field measurements, of strict geometrical checking, and of various electrical verifications. A number of modifications were introduced in order to improve the magnet fabrication, mainly correction of the coil geometry for achieving the specified field quality and measures for avoiding coil insulation problems. Further changes concern the electrical connectivity and insulation of instrumentation, and of the corrector magnets inside the cold masses. The contact resistances for the bus-bar connections to the quench protection diode...

  6. Quadrupole collective excitations in rapidly rotating nuclej

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    The spectrum of collective quadrupole excitations in nuclei is investigated. The average nucleus field has the axial symmetry and rotation occurs relatively to this axis. Dependences of the spectrum of quadrupole oscillations on rotation rate for classic liquid drop (CLD) and for a drop of fermi-liquid (DFL) with fissionability parameter X=0.62 ( 154 Er) are presented. The dependence of probabilities of E2-transitions between single-phonon and phonon-free states on rotation rate for CLD and DFL with fussionability parameter X=0.62 ( 154 Er) is also presented. It is shown that for CLD collective E2-transition of states of yrast-consequence is absolutely forbidden. For DFL transitions are possible that lead to decay of phonon-free state with the excitation of phonons of γ-modes and decrease of angular momentum

  7. Design of the CLIC Quadrupole Vacuum Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider, under study, requires vacuum chambers with a very small aperture, of the order of 8 mm in diameter, and with a length up to around 2 m for the main beam quadrupoles. To keep the very tight geometrical tolerances on the quadrupoles, no bake out is allowed. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-9 mbar static pressure) in a system where the vacuum performance is driven by water outgassing. For this application, a thinwalled stainless steel vacuum chamber with two ante chambers equipped with NEG strips, is proposed. The mechanical design, especially the stability analysis, is shown. The key technologies of the prototype fabrication are given. Vacuum tests are carried out on the prototypes. The test set-up as well as the pumping system conditions are presented.

  8. Solar Drift-Pair Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A.; Volvach, Ya.; Konovalenko, A.; Koval, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper a new sight on the study of solar bursts historically called drift pairs (DPs) is presented. Having a simple morphology on dynamic spectra of radio records (two short components separated in time, and often they are very similar) and discovered at the dawn of radio astronomy, their features remain unexplained totally up to now. Generally, the DPs are observed during the solar storms of type III bursts, but not every storm of type III bursts is linked with DPs. Detected by ground-based instruments at decameter and meter wavelengths, the DP bursts are limited in frequency bandwidth. They can drift from high frequencies to low ones and vice versa. Their frequency drift rate may be both lower and higher than typical rates of type III bursts at the same frequency range. The development of low-frequency radio telescopes and data processing provide additional possibilities in the research. In this context the fresh analysis of DPs, made from recent observations in the summer campaign of 2015, are just considered. Their study was implemented by updated tools of the UTR-2 radio telescope at 9-33 MHz. During 10-12 July of 2015, DPs forming the longest patterns on dynamic spectra are about 7% of the total number of recorded DPs. Their marvelous resemblance in frequency drift rates with the solar S-bursts is discussed.

  9. Job satisfaction and preference drift.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen van den Brink, H.; Groot, W.J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Most empirical studies do not find that higher wages lead to more job satisfaction. In this paper we argue that the insignificant effect of wages on job satisfaction is due to preference drift. We adapt the standard ordered response model to allow for preference shifts. The empirical results support

  10. Contamination measurements with quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohatka, S.; Berecz, I.; Langer, G.

    1981-01-01

    A sensitive quadrupole mass spectrometer of our own construction was used for different purity measurements. The analysis of gases in operating rooms showed a 1 ppm-10 5 ppm concentration of narcotics and helped to develop an effective and cheap method for regenerating narcotic filters. We regularly control the gases used in radioactive pollution measurements by internal GM counters and in radiocarbon dating technique. Combustion products and the gases of a fermenter are investigated for industrial application. (orig.) [de

  11. Superconducting quadrupoles for the SLC final focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Murray, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The final focus system of the SLC will be upgraded by replacing the final quadrupoles with higher gradient superconducting magnets positioned closer to the interaction point. The parameters of the new system have been chosen to be compatible with the experimental detectors with a minimum of changes to other final focus components. These parameter choices are discussed along with the expected improvement in SLC performance

  12. On the theory of nuclear quadrupole oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrosimov, V.I.; Strutinskij, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    Presented is a deduction and a convinient writing form of the secular equation for nuclear quadrupole oscillations. The deduction is consistent with usual random phase approximation. It is regarded that the oscillations of the nuclear average potential are adiabatic with respect to formation of the Cooper pairs and the collective motion arises as a result of the coherent distortion of the quasiparticle wave functions. The energy gap changes are also taken into account

  13. 15 T And Beyond - Dipoles and Quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbi, GianLuca

    2008-01-01

    Starting with the invention of the cyclotron by Lawrence, accelerator-based experiments have been the primary source of new discoveries in particle physics. In order to progress toward higher energy and luminosity, higher field magnets are required. R and D programs are underway to take advantage of new developments in superconducting materials, achieve better efficiency and simplify magnet fabrication while preserving accelerator-class field quality. A review of recent progress on high field dipole and quadrupole magnets is presented.

  14. Hydrogen isotope analysis by quadrupole mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellefson, R.E.; Moddeman, W.E.; Dylla, H.F.

    1981-03-01

    The analysis of isotopes of hydrogen (H, D, T) and helium ( 3 He, 4 He) and selected impurities using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) has been investigated as a method of measuring the purity of tritium gas for injection into the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A QMS was used at low resolution, m/Δm 3 He, and 4 He in HT/D 2

  15. Superconducting quadrupoles for the SLC final focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Murray, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The final focus system of the SLC will be upgraded by replacing the final quadrupoles with higher gradient supperconducting magnets positioned closer to the interaction point. The parameters of the new system have been chosen to be compatible with the experimental detectors with a minimum of changes to other final focus components. These parameter choices are discussed along with the expected improvement in SLC performance

  16. Emittance measurements by variable quadrupole method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toprek, D.

    2005-01-01

    The beam emittance is a measure of both the beam size and beam divergence, we cannot directly measure its value. If the beam size is measured at different locations or under different focusing conditions such that different parts of the phase space ellipse will be probed by the beam size monitor, the beam emittance can be determined. An emittance measurement can be performed by different methods. Here we will consider the varying quadrupole setting method.

  17. Radio frequency quadrupole resonator for linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Alfred

    1985-01-01

    An RFQ resonator for a linear accelerator having a reduced level of interfering modes and producing a quadrupole mode for focusing, bunching and accelerating beams of heavy charged particles, with the construction being characterized by four elongated resonating rods within a cylinder with the rods being alternately shorted and open electrically to the shell at common ends of the rods to provide an LC parallel resonant circuit when activated by a magnetic field transverse to the longitudinal axis.

  18. Excitation of giant monopole and quadrupole resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, H. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics; Yamagata, T.; Tanaka, M. [and others; Ikegami, H.; Muraoka, M. [eds.; Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies on the giant monopole resonance (GMR) and the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) in /sup 144/Sm and /sup 208/Pb using the ..cap alpha..-scattering performed at RCNP are summarized. The observed angular range covered 1.6/sup 0/ -- 7/sup 0/ with a coupled system of a dipole and a triplet quadrupole magnet. The incident energy was changed from 84 to 119 MeV. The resonance shapes and energy-weighted sum-rule strengths of the GMR and the GQR were reliably deduced as a function of incident energy. The quadrupole strength of --20% was found in the GMR region. The observed excitation function of the GMR was compared with the DWBA calculation, in which the Satchler's Version I was used as a form factor representing the compressional motion of the nucleus. It was found that the experimental excitation function of the GMR shows steeper decrease as lowering the incident energy than the DWBA prediction whereas that of the GQR is successfully described by the DWBA. This suggests that examination of the model describing the GMR is necessary.

  19. Observation of a phononic quadrupole topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Garcia, Marc; Peri, Valerio; Süsstrunk, Roman; Bilal, Osama R.; Larsen, Tom; Villanueva, Luis Guillermo; Huber, Sebastian D.

    2018-03-01

    The modern theory of charge polarization in solids is based on a generalization of Berry’s phase. The possibility of the quantization of this phase arising from parallel transport in momentum space is essential to our understanding of systems with topological band structures. Although based on the concept of charge polarization, this same theory can also be used to characterize the Bloch bands of neutral bosonic systems such as photonic or phononic crystals. The theory of this quantized polarization has recently been extended from the dipole moment to higher multipole moments. In particular, a two-dimensional quantized quadrupole insulator is predicted to have gapped yet topological one-dimensional edge modes, which stabilize zero-dimensional in-gap corner states. However, such a state of matter has not previously been observed experimentally. Here we report measurements of a phononic quadrupole topological insulator. We experimentally characterize the bulk, edge and corner physics of a mechanical metamaterial (a material with tailored mechanical properties) and find the predicted gapped edge and in-gap corner states. We corroborate our findings by comparing the mechanical properties of a topologically non-trivial system to samples in other phases that are predicted by the quadrupole theory. These topological corner states are an important stepping stone to the experimental realization of topologically protected wave guides in higher dimensions, and thereby open up a new path for the design of metamaterials.

  20. Table of Nuclear Electric Quadrupole Moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, N.J.

    2013-12-01

    This Table is a compilation of experimental measurements of static electric quadrupole moments of ground states and excited states of atomic nuclei throughout the periodic table. To aid identification of the states, their excitation energy, half-life, spin and parity are given, along with a brief indication of the method and any reference standard used in the particular measurement. Experimental data from all quadrupole moment measurements actually provide a value of the product of the moment and the electric field gradient [EFG] acting at the nucleus. Knowledge of the EFG is thus necessary to extract the quadrupole moment. A single recommended value of the moment is given for each state, based, for each element, wherever possible, upon a standard reference moment for a nuclear state of that element studied in a situation in which the electric field gradient has been well calculated. For several elements one or more subsidiary reference EFG/moment references are required and their use is specified. The literature search covers the period to mid-2013. (author)

  1. Three-dimensional simulation studies of 10 MeV, 352.2 MHz drift ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    drift tube Linac was done by varying the gap to cell length (g/L) ratio using SUPERFISH ... diameter and stem diameter were taken to be the same to ease fabrication ... The effect on resonant frequency of the DTL, due to tuners, vacuum ports and post- ... the electric field and frequency, and is highly dependent on mesh size.

  2. The large size straw drift chambers of the COMPASS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bychkov, V N; Dünnweber, W; Faessler, Martin A; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Geyer, R; Gousakov, Yu V; Grünemaier, A; Heinsius, F H; Ilgner, C; Ivanchenko, I M; Kekelidze, G D; Königsmann, K C; Livinski, V V; Lysan, V M; Marzec, J; Matveev, D A; Mishin, S V; Mialkovski, V V; Novikov, E A; Peshekhonov, V D; Platzer, K; San, M; Schmid, T; Shokin, V I; Sissakian, A N; Viriasov, K S; Wiedner, U; Zaremba, K; Zhukov, I A; Zlobin, Y L; Zvyagin, A

    2005-01-01

    Straw drift chambers are used for the Large Area Tracking (LAT) of the Common Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) at CERN. An active area of 130 m2 in total is covered by 12 440 straw tubes, which are arranged in 15 double layers. The design has been optimized with respect to spatial resolution, rate capability, low material budget and compactness of the detectors. Mechanical and electrical design considerations of the chambers are discussed as well as new production techniques. The mechanical precision of the chambers has been determined using a CCD X-ray scanning apparatus. Results about the performance during data taking in COMPASS are described.

  3. Ear Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ear drum or eustachian tube, Down Syndrome, cleft palate, and barotrauma (injury to the middle ear caused by a reduction of air pressure, ... specialist) may be warranted if you or your child has experienced repeated ... fluid in the middle ear, barotrauma, or have an anatomic abnormality that ...

  4. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I; Martinez laso, L

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  5. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  6. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H., E-mail: hendrik.jansen@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  7. Corrector/quadrupole/sextupole power leads for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutt, R.; Hornik, K.; Rehak, M.

    1993-01-01

    In RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), there are 492 CQS (Corrector/Quadrupole/Sextupole) assemblies which require leads to carry the current from the power supply to the magnet. The lead assemblies will contain these leads along with instrumentation voltage taps and current carrying wires that are used only for magnet warm-up. These lead assemblies are analyzed for two cooling schemes: (1) gas flow through the lead tube and (2) heat sinking the lead tube along a 40--70 K heat shield (without gas flow). The analysis was extended to include the modeling of the cold and warm ends and effects of superinsulation shielding the lead assembly against radiation (including heat conduction due to residual gas pressure in the surrounding vacuum). Extensive parametric studies of heat exchange areas, specific copper properties, length of the lead, etc. are also included in the analysis

  8. Nuclear electric quadrupole interactions in liquids entrapped in cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, Gregory B., E-mail: gregoryf@bgu.ac.il; Meerovich, Victor M.; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Physics Department (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    Liquids entrapped in cavities and containing quadrupole nuclei are considered. The interaction of the quadrupole moment of a nucleus with the electric field gradient is studied. In such a system, molecules are in both rotational and translational Brownian motions which are described by the diffusion equation. Solving this equation, we show that the intra- and intermolecular nuclear quadrupole interactions are averaged to zero in cavities with the size larger than several angstroms.

  9. MPS II drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed

  10. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated

  11. Power supplies for the injector synchrotron quadrupoles and sextupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathizadeh, M.

    1995-01-01

    This light source note will describe the power supplies for the injector synchrotron quadrupole and sextupole magnets. The injector synchrotron has two families of quadrupole magnets. Each family consists of 40 quadrupole magnets connected in series. These magnets are energized by two phase-controlled, 12-pulse power supplies. Therefore, each power supply will be rated to deliver the necessary power to only 40 quadrupole magnets. The two families of sextupole magnets in the injector synchrotron each consists of 32 sextupole magnets connected in series, powered by a phase-controlled power supply. Thus, each power supply shall be capable of delivering power to only 32 sextupole magnets

  12. Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric analysis of geochemical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Johnson, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric-analysis techniques can be used to study a wide variety of problems involving decomposition processes and identification of released volatile components. A recording vacuum thermoanalyzer has been coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The rapid scan capabilities of the quadrupole mass spectrometer are used to identify the gaseous components released. The capability of the thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass spectrometer to provide analytical data for identification of the released volatile components, for determination of their sequence of release and for correlation of thermal-decomposition studies is illustrated by an analysis of the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite.

  13. Measurements of field decay and snapback effect on Tevatron dipole and quadrupole magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velev, G.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Annala, G.; Bauer, P.; Carcagno, R.; DiMarco, J.; Glass, H.; Hanft, R.; Kephart, R.; Lamm, M.; Martens, M.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Since the beginning of 2002 an intensive measurement program has been performed at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF) to understand dynamic effects in Tevatron magnets. Based on the results of this program a new correction algorithm was proposed to compensate for the decay of the sextupole field during the dwell at injection and for the subsequent field ''snapback'' during the first few seconds of the energy ramp. Beam studies showed that the new correction algorithm works better than the original one, and improves the Tevatron efficiency by at least 3%. The beam studies also indicated insufficient correction during the first 6s of the injection plateau where an unexpected discrepancy of 0.15 sextupole units of extra drift was observed. This paper reports on the most recent measurements of the Tevatron dipoles field at the beginning of the injection plateau. Results on the field decay and snapback in the Tevatron quadrupoles are also presented.

  14. Measurements of field decay and snapback effect on Tevatron dipole and quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velev, G.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Annala, G.; Bauer, P.; Carcagno, R.; DiMarco, J.; Glass, H.; Hanft, R.; Kephart, R.; Lamm, M.; Martens, M.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.

    2005-01-01

    Since the beginning of 2002 an intensive measurement program has been performed at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF) to understand dynamic effects in Tevatron magnets. Based on the results of this program a new correction algorithm was proposed to compensate for the decay of the sextupole field during the dwell at injection and for the subsequent field ''snapback'' during the first few seconds of the energy ramp. Beam studies showed that the new correction algorithm works better than the original one, and improves the Tevatron efficiency by at least 3%. The beam studies also indicated insufficient correction during the first 6s of the injection plateau where an unexpected discrepancy of 0.15 sextupole units of extra drift was observed. This paper reports on the most recent measurements of the Tevatron dipoles field at the beginning of the injection plateau. Results on the field decay and snapback in the Tevatron quadrupoles are also presented

  15. Measurements of Field Decay and Snapback Effect on Tevatron Dipole and Quadrupole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Velev, Gueorgui; Annala, Gerald; Bauer, Pierre; Carcagno, Ruben H; Di Marco, Joseph; Glass, Henry; Hanft, Ray; Kephart, Robert; Lamm, Michael J; Martens, Michael A; Schlabach, Philip; Sylvester, C D; Tartaglia, M; Tompkins, John

    2005-01-01

    Since the beginning of 2002 an intensive measurement program has been performed at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility to understand dynamic effects in the Tevatron magnets. Based on the results of this program a new correction algorithm was proposed to compensate for the decay of the sextupole field during the dwell at injection and for the subsequent field "snapback" during the first few seconds of the energy ramp. Beam studies showed that the new correction algorithm works better than the original one, and improves the Tevatron efficiency by at least 3%. The beam studies also indicated insufficient correction during the first 20 s of the injection plateau where an unexpected discrepancy of 0.15 sextupole units of extra drift was observed. This paper reports on the most recent measurements of the Tevatron dipoles field at the beginning of the injection plateau. Results on the field decay and snapback in the Tevatron quadrupoles are also presented.

  16. ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS OF SINGULAR ISOTHERMAL QUADRUPOLE LENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Zhe; Lin, W. P.; Yang Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Using an analytical method, we study the singular isothermal quadrupole (SIQ) lens system, which is the simplest lens model that can produce four images. In this case, the radial mass distribution is in accord with the profile of the singular isothermal sphere lens, and the tangential distribution is given by adding a quadrupole on the monopole component. The basic properties of the SIQ lens have been studied in this Letter, including the deflection potential, deflection angle, magnification, critical curve, caustic, pseudo-caustic, and transition locus. Analytical solutions of the image positions and magnifications for the source on axes are derived. We find that naked cusps will appear when the relative intensity k of quadrupole to monopole is larger than 0.6. According to the magnification invariant theory of the SIQ lens, the sum of the signed magnifications of the four images should be equal to unity, as found by Dalal. However, if a source lies in the naked cusp, the summed magnification of the left three images is smaller than the invariant 1. With this simple lens system, we study the situations where a point source infinitely approaches a cusp or a fold. The sum of the magnifications of the cusp image triplet is usually not equal to 0, and it is usually positive for major cusps while negative for minor cusps. Similarly, the sum of magnifications of the fold image pair is usually not equal to 0 either. Nevertheless, the cusp and fold relations are still equal to 0 in that the sum values are divided by infinite absolute magnifications by definition.

  17. Quenching of spin-flip quadrupole transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castel, B.; Blunden, P.; Okuhara, Y.

    1985-01-01

    An increasing amount of experimental data indicates that spin-flip quadrupole transitions exhibit quenching effects similar to those reported earlier in (p,n) reactions involving l = 0 and l = 1 transitions. We present here two model calculations suggesting that the E2 spin-flip transitions are more affected than their M1 and M3 counterparts by the tensor and spin-orbit components of the nuclear force and should exhibit the largest quenching. We also review the experimental evidence corroborating our observations

  18. Quadrupole interaction studies of Hg in Sb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, J.C.; Krien, K.; Herzog, P.; Folle, H.R.; Freitag, K.; Reuschenbach, F.; Reuschenbach, M.; Trzcinski, R.

    1978-01-01

    Time differential perturbed angular correlation and nuclear orientation studies of the electric quadrupole interaction for Hg in Sb have been performed. The effective field gradients at room temperature and below 0.05K have been derived. These two values are no indication for an anomalous temperature dependence of the effective field gradient for Hg in Sb. The value of the electric field gradient fits well into the systematics for Hg in other hosts. It is shown that the electronic enhancements of the field gradients are correlated to the valence of the impurities and are rather insensitive to the host properties. (orig./HPOE) [de

  19. Precise calculations of the deuteron quadrupole moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Franz L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Recently, two calculations of the deuteron quadrupole moment have have given predictions that agree with the measured value to within 1%, resolving a long-standing discrepancy. One of these uses the covariant spectator theory (CST) and the other chiral effective field theory (cEFT). In this talk I will first briefly review the foundations and history of the CST, and then compare these two calculations with emphasis on how the same physical processes are being described using very different language. The comparison of the two methods gives new insights into the dynamics of the low energy NN interaction.

  20. Quadrupole Transfer Function for Emittance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Peter; Jansson, Andreas; Tan, Cheng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    Historically the use of the quadrupole moment measurement has been impeded by the requirement for large dynamic range, as well as measurement sensitivity to beam position. We investigate the use of the transfer function technique [1-3] in combination with the sensitivity and 160dB revolution line rejection of the direct diode detection analog front end [4] to open the possibility of an emittance diagnostic that may be implemented without operational complication, quasi- parasitic to the operation of existing tune measurement systems. Such a diagnostic would be particularly useful as an emittance monitor during acceleration ramp development in machines like RHIC and the LHC.

  1. Fast storage of nuclear quadrupole resonance signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anferov, V.P.; Molchanov, S.V.; Levchun, O.D.

    1988-01-01

    Fast multichannel storage of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals is described. Analog-to-digital converter, arithmetic-logical unit, internal memory device (IMD) selection-storage unit and control unit are the storage main units. The storage is based on 43 microcircuits and provides for record and storage of NQR-signals at the contributed operation with Mera-60 microcomputer. Time of analog-to-digital conversion and signal recording into IMD is ∼ 1 mks. Capacity of analog-to-digital converter constitutes 8-10 bits. IMD capacity is 4 K bitsx16. Number of storage channels is 4

  2. Electron tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Motohiro [Hamamatsu, JP; Fukasawa, Atsuhito [Hamamatsu, JP; Arisaka, Katsushi [Los Angeles, CA; Wang, Hanguo [North Hills, CA

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  3. Chest tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... Be careful there are no kinks in your tube. The drainage system should always sit upright and be placed ...

  4. The launching and propagation of drift waves in a steady-state plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandeman, J.; Elliott, J.A.; Sutcliffe, M.; Rusbridge, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    The UMIST linear quadrupole GOLUX is a steady-state device in which hydrogen plasma is continuously injected axially, at one end, from an external duoplasmatron source. The electron temperature in the drift wave region is about 1 eV, and the density about 10 15 m -3 . Self-excited intrinsic drift modes are observed in the shared flux region of GOLUX, forming a broad band between 30 and 50 kHz. Drift waves may also be launched into the system, by passing an AC current through the plasma between the two flag antennae. These coherent launched waves present a powerful means of studying drift wave phenomena. We obtain information about the launched wave by detecting both density and potential fluctuations, using a small cylindrical Langmuir probe and lock-in amplifier techniques. Scanning the probe in the longitudinal (z) direction yields the spatial variation of amplitude and phase with respect to the launching signal; the ratio of the wave potential, extrapolated back to the probe, to the launching current gives the launching impedance, a measure of the effectiveness of the launching process. (author) 5 refs., 6 figs

  5. Correlations of drift velocity for gas-liquid two-phase flow in rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Isao; Matsuura, Keizo; Serizawa, Akimi

    2004-01-01

    A new correlation was developed for the drift velocity for low inlet liquid flux in rod bundle. Based on authors' previous analysis of drift velocity for large diameter pipe, an analysis was made on the drift velocity in rod bundle. It is assumed that the large bubble of which size is several subchannel diameter behaves as slug bubble. Under this assumption, it becomes very important how to define equivalent diameter for rod bundle. In view of physical consideration of slug bubble behavior and previous analysis, an equivalent diameter based on the wetted perimeter was found to be most appropriate. Using this equivalent diameter, experimental data of drift velocity in rod bundle were correlated with dimensional analysis. It was found out that for small diameter (dimensionless diameter less than 48) drift velocity increased with square root of diameter which is same dependency of ordinary slug flow correlation. For larger diameter (dimensionless diameter is more than 48), drift velocity is almost constant and same as that of dimensionless diameter of 48. The physical meaning of this result was considered to be the instability of interface of large slug bubble. The density ratio between gas and liquid and viscosity of liquid phase were found to be the main parameters which affect the drift velocity. This is physically reasonable because density ratio is related to the buoyancy force and liquid viscosity is related to shear force near solid wall. The experimental data were correlated by density ratio and dimensionless liquid viscosity. The obtained dimensionless correlation for the drift velocity in rod bundle successfully correlated experimental data for various rod bundles (equivalent diameters), pressures, liquid fluxes etc. It is also consistent with the drift flux correlation for round tube. (author)

  6. Variable high gradient permanent magnet quadrupole (QUAPEVA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteau, F.; Ghaith, A.; N'Gotta, P.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Valléau, M.; Kitegi, C.; Loulergue, A.; Vétéran, J.; Sebdaoui, M.; André, T.; Le Bec, G.; Chavanne, J.; Vallerand, C.; Oumbarek, D.; Cosson, O.; Forest, F.; Jivkov, P.; Lancelot, J. L.; Couprie, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Different applications such as laser plasma acceleration, colliders, and diffraction limited light sources require high gradient quadrupoles, with strength that can reach up to 200 T/m for a typical 10 mm bore diameter. We present here a permanent magnet based quadrupole (so-called QUAPEVA) composed of a Halbach ring and surrounded by four permanent magnet cylinders. Its design including magnetic simulation modeling enabling us to reach 201 T/m with a gradient variability of 45% and mechanical issues are reported. Magnetic measurements of seven systems of different lengths are presented and confirmed the theoretical expectations. The variation of the magnetic center while changing the gradient strength is ±10 μm. A triplet of QUAPEVA magnets is used to efficiently focus a beam with large energy spread and high divergence that is generated by a Laser Plasma Acceleration source for a free electron laser demonstration and has enabled us to perform beam based alignment and control the dispersion of the beam.

  7. LHC interaction region quadrupole cryostat design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, T.H.; Darve, Ch.; Huang, Y.; Page, T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The cryostat of a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Interaction Region (IR) quadrupole magnet consists of all components of the inner triplet except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, to house all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be able to be manufactured at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course of their expected operating lifetime. This paper describes the current LHC IR inner triplet quadrupole magnet cryostats being designed and manufactured at Fermilab as part of the US-LHC collaboration, and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems

  8. Measurement of the positron-drift time relation of a high-pressure drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruefert, W.

    1989-04-01

    As a test of its performance, the measurement of the drift time versus drift distance relation of a high pressure drift chamber using cosmic rays is described. Two multiwire proportional chambers, mounted above and below the detector, are used to define the track of the cosmic particle in the drift chamber. The drift chamber is read out by FADCs (Flash Analog to Digital Converter), and the drift time is determined from the FADC signals by the DOS- (Difference Of Samples) method. The measured drift time versus drift distance relation showed good agreement with the relation, which is expected from the spatial dependence of the electric field and the dependence of the drift velocity on this field. (orig.) [de

  9. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution. (orig.)

  10. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, H J

    1987-09-15

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution.

  11. Drift waves in a stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Sedlak, J.E.; Similon, P.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Ross, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    We investigate the eigenmode structure of drift waves in a straight stellarator using the ballooning mode formalism. The electrons are assumed to be adiabatic and the ions constitute a cold, magnetized fluid. The effective potential has an overall parabolic envelope but is modulated strongly by helical ripples along B. We have found two classes of solutions: those that are strongly localized in local helical wells, and those that are weakly localized and have broad spatial extent. The weakly localized modes decay spatially due to the existence of Mathieu resonances between the periods of the eigenfunction and the effective potential

  12. Kinetic theory of drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, G.

    1988-01-01

    The linear stability of the electrostatic drift waves in slab geometry has been studied analytically and numerically. The effects of magnetic field with shear, of the finite Larmor radius, of an electron streaming, of a temperature gradient and of collisions have been retained. The analytical solution has been obtained using the matched asymptotic expansion technique, and an expression for the critical streaming parameter has been derived. Finally, assuming that the transport in the Reversed Field Pinches is dominated by this instability, a scaling law for the temperature in such machine is derived

  13. Experimental work on drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.; Duran, I.; Gonzalez, E.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Olmos, P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental work made on drift chambers is described in two chapters. In the firt chapter we present the description of the experimental installation used, as well as some details on the data adquisition systems and the characteristics on three ways used for calibration proposes (cosmic muons, β radiation and test beam using SPS at CERN facilities). The second chapter describes the defferent prototypes studied. The experimental set up and the analysis are given. Some results are discussed. The magnetic field effect is also studied. (Author)

  14. Drift vortices in continuous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernousenko, V.M.; Chernenko, I.V.; Chernyshenko, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    The work is devoted to investigation into the problems of large-scale cortex drift and generation in continuous media based on the solution of notably non-linear differential equations. Using the capability of the modern computer technique it is possible to consider a series of cases with regard to medium viscosity and its inhomogeneity and with regard to three-dimensional vortex nature. Based on the solutions obtained the large-scale steady-state vortex generation processes are considered. The results can be used when studying non-linear phenomena in plasma and processes of substance and energy transfer in non-equilibrium media. 16 refs.; 5 figs

  15. Fe/sup 57/ polarimetry based on quadrupole interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonser, U; Sakai, H; Keune, W [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (F.R. Germany). Fachbereich Angewandte Physik

    1976-01-01

    A quadrupole Fe/sup 57/ polarimeter consisting of single crystals of LiNbO/sub 3/:Co/sup 57/ as source (polarizer) and of FeCO/sub 3/ (siderite) as absorber (analyzer) is described. The quadrupole interactions of the two materials are nearly equal in magnitude but opposite in sign and in addition the asymmetry parameter eta equal approximately 0.

  16. Large permanent magnet quadrupoles for an electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herb, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    We have built large high quality permanent magnet quadrupoles for use as interaction region quadrupoles in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring where they must operate in the 10 kG axial field of the CLEO experimental detector. We describe the construction and the magnetic measurement and tuning procedures used to achieve the required field quality and stability. (orig.)

  17. Fifth-order aberrations in magnetic quadrupole-octupole systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    Explicit integral expressions are given for the fifth-order geometrical aberration coefficients in rectilinear magnetic quadrupole-octupole systems used for the transport of nonrelativistic charged particle beams. The numerical values of the fifth-order geometrical aberration coefficients for a rare earth cobalt (REC) quadrupole doublet are given as an example. 26 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Computation of a quadrupole magnet for the APS storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, L.R.; Kim, S.H.; Thompson, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    The storage ring of the Advanced Photon Source will include 400 quadrupole magnets for focusing the beam. A prototype quadrupole has been designed, constructed, and measured. This paper describes the two- and three-dimensional (2-D and 3-D) field computations performed for this design. 2 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschke, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly

  20. photomultiplier tubes

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  1. photomultiplier tube

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  2. Double-photoionization of helium including quadrupole radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ludlow, J A [AUBURN UNIV; Lee, Teck - Ghee [AUBURN UNIV; Pindzola, M S [AUBURN UNIV; Robicheaux, F [AUBURN UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Non-perturbative time-dependent close-coupling calculations are carried out for the double photoionization of helium including both dipole and quadrupole radiation effects. At a photon energy of 800 eV, accessible at CUlTent synchrotron light sources, the quadrupole interaction contributes around 6% to the total integral double photoionization cross section. The pure quadrupole single energy differential cross section shows a local maxima at equal energy sharing, as opposed to the minimum found in the pure dipole single energy differential cross section. The sum of the pure dipole and pure quadrupole single energy differentials is insensitive to non-dipole effects at 800 eV. However, the triple differential cross section at equal energy sharing of the two ejected electrons shows strong non-dipole effects due to the quadrupole interaction that may be experimentally observable.

  3. Rescuing the nonjet (NJ azimuth quadrupole from the flow narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trainor Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the flow narrative commonly applied to high-energy nuclear collisions a cylindrical-quadrupole component of 1D azimuth angular correlations is conventionally denoted by quantity υ2 and interpreted to represent elliptic flow. Jet angular correlations may also contribute to υ2 data “nonflow” depending on the method used to calculate υ2, but 2D graphical methods are available to insure accurate separation. The nonjet (NJ quadrupole has various properties inconsistent with a flow interpretation, including the observation that NJ quadrupole centrality variation in A-A collisions has no relation to strongly-varying jet modication (“jet quenching” in those collisions commonly attributed to jet interaction with a flowing dense medium. In this presentation I describe isolation of quadrupole spectra from pt-differential υ2(pt data from the RHIC and LHC. I demonstrate that quadrupole spectra have characteristics very different from the single-particle spectra for most hadrons, that quadrupole spectra indicate a common boosted hadron source for a small minority of hadrons that “carry” the NJ quadrupole structure, that the narrow source-boost distribution is characteristic of an expanding thin cylindrical shell (strongly contradicting hydro descriptions, and that in the boost frame a single universal quadrupole spectrum (Lévy distribution on transverse mass mt accurately describes data for several hadron species scaled according to their statistical-model abundances. The quadrupole spectrum shape changes very little from RHIC to LHC energies. Taken in combination those characteristics strongly suggest a unique nonflow (and nonjet QCD mechanism for the NJ quadrupole conventionally represented by υ2.

  4. Rescuing the nonjet (NJ) azimuth quadrupole from the flow narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Thomas A.

    2017-04-01

    According to the flow narrative commonly applied to high-energy nuclear collisions a cylindrical-quadrupole component of 1D azimuth angular correlations is conventionally denoted by quantity υ2 and interpreted to represent elliptic flow. Jet angular correlations may also contribute to υ2 data "nonflow" depending on the method used to calculate υ2, but 2D graphical methods are available to insure accurate separation. The nonjet (NJ) quadrupole has various properties inconsistent with a flow interpretation, including the observation that NJ quadrupole centrality variation in A-A collisions has no relation to strongly-varying jet modication ("jet quenching") in those collisions commonly attributed to jet interaction with a flowing dense medium. In this presentation I describe isolation of quadrupole spectra from pt-differential υ2(pt) data from the RHIC and LHC. I demonstrate that quadrupole spectra have characteristics very different from the single-particle spectra for most hadrons, that quadrupole spectra indicate a common boosted hadron source for a small minority of hadrons that "carry" the NJ quadrupole structure, that the narrow source-boost distribution is characteristic of an expanding thin cylindrical shell (strongly contradicting hydro descriptions), and that in the boost frame a single universal quadrupole spectrum (Lévy distribution) on transverse mass mt accurately describes data for several hadron species scaled according to their statistical-model abundances. The quadrupole spectrum shape changes very little from RHIC to LHC energies. Taken in combination those characteristics strongly suggest a unique nonflow (and nonjet) QCD mechanism for the NJ quadrupole conventionally represented by υ2.

  5. Drift-time measurement electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, M.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the construction was to improve the time resolution without using the facility of time stretching, to have a fast read-out possibility, and to be still cheaper in price in comparison to other systems. A possibility was thus foreseen for using the firm Fairchild. These integrated circuits (IC) have, for example, a propagation delay of 0.75 ns for a gate. One can expect therefore less time jitter and less time difference between the different inputs. Furthermore this IC offers a greater flexibility and therefore the number of ICs decreases and distances become smaller. Working with clock frequencies up to 166.6 MHz is easily possible without running into timing problems. On the other hand, to make full use of the advantages of this IC, it was necessary to build the print as a multilayer. The only risk could be in the use of a completely new product. A further aim was to build for this system a second type of drift-time module with a short time range for measuring drift time and pulse length in rotated multiwire proportional chambers. A brief outline of the specifications of the different modules is given in table 1. (Auth.)

  6. The large cylindrical drift chamber of TASSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, H.; Fischer, H.M.; Hartmann, H.; Loehr, B.; Wollstadt, M.; Fohrmann, R.; Schmueser, P.; Cassel, D.G.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.

    1980-03-01

    We have built and operated a large cylindrical drift chamber for the TASSO experiment at the DESY storage ring, PETRA. The chamber has a length of 3.5 m, a diameter of 2.5 m, and a total of 2340 drift cells. The cells are arranged in 15 concentric layers such that tracks can be reconstructed in three dimensions. A spatial resolution of 220 μm has been achieved for tracks of normal incidence on the drift cells. (orig.)

  7. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  8. Electron injection in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Castoldi, A.; Vacchi, A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports the first successful results of a simple MOS structure to inject electrons at a given position in Silicon Drift Detectors. The structure allows on-line calibration of the drift velocity of electrons within the detector. The calibration is a practical method to trace the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. Several of these injection structures can be implemented in silicon drift detectors without additional steps in the fabrication process. 5 refs., 11 figs

  9. Cooling tower drift: comprehensive case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laulainen, N.S.; Ulanski, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive experiment to study drift from mechanical drift cooling towers was conducted during June 1978 at the PG and E Pittsburg Power Plant. The data from this study will be used for validation of drift deposition models. Preliminary results show the effects of tower geometry and orientation with respect to the wind and to single- or two-tower operation. The effect of decreasing relative humidity during a test run can also be seen

  10. Quench Protection of SC Quadrupole Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, S.; Bossert, R.; Dimarco, J.; Mitchell, D.; Lamm, M. J.; Limon, P. J.; Mazur, P.; Nobrega, F.; Orris, D.; Ozelis, J. P.; Strait, J. B.; Tompkins, J. C.; Zlobin, A. V.; McInturff, A. D.

    1997-05-01

    The energy stored in a superconducting accelerator magnet is dissipated after a quench in the coil normal zones, heating the coil and generating a turn to turn and coil to ground voltage drop. Quench heaters are used to protect the superconducting magnet by greatly increasing the coil normal zone thus allowing the energy to be dissipated over a larger conductor volume. Such heaters will be required for the Fermilab/LBNL design of the high gradient quads (HGQ) designed for the LHC interaction regions. As a first step, heaters were installed and tested in several Tevatron low-β superconducting quadrupoles. Experimental studies in normal and superfluid helium are presented which show the heater-induced quench response as a function of magnet excitation current, magnet temperature and peak heater energy density.

  11. Isabelle dipole and quadrupole coil configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.F.; Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    The coil configurations of the ISABELLE dipole and quadrupole magnets have been reviewed and a number of improvements were suggested for incorporation into the final design. The coil designs are basically single layer multiple block approximations to cosine current distributions, wound from a high aspect ratio non-keystoned braided conductor. The blocks are separated by knife-edge wedges to maximize the quench propagation velocity. The current density variation is obtained by an appropriate distribution of the spacer turns and, to a lesser degree, by the wedge locations. The use of inert turns is necessary to minimize the peak field enhancement both in the ends and in the two dimensional section. Schemes for deriving turns distributions yielding harmonic coefficients satisfying the stringent ISABELLE tolerances on field uniformity, while allowing for simplicity in winding and taking into account quench propagation considerations, will be discussed, as well as our approach to the coil end configuration

  12. An improved integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, S.R.

    1987-10-05

    An improved radio frequency quadrupole is provided having an elongate housing with an elongate central axis and top, bottom and two side walls symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes formed integrally with the walls, the vanes each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls, and the vanes integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane passing through the tip of the vane, the walls having flat mounting surfaces at right angles to and parallel to the control plane, respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other. 4 figs.

  13. Radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.; Stokes, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is a new linear accelerator concept in which rf electric fields are used to focus, bunch, and accelerate the beam. Because the RFQ can provide strong focusing at low velocities, it can capture a high-current dc ion beam from a low-voltage source and accelerate it to an energy of 1 MeV/nucleon within a distance of a few meters. A recent experimental test at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has confirmed the expected performance of this structure and has stimulated interest in a wide variety of applications. The general properties of the RFQ are reviewed and examples of applications of this new accelerator are presented

  14. Commissioning results of the HZB quadrupole resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kleindienst, Raphael; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Recent cavity results with niobium have demonstrated the necessity of a good understanding of both the BCS and residual resistance. For a complete picture and comparison with theory, it is essential that one can measure the RF properties as a function of field, temperature, frequency and ambient magnetic field. Standard cavity measurements are limited in their ability to change all parameters freely and in a controlled manner. On the other hand, most sample measurement setups operate at fairly high frequency, where the surface resistance is always BCS dominated. The quadrupole resonator, originally developed at CERN, is ideally suited for characterization of samples at typical cavity RF frequencies. We report on a modified version of the QPR with improved RF figures of merit for high-field operation. Experimental challenges in the commissioning run and alternate designs for simpler sample changes are shown alongside measurement results of a large grain niobium sample.

  15. TOUTATIS: A radio frequency quadrupole code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romuald Duperrier

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A cw high power linear accelerator can only work with very low particle losses and structure activation. At low energy, the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ is an accelerator element that is very sensitive to losses. To design this structure, a good understanding of the beam dynamics is required. Generally, the reference code PARMTEQM is enough to design the accelerator. TOUTATIS has been written with the goals of cross-checking results and obtaining more reliable dynamics. This paper relates the different numerical methods used in the code. It is time based, using multigrids methods and adaptive mesh for a fine description of the forces without being time consuming. The field is calculated through a Poisson solver and the vanes are fully described, allowing it to properly simulate the coupling gaps and the RFQs extremities. Theoretical and experimental tests are also described and show a good agreement between simulations and reference cases.

  16. Experimental investigation of quadrupole virtual photon spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouffon, P.

    1986-01-01

    To test experimentally the quadrupole virtual photon spectrum calculation, the (e,α) excitation function of an isolated 2 + level at 20.14 MeV in 24 Mg was measured. The most recent calculations in DWBA, including nuclear size effects, are compared to this experimental curve. The differential cross section d 2 σ/dΩdE was measured 48 0 , 90 0 , 132 0 in the laboratory system, for total electron energies of 20.0, 20.8, 21.5, 24.0, 26.0, 28.0, 30.0, 32.0, 36.0, and 40.0 MeV. The reduced matrix element B(E2) of the 20,14 MeV level is extracted as a secondary product of this work. (author) [pt

  17. Drift Compression and Final Focus for Intense Heavy Ion Beams with Non-periodic, Time-dependent Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Qin; Davidson, Ronald C.; Barnard, John J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2005-01-01

    In the currently envisioned configurations for heavy ion fusion, it is necessary to longitudinally compress the beam bunches by a large factor after the acceleration phase. Because the space-charge force increases as the beam is compressed, the beam size in the transverse direction will increase in a periodic quadrupole lattice. If an active control of the beam size is desired, a larger focusing force is needed to confine the beam in the transverse direction, and a non-periodic quadrupole lattice along the beam path is necessary. In this paper, we describe the design of such a focusing lattice using the transverse envelope equations. A drift compression and final focus lattice should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. This is difficult with a fixed lattice, because different slices of the beam may have different perveance and emittance. Four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of drift compression to focus the entire pulse onto the sam e focal spot. Drift compression and final focusing schemes are developed for a typical heavy ion fusion driver and for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) being designed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory

  18. Matter-wave solitons supported by quadrupole-quadrupole interactions and anisotropic discrete lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Rong-Xuan; Huang, Nan; Li, Huang-Wu; He, He-Xiang; Lü, Jian-Tao; Huang, Chun-Qing; Chen, Zhao-Pin

    2018-04-01

    We numerically and analytically investigate the formations and features of two-dimensional discrete Bose-Einstein condensate solitons, which are constructed by quadrupole-quadrupole interactional particles trapped in the tunable anisotropic discrete optical lattices. The square optical lattices in the model can be formed by two pairs of interfering plane waves with different intensities. Two hopping rates of the particles in the orthogonal directions are different, which gives rise to a linear anisotropic system. We find that if all of the pairs of dipole and anti-dipole are perpendicular to the lattice panel and the line connecting the dipole and anti-dipole which compose the quadrupole is parallel to horizontal direction, both the linear anisotropy and the nonlocal nonlinear one can strongly influence the formations of the solitons. There exist three patterns of stable solitons, namely horizontal elongation quasi-one-dimensional discrete solitons, disk-shape isotropic pattern solitons and vertical elongation quasi-continuous solitons. We systematically demonstrate the relationships of chemical potential, size and shape of the soliton with its total norm and vertical hopping rate and analytically reveal the linear dispersion relation for quasi-one-dimensional discrete solitons.

  19. Construction update and drift velocity calibration for the CLAS drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestayer, M.D.; Barbosa, F.J.; Bonneau, P.; Burtin, E.; Christo, S.; Doolittle, G.; Dytman, S.A.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Hyde-Wright, C.E.; Klein, A.; Kossov, M.V.; Kuhn, S.E.; Magahiz, R.; Miskimen, R.A.; Murphy, L.Y.; O'Meara, J.E.; Pyron, T.D.; Qin, L.; Raue, B.A.; Schumacher, R.A.; Tuzel, W.; Weinstein, L.B.; Yegneswaran, A.

    1995-01-01

    We briefly describe the drift chamber system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, concentrating on the method which will be used to calibrate the drift velocity function. We identify key features of the function which should apply to any small-cell drift chamber geometry in which the cathode and anode surfaces are wires. Using these ideas, we describe a simple method to compensate for variations in the drift velocity function due to environmental changes. (orig.)

  20. Construction update and drift velocity calibration for the CLAS drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestayer, M.D. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Barbosa, F.J. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bonneau, P. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Burtin, E. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Christo, S. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Doolittle, G. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dytman, S.A. [University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, PA (United States); Gilfoyle, G.P. [University of Richmond, Richmond, VA (United States); Hyde-Wright, C.E. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Klein, A. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Kossov, M.V. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Kuhn, S.E. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Magahiz, R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Miskimen, R.A. [University of Massachussetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Murphy, L.Y. [CE Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); O`Meara, J.E. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Pyron, T.D. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Qin, L. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Raue, B.A. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Schumacher, R.A. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tuzel, W. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weinstein, L.B. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Yegneswaran, A. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1995-12-11

    We briefly describe the drift chamber system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, concentrating on the method which will be used to calibrate the drift velocity function. We identify key features of the function which should apply to any small-cell drift chamber geometry in which the cathode and anode surfaces are wires. Using these ideas, we describe a simple method to compensate for variations in the drift velocity function due to environmental changes. (orig.).

  1. Electron drift time in silicon drift detectors: A technique for high precision measurement of electron drift mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Rehak, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a precise absolute measurement of the drift velocity and mobility of electrons in high resistivity silicon at room temperature. The electron velocity is obtained from the differential measurement of the drift time of an electron cloud in a silicon drift detector. The main features of the transport scheme of this class of detectors are: the high uniformity of the electron motion, the transport of the signal electrons entirely contained in the high-purity bulk, the low noise timing due to the very small anode capacitance (typical value 100 fF), and the possibility to measure different drift distances, up to the wafer diameter, in the same semiconductor sample. These features make the silicon drift detector an optimal device for high precision measurements of carrier drift properties. The electron drift velocity and mobility in a 10 kΩ cm NTD n-type silicon wafer have been measured as a function of the electric field in the range of possible operation of a typical drift detector (167--633 V/cm). The electron ohmic mobility is found to be 1394 cm 2 /V s. The measurement precision is better than 1%. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  2. Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.; Tsang, C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to

  3. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shagalov, A.G.; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2017-01-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined...... on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear...... waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes....

  4. Single wire drift chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krider, J.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the design and prototype tests of single wire drift chambers to be used in Fermilab test beam lines. The goal is to build simple, reliable detectors which require a minimum of electronics. Spatial resolution should match the 300 μm rms resolution of the 1 mm proportional chambers that they will replace. The detectors will be used in beams with particle rates up to 20 KHz. Single track efficiency should be at least 99%. The first application will be in the MT beamline, which has been designed for calibration of CDF detectors. A set of four x-y modules will be used to track and measure the momentum of beam particles

  5. Drift effects in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koclas, J.; Roy, R.; Marleau, G.

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion equation is an approximation to the transport equation which relies on the validity of Fick's law. Since this law is not explicitly integrated in the transport equation it can only be derived approximately using homogenization theories. However, such homogenization theories state that when the cell is not symmetric Fick's law breaks down due to the presence of an additional term to the neutron current, called the drift term. In fact, this term can be interpreted as a transport correction to Fick's law which tends to increase the neutron current in a direction opposite to that specified by the flux gradient. In this paper, we investigate how the presence of asymmetric liquid zone controllers will modify the flux distribution inside a CANDU core. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Cease, H. [Fermilab; Jaskierny, W. F. [Fermilab; Markley, D. [Fermilab; Pahlka, R. B. [Fermilab; Balakishiyeva, D. [Florida U.; Saab, T. [Florida U.; Filipenko, M. [Erlangen - Nuremberg U., ECAP

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  7. Design of the LINAC4 Transfer Line Quadrupole Electromagnets

    CERN Document Server

    Vanherpe, L

    2013-01-01

    Beam focusing in the various segments of the Linac4 Transfer Line is provided by quadrupole electromagnets. In total seventeen pulsed, air-cooled quadrupole electromagnets are required. They are made of laminated electrical steel yokes and coils wound from solid copper wire. All magnets have an aperture radius of 50 mm and are required to provide an integrated field gradient of 1.8 T over a magnetic length of 300 mm. This design report summarizes the main magnetic, electrical and mechanical design parameters of the Linac4 Transfer Line Quadrupole Magnets. The effect of the vacuum chamber on the magnetic field quality and the field delay is studied.

  8. Development of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for Heavy Ion Drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Manahan, R; Lietzke, A F

    2001-09-10

    Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is exploring a promising path to a practical inertial-confinement fusion reactor. The associated heavy ion driver will require a large number of focusing quadrupole magnets. A concept for a superconducting quadrupole array, using many simple racetrack coils, was developed at LLNL. Two, single-bore quadrupole prototypes of the same design, with distinctly different conductor, were designed, built, and tested. Both prototypes reached their short sample currents with little or no training. Magnet design, and test results, are presented and discussed.

  9. Energy drift in reversible time integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, R I; Perlmutter, M

    2004-01-01

    Energy drift is commonly observed in reversible integrations of systems of molecular dynamics. We show that this drift can be modelled as a diffusion and that the typical energy error after time T is O(√T). (letter to the editor)

  10. TBV 361 RESOLUTION ANALYSIS: EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ORIENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.; Kicker, D.C.; Sellers, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this To Be Verified/To Be Determined (TBX) resolution analysis is to release ''To Be Verified'' (TBV)-361 related to the emplacement drift orientation. The system design criterion in ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9) specifies that the emplacement drift orientation relative to the dominant joint orientations should be at least 30 degrees. The specific objectives for this analysis include the following: (1) Collect and evaluate key block data developed for the repository host horizon rock mass. (2) Assess the dominant joint orientations based on available fracture data. (3) Document the maximum block size as a function of drift orientation. (4) Assess the applicability of the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion in the ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9). (5) Consider the effects of seepage on drift orientation. (6) Verify that the viability assessment (VA) drift orientation complies with the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion, or provide justifications and make recommendations for modifying the VA emplacement drift layout. In addition to providing direct support to the System Description Document (SDD), the release of TBV-361 will provide support to the Repository Subsurface Design Department. The results from this activity may also provide data and information needs to support the MGR Requirements Department, the MGR Safety Assurance Department, and the Performance Assessment Organization

  11. Silicon drift detectors, present and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, J.; Bellwied, R.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Caines, H.; Chen, W.; Dyke, H.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Humanic, T.; Kotov, I.; Kuczewski, P.; Leonhardt, W.; Li, Z.; Lynn, D.; Minor, R.; Munhoz, M.; Ott, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Schambach, J.; Soja, R.; Sugarbaker, E.; Willson, R. M.

    2001-04-01

    Silicon drift detectors provide unambiguous two-dimensional position information for charged particle detection with a single detector layer. A large area silicon drift detector was developed for the inner tracking detector of the STAR experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we discuss the lessons learned and the future prospects of this technology.

  12. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.W. Su; T.J. Kneafsey

    2006-01-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rock mass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming the existence of the drift shadow have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow--and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sand mine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rock mass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content using a gravimetric technique, as well as analyzed for chemistry. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift

  13. Role of drifts in diffusive shock acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The role played by shock-associated drifts during the diffusive acceleration of charged particles at collisionless MHD shocks is evaluated. In the rest frame of the shock, the total energy gained by a particle is shown to result from two coupled acceleration mechanisms, the usual first-order Fermi mechanism and the drift mechanism. When averaged over a distribution of particles, the ratio of the drift-associated energy gain to the total energy is found to be independent of the total energy at a given theta1 (the angle between the shock normal and the unperturbed upstream magnetic field) in agreement with theoretical predictions. No evidence is found for drift-associated deceleration, suggesting that drifts always augment acceleration. 35 references

  14. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, K.; Okamura, S.

    2002-10-01

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  15. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, K.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Nakajima, N.; Itoh, S.-I.; Neilson, G.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Rewoldt, G.

    2003-01-01

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  16. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Sun

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c)

  17. Dissipative drift instability in dusty plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Das

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been done on the very low-frequency electrostatic drift waves in a collisional dusty plasma. The dust density gradient is taken perpendicular to the magnetic field B0⃗, which causes the drift wave. In this case, low-frequency drift instabilities can be driven by E1⃗×B0⃗ and diamagnetic drifts, where E1⃗ is the perturbed electric field. Dust charge fluctuation is also taken into consideration for our study. The dust- neutral and ion-neutral collision terms have been included in equations of motion. It is seen that the low-frequency drift instability gets damped in such a system. Both dust charging and collision of plasma particles with the neutrals may be responsible for the damping of the wave. Both analytical and numerical techniques have been used while developing the theory.

  18. Eustachian tube patency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustachian tube patency refers to how much the eustachian tube is open. The eustachian tube runs between the middle ear and the throat. It controls the pressure behind the eardrum and middle ear space. This helps keep ...

  19. Feeding tube - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007235.htm Feeding tube - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A feeding tube is a small, soft, plastic tube placed ...

  20. The Features of Moessbauer Spectra of Hemoglobins: Approximation by Superposition of Quadrupole Doublets or by Quadrupole Splitting Distribution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2004-01-01

    Moessbauer spectra of hemoglobins have some features in the range of liquid nitrogen temperature: a non-Lorentzian asymmetric line shape for oxyhemoglobins and symmetric Lorentzian line shape for deoxyhemoglobins. A comparison of the approximation of the hemoglobin Moessbauer spectra by a superposition of two quadrupole doublets and by a distribution of the quadrupole splitting demonstrates that a superposition of two quadrupole doublets is more reliable and may reflect the non-equivalent iron electronic structure and the stereochemistry in the α- and β-subunits of hemoglobin tetramers.

  1. Three-dimensional simulation studies of 10 MeV, 352.2 MHz drift ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is proposed to build a drift tube Linac (DTL) at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, India, that will form a part of the future Spallation Neutron Source. This DTL will accelerate 30 mA H-ion beam from 3 MeV to 10 MeV. The DTL is designed to operate at 352.2 MHz with a maximum duty cycle of 3%.

  2. Long-drift calorimeter modules for the Soudan 2 nucleon decay detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoftiezer, J.

    1985-01-01

    The first full size 5-ton detector modules for the Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment have been assembled and operated. Modules consist of a hexagonal array of drift tubes and corrugated steel, instrumented to read out three-dimensional track positions and pulse height. These will be assembled to form an isotropic, continuously sensitive, self-triggering detector. Details of the design, construction, operation and performance of the modules are discussed. 7 refs., 10 figs

  3. Tube holding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    A tube holding rig is described for the lateral support of tubes arranged in tight parcels in a heat exchanger. This tube holding rig includes not less than two tube supporting assemblies, with a space between them, located crosswise with respect to the tubes, each supporting assembly comprising a first set of parallel components in contact with the tubes, whilst a second set of components is also in contact with the tubes. These two sets of parts together define apertures through which the tubes pass [fr

  4. PRINCIPLE OF SKEW QUADRUPOLE MODULATION TO MEASURE BETATRON COUPLING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUO, Y.; PILAT, F.; ROSER, T.

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of the residual betatron coupling via skew quadrupole modulation is a new diagnostics technique that has been developed and tested at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as a very promising method for the linear decoupling on the ramp. By modulating the strengths of different skew quadrupole families the two eigentunes are precisely measured with the phase lock loop system. The projections of the residual coupling coefficient onto the skew quadrupole coupling modulation directions are determined. The residual linear coupling could be corrected according to the measurement. An analytical solution for skew quadrupole modulation based on Hamiltonian perturbation approximation is given, and simulation code using smooth accelerator model is also developed. Some issues concerning the practical applications of this technique are discussed

  5. The giant quadrupole resonance in highly excited rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civitarese, O.; Furui, S.; Ploszajczak, M.; Faessler, A.

    1983-01-01

    The giant quadrupole resonance in highly excited, fast rotating nuclei is studied as a function of both the nuclear temperature and the nuclear angular momentum. The photo-absorption cross sections for quadrupole radiation in 156 Dy, 160 Er and 164 Er are evaluated within the linear response theory. The strength functions of the γ-ray spectrum obtained from the decay of highly excited nuclear states by deexcitation of the isoscalar quadrupole mode show a fine structure, which depends on the temperature T, the angular momentum I and the deformation of the nucleus β. The splitting of the modes associated with the signature-conserving and signature-changing components of the quadrupole field is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Beam-based alignment of C-shaped quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portmann, G.; Robin, D.

    1998-06-01

    Many storage rings have implemented a method of finding the positional offset between the electrical center of the beam position monitors (BPM) and the magnetic center of the adjacent quadrupole magnets. The algorithm for accomplishing this is usually based on modulating the current in the quadrupole magnet and finding the beam position that minimizes the orbit perturbation. When the quadrupole magnet is C-shaped, as it is for many light sources, the modulation method can produce an erroneous measurement of the magnetic center in the horizontal plane. When the current in a C-shaped quadrupole is changed, there is an additional dipole component in the vertical field. Due to nonlinearities in the hysteresis cycle of the C-magnet geometry, the beam-based alignment technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) deviated horizontally by .5 mm from the actual magnetic center. By modifying the technique, the offsets were measured to an accuracy of better than 50 microm

  7. Semimicroscopic description of the giant quadrupole resonances in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurchev, G.; Malov, L.A.; Nesterenko, V.O.; Soloviev, V.G.

    1976-01-01

    The calculation results of the giant quadrupole isoscalar and isovector resonances performed within the random phase approximation are represented. The strength functions for E2-transitions are calculated for doubly even deformed nuclei in the regions 150 (<=) A < 190 and 228 (<=) A < 248 in the energy interval (0-40) MeV. The following integral characteristics of giant quadrupole resonances are obtained: the position, widths, the contribution to the energy weighted sum rule and the contribution to the total cross section of photoabsorption. The calculations have shown that giant quadrupole resonances are common for all the considered nuclei. The calculated characteristics of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance agree with the available experimental data. The calculations also show that the semimicroscopic theory can be successfully applied for the description of giant multipole resonances

  8. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming its existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, and ground

  9. Nuclear quadrupole interactions in ferroelectric compounds of HF181

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunzler, J.V.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of nuclear quadrupole interaction constants in perovkite-type compounds of PbHfO 3 , SnhfO 3 , CaHfO 3 e SrHfO 3 have been performed using the perturbed angular correlation technique. A range of fundamental frequencies from 150 to 550 Megaradians persecond was determined. The variation of quadrupole constants has been discussed through the molecular orbital theory

  10. Relaxation of quadrupole orientation in an optically pumped alkali vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu, E; Tornos, J

    1985-04-01

    The relaxation of quadrupole orientation (alignment) in an optically pumped alkali vapour is theoretically studied by taking into account the relaxation processes by alkali-buffer gas, alkali-alkali with spin exchange and alkali-cell wall (diffusion process) collisions. The relaxation transients of the quadrupole orientation are obtained by introducing a first-order weak-pumping approximation (intermediate pumping) less restrictive than the usually considered (zeroth order) one.

  11. Quadrupole moment of the superdeformed band in 131Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Y.; Godfrey, M.J.; Jenkins, I.; Kirwan, A.J.; Nolan, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    A mean lifetime measurement has been carried out on the states in the superdeformed band found in 131 Ce using the Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM). The measured intrinsic nuclear quadrupole moment is Q o approx= 6 eb, assuming constant deformation, which corresponds to a quadrupole deformation β 2 approx= 0.35. This is considerably smaller than the value deduced for 132 Ce. (author)

  12. Waferscale Electrostatic Quadrupole Array for Multiple Ion Beam Manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vinayakumar, K. B.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Ji, Q.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Ardanuc, S.; Lal, A.

    2018-01-01

    We report on the first through-wafer silicon-based Electrostatic Quadrupole Array (ESQA) to focus high energy ion beams. This device is a key enabler for a wafer based accelerator architecture that lends itself to orders-of-magnitude reduction in cost, volume and weight of charged particle accelerators. ESQs are a key building block in developing compact Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator (MEQALAC) [1]. In a MEQALAC electrostatic forces are used to focus ions, and elec...

  13. Ellipsoidal universe can solve the cosmic microwave background quadrupole problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, L; Cea, P; Tedesco, L

    2006-09-29

    The recent 3 yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data have confirmed the anomaly concerning the low quadrupole amplitude compared to the best-fit Lambda-cold dark matter prediction. We show that by allowing the large-scale spatial geometry of our universe to be plane symmetric with eccentricity at decoupling or order 10(-2), the quadrupole amplitude can be drastically reduced without affecting higher multipoles of the angular power spectrum of the temperature anisotropy.

  14. A drift chamber with a new type of straws for operation in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorskiy, N.; Glonti, L.; Gusakov, Yu.; Elsha, V.; Enik, T.; Kakurin, S.; Kekelidze, V.; Kislov, E.; Kolesnikov, A.; Madigozhin, D.; Movchan, S.; Polenkevich, I.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Samsonov, V.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Sotnikov, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Danielsson, H.; Bendotti, J.; Degrange, J.; Dixon, N.; Lichard, P.; Morant, J.; Palladino, V.; Gomez, F. Perez; Ruggiero, G.; Vergain, M.

    2016-07-01

    A 2150×2150 mm2 registration area drift chamber capable of working in vacuum is presented. Thin-wall tubes (straws) of a new type are used in the chamber. A large share of these 9.80 mm diameter drift tubes are made in Dubna from metalized 36 μm Mylar film welded along the generatrix using an ultrasonic welding machine created at JINR. The main features of the chamber and some characteristics of the drift tubes are described. Four such chambers with the X, Y, U, V coordinates each, containing 7168 straws in total, are designed and produced at JINR and CERN. They are installed in the vacuum volume of the NA62 setup in order to study the ultra-rare decay K+ →π+ vv bar and to search for and study rare meson decays. In autumn 2014 the chambers were used for the first time for the data taking in the experimental run of the NA62 at CERN's SPS.

  15. Two qubits in pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, G.B.; Goren, S.D.; Meerovich, V.M.; Sokolovsky, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown theoretically that by the use of two radio-frequency fields of the same resonance frequency but with the different phases and directions the degeneracy of the energy spectrum of a spin system with I=3/2 is removed. This leads to four non-degenerate spin states which can be used as a platform for quantum computing. The feasibility of quantum computing based on a pure (without DC magnetic fields) nuclear quadrupole resonance technique is investigated in detail. Various quantum logic gates can be constructed by using different excitation techniques allowing different manipulations with the spin system states. Three realizations of quantum logic gates are considered: the application of an additional magnetic field with the resonance frequency, the amplitude modulation of one of the applied RF fields by the resonance frequency field, and the level-crossing method. It is shown that the probabilities of the resonance transitions depend on the method of excitation and on the direction of the excitation field. Feasibility of quantum computing is demonstrated with the examples of constructing a controlled-NOT logic gate using the resonance excitation technique and SWAP and NOT2 logic gates using the level-crossing method. (author)

  16. Quadrupole collectivity in {sup 128}Cd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boenig, Esther Sabine

    2014-07-07

    The regions around shell closures, especially around doubly magic nuclei, are of major interest in nuclear structure physics, as they provide a perfect test for nuclear structure theory. The neutron-rich Cd isotopes in the region of {sup 132}Sn are only two protons away from the shell closure at Z=50 and in close proximity to the N=82 magic number. Nevertheless they show an irregular behaviour regarding the excitation energy of the first excited 2{sup +} state. This is not reproduced by shell model calculations, which is astonishing due to the proximity of the shell closures. In order to shed light on the much discussed region around doubly magic {sup 132}Sn, a Coulomb excitation experiment of {sup 128}Cd has been performed at REX-ISOLDE, CERN. The reduced transition strength B(E2;0{sup +}{sub gs} → 2{sup +}{sub 1}), which is a measure of collectivity, and the spectroscopic quadrupole moment Q{sub s}(2{sup +}{sub 1}) as a measure of deformation could be determined for the first time. The results are shown as the continuation of already measured neutron-rich Cd isotopes and are compared to both beyond mean field and shell model calculations, which give different predictions for these observables.

  17. Drift stabilizer for reciprocating free-piston devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, William C.; Corey, John A.; Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-20

    A free-piston device has a stabilized piston drift. A piston having a frequency of reciprocation over a stroke length and with first and second sides facing first and second variable volumes, respectively, for containing a working fluid defining an acoustic wavelength at the frequency of reciprocation. A bypass tube waveguide connects the first and second variable volumes at all times during reciprocation of the piston. The waveguide has a relatively low impedance for steady flow and a relatively high impedance for oscillating flow at the frequency of reciprocation of the piston, so that steady flow returns fluid leakage from about the piston between the first and second volumes while oscillating flow is not diverted through the waveguide. Thus, net leakage about the piston is returned during each stroke of the piston while oscillating leakage is not allowed and pressure buildup on either the first or second side of the piston is avoided to provide a stable piston location.

  18. Drift-modeling and monitoring comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Hanna, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    Congress is looking into the conglomeration of nuclear reactors into energy centers of limited area. Drift from cooling towers can corrode and damage structures in the immediate vicinity of the towers, cause a public nuisance if located near parking lots or high-density traffic areas, and endanger local vegetation. The estimation of salt deposition has relied primarily on predictions from a variety of models, with very few direct measurements. One of the major efforts in our program is to evaluate the assumptions, limitations, and applicabilities of various analytical models for drift deposition prediction. Several drift deposition models are compared using a set of standard input conditions. The predicted maximum drift deposition differs by two orders of magnitude, and the downwind locations of the maximum differ by one order of magnitude. The discrepancies are attributed mainly to different assumptions in the models regarding the initial effective height of the droplets. Current programs in which drift characteristics at the tower mouth and drift deposition downwind of the tower are being measured are summarized. At the present time, drift deposition measurements, sufficiently comprehensive for model verifications, are unavailable. Hopefully, the Chalk Point Program will satisfy this need

  19. Seepage into drifts with mechanical degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2002-01-01

    Seepage into drifts in unsaturated tuff is an important issue for the long-term performance of the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Drifts in which waste packages will potentially be emplaced are subject to degradation in the form of rockfall from the drift ceiling induced by stress relief, seismic, or thermal effects. The objective of this study is to calculate seepage rates for various drift-degradation scenarios and for different values of percolation flux for the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and the Topopah Spring lower lithophysal (Tptpll) units. Seepage calculations are conducted by (1) defining a heterogeneous permeability model on the drift scale that is consistent with field data, (2) selecting calibrated parameters associated with the Tptpmn and Tptpll units, and (3) simulating seepage on detailed degraded-drift profiles, which were obtained from a separate rock mechanics engineering analysis. The simulation results indicate (1) that the seepage threshold (i.e., the percolation flux at which seepage first occurs) is not significantly changed by drift degradation, and (2) the degradation-induced increase in seepage above the threshold is influenced more by the shape of the cavity created by rockfall than the rockfall volume

  20. Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Theory With Polarization Drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Hahm, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    A set of the electrostatic toroidal gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and the Poisson equation, which explicitly includes the polarization drift, is derived systematically by using Lie-transform method. The polarization drift is introduced in the gyrocenter equations of motion, and the corresponding polarization density is derived. Contrary to the wide-spread expectation, the inclusion of the polarization drift in the gyrocenter equations of motion does not affect the expression for the polarization density significantly. This is due to modification of the gyrocenter phase-space volume caused by the electrostatic potential [T. S. Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4658 (1996)].

  1. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  2. Computer controlled drifting of Si(Li) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, D.A.; Wong, Y.K.; Walton, J.T.; Goulding, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    A relatively inexpensive computer-controlled system for performing the drift process used in fabricating Si(Li) detectors is described. The system employs a small computer to monitor the leakage current, applied voltage and temperature on eight individual drift stations. The associated computer program initializes the drift process, monitors the drift progress and then terminates the drift when an operator set drift time has elapsed. The improved control of the drift with this system has been well demonstrated over the past three years in the fabrication of a variety of Si(Li) detectors. A few representative system responses to detector behavior during the drift process are described

  3. Practical acoustic thermometry with twin-tube and single-tube sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Podesta, M.; Sutton, G.; Edwards, G.; Stanger, L.; Preece, H. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Accurate measurement of high temperatures in a nuclear environment presents unique challenges. All secondary techniques inevitably drift because the thermometric materials in thermocouples and resistance sensors are sensitive not just to temperature, but also their own chemical and physical composition. The solution is to use primary methods that rely on fundamental links between measurable physical properties and temperature. In the nuclear field the best known technique is the measurement of Johnson Noise in a resistor (See Paper 80 at this conference). In this paper we describe the measurement of temperature in terms of the speed of sound in a gas confined in a tube - an acoustic waveguide. Acoustic thermometry is the most accurate technique of primary thermometry ever devised with the best uncertainty of measurement below 0.001 C. In contrast, the acoustic technique described in this work has a much larger uncertainty, approximately 1 deg. C. But the cost and ease of use are improved by several orders of magnitude, making implementation eminently practical. We first describe the basic construction and method of operation of thermometers using twin-tubes and single tubes. We then present results using a twin-tube design showing that showing long term stability (i.e. no detectable drift) at 700 deg. C over periods of several weeks. We then outline how the technique may be developed for different nuclear applications. (authors)

  4. Bender/Coiler for Tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Easy-to-use tool makes coils of tubing. Tubing to be bend clamped with stop post. Die positioned snugly against tubing. Operator turns handle to slide die along tubing, pushing tubing into spiral groove on mandrel.

  5. Unintended Positional Drift and Its Potential Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    many users unintentionally move forward while walking in place. We refer to this phenomenon accidental movement as Unintended Positional Drift. The poster presents evidence of the phenomenon's existence and subsequently discusses different design solutions which potentially could circumvent the problem....

  6. CROSS DRIFT ALCOVE/NICHE UTILITIES ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Goodin

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide the design basis and general arrangement requirements of the non-potable water, waste water, compressed air and ventilation (post excavation) utilities required in support of the Cross Drift alcoves and niches

  7. Travelling fronts in stochastic Stokes’ drifts

    KAUST Repository

    Blanchet, Adrien; Dolbeault, Jean; Kowalczyk, Michał

    2008-01-01

    By analytical methods we study the large time properties of the solution of a simple one-dimensional model of stochastic Stokes' drift. Semi-explicit formulae allow us to characterize the behaviour of the solutions and compute global quantities

  8. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, J.L.V.

    2003-01-01

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects

  9. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Tsang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  10. Ponderomotive modification of drift tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquijo, G.; Singh, R.; Sen, A.

    1997-01-01

    The linear characteristics of drift tearing modes are investigated in the presence of a significant background of radio-frequency (RF) waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The ponderomotive force, arising from the radial gradients in the RF field energy, is found to significantly modify the inner layer solutions of the drift tearing modes. It can have a stabilizing influence, even at moderate RF powers, provided the field energy has a decreasing radial profile at the mode rational surface. (author)

  11. Unstable universal drift eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chen, L.

    1980-01-01

    The eigenmode equation describing ballooning collisionless drift instabilities is analyzed both analytically and numerically. A new branch of eigenmodes, which corresponds to quasi-bound states due to toroidal coupling effects such as ion delB drifts, is shown to be destabilized by electron Landau damping for typical tokamak parameters. This branch cannot be understood by the strong coupling approximation. However, the slab-like (Pearlstein--Berk-type) branch is found to remain stable and experience enhanced shear damping

  12. Effects of Fault Displacement on Emplacement Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, F.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate potential effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts, including drip shields and waste packages emplaced in emplacement drifts. The output from this analysis not only provides data for the evaluation of long-term drift stability but also supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) process model report (PMR) and Disruptive Events Report currently under development. The primary scope of this analysis includes (1) examining fault displacement effects in terms of induced stresses and displacements in the rock mass surrounding an emplacement drift and (2 ) predicting fault displacement effects on the drip shield and waste package. The magnitude of the fault displacement analyzed in this analysis bounds the mean fault displacement corresponding to an annual frequency of exceedance of 10 -5 adopted for the preclosure period of the repository and also supports the postclosure performance assessment. This analysis is performed following the development plan prepared for analyzing effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts (CRWMS M and O 2000). The analysis will begin with the identification and preparation of requirements, criteria, and inputs. A literature survey on accommodating fault displacements encountered in underground structures such as buried oil and gas pipelines will be conducted. For a given fault displacement, the least favorable scenario in term of the spatial relation of a fault to an emplacement drift is chosen, and the analysis is then performed analytically. Based on the analysis results, conclusions are made regarding the effects and consequences of fault displacement on emplacement drifts. Specifically, the analysis will discuss loads which can be induced by fault displacement on emplacement drifts, drip shield and/or waste packages during the time period of postclosure

  13. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  14. Theoretical investigation of flute modes in a magnetic quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    This research developed theories and conducted numerical investigations of electrostatic flute modes in a plasma confined in a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter I presents the discussion of relevant background. Chapter II contains a brief discussion of the basic flute-mode operator L 0 for intermediate- and low-frequency regimes. Chapter III develops a simple theory for a flute mode with frequency between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in the uniform density and temperature regions of a magnetic quadrupole. The frequency is predicted to be inversely proportional to the wave number. Chapter IV describes the kinetic approach. Chapter V contains the derivation of an eigenvalue equation for electrostatic waves with frequencies below the ion frequency in the private flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VI develops a theory for electrostatic waves with frequency below the ion bounce frequency in the shared flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VII contains the derivation of a dispersion equation for flute modes with frequencies between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in a plasma confined to a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VIII presents a summary of the research described

  15. MEQALAC: (multiple electrostatic quadrupole linac): a new approach to low beta rf acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobley, R.M.; Brodowski, J.J.; Gammel, G.M.; Keane, J.T.; Maschka, A.W.; Sanders, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    MEQALAC is an acronym for a multiple-beam electrostatic-quadrupole array linear accelerator. The principle of operation is very simple. It makes use of the fact that electrostatic quadrupoles focus more effectively at low velocities than conventional magnetic quadrupoles. Moreover, the pole-tip field of an electrostatic quadrupole is limited by field emission of electrons, and is not a function of the size of the quadrupole. Conventional magnetic quadrupoles, on the other hand, require increasingly high current densities if one attempts to scale to smaller size

  16. Strong drifts effects on neoclassical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessarotto, M.; Gregoratto, D.; White, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that strong drifts play an important role in plasma equilibrium, stability and confinement A significant example concerns, in particular for tokamak plasmas, the case of strong toroidal differential rotation produced by E x B drift which is currently regarded as potentially important for its influence in equilibrium, stability and transport. In fact, theoretically, it has been found that shear flow can substantially affect the stability of microinstabilities as well modify substantially transport. Recent experimental observations of enhanced confinement and transport regimes in Tokamaks, show, however, evidence of the existence of strong drifts in the plasma core. These are produced not only by the radial electric field [which gives rise to the E x B drift], but also by density [N s ], temperature [T s ] and mass flow [V = ωRe var-phi , with e var-phi the toroidal unit vector, R the distance for the symmetry axis of the torus and ω being the toroidal angular rotation velocity] profiles which are suitably steep. This implies that, in a significant part of the plasma core, the relevant scale lengths of the gradients [of N s , T s , ω], i.e., respectively L N , L T and L ω can be as large as the radial scale length characterizing the banana orbits, L b . Interestingly enough, the transport estimates obtained appear close or even lower than the predictions based on the simplest neoclassical model. However, as is well known, the latter applies, in a strict sense only in the case of weak drifts and also ignoring even the contribution of shear flow related to strong E x B drift. Thus a fundamental problem appears the extension of neoclassical transport theory to include the effect of strong drifts in Tokamak confinement systems. The goal of this investigation is to develop a general formulation of neoclassical transport embodying such important feature

  17. Variable-field permanent-magnet quadrupole for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Martinez, R.P.; Meyer, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    A set of compact variable-field permanent-magnet quadrupoles have been designed, fabricated, and tested for use in the SSC linac matching section. The quadrupoles have 24 mm-diameter apertures and 40 mm-long poles. The hybrid (permanent-magnet and iron) design, uses a fixed core of magnet material (NdFeB) and iron (C-1006) surrounded by a rotating ring of the same magnet material and iron. The quadrupole gradient-length product can be smoothly varied from a minimum of 0.7 T up to a maximum of 4.3 T by a 90 degree rotation of the outer ring of iron and magnet material

  18. Collisional damping of giant monopole and quadrupole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, S.; Gokalp, A.; Yilmaz, O.; Ayik, S.

    2001-01-01

    Collisional damping widths of giant monopole and quadrupole excitations for 120 Sn and 208 Pb at zero and finite temperatures are calculated within Thomas-Fermi approximation by employing the microscopic in-medium cross-sections of Li and Machleidt and the phenomenological Skyrme and Gogny forces, and are compared with each other. The results for the collisional widths of giant monopole and quadrupole vibrations at zero temperature as a function of the mass number show that the collisional damping of giant monopole vibrations accounts for about 30 - 40% of the observed widths at zero temperature, while for giant quadrupole vibrations it accounts for only 20 - 30% of the observed widths at zero temperature. (orig.)

  19. Mechanical Design of a Second Generation LHC IR Quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.; Bartlett, S.E.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Lietzke, A.F.; McInturff, A.D.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    One of the proposed options to increase the LHC luminosity is the replacement of the existing inner triplets at the Interaction Regions with new low-beta larger aperture quadrupoles operating at the same gradient. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is carrying out preliminary studies of a large-bore Nb 3 Sn quadrupole. The mechanical design presents a support structure based on the use of keys and bladders without self-supporting collars. This technology has been proven effective in several successful common coil Nb 3 Sn dipoles built at LBNL, and it is for the first time applied to a cos(2(var t heta)) design. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the quadrupole mechanical behavior, demonstrating the possibility of delivering, through this method, well-controlled coil precompression during assembly, cool-down and excitation. The study has been performed with the finite element program ANSYS

  20. Development of LHC-IR model quadrupoles in the US

    CERN Document Server

    Sabbi, G

    2007-01-01

    Insertion quadrupoles with large aperture and high gradient are required to achieve the luminosity upgrade goal of 1035 cm-2 s-1 at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In 2004, the US Department of Energy established the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) to develop a technology base for the upgrade. The focus of the magnet program, which is a collaboration of three US laboratories, BNL, FNAL and LBNL, is on development of high gradient quadrupoles using Nb$_{3}$Sn in order to operate at high field and with sufficient temperature margin. Other program components address issues regarding magnet design, radiation-hard materials, long magnet scale-up, quench protection, fabrication techniques and conductor and cable R&D. This paper reports on the development od model quadrupoles and outlines the long-term goals of the program.

  1. Variable-field permanent magnet quadrupole for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Martinez, R.P.; Meyer, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    A set of compact variable-field permanent-magnet quadrupoles have been designed, fabricated, and tested for use In the SSC linac matching section. The quadrupoles have 24 mm-diameter apertures and 40 mm-long poles. The hybrid (permanent-magnet and iron) design, uses a fixed core of magnet material (NdFeB) and iron (C-1006) surrounded by a rotating ring of the same magnet material and iron. The quadrupole gradient-length product can be smoothly varied from a minimum of 0.7 T up to a maximum, of 4.3 T by a 90 degrees rotation of the outer ring of iron and magnet material

  2. Quadrupole interactions in pionic and muonic tantalum and rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijn, J.; Doesburg, W. van; Ewan, G.T; Johansson, T.; Tibell, G.

    1981-01-01

    The hyperfine splitting of pionic and muonic X-rays in natural Re has been studied using the known ratio (accurate to 1.6 parts in 10 5 ) of the quadrupole moments of the two naturally occurring 185 Re and 187 Re isotopes. From the hyperfine splitting of the 5g → 4f and 4f → 3d pionic X-rays the effective quadrupole hyperfine constants were determined to be 187 A 2 sup(e)sup(f)sup(f) (4f) = 1.163 +- 0.010 keV and 187 A 2 sup(e)sup(f)sup(f) (3d) = 5.39 +- 0.63 keV, giving strong interaction quadrupole shifts epsilon 2 (4f) = 46 +- 10 eV and epsilon 2 (3d) = 1.3 +- 0.6 keV. The strong interaction monopole shifts epsilon 0 and widths GAMMA 0 of the 5g, 4f and 3d levels have also been measured. For the two higher orbits, standard optical-potential calculations fit the measured shifts and widths quite well. The observed deeper-lying 3d state, however, has shifts and widths that differ by a factor of 2 or more from the predictions. From the measured quadrupole hyperfine constants of the 4f level we calculate the spectroscopic quadrupole moments to be 187 Qsup(μ) = 2.09 +- 0.04 b, 187 Qsup(π) = 2.07 +- 0.02 b, 185 Qsup(μ) = 2.21 +- 0.04 b, and 185 Qsup(π) = 2.18 +- 0.02 b. In addition, muonic X-rays from 181 Ta were observed; using the same methods for determining the quadrupole moments as above, a value of 181 Qsup(μ) = 3.28 +- 0.06 b was obtained, in good agreement with earlier published data. (orig.)

  3. Single nozzle spray drift measurements of drift reducing nozzles at two forward speeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallinga, H.; Zande, van de J.C.; Michielsen, J.G.P.; Velde, van P.

    2016-01-01

    In 2011‒2012 single nozzle field experiments were carried out to determine the effect of different flat fan spray nozzles of the spray drift reduction classes 50, 75, 90 and 95% on spray drift at two different forward speeds (7.2 km h-1 and 14.4 km h-1). Experiments were performed with a single

  4. A low cost support post for SSC quadrupole magnets and other cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, M.W.; Kunz, R.J.; Lehmann, G.A.; Nilles, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    An injection molded support post has been designed and tested for use in the cryostat of the 5.4 meter long SSC Collider Quadrupole Magnet (CQM). This glass reinforced thermoplastic support is less costly than the complex alternative post designs that consist of filament wound tubes with thermal shrink fit metallic end pieces. The near net shape injection molding process delivers customized components at production rates suitable for present and proposed large scale cryogenic projects such as large accelerators, SMES, and Maglev. In addition, standard shapes (plates, tubes, threaded rods, and fasteners) comprised of this composite are available as catalog items. This paper presents the design considerations, material testing, and validation of predicted structural performance through component testing. Test results reported herein include compressive strength validations as well as previously unreported creep, thermal conductivity, and thermal contraction data. A delineated reliability method is discussed for verifying compliance with apportioned reliability targets using a synthesis of the FEA and test data. Also the design approach and data presented here can be extended toward the design of low cost mass produced supports for other cryogenic applications

  5. Polarization of very cold neutron using a permanent magnet quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Tamaki, E-mail: tyosioka@post.kek.j [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Mishima, Kenji; Ino, Takashi; Taketani, Kaoru; Muto, Suguru; Morishima, Takahiro; Shimizu, Hirohiko M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Oku, Takayuki; Suzuki, Junichi; Shinohara, Takenao; Sakai, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sato, Hiromi; Hirota, Katsuya; Otake, Yoshie [RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hino, Masahiro [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Seki, Yoshichika [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Yamada, Masako [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ichikawa, Masahiro [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    For the future fundamental physics experiments by using cold neutrons, we are developing a device which can measure the neutron polarization degree by accuracy significantly below 10{sup -3}. A quadrupole magnet is one of the promising candidate to measure the neutron polarization degree by such extremely high precision. We have performed a polarization experiment by using the quadrupole magnets at the Very Cold Neutron (VCN) port of the PF-2 in the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL). As a result, we obtained the polarization degree P with very high accuracy P=0.9994{+-}0.0001(stat.){+-}0.0003(syst.), which meet our requirement significantly.

  6. Nuclear quadrupole relaxation and viscosity in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmacher, W.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the nuclear quadrupole relaxation rate due to the molecular motions in liquid metals is related to the shear and bulk viscosity and hence to the absorption coefficient of ultrasound. Application of the 'extended liquid phonon' model of Ortoleva and Nelkin - which is the third of a series of continued-fraction-approximations for the van Hove neutron scattering function - gives a relation to the self diffusion constant. The predictions of the theory concerning the temperature dependence are compared with quadrupole relaxation measurements of Riegel et al. and Kerlin et al. in liquid gallium. Agreement is found only with the data of Riegel et al. (orig.) [de

  7. High and ulta-high gradient quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunk, W.O.; Walz, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    Small bore conventional dc quadrupoles with apertures from 1 to 2.578cm were designed and prototypes built and measured. New fabrication techniques including the use of wire electric discharge milling (EDM) to economically generate the pole tip contours and aperture tolerances are described. Magnetic measurement data from a prototype of a 1cm aperture quadrupole with possible use in future e + /e - super colliders are presented. At a current of 400A, the lens achieved a gradient of 2.475 T/cm, and had an efficiency of 76.6%

  8. Characterization and tuning of ultrahigh gradient permanent magnet quadrupoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Becker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of quadrupole devices with high field gradients and small apertures requires precise control over higher order multipole field components. We present a new scheme for performance control and tuning, which allows the illumination of most of the quadrupole device aperture because of the reduction of higher order field components. Consequently, the size of the aperture can be minimized to match the beam size achieving field gradients of up to 500  T m^{-1} at good imaging quality. The characterization method based on a Hall probe measurement and a Fourier analysis was confirmed using the high quality electron beam at the Mainz Microtron MAMI.

  9. Conceptual design of a quadrupole magnet for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    eRHIC is a proposed upgrade to the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which would allow collisions of up to 21 GeV polarized electrons with a variety of species from the existing RHIC accelerator. eRHIC employs an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and an FFAG lattice for the arcs. The arcs require open-midplane quadrupole magnets of up to 30 T/m gradient of good field quality. In this paper we explore initial quadrupole magnet design concepts based on permanent magnetic material which allow to modify the gradient during operation.

  10. Dynamical quadrupole structure factor of frustrated ferromagnetic chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Hiroaki

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the dynamical quadrupole structure factor of a spin-1/2 J1-J2 Heisenberg chain with competing ferromagnetic J1 and antiferromagnetic J2 in a magnetic field by exploiting density-matrix renormalization group techniques. In a field-induced spin nematic regime, we observe gapless excitations at q = π according to quasi-long-range antiferro-quadrupole correlations. The gapless excitation mode has a quadratic form at the saturation, while it changes into a linear dispersion as the magnetization decreases.

  11. Quadrupole photoionization of endohedral Xe-C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govil, Karan; Deshmukh, P C

    2009-01-01

    The effect of an endohedral confinement on the quadrupole photoionization of atomic Xe is studied using the relativistic random phase approximation (RRPA). The atom's confinement is modelled by placing atomic Xe at the centre of a C 60 cage represented by an annular potential around it. A new confinement resonance is reported in the 4p quadrupole cross-section along with 'correlation confinement resonances' in 4d, 5s and 5p photoionizations at about 185 eV. The effect of the confinement on the non-dipole photoelectron angular distribution parameter γ is also reported.

  12. Calculation of the quadrupole-lense fringing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzumanov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    With the aim of decreasing the scattering field effect at electrode edge or quadrupole lens poles with conformal transformations the scattering fields of electric quadrupole lens, two-electrode lens with the electrodes in a hyperbola form, as well as magnetic lens with hyperbolic poles are calculated. For the two-electrode system with kappa=0.1 (kappa - is coefficient, characterizing the rate of field intensity change in the lens) field distortion equals 1.8%. The comparison of experimental data with the calculation data has shown that with a rather high accuracy the scattering field effect in electric and magnetic lenses with hyperbolic poles may be taken into account

  13. Nb3Sn Quadrupoles Designs For The LHC Upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felice, Helene

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for the LHC luminosity upgrades, high field and large aperture Nb 3 Sn quadrupoles are being studied. This development has to incorporate all the relevant features for an accelerator magnet like alignment and cooling channels. The LARP HQ model is a high field and large bore quadrupole that will meet these requirements. The 2-layer coils are surrounded by a structure based on key and bladder technology with supporting iron yoke and aluminum shell. This structure is aimed at pre-stress control, alignment and field quality. We present here the magnetic and mechanical design of HQ, along with recent progress on the development of the first 1-meter model.

  14. Optical drift effects in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzyński, Mikołaj; Kopiński, Jarosław

    2018-03-01

    We consider the question of determining the optical drift effects in general relativity, i.e. the rate of change of the apparent position, redshift, Jacobi matrix, angular distance and luminosity distance of a distant object as registered by an observer in an arbitrary spacetime. We present a fully relativistic and covariant approach, in which the problem is reduced to a hierarchy of ODE's solved along the line of sight. The 4-velocities and 4-accelerations of the observer and the emitter and the geometry of the spacetime along the line of sight constitute the input data. We build on the standard relativistic geometric optics formalism and extend it to include the time derivatives of the observables. In the process we obtain two general, non-perturbative relations: the first one between the gravitational lensing, represented by the Jacobi matrix, and the apparent position drift, also called the cosmic parallax, and the second one between the apparent position drift and the redshift drift. The applications of the results include the theoretical study of the drift effects of cosmological origin (so-called real-time cosmology) in numerical or exact Universe models.

  15. Drift chamber performance in the field of a superconducting magnet: measurement of the drift angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, G.H.; Sherman, S.; McDonald, K.T.; Smith, A.J.S.; Thaler, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented of the first measurements in a study of drift chamber performance in magnetic fields up to 6 tesla. The angle of the electron drift was measured as a function of electric and magnetic field intensity. It appears that even at the high fields of superconducting magnets (3 to 6 tesla) the drift angle induced by the Lorentz force can be corrected for with tilted electric drift fields and/or the use of Xenon gas. At 3 tesla a drift field tilted at 45 0 with a magnitude of 3.5 kV/cm should restore normal operating conditions. At 4 tesla, a 45 0 tilt field would have a magnitude 5 kV/cm

  16. Large power electron tubes for high frequency heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Tadashi; Sato, Hisaaki.

    1988-01-01

    On the large power electron tubes used for electron cyclotron heating, lower hybrid resonance frequency heating, and ion cyclotron range of frequency heating, namely gyrotron, klystron and quadrupole tube, the features, the present status of development, the construction, the principle and so on are explained. The research and development of gyrotrons are most advanced in USSR, the inventor. The course of the development of gyrotrons in foreign countries and in Japan is described. There are many variants of gyrotrons, for example whispering gallery mode, klystron type, backward wave oscillator type, gyro-peniotron and others. The principle of gyrotrons is explained, and about the examples of the developed gyrotrons, the design parameters are shown. For the purpose of using for the LHRF heating in JT-60, a superlarge power klystron of 1 MW output at 2 GHz frequency, which is the largest class in the world, has been developed. Its total length is 2.7 m, and weight is 1.5 t. It features, construction, function and performance are reported. The trend of large power quadrupole tubes is toward stable action with large power in VHF zone, and the typical products in USA and Europe are shown. (Kako, I.)

  17. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A form of x-ray tube is described which provides satisfactory focussing of the electron beam when the beam extends for several feet from gun to target. Such a tube can be used for computerised tomographic scanning. (UK)

  18. Pressure tube type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komada, Masaoki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the safety of pressure tube type reactors by providing an additional ECCS system to an ordinary ECCS system and injecting heavy water in the reactor core tank into pressure tubes upon fractures of the tubes. Constitution: Upon fractures of pressure tubes, reduction of the pressure in the fractured tubes to the atmospheric pressure in confirmed and the electromagnetic valve is operated to completely isolate the pressure tubes from the fractured portion. Then, the heavy water in the reactor core tank flows into and spontaneously recycles through the pressure tubes to cool the fuels in the tube to prevent their meltdown. By additionally providing the separate ECCS system to the ordinary ECCS system, fuels can be cooled upon loss of coolant accidents to improve the safety of the reactors. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - bolus; G-tube - bolus; Gastrostomy button - bolus; Bard Button - bolus; MIC-KEY - bolus ... KEY, 3 to 8 weeks after surgery. These feedings will help your child grow strong and healthy. ...

  20. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002937.htm Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A gastrostomy feeding tube insertion is the placement of a feeding ...