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Sample records for quadrivalent hpv types

  1. Evaluation of quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine efficacy against cervical and anogenital disease in subjects with serological evidence of prior vaccine type HPV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Sven-Eric; Kjaer, Susanne K; Sigurdsson, Kristján

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In the quadrivalent (types 6/11/16/18) HPV vaccine (GARDASIL((R))/SILGARD((R))) clinical program, 73% of women aged 16-26 were naïve to all vaccine HPV types. In these women, prophylactic administration of the vaccine was highly effective in preventing HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical...

  2. Baseline demographic characteristics of subjects enrolled in international quadrivalent HPV (types 6/11/16/18) vaccine clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavonen, Jorma

    2008-06-01

    In Phase II/III trials, administration of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) (types 6/11/16/18) L1 virus-like-particle vaccine was highly effective in preventing HPV6/11/16/18-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and non-invasive cervical cancer in women aged 16-26 years who were naïve to these HPV types at enrollment. However, the makeup and extent of catch-up vaccination programs among young women is unclear, because a proportion of this population will likely already have been exposed to one or more vaccine-HPV-types. Herein we analyze baseline data from the quadrivalent HPV vaccine clinical trial program to investigate variables which may help shape catch-up vaccine implementation policies. Female adolescents and young adults aged 16-26 years were randomized into five clinical trials. Baseline data regarding demographics, sexual history, pregnancy history, and other characteristics were collected at enrollment. At the baseline gynecological examination during enrollment, specimens were obtained for Pap testing. Swabs of external genital, lateral vaginal, and cervical sites for HPV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing were taken, and serum samples were obtained for HPV serology testing. Regional analyses of data were conducted. Overall, 72% of subjects enrolled worldwide were naïve by both serology and PCR to all four vaccine HPV types. Few subjects were seropositive and/or PCR positive for more than two vaccine-related HPV types. Of all subjects with HSIL at enrollment, 78% were positive to at least one vaccine-related HPV type at enrollment. Regional differences in HPV and STD prevalence were evident. Study limitations included under-representation of women with >/=4 sexual partners and possible underestimation of prior HPV exposure. Our findings demonstrate that sexually active 16-26 year-old women with America, Europe, Latin America, and Asia Pacific are generally naïve to most or all types targeted by the quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine

  3. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  4. Clinical effectiveness and cost effect analysis of quadrivalent HPV vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Lekić, Nataša

    2008-01-01

    1 ABSTRACT Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine- Evaluation of clinical effectiveness and national vaccine programs Author: Nataša Lekić Research Advisor: PharmDr. Lenka Práznovcová, Ph.D. Department of Social and Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové, Charles University in Prague. SUMMARY QUADRIVALENT HPV VACCINE- EVALUATION OF CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS AND NATIONAL VACCINE PROGRAMS Background: Human papillomavirus types 6, 11,16 and 18 cause majority of genital warts an...

  5. Immunological response to quadrivalent HPV vaccine in treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjon Pian Gi, Robin E A; San Giorgi, Michel R M; Pawlita, Michael; Michel, Angelika; van Hemel, Bettien M; Schuuring, Ed M D; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Dikkers, Frederik G

    2016-10-01

    Aim of this study was to explore influence of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Gardasil(®)) on the immune status of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) patients. In retrospective observational study, six RRP patients who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine and whose HPV seroreactivity was measured were included. Multiplex HPV Serology was used to determine HPV-specific antibodies pre- and post-vaccination. Surgical interventions and patient records were analyzed. Five HPV6 and 1 HPV11 infected patient were included. Mean antibody reactivity against the associated HPV type rose from 1125 median fluorescence intensity (MFI) pre-vaccination to 4690 MFI post-vaccination (p immunological increase can cause decrease in number of surgeries.

  6. Safety of the HPV Bivalent and Quadrivalent Vaccines During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forinash, Alicia B; Yancey, Abigail M; Pitlick, Jamie M; Myles, Thomas D

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the safety of the human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in pregnancy. PubMed (1966-August 2010) was searched using the terms human papillomavirus, human papillomavirus vaccine, and pregnancy. References were reviewed for relevant information. All studies including humans that were published in English with data describing HPV vaccine administration in pregnancy were evaluated. Two combined analyses of 7 Phase 3 efficacy trials have retrospectively evaluated the safety of unintentional administration of either the bivalent (n = 1786) or quadrivalent (n = 2085) HPV vaccine during pregnancy. In addition, postmarketing pregnancy registry surveillance data (prospective, n = 787; retrospective, n = 76) for the quadrivalent HPV vaccine have been published. However, only 279 pregnancies from the studies and 90 pregnancies from the registry occurred within 30 days of receiving the vaccination. Overall, the vaccine does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion, fetal malformations, or adverse pregnancy outcomes beyond that found in the general population. Although the data are limited, neither HPV vaccine appears to be associated with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, limitations of the data include small patient populations, minimal to no adjustments for factors known to influence pregnancy outcomes or malformations, and the majority of the available pregnancy data are from retrospective analysis of Phase 3 efficacy trials. Neither HPV vaccine should be routinely administered during pregnancy. If a pregnancy occurs midseries, the remaining vaccines should be given after pregnancy completion. Further studies are required to determine actual risk. © 2011 SAGE Publications.

  7. Immunological response to quadrivalent HPV vaccine in treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon Pian Gi, Robin E. A.; San Giorgi, Michel R. M.; Pawlita, Michael; Michel, Angelika; van Hemel, Bettien M.; Schuuring, Ed M. D.; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Dikkers, Frederik G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to explore influence of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Gardasil(A (R))) on the immune status of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) patients. In retrospective observational study, six RRP patients who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine and whose HPV seroreactivity was

  8. Immunological response to quadrivalent HPV vaccine in treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon Pian Gi, R.E.A.; San Giorgi, M.R.M.; Pawlita, M.; Michel, A.; van Hemel, B.M.; Schuuring, E.M.D.; van den Heuvel, E.R.; van der Laan, B.F.A.M.; Dikkers, F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to explore influence of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Gardasil®) on the immune status of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) patients. In retrospective observational study, six RRP patients who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine and whose HPV seroreactivity was

  9. Estimated health and economic impact of quadrivalent HPV (types 6/11/16/18 vaccination in Brazil using a transmission dynamic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Kosuke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Brazil. We examined the health and economic impacts of quadrivalent HPV vaccination in Brazil. Methods We adapted a previously developed transmission dynamic model to estimate the effectiveness of HPV vaccination on cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 and 3 (CIN2/3, CIN1, and genital warts. We evaluated following vaccination strategies: routine vaccination of 12-year-old girls and routine vaccination in combination with a catch-up vaccination of 12 to 26-year-old women. Results The model projected that the vaccination would reduce the incidence rates of HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical cancer, CIN2/3, CIN1, and female genital warts by 94% to 98% at year 100. Routine vaccination in combination with a catch-up vaccination could prevent approximately 163,000 cases of cervical cancer, 48,000 deaths from cervical cancer, 2.3 million cases of CIN2/3, and 11.4 million genital warts in the next 50 years. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for female vaccination strategies ranged from R$350 to R$720 (US$219 to US$450 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that quadrivalent HPV female vaccination can be a cost-effective public health intervention that can substantially reduce the burden of cervical diseases and genital warts in Brazil.

  10. Focal epithelial hyperplasia by human papillomavirus (HPV)-32 misdiagnosed as HPV-16 and treated with combination of retinoids, imiquimod and quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemigniani, Franco; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ferrer, Berta; García-Patos, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck's disease is a rare, benign and asymptomatic mucosal proliferation associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, mainly with genotypes 13 and 32. We report a florid case of FEH in an 11-year-old Haitian girl with systemic lupus erythematosus receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Cryotherapy was previously performed on numerous occasions with no results. We decided to prescribe a non-invasive and more comfortable treatment. A combination of topical retinoid and imiquimod cream was well tolerated and led to an important improvement. The evidence of infection by HPV-16 detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, prompted us to prescribe the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (types 6, 11,16 and 18). Subsequent PCR sequencing with generic primers GP5-GP6 and further BLAST comparative analysis confirmed that genomic viral sequence in our case truly corresponded with HPV-32. This molecular misdiagnosis can be explained by the similarity between genomic sequences of both HPV-16 and -32 genotypes. At the 1-year follow up, we observed total clinical improvement and no recurrences of the disease. Complete healing in this case may correspond to a potential action of topical retinoid, imiquimod and the cross-protection mechanism of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  11. Early direct and indirect impact of quadrivalent HPV (4HPV) vaccine on genital warts: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Luciano; Vici, Patrizia; Suligoi, Barbara; Checcucci-Lisi, Giovanni; Drury, Rosybel

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, many countries have implemented national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs with the quadrivalent HPV (4HPV) vaccine that has been shown to be efficacious in clinical trials involving 25,000 subjects. Two vaccine serotypes, HPV16 and 18, are responsible for cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers, but the impact of the 4HPV vaccine on these cancers cannot be seen immediately as there is a considerable lag between infection with HPV and cancer development. The other two serotypes, HPV6 and 11, are responsible for genital warts (GWs), which develop within a few months after infection, making GWs an early clinical endpoint for the assessment of the impact of 4HPV vaccination. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed to identify all published studies on 4HPV vaccination, including those that assessed the impact of 4HPV vaccination programs on the incidence of GWs at a population level around the world. A total of 354 records were identified in the PubMed search. After screening and obtaining full papers for 56 publications, 16 publications presenting data on the impact or effectiveness of 4HPV vaccination on GWs were identified. These reported data on the impact or effectiveness of 4HPV in six countries [Australia (n = 6), New Zealand (n = 2), United States (n = 3), Denmark (n = 2), Germany (n = 1), and Sweden (n = 2)]. In Australia, no GWs were diagnosed in women aged <21 years who reported being vaccinated. A 92.6% reduction in GWs incidence was reported for all women in this age group, where the vaccine uptake rate (VUR) was 70% for 3 doses. The highest reductions were reported in countries with high VURs, mostly through school-based vaccination programs, although high VURs were obtained with some non-school-based programs. The results are coherent with the GWs incidence reduction reported in clinical trials and are an early indicator of what can be expected for the long-term clinical impact on vaccine-type HPV

  12. Human Papillomavirus neutralizing and cross-reactive antibodies induced in HIV-positive subjects after vaccination with quadrivalent and bivalent HPV vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faust, Helena; Nielsen, Lars Toft; Sehr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Ninety-one HIV-infected individuals (61 men and 30 women) were randomized to vaccination either with quadrivalent (Gardasil™) or bivalent (Cervarix™) HPV vaccine. Neutralizing and specific HPV-binding serum antibodies were measured at baseline and 12 months after the first vaccine dose. Presence...... of neutralizing and binding antibodies had good agreement (average Kappa for HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 was 0.65). At baseline, 88% of subjects had antibodies against at least one genital HPV. Following vaccination with Cervarix™, all subjects became seropositive for HPV16 and 18. After Gardasil......™ vaccination, 96% of subjects seroconverted for HPV16 and 73% for HPV18. Levels of HPV16-specific antibodies were 10IU in 85% of study subjects after vaccination. Antibodies against non-vaccine HPV types appeared after Gardasil...

  13. Use of the nonavalent HPV vaccine in individuals previously fully or partially vaccinated with bivalent or quadrivalent HPV vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Damme, Pierre; Bonanni, Paolo; Bosch, F Xavier

    2016-01-01

    With the availability of the nonavalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, vaccinees, parents and healthcare providers need guidance on how to complete an immunization course started with the bi- or quadrivalent vaccine and whether to revaccinate individuals who have completed a full immunization...

  14. Impact of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine in Mexican women: public health implications for the region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Pérez, Gonzalo; Cruz-Valdez, Aurelio; Zamilpa, Laura; Aranda-Flores, Carlos; Hernández-Nevarez, Pilar; Viramontes, Jose Luis; Salgado-Hernández, Joaquín; James, Margaret; Lu, Shuang; Sattler, Carlos; Haupt, Richard M; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2009-08-01

    Recognition of human papillomavirus (HPV) as a necessary cause of cervical cancer (CC) led to new perspectives for its control and the demonstration of an effective primary prevention strategy through vaccination. We undertook this study to evaluate the safety, efficacy and immunogenicity of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine in Mexican women. A total of 679 Mexican women between 18 and 23 years old participated in two Phase III double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine. Women were enrolled who tested negative for pregnancy and reported having four or less sexual partners during their lifetime. Vaccine or placebo was administered at day 1, month 2 and month 6. Among Mexican women who were naïve to the respective vaccine type at enrollment, the quadrivalent vaccine was highly efficacious, preventing 100% of HPV6/11/16/18-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3, adenocarcinoma in situ, condyloma and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia. Statistical significance was not reached for every endpoint due to the limited sample size. Vaccination was generally well tolerated and immunogenic. To widely administer the vaccine, collaborative efforts should be coordinated among public, private and local community sectors. In light of the scarce knowledge of many health professionals with respect to the primary prevention of CC, it will be necessary to educate health providers on the advantages and specific recommendations of HPV vaccines and secondary prevention. Decision making should be based on scientific evidence, allowing health professionals to provide an organized social response that supports the universal right to health.

  15. The impact of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV; types 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle vaccine on infection and disease due to oncogenic nonvaccine HPV types in generally HPV-naive women aged 16-26 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Darron R; Kjaer, Susanne K; Sigurdsson, Kristján

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine reduces the risk of HPV-6/11/16/18-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1-3 or adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS). Here, its impact on CIN1-3/AIS associated with nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types was evaluated. METHODS: We enrolled 17......,622 women aged 16-26 years. All underwent cervicovaginal sampling and Pap testing at regular intervals for up to 4 years. HPV genotyping was performed for biopsy samples, and histological diagnoses were determined by a pathology panel. Analyses were conducted among subjects who were negative for 14 HPV...... types on day 1. Prespecified analyses included infection of 6 months' duration and CIN1-3/AIS due to the 2 and 5 most common HPV types in cervical cancer after HPV types 16 and 18, as well as all tested nonvaccine types. RESULTS: Vaccination reduced the incidence of HPV-31/45 infection by 40.3% (95...

  16. The Effect of History of Abnormal Pap Smear or Preceding HPV infection on the Humoral Immune Response to Quadrivalent Human Papilloma virus (qHPV) Vaccine in Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, J Patricia; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Dhar, Renee; Magee, Ardella; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J

    2018-04-30

    To determine if natural human papillomavirus (HPV) infection would induce an anamnestic response to quadrivalent (qHPV) vaccine in women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Thirty four women (19-50 years) with mild to moderate and minimally active or inactive SLE received standard qHPV vaccine. Neutralizing antibody titers to HPV 6, 11, 16 and18 were evaluated pre- and post- vaccine using HPV competitive Luminex Immunoassay. For each HPV type, logistic regressions were performed to explore the relationship between a positive titer at baseline with their final geometric mean titer and with the rise in titer. Fisher's Exact Test was used to assess the association of at least one positive HPV antibody test at baseline and history of abnormal pap. History of abnormal pap smear/cervical neoplasia occurred in 52.9%. Baseline anti HPV antibody titers: 21% = negative for all 4 HPV types, 79% = positive for ≥1 of the HPV types. Statistical analysis showed: those with a history of abnormal pap smear/cervical neoplasia were likely to have a positive anti-HPV antibody result pre-vaccine to ≥ 1 of the 4 types, p = 0.035 Fisher's Exact Test. In general, HPV exposed women showed higher post vaccine GMTs than HPV unexposed women with higher point estimates. However, when examining the rise in titers using logistic regression, there was no evidence of an anamnestic response. Prior HPV infection and cervical neoplasia in SLE are linked with no anamnestic response to HPV vaccine. This supports not checking HPV-antibodies pre-vaccine. Women with SLE should be vaccinated for HPV.

  17. Technology evaluation: HPV vaccine (quadrivalent), Aventis Pasteur MSD/CSL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinis, Milan

    2004-04-01

    CSL, licensee of UniQuest's HPV technology, and Aventis Pasteur MSD (a joint venture between Merck & Co and Aventis) are jointly developing a vaccine for the potential prophylaxis of genital warts and cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus infection. Enrollment for a phase III trial has been completed.

  18. Evaluating the Early Benefit of Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine on Genital Warts in Belgium: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiak-Felden, Geraldine; Gobbo, Corrado; Simondon, François

    2015-01-01

    Genital warts (GWs) are common, with about 5% to 10% of people having at least one episode in their lifetime. They develop about 2–3 months after infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 6 and 11. The prophylactic quadrivalent HPV vaccine (qHPV), protects against HPV6/11 infections and diseases. In Belgium, HPV vaccines started to be reimbursed in 2007 and have been fully reimbursed since December 2008 for women 12 to 18 years old. This study aimed at evaluating the real-life benefit of qHPV vaccine introduction in Belgium on GWs by measuring both vaccine impact (VI) at a population level and the direct effect of the qHPV vaccine at an individual level (vaccine effectiveness (VE)), using data from a large sick-fund (MLOZ) reimbursement database. A first reimbursement for imiquimod (most common first-line GWs treatment in Belgium) was used as a surrogate for a first GWs episode; reimbursement of qHPV vaccine was used as surrogate for vaccination. VI was estimated by comparing the incidence of GWs before and after qHPV vaccine introduction in Belgium (ecologic evaluation). VE was assessed by comparing GWs incidences in vaccinated vs. unvaccinated women, among women eligible for HPV vaccination. VI was evaluated in 9,223,384 person-years. Overall, GWs incidence rates decreased significantly between the pre- and post-vaccination periods (-8.1% (95% CI: -15.3; -0.3) for men and women aged 18–59 years. This decrease was highest in women targeted by the HPV vaccination programme (-72.1% (95% CI: -77.9; -64.7) in women aged 16–22 years, with a 43% vaccine uptake in 2013). A significant decrease was also observed in men aged 16-22 years (-51.1%, 95%CI: -67.6; -26.2), suggesting herd-protection. VE was evaluated in 369,881 person-years. Age-adjusted VE for fully vaccinated women was 88.0% (95% CI: 79.4; 93.0). VE was higher when the first dose was given younger and remained high for over 4 years post-vaccination in all ages. High VI and VE of the qHPV

  19. Evaluation on the persistence of anti-HPV immune responses to the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in Chinese females and males: Up to 3.5 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teng; Liu, Youping; Li, Yanping; Liao, Yuqin; Shou, Qiong; Zheng, Minghuan; Liao, Xueyan; Li, Rongcheng

    2018-03-07

    This was an extension study of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled immunogenicity and safety study of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) (HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18) vaccine conducted in Chinese female subjects aged 9-45 years and male subjects aged 9-15 years. To investigate the persistence of anti-HPV 6, -11, -16, and -18 responses among Chinese subjects, subjects enrolled in the base study were followed up at around month 42 (approximately 3.5 years after vaccination). Among 600 subjects enrolled in the base study, a total of 468 subjects consented for participation in the extension study. Anti-HPV 6, -11, -16, and -18 antibodies were detected by the competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA) and total IgG Luminex immunoassay (IgG LIA). Among the female subjects who received the qHPV vaccine, the proportions of subjects remained seropositive were high with both the cLIA and IgG LIA for HPV type 6, 11, and 16 through approximately 42 months following the first dose vaccination. For HPV 18, the seropositivity rate remained high as 82.0% with the IgG LIA, while it decreased to 53.6% with the cLIA, which was similar to the findings observed in other studies. The seropositivity rates remained high at month 42 for all qHPV types with both the cLIA and IgG LIA among the male subjects. Administration of a 3-dose regimen of qHPV vaccine induces durable anti-HPV 6, anti-HPV 11, anti-HPV 16, and anti-HPV 18 responses among Chinese subjects for at least 3.5 years after vaccination. ClinicalTrials.gov registry:NCT01427777. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The Australian funding debate on quadrivalent HPV vaccine: a case study for the national pharmaceutical policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughead, Elizabeth Ellen; Gilbert, Andrew L; Vitry, Agnes I

    2008-12-01

    To analyse the media and political reactions to the initial decision of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) to reject funding of the quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine in Australia. A case study, informed by media reports and government documents, was utilised to examine the reactions of key stakeholders; PBAC, consumers, consumer organisations, pharmaceutical industry, politicians, health professionals and the media to the initial decision to reject funding of HPV vaccine. The initial decision to reject funding of the HPV vaccine led to unprecedented public response with over 300 newspaper articles and calls by consumers, health professionals and politicians to intervene in the decision making process. Misunderstanding of the decision making process, particularly cost-effectiveness assessments, the need for an independent process, the legislated inability of a timely and transparent response from policy makers and the lack of a risk mitigation strategy all played a role in the public outcry. Despite 15 years of implementation of cost-effectiveness assessments there is still a need for improving stakeholder understanding of the decision making process and for timely transfer of complete information. Risk mitigation strategies should be considered as part of the communication plan for all decisions.

  1. HPV Infections Decrease in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types targeted by the quadrivalent HPV vaccine has declined by nearly two-thirds among teenage girls since HPV vaccination was recommended in the United States.

  2. Sustained Antibody Responses 6 Years Following 1, 2, or 3 Doses of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine in Adolescent Fijian Girls, and Subsequent Responses to a Single Dose of Bivalent HPV Vaccine: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Zheng Quan; Russell, Fiona M; Reyburn, Rita; Fong, James; Tuivaga, Evelyn; Ratu, Tupou; Nguyen, Cattram D; Devi, Rachel; Kama, Mike; Matanitobua, Silivia; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Sinha, Rohit; Frazer, Ian; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Kado, Joseph; Rafai, Eric; Mulholland, Edward K; Licciardi, Paul V

    2017-04-01

    The duration of antibody response following reduced human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine doses has not been determined. We compared the antibody responses in girls previously vaccinated with zero, 1, 2, or 3 doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV; Gardasil, Merck) 6 years previously. A prospective cohort study was undertaken in 200 Fijian girls 15-19 years of age. Approximately equal numbers of girls from 2 main ethnic groups (Fijians of Indian descent [FID] and Indigenous Fijians [iTaukei]) in Fiji were recruited for each dosage groups. Blood was drawn before and 28 days following a single dose of bivalent HPV vaccine (2vHPV; Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline). We measured neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18 using the pseudovirion-based neutralization assay. After 6 years (before a dose of 2vHPV was given), the geometric mean NAb titers for all 4 HPV types were not statistically different between 2-dose (2D) and 3-dose (3D) recipients: HPV-6 (3D: 2216 [95% confidence interval {CI},1695-2896]; 2D: 1476 [95% CI, 1019-2137]; P = .07), HPV-11 (3D: 4431 [95% CI, 3396-5783]; 2D: 2951 [95% CI, 1984-4390]; P = .09), HPV-16 (3D: 3373 [95% CI, 2511-4530]; 2D: 3275 [95% CI, 2452-4373]; P = .89); HPV-18 (3D: 628 [95% CI: 445-888]; 2D: 606 [95% CI, 462-862]; P = .89), and were higher in FID than iTaukei girls. Although 1-dose recipients had significantly lower NAb titers than 2-/3-dose recipients, their NAb titers were 5- to 30-fold higher than unvaccinated girls. Post-2vHPV NAb titers against HPV-16 and -18 were not statistically different between girls who received 1, 2, or 3 doses of 4vHPV previously. Two doses of 4vHPV provide similar NAb titers as 3 doses for 6 years, although the clinical significance is unknown. A single dose of 4vHPV elicits antibodies that persisted for at least 6 years, and induced immune memory, suggesting possible protection against HPV vaccine types after a single dose of 4vHPV. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University

  3. Comparison of Real-Time Multiplex Human Papillomavirus (HPV) PCR Assays with INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra Assay▿

    OpenAIRE

    Else, Elizabeth A.; Swoyer, Ryan; Zhang, Yuhua; Taddeo, Frank J.; Bryan, Janine T.; Lawson, John; Van Hyfte, Inez; Roberts, Christine C.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time type-specific multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in samples collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). Additional multiplex (L1, E6, and E7 open reading frame [ORF]) or duplex (E6 and E7 ORF) HPV PCR assays were developed to detect high-risk HPV types, including HPV type 31 (HPV31), HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58, and H...

  4. Persistence of memory B-cell and T-cell responses to the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in HIV-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Adriana; Huang, Sharon; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Saah, Afred; Levin, Myron J

    2018-04-24

    To determine the magnitude and persistence of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV)16 and HPV18 B-cell and T-cell memory after three or four doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine (QHPV) in HIV-infected children. Seventy-four HIV-infected children immunized with four doses and 23 with three doses of QHPV had HPV16 and HPV18 IgG B-cell and IFNγ and IL2 T-cell ELISPOT performed at 2, 3.5 and 4-5 years after the last dose. HPV16 and HPV18 T-cell responses were similar in both treatment groups, with higher responses to HPV16 vs. HPV18. These HPV T-cell responses correlated with HIV disease characteristics at the study visits. Global T-cell function declined over time as measured by nonspecific mitogenic stimulation. B-cell memory was similar across treatment groups and HPV genotypes. There was a decline in HPV-specific B-cell memory over time that reached statistical significance for HPV16 in the four-dose group. B-cell and T-cell memory did not significantly differ after either three or four doses of QHPV in HIV-infected children. The clinical consequences of decreasing global T-cell function and HPV B-cell memory over time in HIV-infected children requires further investigation.

  5. A pooled analysis of continued prophylactic efficacy of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (Types 6/11/16/18) vaccine against high-grade cervical and external genital lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Susanne K; Sigurdsson, Kristján; Iversen, Ole-Erik

    2009-01-01

    Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been shown to provide protection from HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical, vaginal, and vulvar disease through 3 years. We provide an update on the efficacy of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine against high-grade cervical, vaginal, and vulvar lesions bas...

  6. Impact of a prophylactic quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, 18) L1 virus-like particle vaccine in a sexually active population of North American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Eliav; Gause, Christine K; Bautista, Oliver M; Railkar, Radha A; Lupinacci, Lisa C; Insinga, Ralph P; Sings, Heather L; Haupt, Richard M

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to inform policy regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in North America. We measured the clinical impact of HPV-6/-11/-16/-18 vaccination in North American women. The study enrolled 21,954 women, the majority aged 16-25, across 5 studies of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine or its HPV-16 vaccine prototype. The North American subjects (n = 5996) were pooled from these trials, and the prevalence of HPV-6/-11/-16/-18 exposure was measured. The impact of vaccination on the burden of anogenital HPV lesions in an intention-to-treat population (regardless of enrollment HPV status) was calculated. At enrollment, the median age was 20 years; 13% of the women had had a Papanicolaou test abnormality, and 76% of the women had negative tests results for all 4 vaccine HPV types. With approximately 3 years of follow-up evaluations in the intention-to-treat population (regardless of enrollment HPV status), vaccination reduced the rate of HPV-16- and -18-related precancers and HPV-6/-11/-16/-18-related genital lesions by 66.4% (95% CI, 42.7%-81.1%) and 57.7% (95% CI, 27.3%-76.3%), respectively. The administration of HPV vaccine to sexually active North American women reduced the burden of HPV-6/-11/-16/-18-related disease. Catch-up vaccination programs in this population are warranted.

  7. A novel vaccine for cervical cancer: quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18 recombinant vaccine (Gardasil®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A Govan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Vandana A GovanDivision of Medical Virology, Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Observatory, Cape Town, South AfricaAbstract: Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and remains a public health problem worldwide. There is strong evidence that HPV causes cervical, vulva and vaginal cancers, genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. The current treatments for HPV-induced infections are ineffective and recurrence is commonplace. Therefore, to reduce the burden of HPV-induced infections, several studies have investigated the efficacy of different prophylactic vaccines in clinical human trials directed against HPV types 6, 11, 16, or 18. Notably, these HPV types contribute to a significant proportion of disease worldwide. This review will focus on the published results of Merck & Co’s prophylactic quadrivalent recombinant vaccine targeting HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 (referred to as Gardasil®. Data from the Phase III trial demonstrated that Gardasil was 100% effi cacious in preventing precancerous lesions of the cervix, vulva, and vagina and effective against genital warts. Due to the success of these human clinical trials, the FDA approved the registration of Gardasil on the 8 June 2006. In addition, since Gardasil has been efficacious for 5 years post vaccination, the longest evaluation of an HPV vaccine, it is expected to reduce the incidence of these type specific HPV-induced diseases in the future.Keywords: Gardasil, HPV, prophylactic vaccine, cervical disease

  8. Safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, 18) L1 virus-like-particle vaccine in Latin American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Gonzalo; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio; García, Patricia J; Muñoz, Nubia; Villa, Luisa L; Bryan, Janine; Taddeo, Frank J; Lu, Shuang; Esser, Mark T; Vuocolo, Scott; Sattler, Carlos; Barr, Eliav

    2008-03-15

    The prevalence of HPV infection in Latin America is among the highest in the world. A quadrivalent (types 6/11/16/18) human papillomavirus L1 virus-like-particle vaccine has been shown to be 95-100% effective in preventing HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical and genital disease in women naive to vaccine HPV types. A total of 6,004 female subjects aged 9-24 were recruited from Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala and Peru. Subjects were randomized to immunization with intramuscular (deltoid) injections of HPV vaccine or placebo at enrollment (day 1), month 2 and month 6. Among vaccinated subjects in the per-protocol population from Latin America, quadrivalent HPV vaccine was 92.8 and 100% effective in preventing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and external genital lesions related to vaccine HPV types, respectively. These data support vaccination of adolescents and young adults in the region, which is expected to greatly reduce the burden of cervical and genital cancers, precancers and genital warts. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. An Overview of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vichnin, Michelle; Bonanni, Paolo; Klein, Nicola P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) type 6/11/16/18 vaccine (GARDASIL/SILGARD®) has been licensed in many countries around the world for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers and precancers, as well as external genital warts causally related to HPV types 6...

  10. Two novel genital human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, related to the potentially oncogenic HPV39.

    OpenAIRE

    Longuet, M; Beaudenon, S; Orth, G

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of two novel human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, were cloned from a low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and a vulvar papilloma, respectively, and partially sequenced. Both types are related to HPV39, a potentially oncogenic virus. HPV68 and HPV70 were also detected in genital intraepithelial neoplasia from three patients and one patient, respectively. Comparison with sequence data in the literature indicates that the subgenomic ME180-HPV DNA fragment, clone...

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Quadrivalent Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine for HPV-Related Disease in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Mohsen; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Shahverdi, Zohreh; jamshidi, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine has been added recently to the Iran Drug List. So, decision makers need information beyond that available from RCTs to recommend funding for this vaccination program to add it to the National Immunization program in Iran. Modeling and economic studies have addressed some of those information needs in foreign countries. In order to determine the long term benefit of this vaccine and impact of vaccine program on the future rate of cervical cancer in Iran, we described a model, based on the available economic and health effects of human papilloma virus (HPV), to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination of 15-year-old girls in Iran. Our objective is to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in Iran against cervical cancer based on available data; incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) calculations were based on a model comparing a cohort of 15-year-old girls with and without vaccination. We developed a static model based on available data in Iran on the epidemiology of HPV related health outcome. The model compared the cohort of all 15-year old girls alive in the year 2013 with and without vaccination. The cost per QALY, which was found based on our assumption for the vaccination of 15-years old girl to current situation was 439,000,000 Iranian Rial rate (IRR). By considering the key parameters in our sensitivity analysis, value varied from 251,000,000 IRR to 842,000,000 IRR. In conclusion, quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Gardasil) is not cost-effective in Iran based on the base-case parameters value. PMID:24711850

  12. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2011-01-01

    , we include all women who had at least one follow-up visit postenrollment. Healthy women (17,622) aged 15-26 with no history of HPV disease and a lifetime number of less than five sex partners (average follow-up of 3.6 years) were randomized (1:1) to receive vaccine or placebo at day 1, months 2......The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis......, and 6. Women underwent colposcopy and biopsy according to a Papanicolaou triage algorithm. All tissue specimens were tested for 14 HPV types and were adjudicated by a pathology panel. During the trials, 22 women were diagnosed with AIS (six vaccine and 16 placebo). There were 25 AIS lesions in total...

  13. Safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, 18) recombinant vaccine in women aged 24-45 years: a randomised, double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Nubia; Manalastas, Ricardo; Pitisuttithum, Punee; Tresukosol, Damrong; Monsonego, Joseph; Ault, Kevin; Clavel, Christine; Luna, Joaquin; Myers, Evan; Hood, Sara; Bautista, Oliver; Bryan, Janine; Taddeo, Frank J; Esser, Mark T; Vuocolo, Scott; Haupt, Richard M; Barr, Eliav; Saah, Alfred

    2009-06-06

    Although the peak incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection occurs in most populations within 5-10 years of first sexual experience, all women remain at risk for acquisition of HPV infections. We tested the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the quadrivalent HPV (types 6, 11, 16, 18) L1 virus-like-particle vaccine in women aged 24-45 years. Women aged 24-45 years with no history of genital warts or cervical disease were enrolled from community health centres, academic health centres, and primary health-care providers into an ongoing multicentre, parallel, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Participants were allocated by computer-generated schedule to receive quadrivalent HPV vaccine (n=1911) or placebo (n=1908) at day 1, and months 2 and 6. All study site investigators and personnel, study participants, monitors, and central laboratory personnel were blinded to treatment allocation. Coprimary efficacy endpoints were 6 months' or more duration of infection and cervical and external genital disease due to HPV 6, 11, 16, 18; and due to HPV 16 and 18 alone. Primary efficacy analyses were done in a per-protocol population, but intention-to-treat analyses were also undertaken. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00090220. 1910 women received at least one dose of vaccine and 1907 at least one dose of placebo. In the per-protocol population, efficacy against the first coprimary endpoint (disease or infection related to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18) was 90.5% (95% CI 73.7-97.5, four of 1615 cases in the vaccine group vs 41/1607 in the placebo group) and 83.1% (50.6-95.8, four of 1601 cases vs 23/1579 cases) against the second coprimary endpoint (disease or infection related to HPV 16 and 18 alone). In the intention-to-treat population, efficacy against the first coprimary endpoint was 30.9% (95% CI 11.1-46.5, 108/1886 cases vs 154/1883 cases) and against the second coprimary endpoint was 22.6% (-2.9 to 41.9, 90/1886 cases vs

  14. A novel trivalent HPV 16/18/58 vaccine with anti-HPV 16 and 18 neutralizing antibody responses comparable to those induced by the Gardasil quadrivalent vaccine in rhesus macaque model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV is a key factor in the development of precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer. Prophylactic vaccines to immunize against HPV are an effective approach to reducing HPV related disease burden. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and dosage effect of a trivalent HPV 16/18/58 vaccine (3vHPV produced in Escherichia coli (E.coli, with Gardasil quadrivalent vaccine (4vHPV, Merck & Co. as a positive control. Sera collected from rhesus macaques vaccinated with three dosage formulations of 3vHPV (termed low-, mid-, and high-dosage formulations, respectively, and the 4vHPV vaccine were analyzed by both Pseudovirus-Based Neutralization Assay (PBNA and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Strong immune responses against HPV 16/18/58 were successfully elicited, and dosage-dependence was observed, with likely occurrence of immune interference between different L1-VLP antigens. HPV 16/18 specific neutralizing antibody (nAb and total immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody responses in rhesus macaques receiving 3vHPV at the three dosages tested were generally non-inferior to those observed in rhesus macaques receiving 4vHPV throughout the study period. Particularly, HPV 18 nAb titers induced by the mid-dosage formulation that contained the same amounts of HPV 16/18 L1-VLPs as Gardasil 4vHPV were between 7.3 to 12.7-fold higher compared to the positive control arm from weeks 24–64. The durability of antibody responses specific to HPV 16/18 elicited by 3vHPV vaccines was also shown to be non-inferior to that associated with Gardasil 4vHPV. Keywords: Human papillomavirus, HPV 16/18/58, GMTs, Trivalent, Immunogenicity

  15. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in girls and the risk of autoimmune disorders: the Ontario Grade 8 HPV Vaccine Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Erin Y.; Smith, Leah M.; Ellis, Anne K.; Whitaker, Heather; Law, Barbara; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Farrington, Paddy

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite demonstrated effectiveness in real-world settings, concerns persist regarding the safety of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine. We sought to assess the risk of autoimmune disorders following HPV4 vaccination among grade 8 girls eligible for Ontario’s school-based HPV vaccination program. METHODS: We undertook a population-based retrospective cohort study using Ontario’s administrative health and vaccination databases from 2007 to 2013. The self-controlled case series method was used to compare the rate of a composite end point of autoimmune disorders diagnosed during days 7–60 post-vaccination (“exposed” follow-up) to that at any other time (“unexposed”). The analysis was repeated to assess the effect of a history of immune-mediated diseases and time since vaccination. We also conducted an exploratory analysis of individual autoimmune disorders. Rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional Poisson regression, adjusted for age, seasonality, concomitant vaccinations and infections. RESULTS: The study cohort consisted of 290 939 girls aged 12–17 years who were eligible for vaccination between 2007 and 2013. There was no significant risk for developing an autoimmune disorder following HPV4 vaccination (n = 681; rate ratio 1.12, 95% CI 0.85–1.47), and the association was unchanged by a history of immune-mediated disorders and time since vaccination. Exploratory analyses of individual autoimmune disorders found no significant risks, including for Bell palsy (n = 65; rate ratio 1.73, 95% CI 0.77–3.89), optic neuritis (n = 67; rate ratio 1.57, 95% CI 0.74–3.33) and Graves disease (n = 47; rate ratio 1.55, 95% CI 0.92–2.63). INTERPRETATION: We did not observe an increased risk of autoimmune disorders following HPV4 vaccination among teenaged girls. These findings should reassure parents and health care providers. PMID:29807937

  16. The impact and cost-effectiveness of nonavalent HPV vaccination in the United States: Estimates from a simplified transmission model

    OpenAIRE

    Chesson, Harrell W.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Hariri, Susan; Ekwueme, Donatus U.; Saraiya, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to assess the incremental costs and benefits of the 9-valent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) compared with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV). Like 4vHPV, 9vHPV protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18. 9vHPV also protects against 5 additional HPV types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58. Methods: We adapted a previously published model of the impact and cost-effectiveness of 4vHPV to include the 5 additional HPV types in 9vHPV. The vaccine strategies we examined w...

  17. Seropositivity to non-vaccine incorporated genotypes induced by the bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Sara L; Godi, Anna; Jit, Mark; Beddows, Simon

    2017-07-13

    Human papillomavirus vaccines have demonstrated remarkable efficacy against persistent infection and disease associated with vaccine-incorporated genotypes and a degree of efficacy against some genetically related, non-vaccine-incorporated genotypes. The vaccines differ in the extent of cross-protection against these non-vaccine genotypes. Data supporting the role for neutralizing antibodies as a correlate or surrogate of cross-protection are lacking, as is a robust assessment of the seroconversion rates against these non-vaccine genotypes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available data on vaccine-induced neutralizing antibody seropositivity to non-vaccine incorporated HPV genotypes. Of 304 articles screened, 9 were included in the analysis representing ca. 700 individuals. The pooled estimate for seropositivity against HPV31 for the bivalent vaccine (86%; 95%CI 78-91%) was higher than that for the quadrivalent vaccine (61%; 39-79%; p=0.011). The pooled estimate for seropositivity against HPV45 for the bivalent vaccine (50%; 37-64%) was also higher than that for the quadrivalent vaccine (16%; 6-36%; p=0.007). Seropositivity against HPV33, HPV52 and HPV58 were similar between the vaccines. Mean seropositivity rates across non-vaccine genotypes were positively associated with the corresponding vaccine efficacy data reported from vaccine trials. These data improve our understanding of vaccine-induced functional antibody specificity against non-vaccine incorporated genotypes and may help to parameterize vaccine-impact models and improve patient management in a post-vaccine setting. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunogenicity of quadrivalent HPV and combined hepatitis A and B vaccine when co-administered or administered one month apart to 9-10 year-old girls according to 0-6 month schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilca, Vladimir; Sauvageau, Chantal; Boulianne, Nicole; De Serres, Gaston; Couillard, Michel; Krajden, Mel; Ouakki, Manale; Murphy, Donald; Trevisan, Andrea; Dionne, Marc

    2014-01-01

    No immunogenicity data has been reported after a single dose of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (qHPV-Gardasil®) and no data are available on co-administration of this vaccine with the HAV/HBV vaccine (Twinrix-Junior®). Two pre-licensure studies reported similar anti-HPV but lower anti-HBs titers when co-administering HPV and HBV vaccines. To assess the immunogenicity of the qHPV and HAV/HBV vaccine when co-administered (Group-Co-adm) or given one month apart (Group-Sep) and to measure the persistence of HPV antibodies three years post-second dose of qHPV vaccine in both study groups. 416 9-10 year-old girls were enrolled. Vaccination schedule was 0-6 months. Anti-HAV and anti-HBs were measured in all subjects 6 months post-first dose and 1 month post-second dose. Anti-HPV were measured 6 months post-first dose in Group-Co-adm and in all subjects 1 and 36 months post-second dose. Six months post-first dose: 100% of subjects had detectable anti-HAV and 56% and 73% had detectable anti-HBs in Group-Co-Adm and Group-Sep, respectively. In Group-Co-adm 94, 100, 99 and 96% had detectable antibodies to HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18, respectively. One month post-second dose of qHPV and HAV/HBV vaccine, in both study groups 99.5-100% of subjects had an anti-HAV titer ≥ 20IU/L, 97.5-97.6% an anti-HBs level ≥ 10IU/L, and 100% had an anti-HPV titer ≥ 3LU. Thirty-six months post-second dose of qHPV all but four subjects (99%) had antibodies to HPV18 and 100% had antibodies to HPV6, 11 and 16. The great majority (97-100%) had an anti-HPV titer ≥ 3 LU. Post-second dose administration of qHPV and HAV/HBV, no meaningful difference was observed in the immune response in the two study groups to any component of vaccines. The results indicate that qHPV and HAV/HBV can be given during the same vaccination session. Two doses of of qHPV and HAV/HBV vaccines induce a strong immune response. Three years post-second dose of qHPV, the great majority of subjects had antibodies to HPV types

  19. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of adolescents in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In SA, two vaccines (HPV quadrivalent (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) vaccine, recombinant (Gardasil) and HPV bivalent (types 16 and 18) vaccine, recombinant (Cervarix)) are currently registered for the prevention of HPV-related disease. In the past, there have been significant challenges to achieving high coverage and uptake ...

  20. The impact of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, 18) virus-like particle vaccine in European women aged 16 to 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majewski, S; Bosch, F X; Dillner, J

    2009-01-01

    -associated cervico-genital lesions in a broad population of sexually active European women. METHODS: Female subjects (N = 9265) aged 16-24 with four or fewer lifetime sexual partners were enrolled and randomized to quadrivalent HPV vaccine or placebo. Subjects underwent cervicovaginal sampling for HPV DNA detection...

  1. Suspected side effects to the quadrivalent human papilloma vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Theibel, Ann Cathrine; Pors, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The quadrivalent vaccine that protects against human papilloma virus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Q-HPV vaccine, Gardasil) was included into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 2009. During the past years, a collection of symptoms primarily consistent with sympathetic nervous...

  2. Trivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) VLP vaccine covering HPV type 58 can elicit high level of humoral immunity but also induce immune interference among component types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Xu, Yufei; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Youchun; Wu, Xueling; Fan, Dongsheng; Peng, Qinglin; Xu, Xuemei

    2010-04-26

    Both Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16/18 bivalent vaccine and type 16/18/6/11 quadrivalent vaccine have been proved to be safe and effective, and licensed for public use. However, these two vaccines do not quite match the distribution of HPV types in China, Southeast Asia and Latin America, where HPV 58 is highly prevalent. Here we produced three types of virus-like particles (VLPs) in baculovirus expression system, formulated a trivalent vaccine containing HPV 16, 18, and 58 L1 VLPs and examined its in vitro neutralizing titers. This vaccine could induce high level and long-term humoral immunity against the component types. But immune interference was observed when comparing type specific neutralizing antibody levels induced by trivalent vaccine to those by corresponding monovalent vaccines. This kind of interference would become more obvious when formulating more types of VLPs into multivalent vaccines, but could be greatly overcome by decreasing the antigen dosage and adding a proper adjuvant. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Worldwide burden of cancer attributable to HPV by site, country and HPV type

    OpenAIRE

    de Martel, Catherine; Plummer, Martyn; Vignat, Jerome; Franceschi, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    HPV is the cause of almost all cervical cancer and is responsible for a substantial fraction of other anogenital cancers and oropharyngeal cancers. Understanding the HPV?attributable cancer burden can boost programs of HPV vaccination and HPV?based cervical screening. Attributable fractions (AFs) and the relative contributions of different HPV types were derived from published studies reporting on the prevalence of transforming HPV infection in cancer tissue. Maps of age?standardized incidenc...

  4. Seroprevalence and Associated Factors of 9-Valent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types among Men in the Multinational HIM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shams; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Rollison, Dana E; Wang, Wei; Waterboer, Tim; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Borenstein, Amy R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Recently a 9-valent HPV (9vHPV) prophylactic vaccine was licensed. Seroprevalence prior to vaccine dissemination is needed for monitoring vaccine effectiveness over time. Few studies have assessed the seroprevalence of 9vHPV types in men. To investigate the seroprevalence of 9vHPV vaccine types and associated risk factors among men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. Six hundred men were randomly selected from the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Archived serum specimens collected at enrollment were tested for antibodies against nine HPV types (6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58) using a glutathione S-transferase (GST) L1-based multiplex serologic assay. Socio-demographic, lifestyle and sexual behavior data at enrollment were collected through a questionnaire. Binomial proportions were used to estimate seroprevalence and logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with seropositivity of type-specific and grouped (i.e. 9vHPV, high-risk 9vHPV, low risk 9vHPV, and five-additional) HPV types. Overall, 28.3% of men were seropositive for at least one of the 9vHPV vaccine types, 14.0% for at least one of the seven high-risk types (16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58) and 11.2% for at least one of the five high-risk types (31, 33, 45, 52 and 58) not included in the quadrivalent HPV vaccine, and 17.4% for at least one of the low-risk types (6/11). In multivariate analyses, odds ratios adjusted (AOR) for country of residence, age, marital status, smoking, number of anal sex lifetime partners, compared to men with no anal sex lifetime partners, men with ≥2 partners were more likely to be seropositive for grouped HPV [(9vHPV: AOR 2.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.40-4.54), (high-risk 9vHPV: AOR 2.18; 95%CI: 1.05-4.50) and (low-risk 9vHPV: AOR 2.12; 95%CI: 1.12-4.03)], and individual HPV types 6, 16, 33 and 58 with AORs ranging from 2.19 to 7

  5. A cost-utility analysis of adding a bivalent or quadrivalent HPV vaccine to the Irish cervical screening programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dee, Anne

    2010-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, and in Ireland it is the ninth most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Almost 100% of these cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Two newly developed vaccines against HPV infection have become available. This study is a cost-utility analysis of the HPV vaccine in Ireland, and it compares the cost-effectiveness profiles of the two vaccines.

  6. Oncogenic and incidental HPV types associated with histologically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. In Africa, data on the relationship between oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types, immune status and cervical preinvasive lesions are lacking. Methods. We investigated low-risk (lrHPV) and high-risk (hrHPV) HPV types in a cohort of women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) II/III confirmed on ...

  7. Comparing bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines: economic evaluation based on transmission model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Chapman, Ruth; Hughes, Owain; Choi, Yoon Hong

    2011-09-27

    To compare the effect and cost effectiveness of bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, taking into account differences in licensure indications, protection against non-vaccine type disease, protection against disease related to HPV types 6 and 11, and reported long term immunogenicity. A model of HPV transmission and disease previously used to inform UK vaccination policy, updated with recent evidence and expanded to include scenarios where the two vaccines differ in duration of protection, cross protection, and end points prevented. United Kingdom. Population Males and females aged 12-75 years. Incremental cost effectiveness ratios for both vaccines and additional cost per dose for the quadrivalent vaccine to be equally cost effective as the bivalent vaccine. The bivalent vaccine needs to be cheaper than the quadrivalent vaccine to be equally cost effective, mainly because of its lack of protection against anogenital warts. The price difference per dose ranges from a median of £19 (interquartile range £12-£27) to £35 (£27-£44) across scenarios about vaccine duration, cross protection, and end points prevented (assuming one quality adjusted life year (QALY) is valued at £30,000 and both vaccines can prevent all types of HPV related cancers). The quadrivalent vaccine may have an advantage over the bivalent vaccine in reducing healthcare costs and QALYs lost. The bivalent vaccine may have an advantage in preventing death due to cancer. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the differential benefit of the two vaccines.

  8. Long-term Study of a Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferris, Daron; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Block, Stan L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a long-term safety, immunogenicity, and effectiveness study of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine. METHODS: Sexually naive boys and girls aged 9 to 15 years (N = 1781) were assigned (2:1) to receive HPV4 vaccine or saline placebo at day 1 and months 2 and 6...... objective was to estimate vaccine effectiveness against HPV6/11/16/18-related persistent infection or disease. RESULTS: For each of the HPV4 vaccine types, vaccination-induced anti-HPV response persisted through month 96. Among 429 subjects who received HPV4 vaccine at a mean age of 12, none developed HPV6....../11/16/18-related disease or persistent infection of ≥12 months' duration. Acquisition of new sexual partners (among those ≥16 years) was ∼1 per year. Subjects receiving HPV4 vaccine at month 30 (mean age 15 years) had a similar baseline rate of seropositivity to ≥1 of the 4 HPV types to those vaccinated at day 1...

  9. Influence of evidence type and narrative type on HPV risk perception and intention to obtain the HPV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Xiaoli; Dahlstrom, Michael F; Richards, Adam; Rangarajan, Sarani

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the influence of evidence type (statistical, narrative, or hybrid) and narrative type (first-person or third-person) on risk perception about human papillomavirus (HPV) and behavioral intention to get the HPV vaccine. In total, 174 college students who had not received the HPV vaccine participated in a controlled experiment. Results show that the hybrid message containing both statistical and narrative descriptions of HPV resulted in greater perceived risk of getting HPV than either of the messages containing just one type of evidence--statistical or narrative. Moreover, the first-person narrative message led to greater risk perception about HPV than the third-person narrative message. Both evidence type and narrative type had an indirect effect on intention to get the HPV vaccine free of cost through HPV risk perception. Implications of the findings for vaccine risk communication are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of the Long-Term Anti-Human Papillomavirus 6 (HPV6), 11, 16, and 18 Immune Responses Generated by the Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Mari; Saah, Alfred; Munk, Christian

    2015-01-01

    of the qHPV vaccine (Gardasil) for at least 10 years following completion of the base study. The current report presents immunogenicity data from testing samples of the year 5 LTFU visit (approximately 9 years after vaccination). FUTURE II vaccination arm subjects, who consented to being followed...

  11. Monitoring vaccine and non-vaccine HPV type prevalence in the post-vaccination era in women living in the Basilicata region, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozzi, Francesca; Puliti, Donella; Ocello, Cristina; Anastasio, Pasquale Silvio; Moliterni, Espedito Antonio; Perinetti, Emilia; Serradell, Laurence; Burroni, Elena; Confortini, Massimo; Mantellini, Paola; Zappa, Marco; Dominiak-Felden, Géraldine

    2018-01-15

    A large free-of-charge quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccination program, covering four cohorts annually (women 11, 14, 17 and 24 years), has been implemented in Basilicata since 2007. This study evaluated vaccine and non-vaccine HPV prevalence 5-7 years post-vaccination program implementation in vaccinated and unvaccinated women. This population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in the public screening centers of the Local Health Unit in Matera between 2012 and 2014. Cervical samples were obtained for Pap and HPV testing (HC2, LiPA Extra® assay) and participants completed a sociodemographic and behavioral questionnaire. Detailed HPV vaccination status was retrieved from the official HPV vaccine registry. HPV prevalence was described overall, by type and vaccination status. The association between HPV type-detection and risk/protective factors was studied. Direct vaccine protection (qHPV vaccine effectiveness [VE]), cross-protection, and type-replacement were evaluated in cohorts eligible for vaccination, by analyzing HPV prevalence of vaccine and non-vaccine types according to vaccination status. Overall, 2793 women (18-50 years) were included, 1314 of them having been in birth cohorts eligible for the HPV vaccination program (18- to 30-year-old women at enrolment). Among the latter, qHPV vaccine uptake was 59% (at least one dose), with 94% completing the schedule; standardized qHPV type prevalence was 0.6% in vaccinated versus 5.5% in unvaccinated women (P HPV, high-risk non-vaccine HPV, or any single non-vaccine type prevalence was observed between vaccinated and unvaccinated women. These results, conducted in a post-vaccine era, suggest a high qHPV VE and that a well-implemented catch-up vaccination program may be efficient in reducing vaccine-type infections in a real-world setting. No cross-protective effect or evidence of type-replacement was observed a few years after HPV vaccine introduction.

  12. Validation of a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA Cervical Screening Test That Provides Expanded HPV Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Maria; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Hyun, Noorie; Castle, Philip E; He, Xin; Dallal, Cher M; Chen, Jie; Gage, Julia C; Befano, Brian; Fetterman, Barbara; Lorey, Thomas; Poitras, Nancy; Raine-Bennett, Tina R; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schiffman, Mark

    2018-05-01

    As cervical cancer screening shifts from cytology to human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, a major question is the clinical value of identifying individual HPV types. We aimed to validate Onclarity (Becton Dickinson Diagnostics, Sparks, MD), a nine-channel HPV test recently approved by the FDA, by assessing (i) the association of Onclarity types/channels with precancer/cancer; (ii) HPV type/channel agreement between the results of Onclarity and cobas (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, CA), another FDA-approved test; and (iii) Onclarity typing for all types/channels compared to typing results from a research assay (linear array [LA]; Roche). We compared Onclarity to histopathology, cobas, and LA. We tested a stratified random sample ( n = 9,701) of discarded routine clinical specimens that had tested positive by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2; Qiagen, Germantown, MD). A subset had already been tested by cobas and LA ( n = 1,965). Cervical histopathology was ascertained from electronic health records. Hierarchical Onclarity channels showed a significant linear association with histological severity. Onclarity and cobas had excellent agreement on partial typing of HPV16, HPV18, and the other 12 types as a pool (sample-weighted kappa value of 0.83); cobas was slightly more sensitive for HPV18 and slightly less sensitive for the pooled high-risk types. Typing by Onclarity showed excellent agreement with types and groups of types identified by LA (kappa values from 0.80 for HPV39/68/35 to 0.97 for HPV16). Onclarity typing results corresponded well to histopathology and to an already validated HPV DNA test and could provide additional clinical typing if such discrimination is determined to be clinically desirable. This is a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Foreign copyrights may apply.

  13. Safety and immunogenicity of one dose of MenACWY-CRM, an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine, when administered to adolescents concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguedas, A; Soley, C; Loaiza, C; Rincon, G; Guevara, S; Perez, A; Porras, W; Alvarado, O; Aguilar, L; Abdelnour, A; Grunwald, U; Bedell, L; Anemona, A; Dull, P M

    2010-04-19

    This Phase III study evaluates an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Novartis Vaccines), when administered concomitantly or sequentially with two other recommended adolescent vaccines; combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. In this single-centre study, 1620 subjects 11-18 years of age, were randomized to three groups (1:1:1) to receive MenACWY-CRM concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV. Meningococcal serogroup-specific serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA), and antibodies to Tdap antigens and HPV virus-like particles were determined before and 1 month after study vaccinations. Proportions of subjects with hSBA titres > or =1:8 for all four meningococcal serogroups (A, C, W-135, Y) were non-inferior for both concomitant and sequential administration. Immune responses to Tdap and HPV antigens were comparable when these vaccines were given alone or concomitantly with MenACWY-CRM. All vaccines were well tolerated; concomitant or sequential administration did not increase reactogenicity. MenACWY-CRM was well tolerated and immunogenic in subjects 11-18 years of age, with comparable immune responses to the four serogroups when given alone or concomitantly with Tdap or HPV antigens. This is the first demonstration that these currently recommended adolescent vaccines could be administered concomitantly without causing increased reactogenicity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. HPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a group of related viruses. They can cause warts on different parts of your body. There are ... cancer. There are two categories of sexually-transmitted HPV. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts. High- ...

  15. Worldwide burden of cancer attributable to HPV by site, country and HPV type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Martyn; Vignat, Jerome; Franceschi, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    HPV is the cause of almost all cervical cancer and is responsible for a substantial fraction of other anogenital cancers and oropharyngeal cancers. Understanding the HPV‐attributable cancer burden can boost programs of HPV vaccination and HPV‐based cervical screening. Attributable fractions (AFs) and the relative contributions of different HPV types were derived from published studies reporting on the prevalence of transforming HPV infection in cancer tissue. Maps of age‐standardized incidence rates of HPV‐attributable cancers by country from GLOBOCAN 2012 data are shown separately for the cervix, other anogenital tract and head and neck cancers. The relative contribution of HPV16/18 and HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 was also estimated. 4.5% of all cancers worldwide (630,000 new cancer cases per year) are attributable to HPV: 8.6% in women and 0.8% in men. AF in women ranges from 20% in India and sub‐Saharan Africa. Cervix accounts for 83% of HPV‐attributable cancer, two‐thirds of which occur in less developed countries. Other HPV‐attributable anogenital cancer includes 8,500 vulva; 12,000 vagina; 35,000 anus (half occurring in men) and 13,000 penis. In the head and neck, HPV‐attributable cancers represent 38,000 cases of which 21,000 are oropharyngeal cancers occurring in more developed countries. The relative contributions of HPV16/18 and HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 are 73% and 90%, respectively. Universal access to vaccination is the key to avoiding most cases of HPV‐attributable cancer. The preponderant burden of HPV16/18 and the possibility of cross‐protection emphasize the importance of the introduction of more affordable vaccines in less developed countries. PMID:28369882

  16. The impact and cost-effectiveness of nonavalent HPV vaccination in the United States: Estimates from a simplified transmission model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Harrell W; Markowitz, Lauri E; Hariri, Susan; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Saraiya, Mona

    2016-06-02

    The objective of this study was to assess the incremental costs and benefits of the 9-valent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) compared with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV). Like 4vHPV, 9vHPV protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18. 9vHPV also protects against 5 additional HPV types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58. We adapted a previously published model of the impact and cost-effectiveness of 4vHPV to include the 5 additional HPV types in 9vHPV. The vaccine strategies we examined were (1) 4vHPV for males and females; (2) 9vHPV for females and 4vHPV for males; and (3) 9vHPV for males and females. In the base case, 9vHPV cost $13 more per dose than 4vHPV, based on available vaccine price information. Providing 9vHPV to females compared with 4vHPV for females (assuming 4vHPV for males in both scenarios) was cost-saving regardless of whether or not cross-protection for 4vHPV was assumed. The cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained by 9vHPV for both sexes (compared with 4vHPV for both sexes) was < $0 (cost-saving) when assuming no cross-protection for 4vHPV and $8,600 when assuming cross-protection for 4vHPV. Compared with a vaccination program of 4vHPV for both sexes, a vaccination program of 9vHPV for both sexes can improve health outcomes and can be cost-saving.

  17. A study of HPV typing for the management of HPV-positive ASC-US cervical cytologic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Mark; Vaughan, Laurence M; Raine-Bennett, Tina R; Castle, Philip E; Katki, Hormuzd A; Gage, Julia C; Fetterman, Barbara; Befano, Brian; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    In US cervical screening, immediate colposcopy is recommended for women with HPV-positive ASC-US (equivocal) cytology. We evaluated whether partial typing by Onclarity™ (BD) might identify HPV-positive women with low enough CIN3+ risk to permit 1-year follow-up instead. The NCI-Kaiser Permanente Northern California Persistence and Progression cohort includes a subset of 13,890 women aged 21+ with HC2 (Qiagen)-positive ASC-US at enrollment; current median follow-up is 3.0years. Using stratified random sampling, we typed 2079 archived enrollment specimens including 329 women subsequently diagnosed with CIN3+, 563 with CIN2, and 1187 with typing channel, using Kaplan-Meier methods. The 3-year CIN3+ risk for all HC2-positive women with ASC-US was 5.2%; this establishes the "benchmark" risk for colposcopic referral. Hierarchically, 3-year cumulative risks for each typing channel were 16.0% for HPV16, 7.4% for HPV18, 7.0% for HPV31, 7.1% for grouped HPV33/58, 4.3% for HPV52, 3.9% for HPV45, 2.7% for HPV51, 1.6% for HPV39/68/35, and 1.3% for HPV59/56/66. ASC-US linked to HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, or HPV33/58 warrants immediate colposcopy. Optimal management of women with HPV52 or HPV45 is uncertain. Risk of women with only HPV51, HPV39/68/35, or HPV59/56/66 might be low enough to recommend 1-year retesting permitting viral clearance. This strategy would defer colposcopy for 40% of women with HPV-positive ASC-US, half of whom would be cotest-negative at 1-year return. Approximately 10% of those with CIN3 diagnosable at enrollment would be delayed 1year instead. Cost-effectiveness analyses are needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. 9-Valent HPV vaccine for cancers, pre-cancers and genital warts related to HPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Velicer, Christine; Luxembourg, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of nearly all cervical cancer cases as well as a substantial proportion of anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers, making it responsible for approximately 5% of the global cancer burden. The first-generation HPV vaccines that is, quadrivalent HPV type 6/11/16/18 vaccine and bivalent HPV type 16/18 vaccine were licensed in 2006 and 2007, respectively. A second-generation 9-valent HPV type 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine with broader cancer coverage was initiated even before the first vaccines were approved. By preventing HPV infection and disease due to HPV31/33/45/52/58, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to increase prevention of cervical cancer from 70 to 90%. In addition, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to prevent 85-95% of HPV-related vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. Overall, the 9vHPV vaccine addresses a significant unmet medical need, although further health economics and implementation research is needed.

  19. Cost-utility of quadrivalent versus trivalent influenza vaccine in Brazil - comparison of outcomes from different static model types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bellinghen, Laure-Anne; Marijam, Alen; Tannus Branco de Araujo, Gabriela; Gomez, Jorge; Van Vlaenderen, Ilse

    Influenza burden in Brazil is considerable with 4.2-6.4 million cases in 2008 and influenza-like-illness responsible for 16.9% of hospitalizations. Cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination may be assessed by different types of models, with limitations due to data availability, assumptions, and modelling approach. To understand the impact of model complexity, the cost-utility of quadrivalent versus trivalent influenza vaccines in Brazil was estimated using three distinct models: a 1-year decision tree population model with three age groups (FLOU); a more detailed 1-year population model with five age groups (FLORA); and a more complex lifetime multi-cohort Markov model with nine age groups (FLORENCE). Analysis 1 (impact of model structure) compared each model using the same data inputs (i.e., best available data for FLOU). Analysis 2 (impact of increasing granularity) compared each model populated with the best available data for that model. Using the best data for each model, the discounted cost-utility ratio of quadrivalent versus trivalent influenza vaccine was R$20,428 with FLOU, R$22,768 with FLORA (versus R$20,428 in Analysis 1), and, R$19,257 with FLORENCE (versus R$22,490 in Analysis 1) using a lifetime horizon. Conceptual differences between FLORA and FLORENCE meant the same assumption regarding increased all-cause mortality in at-risk individuals had an opposite effect on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in Analysis 2 versus 1, and a proportionally higher number of vaccinated elderly in FLORENCE reduced this ratio in Analysis 2. FLOU provided adequate cost-effectiveness estimates with data in broad age groups. FLORA increased insights (e.g., in healthy versus at-risk, paediatric, respiratory/non-respiratory complications). FLORENCE provided greater insights and precision (e.g., in elderly, costs and complications, lifetime cost-effectiveness). All three models predicted a cost per quality-adjusted life year gained for quadrivalent versus

  20. Introduction and sustained high coverage of the HPV bivalent vaccine leads to a reduction in prevalence of HPV 16/18 and closely related HPV types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, K; Pollock, K G J; Potts, A; Love, J; Cuschieri, K; Cubie, H; Robertson, C; Donaghy, M

    2014-05-27

    In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme began in Scotland for 12-13 year old females with a three-year catch-up campaign for those under the age of 18. Since 2008, three-dose uptake of bivalent vaccine in the routine cohort aged 12-13 has exceeded 90% annually, while in the catch-up cohort overall uptake is 66%. To monitor the impact of HPV immunisation, a programme of national surveillance was established (pre and post introduction) which included yearly sampling and HPV genotyping of women attending for cervical screening at age 20. By linking individual vaccination, screening and HPV testing records, we aim to determine the impact of the immunisation programme on circulating type-specific HPV infection particularly for four outcomes: (i) the vaccine types HPV 16 or 18 (ii) types considered to be associated with cross-protection: HPV 31, 33 or 45; (iii) all other high-risk types and (iv) any HPV. From a total of 4679 samples tested, we demonstrate that three doses (n=1100) of bivalent vaccine are associated with a significant reduction in prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 from 29.8% (95% confidence interval 28.3, 31.3%) to 13.6% (95% confidence interval 11.7, 15.8%). The data also suggest cross-protection against HPV 31, 33 and 45. HPV 51 and 56 emerged as the most prevalent (10.5% and 9.6%, respectively) non-vaccine high-risk types in those vaccinated, but at lower rates than HPV 16 (25.9%) in those unvaccinated. This data demonstrate the positive impact of bivalent vaccination on the prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 in the target population and is encouraging for countries which have achieved high-vaccine uptake.

  1. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  2. High frequency of multiple HPV types in cervical specimens from Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlhede, Nina; Bonde, Jesper; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2009-01-01

    distribution among cervical specimens from more than 1000 Danish women. We also examined the HPV type distribution and the frequency of single and multiple HPV types for specimens from 113 women who underwent conization and were diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II or worse (CIN2+). Using...... microarray technology, we found that 49% of the HPV-positive patients were infected with multiple HPV types. Among the CIN2+ diagnosed women, this frequency was 41%. The most frequently found high-risk HPV type was HPV-16, which was found in 25% of the HPV-positive cervical specimens. Among the HPV positive...... CIN2+ diagnosed women, 48% were HPV-16 positive. Women younger than 30 years of age had a higher frequency of multiple infections (61%) than women older than 30 years (39%). We conclude that cervical infection with multiple HPV types is common among women in all age groups and among women...

  3. Identification of multiple HPV types on spermatozoa from human sperm donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Larsen, Peter B; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV...... according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of 35 types of HPV was examined on DNA from semen samples of 188 Danish sperm donors using a sensitive...

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the introduction of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Christine; Largeron, Nathalie; McAllister, Ruth; Mathevet, Patrice; Remy, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    A vaccine to prevent diseases due to human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, and 18 is now available in France. The objective of this study was to assess the health and economic impact in France of implementing a quadrivalent HPV vaccine alongside existing screening practices versus screening alone. A Markov model of the natural history of HPV infection incorporating screening and vaccination, was adapted to the French context. A vaccine that would prevent 100 percent of HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18-associated diseases, with lifetime duration and 80 percent coverage, given to girls at age 14 in conjunction with current screening was compared with screening alone. Results were analyzed from both a direct healthcare cost perspective (DCP) and a third-party payer perspective (TPP). Indirect costs such as productivity loss were not taken into account in this analysis. The incremental cost per life-year gained from vaccination was euro12,429 (TPP) and euro20,455 (DCP). The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) for the introduction of HPV vaccination alongside the French cervical cancer screening program was euro8,408 (TPP) and euro13,809 (DCP). Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that cost-effectiveness was stable, but was most sensitive to the discount rate used for costs and benefits. Considering the commonly accepted threshold of euro50,000 per QALY, these analyses support the fact that adding a quadrivalent HPV vaccine to the current screening program in France is a cost-effective strategy for reducing the burden of cervical cancer, precancerous lesions, and genital warts caused by HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18.

  5. A comparative analysis of the epidemiological impact and disease cost-savings of HPV vaccines in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresse, Xavier; Adam, Marjorie; Largeron, Nathalie; Roze, Stephane; Marty, Remi

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to compare the epidemiological and economic impact of 16/18 bivalent and 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent HPV vaccination in France, considering differences in licensed outcomes, protection against non-vaccine HPV types and prevention of HPV-6/11-related diseases. The differential impact of the two vaccines was evaluated using a published model adapted to the French setting. The target population was females aged 14–23 y and the time horizon was 100 y. A total of eight different scenarios compared vaccination impact in terms of reduction in HPV-16/18-associated carcinomas (cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal, penile and head and neck), HPV-6/11-related genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and incremental reduction in cervical cancer due to potential cross-protection. Quadrivalent vaccine was associated with total discounted cost savings ranging from EUR 544–1,020 million vs. EUR 177–538 million with the bivalent vaccination (100-y time horizon). Genital wart prevention thanks to quadrivalent HPV vaccination accounted for EUR 306–380 million savings (37–56% of costs saved). In contrast, the maximal assumed cross-protection against cervical cancer resulted in EUR 13–33 million savings (4%). Prevention of vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers accounted for additional EUR 71–89 million savings (13%). In France, the quadrivalent HPV vaccination would result in significant incremental epidemiological and economic benefits vs. the bivalent vaccination, driven primarily by prevention of genital. The present analysis is the first in the French setting to consider the impact of HPV vaccination on all HPV diseases and non-vaccine types. PMID:23563511

  6. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata).......To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  7. HPV type infection in different anogenital sites among HIV-positive Brazilian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donadi Eduardo Antonio

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV types, and risk factors for HPV positivity across cervix, vagina and anus, we conducted a study among 138 women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Goal Compare the prevalence of different HPV types and the risk factors for HPV positivity in three sites. Results The most frequently detected HPV types in all sites were, in decreasing order, HPV16, 53, 18, 61 and 81. Agreement between the cervix and vagina was good (kappa 0.60 – 0.80 for HPV16 and 53 and excellent (Kappa > 0.80 for HPV18 and 61. HPV positivity was inversely associated with age for all combinations including the anal site. Conclusion In HIV positive women, HPV18 is the most spread HPV type found in combinations of anal and genital sites. The relationship of anal to genital infection has implications for the development of anal malignancies. Thus, the efficacy of the current HPV vaccine may be considered not only for the cervix, but also for prevention of HPV18 anal infection among immunossuppressed individuals.

  8. Cost-utility of quadrivalent versus trivalent influenza vaccine in Brazil – comparison of outcomes from different static model types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure-Anne Van Bellinghen

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: All three models predicted a cost per quality-adjusted life year gained for quadrivalent versus trivalent influenza vaccine in the range of R$19,257 (FLORENCE to R$22,768 (FLORA with the best available data in Brazil (Appendix A.

  9. HPV type-related chromosomal profiles in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bierkens Mariska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of cervical cancer and its high-grade precursor lesions (Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia grade 2/3 [CIN2/3] result from a persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV types and the accumulation of (epigenetic host cell aberrations. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated variable CIN2/3 and cancer risks between different hrHPV types. Recent genomic profiling studies revealed substantial heterogeneity in the chromosomal aberrations detected in morphologically indistinguishable CIN2/3 suggestive of varying cancer risk. The current study aimed to investigate whether CIN2/3 with different hrHPV types vary with respect to their chromosomal profiles, both in terms of the number of aberrations and chromosomal loci affected. Methods Chromosomal profiles were determined of 43 p16INK4a-immunopositive CIN2/3 of women with long-term hrHPV infection (≥ 5 years. Sixteen lesions harboured HPV16, 3 HPV18, 14 HPV31, 1 HPV33, 4 HPV45, 1 HPV51, 2 HPV52 and 2 HPV58. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the chromosomal profiles revealed two major clusters, characterised by either few or multiple chromosomal aberrations, respectively. A majority of 87.5% of lesions with HPV16 were in the cluster with relatively few aberrations, whereas no such unbalanced distribution was seen for lesions harbouring other hrHPV types. Analysis of the two most prevalent types (HPV16 and HPV31 in this data set revealed a three-fold increase in the number of losses in lesions with HPV31 compared to HPV16-positive lesions. In particular, losses at chromosomes 2q, 4p, 4q, 6p, 6q, 8q & 17p and gain at 1p & 1q were significantly more frequent in HPV31-positive lesions (FDR Conclusions Chromosomal aberrations in CIN2/3 are at least in part related to the hrHPV type present. The relatively low number of chromosomal aberrations observed in HPV16-positive CIN2/3 suggests that the development of these lesions is

  10. Prevalence of type-specific HPV among female university students from northern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Rodrigo Covre; Monteiro, Jeniffer do Socorro Valente; Manso, Est?fane Primo; dos Santos, Maria Renata Mendon?a; Tsutsumi, Mihoko Yamamoto; Ishikawa, Edna Aoba Yassui; Ferrari, Stephen Francis; Lima, Karla Val?ria Batista; de Sousa, Ma?sa Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with cervical cancer, the most frequent cancer in women from northern Brazil. Assessment of the short-term impact of HPV vaccination depends on the availability of data on the prevalence of type-specific HPV in young women in the pre-immunization period, although these data are currently unavailable for the study region. The aim of this study was to estimate the distribution of all mucosal HPV genotypes, including low- and high-ris...

  11. Human papillomavirus (HPV types 16, 18, 31, 45 DNA loads and HPV-16 integration in persistent and transient infections in young women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenczy Alex

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HPV burden is a predictor for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer. The natural history of HPV load in young women being recently exposed to HPV is described in this paper. Methods A total of 636 female university students were followed for 2 years. Cervical specimens with HPV-16, -18, -31, or -45 DNA by consensus PCR were further evaluated with type-specific and β-globin real-time PCR assays. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR of infection clearance. Generalized estimating equations assessed whether HPV loads was predictive of HPV infection at the subsequent visit. Results HPV loads were consistently higher among women Conclusions The association between HPV load and persistence is not uniform across high-risk genital genotypes. HPV-16 integration was only rarely demonstrated in young women.

  12. Prevalence of cervical infection with HPV type 16 and 18 in Vietnam: implications for vaccine campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Lan TH

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Expanded Program on Immunization currently considers offering Human Papilomavirus vaccine on a routine basis in Vietnam. However, as the current available vaccine can prevent only two types HPV 16 and 18, before implementing a large-scale vaccine campaign we need information about the prevalence of infection with only HPV 16 and 18 in Viet Nam. This study was done in 5 large cities in Vietnam to estimate the prevalence of HPV 16 and/or 18 infections and to explore the distribution of other high risk types of HPV among married women in these provinces. Methods The study employed a cross-sectional design with multistage sampling. The sample size included 4500 married women in two rounds (aged ranged from 18-69 years old, median age: 40 year old. Participant were randomly selected, interviewed and given gynaecological examinations. HPV infection status (by real-time PCR kit using TaqMan probe and HPV genotyping test (by Reverse dot blot were done for all participants. Results The prevalence of cervical infection with HPV type 16 and/or 18 among married women in this study ranged from 3.1% to 7.4%. Many positive HPV cases (ranged from 24.5% to 56.8% were infected with other type of high risk HPV which can lead to cervical cancer and cannot prevented by currently available vaccines. In addition to HPV 16 and/or 18, most common types of high risk HPV were types 58, 52, 35 and 45. Awareness about HPV and HPV vaccines was still low in the study samples. Discussion While it is relevant to implement an HPV vaccine campaign in Viet Nam, it is important to note that one can be infected with multiple types of HPV. Vaccination does not protected against all type of high risk HPV types. Future vaccine campaigns should openly disclose this information to women receiving vaccines. Conclusion High prevalence of infection with HPV high risk types was observed in this study. As HPV infection has a high correlation with cervical cancer, this

  13. HPV types, HIV and invasive cervical carcinoma risk in Kampala, Uganda: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleter Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the association of human papillomavirus (HPV with cervical cancer is well established, the influence of HIV on the risk of this disease in sub-Saharan Africa remains unclear. To assess the risk of invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC associated with HIV and HPV types, a hospital-based case-control study was performed between September 2004 and December 2006 in Kampala, Uganda. Incident cases of histologically-confirmed ICC (N=316 and control women (N=314, who were visitors or care-takers of ICC cases in the hospital, were recruited. Blood samples were obtained for HIV serology and CD4 count, as well as cervical samples for HPV testing. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using the SPF10/DEIA/LiPA25 technique which detects all mucosal HPV types by DEIA and identifies 25 HPV genotypes by LiPA version 1. Samples that tested positive but could not be genotyped were designated HPVX. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated by logistic regression, adjusting for possible confounding factors. Results For both squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and adenocarcinoma of the cervix, statistically significantly increased ORs were found among women infected with HPV, in particular single HPV infections, infections with HPV16-related types and high-risk HPV types, in particular HPV16, 18 and 45. For other HPV types the ORs for both SCC and adenocarcinoma were not statistically significantly elevated. HIV infection and CD4 count were not associated with SCC or adenocarcinoma risk in our study population. Among women infected with high-risk HPV types, no association between HIV and SCC emerged. However, an inverse association with adenocarcinoma was observed, while decrease in CD4 count was not associated with ICC risk. Conclusions The ORs for SCC and adenocarcinoma were increased in women infected with HPV, in particular single HPV infections, infections with HPV16- and 18-related types, and high-risk HPV types

  14. Burden of disease associated with cervical cancer in malaysia and potential costs and consequences of HPV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljunid, S; Zafar, A; Saperi, S; Amrizal, M

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 70% of cervical cancers worldwide are attributable to persistent infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 and 18. Vaccination against HPV 16/18 has been shown to dramatically reduce the incidence of associated precancerous and cancerous lesions. The aims of the present analyses were, firstly, to estimate the clinical and economic burden of disease attributable to HPV in Malaysia and secondly, to estimate long-term outcomes associated with HPV vaccination using a prevalence-based modeling approach. In the first part of the analysis costs attributable to cervical cancer and precancerous lesions were estimated; epidemiologic data were sourced from the WHO GLOBOCAN database and Malaysian national data sources. In the second part, a prevalence-based model was used to estimate the potential annual number of cases of cervical cancer and precancerous lesions that could be prevented and subsequent HPV-related treatment costs averted with the bivalent (HPV 16/18) and the quadrivalent (HPV 16/18/6/11) vaccines, at the population level, at steady state. A vaccine efficacy of 98% was assumed against HPV types included in both vaccines. Effectiveness against other oncogenic HPV types was based on the latest results from each vaccine's respective clinical trials. In Malaysia there are an estimated 4,696 prevalent cases of cervical cancer annually and 1,372 prevalent cases of precancerous lesions, which are associated with a total direct cost of RM 39.2 million with a further RM 12.4 million in indirect costs owing to lost productivity. At steady state, vaccination with the bivalent vaccine was estimated to prevent 4,199 cervical cancer cases per year versus 3,804 cases for the quadrivalent vaccine. Vaccination with the quadrivalent vaccine was projected to prevent 1,721 cases of genital warts annually, whereas the annual number of cases remained unchanged with the bivalent vaccine. Furthermore, vaccination with the bivalent vaccine was estimated to avert RM 45

  15. Prevalence of single and multiple HPV types in cervical carcinomas in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Maaike C; Dijkman, Anneke; Aziz, Mohammad Farid; Siregar, Budiningsih; Cornain, Santoso; Kolkman-Uljee, Sandra; Peters, Lex A W; Fleuren, Gert Jan

    2004-04-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most frequently occurring type of cancer in women worldwide. A persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary causal factor in cervical carcinogenesis. The distribution of HPV types in populations has been studied worldwide. In Indonesia, however, few data are available describing the prevalence of HPV. Cervical carcinoma is the most common female cancer in Indonesia and causes high morbidity and mortality figures. With HPV vaccination studies in progress, it is important to map the HPV status of a population that would benefit greatly from future prevention programs. We tested 74 cervical cancer specimens from consecutive, newly diagnosed cervical cancer patients in the outpatient clinic of the Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta. After additional staining, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples were histologically classified. HPV presence and genotype distribution were determined by SPF10 polymerase chain reaction and line probe assay. HPV DNA of 12 different HPV types was detected in 96% of the specimens. The three most common types were 16 (44%), 18 (39%) and 52 (14%). In 14% of the specimens, multiple HPV types were present. The multiple HPV types were significantly more prevalent among adenosquamous carcinomas in comparison with squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma (P = 0.014). Distribution of HPV types in Indonesia with a more prominent role for HPV 18 is slightly different from that in other parts of the world. The high amount of multiple HPV infections found in adenosquamous carcinomas may prompt further research on the pathogenesis of this type of cervical tumours.

  16. Age of child, more than HPV type, is associated with clinical course in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrel J Buchinsky

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available RRP is a devastating disease in which papillomas in the airway cause hoarseness and breathing difficulty. The disease is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV 6 or 11 and is very variable. Patients undergo multiple surgeries to maintain a patent airway and in order to communicate vocally. Several small studies have been published in which most have noted that HPV 11 is associated with a more aggressive course.Papilloma biopsies were taken from patients undergoing surgical treatment of RRP and were subjected to HPV typing. 118 patients with juvenile-onset RRP with at least 1 year of clinical data and infected with a single HPV type were analyzed. HPV 11 was encountered in 40% of the patients. By our definition, most of the patients in the sample (81% had run an aggressive course. The odds of a patient with HPV 11 running an aggressive course were 3.9 times higher than that of patients with HPV 6 (Fisher's exact p = 0.017. However, clinical course was more closely associated with age of the patient (at diagnosis and at the time of the current surgery than with HPV type. Patients with HPV 11 were diagnosed at a younger age (2.4y than were those with HPV 6 (3.4y (p = 0.014. Both by multiple linear regression and by multiple logistic regression HPV type was only weakly associated with metrics of disease course when simultaneously accounting for age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE ABSTRACT: The course of RRP is variable and a quarter of the variability can be accounted for by the age of the patient. HPV 11 is more closely associated with a younger age at diagnosis than it is associated with an aggressive clinical course. These data suggest that there are factors other than HPV type and age of the patient that determine disease course.

  17. Population-based prevalence, type- and age-specific distribution of HPV in women before introduction of an HPV-vaccination program in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Susanne K.; Breugelmans, Gabrielle; Munk, Christian

    2008-01-01

    /11. Prevalence of high-risk HPV types increased from 19.2% in women with normal cytology to 100% in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3)/cervical cancer. HPV 16 was the most prevalent type (6.0% of all women), and was also the most prevalent in women with HSIL (35.1%) and CIN3 (53......-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and 1.6% had high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). The HPV prevalence was 26.4% with a peak in women 20-24 years (50.2%) and then decreased without a second peak in older women. Among the youngest women (15-19 years), 14% had HPV 16/18 and 16% had HPV 6.......2%). Other common HPV types in women with CIN3 included HPV 52, 51, 31, 33 and 18. HPV 16/18 alone was present in 23% of CIN3 lesions and 67% of cervical cancers, and HPV 16/18 together with other high-risk HPV types was present in 41% of CIN3 lesions. This suggests that an efficacious HPV 16/18 vaccine...

  18. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  19. Cutaneous wart-associated HPV types: prevalence and relation with patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; de Koning, M.N.; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Ter Schegget, J.; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data on cutaneous wart-associated HPV types are rare. OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence of cutaneous wart-associated HPV types and their relation with patient characteristics. STUDY DESIGN: Swabs were taken from all 744 warts of 246 consecutive immunocompetent

  20. A cohort study of cervical screening using partial HPV typing and cytology triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Mark; Hyun, Noorie; Raine-Bennett, Tina R; Katki, Hormuzd; Fetterman, Barbara; Gage, Julia C; Cheung, Li C; Befano, Brian; Poitras, Nancy; Lorey, Thomas; Castle, Philip E; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    HPV testing is more sensitive than cytology for cervical screening. However, to incorporate HPV tests into screening, risk-stratification ("triage") of HPV-positive women is needed to avoid excessive colposcopy and overtreatment. We prospectively evaluated combinations of partial HPV typing (Onclarity, BD) and cytology triage, and explored whether management could be simplified, based on grouping combinations yielding similar 3-year or 18-month CIN3+ risks. We typed ∼9,000 archived specimens, taken at enrollment (2007-2011) into the NCI-Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) HPV Persistence and Progression (PaP) cohort. Stratified sampling, with reweighting in the statistical analysis, permitted risk estimation of HPV/cytology combinations for the 700,000+-woman KPNC screening population. Based on 3-year CIN3+ risks, Onclarity results could be combined into five groups (HPV16, else HPV18/45, else HPV31/33/58/52, else HPV51/35/39/68/56/66/68, else HPV negative); cytology results fell into three risk groups ("high-grade," ASC-US/LSIL, NILM). For the resultant 15 HPV group-cytology combinations, 3-year CIN3+ risks ranged 1,000-fold from 60.6% to 0.06%. To guide management, we compared the risks to established "benchmark" risk/management thresholds in this same population (e.g., LSIL predicted 3-year CIN3+ risk of 5.8% in the screening population, providing the benchmark for colposcopic referral). By benchmarking to 3-year risk thresholds (supplemented by 18-month estimates), the widely varying risk strata could be condensed into four action bands (very high risk of CIN3+ mandating consideration of cone biopsy if colposcopy did not find precancer; moderate risk justifying colposcopy; low risk managed by intensified follow-up to permit HPV "clearance"; and very low risk permitting routine screening.) Overall, the results support primary HPV testing, with management of HPV-positive women using partial HPV typing and cytology. © 2016 UICC.

  1. Inference of type-specific HPV transmissibility, progression and clearance rates: a mathematical modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C Johnson

    Full Text Available Quantifying rates governing the clearance of Human Papillomavirus (HPV and its progression to clinical disease, together with viral transmissibility and the duration of naturally-acquired immunity, is essential in estimating the impact of vaccination programmes and screening or testing regimes. However, the complex natural history of HPV makes this difficult. We infer the viral transmissibility, rate of waning natural immunity and rates of progression and clearance of infection of 13 high-risk and 2 non-oncogenic HPV types, making use of a number of rich datasets from Sweden. Estimates of viral transmissibility, clearance of initial infection and waning immunity were derived in a Bayesian framework by fitting a susceptible-infectious-recovered-susceptible (SIRS transmission model to age- and type-specific HPV prevalence data from both a cross-sectional study and a randomised controlled trial (RCT of primary HPV screening. The models fitted well, but over-estimated the prevalence of four high-risk types with respect to the data. Three of these types (HPV-33, -35 and -58 are among the most closely related phylogenetically to the most prevalent HPV-16. The fourth (HPV-45 is the most closely related to HPV-18; the second most prevalent type. We suggest that this may be an indicator of cross-immunity. Rates of progression and clearance of clinical lesions were additionally estimated from longitudinal data gathered as part of the same RCT. Our estimates of progression and clearance rates are consistent with the findings of survival analysis studies and we extend the literature by estimating progression and clearance rates for non-16 and non-18 high-risk types. We anticipate that such type-specific estimates will be useful in the parameterisation of further models and in developing our understanding of HPV natural history.

  2. Genital prevalence of HPV types and co-infection in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos P. Freire

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HPV infection is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted disease and there is evidence of the relationship of HPV infection and the development of genital warts, penile intraepitelial neoplasia, invasive penile carcinoma and cervical cancer. However, there is sparse data regarding the prevalence of HPV types and co-infection of different HPV types among men. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of HPV subtypes infections and rates of co-infection among men. Materials and Methods: 366 men were evaluated from March to October 2010. Men were referred to our institution for HPV diagnostic evaluation based on the following criteria: 1. presence of a genital wart; 2. presence of an atypical genital lesion; 3. absence of symptoms and a partner with a HPV diagnosis; 4. absence of symptoms and a desire to undergo a full STD diagnostic evaluation. Genital samples were collected from the urethra, penile shaft, scrotum and anus with Digene® collection and preservation kit and submitted to HPV genotype microarray detection (Papillocheck®. All men were tested for the low-risk HPV types 6-11-40-42-43-44 and for the high-risk HPV types 16-18-31-33-35-39-45-51-52-53-56-58-59-66-68-70-73-82. Results: Of the 366 men, 11 were tested inconclusive and were excluded from the analysis. 256 men (72.1% of the men from the cohort referred to our institution tested positive with genotype micro-array detection and 99 tested negative. The most prevalent HPV-subtypes in the studied population were 6, 42, 51 and 16. Co-infection was found in 153 men. Of those, 70 (19.7% had a co-infection by 2 types, 37 (10.4% by 3 types; 33 men (9.2% by 4 types; 8 men (2.2% by 5 types; 1 man (0.3% by 6 types; 1 man (0.3% by 7 types; 2 men (0.6% by 8 types and 1 man (0.3% by 9 types. Conclusion: The most frequent HPV types were 6, 16, 42 and 51. Co-infection was found in 59% of our patients. This information is vital to drive future public health policies including massive

  3. Prognosis of vulvar dysplasia and carcinoma in situ with special reference to histology and types of human papillomavirus (HPV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Jette; Poulsen, H; Horn, T

    1997-01-01

    is the involvement of the resection borders. The location of the lesion, the degree and type of dysplasia, and the type of HPV seem to play a minor role. Local excision and subsequent intensive control with removal of any visible new lesion probably prevents development of vulvar invasive carcinoma....... were classified according to the WHO (mild, moderate, severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ) and Toki et al. (1991) (warty, basaloid, combined warty/basaloid or mixed (warty, basaloid and simple). No pure types of Toki (1991) could be demonstrated. There were no differences regarding recurrences in any...... of these groups. HPV DNA was detected in the initial lesions by PCR in 50/56 (89%) (44 with HPV type 16 and 6 with HPV type 33) and by ISH in 23/61 (38%). The same type of HPV could be demonstrated in all first recurrences except in two, where HPV types 33 was shown in specimens harboring HPV type 16...

  4. Potential overestimation of HPV vaccine impact due to unmasking of non-vaccine types: quantification using a multi-type mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Hong; Chapman, Ruth; Gay, Nigel; Jit, Mark

    2012-05-14

    Estimates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine impact in clinical trials and modelling studies rely on DNA tests of cytology or biopsy specimens to determine the HPV type responsible for a cervical lesion. DNA of several oncogenic HPV types may be detectable in a specimen. However, only one type may be responsible for a particular cervical lesion. Misattribution of the causal HPV type for a particular abnormality may give rise to an apparent increase in disease due to non-vaccine HPV types following vaccination ("unmasking"). To investigate the existence and magnitude of unmasking, we analysed data from residual cytology and biopsy specimens in English women aged 20-64 years old using a stochastic type-specific individual-based model of HPV infection, progression and disease. The model parameters were calibrated to data on the prevalence of HPV DNA and cytological lesion of different grades, and used to assign causal HPV types to cervical lesions. The difference between the prevalence of all disease due to non-vaccine HPV types, and disease due to non-vaccine HPV types in the absence of vaccine HPV types, was then estimated. There could be an apparent maximum increase of 3-10% in long-term cervical cancer incidence due to non-vaccine HPV types following vaccination. Unmasking may be an important phenomenon in HPV post-vaccination epidemiology, in the same way that has been observed following pneumococcal conjugate vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Carcinogenicity of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in HIV-Positive Women: A Meta-Analysis From HPV Infection to Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Data on the relative carcinogenic potential of human papillomavirus (HPV) types among women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (WHIV) are needed to inform prevention programs for this population. Methods. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of high-risk HPV-type distribution in 19883 HIV-positive women was performed. The women, from 86 studies worldwide, included 11739 with normal cytological findings; 1784 with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS); 2173 with low-grade and 1282 with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) diagnosed cytologically; 1198 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1), 456 with CIN2, and 455 with CIN3 diagnosed histologically; and 796 with invasive cervical cancers (ICCs). A large proportion of WHIV, and almost all with ICCs, were from Africa. Results. In Africa, HPV 16 accounted for 13% of HPV-positive WHIV with normal cytological findings, but this proportion increased through ASCUS, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, CIN1, and CIN2 (18%–25%), up to 41%–47% for CIN3 and ICCs. Only HPV 16, HPV 18, and HPV 45 accounted for a greater proportion of HPV infections in ICCs compared with normal cytological findings (ICC:normal ratios, 3.68, 2.47, and 2.55, respectively). Other high-risk types accounted for important proportions of low- and/or high-grade lesions, but their contribution dropped in ICCs, with ICC:normal ratios in Africa ranging from 0.79 for HPV 33 down to 0.38 for HPV 56. Findings for HPV 16 and HPV 18 in Europe/North America, Asia, and Latin America were compatible with those from Africa. Conclusions. HPV 16 and HPV 18 in particular, but also HPV 45, at least in Africa, warrant special attention in WHIV. Broad consistency of findings with those in HIV-uninfected population would suggest that the risk stratification offered by partial HPV genotyping tests also have relevance for HIV-positive women. PMID:28199532

  6. E4 antibodies facilitate detection and type-assignment of active HPV infection in cervical disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Griffin

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV infections are the cause of nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Although the detection of HPV DNA has proved useful in cervical diagnosis, it does not necessarily predict disease presence or severity, and cannot conclusively identify the causative type when multiple HPVs are present. Such limitations may be addressed using complementary approaches such as cytology, laser capture microscopy, and/or the use of infection biomarkers. One such infection biomarker is the HPV E4 protein, which is expressed at high level in cells that are supporting (or have supported viral genome amplification. Its distribution in lesions has suggested a role in disease staging. Here we have examined whether type-specific E4 antibodies may also allow the identification and/or confirmation of causal HPV-type. To do this, type-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against three E4 proteins (HPV-16, -18, and -58 were generated and validated by ELISA and western blotting, and by immunohistochemistry (IHC staining of epithelial rafts containing these individual HPV types. Type-specific detection of HPV and its associated disease was subsequently examined using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical intra-epithelial neoplasias (CIN, (n = 247 and normal controls (n = 28. All koilocytotic CIN1 lesions showed type-specific E4 expression of their respective HPV types. Differences were noted amongst E4 expression patterns in CIN3. HPV-18 E4 was not detected in any of the 6 HPV-18 DNA-positive CIN3 lesions examined, whereas in HPV-16 and -58 CIN3, 28/37 (76% and 5/9 (55.6% expressed E4 respectively, usually in regions of epithelial differentiation. Our results demonstrate that type-specific E4 antibodies can be used to help establish causality, as may be required when multiple HPV types are detected. The unique characteristics of the E4 biomarker suggest a role in diagnosis and patient management particularly when used in combination.

  7. Prevalence and typing of HPV DNA in atypical squamous cells in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Danielle W; Pirog, Edyta C; Zhu, Xiaopei; Wang, Hanlin L; Pinto, Karen R

    2003-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and typing of HPV DNA in pregnant women with a diagnosis of atypical squamous cells (ASC) and to assess whether pregnancy-related changes contribute to the diagnosis of ASC. HPV testing was performed on residual specimens from the ThinPrep Pap test (Cytyc Corp., Boxborough, Massachusetts, U.S.A.) in pregnant women diagnosed as ASC (study group, n = 105), low and high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL and HSIL) (positive control, n = 33) and negative for epithelial cell abnormality (negative control, n = 20). All cases were reviewed by 2 cytopathologists to obtain consensus diagnoses using the Bethesda System 2001 criteria. The study group cases were further subcategorized into ASC of undetermined significance (ASCUS, n = 99) and ASC cannot exclude HSIL (ASC-H, n = 6). HPV testing was also performed on an ASC control group consisting of 68 consecutive ASC cases in nonpregnant women, matched by age. Mean patient age was 23.7 years for the study group and 25.6 years for the ASC control group. HPV DNA was detected in 88.6% of cases in the study group, including 87.9% of ASC-US and 100% of ASC-H cases. Of the HPV positive cases, 79.6%, 4.3%, 5.4% and 10.8% had high-risk, mixed high- and low-risk, low-risk and unknown HPV types, respectively. The most frequent HPV types detected were: types 52 (31.2%), 16 (15.1%), 39 (11.8%), 53 (10.8%), and 18 and 58 (9.7% each). Multiple viral types were detected in 43.0% of cases. The prevalence of HPV DNA in the positive and negative controls in pregnant women was 100% and 55%, respectively. HPV DNA was detected in 83.8% of the ASC control group. Regardless of pregnancy-related changes, the prevalence of HPV DNA in pregnant women (88.6%) was similar to that found in ASC in nonpregnant women of the same reproductive-age group (83.8%), and the high-risk types accounted for the vast majority of cases (83.9%). These findings demonstrate that pregnancy-related changes do not contribute to the

  8. Prevalence of type-specific HPV infection by age and grade of cervical cytology: data from the ARTISTIC trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, A; Bailey, A; Almonte, M; Turner, A; Thomson, C; Peto, J; Desai, M; Mather, J; Moss, S; Roberts, C; Kitchener, H C

    2008-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes cervical cancer and premalignant dysplasia. Type-specific HPV prevalence data provide a basis for assessing the impact of HPV vaccination programmes on cervical cytology. We report high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) type-specific prevalence data in relation to cervical cytology for 24 510 women (age range: 20–64; mean age 40.2 years) recruited into the ARTISTIC trial, which is being conducted within the routine NHS Cervical Screening Programme in Greater Manchester. The most common HR-HPV types were HPV16, 18, 31, 51 and 52, which accounted for 60% of all HR-HPV types detected. There was a marked decline in the prevalence of HR-HPV infection with age, but the proportion due to each HPV type did not vary greatly with age. Multiple infections were common below the age of 30 years but less so between age 30 and 64 years. Catch-up vaccination of this sexually active cohort would be expected to reduce the number of women with moderate or worse cytology by 45%, but the number with borderline or mild cytology would fall by only 7%, giving an overall reduction of 12% in the number of women with abnormal cytology and 27% in the number with any HR-HPV infection. In the absence of broader cross-protection, the large majority of low-grade and many high-grade abnormalities may still occur in sexually active vaccinated women. PMID:18392052

  9. Substantial Decline in Vaccine-Type Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Among Vaccinated Young Women During the First 8 Years After HPV Vaccine Introduction in a Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jessica A.; Widdice, Lea E.; Ding, Lili; Huang, Bin; Brown, Darron R.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Bernstein, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness and herd protection are not well established in community settings. Our objective was to determine trends in vaccine-type HPV in young women during the 8 years after vaccine introduction, to assess changes in HPV prevalence and characterize herd protection in a community. Methods. We recruited 3 samples of sexually experienced, 13–26-year-old adolescent girls and young women (hereafter women; N = 1180) from 2006–2014: before widespread vaccine introduction (wave 1) and 3 (wave 2) and 7 (wave 3) years after vaccine introduction. We determined the prevalence of vaccine-type HPV (HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18) among all, vaccinated, and unvaccinated women at waves 1, 2, and 3, adjusted for differences in participant characteristics, then examined whether changes in HPV prevalence were significant using inverse propensity score–weighted logistic regression. Results. Vaccination rates increased from 0% to 71.3% across the 3 waves. Adjusted vaccine-type HPV prevalence changed from 34.8% to 8.7% (75.0% decline) in all women, from 34.9% to 3.2% (90.8% decline) in vaccinated women, and from 32.5% to 22.0% (32.3% decline) in unvaccinated women. Among vaccinated participants, vaccine-type HPV prevalence decreased significantly from wave 1 to wave 2 (adjusted odds ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, .13–.34) and from wave 1 to wave 3 (0.06; .03–.13). The same decreases were also significant among unvaccinated participants (adjusted odds ratios, 0.44; [95% confidence interval, .27–.71] and 0.59; [.35–.98], respectively). Conclusions. The prevalence of vaccine-type HPV decreased >90% in vaccinated women, demonstrating high effectiveness in a community setting, and >30% in unvaccinated women, providing evidence of herd protection. PMID:27655996

  10. Patterns of cervical coinfection with multiple human papilloma virus types in a screening population in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Bryan; Rebolj, Matejka; Rygaard, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection suggest that HPV genotypes are not independent of each other. This may be explained by risk factors common to all HPV infections, but type-specific biological factors may also play a role. This raises the question of whether widespread use...... of the quadrivalent vaccine (covering HPV6, 11, 16, 18) may indirectly affect the prevalence of any non-vaccine types. Routine screening samples from 5014 Danish women were tested for 35 HPV genotypes (including 13 high-risk) using the Genomica CLART(®) HPV2 kit, which is a low-density microarray based on PCR...... amplification. Simulation studies were performed both under independence between genotypes and under a common dependence structure as would arise from common risk factors, and simulation results were compared to observed coinfection patterns. Overall HPV prevalence was 37.4%, with multiple infections in 17...

  11. Carcinogenicity of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in HIV-Positive Women: A Meta-Analysis From HPV Infection to Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Clifford, Gary M.; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Data on the relative carcinogenic potential of human papillomavirus (HPV) types among women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (WHIV) are needed to inform prevention programs for this population. Methods. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of high-risk HPV-type distribution in 19883 HIV-positive women was performed. The women, from 86 studies worldwide, included 11739 with normal cytological findings; 1784 with atypical squamous cells of undete...

  12. [Human papillomavirus associated cervix uteri morbidity in Hungary: epidemiology and correlation with the HPV types and the simultaneous cytological diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentirmay, Zoltán; Veleczki, Zsuzsa; Kásler, Miklós

    2017-08-01

    Persistent infection of human papillomavirus is known to cause cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cancer in the cervix uteri and other HPV-associated cancers in different localization. Based on epidemiological and biological data, principally the high risk HPV is responsible for development of cervical these cancers. However, we have no information about the frequently distribution of different HPV types and what is the correlation between the HPV types and cytological diagnosis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In this paper, we are going to present new data involving incidence and mortality of HPV-associated cancers during the period of 2009-2015 in Hungary. We are also going to investigate the correlation of cervical cytological diagnosis and HPV typing, and the preventive effect of HPV vaccination. The epidemiological data spring from the National Cancer Registry. HPV typing was performed by Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test. Simultaneous cytological diagnosis and HPV typing was carried out on 2048 cytological samples collected in period of 2009-2016. According to the epidemiologic data, the most frequently occurring HPV-associated cancer is the laryngeal carcinoma in man, and the cervical cancer in woman in Hungary. During the 2009-2015 time intervals, the frequency distribution of head and neck cancers was not changed in man, but the incidence of tongue root squamous cell carcinomas was gradually increasing in woman. We have defined the clinical significance of single and simultaneously multiple HPV infection and have investigated the correlation of the HPV frequency distribution and cytological diagnosis in CIN. It was found that in the cytological negativity of probably/possibly carcinogen pHR-HPV group classified by IACR was much more frequent as in HR-HPV group (56% versus 47%). The presence of simultaneous multiplex HPV infection betokens an increased cancer risk. According to the international publications, the ratio of HPV16 just twice as

  13. [What should be known for the introduction of an HPV vaccine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Nubia; Jacquard, Anne-Carole

    2008-10-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Two HPV vaccines are now available in many countries: (i) the first vaccine is quadrivalent and indicated in the prevention of CIN 2/3, cervical cancers, VIN 2/3, VaIN 2/3 and genital warts associated with the HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, (ii) the second vaccine is bivalent and indicated in the prevention of CIN 2+ and cervical cancers associated with the HPV types 16 and 18. To critically review all epidemiological aspects of the HPV infection and its relation with preneoplasic lesions of the cervix and cervical cancer to assist the relevant public health authorities to make plans for the introduction of HPV vaccines that have been recently commercialized. Only articles published in English in peer reviewed journals have been selected in Date base PubMed (National Library of Medicine - National Institutes of Health) with Keywords HPV, risk factor, cervical cancer, CIN2/3, incidence, prevalence, transmission, prevention, genital cancer, HPV vaccines, screening. A critical review of most papers published during the last 10 years was made. The topics covered included: diseases caused by HPV, prevalence, incidence and transmission of HPV, risk factors for the acquisition of HPV, natural history of HPV infection, risk factors determining the progression from HPV to cancer, protective factors blocking the progression from infection to cancer (screening) and primary prevention of HPV by vaccines and other methods. The information was interpreted and summarized. It was concluded that HPV infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections, that it is the necessary cause of cervical cancer and the cause of other genital cancers and cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract. Fortunately most infections regress, but those infections that persist are the ones leading to cancer. Primary prevention by the introduction of prophylactic vaccines is the

  14. Kinetic and HPV infection effects on cross-type neutralizing antibody and avidity responses induced by Cervarix®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Troy J.; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Hildesheim, Allan; Pan, Yuanji; Penrose, Kerri J.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that Cervarix® elicits antibody responses against vaccine-related types for which clinical efficacy was demonstrated (HPV-31 and -45). Here, we evaluated the kinetics of neutralization titers and avidity of Cervarix®-induced antibodies up to 36 months of follow-up in unexposed and HPV infected women. Methods A subset of women who participated in the Cost Rica HPV-16/18 Vaccine Trial had pre- and post-vaccination sera tested for antibody responses to HPV-16, -18, -31, -45, and -58 using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay, and HPV-16 antibody avidity using an HPV-16 L1 VLP (virus-like particle)-based ELISA developed in our laboratory. Results In uninfected women, neutralizing antibody titers did not reach significance until after the 3rd dose for HPV-31 (month 12, p=0.009) and HPV-45 (month 12, p=0.003), but then persisted up to month 36 (HPV-31, p=0.01; HPV-45, p=0.002). Individuals infected with HPV-16 or HPV-31 at enrollment developed a significantly higher median antibody response to the corresponding HPV type after one dose, but there was not a difference between median titers after three doses compared to the HPV negative group. Median HPV-16 antibody avidity and titer increased over time up to month 12; however, the HPV-16 avidity did not correlate well with HPV-16 neutralizing antibody titers at each time point examined, except for month 6. The median avidity levels were higher in HPV-16 infected women at month 1 (p=0.04) and lower in HPV-16 infected women at month 12 (p=0.006) compared to the HPV negative women. Conclusions The persistence of cross-neutralization titers at month 36 suggests cross-reactive antibody responses are likely to persist long-term and are not influenced by infection status at enrollment. However, the weak correlation between avidity and neutralization titers emphasizes the need for examining avidity in efficacy studies to determine if high avidity antibodies play a critical role in

  15. Modelling borderline and mild dysplasia associated with HPV 6 and 11 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Ruth; Soldan, Kate; Jit, Mark

    2011-04-05

    Low risk HPV types 6/11 are responsible for some low-grade cytological abnormalities. Most economic analyses of HPV vaccination have estimated the additional benefit of HPV 6/11 protection by the quadrivalent vaccine, over the bivalent, based on reduction of genital warts but have not included reduction in repeat smears and colposcopies due to low-grade abnormalities. We investigate the contribution of HPV types 6/11 to abnormal smears and associated costs in England. The risk of borderline or mild dysplasia due to HPV 6/11 infection was estimated from a study of type-specific HPV DNA in cervical screening specimens collected throughout England. A Markov model representing 10 million women with HPV 6/11 or with no HPV infection from 24 to 64 years was developed to estimate the number of abnormal smears, subsequent repeat smears and colposcopies due to HPV 6/11 associated with borderline or mild dysplasia. Fitting was achieved by varying the force of infection, probability of borderline or mild dysplasia if HPV-uninfected or infected with HPV 6/11 and the duration of infection. The relative risks of borderline or mild dysplasia when infected with HPV 6/11 compared to not being HPV infected were 6.32 (95% credible interval 1.56-25.6) and 17.5 (1.02-300) respectively. Using best fitting parameters we find the costs incurred are between £170 and £195 per abnormal smear due to infection with HPV 6/11. In England, the impact of cytological abnormalities due to HPV 6/11 is relatively small, but not negligible. A vaccine that protects against HPV 6/11 infections could reduce costs associated with borderline and mild dysplasia, and associated colposcopies. These benefits should be considered when formulating immunisation policy, if possible. Smears and colposcopies in those uninfected with HPV far outnumber those in women infected with HPV 6/11. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Automation of the linear array HPV genotyping test and its application for routine typing of human papillomaviruses in cervical specimens of women without cytological abnormalities in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobec, Marinko; Bannwart, Fridolin; Kaeppeli, Franz; Cassinotti, Pascal

    2009-05-01

    There is a need for reliable, automated high throughput HPV detection and genotyping methods for pre- and post-prophylactic vaccine intervention analyses. To optimize the linear array (LA) HPV genotyping test (Roche Diagnostics, Rotkreuz) in regard to possible automation steps for the routine laboratory diagnosis of HPV infections and to analyze the HPV genotype distribution in cervical specimens of women without cytological abnormalities in Switzerland. 680 cervical cell specimens with normal cytology, obtained from women undergoing routine cervical screening by liquid-based Pap smear, were analyzed by the LA HPV genotyping test for HPV-DNA. The automation of the LA HPV genotyping test resulted in a total hands-on time reduction of 255 min (from 480 to 225 min; 53%). Any of 37 HPV genotypes were detected in 117 (17.2%) and high-risk (HR) HPV in 55 (8.1%) of 680 women with normal cytology. The highest prevalence of any HPV (28.1%) and HR-HPV (15.1%) was observed in age-group 21-30 and showed a continuous decrease in older age-groups. The most common HR-HPV genotypes were HPV-16 (12%), HPV-31 (9.4%), HPV-52 (6%), HPV-51 (5.1%), HPV-45 (4.3%), HPV-58 (4.3%) and HPV-59 (4.3%). The optimization and automation of the LA HPV genotyping test makes it suited for high throughput HPV detection and typing. The epidemiological data provides information about distribution of HPV genotypes in women without cytological abnormalities in Switzerland and may be important for determining the future impact of vaccines and potential changes in the country's epidemiological HPV profile.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in adolescent girls

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    A. V. Rudakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV infection is one of the major risk factor of development of genital warts, a cervical dysplasia, a cervical cancer, and also some other oncologic diseases. The usage of quadrivalent HPV vaccine in girls reduces the corresponding case rate and the mortality significantly.The objective of this study is to analyze the cost-effectiveness of quadrivalent HPV vaccination cases of 12-yearold girls in Russian Federation.Materials and methods. A Markov model is used on the basis of epidemiological data in Russian Federation. The cost-effectiveness was estimated from societal perspective. We assumed that the effect of vaccination remains throughout all life. The analysis is performed for survival of 12-year-old girls. We considered only effect in the vaccinated population. Costs for therapy of the diseases associated with HPV infection corresponded to compulsory health insurance rates across St. Petersburg for 2016. Costs and life expectancy have been discounted for 3,5% a year.Results. Quadrivalent HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls in Russian Federation will allow to prevent counting on 10000 the vaccinated persons 293 cases of genital warts, 15 cases of pre invasive cervical cancer, 81 cases of invasive cervical cancer, 6 cases of vulvar cancer, 2 cases of vaginal cancer, 2 cases of anal cancer, 1 case of oropharyngeal cancer. In general, 49 cases of death caused by HPV infection on 10000 vaccinated girls would be prevented. The vaccination will provide cost reduction, caused by HPV-associated diseases, for 68% (58,38 million rubles on 10000 vaccinated, and 96% of the predicted prevented costs will be caused by decrease in incidence of cervical cancer. The quadrivalent HPV vaccination is associated with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of 172 000 rubles per quality adjusted life-year (QALY and 411 300 rubles per death caused by HPV-associated diseases.Conclusions. Quadrivalent

  18. Differences in incidence and co-occurrence of vaccine and nonvaccine human papillomavirus types in Finnish population before human papillomavirus mass vaccination suggest competitive advantage for HPV33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikukka, Marko; Kaasila, Marjo; Namujju, Proscovia B; Palmroth, Johanna; Kirnbauer, Reinhard; Paavonen, Jorma; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Lehtinen, Matti

    2011-03-01

    To understand likelihood of type replacement after vaccination against the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, we evaluated competition of the seven most common genital HPV types in a population sample of unvaccinated, fertile-aged Finnish women. First trimester sera from two consecutive pregnancies were retrieved from 3,183 Finnish women (mean age, 23.1 years) of whom 42.3% had antibodies to at least one HPV type (6/11/16/18/31/33/45) at the baseline. Antibody positivity to more than one HPV types by the second pregnancy was common among the baseline HPV seropositives. However, compared to baseline HPV-seronegative women, significantly increased incidence rate ratios (IRRs), indicating an increased risk to seroconvert for another HPV type, were consistently noted only for HPV33 among baseline HPV16 or HPV18 antibody (ab)-positive women: HPV(16ab only) (→) (16&33ab) IRR 2.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-5.4] and HPV(18ab only) (→) (18&33ab) IRR 2.5 (95% CI 1.1-6.0), irrespectively of the presence of antibodies to other HPV types at baseline: HPV(16ab) (→) (16&33ab) IRR 3.2 (95% CI 2.0-5.2) and HPV(18ab) (→) (18&33ab) IRR 3.6 (95% CI 2.1-5.9). Our findings suggest a possible competitive advantage for HPV33 over other genital HPV types in the unvaccinated population. HPV33 should be monitored for type replacement after HPV mass vaccination. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  19. High Prevalence and Genotype Diversity of Anal HPV Infection among MSM in Northern Thailand.

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    Taweewat Supindham

    Full Text Available HPV infection is common and may cause cancer among men who have sex with men (MSM. Anal HPV infection (HPV+ was found in 85% of HIV-positive (HIV+ and 59% of HIV-negative (HIV- MSM in Bangkok, central Thailand. As little is known about HPV in this group in northern Thailand, we studied MSM subgroups comprised of gay men (GM, bisexual men (BM, and transgender women (TGW.From July 2012 through January 2013, 85 (42.5% of 200 GM, 30 (15% BM, and 85 (42.5% TGW who practiced receptive anal intercourse were recruited after informed consent, followed by self-assisted computer interview, HIV testing, and anal swabs for HPV genotyping.Of 197 adequate specimens, the overall prevalence of any HPV was 157 (80%. Prevalence was 89% (76/85 in GM, 48% (14/29 in BM, and 81% (67/83 in TGW. The most common high-risk types were HPV16 (27% of 197, HPV58 (23%, and HPV51 (18%. Prevalence of high-risk types was 74% in 85 GM, 35% in 29 BM, and 71% in 83 TGW. Prevalence of any HPV type, or high-risk type, was 100% and 94%, respectively, among 48 HIV+ MSM, 70% and 54% among 120 HIV- MSM. Of the 197 specimens, 36% (70 had HPV types 16 and/or 18 in the bivalent vaccine, compared to 48% (95 with ≥1 of types 16/18/06/11 in the quadrivalent, 56% (111 for 16/18/31/33/45/52/58 in the 7-valent, and 64% (126 for 16/18/31/33/45/52/58/06/11 in the 9-valent. HIV+, GM, and TGW were independently associated with HPV infection.We found higher rates of both any HPV and high-risk types than previous studies. Among the heretofore unstudied TGW, their equivalent HPV rates were comparable to GM. Current and investigational HPV vaccines could substantially protect GM, BM, and TGW from the serious consequences of HPV infection especially among HIV + MSM.

  20. The Prevalence of High-Risk HPV Types and Factors Determining Infection in Female Colombian Adolescents.

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    Luisa Del Río-Ospina

    Full Text Available This study reports six HR-HPV types' infection prevalence discriminated by species and multiple infection in unvaccinated Colombian female adolescents, as well as some factors modulating the risk of infection. HPV DNA for six high-risk viral types was identified in cervical samples taken from 2,134 12-19 year-old females using conventional generic and type-specific PCR. Binomial logistical regression analysis was used for modelling HR-HPV infection and multiple infection risk. The interaction between variables in a stepwise model was also included in such analysis. Viral DNA was detected in 48.97% of the females; 28.52% of them had multiple infections, HPV-16 being the most frequently occurring type (37.44%. Cytological abnormality prevalence was 15.61%. Being over 16 years-old (1.66: 1.01-2.71 95%CI, white ethnicity (4.40: 1.16-16.73 95%CI, having had 3 or more sexual partners (1.77: 1.11-2.81 95%CI and prior sexually-transmitted infections (STI (1.65: 1.17-2.32 95%CI were associated with a greater risk of HPV infection. Having given birth was related to a higher risk of infection by A7 species and antecedent of abortion to less risk of coinfection. Where the females in this study came from also influenced the risk of infection by A7 species as female adolescents from the Andean region had a lower risk of infection (0.42: 0.18-0.99 95%CI. The presence of factors related to risky sexual behaviour in the study population indicated that public health services should pay special attention to female adolescents to modify the risk of infection by high-risk HPV types and decrease their impact on this age group.

  1. Immunogenicity and safety of the 9-valent HPV vaccine in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellsagué, X; Giuliano, A R; Goldstone, S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and tolerability of a prophylactic 9-valent HPV (types 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) VLP (9vHPV) vaccine in young men 16-26 years of age in comparison to young women 16-26 years of age (the population that was used to establish 9v......HPV vaccine efficacy). Safety and immunogenicity data from this study will be used to bridge 9vHPV vaccine efficacy findings in 16-26 year old women to 16-26 year old men. METHODS: This study enrolled 1106 heterosexual men (HM) and 1101 women who had not yet received HPV vaccination. In addition, 313 men...... having sex with men (MSM) were enrolled and were evaluated separately for immunogenicity because previous results showed that antibody responses to quadrivalent HPV (types 6/11/16/18) VLP (qHPV) vaccine were lower in MSM than in HM. All subjects were administered a 3-dose regimen (Day 1, Month 2, Month 6...

  2. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in boys and risk of autoimmune diseases, neurological diseases and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisch, Morten; Besson, Andréa; Clemmensen, Kim Katrine Bjerring

    2018-01-01

    following HPV vaccination in this group. We investigated if quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccination of 10-17-year-old boys is associated with any unusual risk of autoimmune diseases, neurological diseases or venous thromboembolism. Methods: We conducted a national cohort study of 568 410 boys born in Denmark...... 1988-2006 and followed for 4 million person-years during 2006-16, using nationwide registers to obtain individual-level information about received doses of the qHPV vaccine and hospital records for 39 autoimmune diseases, 12 neurological diseases and venous thromboembolism. For each outcome, we...... estimated incidence rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) according to qHPV vaccination status. Results: Altogether 7384 boys received at least one dose of the qHPV vaccine at age 10-17 years. Overall, RRs were close to unity for the combined groups of autoimmune diseases (RR = 0.96; 95% CI...

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Adolescent Girls in Russian Federation

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    Alla V. Rudakova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV infection is one of the major risk factor of development of genital warts, a cervical dysplasia, a cervical cancer, and also some other oncologic diseases. The usage  of quadrivalent HPV vaccine in girls reduces the corresponding case  rate and the mortality significantly.The objective of this study is to analyze the cost-effectiveness of quadrivalent HPV vaccination cases of 12-year-old girls in Russian Federation.Methods. A Markov model is used on the basis of epidemiological data in Russian Federation. In base case the cost-effectiveness was  estimated from societal perspective. We assumed that the effect of  vaccination remains throughout all life. The analysis is performed for survival of 12-year-old girls. We considered only effect in the  vaccinated population. Costs for therapy of the diseases associated  with HPV infection corresponded to compulsory health insurance  rates across St. Petersburg for 2017. Costs and life expectancy have been discounted for 3.5% a year.Results. Quadrivalent HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls in Russian Federation will allow to prevent counting on 100 000 the  vaccinated persons 2918 cases of genital warts, 5095 cases of  cervical dysplasia, 893 cases of invasive cervical cancer, 56 cases of  vulvar cancer, 18 cases of vaginal cancer, 13 cases of anal cancer, 7  cases of oropharyngeal cancer. The vaccination will provide cost  reduction, caused by HPV-associated diseases, for 453.9 million  rubles on 100 000 vaccinated, and 86.5% of the predicted prevented costs will be caused by decrease in incidence of cervical cancer, 9%  — cervical dysplasia, 2.9% — genital warts. The quadrivalent HPV vaccination is associated with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of 247 560 rubles per quality adjusted life-year (QALY and  334 200 rubles per life-year gained (LYG. Thus, in both cases, cost  effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination per 1 QALY

  4. Risk of cervical HPV infection and prevalence of vaccine-type and other high-risk HPV types among sexually active teens and young women (13-26 years) enrolled in the VALHIDATE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Giovanna; Fasolo, Michela; Mazza, Francesca; Ricci, Elena; Esposito, Susanna; Frati, Elena; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Cetin, Irene; Gramegna, Maria; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Tanzi, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    HPV vaccination is expected to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer. The greatest and the earliest health gains will be ensured by high vaccine coverage among all susceptible people. The high costs and the risk of a reduced cost/effectiveness ratio in sexually active girls still represent the main obstacles for a more widespread use of HPV vaccination in many countries. Data on the rate, risk factors, and HPV types in sexually active women could provide information for the evaluation of vaccination policies extended to broader age cohorts. Sexually active women aged 13-26 years enrolled in an Italian cohort study were screened for cervical HPV infections; HPV-DNA positive samples were genotyped by InnoLipa HPV Genotyping Extra or by RFLP genotype analysis.: Among the 796 women meeting the inclusion criteria, 10.80% (95% CI 8.65-12.96) were HPV-DNA infected. Age>18 years, lifetime sexual partners>1, and history of STIs were associated to higher risk of HPV infection in the multivariable models adjusted for age, lifetime sexual partners, and time of sexual exposure. The global prevalence of the four HPV vaccine-types was 3.02% (95% CI 1.83-4.20) and the cumulative probability of infection from at least one vaccine-type was 12.82% in 26-years-old women and 0.78% in 18-years-old women.: Our data confirm most of the previously reported findings on the risk factors for HPV infections. The low prevalence of the HPV vaccine-types found may be useful for the evaluation of the cost/efficacy and the cost/effectiveness of broader immunization programs beyond the 12-years-old cohort.

  5. Evaluation of HPV type-replacement in unvaccinated and vaccinated adolescent females-Post-hoc analysis of a community-randomized clinical trial (II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Penelope; Palmroth, Johanna; Luostarinen, Tapio; Apter, Dan; Dubin, Gary; Garnett, Geoff; Eriksson, Tiina; Natunen, Kari; Merikukka, Marko; Pimenoff, Ville; Söderlund-Strand, Anna; Vänskä, Simopekka; Paavonen, Jorma; Pukkala, Eero; Dillner, Joakim; Lehtinen, Matti

    2018-06-15

    Efficacy of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines promises to control HPV infections. However, HPV vaccination programs may lay bare an ecological niche for non-vaccine HPV types. We evaluated type-replacement by HPV type and vaccination strategy in a community-randomized trial executed in HPV vaccination naïve population. Thirty-three communities were randomized to gender-neutral vaccination with AS04-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine (Arm A), HPV vaccination of girls and hepatitis B-virus (HBV) vaccination of boys (Arm B) and gender-neutral HBV vaccination (Arm C). Resident 1992-95 born boys (40,852) and girls (39,420) were invited. 11,662 boys and 20,513 girls were vaccinated with 20-30% and 45-48% coverage, respectively. HPV typing of 11,396 cervicovaginal samples was performed by high throughput PCR. Prevalence ratios (PR) between arms and ranked order of HPV types and odds ratio (OR) for having multiple HPV types in HPV16 or 18/45 positive individuals were calculated. The ranked order of HPV types did not significantly differ between arms or birth cohorts. For the non-HPV vaccinated 1992-1993 birth cohorts increased PR, between the gender-neutral intervention versus control arms for HPV39 (PR A 1.84, 95% CI 1.12-3.02) and HPV51 (PR A 1.56, 95% CI 1.11-2.19) were observed. In the gender-neutral arm, increased clustering between HPV39 and the vaccine-covered HPV types 16 or 18/45 (OR A16  = 5.1, OR A18/45  = 11.4) was observed in the non-HPV vaccinated 1994-1995 birth cohorts. Comparable clustering was seen between HPV51 and HPV16 or HPV18/45 (OR B16  = 4.7, OR B18/45  = 4.3), in the girls-only arm. In conclusion, definitively consistent postvaccination patterns of HPV type-replacement were not observed. Future occurrence of HPV39 and HPV51 warrant investigation. © 2018 UICC.

  6. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus recombinant vaccine: The first vaccine for cervical cancers

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    Sharma Rashmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gardasil ® is the first quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV- types 6, 11, 16, 18 recombinant vaccine approved by the FDA on June 8, 2006. It induces genotype-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies and prevents infection with HPV. Various clinical trials demonstrated a reduction in the incidence of vaccine-type-specific persistent infections and of associated moderate- and high-grade cervical dysplasias and carcinomas in situ after its use. Gardasil is currently approved by FDA for prevention of genital warts, cancers and precancerous conditions of cervix and vulva in 9-26 years old females. Three doses of 0.5 ml of gardasil each at 0, 2 and 6 months are given intramuscularly. It is contraindicated in individuals who are hypersensitive to the active substances or to any of the excipients of the vaccine, patients with bleeding abnormalities or patients on anticoagulant therapy and during pregnancy. However, the vaccine, at an estimated $300-500 per course, is too expensive for many women in developing countries. Moreover, question regarding the longevity of the protection by vaccine is still unsolved. Hence, longer studies are required to establish its real status in cancer prevention.

  7. Impact of HPV vaccination with Gardasil® in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, Martine; Pasquier, Jérôme; Greub, Gilbert; Bongiovanni, Massimo; Achtari, Chahin; Sahli, Roland

    2017-12-22

    Gardasil®, a quadrivalent vaccine targeting low-risk (6, 11) and high-risk (16, 18) human papillomaviruses (HPV), has been offered to 11-14 year-old schoolgirls in Switzerland since 2008. To evaluate its success and its potential impact on cervical cancer screening, HPV genotypes were examined in 18-year-old girls five years later (sub-study 1) and in outpatients participating to cervical cancer screening before and after vaccine implementation (sub-study 2). For sub-study 1, 3726 females aged 18 in 2013 were invited to fill a questionnaire on personal demographics and HPV risk factors and to provide a self-collected cervicovaginal sample for HPV genotyping and Chlamydia trachomatis PCR. Personal data were evaluated by univariable and multivariable statistics. In sub-study 2, the proportion of the vaccine-type HPV among anogenital HPV was examined with archived genotyping data of 8039 outpatients participating to cervical cancer screening from 1999 till 2015. The yearly evolution of this proportion was evaluated by segmented logistic regression. 690 (18.5%) women participated to sub-study 1 and 327 (8.8%) provided a self-collected sample. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis (4.6%) and demographics confirmed that the subjects were representative of sexually-active Swiss young women. Vaccine (five-year coverage: 77.5%) was preferentially accepted by contraceptive-pill users (P = 0.001) and samples were mainly provided by sexually-active subjects (P Switzerland. Our data suggest that cervical cancer screening is now entering a stage of reduced proportion of HPV16 and/or 18 in samples reported positive by cytology. In view of the high likelihood of reduced clinical specificity of cytology, primary screening modalities involving HPV testing and cytology should now be re-evaluated in Switzerland.

  8. Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 protein bodies cause tumour regression in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, Mark; Öhlschläger, Peter; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Alloza, Leonor; Marzábal, Pablo; Meyers, Ann E; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents of cervical cancer in women, which results in over 250 000 deaths per year. Presently there are two prophylactic vaccines on the market, protecting against the two most common high-risk HPV types 16 and 18. These vaccines remain very expensive and are not generally affordable in developing countries where they are needed most. Additionally, there remains a need to treat women that are already infected with HPV, and who have high-grade lesions or cervical cancer. In this paper, we characterize the immunogenicity of a therapeutic vaccine that targets the E7 protein of the most prevalent high-risk HPV - type 16 – the gene which has previously been shown to be effective in DNA vaccine trials in mice. The synthetic shuffled HPV-16 E7 (16E7SH) has lost its transforming properties but retains all naturally-occurring CTL epitopes. This was genetically fused to Zera®, a self-assembly domain of the maize γ-zein able to induce the accumulation of recombinant proteins into protein bodies (PBs), within the endoplasmic reticulum in a number of expression systems. High-level expression of the HPV 16E7SH protein fused to Zera® in plants was achieved, and the protein bodies could be easily and cost-effectively purified. Immune responses comparable to the 16E7SH DNA vaccine were demonstrated in the murine model, with the protein vaccine successfully inducing a specific humoral as well as cell mediated immune response, and mediating tumour regression. The fusion of 16E7SH to the Zera® peptide was found to enhance the immune responses, presumably by means of a more efficient antigen presentation via the protein bodies. Interestingly, simply mixing the free PBs and 16E7SH also enhanced immune responses, indicating an adjuvant activity for the Zera® PBs

  9. Long-term HPV type-specific risks for ASCUS and LSIL: a 14-year follow-up of a randomized primary HPV screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfström, K Miriam; Smelov, Vitaly; Johansson, Anna L V; Eklund, Carina; Naucler, Pontus; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Dillner, Joakim

    2015-01-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections result in a significant burden of low-grade cervical lesions. Between 1997 and 2000, our randomized trial of primary HPV screening enrolled 12,527 women participating in population-based screening. Women between 32 and 38 years of age (median: 34, interquartile range: 33-37) were randomized to HPV and cytology double testing (intervention arm, n = 6,257 enrolled, n = 5,888 followed-up) or to cytology, with samples frozen for future HPV testing (control arm, n = 6,270 enrolled, n = 5,795 followed-up). We estimated the HPV type-specific, long-term absolute risks (AR), and population attributable proportions (PAR) for cytological diagnoses of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and for histopathologically diagnosed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1). The women were followed using comprehensive, nationwide register-based follow-up. During a mean follow-up time of 11.07 years, 886 ASCUS and LSIL lesions were detected, 448 in the intervention arm and 438 in the control arm. Poisson regression estimated the incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of low-grade lesions by HPV type. The IRRs were strongly dependent on follow-up time. The IRRs for ASCUS/LSIL associated with high-risk HPV positivity were 18.6 (95% CI: 14.9-23.4) during the first screening round, 4.1 (95% CI: 2.8-6.2) during the second, 2.6 (95% CI: 1.7-4.1) during the third, and 1.1 (95% CI: 0.7-1.8) for >9 years of follow-up, with similar declines seen for the individual types. Type 16 contributed consistently to the greatest proportion of ASCUS, LSIL, and CIN1 risk in the population (first screening round PAR: ASCUS: 15.5% (95% CI: 9.7-21.9), LSIL: 14.7% (95% CI: 8.0-20.9), and CIN1: 13.4% (95% CI: 3.2-22.5)), followed by type 31 [8.4% (95% CI: 4.2-12.5) for ASCUS to 17.3% (95% CI: 6.8-26.6) for CIN1]. In summary, most ASCUS/LSIL lesions associated with HPV infection are caused by new HPV

  10. HPV and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a group of more than 200 related viruses that can cause several cancers including cervical cancer, anal cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer. Learn more about how HPV is transmitted, the different types of HPV, HPV vaccines, and HPV treatment.

  11. Czy więcej znaczy lepiej? Rozważania immunologiczne o skuteczności szczepionek przeciwko HPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Pawliczak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural history studies conducted over the past 20 years have demonstrated that human papillomavirus(HPV infection is a necessary prerequisite for the development of cervical cancer, the second most frequentcause of death in young women. Recently, two anti-HPV vaccines have been approved for immunoprophylaxis ofcervical cancer: a quadrivalent vaccine containing L1 virus-like particles (VLPs of HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, anda bivalent vaccine containing VLPs of types 16 and 18. In efficacy trials involving young women, both vaccinesproduced outstanding efficacy against primary and secondary endpoints associated with the vaccine type HPVsand were highly and consistently immunogenic. This review is focused on comparing safety and efficacy of bothavailable vaccines.

  12. Are the Two Human Papillomavirus Vaccines Really Similar? A Systematic Review of Available Evidence: Efficacy of the Two Vaccines against HPV

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    Simona Di Mario

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. When the bivalent and the quadrivalent HPV vaccines were marketed they were presented as having comparable efficacy against cervical cancer. Differences between the vaccines are HPV types included and formulation of the adjuvant. Method. A systematic review was conducted to assess the efficacy of the two vaccines against cervical cancer. Outcomes considered were CIN2+, CIN3+, and AIS. Results. Nine reports (38,419 women were included. At enrolment mean age of women was 20 years, 90% had negative cytology, and 80% were seronegative and/or DNA negative for HPV 16 or 18 (naïve women. In the TVC-naïve, VE against CIN2+ was 58% (95% CI: 35, 72; heterogeneity was detected, VE being 65% (95% CI: 54, 74 for the bivalent and 43% (95% CI: 23, 57 for the quadrivalent. VE against CIN3+ was 78% (95% CI: <0, 97; heterogeneity was substantial, VE being 93% (95% CI: 77, 98 for the bivalent and 43% (95% CI: 12, 63 for the quadrivalent. VE in the TVC was much lower. No sufficient data were available on AIS. Conclusions. In naïve girls bivalent vaccine shows higher efficacy, even if the number of events detected is low. In women already infected the benefit of the vaccination seems negligible.

  13. Minor Cytological Abnormalities and up to 7-Year Risk for Subsequent High-Grade Lesions by HPV Type.

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    Maria Persson

    Full Text Available Diagnoses of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL are common, but the corresponding risk of disease varies by human papillomavirus (HPV status, complicating management strategies. Our aim was to estimate the longer-term risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+ among women with ASCUS/LSIL by age, HPV status, and genotype(s.A total of 314 women with ASCUS/ LSIL were followed for a median of 3.8 years. Baseline HPV status was determined by reflex testing and women with histologically confirmed CIN2+ were identified through linkage to the Swedish National Quality Register for Cervical Cancer Prevention. Cumulative incidence and hazard ratios were estimated to explore differences between index data and associations with CIN2+.In total, 89 women (28.3% developed CIN2+. High-risk (HR HPV-positive women developed significantly more CIN2+ than HR-HPV-negative women (cumulative incidence 3.5 years after the index test: 42.2%, 95% CI: 32.5-53.5 for HPV16/18; 36.2%, 95% CI: 28.3-45.4 for other HR-HPV types; and 2.0%, 95% CI: 0.5-7.8 for HR-HPV-negative women; p<0.0001.HPV status was of greatest importance in determining the risk of CIN2+. The risk was low among HPV-negative women during the first years of follow-up, suggesting these women could be followed less intensively. HPV16/18-positive women may need intensified follow-up as they showed the highest risk of CIN2+.

  14. Minor Cytological Abnormalities and up to 7-Year Risk for Subsequent High-Grade Lesions by HPV Type.

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    Persson, Maria; Elfström, K Miriam; Olsson, Sven-Erik; Dillner, Joakim; Andersson, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Diagnoses of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) are common, but the corresponding risk of disease varies by human papillomavirus (HPV) status, complicating management strategies. Our aim was to estimate the longer-term risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) among women with ASCUS/LSIL by age, HPV status, and genotype(s). A total of 314 women with ASCUS/ LSIL were followed for a median of 3.8 years. Baseline HPV status was determined by reflex testing and women with histologically confirmed CIN2+ were identified through linkage to the Swedish National Quality Register for Cervical Cancer Prevention. Cumulative incidence and hazard ratios were estimated to explore differences between index data and associations with CIN2+. In total, 89 women (28.3%) developed CIN2+. High-risk (HR) HPV-positive women developed significantly more CIN2+ than HR-HPV-negative women (cumulative incidence 3.5 years after the index test: 42.2%, 95% CI: 32.5-53.5 for HPV16/18; 36.2%, 95% CI: 28.3-45.4 for other HR-HPV types; and 2.0%, 95% CI: 0.5-7.8 for HR-HPV-negative women; p<0.0001). HPV status was of greatest importance in determining the risk of CIN2+. The risk was low among HPV-negative women during the first years of follow-up, suggesting these women could be followed less intensively. HPV16/18-positive women may need intensified follow-up as they showed the highest risk of CIN2+.

  15. Human papillomavirus type specific risk of progression and remission during long-term follow-up of equivocal and low-grade HPV-positive cervical smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintermyr, Olav Karsten; Andersland, Marie Songstad; Bjørge, Tone; Skar, Robert; Iversen, Ole Erik; Nygård, Mari; Haugland, Hans Kristian

    2018-03-23

    The prevalence of clinically relevant HPV types and their specific risk for progression and regression in women with atypical squamous cells of uncertain significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) were studied in a routine screening population. A 4-year cohort of women (n = 820) with ASCUS/LSIL and a positive HPV test in triage were followed for 6-9 years. The progression risks for CIN2+/CIN3+ were determined for single (71.2%) and multiple HPV infections (28.8%). The CIN2+ progression risk for all HPV 16, all HPV 35, single HPV 16 and single HPV 35 infections were 65.3% (95% CI: 59.6-71.0), 64.4% (95% CI: 50.4-78.4), 63.8% (95% CI: 56.2-71.4) and 73.7% (95% CI: 53.9-93.5), respectively. Based on CIN2+ progression risks four main groups were defined; the HPV 16 group, the HPV 31/33/35 group, the HPV 18/45/51/52 group and the HPV 39/56/58/59/66/68 group with progression risks of 65.3% (95% CI: 59.6-71.0), 62.1% (95% CI: 54.8-69.4), 52.6 (95% CI: 45.9-59.3) and 39.5 (95% CI: 33.0-46.0), respectively. In multivariate analyses, women in the age group 40-49 years had an increased risk of CIN2+ progression. As for CIN3+, HPV 16 had a higher progression risk than other HPV risk groups (p HPV 16 had a significant additive CIN3+ progression risk (p HPV risk groups. In summary, HPV types 16 and 35, including the HPV risk group 31/33/35, had a similar CIN2+ progression risk, but only HPV 16 had a higher risk for CIN3+ progression. © 2018 UICC.

  16. Carcinogenic HPV prevalence and age-specific type distribution in 40,382 women with normal cervical cytology, ASCUS/LSIL, HSIL, or cervical cancer

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    Kjær, Susanne K; Munk, Christian; Junge, Jette

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of the prevaccination type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the general population is important for the prediction of the impact of HPV vaccination. METHODS: We collected consecutively residual specimens from liquid-based cytology samples from 40,382 women......, and histology if any, on all women. RESULTS: The participants were 14-95 years of age (median age 37 years) at enrollment. The overall prevalence of HR HPV was 20.6 % ranging from 46.0 % in 20-23-year-old women to 5.7 % in women 65 years or older. Independently of cytology/histology, HPV16 was the most...... prevalent type. For virtually all HPV types, the occurrence of CIN3+ was higher when the specific HPV type was present together with HPV16 than it was together with other high-risk HPV types than HPV16 or if the HPV type occurred as a single infection. The prevalence of HPV16 and/or HPV18 was 74...

  17. HPV prevalence and type distribution in women with or without cervical lesions in the Northeast region of Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is a major public health problem worldwide. While Romania has the highest incidence of cervical cancer in Europe, the prevalence of HPV has not been evaluated. We report the first data on HPV prevalence and type distribution in Northeast Romania. Methods HPV prevalence and genotype distribution was investigated in 514 consecutively women with or without cervical lesions in Northeast Romania. Genotyping was performed with Linear Array Genotyping/Roche kit. Results In our study group, 192/514 (37.4%) patients were positive for HPV (infected with single and with multiple HPV types). Most frequent types were: 16 (10.5%), 53 (5.44%), 51 (5.05%), 52 (4.08%) 18 (2.91%) and 31 (2.73%). Conclusions Infection with high risk types of HPV is common in Northeast Romania. Enhanced and systematic screening for cervical cancer is needed. Our results call for the implementation of a National HPV vaccine program in Romania. PMID:22192090

  18. Oncogenic HPV Types Infection in Adolescents and University Women from North Portugal: From Self-Sampling to Cancer Prevention

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    Jani Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the HPV infection status in adolescents and young university women in Portugal. The distribution of HPV genotypes was evaluated by PCR DNA genotyping after self-sampling collection from 435 women of exfoliated cervical cells using a commercial kit. We observed an overall frequency of HPV infection of 11.5%. Furthermore, HPV DNA prevalence was 16.6% in those young women that self-declared as sexually active. The more frequently detected HPV types were 31, 16, 53, and 61. Statistical analysis identified median age (OR=3.56; P=0.001, the number of lifetime sexual partners (OR=4.50; P<0.001, and years of sexual activity (OR=2.36; P=0.008 as risk factors for HPV acquisition. Hence, our study revealed that oncogenic HPV infection is common in young asymptomatic women Portuguese women, with a history of 2–5 sexual partners and over 2 year of sexual activity. Moreover, these results demonstrate that HPV detection performed in self-collected samples may be important to appraise better preventive strategies and to monitorize the influence of vaccination programmes within different populations.

  19. Understanding the Role of Intrinsic Disorder of Viral Proteins in the Oncogenicity of Different Types of HPV.

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    Tamarozzi, Elvira Regina; Giuliatti, Silvana

    2018-01-09

    Intrinsic disorder is very important in the biological function of several proteins, and is directly linked to their foldability during interaction with their targets. There is a close relationship between the intrinsically disordered proteins and the process of carcinogenesis involving viral pathogens. Among these pathogens, we have highlighted the human papillomavirus (HPV) in this study. HPV is currently among the most common sexually transmitted infections, besides being the cause of several types of cancer. HPVs are divided into two groups, called high- and low-risk, based on their oncogenic potential. The high-risk HPV E6 protein has been the target of much research, in seeking treatments against HPV, due to its direct involvement in the process of cell cycle control. To understand the role of intrinsic disorder of the viral proteins in the oncogenic potential of different HPV types, the structural characteristics of intrinsically disordered regions of high and low-risk HPV E6 proteins were analyzed. In silico analyses of primary sequences, prediction of tertiary structures, and analyses of molecular dynamics allowed the observation of the behavior of such disordered regions in these proteins, thereby proving a direct relationship of structural variation with the degree of oncogenicity of HPVs. The results obtained may contribute to the development of new therapies, targeting the E6 oncoprotein, for the treatment of HPV-associated diseases.

  20. Efficacy of pulsed dye laser treatment for common warts is not influenced by the causative HPV type: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichman, Yoseph; Levi, Assi; Hodak, Emmilia; Halachmi, Shlomit; Mazor, Sigal; Wolf, Dana; Caplan, Orit; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2018-05-01

    Verruca vulgaris (VV) is a prevalent skin condition caused by various subtypes of human papilloma virus (HPV). The most common causes of non-genital lesions are HPV types 2 and 4, and to a lesser extent types 1, 3, 26, 29, and 57. Although numerous therapeutic modalities exist, none is universally effective or without adverse events (AE). Pulsed dye laser (PDL) is a favorable option due to its observed efficacy and relatively low AE rate. However, it is not known which verrucae are most likely to respond to PDL, or whether the causative viral subtype influences this response. The objective of this prospective blinded study was to assess whether the HPV subtype was predictive of response to PDL. For that matter, 26 verrucae from 26 immunocompetent patients were biopsied prior to treatment by PDL. HPV coding sequences were isolated and genotyped using PCR analysis. Patients were treated by PDL (595 nm wavelength, 5 mm spot size, 1.5 ms pulse duration, 12 J/cm 2 fluence) once a month for up to 6 months, and clinical response was assessed. Binary logistic regression analysis and linear logistic regression analysis were used in order to evaluate statistical significance. Different types of HPV were identified in 22 of 26 tissue samples. Response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type, age, or gender. As no association between HPV type and response to PDL therapy could be established, it is therefore equally effective for all HPV types and remains a favorable treatment option for all VV.

  1. Comparison of different assays to assess human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16- and 18-specific antibodies after HPV infection and vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Schepp, Rutger M.; Mollers, Madelief; Mooij, Sofie H.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Berbers, Guy A. M.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the measurement of human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific serum antibody levels with the virus-like-particle multiplex immunoassay (VLP-MIA), competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) L1-based MIA. Using a large panel of serum samples, these assays showed

  2. Pathogenic role of the eight probably/possibly carcinogenic HPV types 26, 53, 66, 67, 68, 70, 73 and 82 in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halec, Gordana; Alemany, Laia; Lloveras, Belen; Schmitt, Markus; Alejo, Maria; Bosch, Franz X; Tous, Sara; Klaustermeier, Jo Ellen; Guimerà, Nuria; Grabe, Niels; Lahrmann, Bernd; Gissmann, Lutz; Quint, Wim; Bosch, Francesc X; de Sanjose, Silvia; Pawlita, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Eight HPV types (HPV26, 53, 66, 67, 68, 70, 73 and 82) that are phylogenetically closely related to 12 WHO-defined high-risk (HR) HPV have been rarely but consistently identified as single HPV infections in about 3% of cervical cancer (CxCa) tissues. Due to lack of biological data, these types are referred to as probable/possible (p) HR-HPV. To analyse their biological activity in direct comparison to HR-HPV types, we selected 55 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) CxCa tissues harbouring single pHR-HPV infections (2-13 cases per type) and 266 tissues harbouring single HR-HPV (7-40 cases per type) from a worldwide, retrospective, cross-sectional study. Single HPV infection was verified by two genotyping methods. Presence of type-specific spliced E6*I mRNA transcripts and expression of cellular proteins indicative of HPV transformation were assessed in all cases. In 55 CxCa tissues with pHR-HPV, E6*I mRNA expression was 100%; high p16(INK4a) , 98%; low pRb, 96%; low CyD1, 93%; and low p53, 84%. Compared to HPV16 tissues as a reference, individual frequencies of these five markers did not differ significantly, either for any of the eight pHR-HPV and the 11 other HR types individually or for the groups of pHR and HR types without HPV16. We conclude that the eight pHR-HPV types, when present as a single infection in CxCa, are biologically active and affect the same cellular pathways as any of the fully recognized carcinogenic HR-HPV types. Therefore we have provided molecular evidence of carcinogenicity for types currently classified as probably/possibly carcinogenic. Although this evidence is crucial for HPV-type carcinogenicity classification, per se it is not sufficient for inclusion of these HPV types into population-wide primary and secondary prevention programmes. Such decisions have to include careful estimation of effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons

  3. HPV Type 6 and 18 Coinfection in a Case of Adult-Onset Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Immunization with Gardasil

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    Virginia Fancello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal papillomatosis (LP is a rare human papillomavirus (HPV related disease that often requires multiple surgical interventions and residual impairment of voice is almost inevitable. We report the case of a patient with adult onset recurrent LP, showing moderate dysplasia and coinfection with HPV types 6 and 18. The tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil was prescribed off label, with the aim of triggering an immunogenic response and consequently reducing the probability of further recurrences. The patient was followed for 9 months with no sign of relapse of his LP. The postexposure use of the anti-HPV vaccine could represent a promising therapeutic agent in established LP. Unfortunately, the potential efficacy of this new therapeutic option in this situation has been suggested only by isolated case reports. Further controlled studies, with a longer follow-up and a larger sample size, are needed to assess efficacy of Gardasil in LP.

  4. [Human Papilloma virus in Quechua women from Jujuy with high frequency of cervical cancer: viral types and HPV-16 variants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Gronda, Jorge; Alonio, Lidia V; Villa, Luisa L; Sichero, Laura; Miranda, Sergio; Barcena, Martin; Teyssie, Angelica

    2002-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are etiologically associated to cervical carcinoma. In order to evaluate HPV infection and its relationship with the high frequency of this neoplasia in Quechua women from Jujuy (Argentina), 271 cervical samples from preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions (biopsies) and normal controls (cytologies) were studied. Detection and typing were performed using PCR-RFLP or PCR-hybridization and the HPV-16 variability in L1 and E6 genes (by PCR-hybridization) was analysed. HPV was detected in 52% of controls, 91% of low-grade lesions, 97% of high-grade lesions and 100% of invasive carcinomas, corresponding 55% to HPV-16. HPV-16 European variants were predominant, most of them being non-prototypic strains. The high frequency of high risk infection types and the raised proportion of HPV-16 non-prototypic variants related to a greater oncogenic potential could explain, in part, the high cervical cancer frequency of this native population. These data may contribute to disease control and vaccinal formulation.

  5. Prevalence and distribution of high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV types in invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix and in normal women in Andhra Pradesh, India

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    Rao BN

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high incidence of cervical cancer reported from India, large scale population based studies on the HPV prevalence and genotype distribution are very few from this region. In view of the clinical trials for HPV vaccine taking place in India, it is of utmost importance to understand the prevalence of HPV genotypes in various geographical regions of India. We investigated the genotype distribution of high-risk HPV types in squamous cell carcinomas and the prevalence of high-risk HPV in cervicovaginal samples in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh (AP, India. Methods HPV genotyping was done in cervical cancer specimens (n = 41 obtained from women attending a regional cancer hospital in Hyderabad. HPV-DNA testing was also done in cervicovaginal samples (n = 185 collected from women enrolled in the cervical cancer screening pilot study conducted in the rural community, of Medchal Mandal, twenty kilometers away from Hyderabad. Results High-risk HPV types were found in 87.8% (n = 36/41 of the squamous cell carcinomas using a PCR-based line blot assay. Among the HPV positive cancers, the overall type distribution of the major high-risk HPV types was as follows: HPV 16 (66.7%, HPV 18 (19.4%, HPV 33 (5.6%, HPV 35 (5.6%, HPV 45 (5.6%, HPV 52 (2.8%, HPV 58(2.8%, HPV 59(2.8% and HPV 73 (2.8%. Women participating in the community screening programme provided both a self-collected vaginal swab and a clinician-collected cervical swab for HPV DNA testing. Primary screening for high risk HPV was performed using the Digene Hybrid Capture 2 (hc2 assay. All hc2 positive samples by any one method of collection were further analyzed using the Roche PCR-based line blot for genotype determination. The prevalence of high risk HPV infection in this community-based screening population was 10.3% (19/185 using the clinician-collected and 7.0% (13/185 using the self-collected samples. The overall agreement between self-collected and clinician

  6. A 12-Year Follow-up on the Long-Term Effectiveness of the Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine in 4 Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Susanne K; Nygård, Mari; Dillner, Joakim

    2018-01-01

    Background: The long-term effectiveness of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine was assessed by monitoring the combined incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2, CIN3), adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), and cervical cancer related to HPV16 or HPV18. Methods: Women from...... Nordic countries of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden who received a 3-dose regimen of the qHPV vaccine in the beginning of FUTURE II (Females United to Unilaterally Reduce Endo/Ectocervical Disease; V501-015, base study NCT00092534) are followed through different national registries. Effectiveness...

  7. Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men who have sex with men: prevalence and lack of anogenital concordance

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eleanor M; Gilson, Richard; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate; Panwar, Kavita; Young, Carmel; Jit, Mark; Edmunds, W John; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of oral detectable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) attending a sexual health clinic in London and concordance with anogenital HPV infection. Such data are important to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of oral HPV and the potential use of vaccines to prevent oropharyngeal cancers. Methods Paired oral rinse samples and anogenital samples were available from 151 HIV-negative MSM within a larger cross-sectional survey. All samples were tested in parallel for 21 types of HPV DNA using an in-house assay. Results The median age of participants was 30 (IQR 25–35). The prevalence of any oral HPV and of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 13.7% (n=21; 95% CI 8.7 to 20.2) and 5.9% (n=9; 95% CI 2.7 to 10.9) compared with 64.9% (n=98; 95% CI 56.7 to 72.5) and 34.4% (n=52; 95% CI 26.9 to 42.6) in any anogenital sample, respectively. The prevalence of types prevented by the bivalent (HPV16/18), quadrivalent (HPV6/11/16/18) and nonavalent (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccines was 1.3% (95% CI 0.2 to 4.7), 2.6% (95% CI 0.7 to 6.6) and 4.6% (95% CI 1.9 to 9.3), respectively. There was no concordance between HPV genotypes detected in oral and anogenital sites. Conclusions HR-HPV DNA, including HPV 16/18, was detected in oral specimens from HIV-negative MSM attending sexual health clinics, suggesting a potential role for vaccination, but is far less common than anogenital infection. How this relates to the risk and natural history of HPV-related head and neck cancers warrants further study. Lack of concordance with anogenital infection also suggests that oral HPV infection should be considered separately when estimating potential vaccine impact. PMID:25887283

  8. Incidence of cervical lesions in Danish women before and after implementation of a national HPV vaccination program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldur-Felskov, Birgitte; Dehlendorff, Christian; Junge, Jette

    2014-01-01

    +) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) increased in all age groups in 2000-2010. After introduction of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine into the vaccination program, the incidence of atypia+ decreased significantly in women younger than 18 years (EAPC -33.4%; 95% CI -49.6; -12.0) and in 18......PURPOSE: Approximately 7% of cervical cancers and about 50% of high-grade cervical precursor lesions are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18. Denmark introduced the quadrivalent HPV vaccine into the vaccination program for 12-year-old girls in 2009 supplemented by a first catch......-up program for 13-15-year-old girls in 2008, and a second program for women up to the age of 27 years in 2012; all with high vaccination coverage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the vaccine by comparing the incidence trends of cervical lesions before and after its introduction...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in the context of high cervical cancer incidence and low screening coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Võrno, Triin; Lutsar, Katrin; Uusküla, Anneli; Padrik, Lee; Raud, Terje; Reile, Rainer; Nahkur, Oliver; Kiivet, Raul-Allan

    2017-11-01

    Estonia has high cervical cancer incidence and low screening coverage. We modelled the impact of population-based bivalent, quadrivalent or nonavalent HPV vaccination alongside cervical cancer screening. A Markov cohort model of the natural history of HPV infection was used to assess the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating a cohort of 12-year-old girls with bivalent, quadrivalent or nonavalent vaccine in two doses in a national, school-based vaccination programme. The model followed the natural progression of HPV infection into subsequent genital warts (GW); premalignant lesions (CIN1-3); cervical, oropharyngeal, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer. Vaccine coverage was assumed to be 70%. A time horizon of 88years (up to 100years of age) was used to capture all lifetime vaccination costs and benefits. Costs and utilities were discounted using an annual discount rate of 5%. Vaccination of 12-year-old girls alongside screening compared to screening alone had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €14,007 (bivalent), €14,067 (quadrivalent) and €11,633 (nonavalent) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) in the base-case scenario and ranged between €5367-21,711, €5142-21,800 and €4563-18,142, respectively, in sensitivity analysis. The results were most sensitive to changes in discount rate, vaccination regimen, vaccine prices and cervical cancer screening coverage. Vaccination of 12-year-old girls alongside current cervical cancer screening can be considered a cost-effective intervention in Estonia. Adding HPV vaccination to the national immunisation schedule is expected to prevent a considerable number of HPV infections, genital warts, premalignant lesions, HPV related cancers and deaths. Although in our model ICERs varied slightly depending on the vaccine used, they generally fell within the same range. Cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination was found to be most dependent on vaccine cost and duration of vaccine immunity, but not on the type of vaccine

  10. Human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in cervical carcinoma, low-grade, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in Venezuelan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correnti, Maria; Medina, Francisco; Cavazza, María Eugenia; Rennola, Antonieta; Avila, Maira; Fernándes, Andreína

    2011-06-01

    Cervical cancer is an important cause of mortality among women in developing countries, especially in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region. Infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as the primary cause of cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of HR-HPV genotypes in low-grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL, HSIL) and cervical carcinoma (CC) among Venezuelan women. Subjects with histopathological diagnosis of LSIL, HSIL, and CC (LSIL=200; HSIL=100; CC=150) were enrolled in the study after obtaining informed consent. Biopsy samples of these subjects were analyzed to determine the lesion type. HPV detection and typing was done using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse hybridization. HPV type specific prevalence was determined in subjects with single and multiple infections. HPV DNA was detected in 68%, 95%, and 98.7% of LSIL, HSIL, and CC cases, respectively. HR-HPV and low-risk oncogenic HPV (LR-HPV) was observed in 66.9%/11.8% of LSIL cases, 87.3%/3.2% of HSIL cases, and 91.2%/0.7% of CC cases. HPV types -16/-18 (65%) were the most common high-risk HPV types observed, followed by types -52, -33, -45, and -31. Cervical cancer burden in Venezuelan women is substantial. HPV types -16/-18 were the most common types prevalent among Venezuelan women followed by types -52, -33, -45, and -31 (prevalence, ~90.1%). The results of this study provide baseline information on the HPV type distribution, which may facilitate the development of a cervical cancer prevention and control program in Venezuela. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Seroprevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type 6, 11, 16, 18, by Anatomic Site of HPV Infection, in Women Aged 16-64 Years living in the Metropolitan Area of San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Caraballo, Aixa M; Suarez, Erick; Unger, Elizabeth R; Palefsky, Joel M; Panicker, Gitika; Ortiz, Ana Patricia

    2018-03-01

    It is unknown if human papillomavirus (HPV) serum antibody responses vary by anatomic site of infection. We aimed to assess the seroprevalence for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 in association with HPV DNA detection in different anatomic sites among women. This cross sectional population-based study analyzed data from 524 women aged 16-64 years living in the San Juan metropolitan area of Puerto Rico (PR). Questionnaires were used to assess demographic and lifestyle variables, while anogenital and blood samples were collected for HPV analysis. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the adjusted prevalence odds ratio (POR) in order to determine the association between HPV DNA infection status in the cervix and anus and serum antibody status, controlling for different potential confounders. Overall, 46.9% of women had detectable antibodies to one or more types whereas 8.7% had HPV DNA for one or more of these types detected in cervix (4.0%) or anus (6.5%). Women with cervical HPV detection tended to be more HPV seropositive than women without cervical detection (adjusted POR (95%CI): 2.41 (0.90, 6.47), p=0.078); however the type-specific association between cervical DNA and serum antibodies was only significant for HPV 18 (adjusted POR (95% CI): 5.9 (1.03, 33.98)). No significant association was detected between anal HPV and seropositivity (p>0.10). Differences in the anatomic site of infection could influence seroconversion, however, longitudinal studies will be required for further evaluation. This information will be instrumental in advancing knowledge of immune mechanisms involved in anatomic site response.

  12. Detection of HPV-DNA by a PCR-based method in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from rare endocervical carcinoma types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Khalifa, Mahmoud M; Ismiil, Nadia; Dubé, Valerie; Saad, Reda S; Sun, Peizhu; Seth, Arun; Ghorab, Zeina

    2010-01-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of cervical squamous neoplasia and adenocarcinomas of the mucinous and endometrioid cell types. Cervical serous, clear cell, and small cell carcinomas differ from the conventional endocervical adenocarcinoma in their clinical characteristics. The data on the role of HPV in their pathogenesis are limited. In this study, we examined the presence of high-risk HPV-DNA in rare types of cervical carcinoma using polymerase chain reaction-based test. In-house cervical serous, clear cell, and small cell carcinoma cases accessioned between 2000 and 2008 were tested for HPV by polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA extracted from deparaffinized sections using Roche AMPLICOR HPV Amplification Detection and Control Kits. The kit detects all 13 high-risk HPV-DNA genotypes. The positive cut-off point for AMPLICOR HPV Test was A450 = 0.2. We identified 4 serous, 3 clear cell, 1 mixed clear cell and serous, and 5 small cell carcinomas. High-risk HPV-DNA tested positive in 3 out of 4 serous carcinomas, 2 out of 3 cervical clear cell carcinomas, and all 5 cases of small cell carcinoma and the mixed cell type. Our report documents HPV status in a series of archival unusual types of adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. It suggests a robust association between high-risk HPV and these rare subtypes. Despite their unique clinical setting and morphologic appearance, the majority of these tumors likely share a common HPV-mediated carcinogenic pathway. Our observation is particularly significant in cervical cancer prevention as we enter the HPV vaccination era.

  13. Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 6, 16 and 18 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas by in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerovac, Z.; Sarcevic, B.; Kralj, Z.; Ban, J.

    1996-01-01

    Seventy seven squamous cell carcinomas (10 oral cavity, 15 tongue, 26 pharynx and larynx), with different grading were analyzed for the presence of HPV DNA by in situ hybridization. Positive signals were found on the nuclei of cancer cells in 25 (32.5%), in the epithelia adjacent to squamous cell carcinomas in 2 (8.7%), and in the resected margins in 1 (4.3%) case. HPV DNA positive signals were obtained in 42% of laryngeal, 34% of pharyngeal, in 20% of oral, and 20% of tongue carcinomas. Out of 25 HPV positive carcinomas a single HPV type was detected in at least 11 (44%), and double or multiple infection in 36% cases; altogether , HPV 6 DNA was determined in 15 (60%), and HPV 16 and/or 18 DNA in 17 (68%) head and neck tumors. The detection rate of HPV was lower than of HPV 16 and/or 18 for tumors in oral cavity, tongue and larynx. Out of 25 HPV DNA positive carcinomas 21% were graded as G1, 27% as G2, and and 44% were G3. The results indicate that HPV may be involved in the pathogenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. (author)

  14. Estimating the clinical benefits of vaccinating boys and girls against HPV-related diseases in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, Rémi; Roze, Stéphane; Bresse, Xavier; Largeron, Nathalie; Smith-Palmer, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    HPV is related to a number of cancer types, causing a considerable burden in both genders in Europe. Female vaccination programs can substantially reduce the incidence of HPV-related diseases in women and, to some extent, men through herd immunity. The objective was to estimate the incremental benefit of vaccinating boys and girls using the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in Europe versus girls-only vaccination. Incremental benefits in terms of reduction in the incidence of HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18-related diseases (including cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and head and neck carcinomas and genital warts) were assessed. The analysis was performed using a model constructed in Microsoft®Excel, based on a previously-published dynamic transmission model of HPV vaccination and published European epidemiological data on incidence of HPV-related diseases. The incremental benefits of vaccinating 12-year old girls and boys versus girls-only vaccination was assessed (70% vaccine coverage were assumed for both). Sensitivity analyses around vaccine coverage and duration of protection were performed. Compared with screening alone, girls-only vaccination led to 84% reduction in HPV 16/18-related carcinomas in females and a 61% reduction in males. Vaccination of girls and boys led to a 90% reduction in HPV 16/18-related carcinomas in females and 86% reduction in males versus screening alone. Relative to a girls-only program, vaccination of girls and boys led to a reduction in female and male HPV-related carcinomas of 40% and 65%, respectively and a reduction in the incidence of HPV 6/11-related genital warts of 58% for females and 71% for males versus girls-only vaccination. In Europe, the vaccination of 12-year old boys and girls against HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 would be associated with substantial additional clinical benefits in terms of reduced incidence of HPV-related genital warts and carcinomas versus girls-only vaccination. The incremental benefits of adding boys vaccination are

  15. Cost and effectiveness evaluation of prophylactic HPV vaccine in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termrungruanglert, Wichai; Havanond, Piyalamporn; Khemapech, Nipon; Lertmaharit, Somrat; Pongpanich, Sathirakorn; Khorprasert, Chonlakiet; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 80% of cervical cancer cases occur in developing countries. In Thailand, cervical cancer has been the leading cancer in females, with an incidence of 24.7 cases per 100,000 individuals per year. We constructed a decision model to simulate the lifetime economic impact for women in the context of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection prevention. HPV-related diseases were of interest: cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and genital warts. The two strategies used were 1) current practice and 2) prophylactic quadrivalent vaccine against HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18. We developed a Markov simulation model to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of prophylactic HPV vaccine. Women transition through a model either healthy or developing HPV or its related diseases, or die from cervical cancer or from other causes according to transitional probabilities under the Thai health-care context. Costs from a provider perspective were obtained from King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3% annually. Compared with no prophylactic HPV vaccine, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was 160,649.50 baht per quality-adjusted life-year. The mortality rate was reduced by 54.8%. The incidence of cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3, and genital warts was reduced by up to 55.1%. Compared with commonly accepted standard thresholds recommended by the World Health Organization Commission on Macroeconomics and Health, the nationwide coverage of HPV vaccination in girls is likely to be cost-effective in Thailand. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Low prevalence of vaccine-type HPV infections in young women following the implementation of a school-based and catch-up vaccination in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, P; Sauvageau, C; Gilca, V; Defay, F; Lambert, G; Mathieu-C, S; Guenoun, J; Comète, E; Coutlée, F

    2018-01-02

    In Quebec, Canada, a school-based HPV vaccination for girls has been offered since 2008. The vaccine used in the program targets HPV16/18, responsible for ∼70% of cervical cancers and HPV6/11, responsible for the majority of anogenital warts. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of HPV in vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Women aged 17-29 years were eligible to participate. Participants' age, vaccination status and diverse risk factors were assessed by a computer-assisted questionnaire. Biological specimens were obtained by self-sampling. HPV genotyping was performed by Linear Array. A total of 2,118 women were recruited. 2,042 completed the questionnaire and 1,937 provided a vaginal sample. Vaccination coverage varied from 83.5% in women aged 17-19 to 19.1% in those aged 23-29. The overall prevalence of HPV in sexually active women was 39.4% (95%CI: 37.0-41.7) and 56.7% of infected women had multiple type infections. The prevalence of vaccine HPV types varied by age and vaccination status except for women aged 23-29 for whom similar results were observed. Vaccine HPV types were detected in 0.3%, 1.4% and 10.5% of vaccinated women aged 17-19, 20-23, and 23-29 (pHPV16 or HPV18 were detected in 10 women having received at least one dose of vaccine. Nine of these women were already sexually active at the time of vaccination. Infections with HPV types included in the vaccine are rare in women aged less than 23 years and are virtually absent in those who received at least one dose of vaccine before sexual debut.

  17. Estimating the cost-effectiveness profile of a universal vaccination programme with a nine-valent HPV vaccine in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiron, L; Joura, E; Largeron, N; Prager, B; Uhart, M

    2016-04-16

    HPV is a major cancer-causing factor in both sexes in the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, oropharynx as well as the causal factor in other diseases such as genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatis. In the context of the arrival of a nonavalent HPV vaccine (6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58), this analysis aims to estimate the public health impact and the incremental cost-effectiveness of a universal (girls and boys) vaccination program with a nonavalent HPV vaccine as compared to the current universal vaccination program with a quadrivalent HPV vaccine (6/11/16/18), in Austria. A dynamic transmission model including a wide range of health and cost outcomes related to cervical, anal, vulvar, vaginal diseases and genital warts was calibrated to Austrian epidemiological data. The clinical impact due to the 5 new types was included for cervical and anal diseases outcomes only. In the base case, a two-dose schedule, lifelong vaccine type-specific protection and a vaccination coverage rate of 60% and 40% for girls and boys respectively for the 9-year old cohorts were assumed. A cost-effectiveness threshold of €30,000/QALY-gained was considered. Universal vaccination with the nonavalent vaccine was shown to reduce the incidence of HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 -related cervical cancer by 92%, the related CIN2/3 cases by 96% and anal cancer by 83% and 76% respectively in females and males after 100 years, relative to 75%, 76%, 80% and 74% with the quadrivalent vaccine, respectively. Furthermore, the nonavalent vaccine was projected to prevent an additional 14,893 cases of CIN2/3 and 2544 cases of cervical cancer, over 100 years. Depending on the vaccine price, the strategy was shown to be from cost-saving to cost-effective. The present evaluation showed that vaccinating 60% of girls and 40% of boys aged 9 in Austria with a 9-valent vaccine will substantially reduce the incidence of cervical cancer, CIN and anal cancer compared to the existing strategy. The vaccination

  18. Overview of Current Humman Papilloma Virus (HPV Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cumhur Artuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent viral infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes causes virtually all cancer of the cervix. The same HPV genotypes (“types” also cause cases of anal cancer. Cervical cancer is the third most frequent cancer in women worldwide after breast and colorectal cancers. It ranks fourth of women’s cancers according to the mortality ratio. Two vaccines have been developed against HPV infection; one is a quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil™ and the other is a bivalent vaccine (Cervarix™. This topic will cover issues related to HPV infections, routine HPV immunization recommendations, vaccination in special patient populations, the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination, and vaccine safety. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 327-334

  19. Carcinogenic HPV prevalence and age-specific type distribution in 40,382 women with normal cervical cytology, ASCUS/LSIL, HSIL, or cervical cancer: what is the potential for prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Susanne K; Munk, Christian; Junge, Jette; Iftner, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Assessment of the prevaccination type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the general population is important for the prediction of the impact of HPV vaccination. We collected consecutively residual specimens from liquid-based cytology samples from 40,382 women from the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark, during 2002-2005. All samples were tested for high-risk HPV using the Hybrid Capture 2 technique, and genotyping was done using LiPa (Innogenetics). Through linkage with the Pathology Data Bank, we obtained information on the cytology result, and histology if any, on all women. The participants were 14-95 years of age (median age 37 years) at enrollment. The overall prevalence of HR HPV was 20.6 % ranging from 46.0 % in 20-23-year-old women to 5.7 % in women 65 years or older. Independently of cytology/histology, HPV16 was the most prevalent type. For virtually all HPV types, the occurrence of CIN3+ was higher when the specific HPV type was present together with HPV16 than it was together with other high-risk HPV types than HPV16 or if the HPV type occurred as a single infection. The prevalence of HPV16 and/or HPV18 was 74 % in cervical cancer and the corresponding prevalence of HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 was 89 %. This study forms a valuable starting point for monitoring the effect of HPV vaccination in Denmark. In addition, the particular carcinogenic role of HPV16 and 18 is confirmed and may support a role of genotyping for HPV16 and 18 in cervical cancer screening.

  20. Characterization of two novel cutaneous human papillomaviruses, HPV93 and HPV96

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Natasa; Hazard, Kristina; Eliasson, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Two novel human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV93 and HPV96, with genomes of 7450 and 7438 bp, respectively, are described. The L1 open reading frame of HPV93 showed highest identity to HPV24 (79%) and that of HPV96 had highest identity to HPV92 (71%). Real-time PCR for HPV92, 93 and 96 on stripped ...... per 45 cells to one copy per 10,000 cells. The E7 proteins of HPV92, 93 and 96 were found to bind the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). These results suggest a possible role for these HPV types in skin carcinogenesis that deserves further study....

  1. HPV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Against HPV Print en español Vacuna contra el virus del papiloma humano (VPH) What Is HPV and Why Is It a Problem? Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) . HPV is the virus that causes genital warts . Besides genital warts, an ...

  2. The potential health and economic benefits of preventing recurrent respiratory papillomatosis through quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Harrell W; Forhan, Sara E; Gottlieb, Sami L; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2008-08-18

    We estimated the health and economic benefits of preventing recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) through quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. We applied a simple mathematical model to estimate the averted costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) saved by preventing RRP in children whose mothers had been vaccinated at age 12 years. Under base case assumptions, the prevention of RRP would avert an estimated USD 31 (range: USD 2-178) in medical costs (2006 US dollars) and save 0.00016 QALYs (range: 0.00001-0.00152) per 12-year-old girl vaccinated. Including the benefits of RRP reduced the estimated cost per QALY gained by HPV vaccination by roughly 14-21% in the base case and by 100% in the sensitivity analyses. More precise estimates of the incidence of RRP are needed, however, to quantify this impact more reliably.

  3. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Serostatus With Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men: The HPV in Men Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Catharina Johanna; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; da Silva, Roberto José Carvalho; Villa, Luisa Lina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Nyitray, Alan G.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies in women indicate that some sexually transmitted infections promote human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence and carcinogenesis. Little is known about this association in men; therefore, we assessed whether Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection and herpes simplex virus type 2

  4. Can a single dose of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine prevent cervical cancer? Early findings from an Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Joshi, Smita; Muwonge, Richard; Esmy, Pulikottil Okkuru; Basu, Partha; Prabhu, Priya; Bhatla, Neerja; Nene, Bhagwan M; Shaw, Janmesh; Poli, Usha Rani Reddy; Verma, Yogesh; Zomawia, Eric; Pimple, Sharmila; Tommasino, Massimo; Pawlita, Michael; Gheit, Tarik; Waterboer, Tim; Sehr, Peter; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna

    2018-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is a major strategy for preventing cervical and other ano-genital cancers. Worldwide HPV vaccination introduction and coverage will be facilitated if a single dose of vaccine is as effective as two or three doses or demonstrates significant protective effect compared to 'no vaccination'. In a multi-centre cluster randomized trial of two vs three doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccination (Gardasil™) in India, suspension of the vaccination due to events unrelated to the study led to per protocol and partial vaccination of unmarried 10-18 year old girls leading to four study groups, two by design and two by default. They were followed up for the primary outcomes of immunogenicity in terms of L1 genotype-specific binding antibody titres, neutralising antibody titres, and antibody avidity for the vaccine-targeted HPV types and HPV infections. Analysis was per actual number of vaccine doses received. This study is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN98283094; and with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00923702. Of the 17,729 vaccinated girls, 4348 (25%) received three doses on days 1, 60, 180 or later, 4979 (28%) received two doses on days 1 and 180 or later, 3452 (19%) received two doses on days 1 and 60, and 4950 (28%) received one dose. One dose recipients demonstrated a robust and sustained immune response against HPV 16 and 18, albeit inferior to that of 3- or 2-doses and the antibody levels were stable over a 4 year period. The frequencies of cumulative incident and persistent HPV 16 and 18 infections up to 7 years of follow-up were similar and uniformly low in all the vaccinated study groups; the frequency of HPV 16 and 18 infections were significantly higher in unvaccinated age-matched control women than among vaccine recipients. The frequency of vaccine non-targeted HPV types was similar in the vaccinated groups but higher in the unvaccinated control women. Our results indicate that a single dose of quadrivalent HPV

  5. Safety profile of the 9-valent HPV vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, Edson D; Block, Stan L; Ferris, Daron G

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The overall safety profile of the 9-valent human papillomavirus (9vHPV) vaccine was evaluated across 7 Phase III studies, conducted in males and females (nonpregnant at entry), 9 to 26 years of age. METHODS: Vaccination was administered as a 3-dose regimen at day 1, and months 2 and 6....... More than 15 000 subjects received ≥1 dose of 9vHPV vaccine. In 2 of the studies, >7000 control subjects received ≥1 dose of quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine. Serious and nonserious adverse events (AEs) and new medical conditions were recorded throughout the study. Subjects testing positive...... for pregnancy at day 1 were not vaccinated; those who became pregnant after day 1 were discontinued from further vaccination until resolution of the pregnancy. Pregnancies detected after study start (n = 2950) were followed to outcome. RESULTS: The most common AEs (≥5%) experienced by 9vHPV vaccine recipients...

  6. Type-specific detection of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) in self-sampled cervicovaginal cells applied to FTA elute cartridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Inger; Sanner, Karin; Lindell, Monica; Strand, Anders; Olovsson, Matts; Wikström, Ingrid; Wilander, Erik; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2011-08-01

    Most procedures for self-sampling of cervical cells are based on liquid-based media for transportation and storage. An alternative is to use a solid support, such as dry filter paper media. To evaluate if self-sampling of cervicovaginal fluid using a cytobrush (Viba-brush; Rovers Medical Devices B.V., Oss, The Netherlands) and a solid support such as the Whatman Indicating FTA Elute cartridge (GE Healthcare, United Kingdom) can be used for reliable typing of human papillomavirus (HPV), as compared to cervical samples obtained by a physician using a cytobrush and the indicating FTA Elute Micro card and biopsy analysis. A total of 50 women with a previous high-risk (HR) HPV positive test were invited to perform self-sampling using the Viba-brush and the FTA cartridge and thereafter a physician obtained a cervical sample using the cytobrush and a FTA card, together with a cervical biopsy for histology and HPV typing. Detection of HR-HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58 and 59 was performed using three multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. All samples contained sufficient amounts of genomic DNA and the self-samples yielded on average 3.5 times more DNA than those obtained by the physician. All women that were positive for HR-HPV in the biopsy sample also typed positive both by self-sampling and physician-obtained sampling. For women with a histological diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (CIN 2-3) all three HPV samples showed 100% concordance. A higher number of women were HPV positive by self-sampling than by physician-obtained sampling or by biopsy analysis. The Viba-brush and the FTA cartridge are suitable for self-sampling of vaginal cells and subsequent HR-HPV typing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Health and Economic Implications of HPV Vaccination in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane J.; Goldie, Sue J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The cost-effectiveness of prophylactic vaccination against human papillomavirus types 16 (HPV-16) and 18 (HPV-18) is an important consideration for guidelines for immunization in the United States. METHODS We synthesized epidemiologic and demographic data using models of HPV-16 and HPV-18 transmission and cervical carcinogenesis to compare the health and economic outcomes of vaccinating preadolescent girls (at 12 years of age) and vaccinating older girls and women in catch-up programs (to 18, 21, or 26 years of age). We examined the health benefits of averting other HPV-16–related and HPV-18–related cancers, the prevention of HPV-6–related and HPV-11–related genital warts and juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis by means of the quadrivalent vaccine, the duration of immunity, and future screening practices. RESULTS On the assumption that the vaccine provided lifelong immunity, the cost-effectiveness ratio of vaccination of 12-year-old girls was $43,600 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, as compared with the current screening practice. Under baseline assumptions, the cost-effectiveness ratio for extending a temporary catch-up program for girls to 18 years of age was $97,300 per QALY; the cost of extending vaccination of girls and women to the age of 21 years was $120,400 per QALY, and the cost for extension to the age of 26 years was $152,700 per QALY. The results were sensitive to the duration of vaccine-induced immunity; if immunity waned after 10 years, the cost of vaccination of preadolescent girls exceeded $140,000 per QALY, and catch-up strategies were less cost-effective than screening alone. The cost-effectiveness ratios for vaccination strategies were more favorable if the benefits of averting other health conditions were included or if screening was delayed and performed at less frequent intervals and with more sensitive tests; they were less favorable if vaccinated girls were preferentially screened more

  8. Estimation of the overall burden of cancers, precancerous lesions, and genital warts attributable to 9-valent HPV vaccine types in women and men in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwig , Susanne; St Guily , Jean Lacau; Dominiak-Felden , Géraldine; Alemany , Laia; De Sanjosé , Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Background In addition to cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for a significant proportion of cancers and precancerous lesions of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, head and neck, as well as genital warts. We estimated the annual number of new cases of these diseases attributable to 9-valent HPV vaccine types in women and men in Europe. Methods The annual number of new cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and selected head and neck sites in the population of ...

  9. Genetically modified cellular vaccines for therapy of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV 16)-associated tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2008), s. 180-186 ISSN 1568-0096 Grant - others:EU-FP6-NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HPV 16 * genetically modified vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.316, year: 2008

  10. Human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination for the prevention of HPV 16/18 induced cervical cancer and its precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Essential precondition for the development of cervical cancer is a persistent human papillomavirus (HPV infection. The majority - approximately 70% - of cervical carcinomas is caused by two high-risk HPV types (16 and 18. Recently, two vaccines have been approved to the German market with the potential to induce protection against HPV 16 and HPV 18 among additional low-risk virus types. Objectives: To analyse whether HPV vaccination is effective with regard to the reduction of cervical cancer and precursors of cervical carcinoma (CIN, respectively? Does HPV vaccination represent a cost-effective alternative or supplement to present screening practice? Are there any differences concerning cost-effectiveness between the two available vaccines? Should HPV vaccination be recommended from a health economic point of view? If so, which recommendations can be conveyed with respect to a (reorganization of the German vaccination strategy? Which ethical, social and legal implications have to be considered? Methods: Based on a systematic literature review, randomized controlled trials (RCT looking at the effectiveness of HPV vaccination for the prevention of cervical carcinoma and its precursors - cervical intraepithelial neoplasia - have been identified. In addition, health economic models were identified to address the health economic research questions. Quality assessment of medical and economic literature was assured by application of general assessment standards for the systematic and critical appraisal of scientific studies. Results: Vaccine efficacy in prevention of CIN 2 or higher lesions in HPV 16 or HPV 18 negative women, who received all vaccination doses, ranges between 98% and 100%. Side effects of the vaccination are mainly associated with injection site reactions (redness, turgor, pain. No significant differences concerning serious complications between the vaccination- and the placebo-groups were reported. Results of base case

  11. Urine testing to monitor the impact of HPV vaccination in Bhutan and Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Silvia; Chantal Umulisa, M; Tshomo, Ugyen; Gheit, Tarik; Baussano, Iacopo; Tenet, Vanessa; Tshokey, Tshokey; Gatera, Maurice; Ngabo, Fidele; Van Damme, Pierre; Snijders, Peter J F; Tommasino, Massimo; Vorsters, Alex; Clifford, Gary M

    2016-08-01

    Bhutan (2010) and Rwanda (2011) were the first countries in Asia and Africa to introduce national, primarily school-based, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programmes. These target 12 year-old girls and initially included catch-up campaigns (13-18 year-olds in Bhutan and ninth school grade in Rwanda). In 2013, to obtain the earliest indicators of vaccine effectiveness, we performed two school-based HPV urine surveys; 973 female students (median age: 19 years, 5th-95th percentile: 18-22) were recruited in Bhutan and 912 (19 years, 17-20) in Rwanda. Participants self-collected a first-void urine sample using a validated protocol. HPV prevalence was obtained using two PCR assays that differ in sensitivity and type spectrum, namely GP5+/GP6+ and E7-MPG. 92% students in Bhutan and 43% in Rwanda reported to have been vaccinated (median vaccination age = 16, 5th-95th: 14-18). HPV positivity in urine was significantly associated with sexual activity measures. In Rwanda, HPV6/11/16/18 prevalence was lower in vaccinated than in unvaccinated students (prevalence ratio, PR = 0.12, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.03-0.51 by GP5+/GP6+, and 0.45, CI: 0.23-0.90 by E7-MPG). For E7-MPG, cross-protection against 10 high-risk types phylogenetically related to HPV16 or 18 was of borderline significance (PR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.45-1.01). In Bhutan, HPV6/11/16/18 prevalence by GP5+/GP6+ was lower in vaccinated than in unvaccinated students but CIs were broad. In conclusion, our study supports the feasibility of urine surveys to monitor HPV vaccination and quantifies the effectiveness of the quadrivalent vaccine in women vaccinated after pre-adolescence. Future similar surveys should detect increases in vaccine effectiveness if vaccination of 12 year-olds continues. © 2016 UICC.

  12. A chimeric 18L1-45RG1 virus-like particle vaccine cross-protects against oncogenic alpha-7 human papillomavirus types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Huber

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC, a subset of cervical cancer (CxC. Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7 includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18 targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1 of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1. Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent

  13. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine uptake in adolescent boys and maternal utilization of preventive care and history of sexually transmitted infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Rulin C; Chao, Chun; Sy, Lina S; Ackerson, Bradley K; Slezak, Jeff M; Sidell, Margo A; Jacobsen, Steven J

    2013-09-01

    We examined whether maternal utilization of preventive care and history of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) predicted quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) uptake among adolescent boys 1 year following the recommendation for permissive use of HPV4 for males. We linked maternal information with electronic health records of 254 489 boys aged 9 to 17 years who enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Southern California health plan from October 21, 2009, through December 21, 2010. We used multivariable Poisson regression with robust error variance to examine whether HPV4 initiation was associated with maternal uptake of influenza vaccine, Papanicolaou (Pap) screening, and history of STIs. We identified a modest but statistically significant association between initiation of HPV4 series and maternal receipt of influenza vaccine (rate ratio [RR] = 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07, 1.26) and Pap screening (RR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.26). Boys whose mothers had a history of genital warts were more likely to initiate HPV4 (RR = 1.47; 95% CI = 0.93, 2.34), although the association did not reach statistical significance (P = .1). Maternal utilization of preventive care and history of genital warts may influence HPV4 uptake among adolescent boys. The important role of maternal health characteristics and health behaviors needs be considered in intervention efforts to increase vaccine uptake among boys.

  14. Guillain–Barre syndrome following quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination among vaccine-eligible individuals in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Rohit P; Jackson, Bradford E; Tota, Joseph E; Offutt-Powell, Tabatha N; Singh, Karan P; Bae, Sejong

    2014-01-01

    Post-marketing surveillance studies provide conflicting evidence about whether Guillain–Barre syndrome occurs more frequently following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccination. We aimed to assess whether Guillain–Barre syndrome is reported more frequently following HPV4 vaccination than other vaccinations among females and males aged 9 to 26 y in the United States. We used adverse event reports received by the United States Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012 to estimate overall, age-, and sex-specific proportional reporting ratios (PRRs) and corresponding Χ2 values for reports of Guillain–Barre syndrome between 5 and 42 d following HPV vaccination. Minimum criteria for a signal using this approach are 3 or more cases, PRR ≥2, and Χ2 ≥ 4. Guillain–Barre syndrome was listed as an adverse event in 45 of 14 822 reports, of which 9 reports followed HPV4 vaccination and 36 reports followed all other vaccines. The overall, age-, and sex-specific PRR estimates were uniformly below 1. In addition, the overall, age-, and sex-specific Χ2 values were uniformly below 3. Our analysis of post-marketing surveillance data does not suggest that Guillain–Barre syndrome is reported more frequently following HPV4 vaccination than other vaccinations among vaccine-eligible females or males in the United States. Our findings may be useful when discussing the risks and benefits of HPV4 vaccination. PMID:24013368

  15. Guillain-Barre syndrome following quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination among vaccine-eligible individuals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Rohit P; Jackson, Bradford E; Tota, Joseph E; Offutt-Powell, Tabatha N; Singh, Karan P; Bae, Sejong

    2014-01-01

    Post-marketing surveillance studies provide conflicting evidence about whether Guillain-Barre syndrome occurs more frequently following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccination. We aimed to assess whether Guillain-Barre syndrome is reported more frequently following HPV4 vaccination than other vaccinations among females and males aged 9 to 26 y in the United States. We used adverse event reports received by the United States Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012 to estimate overall, age-, and sex-specific proportional reporting ratios (PRRs) and corresponding Χ2 values for reports of Guillain-Barre syndrome between 5 and 42 d following HPV vaccination. Minimum criteria for a signal using this approach are 3 or more cases, PRR≥2, and Χ2≥4. Guillain-Barre syndrome was listed as an adverse event in 45 of 14,822 reports, of which 9 reports followed HPV4 vaccination and 36 reports followed all other vaccines. The overall, age-, and sex-specific PRR estimates were uniformly below 1. In addition, the overall, age-, and sex-specific Χ2 values were uniformly below 3. Our analysis of post-marketing surveillance data does not suggest that Guillain-Barre syndrome is reported more frequently following HPV4 vaccination than other vaccinations among vaccine-eligible females or males in the United States. Our findings may be useful when discussing the risks and benefits of HPV4 vaccination.

  16. HPV DNA methylation at the early promoter and E1/E2 integrity: A comparison between HPV16, HPV18 and HPV45 in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Filho, Sérgio Menezes; Pereira Chaves, Cláudia Bessa; Felix, Shayany Pinto; Basto, Diogo Lisbôa; de Almeida, Liz Maria; Moreira, Miguel Angelo Martins

    2018-04-09

    To compare and describe type-specific characteristics of HPV16, HPV18 and HPV45 in cervical cancer with respect to 3'LCR methylation and disruption of E1/E2. The methylation level of 137 cervical cancer samples (70 with HPV16, 37 with HPV18, and 30 with HPV45) of Brazilian patients was analyzed by pyrosequencing. PCR amplifications were performed to characterize E1 and E2 disruption as an episomal surrogate. The 3'LCR of HPV16 showed a higher methylation at all CpG sites (7%, 9%, 11%, 10% and 10%) than homologous HPV18 regions (4%, 5%. 6%, 9% and 5%) and HPV45 regions (7%, 7% and 5%). Presence of intact E1/E2 was associated with higher HPV16 and HPV18 methylation levels at all CpG sites (p < 0.05). Disruption of E1/E2 was more frequently found in HPV45 (97%) and HPV18 (84%) than in HPV16 DNA (30%). HPV16 disruption was more frequently found in E1 (48%) unlike HPV18, where it was found in E2 (61%). Concomitant disruption of E1/E2 was most frequent in HPV45 (72%). The findings showed a higher methylation associated with intact E1/E2 for HPV16 and HPV18. The closely phylogenetic related HPV18 and HPV45 share a similar methylation level and the frequency of viral genome disruption. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pap smear cytology and identification of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and 18 in multiparity women at Aviati Clinic Padang Bulan Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraini, D. R.; Feriyawati, L.; Fitrie, A. A.; Ginting, R. N. A.

    2018-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most frequent cancer in woman in developing countries and one of the most crucial health problems in the world. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is an agent for sexually transmitted disease which is an act of cervical cancer, especially high-risk of HPV type 16 and 18. In this study, we investigated the Pap smear cytology features and identification of HPV types 16 and18 in multiparity women at Aviati Clinic Padang Bulan, Medan. Samples are cervical swabs of 50 multiparity women who met the inclusion criteria (childbirth ≥ three times) was included in the study. Pap smear examination was conducted using Papanicolaou staining and identification of HPV types 16 and 18 using the Polymerase Chain Reactive (PCR) methods. Pap smearcytology showed 80% Negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM) with inflammation and 20% NILM. The result of PCR amplification showed that there weren’t specific band DNA was found at band 414bp and 216bp. That means there weren’t cervical swabs sample had DNA of HPV type 16 and 18.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccine in reducing the risk of cervical cancer in Ireland due to HPV types 16 and 18 using a transmission dynamic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usher, C.; Tilson, L.; Olsen, J.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of combining a cervical cancer screening programme with a national HPV vaccination programme compared to a screening programme alone to prevent cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer related to HPV types 16 and 18 in the Irish healthcare setting. The incrementa...... per LYG was ((sic)3400 to E38,400). This suggests that vaccination against HPV types 16 and 18 would be cost-effective from the perspective of the Irish healthcare payer. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved......We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of combining a cervical cancer screening programme with a national HPV vaccination programme compared to a screening programme alone to prevent cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer related to HPV types 16 and 18 in the Irish healthcare setting. The incremental...... cost effectiveness of vaccination strategies for 12-year-old females (base-case) and 12-26-year-old catch-up vaccination strategies were examined. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was (sic)17,383/LYG. Using a probabilistic sensitivity analysis about the base-case, the 95% CI for cost...

  19. Impact and Cost-effectiveness of 3 Doses of 9-Valent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Among US Females Previously Vaccinated With 4-Valent HPV Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Harrell W; Laprise, Jean-François; Brisson, Marc; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2016-06-01

    We estimated the potential impact and cost-effectiveness of providing 3-doses of nonavalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (9vHPV) to females aged 13-18 years who had previously completed a series of quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV), a strategy we refer to as "additional 9vHPV vaccination." We used 2 distinct models: (1) the simplified model, which is among the most basic of the published dynamic HPV models, and (2) the US HPV-ADVISE model, a complex, stochastic, individual-based transmission-dynamic model. When assuming no 4vHPV cross-protection, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained by additional 9vHPV vaccination was $146 200 in the simplified model and $108 200 in the US HPV-ADVISE model ($191 800 when assuming 4vHPV cross-protection). In 1-way sensitivity analyses in the scenario of no 4vHPV cross-protection, the simplified model results ranged from $70 300 to $182 000, and the US HPV-ADVISE model results ranged from $97 600 to $118 900. The average cost per QALY gained by additional 9vHPV vaccination exceeded $100 000 in both models. However, the results varied considerably in sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Additional 9vHPV vaccination is likely not as efficient as many other potential HPV vaccination strategies, such as increasing primary 9vHPV vaccine coverage. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Genital Warts (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Genital Warts (HPV) KidsHealth / For Teens / Genital Warts (HPV) What's in ... HPV infection. How Do People Know They Have HPV? Most HPV infections have no signs or symptoms. ...

  1. Application value of different transformation zone types and its genetic relationship with high-risk HPV type in diagnosis and therapy of cervical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jia-De

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to discuss the influence of different types of transformation zone (TZ) on positive surgical margin of loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) and the significance of infection of different genetic high-risk HPV for cervical intraepithelial neoplasm. The clinical data of patients who had CIN2+ and received LEEP during January to December 2013 was investigated. The conditions of positive surgical margin of patients of different transformation zone (type I, II, III) were analyzed. The clinical high-risk types of HPV were divided into three groups, including A5/6, A7 and A9, compared with the pathological conditions of pre-operation and post-operation of the patients in respective group. The results indicated that type III transformation zone is more likely to cause positive cutting margin. For CIN2+ patients, sensitivity and specificity are 0.89% and 79.56% in group A5/6, and negative and positive predicted value (NPV, PPV) are 40% and 5%. The sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV in group A7 is 12.5%, 44.08%, 29.49% and 21.21%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV in group A9 is 88.99%, 87.09%, 85.26%, 81.51%, respectively. Transformation zone type was correlated positively with positive cutting margin percentage (r = 0.8732, P zone is more likely to cause pathological upgrades. In conclusion, different types of transformation zone and high-risk HPV have clinical significance in causing positive cutting margin of surgery and disease extent.

  2. Serial type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) load measurement allows differentiation between regressing cervical lesions and serial virion productive transient infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depuydt, Christophe E; Jonckheere, Jef; Berth, Mario; Salembier, Geert M; Vereecken, Annie J; Bogers, Johannes J

    2015-01-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is strongly associated with the development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or cancer. Not all persistent infections lead to cancer. Viral load measured at a single time-point is a poor predictor of the natural history of HPV infections. However the profile of viral load evolution over time could distinguish nonprogressive from progressive (carcinogenic) infections. A retrospective natural history study was set up using a Belgian laboratory database including more than 800,000 liquid cytology specimens. All samples were submitted to qPCR identifying E6/E7 genes of 18 HPV types. Viral load changes over time were assessed by the linear regression slope. Database search identified 261 untreated women with persistent type-specific HPV DNA detected (270 infections) in at least three of the last smears for a average period of 3.2 years. Using the coefficient of determination (R²) infections could be subdivided in a latency group (n = 143; R² < 0.85) and a regressing group (n = 127; R² ≥ 0.85). In (≥3) serial viral load measurements, serial transient infections with latency is characterized by a nonlinear limited difference in decrease or increase of type-specific viral load (R² < 0.85 and slopes between 2 measurements 0.0010 and −0.0010 HPV copies/cell per day) over a longer period of time (1553 days), whereas regression of a clonal cell population is characterized by a linear (R² ≥ 0.85) decrease (−0.0033 HPV copies/cell per day) over a shorter period of time (708 days; P < 0.001). Using serial HPV type-specific viral load measurements we could for the first time identify regressing CIN2 and CIN3 lesions. Evolution of the viral load is an objective measurable indicator of the natural history of HPV infections and could be used for future triage in HPV-based cervical screening programs

  3. Systematic review and meta-analysis of L1-VLP-based human papillomavirus vaccine efficacy against anogenital pre-cancer in women with evidence of prior HPV exposure.

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    Ada Miltz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether L1-VLP-based human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines are efficacious in reducing the likelihood of anogenital pre-cancer in women with evidence of prior vaccine-type HPV exposure. This study aims to determine whether the combined results of the vaccine trials published to date provide evidence of efficacy compared with control (hepatitis A vaccine/placebo. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted. Randomized-controlled trials (RCTs were identified from MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and references of identified studies. The bivalent vaccine containing HPV-16 and 18 VLPs from GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (Rixenstart, Belgium, the quadrivalent vaccine containing HPV-6, 11, 16, and 18 VLPs from Merck & Co., Inc., (Whitehouse Station, NJ USA, and the HPV-16 monovalent vaccine from Merck Research Laboratories (West Point, PA USA were evaluated. FINDINGS: Three RCT reports and two post-trial cohort studies were eligible, comprising data from 13,482 women who were included in the vaccine studies but had evidence of HPV infection at study entry. Data on efficacy was synthesized using the Mantel-Haenszel weighted fixed-effect approach, or where there was heterogeneity between studies, the DerSimonian and Laird weighted random-effect approach. The mean odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI for the association between Cervarix, Gardasil and HPV-16 monovalent vaccine and HPV-associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse was 0·90 (95% CI: 0·56, 1·44. For the association between Gardasil and HPV-associated vulval/vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3, the overall OR and 95% CI was 2.25 (95% CI: 0·78, 6.50. Sample size and follow-up were limited. CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence that HPV vaccines are effective in preventing vaccine-type HPV associated pre-cancer in women with evidence of prior HPV exposure. Small

  4. Knowledge, acceptance, and willingness to pay for human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination among female parents in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruiroongroj, Siraporn; Chaikledkaew, Usa; Thavorncharoensap, Montarat

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the level of knowledge, attitude, acceptance, and willingness to pay (WTP) for HPV vaccination among female parents of girls aged 12-15 years in Thailand. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in eight schools across Bangkok. Of 1,200 questionnaires sent out, a total of 861 questionnaires were received. Knowledge regarding the HPV vaccine among parents was quite low. Only half of the parents knew about the link between HPV and cervical cancer while one-third of them knew that the vaccine should be administered to the children before they become sexually active. Nevertheless, vaccine acceptance was high if it was offered for free: 76.9% for the bivalent and 74.4% for the quadrivalent vaccine. The proportion of respondents who were willing to copay for the vaccine if it was not totally free was also high, ranging from 68.9% for the bivalent to 67.3% for the quadrivalent vaccine. No significant difference between bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in terms of prevalence of acceptance and willingness to pay was found. About one-third of the participants, who were willing to copay for the vaccine if it was not offered for free, indicated that they would copay less than 500 baht (30 baht = approx US$1) for three doses of bivalent vaccine. Substantial effort should be made to educate parents prior to introduction of a national HPV vaccination program. In terms of acceptance, either bivalent or quadrivalent vaccines can be recommended.

  5. Long-term persistence of oral human papillomavirus type 16: the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Kreimer, Aimée R; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; O'Keefe, Michael T; Ingles, Donna J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with oral HPV16 is believed to drive the development of most oropharyngeal cancers. However, patterns of oral HPV16 persistence remain understudied, particularly among HIV-negative individuals. Oral HPV16 persistence was evaluated among 1,626 participants of the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Twenty-three oral HPV16-positive men who provided an oral gargle sample on ≥2 study visits were included in the analysis. Archived oral samples from all follow-up visits were tested for HPV16 using Linear Array and INNO-LiPA detection methods. Persistence was evaluated using consecutive HPV16-positive visits held approximately 6 months apart and using the Kaplan-Meier method. Oral HPV16-positive men were aged 18 to 64 years [median, 36 years; interquartile range (IQR), 25-42] and were followed for a median of 44.4 months (IQR, 29.9-49.5). Of 13 incident infections, 4 (30.8%) persisted ≥12 months, 1 (10.0%) persisted ≥24 months, and none persisted ≥36 months [median infection duration, 7.3 months; 95% confidence interval (CI), 6.4-NA)]. Of 10 prevalent infections, 9 (90.0%) persisted ≥12 months, 8 (80.0%) persisted ≥24 months, 4 (57.1%) persisted ≥36 months, and 2 (40.0%) persisted ≥48 months (median infection duration, NA). Twelve-month persistence of incident infections increased significantly with age (Ptrend = 0.028). Prevalent oral HPV16 infections in men persisted longer than newly acquired infections, and persistence appeared to increase with age. These findings may explain the high prevalence of oral HPV observed at older ages. Understanding oral HPV16 persistence will aid in the identification of men at high-risk of developing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. HPV infections among MSM in Shenzhen, China.

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    Dong-Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An increasing incidence of anal cancer among men, especially men who have sex with men (MSM suggests a need to better understand anal human papillomavirus (HPV infection among this group. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among MSM in Shenzhen, China. Blood was collected for HIV serological testing and syphilis serological screening, and anal swabs were collected for HPV genotyping. Difference of HPV prevalence between HIV seropositive and HIV seronegative MSM was assessed by chi-square test. Factors associated with anal canal HPV infection were assessed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 408 MSM were recruited. HIV and HPV prevalence were 6.9% and 36.4%, respectively. HPV was detected in the anal canal in 71.4% of the HIV-positive MSM and in 33.8% of the HIV-negative MSM (P<0.001. Oncogenic types were seen more often in anal specimens of HIV-positive MSM than in specimens of HIV-negative MSM (P = 0.001. The HPV genotypes detected most frequently were HPV06 (8.2%, HPV16 (7.2%, HPV11 (6.4%, HPV18 (4.7%, HPV58 (4.7%, and HPV52 (4.2%. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, HIV positive MSM had a higher burden of HPV infection, especially oncogenic HPV infection. HPV types 52 and 58 were as popular as those types designed for the currently available vaccine (HPV6, 11, 16, 18.

  7. Prevalence and Incidence of Anal and Cervical High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types covered by Current HPV Vaccines among HIV-Infected Women in the Study to Understand the Natural History of HIV/AIDS in the Era of Effective Therapy (The SUN Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojic, Erna Milunka; Conley, Lois; Bush, Tim; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Unger, Elizabeth R; Henry, Keith; Hammer, John; Escota, Gerome; Darragh, Teresa M; Palefsky, Joel M; Brooks, John T; Patel, Pragna

    2018-02-14

    Nonavalent (9v) human papilloma virus vaccine targets high-risk (HR)-HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58, and low-risk 6, 11. We examined prevalence, incidence, and clearance of anal and cervical HR-HPV in HIV-infected women. From 2004-2006, the SUN Study enrolled 167 women from four US cities. Anal and cervical specimens were collected annually for cytology and identification of 37 HPV types; 14 HR include: 9v 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58; non-9v 35, 39, 51, 56, 59, 66, 68. Baseline characteristics of 126 women included: median age 38 years; 57% non-Hispanic black; 67% HIV RNA HPV prevalence at anus and cervix was 90% and 83%; for 9v HR-HPV types, 67% and 51%; non-9v HR-HPV, 54% and 29%, respectively. 9v and non-9v HR-HPV incidence rates/100 person-years were similar (10.4 vs 9.5: 8.5 vs 8.3, respectively); 9v clearance rates were 42% and 61%; non-9v 46% and 59%, in anus and cervix, respectively. Anal HR-HPV prevalence was higher than cervical with lower clearance; incidence was similar. Although prevalence of non-9v HR-HPV was substantial, 9v HR-HPV types were generally more prevalent. These findings support use of nonavalent vaccine in HIV-infected women. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  9. HPV genotype distribution in older Danish women undergoing surgery due to cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne; Mejlgaard, Else; Gravitt, Patti

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)16/18 in cervical cancer may decrease with age. This study aimed to describe the HPV genotype distribution in Danish women aged 55 years or older with cervical cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study we identified 153...... cases of cervical cancer diagnosed at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (1990-2012) and Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Denmark (2007-2012). All women had surgery to treat the disease. HPV genotyping was performed on cervical cancer tissue using the INNO LiPA HPV genotyping extra (Fujirebio......, Belgium) at the Department of Pathology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The main outcome was to estimate the age-specific prevalence of high-risk HPV genotypes included in the bivalent, the quadrivalent, and the nonavalent vaccine. RESULTS: Of 121 cases of cervical cancer included in this study, 113...

  10. HPV Prevalence in Multiple Anatomical Sites among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Peru.

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    Magaly M Blas

    Full Text Available Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted viral infection worldwide. HPV is highly prevalent in sexually active men who have sex with men (MSM and has been associated with anal cancer, penile cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer.From March to September 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study of HPV prevalence among MSM above age 18 years. Participants were recruited using respondent driven sampling at Clinica Cayetano Heredia. All participants provided anal, genital, and oral samples for HPV DNA testing, and blood for HIV and HPV antibody testing.A total of 200 MSM were recruited in the study. The mean age was 34 years (range 18-59 years, SD = 9.4 and101 participants were HIV negative (99 HIV positive. HPV 6/11/16/18 or quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4 genotype seroprevalence among HIV negative and positive MSM was 64.3% (55%-75.9% and 93.8% (87.6%-99.2% respectively (p<0.001. HIV positivity was associated with a higher prevalence of HPV4 and HPV 16/18 DNA at external genital sites and the anal canal. HPV4 DNA prevalence at external genital sites among HIV negative and positive MSM was 14.9% and 28.7% (p = 0.02 respectively, at anal canal was 50.9% and 79.0% (p = 0.001, and at the oral cavity was 9.9% and 8.5% (p = 0.6.HPV4 seroprevalence was high in our study among both HIV positives and negatives, with HPV DNA prevalence much lower, and the anal canal being the anatomical site with the highest HPV DNA prevalence. HPV prevention interventions are needed among MSM at high-risk for HIV infection.

  11. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the -Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species 5 (HPV51), 6 (HPV56), 7 (H...

  12. Human papilloma viruses (HPV and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human papillomaviruses (HPV may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer.Methods: RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC.Results: Thirty (3.5% low risk and 20 (2.3% high risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA data base. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%, HPV 113 (24%, HPV 16 (10%, HPV 52 (10%. Data from the PCR cohort study, indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens followed by HPV 16 (13%. The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens.Conclusions: There were 4 observations of particular interest: (i confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii a correlation between high risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of

  13. The Intersection of HPV Epidemiology, Genomics and Mechanistic Studies of HPV-Mediated Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabello, Lisa; Clarke, Megan A; Nelson, Chase W; Dean, Michael; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Yeager, Meredith; Cullen, Michael; Boland, Joseph F; Schiffman, Mark; Burk, Robert D

    2018-02-13

    Of the ~60 human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes that infect the cervicovaginal epithelium, only 12-13 "high-risk" types are well-established as causing cervical cancer, with HPV16 accounting for over half of all cases worldwide. While HPV16 is the most important carcinogenic type, variants of HPV16 can differ in their carcinogenicity by 10-fold or more in epidemiologic studies. Strong genotype-phenotype associations embedded in the small 8-kb HPV16 genome motivate molecular studies to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms. Understanding the mechanisms of HPV genomic findings is complicated by the linkage of HPV genome variants. A panel of experts in various disciplines gathered on 21 November 2016 to discuss the interdisciplinary science of HPV oncogenesis. Here, we summarize the discussion of the complexity of the viral-host interaction and highlight important next steps for selected applied basic laboratory studies guided by epidemiological genomic findings.

  14. The Intersection of HPV Epidemiology, Genomics and Mechanistic Studies of HPV-Mediated Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Mirabello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Of the ~60 human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes that infect the cervicovaginal epithelium, only 12–13 “high-risk” types are well-established as causing cervical cancer, with HPV16 accounting for over half of all cases worldwide. While HPV16 is the most important carcinogenic type, variants of HPV16 can differ in their carcinogenicity by 10-fold or more in epidemiologic studies. Strong genotype-phenotype associations embedded in the small 8-kb HPV16 genome motivate molecular studies to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms. Understanding the mechanisms of HPV genomic findings is complicated by the linkage of HPV genome variants. A panel of experts in various disciplines gathered on 21 November 2016 to discuss the interdisciplinary science of HPV oncogenesis. Here, we summarize the discussion of the complexity of the viral–host interaction and highlight important next steps for selected applied basic laboratory studies guided by epidemiological genomic findings.

  15. HPV Carcinomas in Immunocompromised Patients

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    Nicole M. Reusser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide and can result in pre-malignancies or overt malignancies of the skin and mucosal surfaces. HPV-related illnesses are an important personal and public health problem causing physical, mental, sexual and financial detriments. Moreover, this set of malignancies severely affects the immunosuppressed population, particularly HIV-positive patients and organ-transplant recipients. There is growing incidence of HPV-associated anogenital malignancies as well as a decrease in the average age of affected patients, likely related to the rising number of high-risk individuals. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of HPV-related malignancy. Current treatment options for HPV infection and subsequent disease manifestations include imiquimod, retinoids, intralesional bleomycin, and cidofovir; however, primary prevention with HPV vaccination remains the most effective strategy. This review will discuss anogenital lesions in immunocompromised patients, cutaneous warts at nongenital sites, the association of HPV with skin cancer in immunocompromised patients, warts and carcinomas in organ-transplant patients, HIV-positive patients with HPV infections, and the management of cutaneous disease in the immunocompromised patient.

  16. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6-specific antitumor immunity is induced by oral administration of HPV16 E6-expressing Lactobacillus casei in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Young; Kim, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Soon; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Il-Han; Yang, Jai-Myung; Sung, Moon-Hee; Park, Jong-Sup; Poo, Haryoung

    2010-11-01

    Given that local cell-mediated immunity (CMI) against the human papillomavirus type 16 E6 (HPV16 E6) protein is important for eradication of HPV16 E6-expressing cancer cells in the cervical mucosa, the HPV16 E6 protein may be a target for the mucosal immunotherapy of cervical cancer. Here, we expressed the HPV16 E6 antigen on Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) and investigated E6-specific CMI following oral administration of the L. casei-PgsA-E6 to mice. Surface expression of HPV16 E6 antigens was confirmed and mice were orally inoculated with the L. casei-PgsA or the L. casei-PgsA-E6. Compared to the L. casei-PgsA-treated mice, significantly higher levels of serum IgG and mucosal IgA were observed in L. casei-PgsA-E6-immunized mice; these differences were significantly enhanced after boost. Consistent with this, systemic and local CMI were significantly increased after the boost, as shown by increased counts of IFN-gamma-secreting cells in splenocytes, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and vaginal samples. Furthermore, in the TC-1 tumor model, animals receiving the orally administered L. casei-PgsA-E6 showed reduced tumor size and increased survival rate versus mice receiving control (L. casei-PgsA) immunization. We also found that L. casei-PgsA-E6-induced antitumor effect was decreased by in vivo depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells. Collectively, these results indicate that the oral administration of lactobacilli bearing the surface-displayed E6 protein induces T cell-mediated cellular immunity and antitumor effects in mice.

  17. [HPV immunization for the prevention of cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougin, Christiane; Bourgault-Villada, Isabelle; Coursaget, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) infect epithelial cells of the skin and mucosae. Mucosal high-risk HPV types (mainly HPV 16 and 18) are involved in the development of cervical cancer, one of the most common cancers in young women. HPV infection is usually asymptomatic and clears spontaneously, but 10 - 15 % of high-risk HPV infections are persistent and increase the risk of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix. Two HPV vaccines have been licensed to provide protection against cervical cancer. To report the different aspects of HPV infection in order to improve the understanding of the particular problems of HPV vaccination and to review the most recent findings related to HPV vaccines, particularly regarding the protective efficacy of vaccines and the roles of adjuvants and immune response in protection. Articles were selected from the PubMed database (National Library of Medicine- National Institute of Health) with the following Keywords "HPV", "Prevention", "HPV vaccines", "Immune response", "Antibody". Abstracts of oral presentations from international meetings were also selected for the more recent findings. a critical analysis of the majority of papers published was undertaken and relevant information summarized. Virus-like particle production by expressing the major protein of the HPV capsid was carried out in the early 90's, leading to the recent development of two HPV vaccines. These vaccines are now licensed in many countries and have been demonstrated to be highly immunogenic. In subjects that are non-infected at the time of vaccination, HPV vaccines are highly effective in preventing persistent HPV 16 - 18 infections (90 %) and precursors lesions of cervical cancer associated with these two HPV types (close to 100 %). Clinical trials have also confirmed that HPV vaccines are well tolerated by recipients. The present paper is a detailed review published in French on HPV vaccines, their efficacy in the prevention of HPV infections and unresolved

  18. Awareness and Knowledge About HPV and HPV Vaccine Among Romanian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Mihaela; Teleman, Sergiu Iuliu; Pristavu, Anda; Matei, Mioara

    2018-02-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most prevalent gynecological malignancies worldwide. Romania has the highest incidence of this type of cancer in Europe. A successful prevention strategy has to consider the primary prevention measures (including health education on human papilloma virus (HPV) infection but also vaccination). The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Romanian women about HPV and HPV vaccine. We conducted a cross-sectional study survey of 454 women using an anonymously completed questionnaire covering the awareness and knowledge of HPV infection and attitudes to vaccination. We also analyzed the discussions and conclusion from a focus group of healthcare professionals regarding (1) HPV and HPV awareness and attitude, and (2) suggestions for improving HPV vaccine knowledge and acceptance. 69.2% of women were aware about HPV but their knowledge was minimal and incomplete. While 62.3% had heard about HPV vaccine, only 50.7% had a positive attitude toward it. The main barriers to vaccination were the fear of side effects, the perception that is risky, and the financial concerns. Deficiencies in knowledge were noted for vaccine, genital warts, or risks factors for HPV infection like the early onset of sexual life. The information regarding HPV and vaccine is not always accurate and complete, and only 50.7% of women have a positive attitude toward the vaccine. More educational programs and clearer communication are needed to raise awareness and knowledge regarding HPV and HPV vaccine.

  19. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for developing them, such as taking oral contraceptives . A safety review of Gardasil in Denmark and ... and venous thromboembolic adverse events after immunisation of adolescent girls with quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in Denmark ...

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines from a societal perspective in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte-González, Johanna; Fajardo-Bernal, Luisa; Diaz, Jorge; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Gamboa, Oscar; Hay, Joel W

    2013-01-01

    To compare costs and effectiveness of three strategies used against cervical cancer (CC) and genital warts: (i) Screening for CC; (ii) Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 vaccine added to screening; (iii) Quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine added to screening. A Markov model was designed in order to simulate the natural history of the disease from 12 years of age (vaccination) until death. Transition probabilities were selected or adjusted to match the HPV infection profile in Colombia. A systematic review was undertaken in order to derive efficacy values for the two vaccines as well as for the operational characteristics of the cytology test. The societal perspective was used. Effectiveness was measured in number of averted Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYS). At commercial prices reported for 2010 the two vaccines were shown to be non-cost-effective alternatives when compared with the existing screening strategy. Sensitivity analyses showed that results are affected by the cost of vaccines and their efficacy values, making it difficult to determine with certainty which of the two vaccines has the best cost-effectiveness profile. To be 'cost-effective' vaccines should cost between 141 and 147 USD (Unite States Dollars) per vaccinated girl at the most. But at lower prices such as those recommended by WHO or the price of other vaccines in Colombia, HPV vaccination could be considered very cost-effective. HPV vaccination could be a convenient alternative for the prevention of CC in Colombia. However, the price of the vaccine should be lower for this vaccination strategy to be cost-effective. It is also important to take into consideration the willingness to pay, budgetary impact, and program implications, in order to determine the relevance of a vaccination program in this country, as well as which vaccine should be selected for use in the program.

  1. Post-licensure safety monitoring of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), 2009-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Jorge E; Harrington, Theresa; Cano, Maria; Lewis, Paige; Mba-Jonas, Adamma; Rongxia, Li; Stewart, Brock; Markowitz, Lauri E; Shimabukuro, Tom T

    2018-03-20

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (4vHPV) for use in females and males aged 9-26 years, since 2006 and 2009 respectively. We characterized reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a US spontaneous reporting system, in females and males who received 4vHPV vaccination. We searched VAERS for US reports of adverse events (AEs) following 4vHPV from January 2009 through December 2015. Signs and symptoms were coded using Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). We calculated reporting rates and conducted empirical Bayesian data mining to identify disproportional reports. Clinicians reviewed available information, including medical records, and reports of selected pre-specified conditions. VAERS received 19,760 reports following 4vHPV; 60.2% in females, 17.2% in males, and in 22.6% sex was missing. Overall, 94.2% of reports were non-serious; dizziness, syncope and injection site reactions were commonly reported in both males and females. Headache, fatigue and nausea were commonly reported serious AEs. More than 60 million 4vHPV doses were distributed during the study period. Crude AE reporting rates were 327 reports per million 4vHPV doses distributed for all reports, and 19 per million for serious reports. Among 29 verified reports of death, there was no pattern of clustering of deaths by diagnosis, co-morbidities, age, or interval from vaccination to death. No new or unexpected safety concerns or reporting patterns of 4vHPV with clinically important AEs were detected. Safety profile of 4vHPV is consistent with data from pre-licensure trials and postmarketing safety data. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Impact of human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine on all HPV-associated genital diseases in young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Nubia; Kjaer, Susanne K; Sigurdsson, Kristján

    2010-01-01

    The impact of the prophylactic vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, and 18 (HPV6/11/16/18) on all HPV-associated genital disease was investigated in a population that approximates sexually naive women in that they were "negative to 14 HPV types" and in a mixed population of...

  3. Seroconversion following anal and genital HPV infection in men: The HIM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R. Giuliano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protection from naturally acquired human papillomavirus (HPV antibodies may influence HPV infection across the lifespan. This study describes seroconversion rates following genital, anal, and oral HPV 6/11/16/18 infections in men and examines differences by HPV type and anatomic site. Methods: Men with HPV 6/11/16/18 infections who were seronegative for those genotypes at the time of DNA detection were selected from the HPV Infection in Men (HIM Study. Sera specimens collected ≤36 months after detection were analyzed for HPV 6/11/16/18 antibodies using a virus-like particle-based ELISA. Time to seroconversion was separately assessed for each anatomic site, stratified by HPV type. Results: Seroconversion to ≥1 HPV type (6/11/16/18 in this sub-cohort (N=384 varied by anatomic site, with 6.3%, 18.9%, and 0.0% seroconverting following anal, genital, and oral HPV infection, respectively. Regardless of anatomic site, seroconversion was highest for HPV 6 (19.3%. Overall, seroconversion was highest following anal HPV 6 infection (69.2%. HPV persistence was the only factor found to influence seroconversion. Conclusions: Low seroconversion rates following HPV infection leave men susceptible to recurrent infections that can progress to HPV-related cancers. This emphasizes the need for HPV vaccination in men to ensure immune protection against new HPV infections and subsequent disease. Keywords: HPV, Men, Seroconversion, HPV antibodies, Human papillomavirus

  4. Assessing HPV and Cervical Knowledge, Preference and HPV Status Among Urban American Indian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cina, Kristin R; Omidpanah, Adam A; Petereit, Daniel G

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate whether or not an educational intervention would lead to a change in knowledge and attitudes about human papillomavirus (HPV), HPV vaccines, and cervical cancer. The HPV status was also investigated for interested participants. We provided HPV and cervical cancer education to urban American Indian (AI) women 18 and older using a pre and post-knowledge exam to assess knowledge and attitudes. Women were also given the option to perform vaginal self-tests for high risk HPV (hrHPV) analysis immediately after the education. Ninety-six women participated in our educational sessions. Improvement in performance on a knowledge exam increased from 61.6 to 84.3 percent. Ninety-three women performed the vaginal self-test with 63.1 percent of women preferring vaginal self-testing over conventional screening methods. Thirty-five out of 91 women (38.5 percent) had hrHPV types with 12 of the 35 harboring multiple hrHPV types (13 percent overall). HPV and cervical cancer education was beneficial for urban AI women with the majority of women preferring vaginal self-testing. HPV self-testing may be a strategy to improve screening rates for cervical cancer. Urban AI women had high rates of hrHPV compared to rural AI populations as reported in previous studies.

  5. HPV genotype distribution and anomalous association of HPV33 to cervical neoplastic lesions in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelaRosa-Martínez, Raúl; Sánchez-Garza, Mireya; López-Revilla, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    The association of human papillomavirus (HPV) types to neoplastic lesions increase as a function of their oncogenicity and the duration of the infection since lesion severity progresses from low-grade to high-grade and cancer. In an outbreak, the prevalence of the HPV type involved would increase and the proportion of the associated low-grade lesions would predominate over severe lesions. In this study, the prevalence of HPV types and their association to neoplastic lesions was determined in women subjected to colposcopy in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. DNA from high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) HPV types was identified by E6 nested multiplex PCR in cervical scrapes from 700 women with normal cytology, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) or invasive cervical cancer (CC). Overall HPV-DNA prevalence was 67.7 %, that of HR-HPV was 63.1 %, and that of LR-HPV was 21.3 %. The highest prevalence (78.2 %) occurred in the 15-24 year group, whereas that of single infections was 52 % and that of multiple infections (i.e., by 2-6 HPV types) was 48 %. The most prevalent HR types were HPV33 (33.1 %), HPV16 (16.6 %), HPV18 and HPV51 (6.7 % each). HR-HPV prevalence was 29.6 % in normal cytology, 26.7 % in ASCUS, 63.3 % in LSIL, 68.2 % in HSIL, and 90.5 % in CC. Three prevalence trends for HR-HPV types were found in neoplastic lesions of increasing severity: increasing (LSIL  CC) for HPV33. Two-thirds of the women subjected to colposcopy from 2007 to 2010 in San Luis Potosí have HPV infections which predominate in the 15-24 years group. Around half of the infections are by one viral type and the rest by 2-6 types. HPV33 is the most prevalent type, followed by HPV16. Overall HR-HPV prevalence increases with the severity of neoplastic lesions. HPV33 prevalence is highest in LSIL and its U-shaped trend with progressing neoplastic lesions

  6. Association of prior HPV vaccination with reduced preterm birth: A population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Beverley; Howe, Anna S; Turner, Nikki; Filoche, Sara; Slatter, Tania; Devenish, Celia; Hung, Noelyn Anne

    2018-01-02

    Emerging evidence suggests that HPV infection is associated with negative pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth (PTB), and pre-eclampsia. We aimed to determine if prior HPV vaccination reduced adverse pregnancy outcomes. A New Zealand population-based retrospective study linking first pregnancy outcome data (2008-2014 n = 35,646) with prior quadrivalent HPV vaccination status. Primary outcomes were likelihood (odds ratios, ORs) of PTB, pre-eclampsia, and stillbirth. Exposure groups were based on HPV vaccination. Adjusted ORs were calculated for each outcome, controlling for mother's age at delivery, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, health board region at time of delivery, and body mass index and smoking status at time of registration with maternity care provider. Mother's mean age at delivery was 19 (SD 2.1) years. Of 34,994 the pregnancies included in the final study analyses 62.3% of women were unvaccinated, 11.0% vaccinated with one or two doses and 27.7% vaccinated with three doses prior to pregnancy. PTB (OR: 0.87; CI 0.78, 0.96)) was significantly lower for women who previously received the HPV vaccine. A dose response effect was found with each successive dose received decreasing the likelihood of PTB. No associations between the vaccinated and unvaccinated groups were shown for pre-eclampsia or stillbirth. Prior receipt of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was associated with a significant reduction in PTB (13%); suggesting that HPV vaccination may be effective in reducing PTB. The potential global public health impact is considerable and there is urgency to undertake further research to replicate and explore these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Suppression of Innate Immune Response by Primary Human Keratinocytes Expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guess, Jennifer L

    2005-01-01

    Human papillomavims (HPV) types infect the skin and mucosal epithelium. Lesions resulting from HPV infection can linger for months or years suggesting that HPV - presence goes unnoticed by the host immune system...

  8. Understanding HPV Disease and Prevention: A Guide for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood-Rayermann, Suzy; McIntyre, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) causes 99.7% of all cervical cancers. HPV Types 16 and 18 are responsible for approximately 77% of cases, and peak prevalence occurs in females younger than 25 years of age. The recent implementation of HPV vaccination provides females with the opportunity to prevent infection. School nurses are advocates of…

  9. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) L1 Serum Antibodies and the Risk of Subsequent Oral HPV Acquisition in Men: The HIM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Viscidi, Raphael P; Torres, B Nelson; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Abrahamsen, Martha; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Villa, Luisa L; Kreimer, Aimée R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-07-01

    The role of antibody-mediated immunity in preventing newly acquired oral human papillomavirus (HPV) is not well understood. Among 1618 men participating in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study, we evaluated oral rinses for HPV DNA and baseline sera for HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18 L1 antibodies. Thirty percent of men (486) were seropositive for ≥1 HPV type, and 25 men developed incident oral HPV infection (HPV-6 was detected in 7, HPV-11 in 0, HPV-16 in 17, and HPV-18 in 1). Cox models revealed that men with circulating antibodies to HPV-6, -11, -16, or -18 were not less likely to acquire type-specific oral HPV than men without antibodies (hazard ratio for the risk of acquiring HPV-6, -11, -16, or -18, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, .56-4.76). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Assessment of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Safety Using the Self-Controlled Tree-Temporal Scan Statistic Signal-Detection Method in the Sentinel System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yih, W Katherine; Maro, Judith C; Nguyen, Michael; Baker, Meghan A; Balsbaugh, Carolyn; Cole, David V; Dashevsky, Inna; Mba-Jonas, Adamma; Kulldorff, Martin

    2018-06-01

    The self-controlled tree-temporal scan statistic-a new signal-detection method-can evaluate whether any of a wide variety of health outcomes are temporally associated with receipt of a specific vaccine, while adjusting for multiple testing. Neither health outcomes nor postvaccination potential periods of increased risk need be prespecified. Using US medical claims data in the Food and Drug Administration's Sentinel system, we employed the method to evaluate adverse events occurring after receipt of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (4vHPV). Incident outcomes recorded in emergency department or inpatient settings within 56 days after first doses of 4vHPV received by 9- through 26.9-year-olds in 2006-2014 were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis codes and analyzed by pairing the new method with a standard hierarchical classification of diagnoses. On scanning diagnoses of 1.9 million 4vHPV recipients, 2 statistically significant categories of adverse events were found: cellulitis on days 2-3 after vaccination and "other complications of surgical and medical procedures" on days 1-3 after vaccination. Cellulitis is a known adverse event. Clinically informed investigation of electronic claims records of the patients with "other complications" did not suggest any previously unknown vaccine safety problem. Considering that thousands of potential short-term adverse events and hundreds of potential risk intervals were evaluated, these findings add significantly to the growing safety record of 4vHPV.

  11. Is incidence of multiple HPV genotypes rising in genital infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sohrabi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Frequency of cervical cancer related to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV has increased remarkably in less-developed countries. Hence, applying capable diagnostic methods is urgently needed, as is having a therapeutic strategy as an effective step for cervical cancer prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of various multi-type HPV infection patterns and their possible rising incidence in women with genital infections.This descriptive study was conducted on women who attended referral clinical laboratories in Tehran for genital infections from January 2012 until December 2013. A total of 1387 archival cervical scraping and lesion specimens were collected from referred women. HPV genotyping was performed using approved HPV commercial diagnostic technologies with either INNO-LiPA HPV or Geno Array Test kits.HPV was positive in 563 cases (40.59% with mean age of 32.35 ± 9.96. Single, multiple HPV genotypes and untypable cases were detected in 398 (70.69%, 160 (28.42% and 5 (0.89% cases, respectively. Multiple HPV infections were detected in 92 (57.5%, 42 (26.2%, 17 (10.6% and 9 (5.7% cases as two, three, four and five or more genotypes, respectively. The prevalence of 32 HPV genotypes was determined one by one. Seventeen HPV genotypes were identified in 95.78% of all positive infections. Five dominant genotypes, HPV6, 16, 53, 11 and 31, were identified in a total of 52.35%of the HPV positive cases.In the present study, we were able to evaluate the rate of multiple HPV types in genital infections. Nevertheless, it is necessary to evaluate the role of the dominant HPV low-risk types and the new probably high-risk genotypes, such as HPV53, in the increasing incidences of genital infections. Keywords: Multiple HPV Types, Incidence, Genital infection, Cervical cancer, Iran

  12. HPV Vaccine (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Nearly all sexually active men and women will get infected with the human papillomavirus, or HPV, at some point in their lives. HPV can lead to serious health problems later in life, including certain cancers in both men and women. Since 2006, a vaccine has been available that protects against the most frequent cancer-causing types of HPV. In this podcast, Shannon Stokley discusses the importance of getting the HPV vaccine.

  13. Seroconversion Following Anal and Genital HPV Infection in Men: The HIM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Anna R; Viscidi, Raphael; Torres, B Nelson; Ingles, Donna J; Sudenga, Staci L; Villa, Luisa L; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Abrahamsen, Martha; Quiterio, Manuel; Salmeron, Jorge; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Protection from naturally acquired human papillomavirus (HPV) antibodies may influence HPV infection across the lifespan. This study describes seroconversion rates following genital, anal, and oral HPV 6/11/16/18 infections in men and examines differences by HPV type and anatomic site. Men with HPV 6/11/16/18 infections who were seronegative for those genotypes at the time of DNA detection were selected from the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Sera specimens collected ≤36 months after detection were analyzed for HPV 6/11/16/18 antibodies using a virus-like particle-based ELISA. Time to seroconversion was separately assessed for each anatomic site, stratified by HPV type. Seroconversion to ≥1 HPV type (6/11/16/18) in this sub-cohort (N=384) varied by anatomic site, with 6.3, 18.9, and 0.0% seroconverting following anal, genital, and oral HPV infection, respectively. Regardless of anatomic site, seroconversion was highest for HPV 6 (19.3%). Overall, seroconversion was highest following anal HPV 6 infection (69.2%). HPV persistence was the only factor found to influence seroconversion. Low seroconversion rates following HPV infection leave men susceptible to recurrent infections that can progress to HPV-related cancers. This emphasizes the need for HPV vaccination in men to ensure immune protection against new HPV infections and subsequent disease.

  14. Human papilloma virus (HPV genotypes prevalence in a region of South Italy (Apulia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Franca Coscia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. Since human papillomavirus (HPV is the central casual factor in cervical cancer, understanding the epidemiology and geographical area distribution of the most prevalent HPV genotypes constitutes an important step towards development of strategies of prevention. AIM. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and to determine HPV types distribution among 822 HPV positive women and some sexual male partners in Apulia (Italy. METHODS. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed by nested-PCR for the L1 region and reverse line blot hybridization allowing the specific detection of 24 HPV genotyping both high risk (HR and low risk (LR. RESULTS. The most prevalent HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (35%, HPV 31 (16% HPV 6 (9%, HPV 58 and 66 (7%, followed by HPV 33 (6%, HPV 18 and 56 (4%, HPV 70 and 45 (3%, HPV 53 and 11 (2%. Currently 1.5% of tested specimens remained unclassified. Multiple infections with at last two different high-risk HPV genotypes were observed in 10% of specimens. CONCLUSIONS. This finding adds knowledge to HPV epidemiological investigation, and addresses further studies aimed to consider public health for identifying groups at risk for cervical cancer.

  15. Human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes prevalence in a region of South Italy (Apulia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, Maria Franca; Monno, Rosa; Ballini, Andrea; Mirgaldi, Rosanna; Dipalma, Gianna; Pettini, Francesco; Cristallo, Vincenzo; Inchingolo, Francesco; Foti, Caterina; de Vito, Danila

    2015-01-01

    Since human papillomavirus (HPV) is the central casual factor in cervical cancer, understanding the epidemiology and geographical area distribution of the most prevalent HPV genotypes constitutes an important step towards development of strategies of prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and to determine HPV types distribution among 822 HPV positive women and some sexual male partners in Apulia (Italy). HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed by nested-PCR for the L1 region and reverse line blot hybridization allowing the specific detection of 24 HPV genotyping both high risk (HR) and low risk (LR). The most prevalent HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (35%), HPV 31 (16%) HPV 6 (9%), HPV 58 and 66 (7%), followed by HPV 33 (6%), HPV 18 and 56 (4%), HPV 70 and 45 (3%), HPV 53 and 11 (2%). Currently 1.5% of tested specimens remained unclassified. Multiple infections with at last two different high- risk HPV genotypes were observed in 10% of specimens. This finding adds knowledge to HPV epidemiological investigation, and addresses further studies aimed to consider public health for identifying groups at risk for cervical cancer.

  16. Comparison of the Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV test and the Roche cobas 4800 HPV test using urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Myong Cheol; Lee, Do-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Hwang, Na Rae; Lee, Bomyee; Shin, Hye Young; Jun, Jae Kwan; Yoo, Chong Woo; Lee, Dong Ock; Seo, Sang-Soo; Park, Sang-Yoon; Joo, Jungnam

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing based on cervical samples is important for use in cervical cancer screening. However, cervical sampling is invasive. Therefore, non-invasive methods for detecting HPV, such as urine samples, are needed. For HPV detection in urine samples, two real-time PCR (RQ-PCR) tests, Roche cobas 4800 test (Roche_HPV; Roche Molecular Diagnostics) and Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV test (Abbott_HPV; Abbott Laboratories) were compared to standard cervical samples. The performance of Roche_HPV and Abbott_HPV for HPV detection was evaluated at the National Cancer Center using 100 paired cervical and urine samples. The tests were also compared using urine samples stored at various temperatures and for a range of durations. The overall agreement between the Roche_HPV and Abbott_HPV tests using urine samples for any hrHPV type was substantial (86.0% with a kappa value of 0.7173), and that for HPV 16/18 was nearly perfect (99.0% with a kappa value of 0.9668). The relative sensitivities (based on cervical samples) for HPV 16/18 detection using Roche_HPV and Abbott_HPV with urine samples were 79.2% (95% CI; 57.9-92.9%) and 81.8% (95% CI; 59.7-94.8%), respectively. When the cut-off C T value for Abbott_HPV was extended to 40 for urine samples, the relative sensitivity of Abbott_HPV increased to 91.7% from 81.8% for HPV16/18 detection and to 87.0% from 68.5% for other hrHPV detection. The specificity was not affected by the change in the C T threshold. Roche_HPV and Abbott_HPV showed high concordance. However, HPV DNA detection using urine samples was inferior to HPV DNA detection using cervical samples. Interestingly, when the cut-off C T value was set to 40, Abbott_HPV using urine samples showed high sensitivity and specificity, comparable to those obtained using cervical samples. Fully automated DNA extraction and detection systems, such as Roche_HPV and Abbott_HPV, could reduce the variability in HPV detection and accelerate the standardization of HPV

  17. HIV/AIDS, HPV and Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-ching J.; Sparano, Joseph; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Anal cancer is an increasingly common non-AIDS-defining cancer among HIV-infected individuals. It is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infectious agent. The 14 oncogenic types of HPV are causally associated with 5–10% of all cancers, notably anogenital cancers. HPV16 is the most common genotype detected in about 70% of anal cancers. The HPV types detected in anal cancer are included in the 9-valent vaccine. HPV vaccines have demonstrated efficacy in reducing anal precancerous lesions in HIV-infected individuals. The standard treatment for anal cancer has been fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin (or cisplatin) as chemotherapy agents plus radiation, which can also be effectively used for the HIV-infected patients. Continued studies will be needed to test new treatment strategies in HIV-infected patients with anal cancer to determine which treatment protocols provide the best therapeutic index. PMID:27889034

  18. HPV testing and vaccination in Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leeson, Simon C

    2014-01-01

    Current cytology-based screening has a moderate sensitivity to detect cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN 3) and cervical cancer even in those states providing rigorous quality control of their cervical screening programs. The impact of vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 as well as the incorporation of HPV testing on the detection of CIN 3 and cancer is discussed. HPV testing used as a triage for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, test of cure after treatment, and HPV-based primary screening may improve current cervical screening programs.HPV testing as a triage test for ASCUS seems to offer an improved sensitivity, with a similar specificity as compared to repeat cytology for diagnosing high-grade CIN and has been recommended throughout most EU states. HPV testing as a triage test for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions has a low specificity and is not recommended in most member states. HPV test of cure offers an improved sensitivity compared to cytology for women with persistent cervical precancer after treatment. HPV-based cervical cancer screening is more effective than screening with cytology. The effects of HPV-based screening depend on the organization of the program and on adherence to algorithms for screening triage. Otherwise, it is likely that HPV-based screening will increase the referral rate to colposcopy including more women with no detectable cervical lesion. HPV vaccination will require many years to evaluate any beneficial effects on cervical cancer incidence and mortality.

  19. Clinicopathological Implications of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) L1 Capsid Protein Immunoreactivity in HPV16-Positive Cervical Cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jong; Lee, Ah-Won; Kang, Chang-Suk; Park, Jong-Sup; Park, Dong-Choon; Ki, Eun-Young; Lee, Keun-Ho; Yoon, Joo-Hee; Hur, Soo-Young; Kim, Tae-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of human papilloma virus (HPV) L1 capsid protein in abnormal cervical cytology with HPV16 infection and analyze its association with cervical histopathology in Korean women. Material and Methods: We performed immunocytochemistry for HPV L1 in 475 abnormal cervical cytology samples from patients with HPV16 infections using the Cytoactiv® HPV L1 screening set. We investigated the expression of HPV L1 in cervical cytology samples and compared it with the results of histopathological examination of surgical specimens. Results: Of a total of 475 cases, 188 (39.6%) were immunocytochemically positive and 287 (60.4%) negative for HPV L1. The immunocytochemical expression rates of HPV L1 in atypical squamous cells of unknown significance (ASCUS), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and cancer were 21.8%, 59.7%, 19.1%, and 0.0%, respectively. LSIL exhibited the highest rate of HPV L1 positivity. Of a total of 475 cases, the multiple-type HPV infection rate, including HPV16, in HPV L1-negative cytology samples was 27.5%, which was significantly higher than that in HPV L1-positive cytology samples (p = 0.037). The absence of HPV L1 expression in ASCUS and LSIL was significantly associated with high-grade (≥cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] 2) than low-grade (≤CIN1) histopathology diagnoses (p 0.05). On the other hand, among 188 HPV L1-positive cases, 30.6% of multiple-type HPV infections showed high-grade histopathology diagnoses (≥CIN3), significantly higher than the percentage of HPV16 single infections (8.6%) (p = 0.0004) Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that the expression of HPV L1 is low in advanced dysplasia. Furthermore, the absence of HPV L1 in HPV16-positive low-grade cytology (i.e., ASCUS and LSIL) is strongly associated with high-grade histopathology diagnoses. The multiplicity of HPV infections may have an

  20. Broad HPV distribution in the genital region of men from the HPV infection in men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichero, Laura; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Sobrinho, João S; Luiza Baggio, Maria; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R; Villa, Luisa L

    2013-09-01

    The HPV infection in men (HIM) study examines the natural history of genital HPV infection in men. Genotyping methods used in this study identify 37 α-HPV types; however, the viral type could not be identified in approximately 22% of male genital specimens that were HPV PCR positive. Our aim was to genotype HPV-unclassified specimens by sequencing PGMY09/11, GP5+/6+ or FAP59/64 PCR products. Using this approach we were able to detect 86 unique HPV types among 508 of 931 specimens analyzed. We report for the first time the presence of a broad range of α-, β- and γ-HPV at the male genitals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Changes in HPV Knowledge Among College Women from 2008 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Erika L; Vamos, Cheryl A; Griner, Stacey B; Daley, Ellen M

    2018-04-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause anogenital cancers and genital warts; however, it can be prevented through the HPV vaccine, which has been available since 2006. While this vaccine is targeted toward 11-to-12-year-olds, 18-to-26-year-old young adult women are eligible for "catch-up" vaccination. Knowledge of HPV may impact HPV vaccine uptake among this population. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in HPV knowledge and HPV vaccine information sources among young adult college women over a 7-year period. Two independent samples (N = 223 for 2008; N = 323 for 2015) completed a 23-item knowledge scale and survey regarding HPV. Adjusted logistic regression models compared the odds of correctly answering each knowledge item between each time period. The study found that HPV knowledge increased significantly over time (p HPV transmission; there is a vaccine for women that prevents certain types of HPV; HPV can cause genital warts; HPV can be passed to a newborn at birth; and even if you do not see a wart, you can transmit HPV. Recent participants were also more likely to correctly report only women can get HPV as false. While improvements in HPV knowledge were found over time, misperceptions regarding outcomes associated with HPV persist. In order to promote HPV vaccination among this population, health literacy skills, in addition to knowledge, should be improved.

  2. Very Low Prevalence of Vaccine Human Papillomavirus Types Among 18- to 35-Year Old Australian Women 9 Years Following Implementation of Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalek, Dorothy A; Garland, Suzanne M; Brotherton, Julia M L; Bateson, Deborah; McNamee, Kathleen; Stewart, Mary; Rachel Skinner, S; Liu, Bette; Cornall, Alyssa M; Kaldor, John M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2018-04-23

    A quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination program targeting females aged 12-13 years commenced in Australia in 2007, with catch-up vaccination of 14-26 year olds through 2009. We evaluated the program's impact on HPV prevalence among women aged 18-35 in 2015. HPV prevalence among women aged 18-24 and 25-35 was compared with prevalence in these age groups in 2005-2007. For women aged 18-24, we also compared prevalence with that in a postvaccine study conducted in 2010-2012. For the 2015 sample, Vaccination Register-confirmed 3-dose coverage was 53.3% (65.0% and 40.3% aged 18-24 and 25-35, respectively). Prevalence of vaccine HPV types decreased from 22.7% (2005-2007) and 7.3% (2010-2012), to 1.5% (2015) (P trend women aged 18-24, and from 11.8% (2005-2007) to 1.1% (2015) (P = .001) among those aged 25-35. This study, reporting the longest surveillance follow-up to date, shows prevalence of vaccine-targeted HPV types has continued to decline among young women. A substantial fall also occurred in women aged 25-35, despite lower coverage. Strong herd protection and effectiveness of less than 3 vaccine doses likely contributed to these reductions.

  3. HPV and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) HPV and Men - Fact Sheet Language: English (US) Español ( ...

  4. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Español In Chamorro In Urdu In Vietnamese HPV (human papillomavirus) is a sexually transmitted virus. It is ...

  5. HPV: Molecular pathways and targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kumar, Prabhat; Das, Bhudev C

    2018-04-05

    Infection of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is a prerequisite for the development of cervical carcinoma. HPV infections are also implicated in the development of other types of carcinomas. Chronic or persistent infection of HPV is essential but HPV alone is inadequate, additional endogenous or exogenous cues are needed along with HPV to induce cervical carcinogenesis. The strategies that high-risk HPVs have developed in differentiating epithelial cells to reach a DNA-synthesis competent state leading to tumorigenic transformation are basically due to overexpression of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins and the activation of diverse cellular regulatory or signaling pathways that are targeted by them. Moreover, the Wnt/β-catenin/Notch and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathways are deregulated in various cancers, and have also been implicated in HPV-induced cancers. These are basically related to the "cancer hallmarks," and include sustaining proliferative signals, the evasion of growth suppression and immune destruction, replicative immortality, inflammation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis, as well as genome instability, resisting cell death, and deregulation of cellular energetics. These information could eventually aid in identifying or developing new diagnostic, prognostic biomarkers, and may contribute to design more effective targeted therapeutics and treatment strategies. Although surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cure more than 90% of women with early stage cervical cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer mortality. Numerous efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent years, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E5, E6, and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and overexpressed in most of the cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction

  6. HPV Vaccine and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and anus. If I have HPV, will that cause pregnancy problems? It is unclear. Even though HPV is ... HPV can be passed to a newborn during pregnancy or through the birth canal. Usually this causes no problems for the newborn. In rare cases, ...

  7. Commercially available molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV): 2015 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Oštrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Commercial molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV) are invaluable diagnostic tools in cervical carcinoma screening and management of women with cervical precancerous lesions as well as important research tools for epidemiological studies, vaccine development, and implementation and monitoring of vaccination programs. In this third inventory of commercial HPV tests, we identified 193 distinct commercial HPV tests and at least 127 test variants available on the market in 2015, which represents a 54% and 79% increase in the number of distinct HPV tests and variants, respectively, in comparison to our last inventory performed in 2012. Identified HPV tests were provisionally divided into eight main groups and several subgroups. Among the 193 commercial HPV tests, all but two target alpha-HPV types only. Although the number of commercial HPV tests with at least one published study in peer-reviewed literature has increased significantly in the last three years, several published performance evaluations are still not in line with agreed-upon standards in the HPV community. Manufacturers should invest greater effort into evaluating their products and publishing validation/evaluation results in peer-reviewed journals. To achieve this, more clinically oriented external quality-control panels and initiatives are required. For evaluating the analytical performance of the entire range of HPV tests currently on the market, more diverse and reliable external quality-control programs based on international standards for all important HPV types are indispensable. The performance of a wider range of HPV tests must be promptly evaluated on a variety of alternative clinical specimens. In addition, more complete HPV assays containing validated sample-extraction protocols and appropriate internal controls are urgently needed. Provision of a broader range of automated systems allowing large-scale HPV testing as well as the development of reliable, rapid, and affordable molecular

  8. Impact and effectiveness of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garland, Suzanne M; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Muñoz, Nubia

    2016-01-01

    January 2007 through February 2016 to identify observational studies reporting the impact or effectiveness of 4vHPV vaccination on infection, anogenital warts, and cervical cancer or precancerous lesions. Over the last decade, the impact of HPV vaccination in real-world settings has become increasingly...

  9. Polymerase chain reaction and conventional DNA tests in detection of HPV DNA in cytologically normal and abnormal cervical scrapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalia, A.; Jalava, T.; Nieminen, P.

    1992-01-01

    Med.mikrobiologi, polymerase chain reaction, DNA tests, human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical smear, hybridisation, cytologi, affiProbe HPV test, ViraType test......Med.mikrobiologi, polymerase chain reaction, DNA tests, human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical smear, hybridisation, cytologi, affiProbe HPV test, ViraType test...

  10. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 66 from an invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    Tawheed, A R; Beaudenon, S; Favre, M; Orth, G

    1991-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences coexisting with HPV16 and HPV45 were cloned from an invasive cervical carcinoma. The cloned HPV was shown to be a novel type, named HPV66, and is related to HPV56 (an HPV detected in cervical cancer). After screening 160 anogenital biopsies, four specimens exhibited histological features of intraepithelial neoplasia and contained HPV66 sequences. Of these, three were found to be associated with another HPV type.

  11. Possible Synergistic Interactions Among Multiple HPV Genotypes in Women Suffering from Genital Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajia, Massoud; Sohrabi, Amir

    2018-03-27

    Objective: Persistence of HPV infection is the true cause of cervical disorders. It is reported that competition may exist among HPV genotypes for colonization. This survey was designed to establish the multiple HPV genotype status in our community and the probability of multiple HPV infections involvement. Methods: All multiple HPV infections were selected for investigation in women suffering from genital infections referred to private laboratories in Tehran, Iran. A total of 160 multi HPV positive specimens from cervical scraping were identified by the HPV genotyping methods, "INNO-LiPA and Geno Array". Result: In present study, HPV 6 (LR), 16 (HR), 53 (pHR), 31 (HR) and 11 (LR) were included in 48.8% of detected infections as the most five dominant genotypes. HPV 16 was detected at the highest rate with genotypes 53, 31 and 52, while HPV 53 appeared linked with HPV 16, 51 and 56 in concurrent infections. It appears that HPV 16 and 53 may have significant tendencies to associate with each other rather than with other genotypes. Analysis of the data revealed there may be some synergistic interactions with a few particular genotypes such as "HPV 53". Conclusion: Multiple HPV genotypes appear more likely to be linked with development of cervical abnormalities especially in patients with genital infections. Since, there are various patterns of dominant HPV genotypes in different regions of world, more investigations of this type should be performed for careHPV programs in individual countries. Creative Commons Attribution License

  12. Nonendemic HPV-Positive Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Association With Poor Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Matthew H., E-mail: stenmark@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); McHugh, Jonathan B. [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Walline, Heather M.; Komarck, Christine [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Worden, Francis P. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Prince, Mark E.; Bradford, Carol R. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mukherji, Suresh K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Carey, Thomas E. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in nonendemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and assess the prognostic implications of viral status. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from 62 patients with primary NPC diagnosed between 1985 and 2011 were analyzed for EBV and high-risk HPV. EBV status was determined by the use of in situ hybridization for EBV encoded RNA. HPV status was assessed with p16 immunohistochemistry and multiplex polymerase chain reaction MassArray for determination of HPV type. Proportional hazards models were used to compare the risk of death among patients as stratified by viral status. Results: Of 61 evaluable tumors, 26 (43%) were EBV-positive/HPV-negative, 18 (30%) were HPV-positive/EBV-negative, and 17 (28%) were EBV/HPV-negative. EBV and HPV infection was mutually exclusive. HPV positivity was significantly correlated with World Health Organization grade 2 tumors, older age, and smoking (all P<.001). The racial distribution of the study population was 74% white, 15% African American, and 11% Asian/Middle Eastern. Among HPV-positive patients, 94% were white. At a median follow-up time of 7 years, HPV-positive and EBV/HPV-negative tumors exhibited worse outcomes than did EBV-positive tumors, including decreased overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] 2.98, P=.01; and HR 3.89, P=.002), progression-free survival (HR 2.55, P=.02; and HR 4.04, P<.001), and locoregional control (HR 4.01, P=.03; and HR 6.87, P=.001). Conclusion: In our Midwestern population, high-risk HPV infection may play an etiologic role in the development of nonendemic, EBV-negative NPC. Compared with EBV-positive NPC, HPV-positive and EBV/HPV-negative NPC are associated with worse outcomes. A larger confirmatory study is needed to validate these findings.

  13. Nonendemic HPV-Positive Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Association With Poor Prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Schipper, Matthew; Walline, Heather M.; Komarck, Christine; Feng, Felix Y.; Worden, Francis P.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Prince, Mark E.; Bradford, Carol R.; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Carey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in nonendemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and assess the prognostic implications of viral status. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from 62 patients with primary NPC diagnosed between 1985 and 2011 were analyzed for EBV and high-risk HPV. EBV status was determined by the use of in situ hybridization for EBV encoded RNA. HPV status was assessed with p16 immunohistochemistry and multiplex polymerase chain reaction MassArray for determination of HPV type. Proportional hazards models were used to compare the risk of death among patients as stratified by viral status. Results: Of 61 evaluable tumors, 26 (43%) were EBV-positive/HPV-negative, 18 (30%) were HPV-positive/EBV-negative, and 17 (28%) were EBV/HPV-negative. EBV and HPV infection was mutually exclusive. HPV positivity was significantly correlated with World Health Organization grade 2 tumors, older age, and smoking (all P<.001). The racial distribution of the study population was 74% white, 15% African American, and 11% Asian/Middle Eastern. Among HPV-positive patients, 94% were white. At a median follow-up time of 7 years, HPV-positive and EBV/HPV-negative tumors exhibited worse outcomes than did EBV-positive tumors, including decreased overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] 2.98, P=.01; and HR 3.89, P=.002), progression-free survival (HR 2.55, P=.02; and HR 4.04, P<.001), and locoregional control (HR 4.01, P=.03; and HR 6.87, P=.001). Conclusion: In our Midwestern population, high-risk HPV infection may play an etiologic role in the development of nonendemic, EBV-negative NPC. Compared with EBV-positive NPC, HPV-positive and EBV/HPV-negative NPC are associated with worse outcomes. A larger confirmatory study is needed to validate these findings

  14. HPV-FASTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, F Xavier; Robles, Claudia; Díaz, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    protocol would represent an attractive approach for many health-care systems, in particular, countries in Central and Eastern Europe, Latin America, Asia, and some more-developed parts of Africa. The role of vaccination in women aged >30 years and the optimal number of HPV-screening tests required......Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related screening technologies and HPV vaccination offer enormous potential for cancer prevention, notably prevention of cervical cancer. The effectiveness of these approaches is, however, suboptimal owing to limited implementation of screening programmes and restricted...... indications for HPV vaccination. Trials of HPV vaccination in women aged up to 55 years have shown almost 90% protection from cervical precancer caused by HPV16/18 among HPV16/18-DNA-negative women. We propose extending routine vaccination programmes to women of up to 30 years of age (and to the 45-50-year...

  15. The pathobiology and mechanisms of infection of HPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, N H; Khammissa, R A G; Chikte, U M E; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J; Feller, L

    2010-04-01

    There are more than 120 types of low-risk and high-risk human papillomaviruses, all of which are epitheliotropic. HPV infection may be latent, or active in a subclinical form or a symptomatic form, the latter manifesting as benign or malignant neoplasms. In basal cells with non-productive HPV infection some early HPV proteins are expressed independently of cell maturation: the productive cycle of HPV replication depends upon specific cellular factors of the maturation of the infected keratinocytes. In HPV-mediated oncogenesis, the combined pathobiological effects of E6 and E7 oncoproteins of high-risk HPV culminate in cellular genomic instability and transformation of persistently infected cells, that progress to the development of a malignant phenotype. In this article we provide insights into the stages of HPV infection, and into the viral genomic organization and replicative cycle.

  16. Estimation of the epidemiological burden of HPV-related anogenital cancers, precancerous lesions, and genital warts in women and men in Europe: Potential additional benefit of a nine-valent second generation HPV vaccine compared to first generation HPV vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Hartwig

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A second generation HPV vaccine has been developed for the prevention of anogenital cancers and precancerous lesions of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus and of genital warts due to nine HPV types.We estimated the annual burden of these diseases attributable to the nine HPV types compared to HPV types from first generation vaccines in women and men in Europe. Material and methods: Incidence rates from the IARC database, cancer registries, the literature and Eurostat population data were used.The burden attributable to the HPV types targeted by both vaccines was estimated by applying the relative contribution of the respective HPV types from epidemiological studies. Results: In 2013, the number of new anogenital HPV-attributable cancers was 44,480 with 39,494 of these cases related to second vs. 33,285 to first generation vaccine types.Among the 284,373 to 541,621 new HPV-attributable anogenital precancerous lesions 235,364–448,423 and 135,025–256,830 were estimated to be related to second and first generation vaccine types, respectively.The annual number of new genital warts was 753,608–935,318, with 90% related to HPV6/11. Conclusions: These data demonstrate how the large public health impact that was achieved by the first generation HPV vaccines could be further increased by second generation vaccines. Keywords: HPV, Burden of disease, Cancer, Precancerous lesions, Genital warts, HPV vaccine

  17. Evaluation of the clinical performance of the Abbott RealTime High-Risk HPV for carcinogenic HPV detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, Philippe; Benmoura, Dominique; Agostini, Aubert; Khiri, Hacene; Penaranda, Guillaume; Martineau, Agnes; Blanc, Bernard

    2010-08-01

    Abbott RealTime (RT) High-Risk (HR) HPV assay is a new qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assay for the detection of 14 HR HPV DNA. The assay can differentiate between the infection by HPV 16, HPV 18 and non-HPV 16/18 types through the distinct fluorescent labels on the type specific probes. To evaluate the clinical performance of the Abbott RT HR HPV test, in comparison with biopsy, Hybrid Capture II (HCII), and Linear Array (LA), for detection of high-grade disease (CIN2+). The study population consisted of 143 women who were included in three referral gynecology clinics in Marseilles (France) between March 2007 and June 2008. The clinical performance of the RT HR HPV assay, performed on the fully automated m2000 system, was compared with HCII and LA. HR HPV positivity rate was similar for all tests (Abbott RT HR HPV and HCII, 62%, and LA 63%). All tests had high sensitivities and negative predictive values for CIN2+ detection (>90%). The agreement between HCII and Abbott RT HR HPV, and between HCII and LA were 93% (k=0.85) and 96% (k=0.91) respectively. As expected, HPV16 or HPV18 positivity was greater in advanced grades of disease, especially in CIN2+ patients: 85% in CIN2+ vs. 33% in Abbott RT HR HPV assay is good and closely correlated with the two other assays. The automation and ability to identify type 16 and 18 make this a very attractive option for HPV testing in laboratories and potentially provides improved patient management. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Significant difference in p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity in HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, E.M.; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo; Kvinnsland, S.; Holm, R.; Nesland, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 has previously been found in 19/41 breast carcinomas (46%) in women with a history of HPV 16 positive CIN III lesions. There was no significant difference in distribution of histological subtypes, mean or median tumour diameter or number of regional lymph node metastases in the HPV positive and HPV negative breast carcinoma groups. P53, p21 and c-erbB-2 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in the HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas. There was a significant difference in p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity between HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas (p=0.0091 and p=0.0040), with a significant less detectable p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity in the HPV 16 positive cases. There was also a significant difference in the coexpression of p53/p21 between the HPV 16 positive and HPV 16 negative breast carcinomas (p=0.002). No significant difference in immunostaining for c-erbB-2 protein in the two groups was found (p=0.15), or for the coexpression of p53/c-erbB-2 (p=0.19). The significantly lower expression of p53 and p21 proteins in HPV 16 positive than in HPV 16 negative breast carcinomas supports the hypothesis of inactivation and degradation of wild-type p53 proteins by HPV 16 E6 and that p53 mutation is not necessary for transformation in the HPV 16 positive cases. (orig.)

  19. Sequence imputation of HPV16 genomes for genetic association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Smith

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 causes over half of all cervical cancer and some HPV16 variants are more oncogenic than others. The genetic basis for the extraordinary oncogenic properties of HPV16 compared to other HPVs is unknown. In addition, we neither know which nucleotides vary across and within HPV types and lineages, nor which of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs determine oncogenicity.A reference set of 62 HPV16 complete genome sequences was established and used to examine patterns of evolutionary relatedness amongst variants using a pairwise identity heatmap and HPV16 phylogeny. A BLAST-based algorithm was developed to impute complete genome data from partial sequence information using the reference database. To interrogate the oncogenic risk of determined and imputed HPV16 SNPs, odds-ratios for each SNP were calculated in a case-control viral genome-wide association study (VWAS using biopsy confirmed high-grade cervix neoplasia and self-limited HPV16 infections from Guanacaste, Costa Rica.HPV16 variants display evolutionarily stable lineages that contain conserved diagnostic SNPs. The imputation algorithm indicated that an average of 97.5±1.03% of SNPs could be accurately imputed. The VWAS revealed specific HPV16 viral SNPs associated with variant lineages and elevated odds ratios; however, individual causal SNPs could not be distinguished with certainty due to the nature of HPV evolution.Conserved and lineage-specific SNPs can be imputed with a high degree of accuracy from limited viral polymorphic data due to the lack of recombination and the stochastic mechanism of variation accumulation in the HPV genome. However, to determine the role of novel variants or non-lineage-specific SNPs by VWAS will require direct sequence analysis. The investigation of patterns of genetic variation and the identification of diagnostic SNPs for lineages of HPV16 variants provides a valuable resource for future studies of HPV16

  20. Cellular immune responses to HPV-18, -31, and -53 in healthy volunteers immunized with recombinant HPV-16 L1 virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Viscidi, Raphael; Harro, Clayton D.; Kemp, Troy J.; Garcia-Pineres, Alfonso J.; Trivett, Matthew; Demuth, Franklin; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Hildesheim, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Human papillomavirus-like particles (HPV VLP) are candidate vaccines that have shown to be efficacious in reducing infection and inducing robust antiviral immunity. Neutralizing antibodies generated by vaccination are largely type-specific, but little is known about the type-specificity of cellular immune responses to VLP vaccination. To determine whether vaccination with HPV-16 L1VLP induces cellular immunity to heterologous HPV types (HPV-18, HPV-31, and HPV-53), we examined proliferative and cytokine responses in vaccine (n = 11) and placebo (n = 5) recipients. Increased proliferative and cytokine responses to heterologous types were observed postvaccination in some individuals. The proportion of women responding to heterologous types postvaccination (36%-55%) was lower than that observed in response to HPV-16 (73%). Response to HPV-16 VLP predicted response to other types. The strongest correlations in response were observed between HPV-16 and HPV-31, consistent with their phylogenetic relatedness. In summary, PBMC from HPV-16 VLP vaccine recipients can respond to L1VLP from heterologous HPV types, suggesting the presence of conserved T cell epitopes

  1. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS. PREVENTION OF HPV-ASSOCIATED DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Shakhtakhtinskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases among the population attracts attention of specialists in all countries due to frequent development of complications resulting in reproductive dysfunction. The article presents one of the urgent issues of modern medicine — papillomavirus infection, which is the most common sexually transmitted disease. 70–80% of the sexually active persons contract human papilloma virus at one point. HPV induces a broad range of oncological reproductive diseases, including cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer and anogenital condylomae, which are observed both in men and women. The only reliable method of preventing papillomavirus infection is vaccination. The authors present new data on the use of the quadrivalent vaccine, including a new immunization pattern for 9–14-years-old girls.

  2. HPV Infection in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Palefsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While much is known about the natural history of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV infection and its consequences, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer, relatively little is known about the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and diseases in men. In part this reflects difficulties in penile sampling and visual assessment of penile lesions. Anal HPV infection and disease also remain poorly understood. Although HPV is transmitted sexually and infects the genitals of both sexes, the cervix remains biologically more vulnerable to malignant transformation than does the penis or anus in men. An understanding of male HPV infection is therefore important in terms of reducing transmission of HPV to women and improving women's health. However, it is also important due to the burden of disease in men, who may develop both penile and anal cancer, particularly among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Improved sampling techniques of the male genitalia and cohort studies in progress should provide important information on the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and disease in men, including risk factors for HPV acquisition and transmission. The impact of HPV vaccination in women on male anogenital HPV infection will also need to be assessed.

  3. Need for expanded HPV genotyping for cervical screening

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    Jack Cuzick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The focus for HPV genotyping has largely been on types 16 and 18, based on their high prevalence in cervix cancer. However screening is focussed on the detection of high grade precursor lesions (CIN3 and CIN2, where other types have a greater role. While HPV16 retains its high predictive value in this context, HPV31 and especially HPV33 emerge as important types with higher positive predictive values (PPVs than HPV18. Additionally full typing indicates that types 39, 56, 59 and 68 have much lower PPVs than types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 51, 52 and 58 and they should be considered as ‘intermediate risk’ types, whereas type 66 should not be treated as having an increased risk. Available data are summarized to support this view.

  4. HPV-QUEST: A highly customized system for automated HPV sequence analysis capable of processing Next Generation sequencing data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Li; Yao, Jiqiang; Gardner, Brent P; Chang, Kaifen; Yu, Fahong; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2012-01-01

    Next Generation sequencing (NGS) applied to human papilloma viruses (HPV) can provide sensitive methods to investigate the molecular epidemiology of multiple type HPV infection. Currently a genotyping system with a comprehensive collection of updated HPV reference sequences and a capacity to handle NGS data sets is lacking. HPV-QUEST was developed as an automated and rapid HPV genotyping system. The web-based HPV-QUEST subtyping algorithm was developed using HTML, PHP, Perl scripting language, and MYSQL as the database backend. HPV-QUEST includes a database of annotated HPV reference sequences with updated nomenclature covering 5 genuses, 14 species and 150 mucosal and cutaneous types to genotype blasted query sequences. HPV-QUEST processes up to 10 megabases of sequences within 1 to 2 minutes. Results are reported in html, text and excel formats and display e-value, blast score, and local and coverage identities; provide genus, species, type, infection site and risk for the best matched reference HPV sequence; and produce results ready for additional analyses.

  5. HPV SEROSTATUS PRE- AND POST-VACCINATION IN A RANDOMIZED PHASE II PREPAREDNESS TRIAL AMONG YOUNG WESTERN CAPE, SOUTH AFRICAN WOMEN: THE EVRI TRIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudenga, Staci L; Torres, B Nelson; Botha, Matthys H; Zeier, Michele; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Glashoff, Richard H; Engelbrecht, Susan; Schim Van der Loeff, Maarten F; Van der Laan, Louvina E; Kipping, Siegfried; Taylor, Douglas; Giuliano, Anna R

    2017-06-01

    HPV antibodies are a marker of past exposure to the virus. Our objective was to assess HPV serostatus pre- and post-vaccination among HIV-negative women. Women aged 16-24 years old were randomized in a placebo controlled trial utilizing the 4-valent HPV (4vHPV) vaccine (NCT01489527, clinicaltrials.gov). Participants (n=389) received the 4vHPV vaccine or placebo following a three dose schedule. Sera were collected at Day 1 and Month 7 for assessment of HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 neutralizing antibody levels using a multiplex competitive Luminex immunoassay (Merck) based on detecting the L1 capsid antigen for each HPV type. Seroprevalence was 73% for HPV6, 47% for HPV11, 33% for HPV16, and 44% for HPV18. Seroprevalence for any HPV type did not significantly differ by age or lifetime number of partners. The majority of participants (64%) had two or more 4vHPV antibodies present at enrollment and 12% had antibodies to all four. Among women in the vaccine arm, those that were seropositive for HPV16 at enrollment had higher titers at month 7 compared to women that were seronegative for HPV16 at enrollment; this trend holds for the other HPV types as well. Seroconversion among baseline seronegative participants in the placebo group ranged from 5% for HPV16 to 23% for HPV6. HPV seroprevalence was high in this population, emphasizing the need to vaccinate prior to sexual debut.

  6. Comparison of two commercial assays for detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical scrape specimens: validation of the Roche AMPLICOR HPV test as a means to screen for HPV genotypes associated with a higher risk of cervical disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, M.A.P.C. van; Bakkers, J.M.J.E.; Harbers, G.; Quint, W.G.V.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Certain high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) types are a necessary cause for the development of cervical disorders. Women with persistent HR HPV infections have an increased risk of developing high-grade cervical lesions, compared with those who have no or low-risk HPV infections. Therefore,

  7. Prevalence and genotyping of HPV, by cervical brushing, in Irpinia area of Campania region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Carmen Melillo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is due to persistent genital infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV.The purpose of this study was to evaluate prevalence of HPV in Irpinia (Campania region, Italy, distribution of different viral genotypes, correlating cytological results and virological investigations. In the period 2006-2011, were made 1080 cervical samples of women aged 18-65 years for HPV identification and genotyping. Detection of the virus was performed by Multiplex-PCR System (Seegene,Arrow and typing with INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra test (Innogenetics. Out of the 1080 tested samples, 330 (30.6% samples were positive for HPV DNA. The most frequently occurring High Risk (HR-HPV genotype in single infections was HPV16 (16.6%, followed by HPV51 (10.7%, in multiple infections HPV16 (15.7% and 31 (14.6%. The prevalence of infection, correlated with age of patients studied, is greater in the group aged 26-30 years (42.5%. HR-HPV were detected in different percent in patients with Pap test scores: 22.5% in normal Pap smear (20% HPV16, 14.5% ASCUS (47.6% HPV16, 24% LSIL (20% HPV16, 79.3% HSIL (72.7% HPV16; 9.1% HPV18 detected only in this type of cellular alteration. The high prevalence of HR-HPV in patients with ASCUS or normal Pap test, suggesting the real advantage of HPV screening test, more sensitive in selecting the actual population at risk. Based on the findings of our epidemiological study, HR-HPV screening and HPV genotyping test should be strongly advised also to the vaccinated population for the high incidence of genotypes which are not included in vaccines (67%.

  8. Characterization of two novel gammapapillomaviruses, HPV179 and HPV184, isolated from common warts of a renal-transplant recipient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Hošnjak

    Full Text Available Gammapapillomavirus (Gamma-PV is a diverse and rapidly expanding PV-genus, currently consisting of 76 fully characterized human papillomavirus (HPV types. In this study, DNA genomes of two novel HPV types, HPV179 and HPV184, obtained from two distinct facial verrucae vulgares specimens of a 64 year-old renal-transplant recipient, were fully cloned, sequenced and characterized. HPV179 and HPV184 genomes comprise 7,228-bp and 7,324-bp, respectively, and contain four early (E1, E2, E6 and E7 and two late genes (L1 and L2; the non-coding region is typically positioned between L1 and E6 genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the L1 nucleotide sequence placed both novel types within the Gamma-PV genus: HPV179 was classified as a novel member of species Gamma-15, additionally containing HPV135 and HPV146, while HPV184 was classified as a single member of a novel species Gamma-25. HPV179 and HPV184 type-specific quantitative real-time PCRs were further developed and used in combination with human beta-globin gene quantitative real-time PCR to determine the prevalence and viral load of the novel types in the patient's facial warts and several follow-up skin specimens, and in a representative collection, a total of 569 samples, of HPV-associated benign and malignant neoplasms, hair follicles and anal and oral mucosa specimens obtained from immunocompetent individuals. HPV179 and HPV184 viral loads in patients' facial warts were estimated to be 2,463 and 3,200 genome copies per single cell, respectively, suggesting their active role in the development of common warts in organ-transplant recipients. In addition, in this particular patient, both novel types had established a persistent infection of the skin for more than four years. Among immunocompetent individuals, HPV179 was further detected in low-copy numbers in a few skin specimens, indicating its cutaneous tissue tropism, while HPV184 was further detected in low-copy numbers in one mucosal and a few skin

  9. Evaluation of HPV-16 and HPV-18 specific antibody measurements in saliva collected in oral rinses and merocel® sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katherine H; Kemp, Troy J; Pan, Yuanji; Yang, Zhen; Giuliano, Anna R; Pinto, Ligia A

    2018-05-03

    Current Human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 VLP vaccines protect against HPV-16 and HPV-18-associated cancers, in females and males. Although correlates of protection have not been identified, HPV-specific antibodies at sites of infection are thought to be the main mechanism of protection afforded by vaccination. Oral sampling has gained increased attention as a potential alternative to serum in monitoring immunity to vaccination and understanding local immunity in oral cancers. Serum was collected via venipuncture, and saliva was collected via oral rinses and Merocel® sponges from healthy volunteers: 16 unvaccinated females, 6 females (ages 24-41) and 6 mid-adult aged males (ages 27-45) recipients of three doses of the HPV-16/18/6/11 vaccine (Gardasil®). Mid-adult male vaccine trial participants were compared to female participants. Samples were tested for anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 immunoglobulin G levels by an L1 virus-like particle-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All vaccinated participants had detectable serum anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 antibodies. Optimal standard concentration range and sample serial dilutions for oral rinses were determined. The standard curve was not affected by the type of solution examined. Reproducibility of HPV-16 and HPV-18 antibody titers in mouthwash (overall CV  0.9) was observed for sera spiked controls in both solutions. HPV-16 and HPV-18 specific antibodies were detectable in saliva from vaccine recipients, both in mouthwash and in Merocel® sponges but levels were several logs lower than those in serum. This study confirms the application of HPV-16 and HPV-18 ELISAs currently used in sero-epidemiological studies of immunogenicity of HPV vaccines for use with oral samples. Oral samples may be a useful resource for the detection of HPV-16 and HPV-18-specific antibodies in saliva following vaccination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical and epidemiological correlations between the infection with HPV 16 and HPV 18 and female cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, M; Repanovici, R; Corniţescu, F

    1995-01-01

    A number of 66 specimens from female cervical lesions were examined for infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, and 18 by nucleic acid hybridization in dot-blot techniques and 35 sera were tested by the immunodot-blot technique, in order to detect the presence of anti E4 and E7 HPV protein antibodies. The findings were compared with the histologic diagnosis. Fifty-six per cent of specimens contained HPV DNA sequences. In 47% of specimens from cervical carcinoma, HPV 11 was detected in 4 cases, HPV 16 in 21 cases, and HPV 18 in 7 cases. Serum antibodies against HPV 16 E4 and HPV 16 E7 occurred in all the cases of uterine carcinoma, in 4 of 10 cases of CIN I-II, and in 3 of 5 sera obtained from apparently healthy women. The analysis of risk factors disclosed the early onset of sexual activity, a relatively high number of births and abortions before the age of 22 years, the use of oral oestroprogestative contraceptive agents, the presence in anamnesis of genital infections with bacterial flora--Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma, etc. Our results showed that HPV typing by nucleic acid hybridization was useful for differentiating low- from high-risk cervical lesions and also tried to elucidate the risk factors associated with HPV infections and progression to malignancy.

  11. Significance of molecular diagnostics in human papilloma virus (HPV determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available HPV infection is considered to be the most important etiologic factor in cervical cancer development. In this retrospective study, which included the period from 2000 to 2012, the results of two molecular techniques used in the detection of HPV infection among women of the South Bačka District were analyzed. By using the technique of in situ hybridization and the rPCR method, the proportion of high-risk HPV among women with normal cytology was determined to be 19.8% and 32.7%, respectively, and among women with abnormal cytology 43.1% and 61%, respectively. Among the analyzed women, HPV type 16 was the most prevalent, followed by HPV types 31, 51 and 18. Application of molecular HPV diagnosis is valuable because it increases the sensitivity of the screening test, so that the application of both tests to detect cervical cancer is a true prevention of malignancy.

  12. Clinical cancer chemoprevention: From the hepatitis B virus (HBV vaccine to the human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horng-Jyh Tsai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 2 million new cancer cases are attributed to infectious agents each year worldwide. Vaccines for the hepatitis B virus (HBV, a risk factor of hepatocellular cancer, and human papillomavirus (HPV, a risk factor of cervical cancer, are considered major successes in clinical chemoprevention of cancer. In Taiwan, the first evidence of cancer prevention through vaccinations was provided by HBV vaccination data in infants. The Taiwanese HBV vaccination program has since become a model immunization schedule for newborns worldwide. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is generally accepted as prerequisite for cervical cancer diagnosis; however, cervical cancer is a rare complication of HPV infections. This is due to the fact that such infections tend to be transient. The safety and efficacy of both available HPV quadrivalent vaccine and bivalent vaccine are not in doubt at the present time. Until a human cytomegalovirus (CMV vaccine becomes available, simple hygienic practices, such as hand washing, can prevent CMV infection both before and during pregnancy. Each country should establish her official guidelines regarding which vaccines should be used to treat various conditions, the target population (i.e., universal or limited to a selected population, and the immunization schedules. After a vaccine is recommended, decisions regarding reimbursement by the public health care fund are evaluated. The guidelines become part of the immunization schedule, which is updated annually and published in the official bulletin. In conclusion, both HBV and HPV vaccines are considered major successes in the chemoprevention of cancer.

  13. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Massimi, Paola; Lizano, Marcela; Banks, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6 ⁎ proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6 ⁎ . Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8

  14. THE HPV STATUS IN BLADDER CANCER, TUMOR MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS, AND CLINICAL FEATURES OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Golovina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The data of medical records of 101 patients with urothelial bladder cancer (BC were compared with the results of laboratory detection of human papillomaviruses (HPV in the tumor tissue samples taken from these patients during transurethral resection. DNA of HPV 16, the major type of the virus responsible for the occurrence of cervical cancer, was previously detected in 38 samples; and oncogenes E6 and E7 mRNA and HPV 16 E7 oncoprotein were found in 13 of these samples. Comparison of HPV-positive and HPV-negative groups revealed that HPV-positive BC showed higher cell anaplasia than HPV-negative one; moreover, primary cancer was HPV-positive more frequently than recurrent cancer. Sex, age, muscular layer invasion did not correlate with the HPV positivity of BC. 

  15. THE HPV STATUS IN BLADDER CANCER, TUMOR MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS, AND CLINICAL FEATURES OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Golovina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The data of medical records of 101 patients with urothelial bladder cancer (BC were compared with the results of laboratory detection of human papillomaviruses (HPV in the tumor tissue samples taken from these patients during transurethral resection. DNA of HPV 16, the major type of the virus responsible for the occurrence of cervical cancer, was previously detected in 38 samples; and oncogenes E6 and E7 mRNA and HPV 16 E7 oncoprotein were found in 13 of these samples. Comparison of HPV-positive and HPV-negative groups revealed that HPV-positive BC showed higher cell anaplasia than HPV-negative one; moreover, primary cancer was HPV-positive more frequently than recurrent cancer. Sex, age, muscular layer invasion did not correlate with the HPV positivity of BC. 

  16. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Massimi, Paola [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Lizano, Marcela, E-mail: lizanosoberon@gmail.com [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Banks, Lawrence, E-mail: banks@icgeb.org [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  17. Human papillomavirus load in benign HPV-associated oral lesions from HIV/AIDS individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Aguilar, S; Ramírez-Amador, V; Rosendo-Chalma, P; Guido-Jiménez, M; García-Carrancá, A; Anaya-Saavedra, G

    2018-03-01

    Although HPV emerged as a crucial carcinogenic and prognostic biomarker in head and neck cancer, and considering the increase in HPV-associated oral lesions (HPV-OLs) in HIV individuals, molecular information about HPV-OLs is scarce; thus, our aim was to determine viral loads in HPV-OLs from HIV/AIDS individuals. HIV/AIDS subjects with HPV-OL were included in this cross-sectional study. Following informed consent, biopsies were obtained. HPV detection and typing were carried out by PCR and sequencing (MY09/11, GP5+/6+). HPV-13 and HPV-32 loads were determined by a high-resolution melting assay. For statistical analysis, X 2 , Fisher's exact, and Mann-Whitney U tests were applied, using SPSS software (v.23). Twenty-nine HIV subjects (median age 38 years, 93% males) were included. Most were AIDS individuals (72.4%) under HAART (89.7%). Twenty-two (75.9%) participants had more than one HPV-OL (four with florid presentations), mostly multifocal epithelial hyperplasia (62%), being HPV-13 (26%) and HPV-32 (31%) the most frequent types. HPV load was higher in individuals with multiple HPV-OLs than in solitary lesions (4.9 vs. 3.2 Log 10 copies/ml, p = .090) and in HPV-32 + than in HPV-13 + (8.3 vs. 6.4 Log 10 copies/ml, p = .014). Multiple HPV-OLs showed high HPV loads, possibly indicating transcriptional activity of the virus; however, in the HIV setting, the individual and local immunological response could be the key process. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chimeric L2-Based Virus-Like Particle (VLP Vaccines Targeting Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses (HPV.

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    Bettina Huber

    Full Text Available Common cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV types induce skin warts, whereas species beta HPV are implicated, together with UV-radiation, in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC in immunosuppressed patients. Licensed HPV vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP self-assembled from L1 major capsid proteins that provide type-restricted protection against mucosal HPV infections causing cervical and other ano-genital and oro-pharyngeal carcinomas and warts (condylomas, but do not target heterologous HPV. Experimental papillomavirus vaccines have been designed based on L2 minor capsid proteins that contain type-common neutralization epitopes, to broaden protection to heterologous mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Repetitive display of the HPV16 L2 cross-neutralization epitope RG1 (amino acids (aa 17-36 on the surface of HPV16 L1 VLP has greatly enhanced immunogenicity of the L2 peptide. To more directly target cutaneous HPV, L1 fusion proteins were designed that incorporate the RG1 homolog of beta HPV17, the beta HPV5 L2 peptide aa53-72, or the common cutaneous HPV4 RG1 homolog, inserted into DE surface loops of HPV1, 5, 16 or 18 L1 VLP scaffolds. Baculovirus expressed chimeric proteins self-assembled into VLP and VLP-raised NZW rabbit immune sera were evaluated by ELISA and L1- and L2-based pseudovirion (PsV neutralizing assays, including 12 novel beta PsV types. Chimeric VLP displaying the HPV17 RG1 epitope, but not the HPV5L2 aa53-72 epitope, induced cross-neutralizing humoral immune responses to beta HPV. In vivo cross-protection was evaluated by passive serum transfer in a murine PsV challenge model. Immune sera to HPV16L1-17RG1 VLP (cross- protected against beta HPV5/20/24/38/96/16 (but not type 76, while antisera to HPV5L1-17RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV20/24/96 only, and sera to HPV1L1-4RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV4 challenge. In conclusion, RG1-based VLP are promising next generation vaccine candidates to target

  19. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OP-SCC) of the Head and Neck: a Growing Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Jessica; Wirth, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is now considered a major causative agent in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC). The incidence of HPV+ OP-SCC is increasing dramatically, is higher in men, and is now more common than cervical cancer in the United States. HPV+ OPSCCs usually present as locally advanced, stage IV cancers, requiring intensive treatment with surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation that can cause tremendous morbidity. HPV vaccination is predicted to prevent HPV+ OP-SCC because over 90% are caused by vaccine-type HPV. However, current vaccination rates are not yet high enough to be effective at preventing HPV-associated malignancies at a population level. PMID:27132327

  20. Pros, cons, and ethics of HPV vaccine in teens-Why such controversy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark Donald

    2014-12-01

    , but appears to be increasing over time as public education improves and governmentally- mandated vaccine programs increase. Despite the ethical concerns raised, the benefits of vaccination with regard to cancer prevention outweigh the risks and potential side effects related to the quadrivalent vaccine administration. Clearly, more follow-up over time is required to document these improvements in public health. Urologists need to remain aware of the prevention strategies for HPV infection and should help with counseling parents and patients in the appropriate age groups for HPV vaccination. Urology providers need to help engage and educate the parents and teenage patients to help promote broader adoption of the HPV vaccine regimen.

  1. Relationship between Humoral Immune Responses against HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV45 in 12-15 Year Old Girls Receiving Cervarix® or Gardasil® Vaccine.

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    Anna Godi

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines confer protection against the oncogenic genotypes HPV16 and HPV18 through the generation of type-specific neutralizing antibodies raised against virus-like particles (VLP representing these genotypes. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against HPV31 and HPV45, which are genetically-related to the vaccine types HPV16 and HPV18, respectively, although the mechanism is less certain. There are a number of humoral immune measures that have been examined in relation to the HPV vaccines, including VLP binding, pseudovirus neutralization and the enumeration of memory B cells. While the specificity of responses generated against the vaccine genotypes are fairly well studied, the relationship between these measures in relation to non-vaccine genotypes is less certain.We carried out a comparative study of these immune measures against vaccine and non-vaccine genotypes using samples collected from 12-15 year old girls following immunization with three doses of either Cervarix® or Gardasil® HPV vaccine.The relationship between neutralizing and binding antibody titers and HPV-specific memory B cell levels for the vaccine genotypes, HPV16 and HPV18, were very good. The proportion of responders approached 100% for both vaccines while the magnitude of these responses induced by Cervarix® were generally higher than those following Gardasil® immunization. A similar pattern was found for the non-vaccine genotype HPV31, albeit at a lower magnitude compared to its genetically-related vaccine genotype, HPV16. However, both the enumeration of memory B cells and VLP binding responses against HPV45 were poorly related to its neutralizing antibody responses. Purified IgG derived from memory B cells demonstrated specificities similar to those found in the serum, including the capacity to neutralize HPV pseudoviruses.These data suggest that pseudovirus neutralization should be used as the preferred humoral immune

  2. Prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 and attitudes toward HPV vaccination trials in patients with cervical cancer in Mali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téguété, Ibrahima; Dolo, Amadou; Sangare, Kotou; Sissoko, Abdoulaye; Rochas, Mali; Beseme, Sarah; Tounkara, Karamoko; Yekta, Shahla; De Groot, Anne S.; Koita, Ousmane A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the most common and lethal cancers in West Africa. Even though vaccines that protect against the most common Human papillomavirus (HPV) strains, 16 and 18, are currently in use in developed countries, the implementation of these vaccines in developing countries has been painfully slow, considering the pre-eminence of HPV-associated cervical cancer among women in those countries. Aim We performed serological and PCR-based assessment of blood and tissue specimens obtained from women undergoing cervical cancer-related surgery at a major urban hospital in Bamako. Since several therapeutic HPV vaccines are currently in clinical trials, we also assessed willingness to participate in HPV cancer vaccine trials. Methods Blood and biopsy samples of 240 women were evaluated for HPV types 16 and 18 by serology and PCR. Knowledge regarding the HPV vaccine and autonomy to decide to vaccinate their own child was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Results HPV 16 and 18 were identified in 137/166 (82.5%) cervical cancer biopsy samples by PCR. Co-infection with both HPV 16 and 18 was significantly more frequent in women over 50 years of age than in younger women (63.0% vs. 37.0%). 44% of study participants said they would be willing to vaccinate their child with HPV vaccine. Only 39% of women participating in this study reported that they would be able to make an autonomous decision to receive HPV vaccination. Permission from a male spouse or head of household was identified as important for participation by 59% of the women. Conclusion This study provides strong support for the introduction of currently available HPV vaccines in Mali, and also provides key information about conditions for obtaining informed consent for HPV vaccine trials and HPV vaccination in Mali. PMID:28231334

  3. HPV Vaccine (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-07-25

    Nearly all sexually active men and women will get infected with the human papillomavirus, or HPV, at some point in their lives. HPV can lead to serious health problems later in life, including certain cancers in both men and women. Since 2006, a vaccine has been available that protects against the most frequent cancer-causing types of HPV. In this podcast, Shannon Stokley discusses the importance of getting the HPV vaccine.  Created: 7/25/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 7/25/2013.

  4. Comparison of the performance in detection of HPV infections between the high-risk HPV genotyping real time PCR and the PCR-reverse dot blot assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lahong; Dai, Yibei; Chen, Jiahuan; Hong, Liquan; Liu, Yuhua; Ke, Qiang; Chen, Yiwen; Cai, Chengsong; Liu, Xia; Chen, Zhaojun

    2018-01-01

    A new multiplex real-time PCR assay, the high-risk HPV genotyping real time PCR assay (HR HPV RT-PCR), has been developed to detect 15 high-risk HPV types with respective viral loads. In this report, a total of 684 cervical specimens from women diagnosed with vaginitis were assessed by the HR HPV RT-PCR and the PCR reaction and reverse dot blot (PCR-RDB) assays, using a PCR-sequencing method as a reference standard. A total coincidence of 97.7% between the HR HPV RT PCR and the PCR-RDB assays was determined with a Kappa value of 0.953. The HR HPV RT PCR assay had sensitivity, specificity, and concordance rates (accuracy) of 99.7%, 99.7%, and 99.7%, respectively, as confirmed by PCR-sequencing, while the PCR-RDB assay had respective rates of 98.8%, 97.1%, and 98.0%. The overall rate of HPV infection, determined by PCR-sequencing, in women diagnosed with vaginitis was 49.85%, including 36.26% of single infection and 13.6% of multiple infections. The most common infections among the 15 high-risk HPV types in women diagnosed with vaginitis were HPV-52, HPV-16, and HPV-58, with a total detection rate of 10.23%, 7.75%, and 5.85%, respectively. We conclude that the HR HPV RT PCR assay exhibits better clinical performance than the PCR-RDB assay, and is an ideal alternative method for HPV genotyping. In addition, the HR HPV RT PCR assay provides HPV DNA viral loads, and could serve as a quantitative marker in the diagnosis and treatment of single and multiple HPV infections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) subtype in oral cancer patients through microarray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soung Min; Kwon, Ik Jae; Myoung, Hoon; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Suk Keun

    2018-02-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the main source of cervical cancer. Many recent studies have revealed the prevalence and prognosis of HPV associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, but fewer reports have evaluated HPV in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and prognosis of HPV associated with OSCC according to HPV and tumor types. We used a DNA chip kit (MY-HPV chip kit ® , Mygene Co., Korea) to detect high-risk HPV subtypes (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 54, 56, 58) and low-risk subtypes (6, 11, 34, 40, 42, 43, 44) among 187 patients. The prevalence was determined by Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, and the prognosis was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The overall prevalence of HPV in OSCC was 7.0% for all HPV positives and 4.3% for high-risk HPV positives. The prevalence of HPV was significantly higher in individuals under 65 years old and in those with tumors in the tongue and gum regions. The prognosis did not differ between the HPV-positive and -negative groups. Although the prevalence of HPV-positive cases in OSCC was low (7.0, 4.3%) and the prognosis did not depend on HPV positivity, HPV-associated OSCC should be considered in the evaluation and treatment of oral cancer patients. In addition, separating high- and low-risk groups based on the HPV status of other body parts might not be appropriate. The DNA microarray method can accurately detect known HPV subtypes simultaneously, but has limitations in detecting new subtypes. Vaccines can also be used to prevent HPV-associated OSCC in patients, so further studies on the prognosis and efficacy of vaccines should be undertaken.

  6. Knowledge on HPV Vaccine and Cervical Cancer Facilitates Vaccine Acceptability among School Teachers in Kitui County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masika, Moses Muia; Ogembo, Javier Gordon; Chabeda, Sophie Vusha; Wamai, Richard G.; Mugo, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Background Vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have the potential to reduce the burden of cervical cancer. School-based delivery of HPV vaccines is cost-effective and successful uptake depends on school teachers’ knowledge and acceptability of the vaccine. The aim of this study is to assess primary school teachers’ knowledge and acceptability of HPV vaccine and to explore facilitators and barriers of an ongoing Gavi Alliance-supported vaccination program in Kitui County, Kenya. Methods This was a cross-sectional, mixed methods study in Central Division of Kitui County where the Ministry of Health is offering the quadrivalent HPV vaccine to grade four girls. Data on primary school teachers’ awareness, knowledge and acceptability of HPV vaccine as well as facilitators and barriers to the project was collected through self-administered questionnaires and two focus group discussions. Results 339 teachers (60% female) completed the survey (62% response rate) and 13 participated in 2 focus group discussions. Vaccine awareness among teachers was high (90%), the level of knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer among teachers was moderate (48%, SD = 10.9) and females scored higher than males (50% vs. 46%, p = 0.002). Most teachers (89%) would recommend the vaccine to their daughter or close relatives. Those who would recommend the vaccine had more knowledge than those who would not (p = vaccine, poor accessibility of schools, absenteeism of girls on vaccine days, and fear of side effects. Conclusions Despite low to moderate levels of knowledge about HPV vaccine among school teachers, vaccine acceptability is high. Teachers with little knowledge on HPV vaccine are less likely to accept the vaccine than those who know more; this may affect uptake if not addressed. Empowering teachers to be vaccine champions in their community may be a feasible way of disseminating information about HPV vaccine and cervical cancer. PMID:26266949

  7. Knowledge on HPV Vaccine and Cervical Cancer Facilitates Vaccine Acceptability among School Teachers in Kitui County, Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Muia Masika

    Full Text Available Vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV infection have the potential to reduce the burden of cervical cancer. School-based delivery of HPV vaccines is cost-effective and successful uptake depends on school teachers' knowledge and acceptability of the vaccine. The aim of this study is to assess primary school teachers' knowledge and acceptability of HPV vaccine and to explore facilitators and barriers of an ongoing Gavi Alliance-supported vaccination program in Kitui County, Kenya.This was a cross-sectional, mixed methods study in Central Division of Kitui County where the Ministry of Health is offering the quadrivalent HPV vaccine to grade four girls. Data on primary school teachers' awareness, knowledge and acceptability of HPV vaccine as well as facilitators and barriers to the project was collected through self-administered questionnaires and two focus group discussions.339 teachers (60% female completed the survey (62% response rate and 13 participated in 2 focus group discussions. Vaccine awareness among teachers was high (90%, the level of knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer among teachers was moderate (48%, SD = 10.9 and females scored higher than males (50% vs. 46%, p = 0.002. Most teachers (89% would recommend the vaccine to their daughter or close relatives. Those who would recommend the vaccine had more knowledge than those who would not (p = <0.001. The main barriers were insufficient information about the vaccine, poor accessibility of schools, absenteeism of girls on vaccine days, and fear of side effects.Despite low to moderate levels of knowledge about HPV vaccine among school teachers, vaccine acceptability is high. Teachers with little knowledge on HPV vaccine are less likely to accept the vaccine than those who know more; this may affect uptake if not addressed. Empowering teachers to be vaccine champions in their community may be a feasible way of disseminating information about HPV vaccine and cervical cancer.

  8. Estimating HPV DNA Deposition Between Sexual Partners Using HPV Concordance, Y Chromosome DNA Detection, and Self-reported Sexual Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagón, Talía; Burchell, Ann N; El-Zein, Mariam; Guénoun, Julie; Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Coutlée, François; Franco, Eduardo L

    2017-12-05

    Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in genital samples may not always represent true infections but may be depositions from infected sexual partners. We examined whether sexual risk factors and a biomarker (Y chromosome DNA) were associated with genital HPV partner concordance and estimated the fraction of HPV detections potentially attributable to partner deposition. The HITCH study enrolled young women attending a university or college in Montréal, Canada, and their male partners, from 2005 to 2010. We tested baseline genital samples for Y chromosome DNA and HPV DNA using polymerase chain reaction. Type-specific HPV concordance was 42.4% in partnerships where at least one partner was HPV DNA positive. Y chromosome DNA predicted type-specific HPV concordance in univariate analyses, but in multivariable models the independent predictors of concordance were days since last vaginal sex (26.5% higher concordance 0-1 vs 8-14 days after last vaginal sex) and condom use (22.6% higher concordance in never vs always users). We estimated that 14.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.3-21.9%) of HPV DNA detections in genital samples were attributable to vaginal sex in the past week. A substantial proportion of HPV DNA detections may be depositions due to recent unprotected vaginal sex. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Cross-sectional seroprevalence of antibodies against 6, 11, 16 and 18 human papilloma virus (HPV types among teenagers and young women in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lupi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. Little is known about human papilloma virus (HPV seroprevalence in the healthy Italian population. The aim of the study was to assess seroprevalence of antibodies against HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 among girls and young women in Italy. METHODS. Sera were tested with a commercially available ELISA assay detecting specific IgG. Results. Seroprevalence was 54.1% in girls between 11 to 18 years old and 8.2% in over 18s. Overall seropositivity in birth cohorts invited for free immunization reached 72.8% and was significantly higher than in other age subgroups. The highest levels of antibodies were detected in girls of 12 years old that should have just completed the vaccination schedule. Conclusion. A standardized seroepidemiological survey on HPV represents a useful tool for identifying groups at risk in which immunization is recommended, monitoring of vaccinated women, assessing whether booster vaccination is required.

  10. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix(®) and Gardasil(®) human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Müller, Martin

    2014-01-01

    (®) (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil(®) (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no available data on vaccine-induced cross-protection in men and little is known about cross......-reactive immunity after HPV-vaccination of HIV-infected individuals. In an investigator-initiated trial, we randomized 91 HIV-positive men and women to receive vaccination with Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®). The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined with pcr before and after immunization. Cross...

  11. HPV Vaccine Acceptance in a Clinic-Based Sample of Women in the Rural South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Heather M.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; McCree, Donna H.; Wright, Marcie S.; Davis, Jennifer; Hutto, Brent E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common sexually transmitted infection linked to cervical disease. Vaccines for some types of HPV were in development at the time of the study. Purpose: The study examined HPV vaccine acceptability among underserved women in a rural region of the southeastern U.S. with high rates of cervical cancer…

  12. Den HPV-relaterede sygdomsbyrde hos mænd er stor og kan forebygges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiellberg Larsen, Helle; Kofoed, Kristian; Sand, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted infection. High-risk HPV causes penile cancer and a substantial proportion of oropharyngeal and anal malignancy in men. Low-risk types of HPV cause anogenital warts. The incidence of oropharyngeal and anal cancers is increasing...

  13. HPV infection and P16 expression in oral and oropharyngeal cancer in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adilbay, Dauren; Adilbayev, Galim; Kidirbayeva, Gulzhan; Shipilova, Viktoria; Sadyk, Zhanat; Koyanbekova, Gulsum; Sokolenko, Ekaterina; Klozar, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important etiologic factor in different cancers of anogenital region and also in a fraction of head and neck cancers (HNC) particularly oropharyngeal tumors. The HPV16 genotype associated with the majority of HPV-related head and neck carcinomas. Th incidence of oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in many countries, and the rate of HPV positive tumors is about 70% in Europe and North America. Little known about the prevalence of HPV in HNC in Central Asia. It's a prospective analysis of patients with verified oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Sociodemographic and clinical data obtained on admission to treatment. The diagnosis of HPV positivity assessed by both the P16 expression on immunohistochemistry(IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)with HPV DNA detection and HR HPV type determination. Seventy six patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer tested for HPV. Forteen cases were positive for HPV by PCR and 15 cases by P16 IHC. Of the 35 oropharyngeal tumors, nine were HPV DNA and p16 IHC positive, giving the rate of 25.7%. Of the 41 oral tumors, five were HPV DNA and six p16 IHC positive, giving the rate of 12.2%. It is the first study mapping prevalence of HPV positivity in oral and oropharyngeal cancer in the Central Asian region. The rate of HPV positivity was higher in oropharyngeal than in oral cancer, the nonsmokers were significantly more frequent in the HPV positive group and HPV 16 was the most frequent type. However, the HPV positivity rates are lower than referred in the western world.

  14. HPV Vaccine (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Since 2006, a vaccine has been available that protects against the most frequent cancer-causing types of HPV. This podcast discusses the importance of parents talking to their children’s health care providers about getting the HPV vaccine.

  15. HPV Vaccine (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-07-25

    Since 2006, a vaccine has been available that protects against the most frequent cancer-causing types of HPV. This podcast discusses the importance of parents talking to their children’s health care providers about getting the HPV vaccine.  Created: 7/25/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 7/25/2013.

  16. Genetic variability in L1 and L2 genes of HPV-16 and HPV-58 in Southwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaofei Yue

    Full Text Available HPV account for most of the incidence of cervical cancer. Approximately 90% of anal cancers and a smaller subset (<50% of other cancers (oropharyngeal, penile, vaginal, vulvar are also attributed to HPV. The L1 protein comprising HPV vaccine formulations elicits high-titre neutralizing antibodies and confers type restricted protection. The L2 protein is a promising candidate for a broadly protective HPV vaccine. In our previous study, we found the most prevalent high-risk HPV infectious serotypes were HPV-16 and HPV-58 among women of Southwest China. To explore gene polymorphisms and intratypic variations of HPV-16 and HPV-58 L1/L2 genes originating in Southwest China, HPV-16 (L1: n = 31, L2: n = 28 and HPV-58 (L1: n = 21, L2: n = 21 L1/L2 genes were sequenced and compared to others described and submitted to GenBank. Phylogenetic trees were then constructed by Neighbor-Joining and the Kimura 2-parameters methods (MEGA software, followed by an analysis of the diversity of secondary structure. Then selection pressures acting on the L1/L2 genes were estimated by PAML software. Twenty-nine single nucleotide changes were observed in HPV-16 L1 sequences with 16/29 non-synonymous mutations and 13/29 synonymous mutations (six in alpha helix and two in beta turns. Seventeen single nucleotide changes were observed in HPV-16 L2 sequences with 8/17 non-synonymous mutations (one in beta turn and 9/17 synonymous mutations. Twenty-four single nucleotide changes were observed in HPV-58 L1 sequences with 10/24 non-synonymous mutations and 14/24 synonymous mutations (eight in alpha helix and four in beta turn. Seven single nucleotide changes were observed in HPV-58 L2 sequences with 4/7 non-synonymous mutations and 3/7 synonymous mutations. The result of selective pressure analysis showed that most of these mutations were of positive selection. This study may help understand the intrinsic geographical relatedness and biological differences of HPV-16/HPV-58 and

  17. An analysis of HPV infection incidence and clearance by genotype and age in men: The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Donna J; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J; Sudenga, Staci L; Lu, Beibei; Schabath, Matthew B; Papenfuss, Mary R; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Salmeron, Jorge; Villa, Luisa L; Ponce, Eduardo Lazcano; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-12-01

    Genital HPV infection in men causes benign and cancerous lesions, the incidence of which differs by age. The goal of this work was to comprehensively evaluate incidence and clearance of individual HPV genotypes among men by age group. HIV-negative men ages 18-70 with no history of anogenital cancer were recruited for the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study . Participants completed clinical exams and questionnaires every six months for up to ~4 years. Genital specimens underwent HPV genotyping, with associations between age and HPV assessed using Cox analyses. 4085 men were followed for a median of 48.6 months (range: 0.3-94.0). Significantly lower HPV incidence rates were observed among the oldest age group (55-70 years) for grouped high-risk (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=0.71), HPV16 (IRR=0.54), grouped low-risk (IRR=0.74), and HPV6 (IRR=0.57) infections compared to men ages 18-24. However, incidence of the grouped 9-valent HPV vaccine types remained constant across the lifespan. Likelihood of HPV6 and HPV16 clearance remained constant until age 54, then increased significantly for men ages 55-70 (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]=1.92 and 1.65, respectively). Men remain susceptible to HPV infections throughout their lifespan, highlighting the need for prevention efforts with long-lasting duration.

  18. High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) and survival in patients with esophageal carcinoma: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreilich, Martin; Bergqvist, Michael; Moberg, Martin; Brattström, Daniel; Gustavsson, Inger; Bergström, Stefan; Wanders, Alkwin; Hesselius, Patrik; Wagenius, Gunnar; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) in patients with esophageal carcinoma has previously been studied with an average detection rate of 15%, but the role of HPV in relation to survival is less clear. In cervical cancer, lung cancer and tonsil cancer HPV viral load is a predictive factor for survival and outcome of treatment. The primary aim was to study the spectrum of high-risk HPV types in esophageal tumors. Secondary, as a pilot study we investigated the association between HPV status and the survival rates. We compared both the presence and the viral load of high-risk HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 39, 45, 52, 58, and 67 in relation to clinical data from patients with esophageal carcinoma. Survival data and tumor samples were retrieved from 100 patients receiving treatment at the Department of Oncology, Uppsala Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. The tumor samples were investigated for HPV viral load using real-time PCR. HPV 16 was detected in 16% of the patients; no other HPV type was detected. HPV 16 infection had no significant effect on survival (p = 0.72). Also, HPV 16 did not improve survival after treatment (radiotherapy or chemotherapy). Only HPV 16 was detected among the patients. HPV 16 in esophageal carcinoma patients did not influence survival or improve therapy response. However, given the size of the study there is a need to examine a larger cohort in order to understand in more detail the effect of high risk HPV types in esophageal carcinoma

  19. Comparison of Abbott RealTime High-Risk HPV and Hybrid Capture 2 Assays for Detection of HPV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kiwoong; Yu, Shinae; Lee, Eun Hee; Park, Hyosoon; Woo, Hee-Yeon; Kwon, Min-Jung

    2016-09-01

    Various assays for detecting high-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) have been introduced recently, including the Abbott RealTime High-Risk HPV assay. We sought to compare the performance of Abbott PCR to Hybrid Capture 2 for the detection of HR HPV. A total of 941 cervical swab specimens were obtained. We submitted all specimens for HR HPV detection with HC2 and Abbott PCR, and then additionally analyzed discordant and concordant positive results using restriction fragment mass polymorphism (RFMP) genotyping analysis. HC2 detected one of 13 HR HPV types in 12.3% (116/941) of cases, while Abbott PCR detected one of 14 detectable HR HPV types in 12.9% (121/941) of cases. The overall agreement rate was 97.3% with a kappa coefficient of 0.879. Discordant results between these two assays were observed in 25 cases. HC2 showed a sensitivity of 90.0% and specificity of 95.9%, while Abbott PCR showed a sensitivity of 98.0% and specificity of 96.8% when using RFMP results as the gold standard. For HPV 16/18 detection, Abbott PCR showed 95.8%/88.9% sensitivity and 99.2%/99.8% specificity, respectively. The overall coinfection rate between HPV 16, 18 and non-16/18 was 9.9% (12/121) in Abbott PCR analysis. Considering its high agreement rate with HC2, higher sensitivity/specificity compared to HC2, and ability to differentiate HPV 16/18 from other HPV types, Abbott PCR could be a reliable laboratory testing method for the screening of HPV infections. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  20. Estimating effectiveness of HPV vaccination against HPV infection from post-vaccination data in the absence of baseline data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vänskä, Simopekka; Söderlund-Strand, Anna; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Lehtinen, Matti; Dillner, Joakim

    2018-04-28

    HPV vaccination programs have been introduced in large parts of the world, but monitoring of effectiveness is not routinely performed. Many countries introduced vaccination programs without establishing the baseline of HPV prevalences. We developed and validated methods to estimate protective effectiveness (PE) of vaccination from the post-vaccination data alone using references, which are invariant under HPV vaccination. Type-specific HPV prevalence data for 15-39 year-old women were collected from the pre- and post-vaccination era in a region in southern Sweden. In a region in middle Sweden, where no baseline data had been collected, only post-vaccination data was collected. The age-specific baseline prevalence of vaccine HPV types (vtHPV, HPV 6, 11, 16, 18) were reconstructed as Beta distributions from post-vaccination data by applying the reference odds ratios between the target HPV type and non-vaccine-type HPV (nvtHPV) prevalences. Older non-vaccinated age cohorts and the southern Sweden region were used as the references. The methods for baseline reconstructions were validated by computing the Bhattacharyya coefficient (BC), a measure for divergence, between reconstructed and actual observed prevalences for vaccine HPV types in Southern Sweden, and in addition, for non-vaccine types in both regions. The PE estimates among 18-21 year-old women were validated by comparing the PE estimates that were based on the reconstructed baseline prevalences against the PE estimates based on the actual baseline prevalences. In Southern Sweden the PEs against vtHPV were 52.2% (95% CI: 44.9-58.5) using the reconstructed baseline and 49.6% (43.2-55.5) using the actual baseline, with high BC 82.7% between the reconstructed and actual baseline. In the middle Sweden region where baseline data was missing, the PE was estimated at 40.5% (31.6-48.5). Protective effectiveness of HPV vaccination can be estimated from post-vaccination data alone via reconstructing the baseline

  1. Expression profile of microRNA-146a along HPV-induced multistep carcinogenesis: a study in HPV16 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Rita; Santos, Joana M O; Fernandes, Mara; Dias, Francisca; Sousa, Hugo; Ribeiro, Joana; Bastos, Margarida M S M; Oliveira, Paula A; Carmo, Diogo; Casaca, Fátima; Silva, Sandra; Medeiros, Rui; Gil da Costa, Rui M

    2018-02-01

    Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with the development of certain types of cancer and the dysregulation of microRNAs has been implicated in HPV-associated carcinogenesis. This is the case of microRNA-146a (miR-146a), which is thought to regulate tumor-associated inflammation. We sought to investigate the expression levels of miR-146a during HPV16-mediated carcinogenesis using skin samples from K14-HPV16 transgenic mice which develop the consecutive phases of the carcinogenesis process. Female transgenic (HPV +/- ) and wild-type (HPV -/- ) mice were sacrificed at 24-26 weeks-old or 28-30 weeks-old. Chest and ear skin samples from HPV +/- and HPV -/- mice were histologically classified and used for microRNA extraction and quantification by qPCR. Chest skin samples from 24 to 26 weeks-old HPV +/- mice presented diffuse epidermal hyperplasia and only 22.5% showed multifocal dysplasia, while at 28-30 weeks-old all (100.0%) HPV +/- animals showed epidermal dysplasia. All HPV +/- ear skin samples showed carcinoma in situ (CIS). MiR-146a expression levels were higher in HPV +/- compared to HPV -/- mice (p = 0.006). There was also an increase in miR-146a expression in dysplastic skin lesions compared with hyperplasic lesions (p = 0.011). Samples showing CIS had a significant decrease in miR-146a expression when compared to samples showing epidermal hyperplasia (p = 0.018) and epidermal dysplasia (p = 0.009). These results suggest that HPV16 induces the overexpression of miR-146a in the initial stages of carcinogenesis (hyperplasia and dysplasia), whereas decreases its expression at later stages (CIS). Taken together, these data implicate and suggest different roles of miR-146a in HPV-mediated carcinogenesis.

  2. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  3. HPV DNA test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test; Cancer of cervix - HPV DNA test References Hacker NF. Cervical dysplasia and cancer. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ...

  4. Surgical staging identified false HPV-negative cases in a large series of invasive cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Karl Ulrich; Liebrich, Clemens; Luyten, Alexander; Zander, Martina; Iftner, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We examined a large series of biopsy-proven invasive cervical cancers with surgical staging and HPV re-testing to estimate the relevance of HPV-negative cervical cancers in a Caucasian population. We prospectively collected smears from 371 patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of cervical cancer for HC2 testing of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV). In HC2-negative cases, smears and paraffin embedded tissue blocks underwent additional HPV genotyping. HC2 tests showed 31/371 cases (8.8%) had negative findings. Surgical staging showed that 21/31 HC2-negative cases (68%) were not cervical cancer. Overall, 340/350 cases of primary cervical cancer confirmed by surgical staging tested HC2 positive (97.2%). Non-high-risk HPV subtypes were detected in five cases (one HPV-53, one HPV-70, and three HPV-73) and high-risk subtypes in four patients with HC2-negative cervical cancer (two HPV 16 and two HPV-18). The remaining case, a primary undifferentiated carcinoma of the uterine cervix, tested negative for HPV-DNA with all tests. The main explanation for HPV-negative cervical cancer was a false diagnosis, followed by cancers associated with non-HR-HPV types, and false-negative HR-HPV results. Truly HPV negative seem to be very rare in Caucasian populations. Retrospective analyses without surgical staging may overestimate the proportion of HPV negative cervical cancers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrative analyses reveal novel strategies in HPV11,-16 and-45 early infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Rossing, Maria; Andersen, Ditte

    2012-01-01

    of genes not previously implicated in HPV biology, such as the PSG family and ANKRD1, and of genes implicated in the biology of other viruses, e. g. MX1, IFI44 and DDX60. Carcinogenesis-related genes, e. g. ABL2, MGLL and CYR61, were upregulated by high-risk HPV16 and -45. The integrative analysis revealed...... the suppression of DNA repair by HPV11 and -16, and downregulation of cytoskeleton genes by all HPV types. Various signalling pathways were affected by the HPVs: IL-2 by HPV11; JAK-STAT by HPV16; and TGF-beta, NOTCH and tyrosine kinase signalling by HPV45. This study uncovered novel strategies employed by HPV...... to establish infection and promote uncontrolled growth....

  6. One lesion, one virus: individual components of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-positive men contain a single HPV type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richel, Olivier; Quint, Koen D.; Lindeman, Jan; van Noesel, Carel J. M.; de Koning, Maurits N. C.; van den Munckhof, Henk A. M.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Prins, Jan M.; Quint, Wim G. V.

    2014-01-01

    High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is present in many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men. The major etiologic factor is infection with an oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype. We investigated whether individual components of high-grade AIN are

  7. Prevalence of Anal HPV Infection Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Alexandra L; Karthik, Rajiv; Sivasubramanian, Murugesan; Raghavendran, Anantharam; Gnanamony, Manu; Lensing, Shelly; Lee, Jeannette Y; Kannangai, Rajesh; Abraham, Priya; Mathai, Dilip; Palefsky, Joel M

    2016-04-01

    India has a large population of HIV-positive individuals, including men who have sex with men (MSM), and the incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers is high. In developed countries, HIV-positive MSM exhibit the highest prevalence of anal HPV infection and incidence of anal cancer. Little is known about anal HPV infection in HIV-positive Indian MSM. We evaluated 300 HIV-positive MSM from 2 cities in India. Men were tested for anal HPV infection using L1-HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction with probes specific for 29 types and a mixture of 10 additional types. CD4 level and plasma HIV viral load were measured. Participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire including a sexual history. The prevalence of anal HPV was 95% (95% confidence interval: 91% to 97%). The 3 most common types were HPV 35 (20%), HPV 16 (13%), and HPV 6/11 (13%). History of taking antiretroviral medications decreased risk of anal HPV 16 infection [relative risk (RR): 0.6 (0.4-1.0)]. Having an increased number of vaginal sex partners lowered risk of any anal HPV infection. Ever having receptive sex increased risk of any anal HPV [RR: 1.2 (1.1-1.4)] and anal HPV 16 [RR: 6.5 (1.8-107)]. Almost all Indian HIV-positive MSM had anal HPV infection. The prevalence of HPV 16 was lower and the prevalence of other oncogenic HPV types was higher than in similar populations in North America and Europe. Vaccine-based prevention strategies for HPV infection in India should consider potential differences in HPV type distribution among HIV-infected MSM when designing interventions.

  8. A 9-valent HPV vaccine against infection and intraepithelial neoplasia in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joura, Elmar A; Giuliano, Anna R; Iversen, Ole-Erik

    2015-01-01

    obtained by means of biopsy or as part of definitive therapy (including a loop electrosurgical excision procedure and conization) was tested for HPV. RESULTS: The rate of high-grade cervical, vulvar, or vaginal disease irrespective of HPV type (i.e., disease caused by HPV types included in the 9v......HPV vaccine and those not included) in the modified intention-to-treat population (which included participants with and those without prevalent infection or disease) was 14.0 per 1000 person-years in both vaccine groups. The rate of high-grade cervical, vulvar, or vaginal disease related to HPV-31, 33, 45, 52...

  9. Clustering self-organizing maps (SOM) method for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA as the main cause of cervical cancer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamam, A.; Aldila, D.; Fatimah, Arimbi, M. D.

    2017-07-01

    One of the most widely used clustering method, since it has advantage on its robustness, is Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) method. This paper discusses the application of SOM method on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA which is the main cause of cervical cancer disease, the most dangerous cancer in developing countries. We use 18 types of HPV DNA-based on the newest complete genome. By using open-source-based program R, clustering process can separate 18 types of HPV into two different clusters. There are two types of HPV in the first cluster while 16 others in the second cluster. The analyzing result of 18 types HPV based on the malignancy of the virus (the difficultness to cure). Two of HPV types the first cluster can be classified as tame HPV, while 16 others in the second cluster are classified as vicious HPV.

  10. Dynamics of HPV viral loads reflect the treatment effect of photodynamic therapy in genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhili; Liu, Lishi; Zhang, Wenjing; Liu, Hui; Li, Junpeng; Jiang, Lifen; Zeng, Kang

    2018-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has demonstrated good clinical cure rates and low recurrence rates in the treatment of genital warts. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and viral load assays can reflect the status of persistent or latent infection and serve as a predictor of infection clearance. Specimens from 41 patients with HPV infection were obtained, and the HPV genotypes and viral load were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Traditional treatment, such as radiofrequency, microwave, or surgical therapy, was used to remove the visible lesions, and then PDT treatment was performed every week. HPV DNA testing was performed at every patient visit and the frequency of PDT treatment was determined by changes in HPV viral loads. HPV viral loads decreased significantly after PDT treatment. There were significant differences in HPV viral loads between pretherapy and three or six rounds of PDT treatment. Significant differences were also observed between single and multiple type HPV infection after six rounds of PDT treatment. Patients with single type HPV infection had significantly higher rates of negative HPV DNA test results, as compared with patients with multiple infections after six rounds of PDT treatment; however, there was no difference in recurrence rates between the two groups. Dynamic monitoring of HPV genotypes and viral loads can be used to guide PDT treatment and indicate PDT treatment efficacy in eliminating HPV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of Primary HPV in Djibouti: Feasibility of Screening for Early Diagnosis of Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Alessio; Di Napoli, Anteo; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Rossi, Alessandra; Luccini, Daniele; Di Marco, Ilaria; Traoré, Amadou Laico; Gillio Tos, Anna; Trevisan, Morena; Mirisola, Concetta; Costanzo, Gianfranco

    2016-10-01

    In many African Sub-Saharan countries, human papilloma virus (HPV) prevalence data are not available. The current study estimated the prevalence of HPV virus in the female population of Djibouti. Approximately 1000 asymptomatic women 16 to 64 years old were enrolled from 3 of the main health structures of Djibouti in 2014 and 2015; 998 cervical samples were tested for HPV-DNA of high risk types, 499 during the first year, and 499 during the second. Positive samples were typed with an HPV genotyping kit. The women were an average age of 38.8 years (SD, 10.2); 54 women tested positive for HPV (prevalence rate, 5.4% [95% confidence interval, 4.0-6.8]). The highest prevalence was observed among the women younger than 35 years. HPV66 was the most prevalent (15.4% of the infections), followed by HPV31 and HPV52 (10.8% both) and HPV16 (9.2%). All 54 women who tested HPV-positive underwent a Pap test, which was positive in 8 cases (14.8%): 2 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) and 6 low-grade (LSIL). The HPV prevalence shows a curve by age similar to that of other African countries. The proportion of HPV16 is among the lowest ever seen in similar studies. The findings suggest to Djibouti the choice of a strategy of screening that includes forms of cytological triage, thus limiting recourse to colposcopy.

  12. Reasons for receiving or not receiving HPV vaccination in primary schoolgirls in Tanzania: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Jones, Deborah; Tomlin, Keith; Remes, Pieter; Baisley, Kathy; Ponsiano, Riziki; Soteli, Selephina; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Changalucha, John; Kapiga, Saidi; Hayes, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    There are few data on factors influencing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination uptake in sub-Saharan Africa. We examined the characteristics of receivers and non-receivers of HPV vaccination in Tanzania and identified reasons for not receiving the vaccine. We conducted a case control study of HPV vaccine receivers and non-receivers within a phase IV cluster-randomised trial of HPV vaccination in 134 primary schools in Tanzania. Girls who failed to receive vaccine (pupil cases) and their parents/guardians (adult cases) and girls who received dose 1 (pupil controls) of the quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil™) and their parents/guardians (adult controls) were enrolled from 39 schools in a 1∶1 ratio and interviewed about cervical cancer, HPV vaccine knowledge and reasons why they might have received or not received the vaccine. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine factors independently associated with not receiving HPV vaccine. We interviewed 159 pupil/adult cases and 245 pupil/adult controls. Adult-factors independently associated with a daughter being a case were older age, owning fewer household items, not attending a school meeting about HPV vaccine, and not knowing anyone with cancer. Pupil-factors for being a case included having a non-positive opinion about the school de-worming programme, poor knowledge about the location of the cervix, and not knowing that a vaccine could prevent cervical cancer. Reasons for actively refusing vaccination included concerns about side effects and infertility. Most adult and pupil cases reported that they would accept the HPV vaccine if it were offered again (97% and 93% respectively). Sensitisation messages, especially targeted at older and poorer parents, knowledge retention and parent meetings are critical for vaccine acceptance in Tanzania. Vaccine side effects and fertility concerns should be addressed prior to a national vaccination program. Parents and pupils who initially decline vaccination should be

  13. Reasons for receiving or not receiving HPV vaccination in primary schoolgirls in Tanzania: a case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Watson-Jones

    Full Text Available There are few data on factors influencing human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination uptake in sub-Saharan Africa. We examined the characteristics of receivers and non-receivers of HPV vaccination in Tanzania and identified reasons for not receiving the vaccine.We conducted a case control study of HPV vaccine receivers and non-receivers within a phase IV cluster-randomised trial of HPV vaccination in 134 primary schools in Tanzania. Girls who failed to receive vaccine (pupil cases and their parents/guardians (adult cases and girls who received dose 1 (pupil controls of the quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil™ and their parents/guardians (adult controls were enrolled from 39 schools in a 1∶1 ratio and interviewed about cervical cancer, HPV vaccine knowledge and reasons why they might have received or not received the vaccine. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine factors independently associated with not receiving HPV vaccine.We interviewed 159 pupil/adult cases and 245 pupil/adult controls. Adult-factors independently associated with a daughter being a case were older age, owning fewer household items, not attending a school meeting about HPV vaccine, and not knowing anyone with cancer. Pupil-factors for being a case included having a non-positive opinion about the school de-worming programme, poor knowledge about the location of the cervix, and not knowing that a vaccine could prevent cervical cancer. Reasons for actively refusing vaccination included concerns about side effects and infertility. Most adult and pupil cases reported that they would accept the HPV vaccine if it were offered again (97% and 93% respectively.Sensitisation messages, especially targeted at older and poorer parents, knowledge retention and parent meetings are critical for vaccine acceptance in Tanzania. Vaccine side effects and fertility concerns should be addressed prior to a national vaccination program. Parents and pupils who initially decline vaccination

  14. Primary HPV testing recommendations of US providers, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Saraiya, Mona

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the HPV testing recommendations of US physicians who perform cervical cancer screening. Data from the 2015 DocStyles survey of U.S. health care providers were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression to identify provider characteristics associated with routine recommendation of primary HPV testing for average-risk, asymptomatic women ≥30years old. The analysis was limited to primary care physicians and obstetrician-gynecologists who performed cervical cancer screening (N=843). Primary HPV testing for average-risk, asymptomatic women ≥30years old was recommended by 40.8% of physicians who performed cervical cancer screening, and 90.1% of these providers recommended primary HPV testing for women of all ages. The screening intervals most commonly recommended for primary HPV testing with average-risk, asymptomatic women ≥30years old were every 3years (35.5%) and annually (30.2%). Physicians who reported that patient HPV vaccination status influenced their cervical cancer screening practices were almost four times more likely to recommend primary HPV testing for average-risk, asymptomatic women ≥30years old than other providers (Adj OR=3.96, 95% CI=2.82-5.57). Many US physicians recommended primary HPV testing for women of all ages, contrary to guidelines which limit this screening approach to women ≥25years old. The association between provider recommendation of primary HPV testing and patient HPV vaccination status may be due to anticipated reductions in the most oncogenic HPV types among vaccinated women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Morphological correlates of genital HPV infection: Viral replication, transcription and gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, C.P.; Friedman, D.; Nuovo, G.; Silverstein, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Current studies indicate a strong correlation between specific morphological changes and the presence of certain HPV strains in precancerous squamous epithelium of the cervix, vulva and vagina. HPV type 16 is the most commonly detected HPV type in cervical lesions in our experience, and 85% of these lesions exhibit some morphological features associated with aneuploid epithelium (CIN). However, over 50% of these lesions containing HPV 16 DNA exhibit, in addition, foci of epithelium indistinguishable from condyloma, although in our experience, only one HPV type(16) is detected in the majority of these lesions. DNA-DNA in situ hybridization analysis of these lesions containing HPV 16 DNA has demonstrated nucleic acids in areas resembling both condyloma and CIN, with the greatest concentration in mature cells containing cytoplasmic maturation. Ten percent of lesions containing HPV 16 produce detectable capsid antigens, and we have confirmed the presence of these antigens in the same areas which hybridize in-situ for HPV DNA. Recent studies using biotin and S-35 labeled RNa probes constructed in GEM-1 vectors indicate that early HPV genes are expressed primarily in the upper (more mature) regions of the neoplastic epithelium. Thus maturation appears to exert a positive influence on a variety of HPV functions in neoplastic epithelium, including DNA replication, early and late gene expression. It is possible that patterns of gene expression may vary between lesions associated with different HPV types or different morphologies. This possibility is being explored

  16. Seroepidemiology of high-risk HPV in HIV-negative and HIV-infected MSM: the H2M study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Sofie H.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Schepp, Rutger M.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Bogaards, Johannes A.; de Melker, Hester E.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; van der Loeff, Maarten F. Schim

    2013-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM), in particular HIV-infected MSM, are at increased risk for diseases related to human papilloma virus (HPV). Our goal was to assess the effect of HIV status on the presence of type-specific antibodies against seven high-risk HPV types in HPV-unvaccinated MSM. Moreover,

  17. Molecular analysis of genital HPV: results of a study made in the years 2005-2008

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    Maria Di Bello

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human Papilloma virus (HPV infection is the main cause of cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN worldwide. Consequently, it would be useful to evaluate HPV testing to screen for cervical cancer. Recently several molecular biological tests able to detect different HPV types and to classified them into high and low-risk groups have been developed. In this study we examined HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in a group of 346 patients, some women undergoing cytological screening for prevention, others with abnormal cytological and/ or clinics. Methods: HPV detection and genotyping were done using a polymerase chain reaction based assay with the use the HPV Typing kit (Nuclear Laser Medicine.The tests can detect and differentiate 14 types of human papilloma virus, classified them into low, medium and high risk. Results. During the period 2005-2008, a total of 346 samples were analysed.The results of this study show that in this series, HPV infection were detected in 43.35% with a prevalence of 83.3% in patients of 16-20 years. Over the years there weren’t an increase of the infection. Among patients with condylomas, the genotype most frequently detected were HPV 6 (79% followed by HPV 11 (25.5% while among the eso-endocervical swabs were HPV 16 (34.5% and HPV 6 (26.1%. Conclusions: Our work shows how is high the incidence of HPV infection in people especially young, thus the importance of HPV molecular test for diagnosing the presence of high risk HPV oncogenes.This epidemiological study can better understand the incidence of HPV in local and identification of the virus strain that maintains the infection, in order to assume a growing importance in prevention programs.

  18. Distribution of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer in multi- ethnic Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzi Abdul Raub, Sayyidi; Isa, Nurismah Md; Zailani, Hatta Ahmad; Omar, Baharudin; Abdullah, Mohamad Farouk; Mohd Amin, Wan Anna; Noor, Rushdan Md; Ayub, Mukarramah Che; Abidin, Zainal; Kassim, Fauziah; Vicknesh, Visvalingam; Zakaria, Zubaidah; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir; Tan, Geok Chin; Syed Husain, Sharifah Noor Akmal

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third commonest type of cancer among women in Malaysia. Our aim was to determine the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes in cervical cancer in our multi-ethnic population. This was a multicentre study with a total of 280 cases of cervical cancer from 4 referral centres in Malaysia, studied using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of 12 high risk-HPV genotypes. Overall HPV was detected in 92.5% of cases, in 95.9% of squamous cell carcinomas and 84.3%of adenocarcinomas. The five most prevalent high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (68.2%), 18 (40%), 58 (10.7%), 33 (10.4%) and 52 (10.4%). Multiple HPV infections were more prevalent (55.7%) than single HPV infections (36.8%). The percentage of HPV positive cases in Chinese, Malays and Indians were 95.5%, 91.9% and 80.0%, respectively. HPV 16 and 18 genotypes were the commonest in all ethnic groups. We found that the percentage of HPV 16 infection was significantly higher in Chinese (75.9%) compared to Malays (63.7%) and Indians (52.0%) (pMalaysia is similar to other Asian countries. Importantly, we found that different ethnic groups in Malaysia have different HPV genotype infection rates, which is a point to consider during the implementation of HPV vaccination.

  19. Reduction in HPV 16/18 prevalence in sexually active young women following the introduction of HPV immunisation in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesher, D; Soldan, K; Howell-Jones, R; Panwar, K; Manyenga, P; Jit, M; Beddows, S; Gill, O N

    2013-12-17

    Reduction in the prevalence of vaccine type HPV infection in young women is an early indication of the impact of the HPV immunisation programme and a necessary outcome if the subsequent impact on cervical cancer is to be realised. Residual vulva-vaginal swab (VVS) specimens from young women aged 16-24 years undergoing chlamydia screening in community sexual health services (formerly known as family planning clinics), general practice (GP), and youth clinics in 2010-2012 were submitted from 10 laboratories in seven regions around England. These specimens were linked to demographic and sexual behaviour data reported with the chlamydia test, anonymised, and tested for type-specific HPV DNA using a multiplex PCR and Luminex-based genotyping test. Estimated immunisation coverage was calculated and findings were compared to a baseline survey conducted prior to the introduction of HPV immunisation in 2008. A total of 4664 eligible specimens were collected and 4178 had a valid test result. The post-immunisation prevalence of HPV 16/18 infection was lowest in this youngest age group (16-18 years) and increased with age. This increase with age was a reversal of the pattern seen prior to immunisation and was inversely associated with estimates of age-specific immunisation coverage (65% for 16-18 year olds). The prevalence of HPV 16/18 infection in the post-immunisation survey was 6.5% amongst 16-18 year olds, compared to 19.1% in the similar survey conducted prior to the introduction of HPV immunisation. These findings are the first indication that the national HPV immunisation programme is successfully preventing HPV 16/18 infection in sexually active young women in England. The reductions seen suggest, for the estimated coverage, high vaccine effectiveness and some herd-protection benefits. Continued surveillance is needed to determine the effects of immunisation on non-vaccine HPV types. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. HPV16 early gene E5 specifically reduces miRNA-196a in cervical cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chanzhen; Lin, Jianfei; Li, Lianqin; Zhang, Yonggang; Chen, Weiling; Cao, Zeyi; Zuo, Huancong; Chen, Chunling; Kee, Kehkooi

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, which is responsible for greater than 50% of cervical cancer cases, is the most prevalent and lethal HPV type. However, the molecular mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis remain elusive, particularly the early steps of HPV infection that may transform normal cervical epithelium into a pre-neoplastic state. Here, we report that a group of microRNAs (microRNAs) were aberrantly decreased in HPV16-positive normal cervical tissues, and these groups of...

  1. Genetically modified cellular vaccines against human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16)-associated tumors: adjuvant treatment of minimal residual disease after surgery/chemotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan; Šímová, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2009), s. 169-173 ISSN 1107-0625 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/06/0774; GA ČR GA301/07/1410 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : residual tumour disease * HPV16 * cellular vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.600, year: 2009

  2. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: HPV genotypes and risk of high-grade laryngeal neoplasia.

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    Turid Omland

    Full Text Available Patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP in Norway treated between 1987 and 2009 were recruited to this cohort study. They were followed from disease onset and data recorded until January 2012. Here, we describe the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes, the prevalence of multiple HPV infections, and the risk of high-grade laryngeal neoplasia and respiratory tract invasive carcinoma in a large cohort of patients with RRP. We also examined whether HPV genotype, gender, age or clinical course are risk factors for this development. Clinical records and histological specimens were reviewed. Using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies, HPV genotyping were performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays identifying 15 HPV types. HPV-negative specimens were analyzed by metagenomic sequencing. Paraffin blocks were available in 224/238 patients. The DNA quality was approved in 221/224 cases. HPV DNA was detected in 207/221 patients and all were HPV 6 or HPV 11 positive, comprising HPV 6 in 133/207, HPV 11 in 40/207 cases and HPV 6/11 in 15/207 cases. Co-infection with one or two high-risk HPV types together with HPV 6 or HPV 11 was present in 19/207 patients. Metagenomic sequencing of 14 HPV-negative specimens revealed HPV 8 in one case. In total, 39/221 patients developed high-grade laryngeal neoplasia. 8/221 patients developed carcinoma of the respiratory tract (six patients with laryngeal carcinoma and two patients with lung carcinoma. High-grade laryngeal neoplasias were found more frequently in HPV-negative versus HPV-positive patients, (RR = 2.35, 95% CI 1.1, 4.99, as well as respiratory tract carcinomas (RR = 48, 95% CI 10.72, 214.91. In summary, the majority of RRP were associated with HPV 6 and/or 11. HPV-negative RRP biopsies occurred more frequently in adult-onset patients, and were associated with an increased risk of laryngeal neoplasia and carcinoma in the respiratory tract.

  3. National survey by specialty of U.S. physicians' HPV screening practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCree, Donna Hubbard; Leichliter, Jami S; Hogben, Matthew; St Lawrence, Janet S

    2003-02-01

    High-risk types of HPV are the primary cause of cervical cancer. This article reports HPV screening and diagnosis from a survey evaluating community-based physicians' screening, testing, and clinical practices for sexually transmitted diseases. Surveys mailed to physicians (n = 7,300) obtained information on patients they screen for HPV and cases of HPV diagnosed. Seventy percent (70%) of the physicians returned completed surveys. HPV screening was most frequently conducted in female patients by obstetrician/gynecologists and family practice physicians.

  4. Human Papilloma Virus and HPV vaccine knowledge among Mustafa Kemal University Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziye Keskin Kurt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV is regarded as the main cause in the etiology of cervical cancer. The purpose of our study is to assess the knowledge of medical students about HPV vaccine and to evaluate their opinion on this subject.   Material and Method: The study population consisted of 488 medical students. The survey was composed of questions intended   to obtain information about transmission route of HPV, types of HPV, role of HPV in cervical cancer, whether HPV is treatable or not, which types of HPV the HPV vaccine prevents, the age groups HPV vaccine is administered, the opinions on HPV vaccine and sufficiency of public health, whether female students have underwent vaccination and if not what their drawbacks are.   Results: Mean age of the students participating in the study was 21±4 and 58 % of the patients were female. Out of 448 medical students, 60% of them did not know that HPV was a sexually transmitted disease. Only 55% students knew about the association of HPV with cervical cancer and 52% participants stated that HPV vaccine could not be preventive against cervical cancer. None of female students had been immunized and 67% of female students did not consider getting immunized. Among those who did not consider getting immunized, 70% said they had worries about the safety of the vaccine. Conclusion: Our study results revealed that the knowledge of medical students about HPV is satisfactory, however their knowledge about HPV vaccine, immunization status and desire to be immunized were little.

  5. HPV.edu study protocol: a cluster randomised controlled evaluation of education, decisional support and logistical strategies in school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, S Rachel; Davies, Cristyn; Cooper, Spring; Stoney, Tanya; Marshall, Helen; Jones, Jane; Collins, Joanne; Hutton, Heidi; Parrella, Adriana; Zimet, Gregory; Regan, David G; Whyte, Patti; Brotherton, Julia M L; Richmond, Peter; McCaffrey, Kirsten; Garland, Suzanne M; Leask, Julie; Kang, Melissa; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Kaldor, John; McGeechan, Kevin

    2015-09-15

    The National Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Program in Australia commenced in 2007 for females and in 2013 for males, using the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV 6,11,16,18). Thus far, we have demonstrated very substantial reductions in genital warts and in the prevalence of HPV among young Australian women, providing early evidence for the success of this public health initiative. Australia has a long history of school-based vaccination programs for adolescents, with comparatively high coverage. However, it is not clear what factors promote success in a school vaccination program. The HPV.edu study aims to examine: 1) student knowledge about HPV vaccination; 2) psycho-social outcomes and 3) vaccination uptake. HPV.edu is a cluster randomised trial of a complex intervention in schools aiming to recruit 40 schools with year-8 enrolments above 100 students (approximately 4400 students). The schools will be stratified by Government, Catholic, and Independent sectors and geographical location, with up to 20 schools recruited in each of two states, Western Australia (WA) and South Australia (SA), and randomly allocated to intervention or control (usual practice). Intervention schools will receive the complex intervention which includes an adolescent intervention (education and distraction); a decisional support tool for parents and adolescents and logistical strategies (consent form returns strategies, in-school mop-up vaccination and vaccination-day guidelines). Careful process evaluation including an embedded qualitative evaluation will be undertaken to explore in depth possible mechanisms for any observed effect of the intervention on primary and secondary outcomes. This study is the first to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various strategies to promote best practice in school-based vaccination against HPV. The study aims to improve vaccination-related psychosocial outcomes, including adolescent knowledge and attitudes, decision-making involvement, self

  6. Alcohol consumption and prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among US men in the HPV in Men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabath, Matthew B; Thompson, Zachary J; Egan, Kathleen M; Torres, B Nelson; Nguyen, Anthony; Papenfuss, Mary R; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-02-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption can impair host defence against viral infections. The objective of this cross-sectional analysis was to assess the association between alcohol intake and prevalent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among US men enrolled in the HPV in Men (HIM) study using quantitative alcohol intake measured from a Food Frequency Questionnaire. The HIM study is a prospective, multinational study of the natural history of HPV infection. For this report, we restricted our analyses to men from the US cohort (N = 1313). Samples from the corona of glans penis, penile shaft and scrotum were combined for HPV DNA testing. Self-reported alcohol intake was quantified by grams of alcohol intake per day. Multivariable prevalence ratios (mPRs) were used to assess the association between alcohol intake and HPV infections. Prevalent infections were significantly higher among men in the highest quartile of alcohol intake and multivariable models revealed that the highest quartile of alcohol intake was associated with significantly increased risks for any (mPR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27) HPV types and oncogenic (mPR = 1.35; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.68) HPV types. The fourth quartile of alcohol intake was associated with elevated risks for prevalent HPV infection across all strata of number of sexual partners and among never-smokers and current smokers, but not among former smokers. These results demonstrate that high intake of alcohol is associated with an increased risk for prevalent HPV infections among men. The biological role that alcohol plays in genital HPV infection remains understudied and limited epidemiological data exist, especially among men. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Evaluation of a quadrivalent inactivated vaccine for the protection of cattle against diseases due to common viral infections : research report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Patel

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of an inactivated quadrivalent vaccine containing infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR virus, parainfluenza type 3 (PI3 virus, bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV was assessed in naive bovine calves to evaluate short-term (4-18 weeks and long-term (24-38 weeks protection following the basic intramuscular vaccination regime of 2 inoculations a month apart. Vaccination was staggered between the long-term and the short-term groups by about 5 months so that both groups, along with a matched group of 6 unvaccinated (control calves, could be challenged at the same time. Sequential challenges at intervals of 3-8 weeks were done in the order: IBR virus (intranasally, IN, PI3 virus (IN and intratracheally, IT, pestiviruses (IN and BRSV (IN and IT. The IBR virus challenge produced febrile rhinotracheitis (FRT in control calves but both the severity and the duration of FRT was significantly reduced in both vaccinated groups. The amount and the duration of IBR virus shed by the vaccinated groups was significantly reduced compared to the control group. Although PI3 virus, pooled pestivirus and BRSV challenges did not result in a noteworthy disease, challenge virus shedding (amount and duration from the upper (all 3 viruses and the lower (BRSV respiratory tracts was significantly reduced in vaccinated groups. After pestivirus challenge, sera and leukocytes from all control calves were infectious for 6-9 days whereas virus was recovered only from leukocytes in vaccinated calves and only for 1.6-2.7 days. Thus a standard course of the quadrivalent vaccine afforded a significant protection against IBR virus, PI3 virus, BVDV and BRSV for at least 6 months.

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis and Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in Women with Several Cervical Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülçin Alp Avcı

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determinate the prevalence of HPV types in patients with cervical cancers in our legion by Real time PCR and DNA sequence analysis and to make phylogenetic analysis was aimed in this study. Material and methods: From January to October 2010, cervical swap samples of 77 patients directed to colposcopy were included in the study. HPV DNA and HPV type 16 were detected by Real Time polymerase chain reaction using the L1 region. Real Time PCR amplifications of MY09/11 products were done by GP5+/GP6+ primers and Cyanine-5 labeled HPV DNA and HPV type 16 specific probe. HPV types determinate by GP5+/GP6+. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences was calculated by Kimura’s two parameters method. Statistically analyses were by using Pearson chi-square and odss ratio tests. Results: Forty seven samples (prevalence; 61% of total seventy seven cervical samples detected as HPV DNA positive. While HPV type 16; 52%, HPV type 16+11; 4%, HPV type 16+6; 1% and non-typing HPV DNA 4% of seventy seven samples determining, 39% of samples observed as negative HPV. Participated in the study population, HPV DNA positive individuals are among 34-56 years. Most HPV DNA positivity rate of 80.0% was between the ages of 31-40. 52.2% of HPV DNA positivity between the ages of 41-50 to fall, but again, 83.3% between the ages of 51-60 to a second peak was determined that increased. 60.0% of 20 ASC-H cases, 63.8% of 36 ASC-US cases, 100% 9 of HSIL cases and 25.0% of 12 LSIL cases were positive for HPV DNA. Conclusion: The investigation of the distribution of HPV genotypes in women with cervical cancer and precancerous lesions in our region is important. Early diagnosis of HPV by using improved technological assays, play a key role to prevent the turn precancerous lesions into invasive cancers.

  9. Natural history of progression of HPV infection to cervical lesion or clearance: analysis of the control arm of the large, randomised PATRICIA study.

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    Unnop Jaisamrarn

    Full Text Available The control arm of PATRICIA (PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults, NCT00122681 was used to investigate the risk of progression from cervical HPV infection to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN or clearance of infection, and associated determinants.Women aged 15-25 years were enrolled. A 6-month persistent HPV infection (6MPI was defined as detection of the same HPV type at two consecutive evaluations over 6 months and clearance as ≥2 type-specific HPV negative samples taken at two consecutive intervals of approximately 6 months following a positive sample. The primary endpoint was CIN grade 2 or greater (CIN2+ associated with the same HPV type as a 6MPI. Secondary endpoints were CIN1+/CIN3+ associated with the same HPV type as a 6MPI; CIN1+/CIN2+/CIN3+ associated with an infection of any duration; and clearance of infection. The analyses included 4825 women with 16,785 infections (3363 women with 6902 6MPIs. Risk of developing a CIN1+/CIN2+/CIN3+ associated with same HPV type as a 6MPI varied with HPV type and was significantly higher for oncogenic versus non-oncogenic types. Hazard ratios for development of CIN2+ were 10.44 (95% CI: 6.96-15.65, 9.65 (5.97-15.60, 5.68 (3.50-9.21, 5.38 (2.87-10.06 and 3.87 (2.38-6.30 for HPV-16, HPV-33, HPV-31, HPV-45 and HPV-18, respectively. HPV-16 or HPV-33 6MPIs had ~25-fold higher risk for progression to CIN3+. Previous or concomitant HPV infection or CIN1+ associated with a different HPV type increased risk. Of the different oncogenic HPV types, HPV-16 and HPV-31 infections were least likely to clear.Cervical infections with oncogenic HPV types increased the risk of CIN2+ and CIN3+. Previous or concomitant infection or CIN1+ also increased the risk. HPV-16 and HPV-33 have by far the highest risk of progression to CIN3+, and HPV-16 and HPV-31 have the lowest chance of clearance.

  10. Natural history of progression of HPV infection to cervical lesion or clearance: analysis of the control arm of the large, randomised PATRICIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisamrarn, Unnop; Castellsagué, Xavier; Garland, Suzanne M; Naud, Paulo; Palmroth, Johanna; Del Rosario-Raymundo, Maria Rowena; Wheeler, Cosette M; Salmerón, Jorge; Chow, Song-Nan; Apter, Dan; Teixeira, Julio C; Skinner, S Rachel; Hedrick, James; Szarewski, Anne; Romanowski, Barbara; Aoki, Fred Y; Schwarz, Tino F; Poppe, Willy A J; Bosch, F Xavier; de Carvalho, Newton S; Germar, Maria Julieta; Peters, Klaus; Paavonen, Jorma; Bozonnat, Marie-Cecile; Descamps, Dominique; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary O; Rosillon, Dominique; Baril, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The control arm of PATRICIA (PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults, NCT00122681) was used to investigate the risk of progression from cervical HPV infection to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or clearance of infection, and associated determinants. Women aged 15-25 years were enrolled. A 6-month persistent HPV infection (6MPI) was defined as detection of the same HPV type at two consecutive evaluations over 6 months and clearance as ≥2 type-specific HPV negative samples taken at two consecutive intervals of approximately 6 months following a positive sample. The primary endpoint was CIN grade 2 or greater (CIN2+) associated with the same HPV type as a 6MPI. Secondary endpoints were CIN1+/CIN3+ associated with the same HPV type as a 6MPI; CIN1+/CIN2+/CIN3+ associated with an infection of any duration; and clearance of infection. The analyses included 4825 women with 16,785 infections (3363 women with 6902 6MPIs). Risk of developing a CIN1+/CIN2+/CIN3+ associated with same HPV type as a 6MPI varied with HPV type and was significantly higher for oncogenic versus non-oncogenic types. Hazard ratios for development of CIN2+ were 10.44 (95% CI: 6.96-15.65), 9.65 (5.97-15.60), 5.68 (3.50-9.21), 5.38 (2.87-10.06) and 3.87 (2.38-6.30) for HPV-16, HPV-33, HPV-31, HPV-45 and HPV-18, respectively. HPV-16 or HPV-33 6MPIs had ~25-fold higher risk for progression to CIN3+. Previous or concomitant HPV infection or CIN1+ associated with a different HPV type increased risk. Of the different oncogenic HPV types, HPV-16 and HPV-31 infections were least likely to clear. Cervical infections with oncogenic HPV types increased the risk of CIN2+ and CIN3+. Previous or concomitant infection or CIN1+ also increased the risk. HPV-16 and HPV-33 have by far the highest risk of progression to CIN3+, and HPV-16 and HPV-31 have the lowest chance of clearance.

  11. Oropharynx HPV status and its relation to HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora Maciel de Souza Vianna

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The number of oropharyngeal lesions caused by HPV (Human papillomavirus has been increasing worldwide in the past years. In spite of the clinical relevance of HPV infection in the anogenital tract of HIV-positive patients, the relevance of oropharynx HPV infection in these patients is not clear. The aim of the present study was to detect HPV infection, and clinical and cytological changes in the oropharynx of HIV-positive patients. Methods Samples collected from the oropharynx of 100 HIV-positive patients were subjected to hybrid capture (HC, conventional and liquid-based cytology. Clinical data were also collected to investigate the relation with HPV status. Results High and low-risk types of HPV were present in 8% and 16.7% of the total sample. The mean ± sd (maximum-minimum of the relative ratio light unit (RLU/cutoff (CO was 2.94 ± 2.58 (1.09–7.87 and 1.61 ± 0.65 (1.07–2.8 for high- and low-risk-HPV, respectively. By cytology, dysplasia was not detected, but atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US were diagnosed in two samples. No clinical change, suggestive of dysplasia/cancer, was detected. Conclusion Our study was able to detect and characterize HPV infection by hybrid capture, which may represent a good tool for screening and follow-up of HPV in the studied population. The frequency and viral load of HPV were low. Neither clinical nor cytological changes suggestive of dysplasia/neoplasia were observed in oropharynx of HIV-positive patients.

  12. Frequency of HPV in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Priscila Marinho; Có, Anna Clara Gregório; Azevedo, Pedro Leite; do Valle, Isabella Bittencourt; de Oliveira, Karine Gadioli; Gouvea, Sônia Alves; Cordeiro-Silva, Melissa Freitas; Louro, Iúri Drummond; de Podestá, José Roberto Vasconcelos; Lenzi, Jeferson; Sena, Agenor; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco; von Zeidler, Sandra Lúcia Ventorin

    2018-03-27

    The prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) varies widely. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of high-risk HPV DNA in a large Brazilian cohort of patients with oral cavity SCC. Biopsy and resected frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of oral cavity SCC were available from 101 patients who were recruited at two Brazilian centres. Stringent measures with respect to case selection and prevention of sample contamination were adopted to ensure reliability of the data. Nested PCR using MY09/MY11 and GP5 + /GP6 + as well as PGMY09/11 L1 consensus primers were performed to investigate the presence of HPV DNA in the tumours. HPV-positive cases were subjected to direct sequencing. Shapiro-Wilk and Student t test were used to evaluate data normality and to compare the means, respectively. Qualitative variables were analysed by logistic regression. Our results demonstrate that the frequency of high-risk HPV types in oral cavity SCC is very low and is less than 4%. All HPV-positive cases were HPV16. In addition, our results do not show a significant association between the tumour clinical features and the risk factors (tobacco, alcohol and HPV) for oral cavity SCC. In the current study, we observed an overlapping pattern of risk factors that are related to tumour development. This, along with a low frequency of high-risk HPV DNA, supports the findings that HPV is not involved in the genesis of oral cavity SCC in Brazilian population.

  13. Molecular epidemiology and genotype distribution of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) among Arab women in the State of Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Devendra; Elmi, Asha A; Skariah, Sini; Haddad, Pascale; Abu-Raddad, Laith J; Al Hamadi, Aysha H; Mohamed-Nady, Nady; Affifi, Nahla M; Ghedira, Randa; Hassen, Elham; Al-Thani, Asma A J; Al-Ansari, Afaf A H M; Sultan, Ali A

    2014-11-26

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection is the major cause of cervical cancer worldwide. With limited data available on HPV prevalence in the Arab countries, this study aimed to identify the prevalence and genotypic distribution of HPV in the State of Qatar. 3008 cervical samples, exclusively of women with Arabic origin residing in Qatar were collected from the Women's Hospital and Primary Health Care Corporation in Doha, State of Qatar. HPV DNA detection was done using GP5+/6+ primers based real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay followed by the usage of HPV type specific primers based RT- PCR reactions and Sanger sequencing for genotype identification. Similar prevalence rates of HPV infection was identified in both Qatari and non-Qatari women at 6.2% and 5.9% respectively. HPV prevalence rate of 5.8% and 18.4% was identified in women with normal cytology and in women with abnormal cytology respectively. HPV 81, 11 and 16, in decreasing order were the most commonly identified genotypes. HPV 81 was the most frequent low-risk genotype among women with both normal (74.0%) and abnormal (33.3%) cytology. HPV 16 (4.6%) was identified as the predominant high-risk HPV genotype among women with normal cytology and HPV 16, HPV 18, and HPV 56 (22.2% each) were the most common identified high-risk genotypes in women with abnormal cytology. The overall HPV prevalence in Arab women in Qatar was identified as 6.1% with an increased HPV prevalence seen in women with abnormal cytology results and no significant trends seen with age. In contrast to Western countries, we report a varied genotypic profile of HPV with a high prevalence of low-risk HPV genotype 81 among the Arab women residing in Qatar.

  14. Estimation of HPV prevalence in young women in Scotland; monitoring of future vaccine impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Kimberley; Sinka, Katy; Cuschieri, Kate; Love, John; Potts, Alison; Pollock, Kevin G J; Cubie, Heather; Donaghy, Martin; Robertson, Chris

    2013-11-05

    Estimation of pre-immunisation prevalence of HPV and distribution of HPV types is fundamental to understanding the subsequent impact of HPV vaccination. We describe the type specific prevalence of HPV in females aged 20-21 in Scotland who attended or defaulted from cervical screening using three specimen types; from attenders liquid based cytology and from defaulters urine or self-taken swabs. Residual liquid based cytology samples (n = 2148), collected from women aged 20-21 attending for their first smear were genotyped for HPV. A sample (n = 709) from women who had defaulted from screening was also made available for HPV testing through the use of postal testing kits (either urine samples (n = 378) or self-taken swabs (n = 331)). Estimates of prevalence weighted by deprivation, and for the postal testing kit, also by reminder status and specimen type were calculated for each HPV type. The distribution of HPV types were compared between specimen types and the occurrence of multiple high-risk infections examined. The influence of demographic factors on high-risk HPV positivity and multiple infections was examined via logistic regression. The prevalence of any HPV in young women aged 20-21 was 32.2% for urine, 39.5% for self-taken swab, and 49.4% for LBC specimens. Infection with vaccine specific types (HPV 16, 18) or those associated with cross-protection (HPV 31, 33, 45, 51) was common. Individuals were more likely to test positive for high-risk HPV if they resided in an area of high deprivation or in a rural area. The overall distribution of HPV types did not vary between defaulters and attenders. Multiple infections occurred in 48.1% of high-risk HPV positive individuals. Excluding vaccine types the most common pairing was HPV 56 and 66. Understanding of the pre-immunisation prevalence of HPV in young women puts Scotland in a prime position to assess the early effect of vaccination as the first highly vaccinated cohorts of individuals enter the screening

  15. AKT1 loss correlates with episomal HPV16 in vulval intraepithelial neoplasia.

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    Arucha L Ekeowa-Anderson

    Full Text Available Anogenital malignancy has a significant association with high-risk mucosal alpha-human papillomaviruses (alpha-PV, particularly HPV 16 and 18 whereas extragenital SCC has been linked to the presence of cutaneous beta and gamma-HPV types. Vulval skin may be colonised by both mucosal and cutaneous (beta-, mu-, nu- and gamma- PV types, but there are few systematic studies investigating their presence and their relative contributions to vulval malignancy. Dysregulation of AKT, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a significant role in several cancers. Mucosal HPV types can increase AKT phosphorylation and activity whereas cutaneous HPV types down-regulate AKT1 expression, probably to weaken the cornified envelope to promote viral release. We assessed the presence of mucosal and cutaneous HPV in vulval malignancy and its relationship to AKT1 expression in order to establish the corresponding HPV and AKT1 profile of normal vulval skin, vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN and vulval squamous cell carcinoma (vSCC. We show that HPV16 is the principle HPV type present in VIN, there were few detectable beta types present and AKT1 loss was not associated with the presence of these cutaneous HPV. We show that HPV16 early gene expression reduced AKT1 expression in transgenic mouse epidermis. AKT1 loss in our VIN cohort correlated with presence of high copy number, episomal HPV16. Maintained AKT1 expression correlated with low copy number, an increased frequency of integration and increased HPV16E7 expression, a finding we replicated in another untyped cohort of vSCC. Since expression of E7 reflects tumour progression, these findings suggest that AKT1 loss associated with episomal HPV16 may have positive prognostic implications in vulval malignancy.

  16. Prognosis and related factors of HPV infections in postmenopausal Uyghur women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Shuang; Zhu, Mingyue; Jiao, Zhen; Han, Lili; Wang, Lin; Niyazi, Mayineur; Zhu, Kaichun

    2018-03-25

    With the aim to explore the characteristics of persistent HPV infections in postmenopausal Uyghur women and analyse the possible related risk factors, from September 2012 to September 2013; postmenopausal Uyghur women with HPV positive and pathologically diagnosed as non-cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions and non-cervical cancer were recruited. Their clinical course was closely followed up for 24-36 months, and the risk factors were analysed by a logistic regression model. One hundred and sixteen positive women were followed for 36 months. The total persistent HPV infection rate was 67.9%, and the type-specific persistent infection rate was 73.7% at 36 months. Nine (32.1%) women were naturally cleared of their HPV infection at 36 months. We found that an HPV16 infection and an HPV58 infection, and time since menopause over 2 years were closely related with a persistent HPV infection. More attention should be paid to the women above 2 years of menopause who were infected with HPV16 and HPV58 in their further cervical carcinoma screening. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? Previous study revealed that menopause was a risk factor for a persistent HPV infection in Uyghur women. What do the results of this study add? The present study presented the characteristics of HPV persistent infection and the risk factors in Uyghur postmenopausal women. More attention should be paid to the women above 2 of years of menopause who are infected with HPV16 and HPV58. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research? This study would offer a theoretical basis for a better screening design, especially the women above 2 years' menopause who have been infected with HPV16 and HPV58 in the Xinjiang region.

  17. Liquid biopsy in the diagnosis of HPV DNA in breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolis, Sabrina De; Pellegrini, Alice; Santini, Donatella; Ceccarelli, Claudio; De Leo, Antonio; Alessandrini, Federica; Arienti, Chiara; Pignatta, Sara; Tesei, Anna; Mantovani, Vilma; Zamagni, Claudio; Taffurelli, Mario; Sansone, Pasquale; Bonafé, Massimiliano; Cricca, Monica

    2018-02-01

    HPV DNA has never been investigated in nipple discharges (ND) and serum-derived extracellular vesicles, although its presence has been reported in ductal lavage fluids and blood specimens. We analyzed 50 ND, 22 serum-derived extracellular vesicles as well as 51 pathologic breast tissues for the presence of 16 HPV DNA types. We show that the presence of HPV DNA in the ND is predictive of HPV DNA-positive breast lesions and that HPV DNA is more represented in intraductal papillomas. We also show the presence of HPV DNA in the serum-derived extracellular vesicles. Our data supports the use of liquid biopsy to detect HPV DNA in breast pathology.

  18. 4-Valent Human Papillomavirus (4vHPV) Vaccine in Preadolescents and Adolescents After 10 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferris, Daron G; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Block, Stanley L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We describe the final 10-year data for the long-term follow-up study of the 4-valent human papillomavirus (4vHPV) vaccine in preadolescents and adolescents. METHODS: In the base study (V501-018), 1661 sexually inactive boys and girls received the 4vHPV vaccine (early vaccination group...... assessed. Effectiveness was estimated by calculating the incidence rate of the primary endpoints (HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18-related disease or persistent infection). RESULTS: For HPV types 6, 11, and 16, 89% to 96% of subjects remained seropositive through 10-years postvaccination. The preadolescents had...... 38% to 65% higher geometric mean titers at month 7, which remained 16% to 42% higher at 10 years compared with adolescents. No cases of HPV type 6, 11, 16, and 18-related diseases were observed. Ten subjects had a persistent infection of ≥6 months duration with vaccine-type HPV and 2 subjects had...

  19. Immunogenicity of HPV prophylactic vaccines: Serology assays and their use in HPV vaccine evaluation and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ligia A; Dillner, Joakim; Beddows, Simon; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2018-01-17

    When administered as standard three-dose schedules, the licensed HPV prophylactic vaccines have demonstrated extraordinary immunogenicity and efficacy. We summarize the immunogenicity of these licensed vaccines and the most commonly used serology assays, with a focus on key considerations for one-dose vaccine schedules. Although immune correlates of protection against infection are not entirely clear, both preclinical and clinical evidence point to neutralizing antibodies as the principal mechanism of protection. Thus, immunogenicity assessments in vaccine trials have focused on measurements of antibody responses to the vaccine. Non-inferiority of antibody responses after two doses of HPV vaccines separated by 6 months has been demonstrated and this evidence supported the recent WHO recommendations for two-dose vaccination schedules in both boys and girls 9-14 years of age. There is also some evidence suggesting that one dose of HPV vaccines may provide protection similar to the currently recommended two-dose regimens but robust data on efficacy and immunogenicity of one-dose vaccine schedules are lacking. In addition, immunogenicity has been assessed and reported using different methods, precluding direct comparison of results between different studies and vaccines. New head-to-head vaccine trials evaluating one-dose immunogenicity and efficacy have been initiated and an increase in the number of trials relying on immunobridging is anticipated. Therefore, standardized measurement and reporting of immunogenicity for the up to nine HPV types targeted by the current vaccines is now critical. Building on previous HPV serology assay standardization and harmonization efforts initiated by the WHO HPV LabNet in 2006, new secondary standards, critical reference reagents and testing guidelines will be generated as part of a new partnership to facilitate harmonization of the immunogenicity testing in new HPV vaccine trials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. HPV Infections in Adolescents

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    Anna-Barbara Moscicki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents who are sexually active have the highest rates of prevalent and incident HPV infection rates with over 50–80% having infections within 2–3 years of initiating intercourse. These high rates reflect sexual behavior and biologic vulnerability. Most infections are transient in nature and cause no cytologic abnormality. However, a small number of adolescents will not clear the infection. Persistence of HPV is strongly linked to the development of high-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions (HSIL and invasive cancer. The HSIL detected, however, does not appear to progress rapidly to invasive cancer. Understanding the natural history of HPV in adolescents has shed light into optional treatment strategies which include watchful observation of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS and low grade (LSIL. The association between age of first intercourse and invasive cancer cannot be ignored. Consequently, initiating screening at appropriate times in this vulnerable group is essential. In addition, with the advent of the HPV vaccine, vaccination prior to the onset of sexual activity is critical since most infections occur within a short time frame post initiation.

  1. HPV Testing Among Providers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Walter Kinney, a gynecologic oncologist with The Permanente Medical Group in Sacramento, California, talks about Pap and human papillomavirus (HPV) cotesting in women aged 30 and over.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  2. HPV Vaccine PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this 30 second public service announcement, a mother talks about the importance of protecting 11-12 year-old boys and girls with HPV vaccination. (Una madre habla sobre la importancia de proteger a los niños y las niñas de 11 a 12 años con la vacuna contra el VPH.)

  3. Sequential Acquisition of Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection Following Genital Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Women: The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamnani, Shitaldas J; Nyitray, Alan G; Abrahamsen, Martha; Rollison, Dana E; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Huang, Yangxin; Borenstein, Amy; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of sequential acquisition of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection following a type-specific genital HPV infection for the 9-valent vaccine HPV types and investigate factors associated with sequential infection among men who have sex with women (MSW). Genital and anal specimens were available for 1348 MSW participants, and HPV genotypes were detected using the Roche Linear Array assay. Sequential risk of anal HPV infection was assessed using hazard ratios (HRs) among men with prior genital infection, compared with men with no prior genital infection, in individual HPV type and grouped HPV analyses. In individual analyses, men with prior HPV 16 genital infections had a significantly higher risk of subsequent anal HPV 16 infections (HR, 4.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-15.23). In grouped analyses, a significantly higher risk of sequential type-specific anal HPV infections was observed for any of the 9 types (adjusted HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.32-5.99), high-risk types (adjusted HR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.26, 5.55), and low-risk types (adjusted HR, 5.89; 95% CI, 1.29, 27.01). MSW with prior genital HPV infections had a higher risk of a subsequent type-specific anal infection. The higher risk was not explained by sexual intercourse with female partners. Autoinoculation is a possible mechanism for the observed association. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Long-term modeling on HPV vaccination: do we really need any more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garattini, Livio; Curto, Alessandro; van de Vooren, Katelijne

    2015-04-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is closely related to cervical cancer. In 2007, the EMA approved two vaccines, a bivalent and a quadrivalent one, launched at three-dose schedules and very high prices worldwide. We describe what happened in the EU and what might change in the near future from an economic perspective. HPV vaccination is now established in most EU countries. The main target group of the programs is girls aged 10-14 years. Many western countries used competitive tendering to purchase the two vaccines, achieving considerable savings. The extension to males has been a hotly debated issue. The sex limitation implies that this vaccination cannot by definition achieve a 'herd immunity' effect. EMA recently approved a two-dose schedule for both vaccines that should lead to savings, although it is hard to predict how the forthcoming nonavalent vaccine will affect the market situation. Several economic evaluations based on long-term models have been published on the HPV vaccination in the recent years, using official list prices as a baseline. Most of these models can be considered mere exercises in long-term forecasting. Recently, further long-term models have been published with two- and three-dose schedules as alternatives, and the nonavalent vaccine. We wonder what added value they give for public policy purposes.

  5. Cervical, anal and oral HPV in an adolescent inner-city health clinic providing free vaccinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas F Schlecht

    Full Text Available Published human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine trials indicate efficacy is strongest for those naive to the vaccine-types. However, few high-risk young women have been followed and cervical HPV has been the predominant outcome measure.We collected cervical and anal swabs, as well as oral rinse specimens from 645 sexually active inner-city young females attending a large adolescent health-clinic in New York City that offers free care and HPV vaccination. Specimens were tested for HPV-DNA using a MY09/MY11-PCR system. Type-specific prevalence of HPV at each anatomic site was compared for individuals by vaccination dose using generalized estimating equation logistic regression models.The majority of subjects reported being of non-Caucasian (92% and/or Hispanic ethnicity (61%. Median age was 18 years (range:14-20. All had practiced vaginal sex, a third (33% practiced anal sex, and most (77% had also engaged in oral sex. At enrollment, 21% had not received the vaccine and 51% had received three doses. Prevalent HPV infection at enrollment was detected in 54% of cervical, 42% of anal and 20% of oral specimens, with vaccine types present in 7%, 6% and 1% of specimens, respectively. Comparing prevalence for vaccine types, the detection of HPV in the cervix of vaccinated compared to unvaccinated adolescents was significantly reduced: HPV6/11 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.19, 95%CI:0.06-0.75, HPV16 (OR = 0.31, 95%CI:0.11-0.88 and HPV18 (OR = 0.14, 95%CI:0.03-0.75. For anal HPV, the risk of detecting vaccine types HPV6/11 (OR = 0.27, 95%CI:0.10-0.72 and HPV18(OR = 0.12, 95%CI:0.01-1.16 were significantly reduced for vaccinated adolescents however, the risk for HPV16 was not significantly decreased (OR = 0.63, 95%CI:0.18-2.20.HPV Prevalence is extremely high in inner-city female adolescents. Administration of the HPV vaccine reduced the risk for cervical HPV; however continued follow-up is required to assess the protection for HPV at all sites

  6. HPV Prevalence in Colombian Women with Cervical Cancer: Implications for Vaccination in a Developing Country

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    Raúl Murillo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccines have been considered potentially cost-effective for the reduction of cervical cancer burden in developing countries; their effectiveness in a public health setting continues to be researched. We conducted an HPV prevalence survey among Colombian women with invasive cancer. Paraffin-embedded biopsies were obtained from one high-risk and one low-middle-risk regions. GP5+/GP6+ L1 primers, RLB assays, and E7 type specific PCR were used for HPV-DNA detection. 217 cases were analyzed with 97.7% HPV detection rate. HPV-16/18 prevalence was 63.1%; HPV-18 had lower occurrence in the high-risk population (13.8% versus 9.6% allowing for the participation of less common HPV types; HPV-45 was present mainly in women under 50 and age-specific HPV type prevalence revealed significant differences. Multiple high-risk infections appeared in 16.6% of cases and represent a chance of replacement. Age-specific HPV prevalence and multiple high-risk infections might influence vaccine impact. Both factors highlight the role of HPVs other than 16/18, which should be considered in cost-effectiveness analyses for potential vaccine impact.

  7. Double demonstration of oncogenic high risk human papilloma virus DNA and HPV-E7 protein in oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannone, G; Santoro, A; Carinci, F; Bufo, P; Papagerakis, S M; Rubini, C; Campisi, G; Giovannelli, L; Contaldo, M; Serpico, R; Mazzotta, M; Lo Muzio, L

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenic HPVs are necessarily involved in cervical cancer but their role in oral carcinogenesis is debated. To detect HPV in oral cancer, 38 cases of formalin fixed-paraffin embedded OSCC were studied by both DNA genotyping (MY09/11 L1 consensus primers in combination with GP5-GP6 primer pair followed by sequencing) and immunohistochemistry (monoclonal Abs against capsid protein and HPV-E7 protein, K1H8 DAKO and clone 8C9 INVITROGEN, respectively). HPV-16 tonsil cancer was used as positive control. The overall prevalence of HPV infection in OSCCs was 10.5%. Amplification of DNA samples showed single HPV DNA infection in 3 cases (HPV16; HPV53; HPV70) and double infection in one case of cheek cancer (HPV31/HPV44). The overall HR-HPV prevalence was 7.5%. E-7 antigen was immunohistochemically detected in all HPV-positive cases. HPV+ OSCC cases showed an overall better outcome than HPV negative oral cancers, as evaluated by Kaplan-Meier curves. HPVs exert their oncogenic role after DNA integration, gene expression of E5, E6 and E7 loci and p53/pRb host proteins suppression. This study showed that HPV-E7 protein inactivating pRb is expressed in oral cancer cells infected by oncogenic HPV other than classical HR-HPV-16/18. Interestingly HPV-70, considered a low risk virus with no definite collocation in oncogenic type category, gives rise to the expression of HPV-E7 protein and inactivate pRb in oral cancer. HPV-70, as proved in current literature, is able to inactivates also p53 protein, promoting cell immortalization. HPV-53, classified as a possible high risk virus, expresses E7 protein in OSCC, contributing to oral carcinogenesis. We have identified among OSCCs, a subgroup characterized by HPV infection (10.5%). Finally, we have proved the oncogenic potential of some HPV virus types, not well known in literature.

  8. Detection of HPV and the role of p16INK4A overexpression as a surrogate marker for the presence of functional HPV oncoprotein E7 in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lardon Filip

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the well-recognized etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV in cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinogenesis, a potential role of HPV in colorectal carcinogenesis has been suggested. For that reason, the aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of HPV DNA in colorectal carcinomas (CRC and to study overexpression of p16INK4A as a marker for the presence of an active HPV oncoprotein E7. These findings were correlated with clinical and pathological prognostic factors of CRC. Methods The presence of HPV was assessed using a multiplex PCR system of 10 non-biotinylated primers. The amplified fragments of HPV positive samples were further analyzed by a highly sensitive, broad spectrum SPF10 PCR and subsequently genotyped using reverse hybridization in a line probe assay. P16INK4A protein expression was investigated in a subset of 90 (30 HPV positive and 60 HPV negative CRC samples by immunohistochemistry. Results HPV DNA was found in 14.2% of the CRC samples with HPV16 as the most prevalent type. No significant differences in clinical and pathological variables were found between HPV positive and negative CRCs, except for age. HPV positive patients were significantly younger (p = 0.05. There was no significant correlation between the presence of HPV and overexpression of p16INK4A (p = 0.325. Conclusions In conclusion, the presence of oncogenic HPV DNA in a small cohort of CRC samples may suggest that HPV may be involved in the carcinogenesis of some CRC. However, contrary to what has been observed in head and neck squamous cell cancer and cancer of the uterine cervix, p16INK4A does not seem to be a surrogate marker for an active HPV infection in CRC. Therefore, further functional analyses are necessary to elucidate the role of HPV in CRC.

  9. HPV vaccines: a controversial issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, A F; Andrade, C V; Russomano, F B; Rodrigues, L L S; Oliveira, N S; Provance, D W

    2016-01-01

    Controversy still exists over whether the benefits of the available HPV vaccines outweigh the risks and this has suppressed uptake of the HPV vaccines in comparison to other vaccines. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, healthcare officials and parents to withhold the recommended vaccination from the target population. The most common reason for not administering the prophylactic HPV vaccines are concerns over adverse effects. The aim of this review is the assessment of peer-reviewed scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines throughout the world with focused attention on the potential adverse effects. We found that the majority of studies continue to suggest a positive risk-benefit from vaccination against HPV, with minimal documented adverse effects, which is consistent with other vaccines. However, much of the published scientific data regarding the safety of HPV vaccines appears to originate from within the financially competitive HPV vaccine market. We advocate a more independent monitoring system for vaccine immunogenicity and adverse effects to address potential conflicts of interest with regular systematic literature reviews by qualified individuals to vigilantly assess and communicate adverse effects associated with HPV vaccination. Finally, our evaluation suggests that an expanded use of HPV vaccine into more diverse populations, particularly those living in low-resource settings, would provide numerous health and social benefits.

  10. HPV vaccines: a controversial issue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Nicol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Controversy still exists over whether the benefits of the available HPV vaccines outweigh the risks and this has suppressed uptake of the HPV vaccines in comparison to other vaccines. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, healthcare officials and parents to withhold the recommended vaccination from the target population. The most common reason for not administering the prophylactic HPV vaccines are concerns over adverse effects. The aim of this review is the assessment of peer-reviewed scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines throughout the world with focused attention on the potential adverse effects. We found that the majority of studies continue to suggest a positive risk-benefit from vaccination against HPV, with minimal documented adverse effects, which is consistent with other vaccines. However, much of the published scientific data regarding the safety of HPV vaccines appears to originate from within the financially competitive HPV vaccine market. We advocate a more independent monitoring system for vaccine immunogenicity and adverse effects to address potential conflicts of interest with regular systematic literature reviews by qualified individuals to vigilantly assess and communicate adverse effects associated with HPV vaccination. Finally, our evaluation suggests that an expanded use of HPV vaccine into more diverse populations, particularly those living in low-resource settings, would provide numerous health and social benefits.

  11. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Commonly Administered Vaccines After Coadministration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Tregnaghi, Miguel; Keshavan, Pavitra; Ypma, Ellen; Han, Linda; Smolenov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Given the broad age range across which the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine MenACWY-CRM is used, coadministration with routine vaccines should be evaluated across age groups for possible immunologic interference and impact on vaccine reactogenicity and safety. We summarize data from a large population of infants, adolescents and international travelers from 10 phase 3 or 4 clinical studies to evaluate coadministration of MenACWY-CRM with commonly administered vaccines. Noninferiority analyses of immune responses were performed across studies and age groups for each vaccine. Reactogenicity and safety were also assessed. In infants, MenACWY-CRM coadministered with routine vaccines did not reduce immune responses to diphtheria, tetanus, poliovirus, hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcal conjugate, measles-mumps-rubella, varicella or pertussis antigens. Noninferiority criteria were not met for some pneumococcal conjugate serotypes at 7 months of age, but no consistent trends were observed. In adolescents, coadministration did not reduce immune responses to tetanus, diphtheria and human papilloma virus vaccine antigens. Noninferiority criteria for pertussis antigens were not uniformly met in infant and adolescent studies, although the clinical relevance is unclear. In adults, coadministration did not reduce immune responses to hepatitis A/B, typhoid fever, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and rabies antigens. Immune responses to MenACWY-CRM were not impacted by coadministration of commonly administered vaccines. Coadministration did not increase frequencies of postvaccination adverse events in any age group. With no clinically relevant vaccine interactions or impact on vaccine reactogenicity or safety, these results support the coadministration of MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines in all age groups.

  12. Bogarting that joint might decrease oral HPV among cannabis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwenger, S R

    2009-12-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) has many known strains, two of the most well studied perhaps being the high-risk types 16 and 18. These strains have attracted more interest because they are known to disrupt tumour-suppressor genes that control the cell cycle, rendering those genes less effective at keeping cell division in check.Within the last decade, an increase in oral hpv-linked cancers of the throat and tongue has been attributed to exposure and contraction of hpv through oral sex, most notably in younger people. An understudied and arguably equal contributor to oral hpv infection might be indirect contact with an infected person. Presented here is a brief but important perspective on the relationship between cannabis use and oral cancer. The development of oral cancer is not a result of smoking cannabis per se; rather, it is hypothesized to be a result of contracting hpv through various forms of sharing and passing joints and other smoking apparatuses. Therefore, it is hypothesized that bogarting (and not passing) joints might decrease oral hpv among cannabis smokers. Future research should therefore investigate the prevalence of oral hpv in cannabis smokers to better understand its epidemiology.

  13. The high-risk HPV infection and urinary system tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wenyan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available HPV is classified into high-risk and low-risk types depending on its probability of leading to tumorigenesis. Many studies have shown that HPV infection, especially the infection caused by the high-risk type, is always related to prostate cancer, bladder cancer, penile cancer, testicular cancer, and other urinary system tumors. However, previous studies differed in sexual openness and racial genetic susceptibility of the study object, sample size, and experimental methods. Hence, the correlation between high-risk HPV infection and urinary system tumors remains controversial. The early open reading frame of the HPV genome is composed of E1–E7, among which E6 and E7 are the key transfer proteins. The combination of these proteins with oncogene and anti-oncogene may be one of the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis.

  14. Role of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Common and Genital Warts and its Relation to P53 Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekri, A.; Bahnassy, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Aim: Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are small DNA tumor viruses that infect epithelial tissues and cause warts. One of the viral genes responsible for HPV's oncogenic activity is E6 which is known to inactivate the cellular p53 tumor suppressor gene. We aim to detect the presence of HPV infection and its different types in human warts, and to identify the relation between HPV and p53 expression in skin and genital lesions. Patients and Methods: We studied markers of HPV infection in overall of 30 patients (20 with common warts, and 10 with genital warts). Also, 30 normal skin samples were taken from each patient as a normal control. Detection of HPV was done using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and HPV typing was performed using LiPA (Line immuno Probe Assay). In addition, all skin lesions were examined by immunohistochemistry for p53 expression. Results: In patients with common warts, HPV DNA was found in 4/20 (20%) of cases which was of HPV types 11, 31, 6, 33 (p=0.28). Also, P53 expression was found in 4/20 (20%) of cases (p=0.26). No single patient showed reactivity of both HPV and p53 expression. In patients with genital warts, however, HPV DNA was found in 6/10 (60%) of cases. Of these, 5 cases were positive for HPV type 6 and one case had HPV type 11. Three patients (30%) were positive for p53, and two of them (66%) were positive for both HPV and p53. In the normal skin control, 2/30 (6.6%) were positive for HPV DNA which were of types 5, and 31. Conclusions: We conclude that; (1) Prevalence rate of HPV infection in warts is higher than those of normal control group, and Egyptian patients with genital warts had higher prevalence rate of HPV than those with common warts, (2) In Egypt, HPV types 6, and 11 are the most prevalent genotypes associated with genital warts and HPV types 6, 11, 31, and 33 are associated with common warts, (3) There was no definite relation between p53 expression and HPV detection, (4) Also, there was no association

  15. Continuing global improvement in human papillomavirus DNA genotyping services: The 2013 and 2014 HPV LabNet international proficiency studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Carina; Forslund, Ola; Wallin, Keng-Ling; Dillner, Joakim

    2018-04-01

    Accurate and internationally comparable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection and typing services are essential for HPV vaccine research and surveillance. This study assessed the proficiency of different HPV typing services offered routinely in laboratories worldwide. The HPV Laboratory Network (LabNet) has designed international proficiency panels that can be regularly issued. The HPV genotyping proficiency panels of 2013 and 2014 contained 43 and 41 coded samples, respectively, composed of purified plasmids of sixteen HPV types (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68a and 68b) and 3 extraction controls. Proficient typing was defined as detection in both single and multiple infections of 50 International Units of HPV 16 and HPV 18 and 500 genome equivalents for the other 14 HPV types, with at least 97% specificity. Ninety-six laboratories submitted 136 datasets in 2013 and 121 laboratories submitted 148 datasets in 2014. Thirty-four different HPV genotyping assays were used, notably Linear Array, HPV Direct Flow-chip, GenoFlow HPV array, Anyplex HPV 28, Inno-LiPa, and PGMY-CHUV assays. A trend towards increased sensitivity and specificity was observed. In 2013, 59 data sets (44%) were 100% proficient compared to 86 data sets (59%) in 2014. This is a definite improvement compared to the first proficiency panel, issued in 2008, when only 19 data sets (26%) were fully proficient. The regularly issued global proficiency program has documented an ongoing worldwide improvement in comparability and reliability of HPV genotyping services. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Laboratory audit as part of the quality assessment of a primary HPV-screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortlund, Maria; Sundström, Karin; Lamin, Helena; Hjerpe, Anders; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-02-01

    As primary HPV screening programs are rolled out, methods are needed for routine quality assurance of HPV laboratory analyzes. To explore the use of similar design for audit as currently used in cytology-based screening, to estimate the clinical sensitivity to identify women at risk for CIN 3 or worse (CIN3+). Population-based cohort study conducted within the cervical screening program in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2011-2012. All women with histopathologically confirmed CIN3+ in the following two years were identified by registry analysis. Primary HPV and cytology screening results were collected. For women who had not been HPV tested, biobanked cytology samples were HPV-tested. If the original HPV result had been negative, the sample and subsequent biopsies were analyzed with broad HPV typing (general primer PCR and Luminex). 154 women had a biobanked prediagnostic cytology sample taken up to 2 years before a histopathologically confirmed CIN3+. The high-risk HPV-positivity was 97% (148/154 women), whereas 143/154 (94%) women had had a cytological abnormality. Among the six HPV-negative samples, one sample was HPV 33 positive in repeat testing whereas the other five cases were HPV-negative also on repeat testing, but HPV-positive in the subsequent tumor tissue. A sensitivity of the HPV test that is higher than the sensitivity of cytology suggests adequate quality of the testing. Regular audits of clinical sensitivity, similar to those of cytology-based screening, should be used also in HPV-based screening programs, in order to continuously monitor the performance of the analyzes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a bead-based multiplex genotyping method for diagnostic characterization of HPV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mee Young Chung

    Full Text Available The accurate genotyping of human papillomavirus (HPV is clinically important because the oncogenic potential of HPV is dependent on specific genotypes. Here, we described the development of a bead-based multiplex HPV genotyping (MPG method which is able to detect 20 types of HPV (15 high-risk HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68 and 5 low-risk HPV types 6, 11, 40, 55, 70 and evaluated its accuracy with sequencing. A total of 890 clinical samples were studied. Among these samples, 484 were HPV positive and 406 were HPV negative by consensus primer (PGMY09/11 directed PCR. The genotyping of 484 HPV positive samples was carried out by the bead-based MPG method. The accuracy was 93.5% (95% CI, 91.0-96.0, 80.1% (95% CI, 72.3-87.9 for single and multiple infections, respectively, while a complete type mismatch was observed only in one sample. The MPG method indiscriminately detected dysplasia of several cytological grades including 71.8% (95% CI, 61.5-82.3 of ASCUS (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and more specific for high grade lesions. For women with HSIL (high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and SCC diagnosis, 32 women showed a PPV (positive predictive value of 77.3% (95% CI, 64.8-89.8. Among women >40 years of age, 22 women with histological cervical cancer lesions showed a PPV of 88% (95% CI, 75.3-100. Of the highest risk HPV types including HPV-16, 18 and 31 positive women of the same age groups, 34 women with histological cervical cancer lesions showed a PPV of 77.3% (95% CI, 65.0-89.6. Taken together, the bead-based MPG method could successfully detect high-grade lesions and high-risk HPV types with a high degree of accuracy in clinical samples.

  18. Knowledge, Awareness and Attitude on HPV, HPV Vaccine and Cervical Cancer among the College Students in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Shazia; Labani, Satyanarayana; Das, Bhudev C

    2016-01-01

    Infection of specific high risk Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is known to cause cervical cancer and two prophylactic vaccines have been developed against two major high risk HPV types 16 and 18 for prevention of cervical cancer. Because of societal, religious and ethical issues associated with the vaccination of adolescent girls in India together with lack of awareness about HPV and HPV vaccines, no successful HPV immunization program has been employed in India. To determine knowledge, awareness and attitude of college students on HPV, HPV vaccine and cervical cancer. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted in a total of 1580 undergraduate students between the age group 16-26 years comprising 684 girls and 876 boys. Out of a total of 1580 students, girls had more knowledge about cervical cancer (82.45%, pawareness about cervical cancer (81.89%, pawareness compared to boys. Analysis of odds ratio (ORs) along with 95% CI showed older girls with 1.2 to 3 fold (pawareness campaigns to augment HPV immunization program for control of cervical cancer in India.

  19. Potential impact of a 9-valent HPV vaccine in HPV-related cervical disease in 4 emerging countries (Brazil, Mexico, India and China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Beatriz; Alemany, Laia; Ruiz, Patricia Alonso de; Tous, Sara; Lima, Marcus Aurelho; Bruni, Laia; Jain, Asha; Clifford, Gary M; Qiao, You Lin; Weiss, Thomas; Bosch, F Xavier; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    We estimated the potential impact of an investigational 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (HPVs 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) in HPV-related cervical disease in Brazil, Mexico, India and China, to help to formulate recommendations on cervical cancer prevention and control. Estimations for invasive cervical cancer (ICC) were based on an international study including 1356 HPV-positive cases for the four countries altogether, and estimations for precancerous cervical lesions were extracted from a published meta-analysis including 6 025 HPV-positive women from the four mentioned countries. Globocan 2012 and 2012 World Population Prospects were used to estimate current and future projections of new ICC cases. Combined proportions of the 9 HPV types in ICC were 88.6% (95%CI: 85.2-91.3) in Brazil, 85.7% (82.3-88.8) in Mexico, 92.2% (87.9-95.3) in India and 97.3% (93.9-99.1) in China. The additional HPV 31/33/45/52/58 proportions were 18.8% (15.3-22.7) in Brazil, 17.6% (14.2-21.2) in Mexico, 11.3% (7.5-16.1) in India and 11.9% (7.5-17.2) in China. HPV6 and 11 single types were not identified in any of the samples. Proportion of the individual 7 high risk HPV types included in the vaccine varied by cytological and histological grades of HPV-positive precancerous cervical lesions. HPV 16 was the dominant type in all lesions, with contributions in low grade lesions ranging from 16.6%(14.3-19.2) in Mexico to 39.8% (30.0-50.2) in India, and contributions in high grade lesions ranging from 43.8% (36.3-51.4) in Mexico to 64.1% (60.6-67.5) in Brazil. After HPV 16, variations in other majors HPV types were observed by country, with an under representation of HPV 18 and 45 compared to ICC. The addition of HPVs 31/33/45/52/58 to HPV types included in current vaccines could increase the ICC preventable fraction in a range of 12 to 19% across the four countries, accounting the 9-types altogether 90% of ICC cases. Assuming the same degree of efficacy of current vaccines, the

  20. HPV Vaccine Information for Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transmitted Diseases (STDs) HPV Vaccine Information For Young Women Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... warts at any point in time. Which girls/women should receive HPV vaccination? HPV vaccination is recommended ...

  1. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  2. Reactivity of human sera in a sensitive, high-throughput pseudovirus-based papillomavirus neutralization assay for HPV16 and HPV18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastrana, Diana V.; Buck, Christopher B.; Pang, Y.-Y. S.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Castle, Philip E.; FitzGerald, Peter C.; Krueger Kjaer, Susanne; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2004-01-01

    Sensitive high-throughput neutralization assays, based upon pseudoviruses carrying a secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene, were developed and validated for human papillomavirus (HPV)16, HPV18, and bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1). SEAP pseudoviruses were produced by transient transfection of codon-modified papillomavirus structural genes into an SV40 T antigen expressing line derived from 293 cells, yielding sufficient pseudovirus from one flask for thousands of titrations. In a 96-well plate format, in this initial characterization, the assay was reproducible and appears to be as sensitive as, but more specific than, a standard papillomavirus-like particle (VLP)-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The neutralization assay detected type-specific HPV16 or HPV18 neutralizing antibodies (titers of 160-10240) in sera of the majority of a group of women infected with the corresponding HPV type, but not in virgin women. Sera from HPV16 VLP vaccinees had high anti-HPV16 neutralizing titers (mean: 45000; range: 5120-163840), but no anti-HPV18 neutralizing activity. The SEAP pseudovirus-based neutralization assay should be a practical method for quantifying potentially protective antibody responses in HPV natural history and prophylactic vaccine studies

  3. Specificity of the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test for detecting human papillomavirus genotype 52 (HPV-52)

    OpenAIRE

    Kocjan, Boštjan; Poljak, Mario; Oštrbenk, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: HPV-52 is one of the most frequent human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes causing significant cervical pathology. The most widely used HPV genotyping assay, the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Linear Array), is unable to identify HPV- 52 status in samples containing HPV-33, HPV-35, and/or HPV-58. Methods: Linear Array HPV-52 analytical specificity was established by testing 100 specimens reactive with the Linear Array HPV- 33/35/52/58 cross-reactive probe, but not with the...

  4. Unusual and unique distribution of anal high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV among men who have sex with men living in the Central African Republic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph-Sydney Mboumba Bouassa

    Full Text Available High-risk (HR human papillomavirus (HPV infection remains a great concern in relation to African men who have sex with men (MSM, especially those infected with HIV. The prevalence of HR-HPV and associated risk factors was estimated in a cross-sectional observational study covering MSM living in Bangui, Central African Republic.MSM receiving care at the Centre National de Référence des Infections Sexuellement Transmissibles et de la Thérapie Antirétrovirale, Bangui, were included. HIV serostatus and socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics were collected. HPV DNA was detected and genotyped on anal swabs using Anyplex™ II HPV28 test (Seegene, South Korea, and HSV DNA by in-house real-time PCR. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine risk factors associated with HPV outcomes.42 MSM (mean age, 23.2 years; range, 14-39 including 69.1% HIV-1-positive and 30.9% HIV-negative were prospectively enrolled. The prevalence of anal HPV was 69.1%, including 82.7% of HR-HPV which were multiple in 52.0%. The most prevalent genotypes were HPV-35, HPV-58, HPV-59 and HPV-31. While, HPV-16 and HPV-18 were present in a minority of samples. Multiple HR-HPV infection was more frequent in HIV-positive MSM (41.4% with 2.7 genotypes per anal samples than in HIV-negative (7.7% with 1.5 genotypes per anal samples. HPV types included in the prophylactic Gardasil-9® vaccine were detected in 68.9% of specimens and HPV-58 was the most frequently detected. MSM infected by HPV-16 and HPV-18 were all infected by HIV-1. Few anal swabs (11.9% contained HSV-2 DNA without relationship with HPV detection. Condomless receptive anal intercourse was the main risk factor to being infected with any type of HPV and condomless insertive anal intercourse was significantly less associated with HPV contamination than receptive anal intercourse (Odd ratio = 0.02.MSM in Bangui are at-risk of HIV and HR-HPV anal infections. The unusual distribution of HPV-35 as

  5. Genetic susceptibility to HPV infection and cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciag P.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC is one of the leading causes of death in developing countries. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV is the major risk factor to develop malignant lesions in the cervix. Polymorphisms of the MHC and p53 genes seem to influence the outcome of HPV infection and progression to SCCC, although controversial data have been reported. MHC are highly polymorphic genes that encode molecules involved in antigen presentation, playing a key role in immune regulation, while p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that regulates cell proliferation. The HPV E6 protein from high-risk types binds p53 and mediates its degradation by the ubiquitin pathway. The role of these polymorphisms in genetic susceptibility to HPV infection and to SCCC remains under investigation.

  6. No evidence for a protective effect of naturally induced HPV antibodies on subsequent anogenital HPV infection in HIV-negative and HIV-infected MSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Sofie H.; Landén, Olivia; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; de Melker, Hester E.; Coutinho, Roel A.; van Eeden, Arne; van Rooijen, Martijn S.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether HPV serum antibodies detected after natural infection protect against subsequent anal or penile infection with the same HPV type in HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM aged ≥18 years were recruited in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (2010-2011), and

  7. Pharmacists' Attitudes and Perceived Barriers to Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Tessa J; Hohmann, Lindsey A; McFarland, Stuart J; Teeter, Benjamin S; Westrick, Salisa C

    2017-08-07

    Use of non-traditional settings such as community pharmacies has been suggested to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination uptake and completion rates. The objectives of this study were to explore HPV vaccination services and strategies employed by pharmacies to increase HPV vaccine uptake, pharmacists' attitudes towards the HPV vaccine, and pharmacists' perceived barriers to providing HPV vaccination services in community pharmacies. A pre-piloted mail survey was sent to 350 randomly selected community pharmacies in Alabama in 2014. Measures included types of vaccines administered and marketing/recommendation strategies, pharmacists' attitudes towards the HPV vaccine, and perceived system and parental barriers. Data analysis largely took the form of descriptive statistics. 154 pharmacists completed the survey (response rate = 44%). The majority believed vaccination is the best protection against cervical cancer (85.3%), HPV is a serious threat to health for girls (78.8%) and boys (55.6%), and children should not wait until they are sexually active to be vaccinated (80.1%). Perceived system barriers included insufficient patient demand (56.5%), insurance plans not covering vaccination cost (54.8%), and vaccine expiration before use (54.1%). Respondents also perceived parents to have inadequate education and understanding about HPV infection (86.6%) and vaccine safety (78.7%). Pharmacists have positive perceptions regarding the HPV vaccine. Barriers related to system factors and perceived parental concerns must be overcome to increase pharmacist involvement in HPV vaccinations.

  8. HPV-6 Molecular Variants Association With the Development of Genital Warts in Men: The HIM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Díaz, Ema; Sereday, Karen A; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Sirak, Bradley; Sobrinho, João Simão; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R; Villa, Luisa L; Sichero, Laura

    2017-02-15

    Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV-6) and HPV-11 are the etiological agents of approximately 90% of genital warts (GWs). The impact of HPV-6 genetic heterogeneity on persistence and progression to GWs remains undetermined. HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study participants who had HPV-6 genital swabs and/or GWs preceded by a viable normal genital swab were analyzed. Variants characterization was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequencing and samples classified within lineages (A, B) and sublineages (B1, B2, B3, B4, B5). Country- and age-specific analyses were conducted for individual variants; odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the risk of GWs according to HPV-6 variants were calculated. B3 variants were most prevalent. HPV-6 variants distribution differed between countries and case status. HPV-6 B1 variants prevalence was increased in GWs and genital swabs of cases compared to controls. There was difference in B1 and B3 variants detection in GW and the preceding genital swab. We observed significant association of HPV-6 B1 variants detection with GW development. HPV-6 B1 variants are more prevalent in genital swabs that precede GW development, and confer an increased risk for GW. Further research is warranted to understand the possible involvement of B1 variants in the progression to clinically relevant lesions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Cervical cancer screening by high risk HPV testing in routine practice: results at one year recall of high risk HPV-positive and cytology-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Mistro, Annarosa; Frayle, Helena; Ferro, Antonio; Callegaro, Susanna; Del Sole, Annamaria; Stomeo, Anna; Cirillo, Emanuela; Fedato, Chiara; Pagni, Silvana; Barzon, Luisa; Zorzi, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Cervical cancer screening by human papillomavirus (HPV) testing requires the use of additional triage and follow-up analyses. We evaluated women's compliance with and the performance of this strategy in a routine setting. Five cervical service screening programmes in North-East Italy. Eligible women aged 25-64 invited for a new screening episode underwent HPV testing for high risk types (hrHPV by Hybrid Capture 2) and cytology triage. Women with positive HPV and cytology results were referred for colposcopy; women with positive HPV but negative cytology results were referred to 1-year repeat hrHPV testing. Of 46,694 women screened by HPV testing up to December 2011, 3,211 (6.9%) tested hrHPV positive; 45% of these had a positive triage cytology. Those with negative cytology were invited for 1-yr repeat testing. Compliance with invitation was 61.6% at baseline and 85.3% at 1-yr repeat. Rate of persistent hrHPV positivity was 58% (830/1,435). Colposcopy performed in women with a positive hrHPV test at 1-yr repeat accounted for 36% of all colposcopies performed within the screening programmes. Cumulatively, a histological high-grade lesion was detected in 276 women (5.9‰ detection rate), 234 at baseline (85%), and 42 (15%) at 1-yr repeat. Compliance with hrHPV-based screening programmes was high both at baseline and at 1-yr repeat. Compared with the randomized trials, a higher proportion of triage cytology was read as positive, and only a small number of high-grade lesions were detected among the group of hrHPV positive cytology negative women who repeated testing 1-yr after baseline.

  10. Assessment of the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test within the VALGENT framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lan; Oštrbenk, Anja; Poljak, Mario; Arbyn, Marc

    2018-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening programs are switching from cytology-based screening to high-risk (hr) HPV testing. Only clinically validated tests should be used in clinical practice. To assess the clinical performance of the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping test (Linear Array) within the VALGENT-3 framework. The VALGENT framework is designed for comprehensive comparison and clinical validation of HPV tests that have limited to extended genotyping capacity. The Linear Array enables type-specific detection of 37 HPV types. For the purpose of this study, Linear Array results were designated as positive only if one of the 13 hrHPV types also included in the Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) was detected. The VALGENT-3 framework comprised 1600 samples obtained from Slovenian women (1300 sequential cases from routine cervical cancer screening enriched with 300 cytological abnormal samples). Sensitivity for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) (n=127) and specificity for Linear Array and for HC2 and non-inferiority of Linear Array relative to HC2 was checked. In addition, the prevalence of separate hrHPV types in the screening population, as well as the concordance for presence of HPV16, HPV18 and other hrHPV types between Linear Array and the Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV test (RealTime) were assessed. The clinical sensitivity and specificity for CIN2+ of the Linear Array in the total study population was 97.6% (95% CI, 93.3-99.5%) and 91.7% (95% CI, 90.0-93.2%), respectively. The relative sensitivity and specificity of Linear Array vs HC2 was 1.02 [95% CI, 0.98-1.05, (pLinear Array in the screening population was 10.5% (95% CI, 8.9-12.3%) with HPV16 and HPV18 detected in 2.3% and 0.9% of the samples, respectively. Excellent agreement for presence or absence of HPV16, HPV18 and other hrHPV between Linear Array and RealTime was observed. Linear Array showed similar sensitivity with higher specificity to detect CIN2+ compared to HC2. Detection of 13 hrHPV types

  11. Epidemiology of HPV Genotypes among HIV Positive Women in Kenya: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sonia; Wusiman, Aibibula; Boily, Marie Claude; Kariisa, Mbabazi; Mabeya, Hillary; Luchters, Stanley; Forland, Frode; Rossi, Rodolfo; Callens, Steven; vanden Broeck, Davy

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of data on the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in the HIV positive population and in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in Kenya. This may be different from genotypes found in abnormal cytology. Yet, with the advent of preventive HPV vaccines that target HPV 16 and 18, and the nonavalent vaccine targeting 90% of all ICC cases, such HPV genotype distribution data are indispensable for predicting the impact of vaccination and HPV screening on prevention. Even with a successful vaccination program, vaccinated women will still require screening to detect those who will develop ICC from other High risk (HR) HPV genotypes not prevented by current vaccines. The aim of this review is to report on the prevalence of pHR/HR HPV types and multiple pHR/HR HPV genotypes in Kenya among HIV positive women with normal, abnormal cytology and ICC. Methods PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and PROQUEST were searched for articles on HPV infection up to August 2nd 2016. Search terms were HIV, HPV, Cervical Cancer, Incidence or Prevalence, and Kenya. Results The 13 studies included yielded a total of 2116 HIV-infected women, of which 89 had ICC. The overall prevalence of pHR/HR HPV genotypes among HIV-infected women was 64% (95%CI: 50%-77%). There was a borderline significant difference in the prevalence of pHR/HR HPV genotypes between Female Sex workers (FSW) compared to non-FSW in women with both normal and abnormal cytology. Multiple pHR/HR HPV genotypes were highly prominent in both normal cytology/HSIL and ICC. The most prevalent HR HPV genotypes in women with abnormal cytology were HPV 16 with 26%, (95%CI: 23.0%-30.0%) followed by HPV 35 and 52, with 21% (95%CI: 18%-25%) and 18% (95%CI: 15%-21%), respectively. In women with ICC, the most prevalent HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (37%; 95%CI: 28%-47%) and HPV 18 (24%; 95%CI: 16%-33%). Conclusion HPV 16/18 gains prominence as the severity of cervical disease increases, with HPV 16/18 accounting for 61

  12. Epidemiology of HPV Genotypes among HIV Positive Women in Kenya: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Menon

    Full Text Available There is a scarcity of data on the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes in the HIV positive population and in invasive cervical cancer (ICC in Kenya. This may be different from genotypes found in abnormal cytology. Yet, with the advent of preventive HPV vaccines that target HPV 16 and 18, and the nonavalent vaccine targeting 90% of all ICC cases, such HPV genotype distribution data are indispensable for predicting the impact of vaccination and HPV screening on prevention. Even with a successful vaccination program, vaccinated women will still require screening to detect those who will develop ICC from other High risk (HR HPV genotypes not prevented by current vaccines. The aim of this review is to report on the prevalence of pHR/HR HPV types and multiple pHR/HR HPV genotypes in Kenya among HIV positive women with normal, abnormal cytology and ICC.PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and PROQUEST were searched for articles on HPV infection up to August 2nd 2016. Search terms were HIV, HPV, Cervical Cancer, Incidence or Prevalence, and Kenya.The 13 studies included yielded a total of 2116 HIV-infected women, of which 89 had ICC. The overall prevalence of pHR/HR HPV genotypes among HIV-infected women was 64% (95%CI: 50%-77%. There was a borderline significant difference in the prevalence of pHR/HR HPV genotypes between Female Sex workers (FSW compared to non-FSW in women with both normal and abnormal cytology. Multiple pHR/HR HPV genotypes were highly prominent in both normal cytology/HSIL and ICC. The most prevalent HR HPV genotypes in women with abnormal cytology were HPV 16 with 26%, (95%CI: 23.0%-30.0% followed by HPV 35 and 52, with 21% (95%CI: 18%-25% and 18% (95%CI: 15%-21%, respectively. In women with ICC, the most prevalent HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (37%; 95%CI: 28%-47% and HPV 18 (24%; 95%CI: 16%-33%.HPV 16/18 gains prominence as the severity of cervical disease increases, with HPV 16/18 accounting for 61% (95%CI: 50.0%-70.0% of all ICC

  13. HPV infection in women with and without cervical cancer in Conakry, Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, N; Clifford, G M; Koulibaly, M; Douno, K; Kabba, I; Haba, M; Sylla, B S; van Kemenade, F J; Snijders, P J F; Meijer, C J L M; Franceschi, S

    2009-07-07

    Cervical cancer incidence in western Africa is among the highest in the world. To investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Guinea, we obtained cervical specimens from 831 women aged 18-64 years from the general population of the capital Conakry and from 77 locally diagnosed invasive cervical cancers (ICC). Human papillomavirus was detected using a GP5+/6+ PCR-based assay. Among the general population, the prevalence of cervical abnormalities was 2.6% by visual inspection and 9.5% by liquid-based cytology. Fourteen of 15 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions were visual inspection-negative. Human papillomavirus prevalence was 50.8% (32.1% for high-risk types) and relatively constant across all age groups. Being single or reporting > or =3 sexual partners was significantly associated with HPV positivity. HPV16 was the most common type, both among the general population (7.3%) and, notably in ICC (48.6%). HPV45 (18.6%) and HPV18 (14.3%), the next most common types in ICC, were also more common in ICC than in HPV-positive women with normal cytology from the general population. The heavy burden of HPV infection and severe cervical lesions in Guinean women calls for new effective interventions. Sixty-three per cent of cervical cancers are theoretically preventable by HPV16/18 vaccines in Guinea; perhaps more if some cross-protection exists with HPV45.

  14. Evaluation of HPV DNA positivity in colorectal cancer patients in Kerman, Southeast Iran

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    Malekpour Afshar, Reza; Deldar, Zeinab; Mollaei, Hamid Reza; Arabzadeh, Seyed Alimohammad; Iranpour, Maryam

    2018-01-27

    Background: The HPV virus is known to be oncogenic and associations with many cancers has been proven. Although many studies have been conducted on the possible relationship with colorectal cancer (CRC), a definitive role of the virus has yet to be identified. Method: In this cross-sectional study, the frequency of HPV positivity in CRC samples in Kerman was assessed in 84 cases with a mean age of 47.7 ± 12.5 years over two years. Qualitative real time PCR was performed using general primers for the L1 region of HPV DNA. Results: Out of 84 CRC samples, 19 (22.6%), proved positive for HPV DNA. Genotyping of positive samples showed all of these to be of high risk HPV type. Prevalence of HPV infection appears to depend geographic region, life style, diet and other factors. Conclusion: In our location frequency of CRC is low, and this limited the sample size for evaluation of HPV DNA. The most prevalent types were HPV types 51 and 56. While HPV infection may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, this needs to be assessed in future studies. Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. HPV prevalence and HPV-related dysplasia in elderly women.

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    Ruth S Hermansson

    Full Text Available In Sweden, where screening ends at the age of 60, about 30% of the cervical cancer cases occur in women older than 60. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV and cervical dysplasia in women of 60 years and above.From September 2013 until June 2015, 1051 women aged 60-89 years (mean 68 years were sampled for an HPV test when attending an outpatient gynecology clinic. Women with positive results had a second HPV test and liquid based cytology (LBC, after 3.5 months on average. Those with a positive second HPV test were examined by colposcopy, and biopsy and a sample for LBC was obtained.The prevalence of HPV was 4.1%, (95%CI 3.0-5.5, n = 43 at the first test, and at the second test 2.6% remained positive (95%CI 1.7-3.8, n = 27. The majority of women positive in both HPV tests, had dysplasia in histology, 81.5% (22/27 (4 CIN 2-0.4%, 18 CIN 1-1.7%. HPV-related dysplasia was found in 2.1%, (95%CI 1.3-3.2, n = 22 of the 1051 women. Four of the 22 women with positive HPV tests also had abnormal cytology, one ASCUS and three CIN 1. No cancer or glandular dysplasia was detected.A significant proportion of elderly women were found to have a persistent cervical HPV infection. Among them there was a high prevalence of CIN diagnosed by histology. The HPV test showed high sensitivity and specificity in detecting CIN in elderly women, while cytology showed extremely low sensitivity.

  16. HPV vaccine acceptance among African-American mothers and their daughters: an inquiry grounded in culture.

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    Galbraith-Gyan, Kayoll V; Lechuga, Julia; Jenerette, Coretta M; Palmer, Mary H; Moore, Angelo D; Hamilton, Jill B

    2017-05-29

    Much of the research on African-Americans' HPV vaccine acceptance has largely focused on racial/ethnic differences related to cognitive, socio-economical, and structural factors that contribute to differences in HPV vaccine acceptance and completion. A growing body of literature suggest that cultural factors, such as mistrust of healthcare providers (HCPs) and the healthcare system, religion, and social norms related to appropriate sexual behaviors, also plays a prominent role in their HPV vaccine acceptance. However, these studies were limited in their use of theoretical approaches necessary to conceptualize and operationalize culture. To explore the influence of culture on African-American mothers' and daughters' HPV vaccine acceptance using the PEN-3, a culturally-centered conceptual framework. Grounded theory techniques were used to explore cultural factors that influenced the acceptance of the HPV vaccine among African-American mothers (n = 28) and their daughters (n = 34). Positive attitudes towards vaccination stemmed from beliefs that the HPV vaccine has cancer prevention benefits and that vaccinations in general protected against infectious diseases. Negative attitudes stemmed from beliefs that the HPV vaccine was too new, not effective, daughters were too young, and that vaccines were not a one-size-fits-all intervention. Majority of mothers and daughters indicated that their religious doctrine did not impede their HPV vaccination decisions. For a few mothers, religious beliefs could not be separated from their HPV vaccination decisions and ultimately deterred HPV vaccine acceptance. HCP recommendations were valued however mothers were often dissatisfied with the detail of information communicated. Support networks provided both positive and negative types of social support to mothers and daughters. The media highlighted the cancer prevention benefits of the HPV vaccine and unintentionally communicated negative information of the HPV vaccine

  17. Analytic and clinical performance of cobas HPV testing in anal specimens from HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

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    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Tokugawa, Diane; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Chen, Jie; Lorey, Thomas S; Gage, Julia C; Fetterman, Barbara; Boyle, Sean; Sadorra, Mark; Tang, Scott Dahai; Darragh, Teresa M; Castle, Philip E

    2014-08-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common, and the incidence of anal cancer is high in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). To evaluate the performance of HPV assays in anal samples, we compared the cobas HPV test (cobas) to the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping assay (LA) and cytology in HIV-infected MSM. Cytology and cobas and LA HPV testing were conducted for 342 subjects. We calculated agreement between the HPV assays and the clinical performance of HPV testing and HPV genotyping alone and in combination with anal cytology. We observed high agreement between cobas and LA, with cobas more likely than LA to show positive results for HPV16, HPV18, and other carcinogenic types. Specimens testing positive in cobas but not in LA were more likely to be positive for other markers of HPV-related disease compared to those testing negative in both assays, suggesting that at least some of these were true positives for HPV. cobas and LA showed high sensitivities but low specificities for the detection of anal intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (AIN2/3) in this population (100% sensitivity and 26% specificity for cobas versus 98.4% sensitivity and 28.9% specificity for LA). A combination of anal cytology and HPV genotyping provided the highest accuracy for detecting anal precancer. A higher HPV load was associated with a higher risk of AIN2/3 with HPV16 (P(trend) < 0.001), HPV18 (P(trend) = 0.07), and other carcinogenic types (P(trend) < 0.001). We demonstrate that cobas can be used for HPV detection in anal cytology specimens. Additional tests are necessary to identify men at the highest risk of anal cancer among those infected with high-risk HPV. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Comparison of the Natural History of Genital HPV Infection among Men by Country: Brazil, Mexico, and the United States.

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    Sudenga, Staci L; Torres, B Nelson; Silva, Roberto; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Abrahamsen, Martha; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Salmeron, Jorge; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R

    2017-07-01

    Background: Male genital human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and incidence has been reported to vary by geographical location. Our objective was to assess the natural history of genital HPV by country among men with a median of 48 months of follow-up. Methods: Men ages 18-70 years were recruited from United States ( n = 1,326), Mexico ( n = 1,349), and Brazil ( n = 1,410). Genital specimens were collected every 6 months and HPV genotyping identified 37 HPV genotypes. Prevalence of HPV was compared between the three countries using the Fisher exact test. Incidence rates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The median time to HPV clearance among men with an incident infection was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The prevalence and incidence of the genital HPV types known to cause disease in males (HPV 16 and 6) was significantly higher among men from Brazil than men from Mexico. Prevalence and incidence of those genital HPV types in the United States varied between being comparable with those of Mexico or Brazil. Although genital HPV16 duration was significantly longer in Brazil ( P = 0.04) compared with Mexico and the United States, HPV6 duration was shortest in Brazil ( P = 0.03) compared with Mexico and the United States. Conclusions: Men in Brazil and Mexico often have similar, if not higher prevalence of HPV compared with men from the United States. Impact: Currently, there is no routine screening for genital HPV among males and while HPV is common in men, and most naturally clear the infection, a proportion of men do develop HPV-related diseases. Men may benefit from gender-neutral vaccine policies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1043-52. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Impact of HPV infection on the development of head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betiol, J.; Villa, L.L.; Sichero, L.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is considered to be a distinct clinical entity with better prognosis than the classical tobacco- and alcohol-associated tumors. The increasing incidence of this neoplasia during the last decades highlights the need to better understand the role of HPV in the development of these cancers. Although the proportion of HNSCC attributed to HPV varies considerably according to anatomical site, overall approximately 25% of all HNSCC are HPV-DNA positive, and HPV-16 is by far the most prevalent type. In this review we discuss the existing evidence for a causal association between HPV infection and HNSCC at diverse anatomical head and neck subsites. PMID:23532264

  20. Oral Modeling of an Adenovirus-Based Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine in Ferrets and Mice.

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    Scallan, Ciaran D; Lindbloom, Jonathan D; Tucker, Sean N

    2016-06-01

    Oral vaccines delivered as tablets offer a number of advantages over traditional parenteral-based vaccines including the ease of delivery, lack of needles, no need for trained medical personnel, and the ability to formulate into temperature-stable tablets. We have been evaluating an oral vaccine platform based on recombinant adenoviral vectors for the purpose of creating a prophylactic vaccine to prevent influenza, and have demonstrated vaccine efficacy in animal models and substantial immunogenicity in humans. These studies have evaluated monovalent vaccines to date. To protect against the major circulating A and B influenza strains, a multivalent influenza vaccine will be required. In this study, the immunogenicity of orally delivered monovalent, bivalent, trivalent, and quadrivalent vaccines was tested in ferrets and mice. The various vaccine combinations were tested by blending monovalent recombinant adenovirus vaccines, each expressing hemagglutinin from a single strain. Human tablet delivery was modeled in animals by oral gavage in mice and by endoscopic delivery in ferrets. We demonstrated minimal interference between the various vaccine vectors when used in combination and that the oral quadrivalent vaccine compared favorably to an approved trivalent inactivated vaccine. The quadrivalent vaccine presented here produced immune responses that we predict should be capable of providing protection against multiple influenza strains, and the platform should have applications to other multivalent vaccines. Vaxart, Inc.

  1. Age-specific prevalence of HPV genotypes in cervical cytology samples with equivocal or low-grade lesions

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    Brismar-Wendel, S; Froberg, M; Hjerpe, A; Andersson, S; Johansson, B

    2009-01-01

    Background: To define the spectrum of human papillomavirus (HPV) types and establish an age limit for triage HPV testing in atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). Materials and methods: 343 liquid-based cytological samples from the population-based screening programme with minor abnormalities were subjected to HPV genotyping (Linear Array, Roche, Basel, Switzerland). Results: High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) was found in 71% of LSIL and 49% of ASCUS cases (Page-dependent in LSIL (P=0.01), with decreasing prevalence until the age of 50 years, followed by a slight increase. Human papillomavirus type 16 was the most common HR-HPV, found in 23% of HPV-positive women. Human papillomavirus type 18 was the sixth most common, found in 9.9% (Page-dependent quadratic trend was observed for multiple infections (P=0.01) with a trough at about 42 years. The most common HR-HPV types to show a coinfection with HPV16 (clade 9) were HPV39 (28%), 45 (38%), and 59 (46%), belonging to HPV18 clade 7. The frequency of low-risk (LR) vs probable HR and HR-HPV also followed an age-dependent quadratic trend. Conclusions: After the age of 25 years, HR-HPV prevalence is similar in LSIL and ASCUS cases, motivating a low age limit for triage HPV testing. Multiple infections and LR/HR-HPV dominance are age-dependent. Genotyping in longitudinal design is needed to elucidate the importance of multiple infections in cancer progression and in cross-protection from vaccination. PMID:19623178

  2. HPV Vaccine PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-01-15

    In this 30 second public service announcement, a mother talks about the importance of protecting 11-12 year-old boys and girls with HPV vaccination. (Una madre habla sobre la importancia de proteger a los niños y las niñas de 11 a 12 años con la vacuna contra el VPH.).  Created: 1/15/2014 by National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 1/15/2014.

  3. HPV16 early gene E5 specifically reduces miRNA-196a in cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chanzhen; Lin, Jianfei; Li, Lianqin; Zhang, Yonggang; Chen, Weiling; Cao, Zeyi; Zuo, Huancong; Chen, Chunling; Kee, Kehkooi

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, which is responsible for greater than 50% of cervical cancer cases, is the most prevalent and lethal HPV type. However, the molecular mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis remain elusive, particularly the early steps of HPV infection that may transform normal cervical epithelium into a pre-neoplastic state. Here, we report that a group of microRNAs (microRNAs) were aberrantly decreased in HPV16-positive normal cervical tissues, and these groups of microRNAs are further reduced in cervical carcinoma. Among these miRNAs, miR196a expression is the most reduced in HPV16-infected tissues. Interestingly, miR196a expression is low in HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell lines but high in HPV16-negative cervical cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we found that only HPV16 early gene E5 specifically down-regulated miRNA196a in the cervical cancer cell lines. In addition, HoxB8, a known miR196a target gene, is up-regulated in the HPV16 cervical carcinoma cell line but not in HPV18 cervical cancer cell lines. Various doses of miR196a affected cervical cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Altogether, these results suggested that HPV16 E5 specifically down-regulates miR196a upon infection of the human cervix and initiates the transformation of normal cervix cells to cervical carcinoma. PMID:25563170

  4. Rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18 by multiplex nested PCR-immunochromatographic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Bin; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are known to be high-risk viruses that cause cervical cancer. An HPV rapid testing kit that could help physicians to make early and more informed decisions regarding patient care is needed urgently but not yet available. This study aimed to develop a multiplex nested polymerase chain reaction-immunochromatographic test (PCR-ICT) for the rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18. A multiplex nested PCR was constructed to amplify the HPV 16 and 18 genotype-specific L1 gene fragments and followed by ICT which coated with antibodies to identify rapidly the different PCR products. The type-specific gene regions of high-risk HPV 16 and 18 could be amplified successfully by multiplex nested PCR at molecular sizes of approximately 99 and 101bp, respectively. The capture antibodies raised specifically against the moleculars labeled on the PCR products could be detected simultaneously both HPV 16 and 18 in one strip. Under optimal conditions, this PCR-ICT assay had the capability to detect HPV in a sample with as low as 100 copies of HPV viral DNA. The PCR-ICT system has the advantage of direct and simultaneous detection of two high-risk HPV 16 and 18 DNA targets in one sample, which suggested a significant potential of this assay for clinical application. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Prevalence and multiplicity of HPV in HIV women in Minas Gerais, Brazil Prevalência e multiplicidade do HPV em mulheres infectadas pelo HIV em Minas Gerais

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    Christine Miranda Corrêa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To detect the frequency and subtypes of HPV in the uterine cervix of HIV-infected women. METHODS: Sample consisted of 288 HIV-infected women, recruited from the public health system of five cities of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Women were seen from August 2003 to August 2008. Cervical samples were collected for cytological analysis and for HPV DNA detection, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. HPV DNA was classified according to its oncogenic potential in low risk (types 6, 11 and high risk (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35. Colposcopy was performed, followed by cervical biopsy when necessary. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi-squared test, with a significance level established at the 5% level. RESULTS: HPV prevalence was 78.8%. Most frequent genotypes were HPV-6 (63.9% and HPV-16 (48.5%. High-risk HPV were observed in 70.5% of the women; low-risk in 71.4%; both high and low-risk HPV were detected in 55.1% of the patients. Multiple HPV genotypes were detected in 64.8% of the patients; two genotypes in 23.8%, and three in 18.9%. CONCLUSION: HPV prevalence was high among HIV-infected women. Multiple HPV genotypes were common in samples from the uterine cervix of HIV-infected womenOBJETIVO: Detectar a frequência e os subtipos do HPV na cérvice uterina de mulheres infectadas pelo HIV. MÉTODOS: A amostra era composta por 288 mulheres infectadas pelo HIV, recrutadas do sistema público de saúde de cinco cidades de Minas Gerais, Brasil. As mulheres foram avaliadas de agosto de 2003 a agosto de 2008. Amostras cervicais foram coletadas para análise citológica e para detecção do HPV DNA, usando a reação em cadeia de polimerase (PCR. O HPV DNA foi classificado de acordo com seu potencial oncogênico em baixo risco (tipos 6,11 e alto risco (tipos 16, 18, 31, 33, 35. Foi realizada colposcopia, seguida de biópsia cervical, quando indicada. Variáveis categóricas foram comparadas usando o teste do quiquadrado, com nível de signific

  6. HPV detection rate in saliva may depend on the immune system efficiency.

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    Adamopoulou, Maria; Vairaktaris, Eleftherios; Panis, Vassilis; Nkenke, Emeka; Neukam, Friedreich W; Yapijakis, Christos

    2008-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) has been established as a major etiological factor of anogenital cancer. In addition, HPV has also been implicated in oral carcinogenesis but its detection rates appear to be highly variable, depending on the patient population tested, the molecular methodology used, as well as the type of oral specimen investigated. For example, saliva is an oral fluid that may play a role in HPV transmission, although the detection rates of the virus are lower than tissue. Recent evidence has indicated that HPV-related pathology is increased in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. In order to investigate whether the presence of different HPV types in saliva depends on immune system efficiency, oral fluid samples of patients with oral cancer and without any known immune deficiency were compared with those of HIV-positive individuals. Saliva samples were collected from 68 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and 34 HIV seropositive individuals. HPV DNA sequences were detected by L1 concensus polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and DNA sequencing for HPV typing. HPV DNA was detected in 7/68 (10.3%) of the oral cancer patients and in 12/34 (35.3%) of the HIV-positive individuals, a highly significant difference (p = 0.006; odds ratio 4.753; 95% confidence interval 1.698-13.271). Among HPV-positive samples, the prevalence of HPV types associated with high oncogenic risk was similar in oral cancer and HIV-positive cases (71.4% and 66.7%, respectively). In both groups, the most common HPV type was high-risk 16 (50% and 42.8%, respectively). Although a similar pattern of HPV high-risk types was detected in oral cancer and HIV-positive cases, the quantitative detection of HPV in saliva significantly depended on immune system efficiency. Furthermore, the significantly increased detection rates of HPV in saliva of HIV-positive individuals may be

  7. The levels of anti-HPV16/18 and anti-HPV31/33/35/45/52/58 antibodies among AS04-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccinated and non-vaccinated Ugandan girls aged 10-16 years.

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    Nakalembe, Miriam; Banura, Cecily; Namujju, Proscovia B; Mirembe, Florence M

    2014-01-01

    Data on Human Papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine immune response in sub-Saharan Africa is still sparse yet such knowledge is critical for optimal implementation and monitoring of HPV vaccines. Our primary objective was to evaluate levels of anti-HPV-16/18 antibodies and six other 'high risk' HPV (hrHPV) types among the vaccinated and unvaccinated Ugandan girls. We conducted a cross sectional study among AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 vaccinated and unvaccinated school girls aged 10-16 years in Western Uganda using purposive sampling. The vaccinated girls were at 18 months post vaccination. After consenting and assenting, data was collected using interviewer administered questionnaires for demographics and sexual history. Blood was drawn from which serum samples were analysed by the multiplex HPV serology technology to determine anti-HPV antibody levels to HPV-16/18 and six other hrHPV types (31, 33, 35, 45, 52 and 58). The antibody levels were expressed as Median Fluorescent Intensity (MFI). A total of 207 vaccinated [mean age 13.1 years (SD 1.5); range 10-16 years] and 197 unvaccinated girls [mean age 13.6 years (SD 1.3); range 10-16 years] participated in the study. Sexual activity was self reported among 14/207 (6.8%) vaccinated and 5/197 (2.5%) unvaccinated girls. The MFI levels for HPV-16 and HPV-18 were 15 and 20 times higher respectively in the vaccinated girls than in the unvaccinated girls. HPV-16 mean MFI level was 4691(SD 1812; 95% CI: 4438-4958) among the vaccinated compared to 218 (SD 685; 95% CI: 190-252) among the unvaccinated girls. For HPV-18 the mean MFI level was 1615 (SD 1326; 95% CI: 1470-1776) among the vaccinated compared to MFI 103 (SD 506; 95% CI: 88 -121) among unvaccinated girls. In addition antibody levels to non vaccine hrHPV types (31, 33, 35, 45, 52 and 58) were all significantly higher in the vaccinated group than in the unvaccinated group (plevel of antibodies to HPV-16/18 and other non-vaccine hrHPV types compared to the unvaccinated girls

  8. "Histological characteristics of HPV-associated and -independent squamous cell carcinomas of the vulva: A study of 1,594 cases".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakislova, Natalia; Clavero, Omar; Alemany, Laia; Saco, Adela; Quirós, Beatriz; Lloveras, Belen; Alejo, Maria; Pawlita, Michael; Quint, Wim; Del Pino, Marta; de Sanjose, Silvia; Ordi, Jaume

    2017-12-15

    There are at least two different etio-pathogenic pathways for the development of vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC): one associated with infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) and another independent of HPV. We aimed to describe the histological characteristics of HPV-associated and -independent tumors and to determine the best strategy to identify HPV in VSCC. A single paraffin block was available for review from a series of 1,594 VSCCs. In all cases HPV DNA detection was analyzed using the SPF10PCR/DEIA/LiPA25 system and p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC). A tumor was considered as unquestionably HPV-associated if both HPV DNA and p16 IHC were positive. A tumor was considered indisputably HPV-independent if both HPV DNA and p16 IHC were negative. Two groups of tumors were classified as non-conclusive: (1) HPV DNA+/p16- and (2) HPV DNA-/p16+. WHO typing and a thorough histological evaluation were conducted in all cases. Four hundred and forty-one tumors were HPV DNA+ with 367 cases (23.0%) being HPV DNA+/p16+. The latter tumors were more frequently basaloid or warty (49.8%), but 36.5% were of the keratinizing type; 1,153 tumors were HPV DNA-, with 1,060 cases (66.5%) being HPV DNA-/p16-. These HPV DNA-/p16- tumors were mostly keratinizing (81.2%) but were occasionally basaloid or warty (5.2%). The features of HPV DNA-/p16+ cases (n = 93) were similar to those of the HPV-associated VSCC, and HPV DNA+/p16- (n = 74) cases had a more diverse profile, although they were more similar to HPV-independent tumors. Several histological characteristics were more frequently associated with HPV-related VSCC (koilocytotic-like change, necrosis, moderate to marked pleomorphism, invasive front in nests; p < 0.001), however, none of these characteristics allowed differentiation between HPV-associated and -independent VSCC. In conclusion, histological criteria do not allow differentiation between HPV-associated and -independent VSCC. p16 Alone is a clinically easy

  9. HPV prevalence and genotypes in different histological subtypes of cervical adenocarcinoma, a worldwide analysis of 760 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirog, Edyta C; Lloveras, Belen; Molijn, Anco; Tous, Sara; Guimerà, Núria; Alejo, Maria; Clavero, Omar; Klaustermeier, Joellen; Jenkins, David; Quint, Wim Gv; Xavier Bosch, Francesc; Alemany, Laia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    The goal of our study was to provide comprehensive data on the worldwide human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in patients with invasive cervical adenocarcinoma in correlation with histologic tumor subtypes, geographical location, patients' age, and duration of sample storage. Paraffin-embedded samples of 760 cervical adenocarcinoma cases were collected worldwide. A three-level pathology review of cases was performed to obtain consensus histologic diagnoses and 682 cases were determined to be eligible for further analysis. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA(25) system (version 1). Classic cervical adenocarcinoma accounted for 83.1% of cases, while rare histological variants accounted for a few percent of cases individually. HPV positivity varied significantly between the different histologic tumor subtypes. Classic cervical adenocarcinoma showed high HPV positivity (71.8%), while other adenocarcinoma types had significantly lower HPV prevalence (endometrioid 27.3%, serous 25%, clear cell 20%, not otherwise specified 13.9%, and minimal deviation 8.3%). In all, 91.8% of HPV-positive tumors showed the presence of a single viral type and in 7% of cases multiple viral types were detected. Three HPV genotypes, HPV 16, 18, and 45, dominated in all adenocarcinomas and together accounted for 94.1% of HPV-positive tumors. HPV16 was the most common and found in 50.9% of HPV-positive cases, followed by HPV18 (31.6%) and HPV45 (11.6%). HPV prevalence varied depending on geographical region, patient age, and sample storage time. Tumors from older patients and tumor samples with longer storage time showed lower HPV prevalence. Our results indicate that HPV vaccines may prevent up to 82.5% (HPV16/18) and up to 95.3% (9-valent vaccine) of HPV-positive cervical adenocarcinomas, mostly the classic type. HPV testing and vaccination will not provide full coverage for a very small subset of classical adenocarcinomas and most of the rare

  10. Against which human papillomavirus types shall we vaccinate and screen? The international perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz, N.; Bosch, F.X.; Castellsague, X; Diaz, M; Sanjose, de S; Hammouda, D; Shah, K.V.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    At least 15 types of HPV have been associated with cervical cancer, but current HPV vaccines confer only type-specific immunity. To determine geographic variations in the HPV type distribution in cervical cancer, we carried out a pooled analysis of data from an international survey of HPV types in

  11. Hierarchical clustering of HPV genotype patterns in the ASCUS-LSIL triage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wilson, Lauren E.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Carreon, Joseph D.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    Anogenital cancers are associated with about 13 carcinogenic HPV types in a broader group that cause cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Multiple concurrent cervical HPV infections are common which complicate the attribution of HPV types to different grades of CIN. Here we report the analysis of HPV genotype patterns in the ASCUS-LSIL triage study using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Women who underwent colposcopy at baseline (n = 2780) were grouped into 20 disease categories based on histology and cytology. Disease groups and HPV genotypes were clustered using complete linkage. Risk of 2-year cumulative CIN3+, viral load, colposcopic impression, and age were compared between disease groups and major clusters. Hierarchical clustering yielded four major disease clusters: Cluster 1 included all CIN3 histology with abnormal cytology; Cluster 2 included CIN3 histology with normal cytology and combinations with either CIN2 or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) cytology; Cluster 3 included older women with normal or low grade histology/cytology and low viral load; Cluster 4 included younger women with low grade histology/cytology, multiple infections, and the highest viral load. Three major groups of HPV genotypes were identified: Group 1 included only HPV16; Group 2 included nine carcinogenic types plus non-carcinogenic HPV53 and HPV66; and Group 3 included non-carcinogenic types plus carcinogenic HPV33 and HPV45. Clustering results suggested that colposcopy missed a prevalent precancer in many women with no biopsy/normal histology and HSIL. This result was confirmed by an elevated 2-year risk of CIN3+ in these groups. Our novel approach to study multiple genotype infections in cervical disease using unsupervised hierarchical clustering can address complex genotype distributions on a population level. PMID:20959485

  12. [Genital warts and HPV vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilka, R; Dvorák, V; Fait, T

    2011-12-01

    To present and overview of incidence of, and cost of care for, genital warts. Review. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Palacky University and Faculty University, Olomouc; Office gynecology and primary care centre, Brno; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Charles university in Prague-First Faculty of Medicine and General Faculty Hospital, Prague. Literature review of incidence of, and cost of care for, genital warts in some european countries, North America and Australia. Genital warts exert a considerable impact on health services, a large proportion of which could be prevented through immunisation using the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine.

  13. A population-based study of the prevalence of HPV in three districts of Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshkumar, Belli T; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Das, Bhudev C; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection among women from three districts of Tamil Nadu (Erode, Salem, and Namakkal). Between January 27, 2007, and December 15, 2009, 1800 women aged 20-70years who had normal cervical cytology were enrolled into a cross-sectional study. Participants completed interviews and provided first void urine samples for assessment of HPV infection. Among 1699 eligible samples, 179 (10.5%) were HPV positive. HPV16 was the most common type (affecting 68 [4.0%] women), followed by HPV6 (58 [3.4%]). Among the 179 HPV-positive women, 71 (39.7%) were aged 36-45years. An annual income of less than 25 000 INR was significantly associated with HPV infection in all three districts (PTamil Nadu. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. HPV and cofactors for invasive cervical cancer in Morocco: a multicentre case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berraho, Mohamed; Amarti-Riffi, Afaf; El-Mzibri, Mohammed; Bezad, Rachid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Benideer, Abdelatif; Matar, Noureddine; Qmichou, Zinab; Abda, Naima; Attaleb, Mohammed; Znati, Kaoutar; El Fatemi, Hind; Bendahhou, Karima; Obtel, Majdouline; Filali Adib, Abdelhai; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Nejjari, Chakib

    2017-06-20

    Limited national information is available in Morocco on the prevalence and distribution of HPV-sub-types of cervical cancer and the role of other risk factors. The aim was to determine the frequency of HPV-sub-types of cervical cancer in Morocco and investigate risk factors for this disease. Between November 2009 and April 2012 a multicentre case-control study was carried out. A total of 144 cases of cervical cancer and 288 age-matched controls were included. Odds-ratios and corresponding confidence-intervals were computed by conditional logistic regression models. Current HPV infection was detected in 92.5% of cases and 13.9% of controls. HPV16 was the most common type for both cases and controls. Very strong associations between HPV-sub-types and cervical cancer were observed: total-HPV (OR = 39), HPV16 (OR = 49), HPV18 (OR = 31), and multiple infections (OR = 13). Education, high parity, sexual intercourse during menstruation, history of sexually transmitted infections, and husband's multiple sexual partners were also significantly associated with cervical cancer in the multivariate analysis. Our results could be used to establish a primary prevention program and to prioritize limited screening to women who have specific characteristics that may put them at an increased risk of cervical cancer.

  15. Differential expression of cellular microRNAs in HPV 11, -16, and -45 transfected cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreher, Anita; Rossing, Maria; Kaczkowski, Bogumil

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are highly prevalent giving rise to both benign and malignant lesions why they are classified as high- and low-risk viruses. In this study we selected one low-risk (HPV 11) and two high-risk (HPV 16 and -45) types for genomewide miRNA analysis to investigate possible...

  16. The etiologic role of HPV in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma fine tuned.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhof, H.P. van de; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Hullu, J.A. de; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Bulten, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) plays a role in the development of a subset of vulvar squamous cell carcinomas. Uncertainty exists about the true impact of HPV in this tumor type because conflicting reports have been published with diverging prevalence rates. This study was done to

  17. The role of inflammation in HPV infection of the Oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schäfer, Georgia; Kabanda, Siti; Rooyen, Beverly van; Marušič, Martina Bergant; Banks, Lawrence; Parker, M Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    Several human cancers are known to be associated with inflammation and/or viral infections. However, the influence of tumour-related inflammation on viral uptake is largely unknown. In this study we used oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as a model system since this type of cancer is associated with chronic irritation, inflammation and viral infections. Although still debated, the most important viral infection seems to be with Human Papillomavirus (HPV). The present study focused on a possible correlation between inflammation, OSCC development and the influence of HPV infection. A total of 114 OSCC biopsies and corresponding normal tissue were collected at Groote Schuur Hospital and Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa), that were subjected to RNA and DNA isolation. RNA samples were analysed by quantitative Light Cycler RT-PCR for the expression of selected genes involved in inflammation and infection, while conventional PCR was performed on the DNA samples to assess the presence of integrated viral DNA. Further, an in vitro infection assay using HPV pseudovirions was established to study the influence of inflammation on viral infectivity using selected cell lines. HPV DNA was found in about 9% of OSCC patients, comprising predominantly the oncogenic type HPV18. The inflammatory markers IL6 and IL8 as well as the potential HPV receptor ITGA6 were significantly elevated while IL12A was downregulated in the tumour tissues. However, none of these genes were expressed in a virus-dependent manner. When inflammation was mimicked with various inflammatory stimulants such as benzo-α-pyrene, lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan in oesophageal epithelial cell lines in vitro, HPV18 pseudovirion uptake was enhanced only in the benzo-α-pyrene treated cells. Interestingly, HPV pseudovirion infectivity was independent of the presence of the ITGA6 receptor on the surface of the tested cells. This study showed that although the carcinogen benzo

  18. HPV16 E6 regulates annexin 1 (ANXA1) protein expression in cervical carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas [Department of Biology, Institute of Bioscience, Language and Exact Science, São Paulo State University, São Jose do Rio Preto (Brazil); Sichero, Laura [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Centre for Translational Research in Oncology, Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo (ICESP), São Paulo (Brazil); Boccardo, Enrique [Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo., São Paulo (Brazil); Villa, Luisa Lina [Department of Radiology and Oncology, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Rahal, Paula, E-mail: rahalp@yahoo.com.br [Department of Biology, Institute of Bioscience, Language and Exact Science, São Paulo State University, São Jose do Rio Preto (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Annexin 1 (ANXA1) is a substrate for E6AP mediated ubiquitylation. It has been hypothesized that HPV 16 E6 protein redirects E6AP away from ANXA1, increasing its stability and possibly contributing to viral pathogenesis. We analyzed ANXA1 expression in HPV-positive and negative cervical carcinoma-derived cells, in cells expressing HPV-16 oncogenes and in cells transduced with shRNA targeting E6AP. We observed that ANXA1 protein expression increased in HPV-16-positive tumor cells, in keratinocytes expressing HPV-16 E6wt (wild-type) or E6/E7 and C33 cells expressing HPV-16 E6wt. ANXA1 protein expression decreased in cells transfected with E6 Dicer-substrate RNAs (DsiRNA) and C33 cells cotransduced with HPV-16 E6wt and E6AP shRNA. Moreover, colony number and proliferation rate decreased in HPV16-positive cells transduced with ANXA1 shRNA. We observed that in cells infected with HPV16, the E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1. We suggest that ANXA1 may play a role in HPV-mediated carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • ANXA1 upregulation requires the presence of E6 and E6AP and is dependent on E6 integrity. • E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1 in cells infected with HPV16. • ANXA1 plays a role in cell proliferation in HPV-positive cervical cells.

  19. HPV16 E6 regulates annexin 1 (ANXA1) protein expression in cervical carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas; Sichero, Laura; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa Lina; Rahal, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Annexin 1 (ANXA1) is a substrate for E6AP mediated ubiquitylation. It has been hypothesized that HPV 16 E6 protein redirects E6AP away from ANXA1, increasing its stability and possibly contributing to viral pathogenesis. We analyzed ANXA1 expression in HPV-positive and negative cervical carcinoma-derived cells, in cells expressing HPV-16 oncogenes and in cells transduced with shRNA targeting E6AP. We observed that ANXA1 protein expression increased in HPV-16-positive tumor cells, in keratinocytes expressing HPV-16 E6wt (wild-type) or E6/E7 and C33 cells expressing HPV-16 E6wt. ANXA1 protein expression decreased in cells transfected with E6 Dicer-substrate RNAs (DsiRNA) and C33 cells cotransduced with HPV-16 E6wt and E6AP shRNA. Moreover, colony number and proliferation rate decreased in HPV16-positive cells transduced with ANXA1 shRNA. We observed that in cells infected with HPV16, the E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1. We suggest that ANXA1 may play a role in HPV-mediated carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • ANXA1 upregulation requires the presence of E6 and E6AP and is dependent on E6 integrity. • E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1 in cells infected with HPV16. • ANXA1 plays a role in cell proliferation in HPV-positive cervical cells.

  20. Current Status of HPV Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Barbara; Roden, Richard; Wu, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second largest cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide, with ~500,000 diagnoses and 274,000 deaths annually. It remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality despite effective screening tools and treatments for its precursor high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Increased understanding of cervical pathogenesis has led to the identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the etiological agent for cervical cancer and the development of preventive and therapeutic vaccines targeting HPV antigens for the control of cervical cancer. Herein, we discuss the current status of HPV vaccines. PMID:20677402

  1. HPV genotyping and site of viral integration in cervical cancers in Indian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulami Das

    Full Text Available Persistent HPV infection plays a major role in cervical cancer. This study was undertaken to identify HPV types in a cohort of Indian women with locally advanced cervical cancer as well as to determine the physical state and/or site of viral integration in the host genome. Pretreatment biopsies (n = 270 from patients were screened for HPV infection by a high throughput HPV genotyping assay based on luminex xMAP technology as well as MY09/11 PCR and SPF1/2 PCR. Overall HPV positivity was observed to be 95%, with HPV16 being most common (63% followed by infection with HPV18. Integration status of the virus was identified using Amplification of Papillomavirus Oncogene Transcripts (APOT assay in a subset of samples positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18 (n = 86 and with an adequate follow-up. The data was correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Integration of the viral genome was observed in 79% of the cases and a preference for integration into the chromosomal loci 1p, 3q, 6q, 11q, 13q and 20q was seen. Clinical data revealed that the physical state of the virus (integrated or episomal could be an important prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

  2. Detection of E6/E7 HPV oncogene transcripts as biomarker of cervical intaepithelial displasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carcheri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that only persistent infection with high risk types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV HR is a significant risk factor for the development of an invasive squamous cervical cancer. The overexpression of viral oncogenes E6/E7 of HPV is considered a necessary process for incurring in a malignant phenotype.A HPV infection can be identified by detection of HPV DNA in biological samples, but the DNAbased tests cannot delineate between transient or persistent and potentially transforming infection. Instead there is many evidence to suggest that detection of HPV gene expression may constitute a more specific approach to highlight a clinically significant infection. Especially seems that the detection of E6/E7 transcripts can be usefully used for identify the women with a persistent HPV infection that will can induce a future cervical cancer. The aim of our study is to investigate if the detection of oncogenic viral gene activity by detecting transcripts of the E6 and E7 genes can be most usefull of HPV-DNA test in the triage of ASCUS or low grade cervical lesions. Our results confirm that HPV E6/E7 mRNA test can be considered a promising method to stratify HPV positive women for risk of future high-grade cervical lesions or cervical intaepithelial neoplasia.

  3. A case of HPV-53-related cervical cancer in an elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieveld M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marusya Lieveld,1 Elizaveta Padalko,2,3 Marleen Praet,4 Davy Vanden Broeck1 1Department of Uro/gynaecology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 2Department of Clinical Chemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 3School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium; 4N. Goormaghtigh Institute of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, BelgiumZappacosta et al1 recently published a case report concerning a human papillomavirus (HPV-positive invasive cervical cancer in a 79-year-old women who had a history of normal Pap smears. In this article, Anyplex II HPV28 (Seegene is used for HPV genotyping of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissue, liquid based cytology (LBC specimens and urine samples. It is suggested that HPV53 is present exclusively in the cervical cancer cells, lymph node metastases, and atypical urinary cells of one single case while the surrounding CIN2+ tissue revealed ten different HPV strains. Unfortunately, the HPV genotype results for lymph nodes and urinary cells are not presented while these results underline the potential role of HPV53 in oncogenesis. Moreover, it is generally accepted that one lesion is caused by one HPV infection, detection of multiple HPV types thus indicates the presence of multiple infections,2 suggesting that this patient may have several lesions. Read the original article  

  4. Modeling the impact of the difference in cross-protection data between a human papillomavirus (HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and a human papillomavirus (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohli Michele

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background In Canada, two vaccines that have demonstrated high efficacy against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV types −16 and −18 are available. The HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine provides protection against genital warts (GW while the HPV-16/18 vaccine may provide better protection against other oncogenic HPV types. In this analysis, the estimated clinical and economic benefit of each of these vaccines was compared in the Canadian setting. Methods A Markov model of the natural history of HPV infection among women, cervical cancer (CC and GW was used to estimate the impact of vaccinating a cohort of 100,000 12-year-old females on lifetime outcomes and healthcare system costs (no indirect benefit in males included. A budget impact model was used to estimate the impact of each vaccine by province. Results In the base case, vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 48 additional CC cases, and 16 additional CC deaths, while vaccination with the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 6,933 additional GW cases. Vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was estimated to save 1 additional discounted quality adjusted life year (QALY at an overall lower lifetime cost to the healthcare system compared to the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (assuming vaccine price parity. In sensitivity analyses, the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was associated with greater QALYs saved when the cross-protection efficacy of the HPV-16/18 vaccine was reduced, or the burden of GW due to HPV-6/11 was increased. In most scenarios with price parity, the lifetime healthcare cost of the strategy with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to be lower than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. In the probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the HPV-16/18 vaccine provided more QALY benefit than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in 49.2% of scenarios, with lower relative lifetime costs in 83.5% of scenarios. Conclusions Overall, the predicted lifetime healthcare costs and QALYs saved by

  5. Coexistence of K-ras mutations and HPV infection in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tezol Ayda

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the ras genes or association with human papillomavirus infection have been extensively studied in colorectal cancer. However, the correlation between K-ras mutations and HPV in colorectal cancer has not been investigated yet. In this study we aimed to investigate the presence of K-ras mutations and their correlation with HPV infection in colon cancer. Methods K-ras mutations were analyzed by a mutagenic PCR assay and digestion with specific restriction enzymes to distinguish the wild-type and mutant codons. HPV infection was analyzed by PCR amplification and hybridization with specific probes by Southern blotting. Stattistical analyses were performed by the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests Results HPV gene fragments were detected in 43 tumors and 17 normal tissue samples. HPV 18 was the prevalent type in the tumor tissue. A mutation at codon 12 of the K-ras gene was present in 31 patients. 56% of the HPV-positive tumors also harbored a K-ras mutation. Codon 13 mutations were not observed. These data indicate that infection with high risk HPV types and mutational activation of the K-ras gene are frequent events in colorectal carcinogenesis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that mutational activation of the K-ras gene is a common event in colon carcinogenesis and that HPV infection may represent an important factor in the development of the premalignant lesions leading to the neoplastic phenotype.

  6. Human papillomavirus virus (HPV) genotype- and age-specific analyses of external genital lesions among men in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Donna J; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Messina, Jane A; Stoler, Mark H; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Sirak, Bradley A; O'Keefe, Michael T; Papenfuss, Mary; Gage, Christine; Carvalho da Silva, Roberto; Gonzalez Sosa, Rossana; Rojas Juarez, Oscar; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes external genital lesions (EGLs) in men, including condyloma and penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN). We sought to determine the incidence of pathologically confirmed EGLs, by lesion type, among men in different age groups and to evaluate the HPV types that were associated with EGL development. HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study participants who contributed ≥2 visits from 2009-2013 were included in the biopsy cohort. Genotyping by an HPV line-probe assay was performed on all pathologically confirmed EGLs. Age-specific analyses were conducted for incident EGLs, with Kaplan-Meier estimation of cumulative incidence. This biopsy cohort included 2754 men (median follow-up duration, 12.4 months [interquartile range, 6.9-19.2 months]). EGLs (n = 377) were pathologically confirmed in 228 men, 198 of whom had incident EGLs. The cumulative incidence of any EGL was highest among men <45 years old and, for condyloma, decreased significantly over time with age. The genotype-specific incidence of EGL varied by pathological diagnoses, with high- and low-risk genotypes found in 15.6% and 73.2% of EGLs, respectively. Condyloma primarily contained HPV 6 or 11. While PeIN lesions primarily contained HPV 16, 1 PeIN III lesion was positive for HPV 6 only. Low- and high-risk HPV genotypes contribute to the EGL burden. Men remain susceptible to HPV-related EGLs throughout the life span, making it necessary to ensure the longevity of immune protection against the most common causative HPV genotypes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Human papillomavirus detection in cervical neoplasia attributed to 12 high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes by region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellsagué, Xavier; Ault, Kevin A; Bosch, F Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background: We estimated the proportion of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) cases attributed to 14 HPV types, including quadrivalent (qHPV) (6/11/16/18) and 9-valent (9vHPV) (6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccine types, by region. Methods: Women ages 15-26 and 24-45 years from 5 regions were...

  8. HPV-Associated Cancers Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What CDC Is Doing Related Links Stay Informed Statistics for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal ( ... Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home HPV-Associated Cancer Statistics Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  9. HPV Involvement in Head and Neck Cancers: Comprehensive Assessment of Biomarkers in 3680 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellsagué, Xavier; Alemany, Laia; Quer, Miquel; Halec, Gordana; Quirós, Beatriz; Tous, Sara; Clavero, Omar; Alòs, Llúcia; Biegner, Thorsten; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Alejo, Maria; Holzinger, Dana; Cadena, Enrique; Claros, Edith; Hall, Gillian; Laco, Jan; Poljak, Mario; Benevolo, Maria; Kasamatsu, Elena; Mehanna, Hisham; Ndiaye, Cathy; Guimerà, Núria; Lloveras, Belen; León, Xavier; Ruiz-Cabezas, Juan C; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Kang, Chang-Suk; Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Garcia-Rojo, Marcial; Iljazovic, Ermina; Ajayi, Oluseyi F; Duarte, Flora; Nessa, Ashrafun; Tinoco, Leopoldo; Duran-Padilla, Marco A; Pirog, Edyta C; Viarheichyk, Halina; Morales, Hesler; Costes, Valérie; Félix, Ana; Germar, Maria Julieta V; Mena, Marisa; Ruacan, Arzu; Jain, Asha; Mehrotra, Ravi; Goodman, Marc T; Lombardi, Luis Estuardo; Ferrera, Annabelle; Malami, Sani; Albanesi, Estela I; Dabed, Pablo; Molina, Carla; López-Revilla, Rubén; Mandys, Václav; González, Manuel E; Velasco, Julio; Bravo, Ignacio G; Quint, Wim; Pawlita, Michael; Muñoz, Nubia; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Xavier Bosch, F

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a large international study to estimate fractions of head and neck cancers (HNCs) attributable to human papillomavirus (HPV-AFs) using six HPV-related biomarkers of viral detection, transcription, and cellular transformation. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissues of the oral cavity (OC), pharynx, and larynx were collected from pathology archives in 29 countries. All samples were subject to histopathological evaluation, DNA quality control, and HPV-DNA detection. Samples containing HPV-DNA were further subject to HPV E6*I mRNA detection and to p16(INK4a), pRb, p53, and Cyclin D1 immunohistochemistry. Final estimates of HPV-AFs were based on HPV-DNA, HPV E6*I mRNA, and/or p16(INK4a) results. A total of 3680 samples yielded valid results: 1374 pharyngeal, 1264 OC, and 1042 laryngeal cancers. HPV-AF estimates based on positivity for HPV-DNA, and for either HPV E6*I mRNA or p16(INK4a), were 22.4%, 4.4%, and 3.5% for cancers of the oropharynx, OC, and larynx, respectively, and 18.5%, 3.0%, and 1.5% when requiring simultaneous positivity for all three markers. HPV16 was largely the most common type. Estimates of HPV-AF in the oropharynx were highest in South America, Central and Eastern Europe, and Northern Europe, and lowest in Southern Europe. Women showed higher HPV-AFs than men for cancers of the oropharynx in Europe and for the larynx in Central-South America. HPV contribution to HNCs is substantial but highly heterogeneous by cancer site, region, and sex. This study, the largest exploring HPV attribution in HNCs, confirms the important role of HPVs in oropharyngeal cancer and drastically downplays the previously reported involvement of HPVs in the other HNCs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Perspectives for Preventive and Therapeutic HPV Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ken; Doolan, Kimberley; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of female cancer death worldwide. Persistent infection with `high risk' HPV genotypes is the major etiological factor in cervical cancer and thus effective vaccination against HPV provides an opportunity to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with HPV. The FDA has approved two preventive vaccines to limit the spread of HPV. However, these are unlikely to impact upon HPV prevalence and cervical cancer rates for many years. Furthermore, preventive vaccines do not exert therapeutic effects on pre-existing HPV infections and HPV-associated lesions. In order to further impact upon the burden of HPV infections worldwide, therapeutic vaccines are being developed. These vaccines aim to generate a cell-mediated immune response to infected cells. This review discusses current preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines and their future directions. PMID:20123582

  11. 4-Valent Human Papillomavirus (4vHPV) Vaccine in Preadolescents and Adolescents After 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Daron G; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Block, Stanley L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Restrepo, Jaime Alberto; Mehlsen, Jesper; Chatterjee, Archana; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Joshi, Amita; Chu, Jian-Li; Krick, Andrea Likos; Saah, Alfred; Das, Rituparna

    2017-12-01

    We describe the final 10-year data for the long-term follow-up study of the 4-valent human papillomavirus (4vHPV) vaccine in preadolescents and adolescents. In the base study (V501-018), 1661 sexually inactive boys and girls received the 4vHPV vaccine (early vaccination group [EVG], managed for 9.9 years) or a placebo at day 1, month 2, and month 6. Thereafter, at month 30, the placebo group (catch-up vaccination group [CVG], managed for 7.4 years) received the 4vHPV vaccine by using the same dosing schedule. Long-term anti-HPV type 6, 11, 16, and 18 immune responses were assessed. Effectiveness was estimated by calculating the incidence rate of the primary endpoints (HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18-related disease or persistent infection). For HPV types 6, 11, and 16, 89% to 96% of subjects remained seropositive through 10-years postvaccination. The preadolescents had 38% to 65% higher geometric mean titers at month 7, which remained 16% to 42% higher at 10 years compared with adolescents. No cases of HPV type 6, 11, 16, and 18-related diseases were observed. Ten subjects had a persistent infection of ≥6 months duration with vaccine-type HPV and 2 subjects had persistent infection for ≥12 months. No new serious adverse events were reported through 10 years. A 3-dose regimen of the 4vHPV vaccine was immunogenic, clinically effective, and generally well tolerated in preadolescents and adolescents during 10 years of follow-up. These long-term findings support efforts to vaccinate this population against HPV before exposure. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. HPV Infection and Cervical Screening in Socially Isolated Indigenous Women Inhabitants of the Amazonian Rainforest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allex Jardim Fonseca

    Full Text Available Indigenous women from the Amazon regions have some of the highest rates of cervical cancer in the world. This study evaluated cervical cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV in native women that differ by lifestyle and interaction with western society. Yanomami women are isolated deep in the Amazon with a hunter/gatherer lifestyle. Macuxi and Wapishana women live in proximity to western society.To select a representative group of women from each district, random cluster sampling was used, considering each registered village as a cluster. Cervical samples were collected for cytology and HPV detection and typing by PCR amplification and next generation sequencing. The study was approved by the National IRB and by tribal leaders.664 native women were enrolled from 13 indigenous villages (76% participation rate. Yanomami women had higher rates of abnormal cytology (5.1% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.04 and prevalent HR-HPV (34.1% vs. 19.2%, p35 y of age were significantly more likely to have HR-HPV, whereas women ≤ 35 y did not significantly differ between groups. Prevalence of HPV was significantly different amongst geographically clustered Yanomami women (p<0.004. The most prevalent HPV types in the entire group were HPV31 (8.7%, HPV16 (5.9% and HPV18 (4.4%.Isolated endogenous Yanomami women were more likely to be HPV+ and rates increased with age. Study of HPV in isolated hunter-gather peoples suggests that long-term persistence is a characteristic of prehistoric humans and patterns reflecting decreased prevalence with age in western society represents recent change. These studies have implications for cervical cancer prevention and viral-host relationships.

  13. Human papillomavirus infection in Rwanda at the moment of implementation of a national HPV vaccination programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngabo, Fidele; Franceschi, Silvia; Baussano, Iacopo; Umulisa, M Chantal; Snijders, Peter J F; Uyterlinde, Anne M; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Tenet, Vanessa; Gatera, Maurice; Binagwaho, Agnes; Clifford, Gary M

    2016-05-24

    Cervical cancer is the most common female cancer in Rwanda that, in 2011, became the first African country to implement a national vaccination programme against human papillomavirus (HPV). To provide a robust baseline for future evaluations of vaccine effectiveness, cervical cell specimens were obtained from 2508 women aged 18-69 years from the general population in Kigali, Rwanda, during 2013/14. 20 % of women were HIV-positive. Samples were used for liquid-based cytology and HPV testing (44 types) with GP5+/6+ PCR. HPV prevalence was 34 %, being highest (54 %) in women ≤19 years and decreasing to 20 % at age ≥50. Prevalence of high risk (HR) HPV and cytological abnormalities was 22 and 11 % respectively (including 2 % with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, HSIL) decreasing with age. Age-standardised prevalence of HR HPV was 22 % (or 19 % among HIV-negative women), and HPV16 was the most common type. Prevalence of HPV and cytological abnormalities were significantly higher in HIV-positive than HIV-negative women, and the difference increased with age. Other significant risk factors for HPV positivity in multivariate analyses were high lifetime number of sexual partners, receiving cash for sex, and being a farmer. 40 % of women with HSIL were infected with HPV16/18 and there was no significant difference between HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. This study confirms Rwanda to be a setting of high prevalence of HPV and cervical disease that is worsened by HIV. These data will serve as a robust baseline for future evaluations of HPV vaccine programme effectiveness.

  14. HPV epigenetic mechanisms related to Oropharyngeal and Cervix cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Marina; Giovane, Giancarlo; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Iorio, Rosamaria; Romano, Maurizio; De Francesco, Francesco; Feola, Antonia; Siciliano, Camilla; Califano, Luigi; Giordano, Antonio

    2017-03-31

    Human Papilloma Virus infection is very frequent in humans and is mainly transmitted sexually. The majority of infections are transient and asymptomatic, however, if the infection persists, it can occur with a variety of injuries to skin and mucous membranes, depending on the type of HPV involved. Some types of HPV are classified as high oncogenic risk as associated with the onset of cancer. The tumors most commonly associated with HPV are cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, epigenetic mechanisms related to HPV infection include methylation changes to host and viral DNA and chromatin modification in host species. This review is focused about epigenethic mechanism, such as MiRNAs expression, related to cervix and oral cancer. Specifically it discuss about molecular markers associated to a more aggressive phenotype. In this way we will analyze genes involved in meiotic sinaptonemal complex, transcriptional factors, of orthokeratins, sinaptogirin, they are all expressed in cancer in a way not more dependent on cell differentiation but HPV-dependent.

  15. Breast cancer and human papillomavirus infection: No evidence of HPV etiology of breast cancer in Indian women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedau, Suresh; Mir, Mohammad Muzaffar; Chakraborty, Sekhar; Singh, Y Mohan; Kumar, Rakesh; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Bharti, Alok C; Das, Bhudev C; Kumar, Umesh; Hussain, Showket; Shukla, Shirish; Pande, Shailja; Jain, Neeraj; Tyagi, Abhishek; Deshpande, Trivikram; Bhat, Dilafroze

    2011-01-01

    Two clinically relevant high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) types 16 and 18 are etiologically associated with the development of cervical carcinoma and are also reported to be present in many other carcinomas in extra-genital organ sites. Presence of HPV has been reported in breast carcinoma which is the second most common cancer in India and is showing a fast rising trend in urban population. The two early genes E6 and E7 of HPV type 16 have been shown to immortalize breast epithelial cells in vitro, but the role of HPV infection in breast carcinogenesis is highly controversial. Present study has therefore been undertaken to analyze the prevalence of HPV infection in both breast cancer tissues and blood samples from a large number of Indian women with breast cancer from different geographic regions. The presence of all mucosal HPVs and the most common high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 DNA was detected by two different PCR methods - (i) conventional PCR assays using consensus primers (MY09/11, or GP5+/GP6+) or HPV16 E6/E7 primers and (ii) highly sensitive Real-Time PCR. A total of 228 biopsies and corresponding 142 blood samples collected prospectively from 252 patients from four different regions of India with significant socio-cultural, ethnic and demographic variations were tested. All biopsies and blood samples of breast cancer patients tested by PCR methods did not show positivity for HPV DNA sequences in conventional PCRs either by MY09/11 or by GP5+/GP6+/HPV16 E6/E7 primers. Further testing of these samples by real time PCR also failed to detect HPV DNA sequences. Lack of detection of HPV DNA either in the tumor or in the blood DNA of breast cancer patients by both conventional and real time PCR does not support a role of genital HPV in the pathogenesis of breast cancer in Indian women

  16. Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy or Radiochemotherapy: Prognostic Role of TP53 and HPV Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallai, Carlo; Perrone, Federica; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana; Locati, Laura; Bossi, Paolo; Orlandi, Ester; Palazzi, Mauro; Olmi, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods and materials: The TP53 mutation and HPV status were analyzed in 78 cases of locoregionally advanced OPSCC. The possible correlation of these factors with locoregiownal control, relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival (OS) was also investigated. Results: Of these 78 cases, 22 had disruptive and 22 had non-disruptive (silent) TP53 mutations; the remaining 34 cases had wild-type (WT) TP53. HPV 16 DNA was found in 9 cases (11%), but all HPV-positive (HPV+) cases carried a functional p53 protein, except for 1 case that had a silent mutation. HPV+ patients fared better than HPV-negative (HPV-) patients in terms of all survival parameters, with highly statistically significant differences between the groups. Specifically, no distant metastases were observed in the HPV+ patients, whereas they occurred in 17% of the HPV- patients. However, no difference was observed between the WT TP53 and mutation group, even when this was analyzed in terms of disruptive and non-disruptive mutations. Regardless, treatment with chemotherapy nearly doubled the 5-year OS rates, both in the mutation (42% vs. 22%) and WT (30 vs. 16%) group, but only the mutation group showed improvement in all survival parameters. In addition, the second tumor-free 5-year survival rate was 72% in HPV- cases, but no second tumors were observed in HPV+ and WT p53 cases. Conclusions: Patients with HPV+ OPSCC have an excellent prognosis after radiochemotherapy, but cisplatin-based chemotherapy may not confer a satisfactory outcome, especially in WT cases, thereby justifying the additional or alternative use of taxanes and epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors. Uncommon distant metastases and second tumors in the HPV+ group may be cause for clinicians to review the follow-up policies in these patients.

  17. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in histological sections of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma in Madrid, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Espinosa, Benjamín; Moro-Rodríguez, Ernesto; Álvarez-Fernández, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical specimens from the city of Madrid (Spain), as a contribution to the knowledge of Human Papillomavirus genotype distribution and prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types in cervical lesions in Spain. A total of 533 abnormal specimens, from the Hospital General Universitario “Gregorio Marañón” of Madrid, were studied. These included 19 benign lesions, 349 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 1 (CIN1), 158 CIN2-3 and 7 invasive cervical carcinomas (ICC). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. We detected 20 different HPV types: 13 carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (HR-HPVs), 2 probably carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (PHR-HPVs) and 5 carcinogenic low-risk HPV types (LR-HPVs). The most frequent HPV genotypes found in all specimens were HPV16 (26.0%), 31 (10.7%) and 58 (8.0%). HPV 18 was only detected in 5.0%. Co-infections were found in 30.7% of CIN 1 and 18.4% cases of CIN2-3. The highest percentage of HR HPVs was found in those specimens with a CIN2-3 lesion (93.7%). As our study shows the current tetravalent vaccine could be effective in our geographical area for preventing all the invasive cervical carcinomas. In addition, upon the estimates of the important presence of other HR-HPV types – such as 31, 58, 33 and 52 – in different preneoplasic lesions the effectiveness of HPV vaccination in our geographical area, and others with similar genotype distribution, should be limited

  18. Comparison of the clinical performances of the AdvanSure HPV Screening Real-Time PCR, the Abbott Real-Time High-Risk HPV Test, and the Hybrid Capture High-Risk HPV DNA Test for Cervical Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hae-Sun; Hahm, Chorong; Lee, Miae

    2014-09-01

    The clinical performance of three human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA commercial assays for cervical cancer screening was evaluated; the AdvanSure HPV Screening Real-Time PCR (AdvanSure PCR; LG Life Sciences) that was developed recently for the detection of both high-risk and low-risk genotypes, the Abbott RealTime High-Risk HPV Test (Abbott PCR; Abbott Molecular) and the Hybrid Capture High-Risk HPV DNA test (HC2; Qiagen). The three different HPV DNA tests were compared using cytology samples obtained from 619 women who underwent routine cervical cancer screening. The gold-standard assay was histopathological confirmation of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 or worse. The clinical sensitivities of the AdvanSure PCR, the Abbott PCR and the HC2 for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 or worse were 95.5%, 95.5% and 100%, respectively, while the clinical specificities were 61.6%, 86.4% and 83.3%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the clinical sensitivities of the Abbott PCR and the AdvanSure PCR compared to the HC2. The clinical specificities of the Abbott PCR and the AdvanSure PCR for the detection of HPV types 16/18 were 97.8% and 98.5%, respectively. For cervical cancer screening, all three tests showed relatively good clinical sensitivities, but the AdvanSure PCR had lower clinical specificity than the Abbott PCR and the HC2. The AdvanSure PCR and the Abbott PCR assays have the advantage of being automated and the ability to distinguish between HPV types 16/18 and other HPV types. The two real-time PCR assays could be useful tools in HPV testing for cervical cancer screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictors of Adults' Knowledge and Awareness of HPV, HPV-Associated Cancers, and the HPV Vaccine: Implications for Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Kimberly R; Singh, Shipra

    2018-02-01

    High human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and low HPV vaccine uptake are significant public health concerns. Disparities in HPV-associated cancers and HPV vaccine uptake rates suggest the need for additional research examining factors associated with vaccine acceptance. This study assessed HPV awareness and knowledge and identified sociodemographic characteristics associated with HPV knowledge at the population level. Data from adult men ( n = 1,197) and women ( n = 1,906) who participated in the National Cancer Institute's 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey were analyzed. Multivariable regression was used to identify predictors of four HPV knowledge categories: (1) general knowledge, (2) cervical cancer knowledge, (3) "other" cancer knowledge (i.e., anal, oral, penile), and (4) vaccine knowledge. Significant gender differences in awareness and knowledge of HPV and the HPV vaccine were revealed. Most participants (>70%) knew that HPV could cause cervical cancer, but fewer (14.9% to 31.5%) knew of the association between HPV and "other" cancers. Women were more likely to report that a health care provider recommended vaccination. Significant predictors of general HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge included gender, education, income, race, and other sociodemographic characteristics. Age and income predicted cervical cancer knowledge. Knowledge of "other" HPV-associated cancers was predicted by having a child under 18 years in the household and relationship status. HPV knowledge appears to be socially patterned. Low HPV knowledge among men and some racial minorities suggests a need for further intervention. Health education should emphasize risks of noncervical HPV-associated cancers. Patient-provider communication that includes education, counseling, and clear recommendations favoring vaccination may improve uptake.

  20. Estimates of the timing of reductions in genital warts and high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia after onset of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Harrell W; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Saraiya, Mona; Dunne, Eileen F; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2013-08-20

    The objective of this study was to estimate the number of years after onset of a quadrivalent HPV vaccination program before notable reductions in genital warts and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) will occur in teenagers and young adults in the United States. We applied a previously published model of HPV vaccination in the United States and focused on the timing of reductions in genital warts among both sexes and reductions in CIN 2/3 among females. Using different coverage scenarios, the lowest being consistent with current 3-dose coverage in the United States, we estimated the number of years before reductions of 10%, 25%, and 50% would be observed after onset of an HPV vaccination program for ages 12-26 years. The model suggested female-only HPV vaccination in the intermediate coverage scenario will result in a 10% reduction in genital warts within 2-4 years for females aged 15-19 years and a 10% reduction in CIN 2/3 among females aged 20-29 years within 7-11 years. Coverage had a major impact on when reductions would be observed. For example, in the higher coverage scenario a 25% reduction in CIN2/3 would be observed with 8 years compared with 15 years in the lower coverage scenario. Our model provides estimates of the potential timing and magnitude of the impact of HPV vaccination on genital warts and CIN 2/3 at the population level in the United States. Notable, population-level impacts of HPV vaccination on genital warts and CIN 2/3 can occur within a few years after onset of vaccination, particularly among younger age groups. Our results are generally consistent with early reports of declines in genital warts among youth. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Physical status and viral load in women with positive human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byoung Gie; Lee, Eui Don; Zin, Yong Jae

    1998-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the frequency of viral integration and viral load in women with positive HPV type 16 infection, and showing normal findings, CIN, and cervical cancer. Total 75 (normal, 15; CIN I, 20; CIN III, 20; cervical cancer, 20) cervical swab specimens were used. HPV detection, typing, and viral load was determined by PCR method. Seventy of 75 (93.3%) of cervical swab specimens showed same results with hybrid capture assay and PCR method for detecting HPV DNA. HPV type 16 DNA was identified more frequently with progression from normal to cervical cancer (normal, 13 %; CIN I, 15%; CIN III, 40 %; cervical cancer, 55 %). The frequency of HPV type 16 DNA integration also increased with grade of the lesion (normal, 0 %; CIN I, 33 %; CIN III, 87 %; cervical cancer, 91 %) suggesting most of HPV type 16 present as integration forms in the cells. In addition, high-level of HPV 16 viral load also was found more frequently in CIN III and cervical cancer (normal, 0 %; CIN I, 0 %; CIN III, 87 %; cervical cancer, 100 %). These results suggest that viral integration and high-level of viral load may play an important role in cervical carcinogenesis. (author). 13 refs., 5 figs

  2. Human Papillomavirus types distribution among women with cervical preneoplastic, lesions and cancer in Luanda, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damião, Paciência de Almeida; Oliveira-Silva, Michelle; Moreira, Miguel Ângelo; Poliakova, Natalia; de Lima, Maria Emilia Rt; Chiovo, José; Nicol, Alcina Frederica

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among females in Angola and human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for the development of pre-cancerous squamous intraepithelial lesions. The diversity and frequency of HPV types in Angola has yet to be reported. To determine the frequency of HPV among women with squamous intraepithelial lesions from women in Luanda, Angola. Study participants included women diagnosed with cytological abnormalities that voluntarily provided Pap smears (n = 64). Genomic DNA was extracted from the samples for use as templates in the PCR amplification of HPV sequences. PCR products were sequenced to determine HPV type. HPV DNA was detected in 71.9% (46/64) in the samples. A higher diversity of HPV types was found in the cytological lesions, such as ASCUS and LSIL (HPV16, 6, 18, 31, 58, 66, 70 and 82, in order of frequency) than that detected for HSIL and SSC (HPV16, 18, 6 and 33). The most prevalent HPV type were: HPV16, HPV6 and HPV18. This is the first report on HPV type diversity and frequency in woman of Angola. The results suggest that large-scale studies across Africa would improve our understanding of interrelationship between HPV infections and cervical cancer. More directly, the identification of the HPV types most prevalent suggests that women in Angola would benefit from currently available HPV vaccines.

  3. Study comparing human papillomavirus (HPV) real-time multiplex PCR and Hybrid Capture II INNO-LiPA v2 HPV genotyping PCR assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iftner, Thomas; Germ, Liesje; Swoyer, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    methods has not been well characterized. Clinically, cytology is used to establish possible HPV infection. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of HPV multiplex PCR assays compared to those of the testing scheme of the Hybrid Capture II (HCII) assay followed by an HPV PCR/line hybridization assay...... (HCII-LiPA v2). SurePath residual samples were split into two aliquots. One aliquot was subjected to HCII testing followed by DNA extraction and LiPA v2 genotyping. The second aliquot was shipped to a second laboratory, where DNA was extracted and HPV multiplex PCR testing was performed. Comparisons...... were evaluated for 15 HPV types common in both assays. A slightly higher proportion of samples tested positive by the HPV multiplex PCR than by the HCII-LiPA v2 assay. The sensitivities of the multiplex PCR assay relative to those of the HCII-LiPA v2 assay for HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, for example...

  4. The differences in heparin binding for the C-terminal basic-sequence-rich peptides of HPV-16 and HPV-18 capsid protein L1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jian; Yu Jisheng; Yu Zhiwu; Zha Xiao; Wu Yuqing

    2012-01-01

    Graphial abstract: The differences in heparin binding for the C-terminal basic-sequence-rich peptides of HPV-16 and HPV-18 capsid protein L1. Highlights: ► Several driving forces contribute to the interaction between heparin and peptides. ► C-terminal of HPV L1 is a potential candidate for the attachment to host cells. ► The C-terminal peptides of HPV-16 and -18 L1 have different heparin-binding. ► The different heparin-binding provides an explanation for the distinct prevalences. - Abstract: The high-risk types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) HPV-16 and -18 are the predominant types associated with cervical cancer. HPV-16 and -18 account for about 50% and 20%, respectively, of cervical cancers worldwide. While the reason and molecular mechanism of the distinct prevalence and distributions between them remain poorly understood, the binding affinity of cell surface receptor with capsid proteins, especially L1, may be involved. We examined heparin binding with two synthetic peptides corresponding to the 14 amino acid C-terminal peptides of HPV-16 and -18 L1 with the goal of comparing the equivalent residues in different HPV types. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and static right-angle light scattering (SLS), we determined the binding constant K, reaction enthalpy ΔH, and other thermodynamic parameters in the interaction. Especially, we assessed the role of specific residues in binding with heparin by comparing the NMR spectra of free and heparin-bound peptides.

  5. Epidemiology and costs of HPV infection: review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bamfi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available HPV infection is a well-established cause of both benign and malign diseases. The HPV 16 and 18 genotypes are most commonly associated with cervical cancer whereas the HPV 6 and 11 genotypes are most commonly associated with anogenital warts. In Italy are currently approved two types of vaccine: Gardasil® is a tetravalent HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine that prevents cervix cancer and genital warts, Cervarix® is a bivalent HPV 16 and 18 genotype vaccine that protects against cervical cancer and pre cancer forms. Aim of present study was to collect the available epidemiological data and the impact on the Italian National Health Service (NHS budget of genital warts pathology. In Italy 40,000 genital warts cases per year could be estimated in the female population. The management cost in charge of Italian NHS for the female pathology is evaluated around 7 millions €. Comparing the available evidence NHS costs for genital wart pathology represent 3-4% of the total amount for prevention and treatment of cervix cancer.

  6. Rapid enrichment of human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific polyclonal T cell populations for adoptive immunotherapy of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Annemieke; van der Hulst, Jeanette M.; Kenter, Gemma G.; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Vermeij, Pieter; Offringa, Rienk; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The majority of cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16). Cervical cancer is associated with an ineffective host immune response against the HPV16 oncoproteins, characterized by the lack of the strong E6-specific T-helper type 1 (Th1) immunity that is generally present in

  7. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences in metaplastic breast carcinomas of Mexican women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Vela-Chávez, Teresa; Carrillo-García, Adela; Lizano-Soberón, Marcela; Amador-Molina, Alfredo; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F; Hallmann, Rita Sotelo-Regil

    2013-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma, an uncommon subtype of breast cancer, is part of the spectrum of basal-like, triple receptor-negative breast carcinomas. The present study examined 20 surgical specimens of metaplastic breast carcinomas, for the presence of high-risk Human papillomavirus (HPV), which is suspected to be a potential carcinogenic agent for breast carcinoma. Mastectomy specimens from patients harboring metaplastic breast carcinoma, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), and who attended the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia in Mexico City, were retrieved from the files of the Department of Pathology accumulated during a 16-year period (1995–2008). Demographic and clinical information was obtained from patients’ medical records. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors and HPV type-specific amplification was performed by means of Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Quantitative Real-time (RT) PCR was conducted in HPV positive cases. Statistically, the association of continuous or categorical variables with HPV status was tested by the Student t, the Chi square, or Fisher’s exact tests, as appropriate. High-risk HPV DNA was detected in eight (40%) of 20 metaplastic breast carcinomas: seven (87.5%) HPV-16 and one (12.5%) HPV-18. Mean age of patients with HPV-positive cases was 49 years (range 24–72 years), the same as for HPV-negative cases (range, 30–73 years). There were not striking differences between HPV + and HPV– metaplastic carcinomas regarding clinical findings. Nearly all cases were negative for estrogen, progesterone and Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), but positive for Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). High-risk HPV has been strongly associated with conventional breast carcinomas, although the subtle mechanism of neoplastic transformation is poorly understood. In Mexican patients, the prevalence of HPV infection among metaplastic breast carcinomas is higher than in non-metaplastic ones

  8. HPV-related Multiphenotypic Sinonasal Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bishop, Justin A; Andreasen, Simon; Hang, Jen-Fan

    2017-01-01

    . Immunohistochemistry for p16, c-kit, and myoepithelial cell markers (S100, actin, calponin, p63, and/or p40) was performed along with RNA in situ hybridization for HPV (type 33-specific as well as a high-risk cocktail). Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies for fusions of MYB, NFIB, and MYBL1 was performed...... gene fusions were positive. In the 38 cases with follow-up data, (mean follow-up, 42 mo) 14 recurred locally and 2 metastasized (lung, finger). There were no regional lymph node metastases, and no tumor-related deaths. HMSC is a distinct sinonasal neoplasm characterized by myoepithelial differentiation...

  9. Differentiated Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia-like and Lichen Sclerosus-like Lesions in HPV-associated Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Vulva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakislova, Natalia; Alemany, Laia; Clavero, Omar; Del Pino, Marta; Saco, Adela; Quirós, Beatriz; Lloveras, Belen; Alejo, Maria; Halec, Gordana; Quint, Wim; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Ordi, Jaume

    2018-06-01

    Most human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated vulvar squamous cell carcinomas (VSCCs) originate from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, also named usual type vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia. However, growing evidence suggests that morphologic studies have limitations in predicting HPV status in vulvar lesions. We aimed to evaluate adjacent intraepithelial lesions in a series of DNA HPV-positive VSCCs, focusing on unusual histologic patterns mimicking differentiated vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (dVIN) or lichen sclerosus (LS). We identified 326 DNA HPV-positive VSCC with at least 1 cm of skin adjacent to the invasive tumor and analyzed HPV typing, HPV E6*I mRNA, and p16 immunohistochemistry in all cases. A careful histologic evaluation was conducted. A conclusive association with HPV was based on a positive p16 or HPV E6*I mRNA result or both in addition to the HPV DNA, whereas cases negative for both markers were classified as nonconclusively associated with HPV. One hundred twenty-one tumors (37.1%) had normal adjacent skin, 191 (58.6%) had only high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, also named usual type vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, and unusual intraepithelial lesions were identified in 14 (4.3%) tumors. Seven cases showed dVIN-like features, 5 showed adjacent LS-like lesion, and in 2 cases dVIN-like and LS-like lesions were identified simultaneously. Six of them were conclusively associated with HPV (3 dVIN-like, 2 LS-like, 1 with combined dVIN/LS-like features). All 6 tumors were associated with HPV16 and were positive for both p16 and HPV mRNA, and p16 was also positive in the dVIN-like and LS-like lesions. In summary, a small subset of VSCCs conclusively associated with HPV may arise on intraepithelial lesions, mimicking precursors of HPV-independent VSCC.

  10. New Concepts for Translational Head and Neck Oncology: Lessons from HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostareli, Efterpi; Holzinger, Dana; Hess, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is well established as an etiological agent responsible for a number of pathologies affecting the stratified epithelia of skin and anogenital sites. More recently, the infection by (mucosal) high-risk HPV types has also been found to be causally associated with squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region (HNSCC), especially in the oropharynx. Intriguingly, HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) represent a distinct clinical entity compared to HPV-negative tumors with particular regard to treatment–response and survival outcome. The association between HPV infection and OPSCC may therefore have important implications for the prevention and/or treatment of OPSCC. The improved survival of patients with HPV-related tumors also raises the question, as to whether a better understanding of the underlying differences may help to identify new therapeutic concepts that could be used in targeted therapy for HPV-negative and improved therapy for HPV-positive cancers. This review summarizes the most recent advances in our understanding of the molecular principles of HPV-related OPSCC, mainly based on functional genomic approaches, but also emphasizes the significant role played by the tumor microenvironment, especially the immune system, for improved clinical outcome and differential sensitivity of HPV-related tumors to current treatment options.

  11. Screening for high risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) subtypes, among Sudanese patients with oral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Ali Yousif; Eltom, Faris Margani; Abdalaziz, Mohamed S; Rahmani, Arshad; Abusail, Saadalnour; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkareem

    2013-01-01

    HR-HPV subtypes are strongly linked to etiology of many human cancers including oral cancer. The epidemiology of infection with different HPV genotypes greatly varies in different countries. The aim of this study was to identify and genotype the HR-HPV subtypes in oral tissues obtained from Sudanese patients with oral lesions. In this retrospective study 200 patients with oral lesions were screened by molecular methods (PCR) for the presence of HR-HPV subtypes. Of the 200 patients, 100/200 were patients with oral cancer (ascertained as case group) and 100/200 were patients with non-neoplastic oral lesions (ascertained as control group). Out of the 200 patients, 12/200 (6%) were found with HR-HPV infection. Of the 12 positive patients, 8/12 (66.7%) were among cases and the remaining 4/12 (33.3%) were among control group. The distribution of different genotypes was: type HPV 16 6/12 (50%), HPV18 4/12 (34%), HPV 31 1/12 (8%) and HPV 33 1/12 (8%). In view of these findings, HPV particularly subtypes 16 and 18 play a role in the etiology of oral cancer in the Sudan.

  12. Molecular events leading to HPV-induced high grade neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia M. Wilting

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is initiated by high-risk types of the human papillomavirus (hrHPV and develops via precursor stages, called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. High-grade CIN lesions are considered true precancerous lesions when the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are aberrantly expressed in the dividing cells. This results in abolishment of normal cell cycle control via p53 and pRb degradation. However, it has become clear that these viral oncogenes possess additional oncogenic properties, including interference with the DNA methylation machinery and mitotic checkpoints. Identification of the resulting molecular events leading to high-grade neoplasia will 1 increase our understanding of cervical carcinogenesis, 2 yield biomarkers for early diagnosis, and 3 identify therapeutic targets for HPV-induced (pre cancerous lesions.This review will briefly summarise current advances in our understanding of the molecular alterations in the host cell genome that occur during HPV-induced carcinogenesis.

  13. Burden of HPV-caused cancers in Denmark and the potential effect of HPV-vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skorstengaard, Malene; Thamsborg, Lise Holst; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2017-01-01

    -caused cancers in women and men, and to evaluate the potential of HPV-vaccination in cancer control. Methods: Data were retrieved from the literature on population prevalence of high risk (HR) HPV, on HR HPV-prevalence and genotypes in HPV-related cancers, and on number of cytology samples in cervical screening...... were preventable with HPV vaccination. However, including screening prevented cervical cancers, the burden of cancers caused by HPV-infection would be 1300–2000 in women as compared to 234 in men. Conclusion: Taking screening prevented cervical cancers into account, the cancer control potential of HPV...

  14. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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    Full Text Available ... sq how to do kids infect kids links & resources M.O.V.E. parents for prevention ... go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV We provide ...

  15. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... GETVAXED print ads go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV ... not possible without a visit to your doctor. Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family ...

  16. HPV vaccines: their pathology-based discovery, benefits, and adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Alcina F; de Andrade, Cecilia V; Russomano, Fabio B; Rodrigues, Luana S L; Oliveira, Nathalia S; Provance, David William; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine illustrates the power of in situ-based pathologic analysis in better understanding and curing diseases. The 2 available HPV vaccines have markedly reduced the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, genital warts, and cervical cancer throughout the world. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, health care officials, and parents to refuse providing the recommended vaccination to the target population. The aims of the study were to discuss the discovery of HPV vaccine and review scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines. The strong type-specific immunity against HPV in humans has been known for more than 25 years. Multiple studies confirm the positive risk benefit of HPV vaccination with minimal documented adverse effects. The most common adverse effect, injection site pain, occurred in about 10% of girls and was less than the rate reported for other vaccines. Use of HPV vaccine should be expanded into more diverse populations, mainly in low-resource settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William

    2014-01-01

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm

  18. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sin Hang, E-mail: shlee01@snet.net; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William [Department of Pathology, Milford Hospital, 300 Seaside Ave., Milford, CT 06460 (United States)

    2014-10-02

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm.

  19. Prevalent high-risk HPV infection and vaginal microbiota in Nigerian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dareng, E O; Ma, B; Famooto, A O; Adebamowo, S N; Offiong, R A; Olaniyan, O; Dakum, P S; Wheeler, C M; Fadrosh, D; Yang, H; Gajer, P; Brotman, R M; Ravel, J; Adebamowo, C A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the association between high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) and the vaginal microbiome. Participants were recruited in Nigeria between April and August 2012. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by deep sequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA gene fragments (V4) on Illumina MiSeq and HPV was identified using the Roche Linear Array® HPV genotyping test. We used exact logistic regression models to evaluate the association between community state types (CSTs) of vaginal microbiota and hrHPV infection, weighted UniFrac distances to compare the vaginal microbiota of individuals with prevalent hrHPV to those without prevalent hrHPV infection, and the Linear Discriminant Analysis effect size (LEfSe) algorithm to characterize bacteria associated with prevalent hrHPV infection. We observed four CSTs: CST IV-B with a low relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. in 50% of participants; CST III (dominated by L. iners) in 39·2%; CST I (dominated by L. crispatus) in 7·9%; and CST VI (dominated by proteobacteria) in 2·9% of participants. LEfSe analysis suggested an association between prevalent hrHPV infection and a decreased abundance of Lactobacillus sp. with increased abundance of anaerobes particularly of the genera Prevotella and Leptotrichia in HIV-negative women (P < 0·05). These results are hypothesis generating and further studies are required.

  20. Knowledge, behaviours and attitudes regarding HPV infection and its prevention in female students in West Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelastopulu, E; Fafliora, E; Plota, A; Babalis, V; Bartsokas, C; Poulas, K; Plotas, P

    2016-06-01

    Infection with several types of human papilloma viruses (HPV) has been correlated with the development of cervical cancer. Apart from other preventive strategies, two prophylactic vaccines have been added recently to the HPV prevention arsenal. The objectives of this study were to assess HPV vaccination coverage rates and to evaluate the level of knowledge regarding cervical cancer, HPV and Papanicolaou test among female students in a Greek city. A cross-sectional study was carried out among five hundred female students of the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Patras, Greece. They completed an eighteen-item self-administrated questionnaire regarding their knowledge related to cervical cancer. Only 31.7% of the students had a high level (> 66%) of total knowledge. The majority (70.4%) had not been vaccinated against HPV. Students who achieved low and moderate total knowledge scores were less likely to be vaccinated against HPV. Implementing strategies for improving young females' knowledge on the different aspects of the natural course of HPV infection and increasing HPV vaccination coverage rates seem to be crucial.

  1. Human papillomavirus genotypes and phylogenetic analysis of HPV-16 variants in HIV-1 infected subjects in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Amendola, Antonella; Bianchi, Silvia; Fasolo, M Michela; Beretta, Rosangela; Pariani, Elena; Zappa, Alessandra; Frati, Elena; Orlando, Giovanna

    2009-05-29

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to improve the state of evidence regarding the spectrum of HPV types and HPV-16 LCR variants circulating among men and women infected with HIV-1 in Italy. This study, conducted in 518 HIV-positive subjects (346 males and 172 females), showed a high prevalence of HPV anal infections (88.7%) in men and of cervical infections (65.1%) in women. A wide spectrum of HPV genotypes has been observed, as both single and multiple infections. Low-risk HPV types 6, 11 and 61 were frequently detected. HPV-16 was the prevalent high-risk type. Fourteen different HPV-16 LCR variants were found. Ten belonged to the European lineage (78.7% were detected in Italian subjects and 21.3% in foreign-born, all homo/bisexual men), two to the Asiatic lineage and two to the African-2 lineage. This study underlines the great genotypic heterogeneity characterizing anal and cervical HPV infections and the marked polymorphism of the predominant HPV-16 in this high-risk population in Italy.

  2. Human Papilloma Virus Detection by INNOLiPA HPV in Prostate Tissue from Men of Northeast Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Martha I Dávila; Morales, Cesar V Ignacio; Tovar, Anel R Aragón; Jimenez, Delia Olache; Maldonado, Edmundo Castelán; Miranda, Sandra Lara; Gutiérrez, Elva I Cortés

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostatic adenocarcinoma by Prosate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death among men in the Western world. Human papilloma virus (HPV) may be considered as a preventable risk factor. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of HPV infection in prostatic adenocarcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) cases in Northeast Mexico. Materials and Methods: A total of 87 paraffin-embedded blocks (from 25 and 62 patients with definite diagnoses of BPH and adenocarcinoma, respectively) were selected and subjected to INNOLiPA HPV Genotyping to detect 28 high- and low-risk HPV types. The rates of infection were compared in the two studied groups. Results: INNOLiPA HPV demonstrated great sensitivity for HPV detection on paraffin-embedded tissue. Global prevalence was 14.9% (13/87). HPV infection was positive in 19.4% (12/62) of patients with adenocarcinoma and 4.0% (1/25) of patients with BPH. HPV-11, which is considered to be low risk, was more prevalent. Interestingly, one patient with BPH and six with prostate cancer showed examples considered to be high risk (HPV-18, -51, -52, and -66). Conclusion: A higher rate of HPV infection among Mexican patients with prostatic carcinoma than among those with BPH was observed. HPV infections may thus contribute to the risk of prostate cancer. Further studies are required to elucidate any roles of HPV infection in prostate disease in Mexico and the effect of prevention and treatment of HPV infection on prostatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:28030912

  3. Human Papilloma Virus Detection by INNOLiPA HPV in Prostate Tissue from Men of Northeast Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Ignacio Morales, Cesar V; Aragón Tovar, Anel R; Olache Jimenez, Delia; Castelán Maldonado, Edmundo; Lara Miranda, Sandra; Cortés Gutiérrez, Elva I

    2016-11-01

    Background: Prostatic adenocarcinoma by Prosate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death among men in the Western world. Human papilloma virus (HPV) may be considered as a preventable risk factor. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of HPV infection in prostatic adenocarcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) cases in Northeast Mexico. Materials and Methods: A total of 87 paraffin-embedded blocks (from 25 and 62 patients with definite diagnoses of BPH and adenocarcinoma, respectively) were selected and subjected to INNOLiPA HPV Genotyping to detect 28 high- and low-risk HPV types. The rates of infection were compared in the two studied groups. Results: INNOLiPA HPV demonstrated great sensitivity for HPV detection on paraffin-embedded tissue. Global prevalence was 14.9% (13/87). HPV infection was positive in 19.4% (12/62) of patients with adenocarcinoma and 4.0% (1/25) of patients with BPH. HPV-11, which is considered to be low risk, was more prevalent. Interestingly, one patient with BPH and six with prostate cancer showed examples considered to be high risk (HPV-18, -51, -52, and -66). Conclusion: A higher rate of HPV infection among Mexican patients with prostatic carcinoma than among those with BPH was observed. HPV infections may thus contribute to the risk of prostate cancer. Further studies are required to elucidate any roles of HPV infection in prostate disease in Mexico and the effect of prevention and treatment of HPV infection on prostatic adenocarcinoma. Creative Commons Attribution License

  4. HPV Genotypes Predict Survival Benefits From Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Yi-Ting; Chao, Angel; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Between August 1993 and May 2000, 327 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III/IVA or stage IIB with positive lymph nodes) were eligible for this study. HPV genotypes were determined using the Easychip® HPV genechip. Outcomes were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: We detected 22 HPV genotypes in 323 (98.8%) patients. The leading 4 types were HPV16, 58, 18, and 33. The 5-year overall and disease-specific survival estimates for the entire cohort were 41.9% and 51.4%, respectively. CCRT improved the 5-year disease-specific survival by an absolute 9.8%, but this was not statistically significant (P=.089). There was a significant improvement in disease-specific survival in the CCRT group for HPV18-positive (60.9% vs 30.4%, P=.019) and HPV58-positive (69.3% vs 48.9%, P=.026) patients compared with the RT alone group. In contrast, the differences in survival with CCRT compared with RT alone in the HPV16-positive and HPV-33 positive subgroups were not statistically significant (P=.86 and P=.53, respectively). An improved disease-specific survival was observed for CCRT treated patients infected with both HPV16 and HPV18, but these differenced also were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The HPV genotype may be a useful predictive factor for the effect of CCRT in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Verifying these results in prospective trials could have an impact on tailoring future treatment based on HPV genotype.

  5. Initial results of population based cervical cancer screening program using HPV testing in one million Turkish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultekin, Murat; Zayifoglu Karaca, Mujdegul; Kucukyildiz, Irem; Dundar, Selin; Boztas, Guledal; Semra Turan, Hatice; Hacikamiloglu, Ezgi; Murtuza, Kamil; Keskinkilic, Bekir; Sencan, Irfan

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the Turkey's nationwide HPV DNA screening program on the basis of first 1 million screened women. Women over age 30 were invited for population based screening via HPV DNA and conventional cytology. Samples were collected by family physicians and the evaluations and reports had been performed in the National Central HPV laboratories. The acceptance rate for HPV based cervical cancer screening after first invitation was nearly 36.5%. Since HPV DNA tests have been implemented, cervical cancer screening rates have shown 4-5-fold increase in primary level. Through the evaluation of all, HPV positivity was seen in 3.5%. The commonest HPV genotypes were 16, followed by 51, 31, 52 and 18. Among the 37.515 HPV positive cases, cytological abnormality rate was 19.1%. Among HPV positive cases, 16.962 cases had HPV 16 or 18 or other oncogenic HPV types with abnormal cytology (>ASC-US). These patients were referred to colposcopy. The colposcopy referral rate was 1.6%. Among these, final clinico-pathological data of 3.499 patients were normal in 1.985 patients, CIN1 in 708, CIN2 in 285, CIN3 in 436 and cancer in 85 patients and only pap-smear program could miss 45.9% of ≥CIN3 cases. The results of 1 million women including the evaluation of 13 HPV genotypes with respect to prevalence, geographic distribution and abnormal cytology results shows that HPV DNA can be used in primary level settings to have a high coverage rated screening program and is very effective compared to conventional pap-smear. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  6. Human papillomavirus prevalence among indigenous and non-indigenous Australian women prior to a national HPV vaccination program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condon John R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous women in Australia have a disproportionate burden of cervical cancer despite a national cervical screening program. Prior to introduction of a national human papilloma virus (HPV vaccination program, we determined HPV genotype prevalence by Indigenous status and residence in remote areas. Methods We recruited women aged 17 to 40 years presenting to community-based primary health services for routine Pap screening across Australia. A liquid-based cytology (LBC cervical specimen was tested for HPV DNA using the AMPLICOR HPV-DNA test and a PGMY09/11-based HPV consensus PCR; positive specimens were typed by reverse hybridization. We calculated age-adjusted prevalence by weighting to relevant population data, and determined predictors of HPV-DNA positivity by age, Indigenous status and area of residence using logistic regression. Results Of 2152 women (655 Indigenous, prevalence of the high-risk HPV genotypes was similar for Indigenous and non-Indigenous women (HPV 16 was 9.4% and 10.5%, respectively; HPV 18 was 4.1% and 3.8%, respectively, and did not differ by age group. In younger age groups, the prevalence of other genotypes also did not differ, but in those aged 31 to 40 years, HPV prevalence was higher for Indigenous women (35% versus 22.5%; P Conclusion Although we found no difference in the prevalence of HPV16/18 among Australian women by Indigenous status or, for Indigenous women, residence in remote regions, differences were found in the prevalence of risk factors and some other HPV genotypes. This reinforces the importance of cervical screening as a complement to vaccination for all women, and the value of baseline data on HPV genotype prevalence by Indigenous status and residence for the monitoring of vaccine impact.

  7. The cost-effectiveness of trivalent and quadrivalent influenza vaccination in communities in South Africa, Vietnam and Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Pieter T; Kelso, Joel K; Halder, Nilimesh; Nguyen, Thi-Phuong-Lan; Moyes, Jocelyn; Cohen, Cheryl; Barr, Ian G; Postma, Maarten J; Milne, George J

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To inform national healthcare authorities whether quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIVs) provide better value for money than trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs), we assessed the cost-effectiveness of TIV and QIV in low-and-middle income communities based in South Africa and Vietnam and

  8. Predictors of Adults' Knowledge and Awareness of HPV, HPV-Associated Cancers, and the HPV Vaccine: Implications for Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Kimberly R.; Singh, Shipra

    2018-01-01

    High human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and low HPV vaccine uptake are significant public health concerns. Disparities in HPV-associated cancers and HPV vaccine uptake rates suggest the need for additional research examining factors associated with vaccine acceptance. This study assessed HPV awareness and knowledge and identified…

  9. SurePath Specimens Versus ThinPrep Specimen Types on the COBAS 4800 Platform: High-Risk HPV Status and Cytology Correlation in an Ethnically Diverse Bronx Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, R C; Goldstein, D Y; Einstein, Mark H; Ramos Rivera, G; Schlesinger, K; Khader, S N; Suhrland, M; Fox, A S

    2017-08-01

    To compare the cytologic preparations of 130 cervical specimens (from women of various ethnicities at high risk for human papillomavirus [HPV] infection) using the SurePath (SP) collection system with specimens gathered using the ThinPrep (TP) system, as processed on the Cobas 4800 analyzer, to determine which collection method more accurately identifies HPV infection. In our prospective study, specimens were collected from 130 women of various ethnicities residing in or near Bronx County, NY. The SP-collected specimen was first processed for cytologic findings; if clinical HPV testing was requested on that specimen, it was tested using Hybrid Capture II (HC2) methodology. We tested the remnant SP-collected cell concentrate using the Cobas analyzer. Then, the TP-collected and SP-collected specimens were tested in the same run on that analyzer, and the results were compared. We also compared the results with the concurrent cytologic findings. The results were concordant for overall HR-HPV status in 93.8% of cases. Also, a statistically significant lower cycle threshold value was observed with Cobas testing of specimen concentrates tested via the BD SurePath Pap Test (P = .001), suggesting higher sensitivity compared with specimens tested via the ThinPrep Pap Test. Cobas 4800 HPV testing of SP-collected specimen concentrates yields comparable results to TP-collected specimen concentrates. Based on the limited data that we derived, SP collection may be a more favorable methodology than TP collection for HPV testing of individuals at high risk in our ethnically diverse, urban patient population. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Monitoring the impact of HPV vaccine in males—Considerations and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M.L. Brotherton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we examine the issues involved if national or sub-national programs are considering extending post HPV vaccine introduction monitoring to include males. Vaccination programs are now being extended to include males in some countries, in order to improve population level HPV infection control and to directly prevent HPV-related disease in males such as anogenital warts and anal cancers. Coverage and adverse events surveillance are essential components of post-vaccination monitoring. Monitoring the impact of vaccination on HPV infection and disease in men raises some similar challenges to monitoring in females, such as the long time frame until cancer outcomes, and also different ones given that genital specimens suitable for monitoring HPV prevalence are not routinely collected for other diagnostic or screening purposes in males. Thus, dedicated surveillance strategies must be designed; the framework of these may be country-specific, dependent upon the male population that is offered vaccination, the health care infrastructure and existing models of disease surveillance such as STI networks. The primary objective of any male HPV surveillance program will be to document changes in the prevalence of HPV infection and disease due to vaccine targeted HPV types occurring post vaccination. The full spectrum of outcomes to be considered for inclusion in any surveillance plan includes HPV prevalence monitoring, anogenital warts, potentially pre-cancerous lesions such as anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL, and cancers. Ideally, a combination of short term and long term outcome measures would be included. Surveillance over time in specific targeted populations of men who have sex with men and HIV-infected men (populations at high risk for HPV infection and associated disease could be an efficient use of resources to demonstrate impact. Keywords: Human papillomavirus, Males, Disease surveillance, Vaccine effectiveness

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in breast tumors: prevalence in a group of Mexican patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, David Cantu de; Montiel, Delia Pérez; Nemcova, Jana; Mykyskova, Iva; Turcios, Elmer; Villavicencio, Verónica; Cetina, Lucely; Coronel, Alberto; Hes, Ondraj

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main health problems in developed countries, occupying first place in mortality in women. It is well-known that there are risk factors associated with breast cancer development. Nonetheless, in 50–80% of cases known risk factors have not been identified, this has generated the attempt to identify new factors related with this neoplasia as viral infections. The aim of this work is investigate the prevalence of HPV DNA in patients with breast lesions at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia de Mexico. Fifty-one cases of breast cancer were selected from the files of the institute and compared by age and tumor size with 43 cases of non malignant breast lesions (fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease and phyllodes tumor). Paraffin embedded specimens were selected, HPV DNA was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced for different types of HPV in case of positivity for HPV-DNA. Descriptive analysis of clinical and pathological variables was performed and comparisons between positive and negative cases was done. All patients were mexican, mean age was 53.3, median age of menarche was 13 and median tumor size 9 cms. Cervicovaginal cytology was performed to all patients, 1 patient (1.9%) of cancer group had HPV and none in the other group, no cases were diagnosed with cervical dysplasia. In the group of carcinomas 36 (70.5%) were negative and 15 (29.4%) were positive to HPV-DNA, 10(66.6%) were positive for HPV 16, 3(20%) for HPV 18, two cases (13.4%) were positive for both. In the group of benign conditions all were negative to HPV-DNA. Presence of HPV in breast cancer in our group of cases is high in comparison to other authors; larger numbers of cases need to be analyzed in order to establish the exact role of this virus in the pathogenesis of breast cancer

  12. Human Papillomavirus (HPV in breast tumors: prevalence in a group of Mexican patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetina Lucely

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the main health problems in developed countries, occupying first place in mortality in women. It is well-known that there are risk factors associated with breast cancer development. Nonetheless, in 50–80% of cases known risk factors have not been identified, this has generated the attempt to identify new factors related with this neoplasia as viral infections. The aim of this work is investigate the prevalence of HPV DNA in patients with breast lesions at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia de Mexico. Methods Fifty-one cases of breast cancer were selected from the files of the institute and compared by age and tumor size with 43 cases of non malignant breast lesions (fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease and phyllodes tumor. Paraffin embedded specimens were selected, HPV DNA was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequenced for different types of HPV in case of positivity for HPV-DNA. Descriptive analysis of clinical and pathological variables was performed and comparisons between positive and negative cases was done. Results All patients were mexican, mean age was 53.3, median age of menarche was 13 and median tumor size 9 cms. Cervicovaginal cytology was performed to all patients, 1 patient (1.9% of cancer group had HPV and none in the other group, no cases were diagnosed with cervical dysplasia. In the group of carcinomas 36 (70.5% were negative and 15 (29.4% were positive to HPV-DNA, 10(66.6% were positive for HPV 16, 3(20% for HPV 18, two cases (13.4% were positive for both. In the group of benign conditions all were negative to HPV-DNA. Conclusion Presence of HPV in breast cancer in our group of cases is high in comparison to other authors; larger numbers of cases need to be analyzed in order to establish the exact role of this virus in the pathogenesis of breast cancer.

  13. Presenting symptoms and clinical findings in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpén, Timo; Sjöblom, Anni; Lundberg, Marie; Haglund, Caj; Markkola, Antti; Syrjänen, Stina; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Mäkitie, Antti; Hagström, Jaana; Mattila, Petri

    2018-05-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is divided in two different disease entities depending on HPV involvement. We investigated differences in presenting symptoms and clinical findings in patients with HPV-positive and -negative OPSCC tumors. Altogether 118 consecutive patients diagnosed with primary OPSCC between 2012 and 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital were included. HPV-status of the tumors was assessed by PCR detection of HPV DNA and immunostaining with p16-INK4a antibody. Fifty-one (47.7%) of the patients had HPV-positive and 56 (52.3%) HPV-negative tumors. Forty-nine (49/51, 96.1%) of the HPV+ tumors were also p16+ showing high concordance. The most common presenting symptom among HPV+/p16+ patients was a neck mass (53.1%), whereas any sort of pain in the head and neck area was more frequently related to the HPV-/p16- (60.0%) group. HPV+/p16+ tumors had a tendency to locate in the tonsillar complex and more likely had already spread into regional lymph nodes compared with HPV-/p16- tumors. Smoking and heavy alcohol consumption were significantly more common among HPV-/p16- patients but also rather common among HPV+/p16+ patients. This analysis of symptoms and signs confirm that OPSCC can be dichotomized in two distinct disease entities as defined by HPV status.

  14. Retrospective study of the influence of HPV persistence on outcomes among women with high-risk HPV infections and negative cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Taverna, Francesca; Lombardo, Claudia; Borghi, Chiara; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Chiappa, Valentina; Scaffa, Cono; Ditto, Antonino; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of women diagnosed with high-risk HPV without cytology evidence of cervical dysplasia. The present retrospective observational study enrolled consecutive women aged at least 18 years diagnosed with high-risk HPV types with negative cytology results at the National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy, between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2015. The development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) was assessed. There were 212 patients with high-risk HPV infections with negative cytology included in the analysis. After a mean ± SD follow-up period of 48 ± 33 months, 65 (30.7%) and 26 (12.3%) patients had developed cytologic or histologic cervical dysplasia (low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion [LSIL]/CIN1+) and high-grade cervical dysplasia (CIN2+), respectively. No patients had invasive cancer. No correlations were observed between type-specific HPV infections and LSIL/CIN1+ and CIN2+. HPV persistence correlated with both LSIL/CIN1+ (P<0.001) and CIN2+ (P<0.001) in univariate analyses; a 6-month increase in HPV persistence was associated with increased risk of developing LSIL/CIN1+ (P=0.010) and CIN2+ (P=0.012) in multivariate analyses. Regardless of cytology findings, patients diagnosed with high-risk HPV types should receive strict colposcopy follow-up, particularly with persistent HPV infections. Further prospective studies are needed to defined optimal surveillance strategies for these patients. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  15. Human papilloma virus (HPV) status associated with prognosis of cervical cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harima, Yoko; Miyazaki, Yuki; Imamura, Masahiro; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Sawada, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Our study explored whether the HPV status of tumors is associated with the outcome of radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. A total of 84 patients with cervical cancer (6 stage I, 10 stage II, 49 stage III, and 19 stage IV) who underwent definitive radiotherapy between January 1995 and June 2000 were included in this study. Tumor samples were obtained from all patients by punch biopsy prior to radiotherapy. The presence of HPV and its type were analyzed by PCR-based assay using the consensus primers for E6 and L1 regions. Actuarial methods were used to calculate overall survival, and disease-free survival. A total of 42 patients (50%) had cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. HPV-positive tumors were found in 76.2% (64 cases) of the patients. HPV-negative patients survived significantly shorter compared to the HPV-positive patients in the overall survival (p=0.007) and the disease-free survival (p=0.005). According to multivariate analysis, HPV status is a significant predictor of both overall (p=0.02) and disease-free survival time (p=0.005). These results of this study suggest that HPV-negative patients with cervical carcinoma are have a significantly poorer prognosis after radiotherapy, and may be used as a marker in order to optimize the treatment of patients with this type of cancer. (author)

  16. Human papilloma virus (HPV) status associated with prognosis of cervical cancer after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harima, Yoko; Miyazaki, Yuki; Imamura, Masahiro; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Our study explored whether the HPV status of tumors is associated with the outcome of radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. A total of 84 patients with cervical cancer (6 stage I, 10 stage II, 49 stage III, and 19 stage IV) who underwent definitive radiotherapy between January 1995 and June 2000 were included in this study. Tumor samples were obtained from all patients by punch biopsy prior to radiotherapy. The presence of HPV and its type were analyzed by PCR-based assay using the consensus primers for E6 and L1 regions. Actuarial methods were used to calculate overall survival, and disease-free survival. A total of 42 patients (50%) had cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. HPV-positive tumors were found in 76.2% (64 cases) of the patients. HPV-negative patients survived significantly shorter compared to the HPV-positive patients in the overall survival (p=0.007) and the disease-free survival (p=0.005). According to multivariate analysis, HPV status is a significant predictor of both overall (p=0.02) and disease-free survival time (p=0.005). These results of this study suggest that HPV-negative patients with cervical carcinoma are have a significantly poorer prognosis after radiotherapy, and may be used as a marker in order to optimize the treatment of patients with this type of cancer. (author)

  17. Impact of baseline covariates on the immunogenicity of the 9-valent HPV vaccine - A combined analysis of five phase III clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lone K; Restrepo, Jaime; Moreira, Edson D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The immunogenicity profile of the 9-valent HPV (9vHPV) vaccine was evaluated across five phase III clinical studies conducted in girls and boys 9-15 years of age and young women 16-26 years of age. The effect of baseline characteristics of subjects on vaccine-induced HPV antibody...... responses was assessed. METHODS: Immunogenicity data from 11,304 subjects who received ≥1 dose of 9vHPV vaccine in five Phase III studies were analyzed. Vaccine was administered as a 3-dose regimen. HPV antibody titers were assessed 1 month after dose 3 using a competitive Luminex immunoassay and summarized...... as geometric mean titers (GMTs). Covariates examined were age, gender, race, region of residence, and HPV serostatus and PCR status at day 1. RESULTS: GMTs to all 9 vaccine HPV types decreased with age at vaccination initiation, and were otherwise generally similar among the demographic subgroups defined...

  18. HPV Vaccine Safety PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this 30 second public service announcement, a mother talks about the importance of protecting 11-12 year-old boys and girls with HPV vaccination. (Una madre habla sobre la importancia de proteger a los niños y las niñas de 11 a 12 años con la vacuna contra el VPH.)

  19. HPV Vaccine (:30) (No Tag)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this 30 second public service announcement, a mother talks about the importance of protecting 11-12 year-old boys and girls with HPV vaccination. (Una madre habla sobre la importancia de proteger a los niños y las niñas de 11 a 12 años con la vacuna contra el VPH.)

  20. HPV-16 L1 genes with inactivated negative RNA elements induce potent immune responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollman, Erik; Arnheim, Lisen; Collier, Brian; Oeberg, Daniel; Hall, Haakan; Klingstroem, Jonas; Dillner, Joakim; Pastrana, Diana V.; Buck, Chris B.; Hinkula, Jorma; Wahren, Britta; Schwartz, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Introduction of point mutations in the 5' end of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) L1 gene specifically inactivates negative regulatory RNA processing elements. DNA vaccination of C57Bl/6 mice with the mutated L1 gene resulted in improved immunogenicity for both neutralizing antibodies as well as for broad cellular immune responses. Previous reports on the activation of L1 by codon optimization may be explained by inactivation of the regulatory RNA elements. The modified HPV-16 L1 DNA that induced anti-HPV-16 immunity may be seen as a complementary approach to protein subunit immunization against papillomavirus

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus and human papilloma virus - why HPV-induced lesions do not spontaneously resolve and why therapeutic vaccination can be successful

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burg Sjoerd H

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV and HPV can both cause chronic infections and are acquired during sexual contact. HIV infection results in a progressive loss of CD4+ T cells that is associated with an increased prevalence of HPV infections, type-specific persistence and an increase in HPV-associated malignancies. On the one hand this illustrates the important role of HPV-specific CD4+ helper T-cell immunity, on the other it shows the Achilles heel of the HPV-specific immune response. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART results in a rapid reduction of HIV and a reconstitution of systemic CD4+ T-cell levels. The use of HAART thus has the potential to raise immunity to HPV but to the surprise of many, the incidence of HPV-induced diseases has increased rather than declined since the introduction of HAART. Here, the knowledge on how HPV-induced diseases develop in the face of a non-compromised immune system will be used to explain why the effect of HAART on HPV-induced diseases is modest at best. Furthermore, exciting new data in the field of therapeutic vaccines against HPV will be discussed as this may form a more durable and clinically successful therapeutic approach for the treatment of HPV-induced high-grade lesions in HIV-positive subjects on HAART.

  2. Prevalência dos HPV 16, 18, 45 e 31 em mulheres com lesão cervical Prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 45 and 31 in women with cervical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Rocha Pitta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a prevalência dos HPV 16, 18, 31 e 45 em amostras de raspado cervical de mulheres com alterações celulares e/ou colposcopia sugestiva de lesão de alto grau ou lesão de baixo grau persistente submetidas à conização. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídas 120 mulheres. A análise histológica dos cones cervicais revelou 7 casos de cervicite, 22 de NIC1, 31 de NIC2, 54 de NIC3 e 6 carcinomas invasores. Foram analisadas as amostras de raspado cervical coletadas antes da conização para a presença do DNA-HPV por PCR com os primers de consenso, PGMY09/11. As amostras positivas para DNA de HPV foram testadas para presença do HPV16, 18, 31 e 45 utilizando-se primers tipo específico para esses HPV. RESULTADOS: O DNA-HPV foi detectado em 67,5% das mulheres. O HPV 16 (40% foi o tipo mais prevalente na maioria das lesões, seguido dos HPV 31 (13,3%, 45 (13,3% e 18 (4,1%. Infecções múltiplas ocorreram em 15% dos casos e as infecções por outros tipos de HPV foram detectadas em 14% da amostra. CONCLUSÕES: as infecções pelos HPV 16 e 18 nem sempre ocorrem de maneira solitária (infecção única, estando associadas a outros tipos de HPV em diversas ocasiões.PURPOSE: to determine the prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 31 and 45 in cervical screening samples of women with cellular changes and/or colposcopy suggestive of persistent high grade or low grade lesion who were submitted to conization. METHODS: a total of 120 women were included in the study. Histological analysis of the cervical cones revealed 7 cases of cervicitis, 22 of CIN1, 31 of CIN2, 54 of CIN3, and 6 invasive carcinomas. The cervical screening samples were analyzed before conization for the presence of HPV-DNA by PCR using the consensus primers PGMY09/11. HPV-DNA-positive samples were tested for the presence of HPV16, 18, 31 and 45 using type-specific primers for these HPV. RESULTS: HPV-DNA was detected in 67.5% of the studied women. HPV 16 (40% was the most prevalent type in

  3. Human Papilloma Virus prevalence and type-specific relative contribution in invasive cervical cancer specimens from Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloveras Belén

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer represents an important global public health problem. It is the 2nd most common cancer among women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection is now well-established as a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC development. Only a few studies on HPV prevalence and type-specific distribution in ICC have been conducted in Italy. Aim To describe the prevalence of HPV and the HPV type-specific distribution in ICC cases identified in Rome, Italy. Methods 140 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of primary ICC diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 were identified at the Regina Elena Cancer Institute in Rome (Italy. HPV was detected through amplification of HPV DNA using SPF-10 HPV broad-spectrum primers followed by DEIA and then genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1. Results 134 cases were considered suitable for HPV DNA detection after histological evaluation; and overall, 90.3% (121/134 HPV prevalence was detected. 111 cases had a single HPV type, 4 cases had an uncharacterized type (HPVX and 6 cases had multiple HPV infections. The five most common single HPV types among positive cases were: HPV16 (71/121; 58.7%, HPV18 (12/121; 9.9%, HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 (5/121; 4.1% each. 2 (1.5% of the single infections and 2 (1.5% of the multiple infections contained low risk types. Statistically significant differences in the relative contribution of HPV18 were found when comparing squamous cell carcinomas with adenocarcinomas. Conclusions HPV16 and HPV18 accounted for almost 70% of all the HPV positive ICC cases. The study provides baseline information for further evaluation on the impact of recently introduced HPV vaccines in Italy.

  4. Possible adverse effects of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in the Region of Southern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramon, Cecilie; Lindegaard Poulsen, Christina; Hartling, Ulla Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since the introduction of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine, young girls and women have reported a broad range of symptoms. These have been described as possible adverse effects of the vaccine. In this study, we describe demographic characteristics, symptomatology......, clinical and laboratory test results in patients referred with suspected adverse effects in the Region of Southern Denmark. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study. The patients filled out a questionnaire, were interviewed by a doctor and received a standard physical examination...... still in diagnostic workup when the present study concluded. CONCLUSIONS: The patients reported a wide range of symptoms. We found an overall low prevalence of POTS. It should be further investigated whether these patients might suffer from a functional disorder rather than from adverse effects...

  5. Human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA associated with prognosis of cervical cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harima, Yoko; Sawada, Satoshi; Nagata, Kenji; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The importance of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in the outcome of cervical cancer after radiotherapy remains unknown. Our study explored whether the HPV status of tumors is associated with the outcome of radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 84 patients with cervical cancer (6 Stage I, 10 Stage II, 49 Stage III, and 19 Stage IV) who underwent definitive radiotherapy between January 1995 and June 2000 were included in this study. Tumor samples were obtained from all patients by punch biopsy before radiotherapy. The presence of HPV and its type were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assay using the consensus primers for E6 and L1 regions. Actuarial methods were used to calculate overall survival and disease-free survival. Results: A total of 42 patients (50%) had cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. HPV-positive tumors were found in 76.2% (64 cases) of patients. HPV-negative patients survived for significantly shorter time periods compared to the HPV-positive patients in the overall survival (p=0.007) and the disease-free survival (p=0.005). According to multivariate analysis, HPV status is a significant predictor of both overall (p=0.02) and disease-free survival time (p=0.005). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that HPV-negative patients with cervical carcinoma have a significantly poorer prognosis after radiotherapy, and HPV status may be used as a marker to optimize the treatment of patients with this type of cancer

  6. Comparison of HPV detection technologies: Hybrid capture 2, PreTect HPV-Proofer and analysis of HPV DNA viral load in HPV16, HPV18 and HPV33 E6/E7 mRNA positive specimens.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keegan, Helen

    2012-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing using molecular methods in liquid based cytology (LBC) specimens may be useful as an adjunct to cervical screening by cytology. We compared the positivity rate of the commercially available HPV DNA method hybrid capture 2 (hc2) and the commercially available E6\\/E7 mRNA method PreTect HPV-Proofer in cytological specimens (n=299). LBC specimens collected (n=299) represented the following cervical cytological disease categories: Normal (n=60), borderline nuclear abnormalities (BNA) (n=34), CIN1 (n=121), CIN2 (n=60), CIN3 (n=24). Overall, 69% (205\\/299) of the cases were positive by hc2 and 38% (112\\/299) of the cases were positive by PreTect HPV-Proofer. Concordance rates between the two tests were highest in the high-grade cytology cases (CIN2: 67% and CIN3: 83%) and the normal cytology cases (88%) and lowest in the BNA and CIN1 categories (56% and 52%). HPV DNA viral load analyses were carried out on HPV16 (n=55), HPV18 (n=9) and HPV33 (n=13) samples that were positive by PreTect HPV-Proofer. The sensitivity and specificity of PreTect HPV-Proofer and the hc2 DNA test for the detection of high-grade cytology (i.e. CIN2+) were 71.4% and 75.8% vs 100% and 43.7%, respectively. The relatively low detection rate observed by PreTect HPV-Proofer in the whole range of cytological positive cases, combined with a relatively higher specificity and PPV, suggests that PreTect HPV-Proofer may be more useful than hc2 for triage and in predicting high-grade disease.

  7. The association of pre-treatment HPV subtypes with recurrence of VIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Martinelli, Fabio; Ditto, Antonino; Signorelli, Mauro; Taverna, Francesca; Lombardo, Claudia; Chiappa, Valentina; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Recalcati, Dario; Scaffa, Cono; Perotto, Stefania; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Indini, Alice; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    To assess whether pre-treatment HPV types are associated with recurrence of high-grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN2+). Data of consecutive patients with pretreatment HPV DNA test undergoing treatment for VIN2+ were retrospectively collected. Risk factors promoting the risk of VIN2+ persistence and recurrence were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox hazard proportional models. 64 patients had pretreatment vulvar-vaginal HPV DNA test. Two were excluded due to the presence of synchronous vulvar cancer, thus leaving 62 patients for the final analysis. HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV33 were the most common HPV genotype detected, occurring in 15 (24.2%), 4 (6.5%), 8 (12.9%) and 5 (8.0%) patients, respectively. HPV was not detected in 19 (30.6%) patients. During a mean (SD) follow up of 56.7 (±26.7) months, 10 (16.1%) patients had VIN2+ persistence/recurrence. Mean (SD) lesion-free interval was 51.7 (±31.4) months. Via multivariate analysis, pretreatment infection from HPV31 (HR:46.7(95%CI:4.21,518.4); p=0.02) and HPV33 (HR:77.0(95%CI:6.73,881.9); p<0.001) correlated with an increased risk of VIN2+ persistence/recurrence. Additionally, we observed that patients undergoing surgical excision followed by LASER ablation experienced a trend towards lower recurrence rate than patients undergoing other surgical or medical treatments (HR:0.20(95%CI:0.03,1.09); p=0.05). Two (3.2%) patients developed progression to vulvar cancer. Owing to the inherent biases of the retrospective study design and the small sample size, our data have to be corroborated by larger and prospective studies. HPV31 and HPV33 have a potential role in predicting VIN2+ persistence/recurrence. These findings will be paramount, owing to the implementation of new immunization programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Population-based HPV vaccination programmes are safe and effective: 2017 update and the impetus for achieving better global coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Julia M L; Bloem, Paul N

    2018-02-01

    Persistent oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of cervical cancer, as well as cancers of the anus, penis, vulva, vagina and oropharynx. There is good evidence that prophylactic HPV vaccines are immunogenic and effective against targeted-type HPV infections and type-specific genital lesions, including high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), when administered prior to HPV infection. There is good evidence that HPV vaccines are safe in population usage, with the most frequent adverse event being injection-site reactions. There is evidence to support some cross-protection against non-targeted types occurring following the administration of HPV vaccines. There is limited evidence suggesting that HPV vaccines may be beneficial in preventing future disease in women treated for high-grade CIN. This chapter focuses on the accumulated evidence regarding the global use of the three licensed HPV vaccines including safety, immunogenicity, duration of protection, effectiveness, coverage to date and barriers to higher coverage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Young adults awareness of HPV and vaccine acceptance after introduction of the HPV vaccine in the Dutch national vaccination program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmeink, C.E.; Gosens, K.C.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bekkers, R.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of implementation of the HPV vaccine on HPV knowledge and HPV vaccine acceptance. METHODS: From June until December 2009 in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 698 male and female students aged 18-25 years were recruited and interviewed about HPV, cervical carcinoma and HPV

  10. Deconstructing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Knowledge: Objective and Perceived Knowledge in Males' Intentions to Receive the HPV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Stephenson, Ellen; Perez, Samara; Lau, Elsa; Rosberger, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recently approved for men. To effectively tailor HPV education efforts toward men, it is important to understand what men know about HPV and how this knowledge relates to their decision to receive the vaccine. This study examines how objective HPV knowledge, objective HPV vaccine knowledge,…

  11. Characterization of HPV and host genome interactions in primary head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Gehlenborg, Nils; Freeman, Samuel S.; Danilova, Ludmila; Bristow, Christopher A.; Lee, Semin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Protopopov, Alexei; Yang, Lixing; Seth, Sahil; Song, Xingzhi; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Jianhua; Pantazi, Angeliki; Santoso, Netty; Xu, Andrew W.; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Wheeler, David A.; Hadd