WorldWideScience

Sample records for qc quality control

  1. ChronQC: a quality control monitoring system for clinical next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawari, Nilesh R; Seow, Justine Jia Wen; Perumal, Dharuman; Ow, Jack L; Ang, Shimin; Devasia, Arun George; Ng, Pauline C

    2018-05-15

    ChronQC is a quality control (QC) tracking system for clinical implementation of next-generation sequencing (NGS). ChronQC generates time series plots for various QC metrics to allow comparison of current runs to historical runs. ChronQC has multiple features for tracking QC data including Westgard rules for clinical validity, laboratory-defined thresholds and historical observations within a specified time period. Users can record their notes and corrective actions directly onto the plots for long-term recordkeeping. ChronQC facilitates regular monitoring of clinical NGS to enable adherence to high quality clinical standards. ChronQC is freely available on GitHub (https://github.com/nilesh-tawari/ChronQC), Docker (https://hub.docker.com/r/nileshtawari/chronqc/) and the Python Package Index. ChronQC is implemented in Python and runs on all common operating systems (Windows, Linux and Mac OS X). tawari.nilesh@gmail.com or pauline.c.ng@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Quality control in urodynamics and the role of software support in the QC procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, S; Jarvis, P; Gammie, A; Abrams, P

    2011-11-01

    This article aims to identify quality control (QC) best practice, to review published QC audits in order to identify how closely good practice is followed, and to carry out a market survey of the software features that support QC offered by urodynamics machines available in the UK. All UK distributors of urodynamic systems were contacted and asked to provide information on the software features relating to data quality of the products they supply. The results of the market survey show that the features offered by manufacturers differ greatly. Automated features, which can be turned off in most cases, include: cough recognition, detrusor contraction detection, and high pressure alerts. There are currently no systems that assess data quality based on published guidelines. A literature review of current QC guidelines for urodynamics was carried out; QC audits were included in the literature review to see how closely guidelines were being followed. This review highlights the fact that basic QC is not being carried out effectively by urodynamicists. Based on the software features currently available and the results of the literature review there is both the need and capacity for a greater degree of automation in relation to urodynamic data quality and accuracy assessment. Some progress has been made in this area and certain manufacturers have already developed automated cough detection. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. NGS QC Toolkit: a toolkit for quality control of next generation sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Patel

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies provide a high-throughput means to generate large amount of sequence data. However, quality control (QC of sequence data generated from these technologies is extremely important for meaningful downstream analysis. Further, highly efficient and fast processing tools are required to handle the large volume of datasets. Here, we have developed an application, NGS QC Toolkit, for quality check and filtering of high-quality data. This toolkit is a standalone and open source application freely available at http://www.nipgr.res.in/ngsqctoolkit.html. All the tools in the application have been implemented in Perl programming language. The toolkit is comprised of user-friendly tools for QC of sequencing data generated using Roche 454 and Illumina platforms, and additional tools to aid QC (sequence format converter and trimming tools and analysis (statistics tools. A variety of options have been provided to facilitate the QC at user-defined parameters. The toolkit is expected to be very useful for the QC of NGS data to facilitate better downstream analysis.

  4. General Quality Control (QC) Guidelines for SAM Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  5. Quality control of portal imaging with PTW EPID QC PHANTOM registered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesznyak, Csilla; Kiraly, Reka; Polgar, Istvan; Zarand, Pal; Mayer, Arpad; Fekete, Gabor; Mozes, Arpad; Kiss, Balazs

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of different electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and portal images with the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM registered . Material and methods: characteristic properties of images of different file formats were measured on Siemens OptiVue500aSi registered , Siemens BeamView Plus registered , Elekta iView registered , and Varian PortalVision trademark and analyzed with the epidSoft registered 2.0 program in four radiation therapy centers. The portal images were taken with Kodak X-OMAT V registered and the Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack registered films and evaluated with the same program. Results: the optimal exposition both for EPIDs and portal films of different kind was determined. For double exposition, the 2+1 MU values can be recommended in the case of Siemens OptiVue500aSi registered , Elekta iView registered and Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack registered films, while for Siemens BeamView Plus registered , Varian PortalVision trademark and Kodak X-OMAT V registered film 7+7 MU is recommended. Conclusion: the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM registered can be used not only for amorphous silicon EPIDs but also for images taken with a video-based system or by using an ionization chamber matrix or for portal film. For analysis of QC tests, a standardized format (used at the acceptance test) should be applied, as the results are dependent on the file format used. (orig.)

  6. qcML: an exchange format for quality control metrics from mass spectrometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Mathias; Pernas, Lucia Espona; Nasso, Sara; Bittremieux, Wout; Nahnsen, Sven; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Pichler, Peter; van den Toorn, Henk W P; Staes, An; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Mazanek, Michael; Taus, Thomas; Scheltema, Richard A; Kelstrup, Christian D; Gatto, Laurent; van Breukelen, Bas; Aiche, Stephan; Valkenborg, Dirk; Laukens, Kris; Lilley, Kathryn S; Olsen, Jesper V; Heck, Albert J R; Mechtler, Karl; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gevaert, Kris; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Martens, Lennart

    2014-08-01

    Quality control is increasingly recognized as a crucial aspect of mass spectrometry based proteomics. Several recent papers discuss relevant parameters for quality control and present applications to extract these from the instrumental raw data. What has been missing, however, is a standard data exchange format for reporting these performance metrics. We therefore developed the qcML format, an XML-based standard that follows the design principles of the related mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML, and TraML standards from the HUPO-PSI (Proteomics Standards Initiative). In addition to the XML format, we also provide tools for the calculation of a wide range of quality metrics as well as a database format and interconversion tools, so that existing LIMS systems can easily add relational storage of the quality control data to their existing schema. We here describe the qcML specification, along with possible use cases and an illustrative example of the subsequent analysis possibilities. All information about qcML is available at http://code.google.com/p/qcml. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. qcML: An Exchange Format for Quality Control Metrics from Mass Spectrometry Experiments*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Mathias; Pernas, Lucia Espona; Nasso, Sara; Bittremieux, Wout; Nahnsen, Sven; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Pichler, Peter; van den Toorn, Henk W. P.; Staes, An; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Mazanek, Michael; Taus, Thomas; Scheltema, Richard A.; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Gatto, Laurent; van Breukelen, Bas; Aiche, Stephan; Valkenborg, Dirk; Laukens, Kris; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Heck, Albert J. R.; Mechtler, Karl; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gevaert, Kris; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Martens, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Quality control is increasingly recognized as a crucial aspect of mass spectrometry based proteomics. Several recent papers discuss relevant parameters for quality control and present applications to extract these from the instrumental raw data. What has been missing, however, is a standard data exchange format for reporting these performance metrics. We therefore developed the qcML format, an XML-based standard that follows the design principles of the related mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML, and TraML standards from the HUPO-PSI (Proteomics Standards Initiative). In addition to the XML format, we also provide tools for the calculation of a wide range of quality metrics as well as a database format and interconversion tools, so that existing LIMS systems can easily add relational storage of the quality control data to their existing schema. We here describe the qcML specification, along with possible use cases and an illustrative example of the subsequent analysis possibilities. All information about qcML is available at http://code.google.com/p/qcml. PMID:24760958

  8. RNA-SeQC: RNA-seq metrics for quality control and process optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, David S; Levin, Joshua Z; Sivachenko, Andrey; Fennell, Timothy; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Williams, Chris; Reich, Michael; Winckler, Wendy; Getz, Gad

    2012-06-01

    RNA-seq, the application of next-generation sequencing to RNA, provides transcriptome-wide characterization of cellular activity. Assessment of sequencing performance and library quality is critical to the interpretation of RNA-seq data, yet few tools exist to address this issue. We introduce RNA-SeQC, a program which provides key measures of data quality. These metrics include yield, alignment and duplication rates; GC bias, rRNA content, regions of alignment (exon, intron and intragenic), continuity of coverage, 3'/5' bias and count of detectable transcripts, among others. The software provides multi-sample evaluation of library construction protocols, input materials and other experimental parameters. The modularity of the software enables pipeline integration and the routine monitoring of key measures of data quality such as the number of alignable reads, duplication rates and rRNA contamination. RNA-SeQC allows investigators to make informed decisions about sample inclusion in downstream analysis. In summary, RNA-SeQC provides quality control measures critical to experiment design, process optimization and downstream computational analysis. See www.genepattern.org to run online, or www.broadinstitute.org/rna-seqc/ for a command line tool.

  9. Quality control of portal imaging with PTW EPID QC PHANTOM {sup registered}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesznyak, Csilla; Kiraly, Reka; Polgar, Istvan; Zarand, Pal; Mayer, Arpad [Inst. of Oncoradiology, Uzsoki Hospital, Budapest (Hungary); Fekete, Gabor [Dept. of Oncotherapy, Univ. of Szeged (Hungary); Mozes, Arpad [Oncology Center, Kalman Pandy County Hospital, Gyula (Hungary); Kiss, Balazs [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Markusovszky County Hospital, Szombathely (Hungary)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of different electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and portal images with the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM {sup registered}. Material and methods: characteristic properties of images of different file formats were measured on Siemens OptiVue500aSi {sup registered}, Siemens BeamView Plus {sup registered}, Elekta iView {sup registered}, and Varian PortalVision trademark and analyzed with the epidSoft {sup registered} 2.0 program in four radiation therapy centers. The portal images were taken with Kodak X-OMAT V {sup registered} and the Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack {sup registered} films and evaluated with the same program. Results: the optimal exposition both for EPIDs and portal films of different kind was determined. For double exposition, the 2+1 MU values can be recommended in the case of Siemens OptiVue500aSi {sup registered}, Elekta iView {sup registered} and Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack {sup registered} films, while for Siemens BeamView Plus {sup registered}, Varian PortalVision trademark and Kodak X-OMAT V {sup registered} film 7+7 MU is recommended. Conclusion: the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM {sup registered} can be used not only for amorphous silicon EPIDs but also for images taken with a video-based system or by using an ionization chamber matrix or for portal film. For analysis of QC tests, a standardized format (used at the acceptance test) should be applied, as the results are dependent on the file format used. (orig.)

  10. FQC Dashboard: integrates FastQC results into a web-based, interactive, and extensible FASTQ quality control tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joseph; Pirrung, Meg; McCue, Lee Ann

    2017-06-09

    FQC is software that facilitates large-scale quality control of FASTQ files by carrying out a QC protocol, parsing results, and aggregating quality metrics within and across experiments into an interactive dashboard. The dashboard utilizes human-readable configuration files to manipulate the pages and tabs, and is extensible with CSV data.

  11. FQC Dashboard: integrates FastQC results into a web-based, interactive, and extensible FASTQ quality control tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joseph; Pirrung, Meg; McCue, Lee Ann

    2017-06-09

    FQC is software that facilitates quality control of FASTQ files by carrying out a QC protocol using FastQC, parsing results, and aggregating quality metrics into an interactive dashboard designed to richly summarize individual sequencing runs. The dashboard groups samples in dropdowns for navigation among the data sets, utilizes human-readable configuration files to manipulate the pages and tabs, and is extensible with CSV data. FQC is implemented in Python 3 and Javascript, and is maintained under an MIT license. Documentation and source code is available at: https://github.com/pnnl/fqc . joseph.brown@pnnl.gov. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Osaka Rosai Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Kazuki; Yagi, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Kanta

    2013-01-01

    The linear accelerator with image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was introduced in May 2010. We performed the verification of the IGRT system, id est (i.e.), acceptance test and our original performance test and confirmed the acceptability for clinical use. We also performed daily QA/QC program before the start of treatment. One-year experience of QA/QC program showed excellent stability of IGRT function compared with our old machine. We further hope to establish the more useful management system and QA/QC program. (author)

  13. QC-ART: A tool for real-time quality control assessment of mass spectrometry-based proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfill, Bryan A; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Bramer, Lisa M; Thompson, Allison M; Ansong, Charles K; Clauss, Therese; Gritsenko, Marina A; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Orton, Daniel J; Piehowski, Paul D; Schepmoes, Athena A; Smith, Richard D; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Metz, Thomas O; TEDDY Study Group, The Environmental Determinants Of Diabetes In The Young

    2018-04-17

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomics studies of large sample cohorts can easily require from months to years to complete. Acquiring consistent, high-quality data in such large-scale studies is challenging because of normal variations in instrumentation performance over time, as well as artifacts introduced by the samples themselves, such as those due to collection, storage and processing. Existing quality control methods for proteomics data primarily focus on post-hoc analysis to remove low-quality data that would degrade downstream statistics; they are not designed to evaluate the data in near real-time, which would allow for interventions as soon as deviations in data quality are detected.  In addition to flagging analyses that demonstrate outlier behavior, evaluating how the data structure changes over time can aide in understanding typical instrument performance or identify issues such as a degradation in data quality due to the need for instrument cleaning and/or re-calibration.  To address this gap for proteomics, we developed Quality Control Analysis in Real-Time (QC-ART), a tool for evaluating data as they are acquired in order to dynamically flag potential issues with instrument performance or sample qualityQC-ART has similar accuracy as standard post-hoc analysis methods with the additional benefit of real-time analysis.  We demonstrate the utility and performance of QC-ART in identifying deviations in data quality due to both instrument and sample issues in near real-time for LC-MS-based plasma proteomics analyses of a sample subset of The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young cohort. We also present a case where QC-ART facilitated the identification of oxidative modifications, which are often underappreciated in proteomic experiments. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. HANDBOOK: QUALITY ASSURANCE/QUALITY CONTROL (QA/QC) PROCEDURES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations for hazardous waste incineration require trial burns by permit applicants. uality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) must accompany a trial burn plan with appropriate quality assurance/quality control procedures. uidance on the prepa...

  15. jQC-PET, an ImageJ macro to analyse the quality control of a PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes-Rodicio, J.; Sanchez-Merino, G.; Garcia-Fidalgo, A.

    2015-01-01

    An ImageJ macro has been developed to facilitate the analysis of three PET/CT quality control procedures included in the documents from the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NU2-2007) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (Pub-1393): image quality, uniformity and spatial resolution. In them, the generation of the regions of interest and the analysis are automatized. The results obtained with the software have been compared with those of the commercial software and the literature. The use of jQC-PET allows a standard analysis and the independence of the commercial software. (Author)

  16. jqcML: an open-source java API for mass spectrometry quality control data in the qcML format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittremieux, Wout; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Valkenborg, Dirk; Martens, Lennart; Laukens, Kris

    2014-07-03

    The awareness that systematic quality control is an essential factor to enable the growth of proteomics into a mature analytical discipline has increased over the past few years. To this aim, a controlled vocabulary and document structure have recently been proposed by Walzer et al. to store and disseminate quality-control metrics for mass-spectrometry-based proteomics experiments, called qcML. To facilitate the adoption of this standardized quality control routine, we introduce jqcML, a Java application programming interface (API) for the qcML data format. First, jqcML provides a complete object model to represent qcML data. Second, jqcML provides the ability to read, write, and work in a uniform manner with qcML data from different sources, including the XML-based qcML file format and the relational database qcDB. Interaction with the XML-based file format is obtained through the Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB), while generic database functionality is obtained by the Java Persistence API (JPA). jqcML is released as open-source software under the permissive Apache 2.0 license and can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/proteinspector/jqcml .

  17. Performance evaluation of the QC-6PLUS quality control system in terms of photons and electrons absorbed doses to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Flavia Cristina da Silva

    2004-06-01

    The quality of the treatment in radiotherapy depends on the necessary knowledge of the liberated dose in the tumor and of several other physical parameters and dosimetric that characterize the profile of the radiation field. Worrying about the reliability of some commercial equipment that aim at determining the main parameters of a radiation field in a practical way for daily checks in an institution with radiotherapy service, in this work a study of the performance of the quality assurance system, QC6-Plus manufactured by PTW-Freiburg for daily checks, was developed, in order to assure the use of this equipment with larger reliability level in the routine of quality assurance of the hospitals as well as to make possible its use in the Program of Regulatory Inspections of the Services of Radiotherapy of the Country accomplished by IRD/CNEN. The found results indicate that the system QC6-Plus is perfectly adapted and practical for relative measures of daily and weekly control of the main parameters of clinical beans in agreement with reference values recommended in TECDOC 1151. However for measurements of absolute dose it should not be used because, for beams of electrons the system does not present the necessary characteristics to execute this measure type in agreement with the reference protocol, TRS 398, and for photons of energy 15 MV presented a deviation in relation to the conventional method of absolute dosimetry of 7,7%, that it is a lot above the expected in agreement with TRS 398. (author)

  18. qcML : an exchange format for quality control metrics from mass spectrometry experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walzer, Mathias; Pernas, Lucia Espona; Nasso, Sara; Bittremieux, Wout; Nahnsen, Sven; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Pichler, Peter; van den Toorn, Henk W P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31093205X; Staes, An; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Mazanek, Michael; Taus, Thomas; Scheltema, Richard A; Kelstrup, Christian D; Gatto, Laurent; van Breukelen, Bas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/244219087; Aiche, Stephan; Valkenborg, Dirk; Laukens, Kris; Lilley, Kathryn S; Olsen, Jesper V; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Mechtler, Karl; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gevaert, Kris; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Martens, Lennart

    Quality control is increasingly recognized as a crucial aspect of mass spectrometry based proteomics. Several recent papers discuss relevant parameters for quality control and present applications to extract these from the instrumental raw data. What has been missing, however, is a standard data

  19. Standardization of D2 lymphadenectomy and surgical quality control (KLASS-02-QC): a prospective, observational, multicenter study [NCT01283893

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung-Il; Hur, Hoon; Kim, Youn Nam; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, Min-Chan; Han, Sang-Uk; Hyung, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    Extended systemic lymphadenectomy (D2) is standard procedure for surgical treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) although less extensive lymphadenectomy (D1) can be applied to early gastric cancer. Complete D2 lymphadenectomy is the mandatory procedure for studies that evaluate surgical treatment results of AGC. However, the actual extent of D2 lymphadenectomy varies among surgeons because of a lacking consensus on the anatomical definition of each lymph node station. This study is aimed to develop a consensus for D2 lymphadenectomy and also to qualify surgeons that can perform both laparoscopic and open D2 gastrectomy. This (KLASS-02-QC) is a prospective, observational, multicenter study to qualify the surgeons that will participate in the KLASS-02-RCT, which is a prospective, randomized, clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open gastrectomy for AGC. Surgeons and reviewers participating in the study will be required to complete a questionnaire detailing their professional experience and specific gastrectomy surgical background/training, and the gastrectomy metrics of their primary hospitals. All surgeons must submit three laparoscopic and three open D2 gastrectomy videos, respectively. Each video will be allocated to five peer reviewers; thus each surgeon’s operations will be assessed by a total of 30 reviews. Based on blinded assessment of unedited videos by experts’ review, a separate review evaluation committee will decide whether or not the evaluated surgeon will participate in the KLASS-02-RCT. The primary outcome measure is each surgeon’s proficiency, as assessed by the reviewers based on evaluation criteria for completeness of D2 lymphadenectomy. We believe that our study for standardization of D2 lymphadenectomy and surgical quality control (KLASS-02-QC) will guarantee successful implementation of the subsequent KLASS-02-RCT study. After making consensus on D2 lymphadenectomy, we developed evaluation criteria for completeness of D2

  20. Matlab Toolbox to Perform Secondary Quality Control (2nd QC) on Hydrographic Data (NCEI Accession 0164484)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — High quality, reference measurements of chemical and physical properties of seawater are of great importance for a wide research community, including the need to...

  1. THE MAQC PROJECT: ESTABLISHING QC METRICS AND THRESHOLDS FOR MICROARRAY QUALITY CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microarrays represent a core technology in pharmacogenomics and toxicogenomics; however, before this technology can successfully and reliably be applied in clinical practice and regulatory decision-making, standards and quality measures need to be developed. The Microarray Qualit...

  2. Quality Certification 4 (QC4) for RE4 Performance Plots

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The installation of two new wheels in the end-caps of the RPC system (RE4) is expected during LHC Long Shutdown (LS1). The RE4 upgrade project consists of 72 Super Modules (SM), each one made with 2 RPC chambers, for a total of 144 double-gap RPC chambers. To ensure the quality of the chambers several steps have been established for the Quality Certification (QC) of the RPC chamber production: QC1 (for components), QC2 (for gaps), QC3 (for chambers), QC4 (for chambers and super modules) and QC5 (Commissioning at P5). The results from the QC4 tests, performed for the new RPC, are presented in this note.

  3. Sci-Fri AM: Quality, Safety, and Professional Issues 05: QC Program Management and the Benefits of QATrack+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angers, Crystal Plume; Bottema, Ryan; Buckley, Lesley; Studinski, Ryan [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Treatment unit uptime statistics are typically used to monitor radiation equipment performance. The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre has introduced the use of Quality Control (QC) test success as a quality indicator for equipment performance and overall health of the equipment QC program. Methods: Implemented in 2012, QATrack+ is used to record and monitor over 1100 routine machine QC tests each month for 20 treatment and imaging units ( http://qatrackplus.com/ ). Using an SQL (structured query language) script, automated queries of the QATrack+ database are used to generate program metrics such as the number of QC tests executed and the percentage of tests passing, at tolerance or at action. These metrics are compared against machine uptime statistics already reported within the program. Results: Program metrics for 2015 show good correlation between pass rate of QC tests and uptime for a given machine. For the nine conventional linacs, the QC test success rate was consistently greater than 97%. The corresponding uptimes for these units are better than 98%. Machines that consistently show higher failure or tolerance rates in the QC tests have lower uptimes. This points to either poor machine performance requiring corrective action or to problems with the QC program. Conclusions: QATrack+ significantly improves the organization of QC data but can also aid in overall equipment management. Complimenting machine uptime statistics with QC test metrics provides a more complete picture of overall machine performance and can be used to identify areas of improvement in the machine service and QC programs.

  4. jQC-PET, an ImageJ macro to analyse the quality control of a PET/CT; jQC-PET, una macro de ImageJ para el analisis del control de calidad de un PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes-Rodicio, J.; Sanchez-Merino, G.; Garcia-Fidalgo, A.

    2015-07-01

    An ImageJ macro has been developed to facilitate the analysis of three PET/CT quality control procedures included in the documents from the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NU2-2007) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (Pub-1393): image quality, uniformity and spatial resolution. In them, the generation of the regions of interest and the analysis are automatized. The results obtained with the software have been compared with those of the commercial software and the literature. The use of jQC-PET allows a standard analysis and the independence of the commercial software. (Author)

  5. Establishing daily quality control (QC) in screen-film mammography using leeds tor (max) phantom at the breast imaging unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acaba, K. J. C.; Cinco, L. D.; Melchor, J. N.

    2016-03-01

    Daily QC tests performed on screen film mammography (SFM) equipment are essential to ensure that both SFM unit and film processor are working in a consistent manner. The Breast Imaging Unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute has been conducting QC following the test protocols in the IAEA Human Health Series No.2 manual. However, the availability of Leeds breast phantom (CRP E13039) in the facility made the task easier. Instead of carrying out separate tests on AEC constancy and light sensitometry, only one exposure of the phantom is done to accomplish the two tests. It was observed that measurements made on mAs output and optical densities (ODs) using the Leeds TOR (MAX) phantom are comparable with that obtained from the usual conduct of tests, taking into account the attenuation characteristic of the phantom. Image quality parameters such as low contrast and high contrast details were also evaluated from the phantom image. The authors recognize the usefulness of the phantom in determining technical factors that will help improve detection of smallest pathological details on breast images. The phantom is also convenient for daily QC monitoring and economical since less number of films is expended.

  6. Automated, Miniaturized and Integrated Quality Control-on-Chip (QC-on-a-Chip for Advanced Cell Therapy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWartmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The combination of microfabrication-based technologies with cell biology has laid the foundation for the development of advanced in vitro diagnostic systems capable of evaluating cell cultures under defined, reproducible and standardizable measurement conditions. In the present review we describe recent lab-on-a-chip developments for cell analysis and how these methodologies could improve standard quality control in the field of manufacturing cell-based vaccines for clinical purposes. We highlight in particular the regulatory requirements for advanced cell therapy applications using as an example dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines to describe the tangible advantages of microfluidic devices that overcome most of the challenges associated with automation, miniaturization and integration of cell-based assays. As its main advantage lab-on-a-chip technology allows for precise regulation of culturing conditions, while simultaneously monitoring cell relevant parameters using embedded sensory systems. State-of-the-art lab-on-a-chip platforms for in vitro assessment of cell cultures and their potential future applications for cell therapies and cancer immunotherapy are discussed in the present review.

  7. Performance evaluation of the QC-6PLUS quality control system in terms of photons and electrons absorbed doses to water; Avaliacao do desempenho do sistema de controle da qualidade QC-6Plus em termos de dose absorvida na agua para fotons e eletrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Flavia Cristina da Silva

    2004-06-15

    The quality of the treatment in radiotherapy depends on the necessary knowledge of the liberated dose in the tumor and of several other physical parameters and dosimetric that characterize the profile of the radiation field. Worrying about the reliability of some commercial equipment that aim at determining the main parameters of a radiation field in a practical way for daily checks in an institution with radiotherapy service, in this work a study of the performance of the quality assurance system, QC6-Plus manufactured by PTW-Freiburg for daily checks, was developed, in order to assure the use of this equipment with larger reliability level in the routine of quality assurance of the hospitals as well as to make possible its use in the Program of Regulatory Inspections of the Services of Radiotherapy of the Country accomplished by IRD/CNEN. The found results indicate that the system QC6-Plus is perfectly adapted and practical for relative measures of daily and weekly control of the main parameters of clinical beans in agreement with reference values recommended in TECDOC 1151. However for measurements of absolute dose it should not be used because, for beams of electrons the system does not present the necessary characteristics to execute this measure type in agreement with the reference protocol, TRS 398, and for photons of energy 15 MV presented a deviation in relation to the conventional method of absolute dosimetry of 7,7%, that it is a lot above the expected in agreement with TRS 398. (author)

  8. Improvement of the customer satisfaction through Quality Assurance Matrix and QC-Story methods: A case study from automotive industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicoe, G. M.; Belu, N.; Rachieru, N.; Nicolae, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    Presently, in the automotive industry, the tendency is to adapt permanently to the changes and introduce the market tendency in the new products that leads of the customer satisfaction. Many quality techniques were adopted in this field to continuous improvement of product and process quality and advantages were also gained. The present paper has focused on possibilities that offers the use of Quality Assurance Matrix (QAM) and Quality Control Story (QC Story) to provide largest protection against nonconformities in the production process, throughout a case study in the automotive industry. There is a direct relationship from the QAM to a QC Story analysis. The failures identified using QAM are treated with QC Story methodology. Using this methods, will help to decrease the PPM values and will increase the quality performance and the customer satisfaction.

  9. qcML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walzer, Mathias; Pernas, Lucia Espona; Nasso, Sara

    2014-01-01

    provide tools for the calculation of a wide range of quality metrics as well as a database format and interconversion tools, so that existing LIMS systems can easily add relational storage of the quality control data to their existing schema. We here describe the qcML specification, along with possible...... use cases and an illustrative example of the subsequent analysis possibilities. All information about qcML is available at http://code.google.com/p/qcml....

  10. Quality control and quality assurance of nuclear analytical techniques. Thematic planning of QC/QA in technical co-operations. Report of the external participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innes, R.W.; Bode, P.; Brickenkamp, C.S.; Casa, A.; Abdul Khalik Haji Wood

    1998-02-01

    In areas of trade, health, safety, and environmental protection users of a laboratory's analytical results, for example by governments and private institutions, are increasingly requiring demonstrable proof of the reliability and credibility of the laboratory's analytical results using internationally accepted standards. This is so that the products and the decisions based on these laboratory results will be accepted in the respective national and international communities. These requirements are being imposed, for example by the European Community and others, for products to be imported and can be a significant barrier to trade, especially for developing nations. In addition to this there is a growing need for these laboratories to operate efficiently and effectively to reduce internal waste, to provide reports on time in an economical manner and to become self supporting. The need for change is global and this proposal is for the Agency to pursue a thematic plan for the implementation of quality assurance as partners in development with the selected laboratories using nuclear analytical techniques. This report describes a model project for this thematic approach to confirm the models immediate benefits as well as facilitating long-term sustainability of member states' laboratories. The model is thematic in that it is also applicable to all other projects for which the credibility and reliability of the results of a laboratory's processes and results must be demonstrated. This model project provides a cost effective approach for protecting the Agency's investment in these laboratories and strengthening the ability of these national institutions to define, organize, and manage the application of nuclear technology in their respective countries. This pilot project consists of (1) determining the general levels of knowledge and application of quality assurance principles (as delineated in ISO Guide 25) in the responding laboratories; (2) selecting a trail group of

  11. Quality control in urinalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takubo, T; Tatsumi, N

    1999-01-01

    Quality control (QC) has been introduced in laboratories, and QC surveys in urinalysis have been performed by College of American Pathologist, by Japanese Association of Medical Technologists, by Osaka Medical Association and by manufacturers. QC survey in urinalysis for synthetic urine by the reagent strip and instrument made in same manufacturer, and by an automated urine cell analyser provided satisfactory results among laboratories. QC survey in urinalysis for synthetic urine by the reagent strips and instruments made by various manufacturers indicated differences in the determination values among manufacturers, and between manual and automated methods because the reagent strips and instruments have different characteristics, respectively. QC photo survey in urinalysis on the microscopic photos of urine sediment constituents indicated differences in the identification of cells among laboratories. From the results, it is necessary to standardize a reagent strip method, manual and automated methods, and synthetic urine.

  12. A Total Quality-Control Plan with Right-Sized Statistical Quality-Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, James O

    2017-03-01

    A new Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments option for risk-based quality-control (QC) plans became effective in January, 2016. Called an Individualized QC Plan, this option requires the laboratory to perform a risk assessment, develop a QC plan, and implement a QC program to monitor ongoing performance of the QC plan. Difficulties in performing a risk assessment may limit validity of an Individualized QC Plan. A better alternative is to develop a Total QC Plan including a right-sized statistical QC procedure to detect medically important errors. Westgard Sigma Rules provides a simple way to select the right control rules and the right number of control measurements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of QC_DR software for acceptance testing and routine quality control of direct digital radiography systems: initial experiences using the Italian Association of Physicist in Medicine quality control protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrosi, Andrea; Bertolini, Marco; Borasi, Giovanni; Botti, Andrea; Barani, Adriana; Rivetti, Stefano; Pierotti, Luisa

    2009-12-01

    Ideally, medical x-ray imaging systems should be designed to deliver maximum image quality at an acceptable radiation risk to the patient. Quality assurance procedures are employed to ensure that these standards are maintained. A quality control protocol for direct digital radiography (DDR) systems is described and discussed. Software to automatically process and analyze the required images was developed. In this paper, the initial results obtained on equipment of different DDR manufacturers were reported. The protocol was developed to highlight even small discrepancies in standard operating performance.

  14. The Study on quality control of nuclear power installation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jie

    2008-01-01

    The quality planning, quality assurance and quality control are discussed by applying the quality control (QC) theory and combining the real situation of the Qinshan II project. This paper is practical and plays an active role in instruction of project quality control by applying the above QC theory and control techniques. (authors)

  15. Challenges in setting up quality control in diagnostic radiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 24, No 4 (2015) >. Log in or ... Quality control (QC) on diagnostic radiology equipment form part of the fundamental requirements for the ... Inadequate cooperation by facilities management, lack of QC equipment and insufficient staff form the major challenges in setting up QC in the facilities under study.

  16. Quality Control in Primary Schools: Progress from 2001-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings of research into the quality control (QC) of schools from 2001-2006. In 2001 several targets for QC were set and the progress of 939 primary schools is presented. Furthermore, using cluster analysis, schools are classified into four QC-types that differ in their focus on school (self) evaluation and school…

  17. ATACseqQC: a Bioconductor package for post-alignment quality assessment of ATAC-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jianhong; Liu, Haibo; Yu, Jun; Kelliher, Michelle A; Castilla, Lucio H; Lawson, Nathan D; Zhu, Lihua Julie

    2018-03-01

    ATAC-seq (Assays for Transposase-Accessible Chromatin using sequencing) is a recently developed technique for genome-wide analysis of chromatin accessibility. Compared to earlier methods for assaying chromatin accessibility, ATAC-seq is faster and easier to perform, does not require cross-linking, has higher signal to noise ratio, and can be performed on small cell numbers. However, to ensure a successful ATAC-seq experiment, step-by-step quality assurance processes, including both wet lab quality control and in silico quality assessment, are essential. While several tools have been developed or adopted for assessing read quality, identifying nucleosome occupancy and accessible regions from ATAC-seq data, none of the tools provide a comprehensive set of functionalities for preprocessing and quality assessment of aligned ATAC-seq datasets. We have developed a Bioconductor package, ATACseqQC, for easily generating various diagnostic plots to help researchers quickly assess the quality of their ATAC-seq data. In addition, this package contains functions to preprocess aligned ATAC-seq data for subsequent peak calling. Here we demonstrate the utilities of our package using 25 publicly available ATAC-seq datasets from four studies. We also provide guidelines on what the diagnostic plots should look like for an ideal ATAC-seq dataset. This software package has been used successfully for preprocessing and assessing several in-house and public ATAC-seq datasets. Diagnostic plots generated by this package will facilitate the quality assessment of ATAC-seq data, and help researchers to evaluate their own ATAC-seq experiments as well as select high-quality ATAC-seq datasets from public repositories such as GEO to avoid generating hypotheses or drawing conclusions from low-quality ATAC-seq experiments. The software, source code, and documentation are freely available as a Bioconductor package at https://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/ATACseqQC.html .

  18. Easy QC 7 tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This book explains method of QC 7 tools, mind for using QC 7 tools, effect of QC 7 tools application, giving descriptions of graph, pareto's diagram like application writing way and using method of pareto's diagram, characteristic diagram, check sheet such as purpose and subject of check, goals and types of check sheet, and using point of check sheet, histogram like application and using method, and stratification, scatterplot, control chart, promotion method and improvement and cases of practice of QC tools.

  19. Easy QC 7 tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-04-15

    This book explains method of QC 7 tools, mind for using QC 7 tools, effect of QC 7 tools application, giving descriptions of graph, pareto's diagram like application writing way and using method of pareto's diagram, characteristic diagram, check sheet such as purpose and subject of check, goals and types of check sheet, and using point of check sheet, histogram like application and using method, and stratification, scatterplot, control chart, promotion method and improvement and cases of practice of QC tools.

  20. Comparison of Different Matrices as Potential Quality Control Samples for Neurochemical Dementia Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelental, Natalia; Brandner, Sebastian; Kofanova, Olga; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Andreasson, Ulf; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Mroczko, Barbara; Gabryelewicz, Tomasz; Teunissen, Charlotte; Mollenhauer, Brit; Parnetti, Lucilla; Chiasserini, Davide; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Andreasen, Niels; Brosseron, Frederic; Bahl, Justyna M. C.; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Hausner, Lucrezia; Froelich, Lutz; Labonte, Anne; Poirier, Judes; Miller, Anne-Marie; Zilka, Norbert; Kovacech, Branislav; Urbani, Andrea; Suardi, Silvia; Oliveira, Catarina; Baldeiras, Ines; Dubois, Bruno; Rot, Uros; Lehmann, Sylvain; Skinningsrud, Anders; Betsou, Fay; Wiltfang, Jens; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Winblad, Bengt; Buchfelder, Michael; Kornhuber, Johannes; Lewczuk, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Assay-vendor independent quality control (QC) samples for neurochemical dementia diagnostics (NDD) biomarkers are so far commercially unavailable. This requires that NDD laboratories prepare their own QC samples, for example by pooling leftover cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples.

  1. Effect of quality control implementation on image quality of radiographic films and irradiation doses to patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yuxi; Zhou Qipu; Ge Lijuan; Hou Changsong; Qi Xuesong; Yue Baorong; Wang Zuoling; Wei Kedao

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes in the image quality of radiographic films and the irradiation doses to patients after quality control (QC) implementation. Methods: The entrance surface doses (ESD) to patients measured with TLD and the image quality of radiographic films were evaluated on the basis of CEC image quality criteria. Results: The ESD to patients were significantly reduced after QC implementation (P 0.05), but the post-QC image quality was significantly improved in chest PA, lumbar spine AP and pelvis AP(P0.01 or P<0.05). Conclusion: Significantly reduced irradiation dose with improved image quality can be obtained by QC implementation

  2. Construction QA/QC systems: comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willenbrock, J.H.; Shepard, S.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis which compares the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) systems adopted in the highway, nuclear power plant, and U.S. Navy construction areas with the traditional quality control approach used in building construction is presented. Full participation and support by the owner as well as the contractor and AE firm are required if a QA/QC system is to succeed. Process quality control, acceptance testing and quality assurance responsibilities must be clearly defined in the contract documents. The owner must audit these responsibilities. A contractor quality control plan, indicating the tasks which will be performed and the fact that QA/QC personnel are independent of project time/cost pressures should be submitted for approval. The architect must develop realistic specifications which consider the natural variability of material. Acceptance criteria based on the random sampling technique should be used. 27 refs

  3. Analytical approaches to quality assurance and quality control in rangeland monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Producing quality data to support land management decisions is the goal of every rangeland monitoring program. However, the results of quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) efforts to improve data quality are rarely reported. The purpose of QA and QC is to prevent and describe non-sampling...

  4. Quality Control Assessment of Radiology Devices in Kerman Province, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Jomehzadeh; Ali Jomehzadeh; Mohammad Bagher Tavakoli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Application of quality control (QC) programs at diagnostic radiology departments is of great significance for optimization of image quality and reduction of patient dose. The main objective of this study was to perform QC tests on stationary radiographic X-ray machines, installed in 14 hospitals of Kerman province, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, QC tests were performed on 28 conventional radiographic X-ray units in Kerman governmental hospitals, based ...

  5. Quality Control Practices for Chemistry and Immunochemistry in a Cohort of 21 Large Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Matthew W; Flood, James G; Melanson, Stacy E F; Baumann, Nikola A; Marzinke, Mark A; Rai, Alex J; Hayden, Joshua; Wu, Alan H B; Ladror, Megan; Lifshitz, Mark S; Scott, Mitchell G; Peck-Palmer, Octavia M; Bowen, Raffick; Babic, Nikolina; Sobhani, Kimia; Giacherio, Donald; Bocsi, Gregary T; Herman, Daniel S; Wang, Ping; Toffaletti, John; Handel, Elizabeth; Kelly, Kathleen A; Albeiroti, Sami; Wang, Sihe; Zimmer, Melissa; Driver, Brandon; Yi, Xin; Wilburn, Clayton; Lewandrowski, Kent B

    2018-05-29

    In the United States, minimum standards for quality control (QC) are specified in federal law under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment and its revisions. Beyond meeting this required standard, laboratories have flexibility to determine their overall QC program. We surveyed chemistry and immunochemistry QC procedures at 21 clinical laboratories within leading academic medical centers to assess if standardized QC practices exist for chemistry and immunochemistry testing. We observed significant variation and unexpected similarities in practice across laboratories, including QC frequency, cutoffs, number of levels analyzed, and other features. This variation in practice indicates an opportunity exists to establish an evidence-based approach to QC that can be generalized across institutions.

  6. Quality-control activities of the Hanford Environmental Surveillance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, K.R.; Jaquish, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive approach to quality control (QC) has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Hanford Environmental Surveillance Program. The framework of quality control for the surveillance program has been documented in a QC implementation guide wherein QC requirements are specified and specific responsibilities and authorities are described. Subjects in the guide include the collection, analysis, and reporting of samples as well as equipment calibration and maintenance, training, audits, and record keeping. A QC file and library have been established to store pertinent documentation, records, and references for ready access

  7. Quality control for diagnostic oral microbiology laboratories in European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rautemaa-Richardson, R.; van der Reijden, W.A.; Dahlen, G.; Smith, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Participation in diagnostic microbiology internal and external quality control (QC) processes is good laboratory practice and an essential component of a quality management system. However, no QC scheme for diagnostic oral microbiology existed until 2009 when the Clinical Oral Microbiology (COMB)

  8. SprayQc: a real-time LC-MS/MS quality monitoring system to maximize uptime using off the shelf components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheltema, Richard A; Mann, Matthias

    2012-06-01

    With the advent of high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, the magnitude and complexity of the performed experiments has increased dramatically. Likewise, investments in chromatographic and MS instrumentation are a large proportion of the budget of proteomics laboratories. Guarding measurement quality and maximizing uptime of the LC-MS/MS systems therefore requires constant care despite automated workflows. We describe a real-time surveillance system, called SprayQc, that continuously monitors the status of the peripheral equipment to ensure that operational parameters are within an acceptable range. SprayQc is composed of multiple plug-in software components that use computer vision to analyze electrospray conditions, monitor the chromatographic device for stable backpressure, interact with a column oven to control pressure by temperature, and ensure that the mass spectrometer is still acquiring data. Action is taken when a failure condition has been detected, such as stopping the column oven and the LC flow, as well as automatically notifying the appropriate operator. Additionally, all defined metrics can be recorded synchronized on retention time with the MS acquisition file, allowing for later inspection and providing valuable information for optimization. SprayQc has been extensively tested in our laboratory, supports third-party plug-in development, and is freely available for download from http://sourceforge.org/projects/sprayqc .

  9. Quality control and quality assurance of micromegas readout boards for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    CERN Document Server

    Nanda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The resistive anode boards of the Micromegas detectors for ATLAS NSW upgrade, will be produced in industries. The anode boards will be thoroughly evaluated at CERN following a detailed quality control and quality assurance (QA/QC) procedure. The report describes thoroughly the procedures and the design of a small QC tool for easier measurements of electrical properties of the readout boards.

  10. Serial correlation of quality control data--on the use of proper control charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, P; Zhang, Nevin

    2004-01-01

    Biochemical quality control (QC) data have been reported to be autocorrelated. Serial correlation may increase the rate of false alarms if the traditional exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control chart to monitoring the process mean is used. False alarms are the focus of this paper......, where an alarm is defined as the occurrence of a QC value outside the three standard deviation control limits....

  11. A survey of the practice and management of radiotherapy linear accelerator quality control in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, A; Kearton, J; Hayman, O

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine current radiotherapy linear accelerator quality control (QC) practice in the UK, as a comparative benchmark and indicator of development needs, and to raise awareness of QC as a key performance indicator. All UK radiotherapy centres were invited to complete an online questionnaire regarding their local QC processes, and submit their QC schedules. The range of QC tests, frequency of measurements and acceptable tolerances in use across the UK were analysed, and consensus and range statistics determined. 72% of the UK's 62 radiotherapy centres completed the questionnaire and 40% provided their QC schedules. 60 separate QC tests were identified from the returned schedules. There was a large variation in the total time devoted to QC between centres: interquartile range from 13 to 26 h per linear accelerator per month. There has been a move from weekly to monthly testing of output calibration in the last decade, with reliance on daily constancy testing equipment. 33% of centres thought their schedules were in need of an update and only 30% used risk-assessment approaches to determine local QC schedule content. Less than 30% of centres regularly complete all planned QC tests each month, although 96% achieve over 80% of tests. A comprehensive "snapshot" of linear accelerator QC testing practice in the UK has been collated, which demonstrates reasonable agreement between centres in their stated QC test frequencies. However, intelligent design of QC schedules and management is necessary to ensure efficiency and appropriateness.

  12. The Quality Control Circle: Is It for Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Arthur J.

    From its start in Japan after World War II, the Quality Control Circle (Q.C.) approach to management and organizational operation evolved into what it is today: people doing similar work meeting regularly to identify, objectively analyze, and develop solutions to problems. The Q.C. approach meets Maslow's theory of motivation by inviting…

  13. Perception of quality control by personnel in diagnostic radiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This situation may be due to the perceived lack of interest and lack of cooperation from management of their facilities.The personnel also felt that they did not have sufficient training to implement QC and that QC results were difficult to analyse. Keywords: perception, quality control, personnel, management, diagnostic ...

  14. Quality control for retinal OCT in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippling, S; Balk, Lj; Costello, F

    2015-01-01

    to provide guidance on the use of validated quality control (QC) criteria for the use of OCT in MS research and clinical trials. METHODS: A prospective multi-centre (n = 13) study. Peripapillary ring scan QC rating of an OCT training set (n = 50) was followed by a test set (n = 50). Inter-rater agreement...

  15. Portland cement concrete pavement review of QC/QA data 2000 through 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This report analyzes the Quality Control/Quality Assurance (QC/QA) data for Portland cement concrete pavement : (PCCP) awarded in the years 2000 through 2009. Analysis of the overall performance of the projects is accomplished by : reviewing the Calc...

  16. Application of newly developed Fluoro-QC software for image quality evaluation in cardiac X-ray systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M; Lopez, G; Geambastiani, P; Ubeda, C

    2018-05-01

    A quality assurance (QA) program is a valuable tool for the continuous production of optimal quality images. The aim of this paper is to assess a newly developed automatic computer software for image quality (IR) evaluation in fluoroscopy X-ray systems. Test object images were acquired using one fluoroscopy system, Siemens Axiom Artis model (Siemens AG, Medical Solutions Erlangen, Germany). The software was developed as an ImageJ plugin. Two image quality parameters were assessed: high-contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The time between manual and automatic image quality assessment procedures were compared. The paired t-test was used to assess the data. p Values of less than 0.05 were considered significant. The Fluoro-QC software generated faster IQ evaluation results (mean = 0.31 ± 0.08 min) than manual procedure (mean = 4.68 ± 0.09 min). The mean difference between techniques was 4.36 min. Discrepancies were identified in the region of interest (ROI) areas drawn manually with evidence of user dependence. The new software presented the results of two tests (HCSR = 3.06, SNR = 5.17) and also collected information from the DICOM header. Significant differences were not identified between manual and automatic measures of SNR (p value = 0.22) and HCRS (p value = 0.46). The Fluoro-QC software is a feasible, fast and free to use method for evaluating imaging quality parameters on fluoroscopy systems. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New QC 7 tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This book tells of new QC with 7 tools which includes TQC and new QC with 7 tools which is for better propel, what is QC method to think? what is new QC 7 tool ? like KJ law, PDPC law, arrow and diagram law, and matrix diagram law, application of new QC 7 tools such as field to apply, application of new QC 7 tools for policy management the method of new QC 7 tools including related regulations KJ law, matrix and data analysis, PDPC law and education and introduction of new QC 7 tools.

  18. Survey of Current Status of Quality Control of Gamma Cameras in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Jae Gol; Joh, Cheol Woo

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that good quality control (QC) program is essential for adequate imaging diagnosis using gamma camera. The purpose of this study is to survey the current status of QC of gamma cameras in Republic of Korea for implementing appropriate nationwide quality control guidelines and programs. A collection of data is done for personnel, equipment and appropriateness of each nuclear medicine imaging laboratory's' quality control practice. This survey is done by collection of formatted questionnaire by mails, e mails or interviews. We also reviewed the current recommendations concerning quality assurance by international societies. This survey revealed that practice of quality control is irregular and not satisfactory. The irregularity of the QC practice seems due partly to the lack of trained personnel, equipment, budget, time and hand-on guidelines. The implementation of QC program may cause additional burden to the hospitals, patients and nuclear medicine laboratories. However, the benefit of a good QC program is obvious that the hospitals can provide good quality nuclear medicine imaging studies to the patients. It is important to use least cumbersome QC protocol, to educate the nuclear medicine and hospital administrative personnel concerning QC, and to establish national QC guidelines to help each individual nuclear medicine laboratory

  19. Quality control of the software in the JT-60 computer control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaji, Nobuaki; Kurihara, Kenichi; Kimura, Toyoaki

    1990-07-01

    The JT-60 Control System should be improved corresponding to the experimental requirements. In order to keep the integrity of the system even in the modification the concept of quality control (QC) was introduced in the software development. What we have done for QC activity are (1) to establish standard procedures of the software development, (2) to develop support tools for grasping the present status of the program structure, and (3) to develop a document system, and a source program management system. This paper reports these QC activities and their problems for the JT-60 control system. (author)

  20. Serial correlation of quality control data--on the use of proper control charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, P; Zhang, Nevin

    2004-01-01

    Biochemical quality control (QC) data have been reported to be autocorrelated. Serial correlation may increase the rate of false alarms if the traditional exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control chart to monitoring the process mean is used. False alarms are the focus of this paper, w......, where an alarm is defined as the occurrence of a QC value outside the three standard deviation control limits....

  1. CHALLENGES IN SETTING UP QUALITY CONTROL IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY FACILITIES IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyang, S O; Egbe, N O; Ekpo, E

    2015-01-01

    The Nigerian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NNRA) was established to regulate and control the use of radioactive and radiation emitting sources in Nigeria. Quality control (QC) on diagnostic radiology equipment form part of the fundamental requirements for the authorization of diagnostic radiology facilities in the Country. Some quality control tests (output, exposure linearity and reproducibility) were measured on the x-ray machines in the facilities that took part in the study. Questionnaire was developed to evaluate the frequencies at which QC tests were conducted in the facilities and the challenges in setting up QC. Results show great variation in the values of the QC parameters measured. Inadequate cooperation by facilities management, lack of QC equipment and insufficient staff form the major challenges in setting up QC in the facilities under study. The responses on the frequencies at which QC tests should be conducted did not correspond to the recommended standards; indicating that personnel were not familiar with QC implementation and may require further training on QC.

  2. Ongoing quality control in digital radiography: Report of AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 151

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A. Kyle; Geiser, William; Heintz, Philip; Goldman, Lee; Jerjian, Khachig; Martin, Melissa; Peck, Donald; Pfeiffer, Douglas; Ranger, Nicole; Yorkston, John

    2015-01-01

    Quality control (QC) in medical imaging is an ongoing process and not just a series of infrequent evaluations of medical imaging equipment. The QC process involves designing and implementing a QC program, collecting and analyzing data, investigating results that are outside the acceptance levels for the QC program, and taking corrective action to bring these results back to an acceptable level. The QC process involves key personnel in the imaging department, including the radiologist, radiologic technologist, and the qualified medical physicist (QMP). The QMP performs detailed equipment evaluations and helps with oversight of the QC program, the radiologic technologist is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the QC program. The continued need for ongoing QC in digital radiography has been highlighted in the scientific literature. The charge of this task group was to recommend consistency tests designed to be performed by a medical physicist or a radiologic technologist under the direction of a medical physicist to identify problems with an imaging system that need further evaluation by a medical physicist, including a fault tree to define actions that need to be taken when certain fault conditions are identified. The focus of this final report is the ongoing QC process, including rejected image analysis, exposure analysis, and artifact identification. These QC tasks are vital for the optimal operation of a department performing digital radiography

  3. Proteomics Quality Control: Quality Control Software for MaxQuant Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielow, Chris; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Kempa, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics coupled to liquid chromatography has matured into an automatized, high-throughput technology, producing data on the scale of multiple gigabytes per instrument per day. Consequently, an automated quality control (QC) and quality analysis (QA) capable of detecting measurement bias, verifying consistency, and avoiding propagation of error is paramount for instrument operators and scientists in charge of downstream analysis. We have developed an R-based QC pipeline called Proteomics Quality Control (PTXQC) for bottom-up LC-MS data generated by the MaxQuant software pipeline. PTXQC creates a QC report containing a comprehensive and powerful set of QC metrics, augmented with automated scoring functions. The automated scores are collated to create an overview heatmap at the beginning of the report, giving valuable guidance also to nonspecialists. Our software supports a wide range of experimental designs, including stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), tandem mass tags (TMT), and label-free data. Furthermore, we introduce new metrics to score MaxQuant's Match-between-runs (MBR) functionality by which peptide identifications can be transferred across Raw files based on accurate retention time and m/z. Last but not least, PTXQC is easy to install and use and represents the first QC software capable of processing MaxQuant result tables. PTXQC is freely available at https://github.com/cbielow/PTXQC .

  4. Quality assurance and quality control of nuclear engineering during construction phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhihua; Deng Yue; Liu Yaoguang; Xu Xianqi; Zhou Shan; Qian Dazhi; Zhang Yang

    2007-01-01

    The quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) is a very important work in the nuclear engineering. This paper starts with how to establish quality assurance system of nuclear engineering construction phase, then introduces several experiments and techniques such as the implementation of quality assurance program, the quality assurance and quality control of contractors, the quality surveillance and control of supervisory companies, quality assurance audit and surveillance of builders. (authors)

  5. Quality control and conduct of genome-wide association meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Thomas W; Day, Felix R; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous organization and quality control (QC) are necessary to facilitate successful genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMAs) of statistics aggregated across multiple genome-wide association studies. This protocol provides guidelines for (i) organizational aspects of GWAMAs, and for (ii) QC...

  6. ITC Guidelines on Quality Control in Scoring, Test Analysis, and Reporting of Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allalouf, Avi

    2014-01-01

    The Quality Control (QC) Guidelines are intended to increase the efficiency, precision, and accuracy of the scoring, analysis, and reporting process of testing. The QC Guidelines focus on large-scale testing operations where multiple forms of tests are created for use on set dates. However, they may also be used for a wide variety of other testing…

  7. [Development of quality assurance/quality control web system in radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Mochizuki, Toshihiko; Yokoyama, Kazutoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Nakamura, Satoshi; Ueki, Heihachi; Shiozawa, Keiko; Sasaki, Koji; Fuse, Masashi; Abe, Yoshihisa; Itami, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Our purpose is to develop a QA/QC (quality assurance/quality control) web system using a server-side script language such as HTML (HyperText Markup Language) and PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor), which can be useful as a tool to share information about QA/QC in radiotherapy. The system proposed in this study can be easily built in one's own institute, because HTML can be easily handled. There are two desired functions in a QA/QC web system: (i) To review the results of QA/QC for a radiotherapy machine, manuals, and reports necessary for routinely performing radiotherapy through this system. By disclosing the results, transparency can be maintained, (ii) To reveal a protocol for QA/QC in one's own institute using pictures and movies relating to QA/QC for simplicity's sake, which can also be used as an educational tool for junior radiation technologists and medical physicists. By using this system, not only administrators, but also all staff involved in radiotherapy, can obtain information about the conditions and accuracy of treatment machines through the QA/QC web system.

  8. The quality control theory of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Ladiges

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality control (QC theory of aging is based on the concept that aging is the result of a reduction in QC of cellular systems designed to maintain lifelong homeostasis. Four QC systems associated with aging are 1 inadequate protein processing in a distressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER; 2 histone deacetylase (HDAC processing of genomic histones and gene silencing; 3 suppressed AMPK nutrient sensing with inefficient energy utilization and excessive fat accumulation; and 4 beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR signaling and environmental and emotional stress. Reprogramming these systems to maintain efficiency and prevent aging would be a rational strategy for increased lifespan and improved health. The QC theory can be tested with a pharmacological approach using three well-known and safe, FDA-approved drugs: 1 phenyl butyric acid, a chemical chaperone that enhances ER function and is also an HDAC inhibitor, 2 metformin, which activates AMPK and is used to treat type 2 diabetes, and 3 propranolol, a beta blocker which inhibits BAR signaling and is used to treat hypertension and anxiety. A critical aspect of the QC theory, then, is that aging is associated with multiple cellular systems that can be targeted with drug combinations more effectively than with single drugs. But more importantly, these drug combinations will effectively prevent, delay, or reverse chronic diseases of aging that impose such a tremendous health burden on our society.

  9. The quality control theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladiges, Warren

    2014-01-01

    The quality control (QC) theory of aging is based on the concept that aging is the result of a reduction in QC of cellular systems designed to maintain lifelong homeostasis. Four QC systems associated with aging are 1) inadequate protein processing in a distressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER); 2) histone deacetylase (HDAC) processing of genomic histones and gene silencing; 3) suppressed AMPK nutrient sensing with inefficient energy utilization and excessive fat accumulation; and 4) beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR) signaling and environmental and emotional stress. Reprogramming these systems to maintain efficiency and prevent aging would be a rational strategy for increased lifespan and improved health. The QC theory can be tested with a pharmacological approach using three well-known and safe, FDA-approved drugs: 1) phenyl butyric acid, a chemical chaperone that enhances ER function and is also an HDAC inhibitor, 2) metformin, which activates AMPK and is used to treat type 2 diabetes, and 3) propranolol, a beta blocker which inhibits BAR signaling and is used to treat hypertension and anxiety. A critical aspect of the QC theory, then, is that aging is associated with multiple cellular systems that can be targeted with drug combinations more effectively than with single drugs. But more importantly, these drug combinations will effectively prevent, delay, or reverse chronic diseases of aging that impose such a tremendous health burden on our society.

  10. Automated quality control in a file-based broadcasting workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lina

    2014-04-01

    Benefit from the development of information and internet technologies, television broadcasting is transforming from inefficient tape-based production and distribution to integrated file-based workflows. However, no matter how many changes have took place, successful broadcasting still depends on the ability to deliver a consistent high quality signal to the audiences. After the transition from tape to file, traditional methods of manual quality control (QC) become inadequate, subjective, and inefficient. Based on China Central Television's full file-based workflow in the new site, this paper introduces an automated quality control test system for accurate detection of hidden troubles in media contents. It discusses the system framework and workflow control when the automated QC is added. It puts forward a QC criterion and brings forth a QC software followed this criterion. It also does some experiments on QC speed by adopting parallel processing and distributed computing. The performance of the test system shows that the adoption of automated QC can make the production effective and efficient, and help the station to achieve a competitive advantage in the media market.

  11. Individualized Quality Control Plan (IQCP): Is It Value-Added for Clinical Microbiology?

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Susan E.; Miller, Melissa B.; Hindler, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) recently published their Individualized Quality Control Plan (IQCP [https://www.cms.gov/regulations-and-guidance/legislation/CLIA/Individualized_Quality_Control_Plan_IQCP.html]), which will be the only option for quality control (QC) starting in January 2016 if laboratories choose not to perform Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) [U.S. Statutes at Large 81(1967):533] default QC. Laboratories will no longer be able to use “equivalent ...

  12. Intercomparison of quality control procedures in radiotherapy in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleffens, H.J. van; Meijer, G.J.; Mijnheer, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    A grant was received from the Dutch government to accomplish the development and implementation of guidelines for quality control (QC) of radiotherapy equipment in The Netherlands. QC of electron accelerators, simulators, CT scanners, mould room equipment, dosimetry equipment and treatment planning systems will be considered in this project. The project started in September 1994 with an investigation of QC of medical electron accelerators as performed in all 21 radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands. An extensive questionnaire on QC procedures of electron accelerators was sent to all centres with items related to safety systems, mechanical aspects, radiation leakage, beam data and dosimetry equipment (in total about 60 questions). From the answers the following conclusions can be drawn: There is a large variation in time spent on QC; This QC time strongly depends on the complexity of the linear accelerator; There is a large variation in frequency and tolerance levels of the various tests; The way QC of an item is performed differs considerably (extensive-comprehensive). From these data recommendations specific for the situation in The Netherlands are being prepared and compared with other existing national and international reports. Similar procedures are underway for CT scanners and simulators while for the other equipment minimum guidelines still have to be developed. (author)

  13. New insight into the comparative power of quality-control rules that use control observations within a single analytical run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvin, C A

    1993-03-01

    The error detection characteristics of quality-control (QC) rules that use control observations within a single analytical run are investigated. Unlike the evaluation of QC rules that span multiple analytical runs, most of the fundamental results regarding the performance of QC rules applied within a single analytical run can be obtained from statistical theory, without the need for simulation studies. The case of two control observations per run is investigated for ease of graphical display, but the conclusions can be extended to more than two control observations per run. Results are summarized in a graphical format that offers many interesting insights into the relations among the various QC rules. The graphs provide heuristic support to the theoretical conclusions that no QC rule is best under all error conditions, but the multirule that combines the mean rule and a within-run standard deviation rule offers an attractive compromise.

  14. Quality control for measurement of soil samples containing 237Np and 241Am as radiotracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha Lianmao; Zhang Caihong; Song Hailong; Ren Xiaona; Han Yuhu; Zhang Aiming; Chu Taiwei

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports quality control (QC) for the measurement of soil samples containing 237 Np and 241 Am as radiotracers in migration test of transuranic nuclides. All of the QC were done independently by the QA members of analytical work. It mainly included checking 5%-10% of the total analyzed samples; preparing blank samples, blind replicate sample and spiked samples used as quality control samples to check the quality of analytical work

  15. Development of a standardized susceptibility test for Campylobacter with quality control ranges for ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, and meropenem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, P. F.; Bodeis, S. M.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2004-01-01

    -control (QC) strain. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) QC ranges were determined for two incubation time/temperature combinations: 36degreesC for 48 hr and 42degreesC for 24 hr. Quality-control ranges were determined for ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, and meropenem. For all...

  16. QC in MRI: useful or superfluous?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infantino, S.; Malchair, F.

    1995-01-01

    A European task group has developed a protocol for quality control (QC) in MRI. This protocol is essentially based on the control of image properties (uniformity of the signal, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, distortion, ...). We applied this protocol to the Magnetom SP (Siemens) of the University Hospital in Liege (Belgium). We used the Siemens multi-purpose phantom, which does not permit a QC as complete and accurate as the test objects used in the protocol. The phantom simulates the magnetic properties of the body. The body and head coils were tested with and without a loading annulus that simulates the body conductivity. The following results were obtained: body coil: the signal, SNR, uniformity and artifacts were satisfactory just after a maintenance but had changed significantly and became unacceptable two weeks later. Head coil: the uniformity of the signal and SNR were satisfactory without the annulus. With the annulus the signal increased from the right to the left of the phantom of nearly 20%. This came from a lack of correction of uniformity in the static field. Other parameters (slice width and spacing, resolution and distortion) were satisfactory. Since the head coil problem did not appear during the maintenance we suggest Siemens QC should include observation of intensity profiles. It is recommended to archive the obtained images so that the evolution of performances of the scanner can be followed

  17. QC in MRI: useful or superfluous?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infantino, S; Malchair, F [Biomed Engineering, Boncelles (France)

    1995-12-01

    A European task group has developed a protocol for quality control (QC) in MRI. This protocol is essentially based on the control of image properties (uniformity of the signal, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, distortion, ...). We applied this protocol to the Magnetom SP (Siemens) of the University Hospital in Liege (Belgium). We used the Siemens multi-purpose phantom, which does not permit a QC as complete and accurate as the test objects used in the protocol. The phantom simulates the magnetic properties of the body. The body and head coils were tested with and without a loading annulus that simulates the body conductivity. The following results were obtained: body coil: the signal, SNR, uniformity and artifacts were satisfactory just after a maintenance but had changed significantly and became unacceptable two weeks later. Head coil: the uniformity of the signal and SNR were satisfactory without the annulus. With the annulus the signal increased from the right to the left of the phantom of nearly 20%. This came from a lack of correction of uniformity in the static field. Other parameters (slice width and spacing, resolution and distortion) were satisfactory. Since the head coil problem did not appear during the maintenance we suggest Siemens QC should include observation of intensity profiles. It is recommended to archive the obtained images so that the evolution of performances of the scanner can be followed.

  18. Results of a QC program on dental radiography in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappous, George; Kolitsi, Zoi; Pallikarakis, Nikolas [Medical Physics Department, Patras University, 26 500 Patras (Greece); Arvanitakis, Gerasimos [Achaia branch of Hellenic Dental Association, Pantanasis 70-72, 262 21 (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Quality Control (QC) performed on 99 intraoral dental X-Ray units, installed in equal in number dental offices, at the Achaia prefecture, a region of south west Greece. The QC procedure includes collection of general information, radiation safety checks, beam qualitative and quantitative characteristic checks, and film processing checks, according to international established protocols. The collected data are characterised by a non-uniformity and in some cases indicate a poor performance level. The results of the study on a representative sample of dental X-Ray units helps to map the existing situation and may be useful in the reviewing and optimisation of the applied process. (authors) 10 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Results of a QC program on dental radiography in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappous, George; Kolitsi, Zoi; Pallikarakis, Nikolas; Arvanitakis, Gerasimos

    1998-01-01

    Quality Control (QC) performed on 99 intraoral dental X-Ray units, installed in equal in number dental offices, at the Achaia prefecture, a region of south west Greece. The QC procedure includes collection of general information, radiation safety checks, beam qualitative and quantitative characteristic checks, and film processing checks, according to international established protocols. The collected data are characterised by a non-uniformity and in some cases indicate a poor performance level. The results of the study on a representative sample of dental X-Ray units helps to map the existing situation and may be useful in the reviewing and optimisation of the applied process. (authors)

  20. Quality control of brachytherapy equipment in the Netherlands and Belgium: current practice and minimum requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfrink, Robert J.M.; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Kleffens, Herman J. van; Rijnders, Alex; Schaeken, Bob; Aalbers, Tony H.L.; Dries, Wim J.F.; Venselaar, Jack L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: Brachytherapy is applied in 39 radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands and Belgium. Each institution has its own quality control (QC) programme to ensure safe and accurate dose delivery to the patient. The main goal of this work is to gain insight into the current practice of QC of brachytherapy in The Netherlands and Belgium and to reduce possible variations in test frequencies and tolerances by formulating a set of minimum QC-requirements. Materials and methods: An extensive questionnaire about QC of brachytherapy was distributed to and completed by the 39 radiotherapy institutions. A separate smaller questionnaire was sent to nine institutions performing intracoronary brachytherapy. The questions were related to safety systems, physical irradiation parameters and total time spent on QC. The results of the questionnaires were compared with recommendations given in international brachytherapy QC reports. Results: The answers to the questionnaires showed large variations in test frequencies and test methods. Furthermore, large variations in time spent on QC exist, which is mainly due to differences in QC-philosophy and differences in the available resources. Conclusions: Based on the results of the questionnaires and the comparison with the international recommendations, a set of minimum requirements for QC of brachytherapy has been formulated. These guidelines will be implemented in the radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands and Belgium

  1. How to set up and manage quality control and quality assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschedijk, M.; Hendriks, R.; Nuyts, K.

    2005-01-01

    This document provides a general introduction to clarify the differences between quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA). In addition it serves as a starting point for implementing a quality system approach within an organization. The paper offers practical guidance to the implementation of

  2. Selecting a Risk-Based SQC Procedure for a HbA1c Total QC Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, Sten A; Bayat, Hassan; Westgard, James O

    2017-09-01

    Recent US practice guidelines and laboratory regulations for quality control (QC) emphasize the development of QC plans and the application of risk management principles. The US Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) now includes an option to comply with QC regulations by developing an individualized QC plan (IQCP) based on a risk assessment of the total testing process. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) has provided new practice guidelines for application of risk management to QC plans and statistical QC (SQC). We describe an alternative approach for developing a total QC plan (TQCP) that includes a risk-based SQC procedure. CLIA compliance is maintained by analyzing at least 2 levels of controls per day. A Sigma-Metric SQC Run Size nomogram provides a graphical tool to simplify the selection of risk-based SQC procedures. Current HbA1c method performance, as demonstrated by published method validation studies, is estimated to be 4-Sigma quality at best. Optimal SQC strategies require more QC than the CLIA minimum requirement of 2 levels per day. More complex control algorithms, more control measurements, and a bracketed mode of operation are needed to assure the intended quality of results. A total QC plan with a risk-based SQC procedure provides a simpler alternative to an individualized QC plan. A Sigma-Metric SQC Run Size nomogram provides a practical tool for selecting appropriate control rules, numbers of control measurements, and run size (or frequency of SQC). Applications demonstrate the need for continued improvement of analytical performance of HbA1c laboratory methods.

  3. NEMA NU-1 2007 based and independent quality control software for gamma cameras and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickery, A; Joergensen, T; De Nijs, R

    2011-01-01

    A thorough quality assurance of gamma and SPECT cameras requires a careful handling of the measured quality control (QC) data. Most gamma camera manufacturers provide the users with camera specific QC Software. This QC software is indeed a useful tool for the following of day-to-day performance of a single camera. However, when it comes to objective performance comparison of different gamma cameras and a deeper understanding of the calculated numbers, the use of camera specific QC software without access to the source code is rather avoided. Calculations and definitions might differ, and manufacturer independent standardized results are preferred. Based upon the NEMA Standards Publication NU 1-2007, we have developed a suite of easy-to-use data handling software for processing acquired QC data providing the user with instructive images and text files with the results.

  4. Quality Control Assessment of Radiology Devices in Kerman Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jomehzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Application of quality control (QC programs at diagnostic radiology departments is of great significance for optimization of image quality and reduction of patient dose. The main objective of this study was to perform QC tests on stationary radiographic X-ray machines, installed in 14 hospitals of Kerman province, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, QC tests were performed on 28 conventional radiographic X-ray units in Kerman governmental hospitals, based on the protocols and criteria recommended by the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI, using a calibrated Gammex QC kit. Each section of the QC kit incorporated different models. Results Based on the findings, kVp accuracy, kVp reproducibility, timer accuracy, timer reproducibility, exposure reproducibility, mA/timer linearity, and half-value layer were not within the acceptable limits in 25%, 4%, 29%, 18%, 11%, 12%, and 7% of the evaluated units (n=28, respectively. Conclusion As radiographic X-ray equipments in Kerman province are relatively old with a high workload, it is recommended that AEOI modify the current policies by changing the frequency of QC test implementation to at least once a year.

  5. Seven Basic Tools of Quality Control: An Appropriate Tools for Solving Quality Problems in the Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Neyestani, Behnam

    2017-01-01

    Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa was first total quality management guru, who has been associated with the development and advocacy of using the seven quality control (QC) tools in the organizations for problem solving and process improvements. Seven old quality control tools are a set of the QC tools that can be used for improving the performance of the production processes, from the first step of producing a product or service to the last stage of production. So, the general purpose of this paper was to...

  6. Effect of uncertainty components such as recalibration on the performance of quality control charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, P; Zhang, Nevin

    2005-01-01

    Uncertainty components (recalibration, new reagent lots, etc.) may be the source of random changes in the level of quality control (QC) values, thus causing false alarms. We propose a method for reducing false alarms.......Uncertainty components (recalibration, new reagent lots, etc.) may be the source of random changes in the level of quality control (QC) values, thus causing false alarms. We propose a method for reducing false alarms....

  7. Survey on quality control measurements for nuclear medicine imaging equipment in Finland in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpela, Helinae; Niemelae, Jarkko

    2008-01-01

    Routine quality control (QC) is an essential requirement in nuclear medicine (NM) in order to ensure optimal functioning of equipment. To harmonise the routine QC of NM imaging equipment in Finnish hospital s (planar gamma cameras, SPECT, coincidence gamma cameras, PET), the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) will publish guidelines on QC in collaboration with several hospital physicists. Recommendations will be provided on routine QC measurements and on the frequency of testing. It is also planned to provide recommendations for the acceptance criteria when assessing different performance parameters for NM imaging equipment. In order to determine what performance parameters of NM equipment are currently measured in hospitals, how frequently they are measured and what acceptance criteria are used, a survey was carried out on the QC of NM equipment in Finland during 2006. (author)

  8. Quality Assurance and Quality Control Practices for Rehabilitation of Sewer and Water Mains

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program, several areas of research are being pursued, including a review of quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) practices and acceptance testing during the installation of reha...

  9. Comparison of quality control software tools for diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bilan; Zhu, Tong; Zhong, Jianhui

    2015-04-01

    Image quality of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is critical for image interpretation, diagnostic accuracy and efficiency. However, DTI is susceptible to numerous detrimental artifacts that may impair the reliability and validity of the obtained data. Although many quality control (QC) software tools are being developed and are widely used and each has its different tradeoffs, there is still no general agreement on an image quality control routine for DTIs, and the practical impact of these tradeoffs is not well studied. An objective comparison that identifies the pros and cons of each of the QC tools will be helpful for the users to make the best choice among tools for specific DTI applications. This study aims to quantitatively compare the effectiveness of three popular QC tools including DTI studio (Johns Hopkins University), DTIprep (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Iowa and University of Utah) and TORTOISE (National Institute of Health). Both synthetic and in vivo human brain data were used to quantify adverse effects of major DTI artifacts to tensor calculation as well as the effectiveness of different QC tools in identifying and correcting these artifacts. The technical basis of each tool was discussed, and the ways in which particular techniques affect the output of each of the tools were analyzed. The different functions and I/O formats that three QC tools provide for building a general DTI processing pipeline and integration with other popular image processing tools were also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An overview of quality control practices in Ontario with particular reference to cholesterol analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, S; Webb, S; Henderson, A R; Cheung, C M; Nazir, D J; Richardson, H

    1999-03-01

    The Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program (LPTP) assesses the analytical performance of all licensed laboratories in Ontario. The LPTP Enzymes, Cardiac Markers, and Lipids Committee conducted a "Patterns of Practice" survey to assess the in-house quality control (QC) practices of laboratories in Ontario using cholesterol as the QC paradigm. The survey was questionnaire-based seeking information on statistical calculations, software rules, review process and data retention, and so on. Copies of the in-house cholesterol QC graphs were requested. A total of 120 of 210 laboratories were randomly chosen to receive the questionnaires during 1995 and 1996; 115 laboratories responded, although some did not answer all questions. The majority calculate means and standard deviations (SD) every month, using anywhere from 4 to >100 data points. 65% use a fixed mean and SD, while 17% use means calculated from the previous month. A few use a floating or cumulative mean. Some laboratories that do not use fixed means use a fixed SD. About 90% use some form of statistical quality control rules. The most common rules used to detect random error are 1(3s)/R4s while 2(2s)/4(1s)/10x are used for systematic errors. About 20% did not assay any QC at levels >5.5 mmol/L. Quality control data are reviewed daily (technologists), weekly and monthly (supervisors/directors). Most laboratories retain their QC records for up to 3 years on paper and magnetic media. On some QC graphs the mean and SD, QC product lot number, or reference to action logs are not apparent. Quality control practices in Ontario are, therefore, disappointing. Improvement is required in the use of clinically appropriate concentrations of QC material and documentation on QC graphs.

  11. Quality control of 131I treatment of graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zeng; Liu Guoqiang

    2009-01-01

    To make a preliminary quality control (QC) criteria and apply on the various stages of clinic 131 I treatment of Graves' disease in order to decrease the early happening of hypothyroidism and enhance the onetime 131 I cure rate of Graves' disease, the quality control criteria in the stochastic outpatient with 131 I treatment, such as plan of the indication, contraindication, method of treatment, matters needing attention, follow-up observation and curative effect appraisal, patient selection, RAIU, thyroid gland weight measurement and 131 I dose criteria for the various steps of 131 I medication were determined. The 131 I treatment effects of Graves' disease including the once-cure rate, the improving rate, duplicate cure rate and the early happening rate of hypothyroidism were analyzed in patients with applying QC and without QC ccriteria. The results showed that the oncecure rate in patients with applying QC criteria was increased from 76.6% to 90.9% (P≤0.01); the improving rate was decreased from 12.2% to 7.0% (P≤0.01); the duplicate cure rate was increased from 90.1% to 93.0% (P>0.05); the early happening rate of hypothyroidism was decreased from 11.0% to 2.1% (P≤0.01). The 131 I treatment of Graves' disease applying with QC criteria had tremendously improved the oncecure rate and decreased the early happening of hypothyroidism rate. (authors)

  12. Quality control for diagnostic oral microbiology laboratories in European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Smith

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Participation in diagnostic microbiology internal and external quality control (QC processes is good laboratory practice and an essential component of a quality management system. However, no QC scheme for diagnostic oral microbiology existed until 2009 when the Clinical Oral Microbiology (COMB Network was created. At the European Oral Microbiology Workshop in 2008, 12 laboratories processing clinical oral microbiological samples were identified. All these were recruited to participate into the study and six laboratories from six European countries completed both the online survey and the first QC round. Three additional laboratories participated in the second round. Based on the survey, European oral microbiology laboratories process a significant (mean per laboratory 4,135 number of diagnostic samples from the oral cavity annually. A majority of the laboratories did not participate in any internal or external QC programme and nearly half of the laboratories did not have standard operating procedures for the tests they performed. In both QC rounds, there was a large variation in the results, interpretation and reporting of antibiotic susceptibility testing among the laboratories. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate the need for harmonisation of laboratory processing methods and interpretation of results for oral microbiology specimens. The QC rounds highlighted the value of external QC in evaluating the efficacy and safety of processes, materials and methods used in the laboratory. The use of standardised methods is also a prerequisite for multi-centre epidemiological studies that can provide important information on emerging microbes and trends in anti-microbial susceptibility for empirical prescribing in oro-facial infections.

  13. Developing Product Quality Control for Standardization of Tsetse Mass Production. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The recent Pan-African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC) provides a mechanism within which SIT will be one of the major components of an integrated areawide approach to the establishment of tsetse fly-free areas. Currently world-wide tsetse production is 1/40 of the projected requirement in 2006. To achieve this objective it is essential that quality control (QC) measures suitable for the expanded production be in place. Therefore, improved QC methodology has become a top priority. Improvements in QC methodology will help to ensure the attainment of these production goals and improve quality of rearing, minimize production costs and generate trained QC and production staff required to successfully produce flies and monitor their quality and suitability for release. The proposed CRP is designed to address these issues.

  14. Quality control ranges for testing broth microdilution susceptibility of Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilium to nine antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multi-laboratory broth microdilution method trial was performed to standardize the specialized test conditions required for fish pathogens Flavobacterium columnare and F. pyschrophilum. Nine laboratories tested the quality control (QC) strains Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicid...

  15. Toward standardising gamma camera quality control procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhorayef, M.A.; Alnaaimi, M.A.; Alduaij, M.A.; Mohamed, M.O.; Ibahim, S.Y.; Alkandari, F.A.; Bradley, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    Attaining high standards of efficiency and reliability in the practice of nuclear medicine requires appropriate quality control (QC) programs. For instance, the regular evaluation and comparison of extrinsic and intrinsic flood-field uniformity enables the quick correction of many gamma camera problems. Whereas QC tests for uniformity are usually performed by exposing the gamma camera crystal to a uniform flux of gamma radiation from a source of known activity, such protocols can vary significantly. Thus, there is a need for optimization and standardization, in part to allow direct comparison between gamma cameras from different vendors. In the present study, intrinsic uniformity was examined as a function of source distance, source activity, source volume and number of counts. The extrinsic uniformity and spatial resolution were also examined. Proper standard QC procedures need to be implemented because of the continual development of nuclear medicine imaging technology and the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of hybrid imaging system data. The present work seeks to promote a set of standard testing procedures to contribute to the delivery of safe and effective nuclear medicine services. - Highlights: • Optimal parameters for quality control of the gamma camera are proposed. • For extrinsic and intrinsic uniformity a minimum of 15,000 counts is recommended. • For intrinsic flood uniformity the activity should not exceed 100 µCi (3.7 MBq). • For intrinsic uniformity the source to detector distance should be at least 60 cm. • The bar phantom measurement must be performed with at least 15 million counts.

  16. Software for creating quality control database in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeva, M.; Spassov, G.; Tabakov, S.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes a PC based program with database for quality control (QC). It keeps information about all surveyed equipment and measured parameters. The first function of the program is to extract information from old (existing) MS Excel spreadsheets with QC surveys. The second function is used for input of measurements which are automatically organized in MS Excel spreadsheets and built into the database. The spreadsheets are based on the protocols described in the EMERALD Training Scheme. In addition, the program can make statistics of all measured parameters, both in absolute term and in time

  17. Quality Control of Mega Voltage Portal Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diklic, A.; Dundara Debeljuh, D.; Jurkovic, S.; Smilovic Radojcic, D.; Svabic Kolacio; Kasabasic, M.; Faj, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) is a system used to verify either the correct positioning of the patient during radiotherapy treatment or the linear accelerator beam parameters. The correct position of the patient corresponds to the position at which the patient was scanned at the CT simulator and according to which the therapy plan was made and optimized. Regarding this, besides the advanced treatment planning system and optimized treatment planning techniques, the day-to-day reproduction of simulated conditions is of great importance for the treatment outcome. Therefore, to verify the patient set-up portal imaging should be applied prior to the first treatment session and repeated according to treatment prescriptions during the treatment. In order to achieve full functionality and precision of the EPID, it must be included in radiotherapy Quality Control (QC) programme. The QC of the Mega Voltage portal imaging system was separated in two parts. In the first, the QC of the detector parameters should be performed. For this purpose, the FC2 and QC3 phantoms should be used, along with the Portal Image Processing System program (PIPSpro) package for data analysis. The second part of the QC of the linear accelerator's portal imaging system should include the QC of the CBCT. In this part a set of predefined manufacturer's tests using two different phantoms, one for the geometry calibration and the other for the image quality evaluation, should be performed. Also, the treatment conditions should be simulated using anthropomorphic phantoms and dose distributions for particular EPID protocols should be measured. Procedures for quality control of the portal imaging system developed and implemented at University Hospital Rijeka are presented in this paper.(author)

  18. The quality control program for an Ontario Hydro operated thermoluminescence dosimetry service at nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, B.H.; Walsh, M.L.

    1975-11-01

    An essential aspect of the Ontario Hydro TLD service is the operation of an acceptable quality control (QC) program. The QC program which has been generally accepted by the A.E.C.B. is presented in this document. The aims of the program are as follows: (1) to ensure that Ontario Hydro maintains an acceptable standard of dosimetry; (2) to be able to demonstrate to any interested party that the dose measurements for individual workers have a high degree of credibility. (author)

  19. Eight years of quality control in Bulgaria: impact on mammography practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramova-Cholakova, S; Lilkov, G; Kaneva, M; Terziev, K; Nakov, I; Mutkurov, N; Kovacheva, D; Ivanova, M; Vasilev, D

    2015-07-01

    The requirements for quality control (QC) in diagnostic radiology were introduced in Bulgarian legislation in 2005. Hospital medical physicists and several private medical physics groups provide QC services to radiology departments. The aim of this study was to analyse data from QC tests in mammography and to investigate the impact of QC introduction on mammography practice in the country. The study was coordinated by the National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection. All medical physics services were requested to fill in standardised forms with information about most important parameters routinely measured during QC. All QC service providers responded. Results demonstrated significant improvement of practice since the introduction of QC, with reduction of established deviations from 65 % during the first year to 7 % in the last year. The systems that do not meet the acceptability criteria were suspended from use. Performance of automatic exposure control and digital detectors are not regularly tested because of the absence of requirements in the legislation. The need of updated guidance and training of medical physicists to reflect the change in technology was demonstrated. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Implementation of quality assurance and quality control in the Nuclear Analytical Laboratory of the Estonian Radiation Protection Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeoep, T.; Jakobson, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Analytical Laboratory of the Estonian Radiation Protection Centre is in the process of implementing the system of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) in the framework of the IAEA TC Project RER/2/004/ 'QA/QC of Nuclear Analytical Techniques'. The draft Quality Manual with annexes has been prepared accordingly to the ISO 17025 Guide, documents and other printed material delivered on the seminars of the project. The laboratory supply has been supplemented with necessary equipment for guaranteeing of quality. Proficiency testing included in the project has been performed successfully. (author)

  1. quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skujina, A.; Purina, S.; Riekstina, D.

    1999-01-01

    The optimal objects: soils, spruce needles and bracken ferns were found for the environmental monitoring in the regions of possible radioactive contamination - near SalaspiIs nuclear reactor and Ignalina nuclear power plant. The determination of Sr-90 was based on the radiochemical separation of Sr-90 (=Y-90) by HDEHP extraction and counting the Cerenkov radiation. The quality control of the results was carried out. (authors)

  2. Development and prospective evaluation of an automated software system for quality control of quantitative 99mTc-MAG3 renal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folks, Russell D; Garcia, Ernest V; Taylor, Andrew T

    2007-03-01

    Quantitative nuclear renography has numerous potential sources of error. We previously reported the initial development of a computer software module for comprehensively addressing the issue of quality control (QC) in the analysis of radionuclide renal images. The objective of this study was to prospectively test the QC software. The QC software works in conjunction with standard quantitative renal image analysis using a renal quantification program. The software saves a text file that summarizes QC findings as possible errors in user-entered values, calculated values that may be unreliable because of the patient's clinical condition, and problems relating to acquisition or processing. To test the QC software, a technologist not involved in software development processed 83 consecutive nontransplant clinical studies. The QC findings of the software were then tabulated. QC events were defined as technical (study descriptors that were out of range or were entered and then changed, unusually sized or positioned regions of interest, or missing frames in the dynamic image set) or clinical (calculated functional values judged to be erroneous or unreliable). Technical QC events were identified in 36 (43%) of 83 studies. Clinical QC events were identified in 37 (45%) of 83 studies. Specific QC events included starting the camera after the bolus had reached the kidney, dose infiltration, oversubtraction of background activity, and missing frames in the dynamic image set. QC software has been developed to automatically verify user input, monitor calculation of renal functional parameters, summarize QC findings, and flag potentially unreliable values for the nuclear medicine physician. Incorporation of automated QC features into commercial or local renal software can reduce errors and improve technologist performance and should improve the efficiency and accuracy of image interpretation.

  3. Use of Six Sigma Worksheets for assessment of internal and external failure costs associated with candidate quality control rules for an ADVIA 120 hematology analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cian, Francesco; Villiers, Elisabeth; Archer, Joy; Pitorri, Francesca; Freeman, Kathleen

    2014-06-01

    Quality control (QC) validation is an essential tool in total quality management of a veterinary clinical pathology laboratory. Cost-analysis can be a valuable technique to help identify an appropriate QC procedure for the laboratory, although this has never been reported in veterinary medicine. The aim of this study was to determine the applicability of the Six Sigma Quality Cost Worksheets in the evaluation of possible candidate QC rules identified by QC validation. Three months of internal QC records were analyzed. EZ Rules 3 software was used to evaluate candidate QC procedures, and the costs associated with the application of different QC rules were calculated using the Six Sigma Quality Cost Worksheets. The costs associated with the current and the candidate QC rules were compared, and the amount of cost savings was calculated. There was a significant saving when the candidate 1-2.5s, n = 3 rule was applied instead of the currently utilized 1-2s, n = 3 rule. The savings were 75% per year (£ 8232.5) based on re-evaluating all of the patient samples in addition to the controls, and 72% per year (£ 822.4) based on re-analyzing only the control materials. The savings were also shown to change accordingly with the number of samples analyzed and with the number of daily QC procedures performed. These calculations demonstrated the importance of the selection of an appropriate QC procedure, and the usefulness of the Six Sigma Costs Worksheet in determining the most cost-effective rule(s) when several candidate rules are identified by QC validation. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  4. In-house quality audit and benefits of some quality control procedures in the quality assurance of TL dosimetry system at NRPB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A number of Quality Control (QC) procedures have been introduced into the running and operation of the NRPB personal monitoring services. Those described here apply to the whole-body TL dosimetry system. These QC procedures comprise Quality Assurance (QA) of incoming raw materials and equipment, reader stabilisation, daily, routine and periodic QA checks on all phases of the service. In-house quality audit, periodic internal and external 'blind QA checks' on the dosimetry system as a whole have assured the continuing high quality and reliability of the NRPB TL dosimetry service for assessing body and skin doses of radiation workers from external photon and beta radiations. (author)

  5. Quality control and quality assurance in individual monitoring of ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, J.C.; Lindborg, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the programmes and approaches that are to be considered in developing and introducing quality assurance and quality control procedures in individual monitoring services. Quality assurance and quality control in individual monitoring services are essential to maintain quality and are of increasing importance in order to meet the requirements of national regulations and international standards and guidelines. It is recommended here that all organisations offering individual monitoring services should run their services based on the principles of Quality System as given in the European Standard EN45001 and maintain a property resources QA/QC programme as an integral part of their operations. All aspects of QA/QC in individual monitoring services starting from the initial selection, installation, calibration, and operation to the final products including dose reporting, dose record keeping, dealing with customers' complaints and product liability issues have been discussed. (Author)

  6. Development and experience of quality control methods for digital breast tomosynthesis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudley, Cecilia J; Young, Kenneth C; Looney, Padraig; Gilbert, Fiona J

    2015-01-01

    To develop tomosynthesis quality control (QC) test methods and use them alongside established two-dimensional (2D) QC tests to measure the performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems used in a comparative trial with 2D mammography. DBT QC protocols and associated analysis were developed, incorporating adaptions of some 2D tests as well as some novel tests. The tomosynthesis tests were: mean glandular dose to the standard breast model; contrast-to-noise ratio in reconstructed focal planes; geometric distortion; artefact spread; threshold contrast detail detection in reconstructed focal planes, alignment of the X-ray beam to the reconstructed image and missed tissue; reproducibility of the tomosynthesis exposure; and homogeneity of the reconstructed focal planes. Summaries of results from the tomosynthesis QC tests are presented together with some 2D results for comparison. The tomosynthesis QC tests and analysis methods developed were successfully applied. The lessons learnt, which are detailed in the Discussion section, may be helpful to others embarking on DBT QC programmes. DBT performance test equipment and analysis methods have been developed. The experience gained has contributed to the subsequent drafting of DBT QC protocols in the UK and Europe.

  7. The Development of Quality Control Genotyping Approaches: A Case Study Using Elite Maize Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafa Chen

    Full Text Available Quality control (QC of germplasm identity and purity is a critical component of breeding and conservation activities. SNP genotyping technologies and increased availability of markers provide the opportunity to employ genotyping as a low-cost and robust component of this QC. In the public sector available low-cost SNP QC genotyping methods have been developed from a very limited panel of markers of 1,000 to 1,500 markers without broad selection of the most informative SNPs. Selection of optimal SNPs and definition of appropriate germplasm sampling in addition to platform section impact on logistical and resource-use considerations for breeding and conservation applications when mainstreaming QC. In order to address these issues, we evaluated the selection and use of SNPs for QC applications from large DArTSeq data sets generated from CIMMYT maize inbred lines (CMLs. Two QC genotyping strategies were developed, the first is a "rapid QC", employing a small number of SNPs to identify potential mislabeling of seed packages or plots, the second is a "broad QC", employing a larger number of SNP, used to identify each germplasm entry and to measure heterogeneity. The optimal marker selection strategies combined the selection of markers with high minor allele frequency, sampling of clustered SNP in proportion to marker cluster distance and selecting markers that maintain a uniform genomic distribution. The rapid and broad QC SNP panels selected using this approach were further validated using blind test assessments of related re-generation samples. The influence of sampling within each line was evaluated. Sampling 192 individuals would result in close to 100% possibility of detecting a 5% contamination in the entry, and approximately a 98% probability to detect a 2% contamination of the line. These results provide a framework for the establishment of QC genotyping. A comparison of financial and time costs for use of these approaches across different

  8. DTIPrep: quality control of diffusion-weighted images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ipek; Farzinfar, Mahshid; Matsui, Joy; Budin, Francois; Liu, Zhexing; Gerig, Guido; Johnson, Hans J; Styner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, diffusion MRI (dMRI) studies of the human and animal brain have been used to investigate a multitude of pathologies and drug-related effects in neuroscience research. Study after study identifies white matter (WM) degeneration as a crucial biomarker for all these diseases. The tool of choice for studying WM is dMRI. However, dMRI has inherently low signal-to-noise ratio and its acquisition requires a relatively long scan time; in fact, the high loads required occasionally stress scanner hardware past the point of physical failure. As a result, many types of artifacts implicate the quality of diffusion imagery. Using these complex scans containing artifacts without quality control (QC) can result in considerable error and bias in the subsequent analysis, negatively affecting the results of research studies using them. However, dMRI QC remains an under-recognized issue in the dMRI community as there are no user-friendly tools commonly available to comprehensively address the issue of dMRI QC. As a result, current dMRI studies often perform a poor job at dMRI QC. Thorough QC of dMRI will reduce measurement noise and improve reproducibility, and sensitivity in neuroimaging studies; this will allow researchers to more fully exploit the power of the dMRI technique and will ultimately advance neuroscience. Therefore, in this manuscript, we present our open-source software, DTIPrep, as a unified, user friendly platform for thorough QC of dMRI data. These include artifacts caused by eddy-currents, head motion, bed vibration and pulsation, venetian blind artifacts, as well as slice-wise and gradient-wise intensity inconsistencies. This paper summarizes a basic set of features of DTIPrep described earlier and focuses on newly added capabilities related to directional artifacts and bias analysis.

  9. Aminoacyl-tRNA quality control is required for efficient activation of the TOR pathway regulator Gln3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, Kyle; Mann, Rebecca; Kyle, Amanda; Reynolds, Noah; Ibba, Michael

    2017-09-14

    The aminoacylation status of the cellular tRNA pool regulates both general amino acid control (GAAC) and target of rapamycin (TOR) stress response pathways in yeast. Consequently, fidelity of translation at the level of aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis plays a central role in determining accuracy and sensitivity of stress responses. To investigate effects of translational quality control (QC) on cell physiology under stress conditions, phenotypic microarray analyses were used to identify changes in QC deficient cells. Nitrogen source growth assays showed QC deficient yeast grew differently compared to WT. The QC deficient strain was more tolerant to caffeine treatment than wild type through altered interactions with the TOR and GAAC pathways. Increased caffeine tolerance of the QC deficient strain was consistent with the observation that the activity of Gln3p, a transcription factor controlled by the TOR pathway, is decreased in the QC deficient strain compared to WT. GCN4 translation, which is typically repressed in the absence of nutritional stress, was enhanced in the QC deficient strain through TOR inhibition. QC did not impact cell cycle regulation; however, the chronological lifespan of QC deficient yeast strains decreased compared to wild type, likely due to translational errors and alteration of the TOR-associated regulon. These findings support the idea that changes in translational fidelity provide a mechanism of cellular adaptation by modulating TOR activity. This, in turn, supports a central role for aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis QC in the integrated stress response by maintaining the proper aa-tRNA pools necessary to coordinate the GAAC and TOR.

  10. Quality control and assurance for validation of DOS/I measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert; Durkin, Amanda; Kwong, Richard; Quang, Timothy; Hill, Brian; Tromberg, Bruce J.; MacKinnon, Nick; Mantulin, William W.

    2010-02-01

    Ongoing multi-center clinical trials are crucial for Biophotonics to gain acceptance in medical imaging. In these trials, quality control (QC) and assurance (QA) are key to success and provide "data insurance". Quality control and assurance deal with standardization, validation, and compliance of procedures, materials and instrumentation. Specifically, QC/QA involves systematic assessment of testing materials, instrumentation performance, standard operating procedures, data logging, analysis, and reporting. QC and QA are important for FDA accreditation and acceptance by the clinical community. Our Biophotonics research in the Network for Translational Research in Optical Imaging (NTROI) program for breast cancer characterization focuses on QA/QC issues primarily related to the broadband Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging (DOS/I) instrumentation, because this is an emerging technology with limited standardized QC/QA in place. In the multi-center trial environment, we implement QA/QC procedures: 1. Standardize and validate calibration standards and procedures. (DOS/I technology requires both frequency domain and spectral calibration procedures using tissue simulating phantoms and reflectance standards, respectively.) 2. Standardize and validate data acquisition, processing and visualization (optimize instrument software-EZDOS; centralize data processing) 3. Monitor, catalog and maintain instrument performance (document performance; modularize maintenance; integrate new technology) 4. Standardize and coordinate trial data entry (from individual sites) into centralized database 5. Monitor, audit and communicate all research procedures (database, teleconferences, training sessions) between participants ensuring "calibration". This manuscript describes our ongoing efforts, successes and challenges implementing these strategies.

  11. Report on the analysis of the quality assurance and quality control data for the petroleum refining sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorton, N.; Michajluk, S.; Powell, T.; Lee, G.

    1992-07-01

    The Ontario Municipal-Industrial Strategy for Abatement (MISA) program has the ultimate goal of virtual elimination of persistent toxic contaminants from all discharges to provincial waterways. MISA effluent monitoring regulations, first promulgated for the petroleum refining sector, require direct dischargers to monitor their effluents for a specified number of contaminants and a specified frequency over a one-year period. The refineries were also required to carry out a quality control program on all process effluent streams and for specified analytical test groups. Two types of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) data were required: field QA/QC, which would indicate problems with field contamination or sampling, and laboratory QA/QC, which would indicate problems with the laboratory. The objectives of QA/QC analysis are to identify the significance of biases, chronic contamination, data variability, and false results, to assess data validity, and to allow data comparability among companies and laboratories. Of the 149 parameters monitored in the petroleum refining sector, 34 qualified as candidates for setting effluent limits. The QA/QC evaluation of monitoring data for the 34 parameters confirmed the presence of 18 parameters at such levels that they could be used to set statistically valid quantitative limits. 50 tabs

  12. Requirements tests for QC of microSelectron-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesheva-Atanasova, N.; Gogova, A.; Peycheva, S.; Constantinov, B.; Ganchev, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Quality Control (QC) considers checks and measurements with the purpose of reconstruction, maintaining and increasing the quality of medical procedures and equipment. The QC tests for micro Selectron HDR afterloading machine with 192 Ir which allows more precise calculation and realisation of the tumour's dose have been created and introduced regularly in National Oncological Centre, Sofia. This paper has been cover the machine and software performance, source positioning, application equipment and radiation safety. A list of tests, their frequency, tolerance and action levels, as well as the tests' procedures have been worked out. The used methods are based on establishment of QC protocols. The documents have achieved for a certain period of time and they are available at any time. The experience shows drastically reduction of failures during medical treatment, ensuring the reliability of the used equipment and confidence that all the patients have treated adequate. Where some parameter is above the tolerance is it possible to do proper corrections measures immediately. This QA protocols give assurance that specific objectives being successfully met

  13. Operational quality control of daily precipitation using spatio-climatological consistency testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, S. C.; Croci-Maspoli, M.; van Geijtenbeek, D.; Naguel, C.; Appenzeller, C.

    2010-09-01

    Quality control (QC) of meteorological data is of utmost importance for climate related decisions. The search for an effective automated QC of precipitation data has proven difficult and many weather services still use mainly manual inspection of daily precipitation including MeteoSwiss. However, man power limitations force many weather services to move towards less labour intensive and more automated QC with the challenge to keeping data quality high. In the last decade, several approaches have been presented to objectify daily precipitation QC. Here we present a spatio-climatological approach that will be implemented operationally at MeteoSwiss. It combines the information from the event based spatial distribution of everyday's precipitation field and the historical information of the interpolation error using different precipitation intensity intervals. Expert judgement shows that the system is able to detect potential outliers very well (hardly any missed errors) without creating too many false alarms that need human inspection. 50-80% of all flagged values have been classified as real errors by the data editor. This is much better than the roughly 15-20% using standard spatial regression tests. Very helpful in the QC process is the automatic redistribution of accumulated several day sums. Manual inspection in operations can be reduced and the QC of precipitation objectified substantially.

  14. Quality assurance and quality control of geochemical data—A primer for the research scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Geochemistry is a constantly expanding science. More and more, scientists are employing geochemical tools to help answer questions about the Earth and earth system processes. Scientists may assume that the responsibility of examining and assessing the quality of the geochemical data they generate is not theirs but rather that of the analytical laboratories to which their samples have been submitted. This assumption may be partially based on knowledge about internal and external quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) programs in which analytical laboratories typically participate. Or there may be a perceived lack of time or resources to adequately examine data quality. Regardless of the reason, the lack of QA/QC protocols can lead to the generation and publication of erroneous data. Because the interpretations drawn from the data are primary products to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) stakeholders, the consequences of publishing erroneous results can be significant. The principal investigator of a scientific study ultimately is responsible for the quality and interpretation of the project's findings, and thus must also play a role in the understanding, implementation, and presentation of QA/QC information about the data. Although occasionally ignored, QA/QC protocols apply not only to procedures in the laboratory but also in the initial planning of a research study and throughout the life of the project. Many of the tenets of developing a sound QA/QC program or protocols also parallel the core concepts of developing a good study: What is the main objective of the study? Will the methods selected provide data of enough resolution to answer the hypothesis? How should samples be collected? Are there known or unknown artifacts or contamination sources in the sampling and analysis methods? Assessing data quality requires communication between the scientists responsible for designing the study and those collecting samples, analyzing samples, treating data, and

  15. DTIPrep: Quality Control of Diffusion-Weighted Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipek eOguz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, diffusion MRI (dMRI studies of the human and animal brain have been used to investigate a multitude of pathologies and drug-related effects in neuroscience research. Study after study identifies white matter (WM degeneration as a crucial biomarker for all these diseases. The tool of choice for studying WM is dMRI. However, dMRI has inherently low signal-to-noise ratio and its acquisition requires a relatively long scan time; in fact, the high loads required occasionally stress scanner hardware past the point of physical failure. As a result, many types of artifacts implicate the quality of diffusion imagery. Using these complex scans containing artifacts without quality control (QC can result in considerable error and bias in the subsequent analysis, negatively affecting the results of research studies using them. However, dMRI QC remains an under-recognized issue in the dMRI community as there are no user-friendly tools commonly available to comprehensively address the issue of dMRI QC. As a result, current dMRI studies often perform a poor job at dMRI QC.Thorough QC of diffusion MRI will reduce measurement noise and improve reproducibility, and sensitivity in neuroimaging studies; this will allow researchers to more fully exploit the power of the dMRI technique and will ultimately advance neuroscience. Therefore, in this manuscript, we present our open-source software, DTIPrep, as a unified, user friendly platform for thorough quality control of dMRI data. These include artifacts caused by eddy-currents, head motion, bed vibration and pulsation, venetian blind artifacts, as well as slice-wise and gradient-wise intensity inconsistencies. This paper summarizes a basic set of features of DTIPrep described earlier and focuses on newly added capabilities related to directional artifacts and bias analysis.

  16. Recent Progress toward Microfluidic Quality Control Testing of Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel S. Ha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals labeled with short-lived positron-emitting or gamma-emitting isotopes are injected into patients just prior to performing positron emission tomography (PET or single photon emission tomography (SPECT scans, respectively. These imaging modalities are widely used in clinical care, as well as in the development and evaluation of new therapies in clinical research. Prior to injection, these radiopharmaceuticals (tracers must undergo quality control (QC testing to ensure product purity, identity, and safety for human use. Quality tests can be broadly categorized as (i pharmaceutical tests, needed to ensure molecular identity, physiological compatibility and that no microbiological, pyrogenic, chemical, or particulate contamination is present in the final preparation; and (ii radioactive tests, needed to ensure proper dosing and that there are no radiochemical and radionuclidic impurities that could interfere with the biodistribution or imaging. Performing the required QC tests is cumbersome and time-consuming, and requires an array of expensive analytical chemistry equipment and significant dedicated lab space. Calibrations, day of use tests, and documentation create an additional burden. Furthermore, in contrast to ordinary pharmaceuticals, each batch of short-lived radiopharmaceuticals must be manufactured and tested within a short period of time to avoid significant losses due to radioactive decay. To meet these challenges, several efforts are underway to develop integrated QC testing instruments that automatically perform and document all of the required tests. More recently, microfluidic quality control systems have been gaining increasing attention due to vastly reduced sample and reagent consumption, shorter analysis times, higher detection sensitivity, increased multiplexing, and reduced instrumentation size. In this review, we describe each of the required QC tests and conventional testing methods, followed by a

  17. Quality control in diagnostic radiology: experience and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Mohd Ramli Arshad; Mohd Khalid Matori; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Husaini Salleh; Abdullah Tahir Aliyasak; Zainal Jamaluddin; Hasrul Hisham Hussain

    2005-01-01

    Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research through its Medical Physics Group has been providing Quality Control (QC) services for medical x-ray apparatus used in diagnostic radiology to private clinics and hospitals since the year 1997. The quality control (QC) in diagnostic radiology is considered as part of quality assurance program which provide accurate diagnostic information at the lowest cost and the least exposure of the patients to radiation. Many experience and obstacles were faced by Medical Physics Group. This paper will discuss on some of the experiences and challenges that could be shared together with MINT staff especially in the safety aspect related to electrical and mechanical, radiation protection, performance and standard. The challenging in administrative aspect also will discuss. (Author)

  18. Statistical analysis of quality control of automatic processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Yantao; Zhao Lei; Zhang Wei; Yan Shulin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To strengthen the scientific management of automatic processor and promote QC, based on analyzing QC management chart for automatic processor by statistical method, evaluating and interpreting the data and trend of the chart. Method: Speed, contrast, minimum density of step wedge of film strip were measured everyday and recorded on the QC chart. Mean (x-bar), standard deviation (s) and range (R) were calculated. The data and the working trend were evaluated and interpreted for management decisions. Results: Using relative frequency distribution curve constructed by measured data, the authors can judge whether it is a symmetric bell-shaped curve or not. If not, it indicates a few extremes overstepping control limits possibly are pulling the curve to the left or right. If it is a normal distribution, standard deviation (s) is observed. When x-bar +- 2s lies in upper and lower control limits of relative performance indexes, it indicates the processor works in stable status in this period. Conclusion: Guided by statistical method, QC work becomes more scientific and quantified. The authors can deepen understanding and application of the trend chart, and improve the quality management to a new step

  19. Assays for Qualification and Quality Stratification of Clinical Biospecimens Used in Research: A Technical Report from the ISBER Biospecimen Science Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsou, Fay; Bulla, Alexandre; Cho, Sang Yun; Clements, Judith; Chuaqui, Rodrigo; Coppola, Domenico; De Souza, Yvonne; De Wilde, Annemieke; Grizzle, William; Guadagni, Fiorella; Gunter, Elaine; Heil, Stacey; Hodgkinson, Verity; Kessler, Joseph; Kiehntopf, Michael; Kim, Hee Sung; Koppandi, Iren; Shea, Katheryn; Singh, Rajeev; Sobel, Marc; Somiari, Stella; Spyropoulos, Demetri; Stone, Mars; Tybring, Gunnel; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Van den Eynden, Gert; Wadhwa, Lalita

    2016-10-01

    This technical report presents quality control (QC) assays that can be performed in order to qualify clinical biospecimens that have been biobanked for use in research. Some QC assays are specific to a disease area. Some QC assays are specific to a particular downstream analytical platform. When such a qualification is not possible, QC assays are presented that can be performed to stratify clinical biospecimens according to their biomolecular quality.

  20. Quality Control Quantification (QCQ): A Tool to Measure the Value of Quality Control Checks in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Eric C.; Terezakis, Stephanie; Souranis, Annette; Harris, Kendra; Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the error-detection effectiveness of commonly used quality control (QC) measures. Methods: We analyzed incidents from 2007-2010 logged into a voluntary in-house, electronic incident learning systems at 2 academic radiation oncology clinics. None of the incidents resulted in patient harm. Each incident was graded for potential severity using the French Nuclear Safety Authority scoring scale; high potential severity incidents (score >3) were considered, along with a subset of 30 randomly chosen low severity incidents. Each report was evaluated to identify which of 15 common QC checks could have detected it. The effectiveness was calculated, defined as the percentage of incidents that each QC measure could detect, both for individual QC checks and for combinations of checks. Results: In total, 4407 incidents were reported, 292 of which had high-potential severity. High- and low-severity incidents were detectable by 4.0 ± 2.3 (mean ± SD) and 2.6 ± 1.4 QC checks, respectively (P<.001). All individual checks were less than 50% sensitive with the exception of pretreatment plan review by a physicist (63%). An effectiveness of 97% was achieved with 7 checks used in combination and was not further improved with more checks. The combination of checks with the highest effectiveness includes physics plan review, physician plan review, Electronic Portal Imaging Device-based in vivo portal dosimetry, radiation therapist timeout, weekly physics chart check, the use of checklists, port films, and source-to-skin distance checks. Some commonly used QC checks such as pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy QA do not substantially add to the ability to detect errors in these data. Conclusions: The effectiveness of QC measures in radiation oncology depends sensitively on which checks are used and in which combinations. A small percentage of errors cannot be detected by any of the standard formal QC checks currently in broad use, suggesting that further

  1. Quality control quantification (QCQ): a tool to measure the value of quality control checks in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric C; Terezakis, Stephanie; Souranis, Annette; Harris, Kendra; Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-11-01

    To quantify the error-detection effectiveness of commonly used quality control (QC) measures. We analyzed incidents from 2007-2010 logged into a voluntary in-house, electronic incident learning systems at 2 academic radiation oncology clinics. None of the incidents resulted in patient harm. Each incident was graded for potential severity using the French Nuclear Safety Authority scoring scale; high potential severity incidents (score >3) were considered, along with a subset of 30 randomly chosen low severity incidents. Each report was evaluated to identify which of 15 common QC checks could have detected it. The effectiveness was calculated, defined as the percentage of incidents that each QC measure could detect, both for individual QC checks and for combinations of checks. In total, 4407 incidents were reported, 292 of which had high-potential severity. High- and low-severity incidents were detectable by 4.0 ± 2.3 (mean ± SD) and 2.6 ± 1.4 QC checks, respectively (P<.001). All individual checks were less than 50% sensitive with the exception of pretreatment plan review by a physicist (63%). An effectiveness of 97% was achieved with 7 checks used in combination and was not further improved with more checks. The combination of checks with the highest effectiveness includes physics plan review, physician plan review, Electronic Portal Imaging Device-based in vivo portal dosimetry, radiation therapist timeout, weekly physics chart check, the use of checklists, port films, and source-to-skin distance checks. Some commonly used QC checks such as pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy QA do not substantially add to the ability to detect errors in these data. The effectiveness of QC measures in radiation oncology depends sensitively on which checks are used and in which combinations. A small percentage of errors cannot be detected by any of the standard formal QC checks currently in broad use, suggesting that further improvements are needed. These data

  2. Quality Control Quantification (QCQ): A Tool to Measure the Value of Quality Control Checks in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Terezakis, Stephanie; Souranis, Annette; Harris, Kendra [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To quantify the error-detection effectiveness of commonly used quality control (QC) measures. Methods: We analyzed incidents from 2007-2010 logged into a voluntary in-house, electronic incident learning systems at 2 academic radiation oncology clinics. None of the incidents resulted in patient harm. Each incident was graded for potential severity using the French Nuclear Safety Authority scoring scale; high potential severity incidents (score >3) were considered, along with a subset of 30 randomly chosen low severity incidents. Each report was evaluated to identify which of 15 common QC checks could have detected it. The effectiveness was calculated, defined as the percentage of incidents that each QC measure could detect, both for individual QC checks and for combinations of checks. Results: In total, 4407 incidents were reported, 292 of which had high-potential severity. High- and low-severity incidents were detectable by 4.0 {+-} 2.3 (mean {+-} SD) and 2.6 {+-} 1.4 QC checks, respectively (P<.001). All individual checks were less than 50% sensitive with the exception of pretreatment plan review by a physicist (63%). An effectiveness of 97% was achieved with 7 checks used in combination and was not further improved with more checks. The combination of checks with the highest effectiveness includes physics plan review, physician plan review, Electronic Portal Imaging Device-based in vivo portal dosimetry, radiation therapist timeout, weekly physics chart check, the use of checklists, port films, and source-to-skin distance checks. Some commonly used QC checks such as pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy QA do not substantially add to the ability to detect errors in these data. Conclusions: The effectiveness of QC measures in radiation oncology depends sensitively on which checks are used and in which combinations. A small percentage of errors cannot be detected by any of the standard formal QC checks currently in broad use, suggesting that

  3. Design of a Clean Room for Quality Control of an Environmental Sampling in KINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jongho; Ahn, Gil Hoon; Seo, Hana; Han, Kitek; Park, Il Jin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of environmental sampling and analysis for safeguards is to characterize the nuclear materials handled and the activities conducted at the specific locations. The KINAC is responsible for the conclusions drawn from the analytical results provided by the analytical laboratories. To assure the KINAC of the continuity of the quality of the analytical results provided by the laboratories, the KINAC will implement a quality control(QC) programme. One of the QC programme is to prepare QC samples. The establishment of a clean room is needed to handle QC samples due to stringent control of contamination. The KINAC designed a clean facility with cleanliness of ISO Class 6, the Clean Room for Estimation and Assay of trace Nuclear materials(CREAN) to meet conflicting requirements of a clean room and for handling of nuclear materials according to Korean laws. The clean room will be expected to acquire of a radiation safety license under these conditions in this year and continue to improve it. The construction of the CREAN facility will be completed by the middle of 2015. In terms of QC programme, the establishment of a clean room is essential and will be not only very helpful for setting of quality control system for the national environmental sampling programme but also be applied for the environmental sample analysis techniques to the nuclear forensics

  4. Quality Assurance and Quality Control in TLD Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Qronfla, M.M.; Abulfaraj, W.H.; Kinsara, A.A.; Taha, T.M.; Molla, N.I.; Elmohr, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    TLD technique characterized by high precision and reproducibility of dose measurement is presented by addressing pre-readout annealing, group sorting, dose evaluation, blind tests, internal dose quality audit and external quality control audits. Two hundred and forty TLD chips were annealed for 1 hour at 4000 degree C followed by 2 h at 1000 degree C. After exposure of 1 mGy from 90 Sr irradiator TLDs were subjected to pre-readout annealing at 1000 degree C, then readout, sorted into groups each with nearly equal sensitivity. Upon repeating the procedures, TLDs having response >3.5% from group mean were dropped to assuring group stability. Effect of pre-readout annealing has been studied. Series of repeated measurements were conducted to stabilize calibration procedures and DCF generation using SSDL level 137 Cs calibrator, dose master, ionization chambers. Performed internal dose quality audits, blind tests and validated by external QC tests with King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology

  5. Quality assurance: image production and film quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli

    2004-01-01

    The contents of this chapter are follows - Factors Affecting Image Quality and Patient Dose: Quality Control in Diagnostic Radiology, Mechanical Safety, Electrical Safety, Radiation Protection, Performance and Safety Standard, Calibration of QC Test Tools

  6. Quality control and standardization of forearm X-ray osteodensitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyanov, M.

    2000-01-01

    Quality control (QC) has an essential practical bearing on the proper function of the equipment used for bone density measurement. Special attention is likewise focused on the issue of standardization of the results afforded by different osteodensitometry instruments. It is the purpose of the study to assay QC of a single-energy x-ray forearm osteodensitometry unit DTX-100 covering a 3 year period, and compare the data on bone mineral density (BMD) produced by three different devices. Long-term BMD reproducibility in vitro, expressed as coefficient of variation, amounts to 0.55 per cent. Except for a two week period, no deviation from the normal function of the instrument is documented. Failing to comply with the manufacturer's instructions may discredit QC efficacy. On comparative assessment of the results produced by different osteodensitometers, differences in vivo may reach up to 1.2 standard deviation. Definite regions of special interest, feasible for comparison, are recommended. In conclusion special emphasis is laid on the necessity of performing through QC, measurement results standardization and accreditation of a reference osteodensitometry center

  7. Quality Control in Diagnostic Radiology: Experiences and Achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Husaini Salleh; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa

    2015-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency through its Medical Physics Group has been providing Quality Control (QC) services for medical X-ray apparatus used in diagnostic radiology to private clinics and hospitals since the year 1997. The Medical Physics Groups services is endorsed by the Malaysian Ministry Of Health (MOH) and is in accordance with the Malaysian Standard MS 838 and the Atomic Energy Licensing Act, 1984. Until today, the scopes of testing services also include all types of medical x-ray apparatus. The quality control (QC) in diagnostic radiology is considered as part of quality assurance program which provide accurate diagnostic information at the lowest cost and the least exposure of the patients to radiation. Many experience and obstacles were faced by Medical Physics Group. This paper will discuss the experiences and achievements of providing QC service from early stage until now so that it can be shared by the citizens of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency. The results of quality assurance inspection of all types of X-ray apparatus for medical conducted by Agency Nuclear Malaysia will be presented in brief. (author)

  8. Quality Control of Wind Data from 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Austin

    2016-01-01

    Upper-level wind profiles obtained from a 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) instrument at Kennedy Space Center are incorporated in space launch vehicle design and day-of-launch operations to assess wind effects on the vehicle during ascent. Automated and manual quality control (QC) techniques are implemented to remove spurious data in the upper-level wind profiles caused from atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts over the 2010-2012 period of record (POR). By adding the new quality controlled profiles with older profiles from 1997-2009, a robust database will be constructed of upper-level wind characteristics. Statistical analysis will determine the maximum, minimum, and 95th percentile of the wind components from the DRWP profiles over recent POR and compare against the older database. Additionally, this study identifies specific QC flags triggered during the QC process to understand how much data is retained and removed from the profiles.

  9. Validation of an image quality index: its correlation with quality control parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrejas, M.L.C.; Giannone, C.A.; Arashiro, J.G.; Cabrejas, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    Objective and Rationale: To validate a new image quality index (the Performance Index: PI) that assesses detectability of simulated lesions with a phantom. This index, presumably must depend markedly on quality control (QC) parameters as tomographic uniformity (Unif), Centre of Rotation (COR) and Spatial resolution (FWHM). The simultaneous effects of the QC parameters may explain much of the variation in the PIs; i.e. they may be predictors of the PI values. Methods: An overall performance phantom containing 3 sections was used. The first uniform section was used to determine tomographic uniformity. From the analysis of the slices corresponding to the second section containing 8 cold cylindrical simulated lesions of different diameters (range 7 mm - 17 mm), the number of true and false positives are determined and from these a new Performance Index (PI) is defined as the ratio between the positive predictive value and the sensitivity (expressed as its complement adding a constant to avoid a singularity). A point source located on the top of the phantom was used to determine the Centre of Rotation and the Spatial Resolution expressed by the FWHM in mm. 40 nuclear medicine labs participate at the survey. Standard multiple regression analysis between the Performance Index, as dependent variable, and FWHM, COR and Unif as independent variables was performed to evaluate the influence of the QC parameters on the PI values. Results: It is shown that resolution and COR are both predictors of the PIs, with statistical significance for the multiple correlation co-efficient R. However the addition of the variable tomographic uniformity to the model, does not improve the prediction of PIs. Moreover, the regression model lacks overall statistical significance. Regression summary for dependent variable Performance Index is presented. Conclusions: We confirm that the new Performance Index (PI), depends on QC parameters as COR and Spatial resolution. Those labs whose PIs are out

  10. Managing the Quality of Environmental Data in EPA Region 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Pacific Southwest, Region 9's Quality Assurance (QA) section's primary mission is to effectively oversee and carry out the Quality System and Quality Management Plan, and project-level quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) activities.

  11. Quality Control Procedure Based on Partitioning of NMR Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Staniszewski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS depends on the stability of magnetic resonance (MR system performance and optimal hardware functioning, which ensure adequate levels of signal-to-noise ratios (SNR as well as good spectral resolution and minimal artifacts in the spectral data. MRS quality control (QC protocols and methodologies are based on phantom measurements that are repeated regularly. In this work, a signal partitioning algorithm based on a dynamic programming (DP method for QC assessment of the spectral data is described. The proposed algorithm allows detection of the change points—the abrupt variations in the time series data. The proposed QC method was tested using the simulated and real phantom data. Simulated data were randomly generated time series distorted by white noise. The real data were taken from the phantom quality control studies of the MRS scanner collected for four and a half years and analyzed by LCModel software. Along with the proposed algorithm, performance of various literature methods was evaluated for the predefined number of change points based on the error values calculated by subtracting the mean values calculated for the periods between the change-points from the original data points. The time series were checked using external software, a set of external methods and the proposed tool, and the obtained results were comparable. The application of dynamic programming in the analysis of the phantom MRS data is a novel approach to QC. The obtained results confirm that the presented change-point-detection tool can be used either for independent analysis of MRS time series (or any other or as a part of quality control.

  12. Vision of new generation CRMs for QC of microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Weizhi

    2005-01-01

    Direct analysis of ever smaller solid samples has become one of the trends in modern analytical science, in coping with the increasing requirements from life, materials, environment, and other frontier scientific fields. Due to the lack of natural matrix CRMs certified at matched sample size levels, however, quantitative calibration and quality control have long been a bottleneck of microanalysis. CRMs of new generation are therefore called for to make solid sampling microanalysis an accurately quantitative and quality-controllable technique. In this paper, an approach is proposed to use a combination of several nuclear analytical techniques in the certification of RMs suitable for QC of analyses at sub-ng sample size levels. The technical procedures, the major problems, and the possible format of certificates of the new generation CRMs, and the outliik of the establishment of QC system for microanalysis are described. The CRMs of current generation have played an important role in the quality of analysis, especially trace analysis, and in turn in the development of related scientific fields in 20 th century. It may be reasonably predicted that the new generation CRMs will play the similar role in the quality of microanalysis, and in turn in relevant frontier scientific fields in 21 st century. Nuclear analytical techniques have made, and will continue to make, unique contributions to both generations of CRMs.

  13. Droplet digital PCR-based EGFR mutation detection with an internal quality control index to determine the quality of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Su; Choi, Hyun-Jeung; Kim, Jin Ju; Kim, M Sun; Lee, In-Seon; Byun, Bohyun; Jia, Lina; Oh, Myung Ryurl; Moon, Youngho; Park, Sarah; Choi, Joon-Seok; Chae, Seoung Wan; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jihun; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Jae Seok; Won, Jae-Kyung; Cho, Soo Youn; Choi, Yoon-La; Shin, Young Kee

    2018-01-11

    In clinical translational research and molecular in vitro diagnostics, a major challenge in the detection of genetic mutations is overcoming artefactual results caused by the low-quality of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET)-derived DNA (FFPET-DNA). Here, we propose the use of an 'internal quality control (iQC) index' as a criterion for judging the minimum quality of DNA for PCR-based analyses. In a pre-clinical study comparing the results from droplet digital PCR-based EGFR mutation test (ddEGFR test) and qPCR-based EGFR mutation test (cobas EGFR test), iQC index ≥ 0.5 (iQC copies ≥ 500, using 3.3 ng of FFPET-DNA [1,000 genome equivalents]) was established, indicating that more than half of the input DNA was amplifiable. Using this criterion, we conducted a retrospective comparative clinical study of the ddEGFR and cobas EGFR tests for the detection of EGFR mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) FFPET-DNA samples. Compared with the cobas EGFR test, the ddEGFR test exhibited superior analytical performance and equivalent or higher clinical performance. Furthermore, iQC index is a reliable indicator of the quality of FFPET-DNA and could be used to prevent incorrect diagnoses arising from low-quality samples.

  14. Implementation of Quality Control Protocol in Mammography: A Serbian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj Bjelac, O.; Kosutic, D.; Arandjic, D.; Kovacevic, M.

    2008-01-01

    Mammography is method of choice for early detection of breast cancer. In Serbia, mammography is performed only clinically, although there is a long term plan to introduce mammography as screening method. Currently there are 60 mammography units in practice in Serbia, resulting with 70 000 mammographies annually. The purpose of this paper is preliminary evaluation of the mammography practice in Serbia, having in mind the annual number of examinations and fact that part of examination is performed on women without any clinical signs. For pilot implementation of Quality Control (QC) protocol in mammography, five hospitals with highest workload have been selected, representing the typical mammography practice in Serbia. Developed QC protocol, based on European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis, actual practice and resources, includes equipment testing and maintenance, staff training and QC management and allocation of responsibilities. Subsequently, it should be applied on the national scale. The survey demonstrated considerable variations in technical parameters that affect image quality and patients doses. Mean glandular doses ranged from 0.12 to 2.8 mGy, while reference optical density ranged from 1.2 to 2.8. Main problems were associated with film processing, viewing conditions and optical density control. The preliminary survey of mammography practice highlighted the need for optimization of radiation protection and training of operating staff, although the survey itself was very valuable learning process for all participants. Furthermore, systematic implementation of QC protocol should provide reliable performance of mammography units and maintain satisfactory image quality and keep patient doses as low as reasonably practical.(author)

  15. The Quality Assurance_Quality Control of the Monitored Drift Tubes at the HEP Laboratory of the National Technical University of Athens

    CERN Document Server

    Alexopoulos, T; Dris, M; Filippas, A V; Fokitis, E; Gazis, E N; Katsoufis, E C; Maltezos, A; Maltezos, S; Papadopoulos, E; Papadopoulou, T D; Savva, Panagiota S; Stavropoulos, G D; Tsipolitis, G; Tzamariudaki, E

    2001-01-01

    The description of the Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA_QC) procedures for the Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT's) followed at the HEP Laboratory of NTUA are presented and results of the tested tubes are given. The MDT's are the elements from which muon chambers for the ATLAS/LHC Muon Spectrometer are built..

  16. DNA fingerprinting: a quality control case study for human biospecimen authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofanova, Olga A; Mathieson, William; Thomas, Gerry A; Betsou, Fotini

    2014-04-01

    This case study illustrates the usefulness of the DNA fingerprinting method in biobank quality control (QC) procedures and emphasizes the need for detailed and accurate record keeping during processing of biological samples. It also underlines the value of independent third-party assessment to identify points at which errors are most likely to have occurred when unexpected results are obtained from biospecimens.

  17. A uniform, quality controlled Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pfeil, B.; Olsen, A; Bakker, D.C.E.; Hankin, S.; Koyuk, H.; Kozyr, A; Malczyk, J.; Manke, A; Metzl, N.; Sabine, C.L.; Akl, J.; Alin, S.R.; Bates, N.; Bellerby, R.G.J.; Borges, A; Boutin, J.; Brown, P.J.; Cai, W.-J.; Chavez, F.P.; Chen, A; Cosca, C.; Fassbender, A.J.; Feely, R.A.; Gonzalez-Davila, M.; Goyet, C.; Hales, B.; Hardman-Mountford, N.; Heinze, C.; Hood, M.; Hoppema, M.; Hunt, C.W.; Hydes, D.; Ishii, M.; Johannessen, T.; Jones, S.D.; Key, R.M.; Kortzinger, A.; Landschutzer, P.; Lauvset, S.K.; Lefevre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lourantou, A.; Merlivat, L.; Midorikawa, T.; Mintrop, L.; Miyazaki, C.; Murata, A.; Nakadate, A.; Nakano, Y.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; Omar, A.M.; Padin, X.A.; Park, G.-H.; Paterson, K.; Perez, F.F.; Pierrot, D.; Poisson, A.; Rios, A.F.; Santana-Casiano, J.M.; Salisbury, J.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; et al

    by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC). Many additional CO2 data, not yet made...

  18. From Field Notes to Data Portal - A Scalable Data QA/QC Framework for Tower Networks: Progress and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, C.; Hackley, S.; Lee, R.; Holling, G.; Bonarrigo, S.

    2017-12-01

    Quality assurance and control (QA/QC) is one of the most important yet challenging aspects of producing research-quality data. Data quality issues are multi-faceted, including sensor malfunctions, unmet theoretical assumptions, and measurement interference from humans or the natural environment. Tower networks such as Ameriflux, ICOS, and NEON continue to grow in size and sophistication, yet tools for robust, efficient, scalable QA/QC have lagged. Quality control remains a largely manual process heavily relying on visual inspection of data. In addition, notes of measurement interference are often recorded on paper without an explicit pathway to data flagging. As such, an increase in network size requires a near-proportional increase in personnel devoted to QA/QC, quickly stressing the human resources available. We present a scalable QA/QC framework in development for NEON that combines the efficiency and standardization of automated checks with the power and flexibility of human review. This framework includes fast-response monitoring of sensor health, a mobile application for electronically recording maintenance activities, traditional point-based automated quality flagging, and continuous monitoring of quality outcomes and longer-term holistic evaluations. This framework maintains the traceability of quality information along the entirety of the data generation pipeline, and explicitly links field reports of measurement interference to quality flagging. Preliminary results show that data quality can be effectively monitored and managed for a multitude of sites with a small group of QA/QC staff. Several components of this framework are open-source, including a R-Shiny application for efficiently monitoring, synthesizing, and investigating data quality issues.

  19. Many roads may lead to Rome: Selected features of quality control within environmental assessment systems in the US, NL, CA, and UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günther, Markus, E-mail: markus.guenther@tu-berlin.de; Geißler, Gesa; Köppel, Johann

    2017-01-15

    As there is no one-and-only concept on how to precisely define and establish quality control (QC) or quality assurance (QA) in the making of environmental assessments (EA), this paper presents selected features of international approaches that address quality in EA systems in the USA, the Netherlands, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Based on explanative case studies, we highlight the embedding of specific quality control features within the EA systems, the objectives and processes, and relevant transparency challenges. Such features of QC/QA approaches can be considered in cases where substantial quality control and assurance efforts are still missing. Yet further research needs to be conducted on the efficacy of these approaches, which remains beyond the scope of this study. - Highlights: • We present four tools for quality control and assurance from different EA systems. • Approaches vary in institutional setting, objectives, procedures, and transparency. • Highlighted features might provide guidance in cases where QC/QA is still lacking.

  20. Material quality assurance risk assessment : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    With the shift from quality control (QC) of materials and placement techniques : to quality assurance (QA) and acceptance over the years, the role of the Office : of Materials Technology (OMT) has been shifting towards assurance of : material quality...

  1. References on EPA Quality Assurance Project Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides requirements for the conduct of quality management practices, including quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) activities, for all environmental data collection and environmental technology programs performed by or for this Agency.

  2. Development of a quality management system for borehole investigations. (1) Quality assurance and quality control methodology for hydraulic packer testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Shinji; Kunimaru, Takanori; Ota, Kunio; Frieg, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    A quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) system for the hydraulic packer tests has been established based on the surface-based investigations at JAEA's underground research laboratories in Mizunami and Horonobe. The established QA/QC system covers field investigations (data acquisition) and data analysis. For the field investigations, the adopted procedure is selection of a test section based on a detail fluid logging and checking with tally list, followed by inspection of test tools such as pressure transducers and shut-in valves, etc., test method selection using a 'sequential hydraulic test' for deciding appropriate method, and finally data quality confirmation by pressure changes and derivatives on a log-log plots during testing. Test event logs should also be described during testing for traceability. For the test data analysis, a quick analysis for rough estimation of hydraulic parameters, and a detailed analysis using type curve and/or numerical analyses are conducted stepwise. The established QA/QC system has been applied to the recent borehole investigations and its efficiency has been confirmed. (author)

  3. New methods for optical distance indicator and gantry angle quality control tests in medical linear accelerators: image processing by using a 3D phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shandiz, Mahdi Heravian; Khalilzadeh, Mohammadmahdi; Anvari, Kazem [Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Layen, Ghorban Safaeian [Mashhad University of Medical Science, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    In order to keep the acceptable level of the radiation oncology linear accelerators, it is necessary to apply a reliable quality assurance (QA) program. The QA protocols, published by authoritative organizations, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), determine the quality control (QC) tests which should be performed on the medical linear accelerators and the threshold levels for each test. The purpose of this study is to increase the accuracy and precision of the selected QC tests in order to increase the quality of treatment and also increase the speed of the tests to convince the crowded centers to start a reliable QA program. A new method has been developed for two of the QC tests; optical distance indicator (ODI) QC test as a daily test and gantry angle QC test as a monthly test. This method uses an image processing approach utilizing the snapshots taken by the CCD camera to measure the source to surface distance (SSD) and gantry angle. The new method of ODI QC test has an accuracy of 99.95% with a standard deviation of 0.061 cm and the new method for gantry angle QC has a precision of 0.43 degrees. The automated proposed method which is used for both ODI and gantry angle QC tests, contains highly accurate and precise results which are objective and the human-caused errors have no effect on the results. The results show that they are in the acceptable range for both of the QC tests, according to AAPM task group 142.

  4. New methods for optical distance indicator and gantry angle quality control tests in medical linear accelerators: image processing by using a 3D phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandiz, Mahdi Heravian; Khalilzadeh, Mohammadmahdi; Anvari, Kazem; Layen, Ghorban Safaeian

    2015-01-01

    In order to keep the acceptable level of the radiation oncology linear accelerators, it is necessary to apply a reliable quality assurance (QA) program. The QA protocols, published by authoritative organizations, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), determine the quality control (QC) tests which should be performed on the medical linear accelerators and the threshold levels for each test. The purpose of this study is to increase the accuracy and precision of the selected QC tests in order to increase the quality of treatment and also increase the speed of the tests to convince the crowded centers to start a reliable QA program. A new method has been developed for two of the QC tests; optical distance indicator (ODI) QC test as a daily test and gantry angle QC test as a monthly test. This method uses an image processing approach utilizing the snapshots taken by the CCD camera to measure the source to surface distance (SSD) and gantry angle. The new method of ODI QC test has an accuracy of 99.95% with a standard deviation of 0.061 cm and the new method for gantry angle QC has a precision of 0.43 degrees. The automated proposed method which is used for both ODI and gantry angle QC tests, contains highly accurate and precise results which are objective and the human-caused errors have no effect on the results. The results show that they are in the acceptable range for both of the QC tests, according to AAPM task group 142.

  5. Material quality assurance risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades the role of SHA has shifted from quality control (QC) of materials and : placement techniques to quality assurance (QA) and acceptance. The role of the Office of Materials : Technology (OMT) has been shifting towards assuran...

  6. Results-driven approach to improving quality and productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Dramm

    2000-01-01

    Quality control (QC) programs do not often realize their full potential. Elaborate and expensive QC programs can easily get side tracked by the process of building a program with promises of “Someday, this will all pay off.” Training employees in QC methods is no guarantee that quality will improve. Several documented cases show that such activity-centered efforts...

  7. Autonomous Quality Control of Joint Orientation Measured with Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lebel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical mobility assessment is traditionally performed in laboratories using complex and expensive equipment. The low accessibility to such equipment, combined with the emerging trend to assess mobility in a free-living environment, creates a need for body-worn sensors (e.g., inertial measurement units—IMUs that are capable of measuring the complexity in motor performance using meaningful measurements, such as joint orientation. However, accuracy of joint orientation estimates using IMUs may be affected by environment, the joint tracked, type of motion performed and velocity. This study investigates a quality control (QC process to assess the quality of orientation data based on features extracted from the raw inertial sensors’ signals. Joint orientation (trunk, hip, knee, ankle of twenty participants was acquired by an optical motion capture system and IMUs during a variety of tasks (sit, sit-to-stand transition, walking, turning performed under varying conditions (speed, environment. An artificial neural network was used to classify good and bad sequences of joint orientation with a sensitivity and a specificity above 83%. This study confirms the possibility to perform QC on IMU joint orientation data based on raw signal features. This innovative QC approach may be of particular interest in a big data context, such as for remote-monitoring of patients’ mobility.

  8. Calibration of ARI QC ionisation chambers using the Australian secondary standards for activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, L.; Van Der Gaast, H.A.; Alexiev, D.; Butcher, K.S.A.; Davies, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Secondary Standard Activity Laboratory (SSAL) in ANSTO routinely provides standardised radioactive sources, traceable activity measurements and custom source preparation services to customers. The most important activity carried out is the calibration of ionisation chambers located in the Quality Control (QC) section of Australian Radioisotopes (ARI). This ensures that their activity measurements are traceable to the Australian primary methods of standardisation. ARI QC ionisation chambers are calibrated for 99m Tc, 67 Ga, 131 I, 201 Tl and 153 Sm. The SSAL has a TPA ionisation chamber, which has been directly calibrated against a primary standard for a variety of radioactive nuclides. Calibration factors for this chamber were determined specifically for the actual volumes (5ml for 99m Tc, 131 I, 2ml for 67 Ga, 201 Tl and 3 ml for 153 Sm) and types of vial (Wheaton) which are routinely used at ARI. These calibration factors can be used to accurately measure the activity of samples prepared by ARI. The samples can subsequently be used to calibrate the QC ionisation chambers. QC ionisation chambers are re-calibrated biannually

  9. QC in RIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.

    1989-01-01

    A Regional Health Authority expert from the service which performs radioimmunoassays (RIA) and immunoradiometric assays (IRMA) discusses the importance of quality control in these techniques. Originally developed as an aid to endocrinology, applications are now much more widely based and include virology, microbiology, drugs testing, immunology, parasitology, veterinary science and the food industry. The origins of errors in the practice of RIA are examined, with and between batches and the limitations placed on accuracy are explained. Measurement variability between laboratories is also mentioned. (U.K.)

  10. Quality Control Activities Related to Mechanical Maintenance of Safety Related Components at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djakovic, D.

    2016-01-01

    For successful, safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plant, maintenance processes have to be systematically controlled and procedures for quality control of maintenance activities shall be established. This is requested by the quality assurance program, which shall provide control over activities affecting the quality of structures, systems, and components, considering their importance to safety. As a part of Quality and Nuclear Oversight Division (QNOD; SKV), the Quality Control Department (QC) provides quality control activities, which are deeply involved in maintenance processes at Krsko NPP, both on safety related and non-safety related (non-nuclear safety) components. QC activities on safety related components have to fulfil all requirements, which will enable the components to perform their intended safety functions. This paper describes quality control activities related to mechanical maintenance of safety related components at Krsko NPP and significant role of the Krsko plant QC Department in three particular maintenance cases connected with safety related components. In these three specific cases, the QC has confirmed its importance in compliance with quality assurance program and presented its significant added value in providing safe and reliable operation of the plant. The first maintenance activity was installation of nozzle check valves in the scope of a modification for improving regulation of spent fuel pit pumps. The QC Department performed receipt inspection of the valves. Using non-destructive examination methods and X-ray spectrometry, it was found out that the valve diffuser was made of improper material, which could cause progressive corrosion of the valve diffuser in borated water and consequently a loss of safety function of the valves followed by long-term consequences. The second one was the receipt inspection of containment ventilation fan coolers. The coolers were claimed and sent back to the supplier because the QC Department

  11. Multileaf collimator performance monitoring and improvement using semiautomated quality control testing and statistical process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Létourneau, Daniel; McNiven, Andrea; Keller, Harald; Wang, An; Amin, Md Nurul; Pearce, Jim; Norrlinger, Bernhard; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: High-quality radiation therapy using highly conformal dose distributions and image-guided techniques requires optimum machine delivery performance. In this work, a monitoring system for multileaf collimator (MLC) performance, integrating semiautomated MLC quality control (QC) tests and statistical process control tools, was developed. The MLC performance monitoring system was used for almost a year on two commercially available MLC models. Control charts were used to establish MLC performance and assess test frequency required to achieve a given level of performance. MLC-related interlocks and servicing events were recorded during the monitoring period and were investigated as indicators of MLC performance variations. Methods: The QC test developed as part of the MLC performance monitoring system uses 2D megavoltage images (acquired using an electronic portal imaging device) of 23 fields to determine the location of the leaves with respect to the radiation isocenter. The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was assessed by detecting the MLC leaf positions on 127 megavoltage images of a static field. After initial calibration, the MLC performance monitoring QC test was performed 3–4 times/week over a period of 10–11 months to monitor positional accuracy of individual leaves for two different MLC models. Analysis of test results was performed using individuals control charts per leaf with control limits computed based on the measurements as well as two sets of specifications of ±0.5 and ±1 mm. Out-of-specification and out-of-control leaves were automatically flagged by the monitoring system and reviewed monthly by physicists. MLC-related interlocks reported by the linear accelerator and servicing events were recorded to help identify potential causes of nonrandom MLC leaf positioning variations. Results: The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was within ±0.22 mm for most MLC leaves

  12. Multileaf collimator performance monitoring and improvement using semiautomated quality control testing and statistical process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Daniel; Wang, An; Amin, Md Nurul; Pearce, Jim; McNiven, Andrea; Keller, Harald; Norrlinger, Bernhard; Jaffray, David A

    2014-12-01

    High-quality radiation therapy using highly conformal dose distributions and image-guided techniques requires optimum machine delivery performance. In this work, a monitoring system for multileaf collimator (MLC) performance, integrating semiautomated MLC quality control (QC) tests and statistical process control tools, was developed. The MLC performance monitoring system was used for almost a year on two commercially available MLC models. Control charts were used to establish MLC performance and assess test frequency required to achieve a given level of performance. MLC-related interlocks and servicing events were recorded during the monitoring period and were investigated as indicators of MLC performance variations. The QC test developed as part of the MLC performance monitoring system uses 2D megavoltage images (acquired using an electronic portal imaging device) of 23 fields to determine the location of the leaves with respect to the radiation isocenter. The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was assessed by detecting the MLC leaf positions on 127 megavoltage images of a static field. After initial calibration, the MLC performance monitoring QC test was performed 3-4 times/week over a period of 10-11 months to monitor positional accuracy of individual leaves for two different MLC models. Analysis of test results was performed using individuals control charts per leaf with control limits computed based on the measurements as well as two sets of specifications of ± 0.5 and ± 1 mm. Out-of-specification and out-of-control leaves were automatically flagged by the monitoring system and reviewed monthly by physicists. MLC-related interlocks reported by the linear accelerator and servicing events were recorded to help identify potential causes of nonrandom MLC leaf positioning variations. The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was within ± 0.22 mm for most MLC leaves and the majority of the

  13. An Austrian framework for PET quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoletti, R.; Dobrozemsky, G.; Minear, G.; Bergmann, H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The European patient protection directive (97/43 EURATOM) requires regular routine quality control (QC) of PET imaging devices. Since no standards were available covering this area and in order to comply with the directive a joint working party of the Austrian societies of nuclear medicine and of medical physics have developed a set of procedures suitable for both dedicated PET scanners and gamma cameras operating in coincidence mode (GCPET). The routine procedures proposed include both manufacturer recommended procedures and tests for specific parameters and calibration procedures. Wherever possible, procedures adapted or derived from NEMA standards publication NU 2-2001 were used to permit direct comparison with specified parameters of image quality. For dedicated PET scanners the most important procedures are the checking of detector sensitivities and the attenuation calibration scan. With full ring scanners the attenuation calibration scan is a blank scan, with partial ring devices a special attenuation calibration phantom has to be used. Test protocols are specific to manufacturer and scanner type. They are usually performed automatically overnight. In addition, some instruments require special calibrations, e.g. gain adjustments or coincidence timing calibration. GCPET procedures include the frequent assessment in coincidence mode of detector uniformity, energy resolution and system sensitivity. Common to both dedicated PET and GCPET are the regular quarterly assessment of tomographic spatial resolution and the calibration of the system for quantitative measurements. As a total performance test for both systems assessment of image quality following NU 2-2001 was included, to be carried out after major system changes or repairs. The suite of QC procedures was tested on several dedicated PET and GCPET systems including all major manufacturers' systems. Due to missing hardware or software not all tests could be performed on all systems. Some of the

  14. Quality control for the mammography screening program in Serbia: Physical and technical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Bozovic, P.; Lazarevic, D.; Arandjic, D.; Kosutic, D.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the major cause of mortality among female population in Serbia. It is presumed that the introduction of screening programme will reduce mortality and therefore, 47 new mammography units were installed for the purpose of population-based screening program in 2011. In parallel, Quality assurance and Quality control (QC) in mammography has received increasing attention as an essential element of the successful breast cancer campaign that is for the first time initialed in Serbia. The purpose of this study is to investigate the need for and the possible implementation of the comprehensive QC programme for the mammography screening in Serbia, with special focus on physical and technical aspect. In the first phase, a QC protocols containing list of parameters, methodology, frequency of tests and reference values for screen-film, computed radiography and full-filed digital mammography) units, were developed. The second phase is focused on the initial implementation of these protocols. The paper presents results of tests of the selected parameters in 35 mammography units, with special emphasis on patient dose and image quality descriptors. After initial implementation at the beginning of the population based breast cancer screening campaign, it is essential to establish system of regular and periodic QC equipment monitoring and to ensure high quality mammograms with minimal possible radiation dose to population included in the screening. (authors)

  15. The Individualized Quality Control Plan - Coming Soon to Clinical Microbiology Laboratories Everywhere!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nancy

    2015-11-15

    As of January 1, 2016, microbiology laboratories can choose to adopt a new quality control option, the Individualized Quality Control Plan (IQCP), under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA). This voluntary approach increases flexibility for meeting regulatory requirements and provides laboratories the opportunity to customize QC for their testing in their unique environments and by their testing personnel. IQCP is an all-inclusive approach to quality based on risk management to address potential errors in the total testing process. It includes three main steps, (1) performing a risk assessment, (2) developing a QC plan, and (3) monitoring the plan through quality assessment. Resources are available from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Society for Microbiology, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and accrediting organizations, such as the College of American Pathologists and Joint Commission, to assist microbiology laboratories implementing IQCP.

  16. Visualization and Quality Control Web Tools for CERES Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrescu, C.; Doelling, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA CERES project continues to provide the scientific communities a wide variety of satellite-derived data products such as observed TOA broadband shortwave and longwave observed fluxes, computed TOA and Surface fluxes, as well as cloud, aerosol, and other atmospheric parameters. They encompass a wide range of temporal and spatial resolutions, suited to specific applications. CERES data is used mostly by climate modeling communities but also by a wide variety of educational institutions. To better serve our users, a web-based Ordering and Visualization Tool (OVT) was developed by using Opens Source Software such as Eclipse, java, javascript, OpenLayer, Flot, Google Maps, python, and others. Due to increased demand by our own scientists, we also implemented a series of specialized functions to be used in the process of CERES Data Quality Control (QC) such as 1- and 2-D histograms, anomalies and differences, temporal and spatial averaging, side-by-side parameter comparison, and others that made the process of QC far easier and faster, but more importantly far more portable. With the integration of ground site observed surface fluxes we further facilitate the CERES project to QC the CERES computed surface fluxes. An overview of the CERES OVT basic functions using Open Source Software, as well as future steps in expanding its capabilities will be presented at the meeting.

  17. PACS 2000: quality control using the task allocation chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Gary S.; Romlein, John R.; Lyche, David K.; Richardson, Ronald R., Jr.

    2000-05-01

    Medical imaging's technological evolution in the next century will continue to include Picture Archive and Communication Systems (PACS) and teleradiology. It is difficult to predict radiology's future in the new millennium with both computed radiography and direct digital capture competing as the primary image acquisition methods for routine radiography. Changes in Computed Axial Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) continue to amaze the healthcare community. No matter how the acquisition, display, and archive functions change, Quality Control (QC) of the radiographic imaging chain will remain an important step in the imaging process. The Task Allocation Chart (TAC) is a tool that can be used in a medical facility's QC process to indicate the testing responsibilities of the image stakeholders and the medical informatics department. The TAC shows a grid of equipment to be serviced, tasks to be performed, and the organization assigned to perform each task. Additionally, skills, tasks, time, and references for each task can be provided. QC of the PACS must be stressed as a primary element of a PACS' implementation. The TAC can be used to clarify responsibilities during warranty and paid maintenance periods. Establishing a TAC a part of a PACS implementation has a positive affect on patient care and clinical acceptance.

  18. SPECT quality control tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robilotta, C.C.; Rebelo, M.F.S.; Oliveira, M.A.; Abe, R.

    1987-01-01

    Quality control tests of tomographic system composed by a rotatory chamber (CGR Gammatomome T-9000) and a microcomputer are presented. Traditional quality control tests for scintilation chambers and specific tests for tomographic systems are reported. (M.A.C.) [pt

  19. Building a QC Database of Meteorological Data From NASA KSC and the United States Air Force's Eastern Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, James C.; Barbre, Robert E.; Orcutt, John M.; Decker, Ryan K.

    2018-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (EV44) has provided atmospheric databases and analysis in support of space vehicle design and day-of-launch operations for NASA and commercial launch vehicle programs launching from the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), co-located on the United States Air Force's Eastern Range (ER) at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The ER is one of the most heavily instrumented sites in the United States measuring various atmospheric parameters on a continuous basis. An inherent challenge with the large databases that EV44 receives from the ER consists of ensuring erroneous data are removed from the databases, and thus excluded from launch vehicle design analyses. EV44 has put forth great effort in developing quality control (QC) procedures for individual meteorological instruments; however, no standard QC procedures for all databases currently exist resulting in QC databases that have inconsistencies in variables, methodologies, and periods of record. The goal of this activity is to use the previous efforts by EV44 to develop a standardized set of QC procedures from which to build flags within the meteorological databases from KSC and the ER, while maintaining open communication with end users from the launch community to develop ways to improve, adapt and grow the QC database. Details of the QC checks are described. The flagged data points will be plotted in a graphical user interface (GUI) as part of a manual confirmation that the flagged data do indeed need to be removed from the archive. As the rate of launches increases with additional launch vehicle programs, more emphasis is being placed to continually update and check weather databases for data quality before use in launch vehicle design and certification analyses.

  20. Internal quality control: planning and implementation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, James O

    2003-11-01

    The first essential in setting up internal quality control (IQC) of a test procedure in the clinical laboratory is to select the proper IQC procedure to implement, i.e. choosing the statistical criteria or control rules, and the number of control measurements, according to the quality required for the test and the observed performance of the method. Then the right IQC procedure must be properly implemented. This review focuses on strategies for planning and implementing IQC procedures in order to improve the quality of the IQC. A quantitative planning process is described that can be implemented with graphical tools such as power function or critical-error graphs and charts of operating specifications. Finally, a total QC strategy is formulated to minimize cost and maximize quality. A general strategy for IQC implementation is recommended that employs a three-stage design in which the first stage provides high error detection, the second stage low false rejection and the third stage prescribes the length of the analytical run, making use of an algorithm involving the average of normal patients' data.

  1. Challenges in Development of Sperm Repositories for Biomedical Fishes: Quality Control in Small-Bodied Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leticia; Liu, Yue; Guitreau, Amy; Yang, Huiping; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2017-12-01

    Quality control (QC) is essential for reproducible and efficient functioning of germplasm repositories. However, many biomedical fish models present significant QC challenges due to small body sizes (<5 cm) and miniscule sperm volumes (<5 μL). Using minimal volumes of sperm, we used Zebrafish to evaluate common QC endpoints as surrogates for fertilization success along sequential steps of cryopreservation. First, concentrations of calibration bead suspensions were evaluated with a Makler ® counting chamber by using different sample volumes and mixing methods. For sperm analysis, samples were initially diluted at a 1:30 ratio with Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS). Motility was evaluated by using different ratios of sperm and activation medium, and membrane integrity was analyzed with flow cytometry at different concentrations. Concentration and sperm motility could be confidently estimated by using volumes as small as 1 μL, whereas membrane integrity required a minimum of 2 μL (at 1 × 10 6 cells/mL). Thus, <5 μL of sperm suspension (after dilution to 30-150 μL with HBSS) was required to evaluate sperm quality by using three endpoints. Sperm quality assessment using a combination of complementary endpoints enhances QC efforts during cryopreservation, increasing reliability and reproducibility, and reducing waste of time and resources.

  2. Guidebook on quality control of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    As a result of the increasing contribution of nuclear power to the world's supply of electrical energy, growing emphasis is being placed on the reliability of nuclear fuel performance. The need to produce a reliable product is based not only on economic reasons but also on safety considerations. Fuel assemblies must withstand the operational requirements placed on them while in the reactor; also, in some cases, they have to be stored for long periods in water-filled basins until they are either reprocessed or ultimately subjected to disposal. One of the keys to consistent and reliable fuel production is an adequate Quality Control (QC) programme, operating under a Quality Assurance (QA) system. In connection with various activities sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency it has been suggested for some time that a guidebook should be published, highlighting the role that QC plays in the manufacture of nuclear fuel and stressing the relationship that exists between the QC and QA functions. The aim of this book is to give a summary of the present state of practical experience in the areas of: quality-relevant design requirements; quality control of products and processes. Specific QA requirements are referred to where they are important for an understanding of the co-operation required between the various activities involved in nuclear fuel technology. Examples are also given to illustrate specific needs or specific types of experience in this area. In order to distinguish clearly between the generally required criteria and rules and the details of particular practical experience, the book is divided into two main parts. Part A focuses on the philosophy and principles; Part B supplements Part A with technically detailed descriptions and examples

  3. Quality assurance and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaden, W.

    1986-01-01

    General preconditions and methods for QA work in the nuclear field are analysed. The application of general QA principles to actual situations is illustrated by examples in the fields of engineering and of the manufacturing of mechanical and electrical components. All QA measures must be fitted to the complexity and relevance of the work steps, which are under consideration. The key to good product quality is the control of working processes. The term 'controlled process' is discussed in detail and examples of feed back systems are given. The main QA measures for the operation of nuclear power plants include the establishment of a Quality Assurance Program, training and qualification of personnel, procurement control, inspection and tests, reviews and audits. These activities are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Quality assurance and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The practice of nuclear diagnostic imaging requires an appropriate quality assurance program to attain high standards of efficiency and reliability. The International Atomic Energy Agency defines the term quality assurance as ''the closeness with which the outcome of a given procedure approaches some ideal, free from all errors and artifacts.'' The term quality control is used in reference to the specific measures taken to ensure that one particular aspect of the procedure is satisfactory. Therefore, quality assurance is a hospital-wide concept that should involve all aspects of clinical practice. Quality control is concerned with the submission of requests for procedures; the scheduling of patients; the preparation and dispensing of radiopharmaceuticals; the protection of patients, staff, and the general public against radiation hazards and accidents caused by radioactive materials or by faulty equipment; the setting up, use, and maintenance of electronic instruments; the methodology of the actual procedures; the analysis and interpretation of data; the reporting of results; and, finally, the keeping of records. The chapter discusses each of these areas

  5. Quality control in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batalla, A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss the modalities and periodicities of internal quality control on radiotherapy installations. They indicate the different concerned systems and the aspects and items to be controlled (patient and personnel security, apparatus mechanical characteristics, beam quality, image quality, isodose and irradiation duration calculation, data transfer). They present the measurement instruments and tools used for the mechanical controls, dose measurement, beam homogeneity and symmetry, anatomic data acquisition systems, and dose distribution and control imagery calculation

  6. Quality Control Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chorafas, Dimitris N

    2013-01-01

    Quality control is a constant priority in electrical, mechanical, aeronautical, and nuclear engineering – as well as in the vast domain of electronics, from home appliances to computers and telecommunications. Quality Control Applications provides guidance and valuable insight into quality control policies; their methods, their implementation, constant observation and associated technical audits. What has previously been a mostly mathematical topic is translated here for engineers concerned with the practical implementation of quality control. Once the fundamentals of quality control are established, Quality Control Applications goes on to develop this knowledge and explain how to apply it in the most effective way. Techniques are described and supported using relevant, real-life, case studies to provide detail and clarity for those without a mathematical background. Among the many practical examples, two case studies dramatize the importance of quality assurance: A shot-by-shot analysis of the errors made ...

  7. Impacts of Intelligent Automated Quality Control on a Small Animal APD-Based Digital PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Jonathan; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Bergeron, Mélanie; Cadorette, Jules; Arpin, Louis; Lecomte, Roger; Brunet, Charles-Antoine; Fontaine, Réjean

    2016-10-01

    Stable system performance is mandatory to warrant the accuracy and reliability of biological results relying on small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. This simple requirement sets the ground for imposing routine quality control (QC) procedures to keep PET scanners at a reliable optimal performance level. However, such procedures can become burdensome to implement for scanner operators, especially taking into account the increasing number of data acquisition channels in newer generation PET scanners. In systems using pixel detectors to achieve enhanced spatial resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the QC workload rapidly increases to unmanageable levels due to the number of independent channels involved. An artificial intelligence based QC system, referred to as Scanner Intelligent Diagnosis for Optimal Performance (SIDOP), was proposed to help reducing the QC workload by performing automatic channel fault detection and diagnosis. SIDOP consists of four high-level modules that employ machine learning methods to perform their tasks: Parameter Extraction, Channel Fault Detection, Fault Prioritization, and Fault Diagnosis. Ultimately, SIDOP submits a prioritized faulty channel list to the operator and proposes actions to correct them. To validate that SIDOP can perform QC procedures adequately, it was deployed on a LabPET™ scanner and multiple performance metrics were extracted. After multiple corrections on sub-optimal scanner settings, a 8.5% (with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of [7.6, 9.3]) improvement in the CNR, a 17.0% (CI: [15.3, 18.7]) decrease of the uniformity percentage standard deviation, and a 6.8% gain in global sensitivity were observed. These results confirm that SIDOP can indeed be of assistance in performing QC procedures and restore performance to optimal figures.

  8. Daily quality control in computed radiography mammography using the manufacturer phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubiak, Rosangela R.; Messias, Pricila C.; Oliveira, Carlla M.

    2011-01-01

    The quality control (QC) in mammography system involves a large amount of test tools, which implies a large space for storage and a high number of exposure. This work describes a QC system using a phantom, Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) One Shot Phantom M Plus, that evaluates several parameters with just one exposure. The software offers tests with annual, semi-annual, quarterly, weekly and daily periodicity, and analyzes the conformities of the mammography equipment, image plate and cassettes. Because of the high number of tests, it was evaluated the daily test only for seven months in two mammography equipment. The test, through the software and its image, allows the analysis of ten parameters in QC. The evaluation of these parameters was realized by the average of the values provided by the software. Only one of the evaluated items showed not conformity, but this was observed and the necessary corrections were realized. The monitoring of use of FCR Mammography QC software with the FCR One Shot Phantom M Plus was realized and through this we could investigate that the quality program provided by the system is appropriate for the radiology services that has the Fuji Computed Radiography system. (author)

  9. Software product quality control

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Quality is not a fixed or universal property of software; it depends on the context and goals of its stakeholders. Hence, when you want to develop a high-quality software system, the first step must be a clear and precise specification of quality. Yet even if you get it right and complete, you can be sure that it will become invalid over time. So the only solution is continuous quality control: the steady and explicit evaluation of a product's properties with respect to its updated quality goals.This book guides you in setting up and running continuous quality control in your environment. Star

  10. The Quality Control Algorithms Used in the Creation of NASA Kennedy Space Center Lightning Protection System Towers Meteorological Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Brenton, James C.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate database of meteorological data is essential for designing any aerospace vehicle and for preparing launch commit criteria. Meteorological instrumentation were recently placed on the three Lightning Protection System (LPS) towers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39B (LC-39B), which provide a unique meteorological dataset existing at the launch complex over an extensive altitude range. Data records of temperature, dew point, relative humidity, wind speed, and wind direction are produced at 40, 78, 116, and 139 m at each tower. The Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) received an archive that consists of one-minute averaged measurements for the period of record of January 2011 - April 2015. However, before the received database could be used EV44 needed to remove any erroneous data from within the database through a comprehensive quality control (QC) process. The QC process applied to the LPS towers' meteorological data is similar to other QC processes developed by EV44, which were used in the creation of meteorological databases for other towers at KSC. The QC process utilized in this study has been modified specifically for use with the LPS tower database. The QC process first includes a check of each individual sensor. This check includes removing any unrealistic data and checking the temporal consistency of each variable. Next, data from all three sensors at each height are checked against each other, checked against climatology, and checked for sensors that erroneously report a constant value. Then, a vertical consistency check of each variable at each tower is completed. Last, the upwind sensor at each level is selected to minimize the influence of the towers and other structures at LC-39B on the measurements. The selection process for the upwind sensor implemented a study of tower-induced turbulence. This paper describes in detail the QC process, QC results, and the attributes of the LPS towers meteorological

  11. Development of manufacturing equipment and QC equipment for DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, J.J.; Lee, J.W.; Kim, S.S.; Yim, S.P.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, K.H.; Na, S.H.; Kim, W.K.; Shin, J.M.; Lee, D.Y.; Cho, K.H.; Lee, Y.S.; Sohn, J.S.; Kim, M.J.

    1999-05-01

    In this study, DUPIC powder and pellet fabrication equipment, welding system, QC equipment, and fission gas treatment are developed to fabricate DUPIC fuel at IMEF M6 hot cell. The systems are improved to be suitable for remote operation and maintenance with the manipulator at hot cell. Powder and pellet fabrication equipment have been recently developed. The systems are under performance test to check remote operation and maintenance. Welding chamber and jigs are designed and developed to remotely weld DUPIC fuel rod with manipulators at hot cell. Remote quality control equipment are being tested for analysis and inspection of DUPIC fuel characteristics at hot cell. And trapping characteristics is analyzed for cesium and ruthenium released under oxidation/reduction and sintering processes. The design criteria and process flow diagram of fission gas treatment system are prepared incorporating the experimental results. The fission gas treatment system has been successfully manufactured. (Author). 33 refs., 14 tabs., 91 figs

  12. Specialized software for optimization of the quality control of the mammography units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeva, M.; Vassileva, J.

    2004-01-01

    Quality control is essential to ensure the equipment used is reliable and consistent in order to maintain radiation does as low as reasonably achievable whilst optimizing image quality and performance in mammography. The effectiveness of mammographic screening is highly dependent on the consistent production of high quality diagnostic images. Mammography is highly dependent on the equipment status, which requires an effective Quality Control (QC) program to provide tools for continuous assessment of the equipment performance and also data storage and analysis of the protocols' data. The objective of this paper is to present the specialized software for Quality Control of the Mammography Units, as tool providing additional functionality for optimizations of the Mammography QC data storage and management. The PC program was developed according to the requirements stated in the European protocol for Quality Control of the Mammography Screening and the data collected as a result of its application in several Bulgarian hospitals. The Structured Analysis method was used in order to perform a case, which resulted in the development of the specialized software with a database module, providing the following functionality: Data Storage, Preliminary Data Processing and Post-Processing, Manual Data Entry, Data Import from XLS format, Data Export to XLS format, Printing, Data Filters, Automated Calculation, Automated Graphical Representation, Archiving The development of specialized QC software with a database for mammography units facilitates the process of QC data storage and handling and minimizes the errors. The electronic format for data storage is especially useful in case of long-term storage and periodical data analysis/access. The integrated data processing functionality and the automated import/export features based on standard platform increase the compatibility of the data. (authors)

  13. Data quality through a web-based QA/QC system: implementation for atmospheric mercury data from the global mercury observation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amore, Francesco; Bencardino, Mariantonia; Cinnirella, Sergio; Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    The overall goal of the on-going Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project is to develop a coordinated global monitoring network for mercury, including ground-based, high altitude and sea level stations. In order to ensure data reliability and comparability, a significant effort has been made to implement a centralized system, which is designed to quality assure and quality control atmospheric mercury datasets. This system, GMOS-Data Quality Management (G-DQM), uses a web-based approach with real-time adaptive monitoring procedures aimed at preventing the production of poor-quality data. G-DQM is plugged on a cyberinfrastructure and deployed as a service. Atmospheric mercury datasets, produced during the first-three years of the GMOS project, are used as the input to demonstrate the application of the G-DQM and how it identifies a number of key issues concerning data quality. The major issues influencing data quality are presented and discussed for the GMOS stations under study. Atmospheric mercury data collected at the Longobucco (Italy) station is used as a detailed case study.

  14. Checking quality control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    How is quality control doing within the community of GIS, web-services based on geo-information, GI etc.?......How is quality control doing within the community of GIS, web-services based on geo-information, GI etc.?...

  15. Quality Assurance for a TLD Based Individual Monitoring Service (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julius, H.W.; Van Dijk, J.W.E. [Arnhem (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    Approved Individual Monitoring Services should, in addition to complying with specific national performance requirements, also have implemented a quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) programme as an integral part of the operation. Essential elements of a QA/QC programme are discussed. Some practical hints and examples of QA practices are given, focussing on the application of thermoluminescence dosimetry. (author)

  16. Droplet Digital™ PCR Next-Generation Sequencing Library QC Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Nicholas J

    2018-01-01

    Digital PCR is a valuable tool to quantify next-generation sequencing (NGS) libraries precisely and accurately. Accurately quantifying NGS libraries enable accurate loading of the libraries on to the sequencer and thus improve sequencing performance by reducing under and overloading error. Accurate quantification also benefits users by enabling uniform loading of indexed/barcoded libraries which in turn greatly improves sequencing uniformity of the indexed/barcoded samples. The advantages gained by employing the Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR™) library QC assay includes the precise and accurate quantification in addition to size quality assessment, enabling users to QC their sequencing libraries with confidence.

  17. DATA PROCESSING FROM THE MEASURING DEVICE BALLBAR QC20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matúš Košinár

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an innovative method of data processing from the measurement device – Ballbar QC20W. It was created with a program for data transformation (Visual Basic.NET and it used Fourier transformation. The paper deals with the measuring method of CNC machine tools using Ballbar QC20W. There is an influence between qualitative parameters of machine tools and qualitative parameters of products (tolerances, roughness, etc.. It is very important to hold the stability of qualitative parameters of products as a key factor of production quality. Therefore, is also important to evaluate the accuracy of machine tools and make prediction of possible accuracy.

  18. Quality Control Guidelines for Disk Diffusion and Broth Microdilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests with Seven Drugs for Veterinary Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odland, Brant A.; Erwin, Meredith E.; Jones, Ronald N.

    2000-01-01

    This multicenter study proposes antimicrobial susceptibility (MIC and disk diffusion methods) quality control (QC) parameters for seven compounds utilized in veterinary health. Alexomycin, apramycin, tiamulin, tilmicosin, and tylosin were tested by broth microdilution against various National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS)-recommended QC organisms (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49619, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853). In addition, disk diffusion zone diameter QC limits were determined for apramycin, enrofloxacin, and premafloxacin by using E. coli ATCC 25922, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and S. aureus ATCC 25923. The results from five or six participating laboratories produced ≥99.0% of MICs and ≥95.0% of the zone diameters within suggested guidelines. The NCCLS Subcommittee for Veterinary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing has recently approved these ranges for publication in the next M31 document. PMID:10618141

  19. A Benchmark Study on Error Assessment and Quality Control of CCS Reads Derived from the PacBio RS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaoli; Zheng, Xin; Ma, Liang; Kutty, Geetha; Gogineni, Emile; Sun, Qiang; Sherman, Brad T; Hu, Xiaojun; Jones, Kristine; Raley, Castle; Tran, Bao; Munroe, David J; Stephens, Robert; Liang, Dun; Imamichi, Tomozumi; Kovacs, Joseph A; Lempicki, Richard A; Huang, Da Wei

    2013-07-31

    PacBio RS, a newly emerging third-generation DNA sequencing platform, is based on a real-time, single-molecule, nano-nitch sequencing technology that can generate very long reads (up to 20-kb) in contrast to the shorter reads produced by the first and second generation sequencing technologies. As a new platform, it is important to assess the sequencing error rate, as well as the quality control (QC) parameters associated with the PacBio sequence data. In this study, a mixture of 10 prior known, closely related DNA amplicons were sequenced using the PacBio RS sequencing platform. After aligning Circular Consensus Sequence (CCS) reads derived from the above sequencing experiment to the known reference sequences, we found that the median error rate was 2.5% without read QC, and improved to 1.3% with an SVM based multi-parameter QC method. In addition, a De Novo assembly was used as a downstream application to evaluate the effects of different QC approaches. This benchmark study indicates that even though CCS reads are post error-corrected it is still necessary to perform appropriate QC on CCS reads in order to produce successful downstream bioinformatics analytical results.

  20. Quality controls for wind measurement of a 1290-MHz boundary layer profiler under strong wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Zheng, Chaorong; Wu, Yue

    2017-09-01

    Wind profilers have been widely adopted to observe the wind field information in the atmosphere for different purposes. But accuracy of its observation has limitations due to various noises or disturbances and hence need to be further improved. In this paper, the data measured under strong wind conditions, using a 1290-MHz boundary layer profiler (BLP), are quality controlled via a composite quality control (QC) procedure proposed by the authors. Then, through the comparison with the data measured by radiosonde flights (balloon observations), the critical thresholds in the composite QC procedure, including consensus average threshold T 1 and vertical shear threshold T 3 , are systematically discussed. And the performance of the BLP operated under precipitation is also evaluated. It is found that to ensure the high accuracy and high data collectable rate, the optimal range of subsets is determined to be 4 m/s. Although the number of data rejected by the combined algorithm of vertical shear examination and small median test is quite limited, it is proved that the algorithm is quite useful to recognize the outlier with a large discrepancy. And the optimal wind shear threshold T 3 can be recommended as 5 ms -1 /100m. During patchy precipitation, the quality of data measured by the four oblique beams (using the DBS measuring technique) can still be ensured. After the BLP data are quality controlled by the composite QC procedure, the output can show good agreement with the balloon observation.

  1. Quality control of CT systems by automated monitoring of key performance indicators: a two-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowik, Patrik; Bujila, Robert; Poludniowski, Gavin; Fransson, Annette

    2015-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method of performing routine periodical quality controls (QC) of CT systems by automatically analyzing key performance indicators (KPIs), obtainable from images of manufacturers' quality assurance (QA) phantoms. A KPI pertains to a measurable or determinable QC parameter that is influenced by other underlying fundamental QC parameters. The established KPIs are based on relationships between existing QC parameters used in the annual testing program of CT scanners at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. The KPIs include positioning, image noise, uniformity, homogeneity, the CT number of water, and the CT number of air. An application (MonitorCT) was developed to automatically evaluate phantom images in terms of the established KPIs. The developed methodology has been used for two years in clinical routine, where CT technologists perform daily scans of the manufacturer's QA phantom and automatically send the images to MonitorCT for KPI evaluation. In the cases where results were out of tolerance, actions could be initiated in less than 10 min. 900 QC scans from two CT scanners have been collected and analyzed over the two-year period that MonitorCT has been active. Two types of errors have been registered in this period: a ring artifact was discovered with the image noise test, and a calibration error was detected multiple times with the CT number test. In both cases, results were outside the tolerances defined for MonitorCT, as well as by the vendor. Automated monitoring of KPIs is a powerful tool that can be used to supplement established QC methodologies. Medical physicists and other professionals concerned with the performance of a CT system will, using such methods, have access to comprehensive data on the current and historical (trend) status of the system such that swift actions can be taken in order to ensure the quality of the CT examinations, patient safety, and minimal disruption of service.

  2. Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

  3. A real-time automated quality control of rain gauge data based on multiple sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    qi, Y.; Zhang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Precipitation is one of the most important meteorological and hydrological variables. Automated rain gauge networks provide direct measurements of precipitation and have been used for numerous applications such as generating regional and national precipitation maps, calibrating remote sensing data, and validating hydrological and meteorological model predictions. Automated gauge observations are prone to a variety of error sources (instrument malfunction, transmission errors, format changes), and require careful quality controls (QC). Many previous gauge QC techniques were based on neighborhood checks within the gauge network itself and the effectiveness is dependent on gauge densities and precipitation regimes. The current study takes advantage of the multi-sensor data sources in the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) system and developes an automated gauge QC scheme based the consistency of radar hourly QPEs and gauge observations. Error characteristics of radar and gauge as a function of the radar sampling geometry, precipitation regimes, and the freezing level height are considered. The new scheme was evaluated by comparing an NMQ national gauge-based precipitation product with independent manual gauge observations. Twelve heavy rainfall events from different seasons and areas of the United States are selected for the evaluation, and the results show that the new NMQ product with QC'ed gauges has a more physically spatial distribution than the old product. And the new product agrees much better statistically with the independent gauges.

  4. Research of quality control during development of NPP DCS 1E classified software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Weihua; Lu Zhenguo; Xie Qi

    2012-01-01

    The Nuclear safety depends on right behavior of 1E software, which is a important part of 1E DCS system. Nowadays, user focus on good function of 1E system, but pay little attention to quality control of 1E software. In fact, it's declared in IEC61513 and IEC60880 that 1E software should under strict quality control during all stages of development. This article is related to the practice of 1E DCS system quality control and explores the QC surveillance for 1E software from the user's point of view. (authors)

  5. Quality control of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The quality control of radiopharmaceuticals is based in physics, physics-chemical and biological controls. Between the different controls can be enumerated the following: visual aspect,side, number of particle beams,activity,purity,ph,isotonicity,sterility,radioinmunoessay,toxicity,stability and clinical essay

  6. Standardization of the Experimental Methodology for Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA-QC of the CLIC Structural Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gazis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main linear accelerators (linacs of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC are constituted of sequential two-beam modules (of approximate length of two meters. The CLIC linacs need to be firmly stabilized on their supports with a micron-level requirement, essential for maintaining the final target luminosity close to the required XXX value. Real scale two-beam prototype modules have been designed, manufactured and commissioned to study their behaviour under different operation modes and experimental conditions. The CLIC machine will work for continuous runs under conditions of high radiation background. The structural materials of the systems of the accelerator have to sustain the significant fatigue and activation due to the radiation, generated mainly by the losses of the particle beam. Extensive testing has taken place with a combination of mechanical experiments and irradiation sessions on samples of structural materials, focusing on the micro-precise CLIC module supporting system. The followed experimentally strategy was standardized in a series of sequential steps.

  7. Quality Control in construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    behavioral scientists. In 1962, Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa gave shape to the form of training which featured intradepartmental groups of ten or so workers seated...and Japanese circles bears closer scrutiny. 4.3.1 Japanese Ingredients of Quality The founder of quality circles, Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa , gives six...around 51 a table; hence the name Quality Control Circle. 4 Dr. 0 Ishikawa was an engineering professor at Tokyo University, and the circles were

  8. Machine-Specific Magnetic Resonance Imaging Quality Control Procedures for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Ali; Taghizadeh, Somayeh; Yang, Claus Chunli; R Kanakamedala, Madhava; Morris, Bart; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2017-12-18

    Purpose Magnetic resonance (MR) images are necessary for accurate contouring of intracranial targets, determination of gross target volume and evaluation of organs at risk during stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment planning procedures. Many centers use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulators or regular diagnostic MRI machines for SRS treatment planning; while both types of machine require two stages of quality control (QC), both machine- and patient-specific, before use for SRS, no accepted guidelines for such QC currently exist. This article describes appropriate machine-specific QC procedures for SRS applications. Methods and materials We describe the adaptation of American College of Radiology (ACR)-recommended QC tests using an ACR MRI phantom for SRS treatment planning. In addition, commercial Quasar MRID 3D and Quasar GRID 3D phantoms were used to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field (B 0 ) inhomogeneity, gradient nonlinearity, and a Leksell G frame (SRS frame) and its accessories on geometrical distortion in MR images. Results QC procedures found in-plane distortions (Maximum = 3.5 mm, Mean = 0.91 mm, Standard deviation = 0.67 mm, >2.5 mm (%) = 2) in X-direction (Maximum = 2.51 mm, Mean = 0.52 mm, Standard deviation = 0.39 mm, > 2.5 mm (%) = 0) and in Y-direction (Maximum = 13. 1 mm , Mean = 2.38 mm, Standard deviation = 2.45 mm, > 2.5 mm (%) = 34) in Z-direction and < 1 mm distortion at a head-sized region of interest. MR images acquired using a Leksell G frame and localization devices showed a mean absolute deviation of 2.3 mm from isocenter. The results of modified ACR tests were all within recommended limits, and baseline measurements have been defined for regular weekly QC tests. Conclusions With appropriate QC procedures in place, it is possible to routinely obtain clinically useful MR images suitable for SRS treatment planning purposes. MRI examination for SRS planning can benefit from the improved localization and planning

  9. An effective and optimal quality control approach for green energy manufacturing using design of experiments framework and evolutionary algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Juan Alejandro

    Quality Control (QC) and Quality Assurance (QA) strategies vary significantly across industries in the manufacturing sector depending on the product being built. Such strategies range from simple statistical analysis and process controls, decision-making process of reworking, repairing, or scraping defective product. This study proposes an optimal QC methodology in order to include rework stations during the manufacturing process by identifying the amount and location of these workstations. The factors that are considered to optimize these stations are cost, cycle time, reworkability and rework benefit. The goal is to minimize the cost and cycle time of the process, but increase the reworkability and rework benefit. The specific objectives of this study are: (1) to propose a cost estimation model that includes energy consumption, and (2) to propose an optimal QC methodology to identify quantity and location of rework workstations. The cost estimation model includes energy consumption as part of the product direct cost. The cost estimation model developed allows the user to calculate product direct cost as the quality sigma level of the process changes. This provides a benefit because a complete cost estimation calculation does not need to be performed every time the processes yield changes. This cost estimation model is then used for the QC strategy optimization process. In order to propose a methodology that provides an optimal QC strategy, the possible factors that affect QC were evaluated. A screening Design of Experiments (DOE) was performed on seven initial factors and identified 3 significant factors. It reflected that one response variable was not required for the optimization process. A full factorial DOE was estimated in order to verify the significant factors obtained previously. The QC strategy optimization is performed through a Genetic Algorithm (GA) which allows the evaluation of several solutions in order to obtain feasible optimal solutions. The GA

  10. Impact of Case Mix Severity on Quality Improvement in a Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) in the Maryland Multi-Payor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Niharika; Shaya, Fadia T; Chirikov, Viktor V; Sharp, David; Steffen, Ben

    2016-01-01

    We present data on quality of care (QC) improvement in 35 of 45 National Quality Forum metrics reported annually by 52 primary care practices recognized as patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) that participated in the Maryland Multi-Payor Program from 2011 to 2013. We assigned QC metrics to (1) chronic, (2) preventive, and (3) mental health care domains. The study used a panel data design with no control group. Using longitudinal fixed-effects regressions, we modeled QC and case mix severity in a PCMH. Overall, 35 of 45 quality metrics reported by 52 PCMHs demonstrated improvement over 3 years, and case mix severity did not affect the achievement of quality improvement. From 2011 to 2012, QC increased by 0.14 (P case mix severity did not correlate with QC. In multivariate analyses, higher QC correlated with larger practices, greater proportion of older patients, and readmission visits. Rural practices had higher proportions of Medicaid patients, lower QC, and higher QC improvement in interaction analyses with time. The gains in QC in the chronic disease domain, the preventive care domain, and, most significantly, the mental health care domain were observed over time regardless of patient case mix severity. QC improvement was generally not modified by practice characteristics, except for rurality. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  11. Environmental analytical laboratory setup operation and QA/QC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, J.P.; Boyd, J.A.; DeViney, S.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental analysis requires precise and timely measurements. The required precise measurement is ensured with quality control and timeliness through an efficient operation. The efficiency of the operation also ensures cost-competitiveness. Environmental analysis plays a very important role in the environmental protection program. Due to the possible litigation involvement, most environmental analyses follow stringent criteria, such as the U.S. EPA Contract Laboratory Program procedures with analytical results documented in an orderly manner. The documentation demonstrates that all quality control steps are followed and facilitates data evaluation to determine the quality and usefulness of the data. Furthermore, the tedious documents concerning sample checking, chain-of-custody, standard or surrogate preparation, daily refrigerator and oven temperature monitoring, analytical and extraction logbooks, standard operation procedures, etc., also are an important part of the laboratory documentation. Quality control for environmental analysis is becoming more stringent, required documentation is becoming more detailed and turnaround time is shorter. However, the business is becoming more cost-competitive and it appears that this trend will continue. In this paper, we discuss what should be done to deal this high quality, fast-paced and tedious environmental analysis process at a competitive cost. The success of environmental analysis is people. The knowledge and experience of the staff are the key to a successful environmental analysis program. In order to be successful in this new area, the ability to develop new methods is crucial. In addition, the laboratory information system, laboratory automation and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) are major factors for laboratory success. This paper concentrates on these areas

  12. Base for a remote quality control system for magnetic resonance images machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Dalmau, Evelio R; Cabal Mirabal, Carlos; Noda Guerra, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The medical images systems convert characteristic of the tissues in gray levels or color, using a physical method and a specific mathematical transformation. In Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) these levels have a multi-parametric dependence, this a reason of their strong presence in the daily clinical practice. This technological complexity, the high costs and the importance that have these study for the patient's life, confer to the Quality Control (QC) human, technological, economic and juridical implications. Several international groups dedicated to the QC in MRI and diversity of approaches to carry out the tests of acceptance and periodic control of the quality exist. The characterization is habitually carried out, with global methods that don't allow a detailed quantitative parametric study. A novel system of quantitative control was developed based on quantitative describers by slices and temporal. This system is formed for: 1) standard methodology of acquisition of the experimental data, 2) subsystem of functions and programs developed in MatLab, 3) subsystem of graphics and reports, and 4) the expert. It is used successfully in the characterization and the periodic control of MRI machines of several magnetic fields in Cuba and in Venezuela. They were defined and established quantitative descriptors for MRI machines. The software flexibility allows carry out the QC to any machine facilitating the standardization and its use in multi-center studies. The retrospective and predictive value of the system was demonstrated. They feel the bases for the remote realization of the test

  13. Quality control in dual head γ-cameras: comparison between methods and software s used for image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayl E, A.; Fornasier, M. R.; De Denaro, M.; Sulieman, A.; Alkhorayef, M.; Bradley, D.

    2017-10-01

    Patient radiation dose and image quality are the main issues in nuclear medicine (Nm) procedures. Currently, many protocols are used for image acquisition and analysis of quality control (Qc) tests. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (Nema) methods and protocols are widely accepted method used for providing accurate description, measurement and reporting of γ-camera performance parameters. However, no standard software is available for image analysis. The aim os this study was to compare between the vendor Qc software analysis and three software from different developers downloaded free from internet; NMQC, Nm Tool kit and ImageJ-Nm Tool kit software. The three software are used for image analysis of some Qc tests for γ-cameras based on Nema protocols including non-uniformity evaluation. Ten non-uniformity Qc images were taken from dual head γ-camera (Siemens Symbia) installed in Trieste general hospital (Italy), and analyzed. Excel analysis was used as baseline calculation of the non-uniformity test according Nema procedures. The results of the non-uniformity analysis showed good agreement between the three independent software and excel calculation (the average differences were 0.3%, 2.9%, 1.3% and 1.6% for UFOV integral, UFOV differential, CFOV integral and CFOV differential respectively), while significant difference was detected on the analysis of the company Qc software with compare to the excel analysis (the average differences were 14.6%, 20.7%, 25.7% and 31.9% for UFOV integral, UFOV differential, CFOV integral and CFOV differential respectively). NMQC software was the best in comparison with the excel calculations. The variation in the results is due to different pixel sizes used for analysis in the three software and the γ-camera Qc software. Therefore, is important to perform the tests by the vendor Qc software as well as by independent analysis to understand the differences between the values. Moreover, the medical physicist should know

  14. Quality control in dual head γ-cameras: comparison between methods and software s used for image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayl E, A. [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Safety Institute, Khartoum (Sudan); Fornasier, M. R.; De Denaro, M. [Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Trieste, Medical Physics Department, Via Giovanni Sai 7, 34128 Trieste (Italy); Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O. Box 422, 11942 Al-Kharj (Saudi Arabia); Alkhorayef, M.; Bradley, D., E-mail: abdwsh10@hotmail.com [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2-7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Patient radiation dose and image quality are the main issues in nuclear medicine (Nm) procedures. Currently, many protocols are used for image acquisition and analysis of quality control (Qc) tests. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (Nema) methods and protocols are widely accepted method used for providing accurate description, measurement and reporting of γ-camera performance parameters. However, no standard software is available for image analysis. The aim os this study was to compare between the vendor Qc software analysis and three software from different developers downloaded free from internet; NMQC, Nm Tool kit and ImageJ-Nm Tool kit software. The three software are used for image analysis of some Qc tests for γ-cameras based on Nema protocols including non-uniformity evaluation. Ten non-uniformity Qc images were taken from dual head γ-camera (Siemens Symbia) installed in Trieste general hospital (Italy), and analyzed. Excel analysis was used as baseline calculation of the non-uniformity test according Nema procedures. The results of the non-uniformity analysis showed good agreement between the three independent software and excel calculation (the average differences were 0.3%, 2.9%, 1.3% and 1.6% for UFOV integral, UFOV differential, CFOV integral and CFOV differential respectively), while significant difference was detected on the analysis of the company Qc software with compare to the excel analysis (the average differences were 14.6%, 20.7%, 25.7% and 31.9% for UFOV integral, UFOV differential, CFOV integral and CFOV differential respectively). NMQC software was the best in comparison with the excel calculations. The variation in the results is due to different pixel sizes used for analysis in the three software and the γ-camera Qc software. Therefore, is important to perform the tests by the vendor Qc software as well as by independent analysis to understand the differences between the values. Moreover, the medical physicist should know

  15. Activity know-how and doctrine of QC circle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-09-15

    This books introduces activity know-how of QC circle giving descriptions of basic of QC circle activities, introduction operation and development and mind of QC circle activities, method for beginning of QC circle activity like, way order, motivation of introduction of QC circle activity, propel method of QC circle activities, such as leadership, brain storming, and rule of QC circle activity, management and propel method for improvement, development of QC circle activities. It also deals with doctrine of basic of QC circle, purpose, self improvement and group activity.

  16. Activity know-how and doctrine of QC circle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    This books introduces activity know-how of QC circle giving descriptions of basic of QC circle activities, introduction operation and development and mind of QC circle activities, method for beginning of QC circle activity like, way order, motivation of introduction of QC circle activity, propel method of QC circle activities, such as leadership, brain storming, and rule of QC circle activity, management and propel method for improvement, development of QC circle activities. It also deals with doctrine of basic of QC circle, purpose, self improvement and group activity.

  17. Establishment of quality control technology for HTR fuel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, Yeon Ku; Cho, Moon Sung

    2009-01-01

    Korea is currently developing the HTR coated particle fuel technology in view of its long-term Nuclear Hydrogen Production Technology Development and Demonstration (NHDD) Project, which was launched in 2004, of an extensive R and D program on technology development for a hydrogen production by a VHTR. The current NHDD Project essentially covers the R and D works on the core and reactor system analysis, thermo-hydraulics and safety, coated particle fuel technology, material and component aspects and the hydrogen production technology by using the so-called Sulfur-Iodine Process (S-I Process). As a part of the NHDD Project, the fundamental technology for the coated particle fuel has been being developed, which consist of UO 2 kernel fabrication, pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) coating technology, an in-reactor performance model development of a coated particle fuel and a preliminary preparative study for the irradiation tests of the coated particle fuel specimens in the HANARO reactor. In parallel with the development of fabrication process technology of the coated particle fuel, namely, kernel fabrication and coating processes, the characterization techniques for the important characteristics and quality control (QC) methods of the products after each process step were established. This paper deals with the works carried out for the development of the characterization technologies and establishment of the QC techniques for the coated fuel particles. Emphasis is given to the selection and development of the laboratory equipment and apparatus for the development of the methods of the characterizations and relevant QC methods

  18. Quality control of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1981-01-01

    Quality assurance was introduced in the pharmaceutical field long before it was used in many other areas, and the term quality control has been used in a much broader sense than merely analytical quality control. The term Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) has been used to describe the system used for producing safe and effective drugs of a uniform quality. GMP has also been used for the industrial production of radiopharmaceuticals. For the preparation and control of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals a similar system has been named Good Radiopharmacy Practice (GRP). It contains the same elements as GMP but takes into account the special nature of this group of drugs. Data on the assessment of the quality of radiopharmaceuticals in relation to present standards are reviewed. The general conclusion is that the quality of radiopharmaceuticals appears comparable to that of other drugs. It seems possible to establish the production of radiopharmaceuticals, generators and preparation kits in such a way that analytical control of the final product at the hospital may be limited provided the final preparation work is carried out in accordance with GRP principles. The elements of GRP are reviewed. (author)

  19. SNP Data Quality Control in a National Beef and Dairy Cattle System and Highly Accurate SNP Based Parentage Verification and Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. McClure

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A major use of genetic data is parentage verification and identification as inaccurate pedigrees negatively affect genetic gain. Since 2012 the international standard for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP verification in Bos taurus cattle has been the ISAG SNP panels. While these ISAG panels provide an increased level of parentage accuracy over microsatellite markers (MS, they can validate the wrong parent at ≤1% misconcordance rate levels, indicating that more SNP are needed if a more accurate pedigree is required. With rapidly increasing numbers of cattle being genotyped in Ireland that represent 61 B. taurus breeds from a wide range of farm types: beef/dairy, AI/pedigree/commercial, purebred/crossbred, and large to small herd size the Irish Cattle Breeding Federation (ICBF analyzed different SNP densities to determine that at a minimum ≥500 SNP are needed to consistently predict only one set of parents at a ≤1% misconcordance rate. For parentage validation and prediction ICBF uses 800 SNP (ICBF800 selected based on SNP clustering quality, ISAG200 inclusion, call rate (CR, and minor allele frequency (MAF in the Irish cattle population. Large datasets require sample and SNP quality control (QC. Most publications only deal with SNP QC via CR, MAF, parent-progeny conflicts, and Hardy-Weinberg deviation, but not sample QC. We report here parentage, SNP QC, and a genomic sample QC pipelines to deal with the unique challenges of >1 million genotypes from a national herd such as SNP genotype errors from mis-tagging of animals, lab errors, farm errors, and multiple other issues that can arise. We divide the pipeline into two parts: a Genotype QC and an Animal QC pipeline. The Genotype QC identifies samples with low call rate, missing or mixed genotype classes (no BB genotype or ABTG alleles present, and low genotype frequencies. The Animal QC handles situations where the genotype might not belong to the listed individual by identifying: >1 non

  20. Multi-Site Quality Assurance Project Plan for Wisconsin Public Service Corporation, Peoples Gas Light and Coke Company, and North Shore Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Multi-Site QAPP presents the organization, data quality objectives (DQOs), a set of anticipated activities, sample analysis, data handling and specific Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) procedures associated with Studies done in EPA Region 5

  1. Patient pools and the use of "patient means" are valuable tools in quality control illustrated by a bone-specific alkaline phosphatase assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Maja; Lund, Erik D.; Brandslund, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality control (QC) is an essential part of clinical biochemistry to ensure that laboratory test results are reliable and correct. Those tests without a defined reference method constitute a special challenge, as is the case with bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP). METHODS...... AND RESULTS: The present study reports an example where a shift in a BAP assay was detected by use of a patient pool and supported by a retrospective calculation of "patient mean", while the external QC and specific assay control material were unaffected by the shift. CONCLUSIONS: Patient pools and the use...

  2. Quality control of dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, L.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear medicine laboratories are required to assay samples of radioactivity to be administered to patients. Almost universally, these assays are acomplished by use of a well ionization chamber isotope calibrator. The Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (Institute for Radiological Protection and Dosimetry) of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (National Commission for Nuclear Energy) is carrying out a National Quality Control Programme in Nuclear Medicine, supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The assessment of the current needs and practices of quality control in the entire country of Brazil includes Dose Calibrators and Scintilation Cameras, but this manual is restricted to the former. Quality Control Procedures for these Instruments are described in this document together with specific recommendations and assessment of its accuracy. (Author) [pt

  3. Quality control for some digital fluoroscopy equipment used in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayledam, A. I.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work was to perform quality control (QC) for six digital fluoroscopy units used for cardiovascular and interventional radiology procedures. Measurement were based on the QC protocol developed in the framework of European Commission (EU) DIMOND111 project. Measurement made included: beam quality (half-value layer, HVL), peak tube voltage (kVp) accuracy, automatic exposure control (Aec) and patient dose in terms of entrance surface air kerma rate plus image intensifier input air kerma rate. Dose measurements were made using Calibrated dose rate meter. Field limitation and source to skin distant measurement in addition to evaluation radiation protection tools for occupation exposure were performed. Image quality was evaluated in terms of spatial resolution and Contrast detail detectability. Patient dose measurements was performed using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) patient equivalent phantom whereas image quality was assessed using Haunter Type 53 spatial frequency grating and TO10 contrast detail phantom. The results show that the measured HVL and peak tube voltage were within the recommended limits of 10% in four fluoroscopy units. Entrance surface air kerma rate measured ranged from 6.1 to 250 mGy/min for fluoroscopy units operated in pulsed, continuous and cine mode of operation. These results were obtained using varying thicknesses of PMMA phantom. Most values are in reasonable agreement with internationally established reference levels with exception to one fluoroscopy unit where doses were remarkably high. Field limitation and minimum source to skin distance were well within the recommended limits of 30 cm for all fluoroscopy units. The limiting resolution was ranged from 1.0 to 2.2 Lp /mm for image intensifier field diameters between 7 ad 23 cm. The results of present study can be used as baseline for future quality assurance measurements. (Author)

  4. Quality Management, Quality Assurance and Quality Control in Blood Establishments

    OpenAIRE

    Bolbate, N

    2008-01-01

    Quality terms and the roots of the matter are analyzed according to European Committee’s recommendations. Essence of process and product quality control as well as essence of quality assurance is described. Quality system’s structure including quality control, quality assurance and management is justified in the article.

  5. Product quality control, irradiation and shipping procedures for mass-reared tephritid fruit flies for sterile insect release programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    This document represents the recommendations, reached by consensus of an international group of quality control experts, on the standard procedures for product quality control (QC) for mass reared tephritid flies that are to be used in Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) programs. In addition, the manual describes recommended methods of handling and packaging pupae during irradiation and shipment. Most of the procedures were designed specifically for use with Mediterranean fruit flies, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.), but they are applicable, with minor modification in some cases, for other tephritid species such as Caribbean fruit fly Anastrepha suspense, Mexican fruit fly A. ludens, and various Bactrocera species. The manual is evolving and subject to periodic updates. The future additions will include other fruit flies as the need is identified. If followed, procedures described in this manual will help ensure that the quality of mass-produced flies is measured accurately in a standardised fashion, allowing comparisons of quality over time and across rearing facilities and field programmes. Problems in rearing, irradiation and handling procedures, and strain quality can be identified and hopefully corrected before control programmes are affected. Tests and procedures described in this document are only part of a total quality control programme for tephritid fly production. The product QC evaluations included in this manual are, unless otherwise noted, required to be conducted during SIT programmes by the Field programme staff not the production staff. Additional product QC tests have been developed and their use is optional (see ancillary test section). Production and process QC evaluations (e.g., analysis of diet components, monitoring the rearing environment, yield of larvae, development rate, etc.) are not within the scope of this document. Quality specifications are included for minimum and mean acceptability of conventional strains of C. capitata, A. ludens, and A

  6. Quality control in haemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, P; Chatelain, B; Leclerq, R; Lust, A; Masure, R; Arnout, J

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory investigation of the haemostatic system deserves particular procedures in the quality control of analytical variables as well as preanalytical variables. This paper reviews the precautions that have to be taken in the blood prelevement, the transport of the tubes and the performance of the laboratory tests aimed to investigate the haemostatic system in order to obtain reliable results.

  7. Ocean Data Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    the aero- sol at the coincident time and location of the satellite SST retrievals. This informa- tion is available in the daytime for the anti-solar...are of the same form, such as probabilities or standard normal deviates. A quality control decision-making algorithm in use at the U.S. Navy oceano

  8. Advanced methods of quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoufriev, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    Under pressure of current economic and electricity market situation utilities implement more demanding fuel utilization schemes including higher burn ups and thermal rates, longer fuel cycles and usage of Mo fuel. Therefore, fuel vendors have recently initiated new R and D programmes aimed at improving fuel quality, design and materials to produce robust and reliable fuel. In the beginning of commercial fuel fabrication, emphasis was given to advancements in Quality Control/Quality Assurance related mainly to product itself. During recent years, emphasis was transferred to improvements in process control and to implementation of overall Total Quality Management (TQM) programmes. In the area of fuel quality control, statistical control methods are now widely implemented replacing 100% inspection. This evolution, some practical examples and IAEA activities are described in the paper. The paper presents major findings of the latest IAEA Technical Meetings (TMs) and training courses in the area with emphasis on information received at the TM and training course held in 1999 and other latest publications to provide an overview of new developments in process/quality control, their implementation and results obtained including new approaches to QC

  9. A quality control system for digital elevation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Thomas; Kokkendorf, Simon; Flatman, Andrew; Nielsen, Thorbjørn; Rosenkranz, Brigitte; Keller, Kristian

    2015-04-01

    In connection with the introduction of a new version of the Danish national coverage Digital Elevation Model (DK-DEM), the Danish Geodata Agency has developed a comprehensive quality control (QC) and metadata production (MP) system for LiDAR point cloud data. The architecture of the system reflects its origin in a national mapping organization where raw data deliveries are typically outsourced to external suppliers. It also reflects a design decision of aiming at, whenever conceivable, doing full spatial coverage tests, rather than scattered sample checks. Hence, the QC procedure is split in two phases: A reception phase and an acceptance phase. The primary aim of the reception phase is to do a quick assessment of things that can typically go wrong, and which are relatively simple to check: Data coverage, data density, strip adjustment. If a data delivery passes the reception phase, the QC continues with the acceptance phase, which checks five different aspects of the point cloud data: Vertical accuracy Vertical precision Horizontal accuracy Horizontal precision Point classification correctness The vertical descriptors are comparatively simple to measure: The vertical accuracy is checked by direct comparison with previously surveyed patches. The vertical precision is derived from the observed variance on well defined flat surface patches. These patches are automatically derived from the road centerlines registered in FOT, the official Danish map data base. The horizontal descriptors are less straightforward to measure, since potential reference material for direct comparison is typically expected to be less accurate than the LiDAR data. The solution selected is to compare photogrammetrically derived roof centerlines from FOT with LiDAR derived roof centerlines. These are constructed by taking the 3D Hough transform of a point cloud patch defined by the photogrammetrical roof polygon. The LiDAR derived roof centerline is then the intersection line of the two primary

  10. Moving beyond quality control in diagnostic radiology and the role of the clinically qualified medical physicist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, H; Christaki, K; Healy, B; Loreti, G; Poli, G L; Toroi, P; Meghzifene, A

    2017-09-01

    Quality control (QC), according to ISO definitions, represents the most basic level of quality. It is considered to be the snapshot of the performance or the characteristics of a product or service, in order to verify that it complies with the requirements. Although it is usually believed that "the role of medical physicists in Diagnostic Radiology is QC", this, not only limits the contribution of medical physicists, but is also no longer adequate to meet the needs of Diagnostic Radiology in terms of Quality. In order to assure quality practices more organized activities and efforts are required in the modern era of diagnostic radiology. The complete system of QC is just one element of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program that aims at ensuring that the requirements of quality of a product or service will consistently be fulfilled. A comprehensive Quality system, starts even before the procurement of any equipment, as the need analysis and the development of specifications are important components under the QA framework. Further expanding this framework of QA, a comprehensive Quality Management System can provide additional benefits to a Diagnostic Radiology service. Harmonized policies and procedures and elements such as mission statement or job descriptions can provide clarity and consistency in the services provided, enhancing the outcome and representing a solid platform for quality improvement. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) promotes this comprehensive quality approach in diagnostic imaging and especially supports the field of comprehensive clinical audits as a tool for quality improvement. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. PET/CT Atlas on Quality Control and Image Artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Combined positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging has become a routine procedure in diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. The clinical review of both PET and PET/CT images requires a thorough understanding of the basics of image formation as well as an appreciation of variations of inter-patient and intra-patient image appearance. Such variations may be caused by variations in tracer accumulation and metabolism, and, perhaps more importantly, by image artefacts related to methodological pitfalls of the two modalities. This atlas on quality control (QC) and PET/CT artefacts provides guidance on typical image distortions in clinical PET/CT usage scenarios. A number of cases are presented to provide nuclear medicine and radiology professionals with an assortment of examples of possible image distortions and errors in order to support the correct interpretation of images. About 70 typical PET and PET/CT cases, comprised of image sets and cases, have been collected in this book, and all have been catalogued and have explanations as to the causes of and solutions to each individual image problem. This atlas is intended to be used as a guide on how to take proper QC measures, on performing situation and problem analysis, and on problem prevention. This book will be especially useful to medical physicists, physicians, technologists and service engineers in the clinical field

  12. Quality Control in diagnostic radiology according to national regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Chruscielewski, W.; Jankowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to review the main aspects of quality control of radiological devices according to the current national regulations. Explanation of the physical principles of image formation by different test phantoms used to measure focal spot sizes is presented in appendix. The obligation for quality assurance (QA) for all X-ray systems which follows European standards was enforced in updated '' Atomic Law Act '' of 29 November 2000 . This document is the main regulatory act which establishes the basic safety standards for radiation protection in Poland. The main modifications introduced by this new Act concerned the issue of radiation protection of individuals undergoing medical examinations with the use of ionizing radiation which is regulated by EC Directive 97/43 Euratom. According to this Directive quality assurance programmes, including quality control measures need to be implemented by the holder of the radiological installation. Therefore, in the above Act the Minister of Health has been obligated to impose specific regulations describing the way of implementation of general principles laid down in the Directive. Some of these regulations, like those concerning QC tests and tolerances, have already been mentioned in the document titled '' On the conditions for safe application of ionizing radiation in medicine ''. For example, the QC program in radiography is being considered; the obligatory tests- acceptance, routine and annual- are discussed and specific procedures are being indicated. The main idea of the document '' On the conditions for safe application of ionizing radiation in medicine '' which concerns radiation protection of patients and staff against ionizing radiation used in medicine is to implement the surveillance of all X-ray systems in form of acceptance tests followed by internal tests (routine and annual) performed in accordance with European standards. (author)

  13. VGI QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Fonte

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a framework for considering quality control of volunteered geographic information (VGI. Different issues need to be considered during the conception, acquisition and post-acquisition phases of VGI creation. This includes items such as collecting metadata on the volunteer, providing suitable training, giving corrective feedback during the mapping process and use of control data, among others. Two examples of VGI data collection are then considered with respect to this quality control framework, i.e. VGI data collection by National Mapping Agencies and by the most recent Geo-Wiki tool, a game called Cropland Capture. Although good practices are beginning to emerge, there is still the need for the development and sharing of best practice, especially if VGI is to be integrated with authoritative map products or used for calibration and/or validation of land cover in the future.

  14. Quality control in nuclear medicine. Addendum to 'Quality assurance in nuclear medicine', World Health Organization, 1982. Following a training workshop in Neuherberg, Munich, Federal Republic of Germany, November 23-30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cradduck, T.D.; Busemann Sokole, E.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the results of a workshop, sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of the Interior (BMI) and the World Health Organization (WHO), held in Neuherberg, Munich, 1983, a revised concept of quality control (QC) in nuclear medicine is proposed. In a previous document published by the WHO in 1982, a set of rigorous daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly and half-quarterly QC protocols was recommended. The revised concept suggested by the 1983 workshop participants is that of a simple, total system, QC test that can be applied on a frequent, probably daily, basis. Any deviation of the results of such a test from the accepted norm will require further investigation and decision trees can then be applied to localize faults

  15. APPLICATION OF QC TOOLS FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT IN AN EXPENSIVE SEAT HARDFACING PROCESS USING TIG WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Yunus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is carried out to improve quality level by identifying the prime reasons of the quality related problems in the seat hardfacing process involving the deposition of cobalt based super alloy in I.C. Engine valves using TIG welding process. During the Process, defects like stellite deposition overflow, head melt, non-uniform stellite merging, etc., are observed and combining all these defects, the rejection level was in top position in Forge shop. We use widely referred QC tools of the manufacturing field to monitor the complete operation and continuous progressive process improvement to ensure ability and efficiency of quality management system of any firm. The work aims to identify the various causes for the rejection by the detailed study of the operation, equipment, materials and the various process parameters that are very important to get defects-free products. Also, to evolve suitable countermeasures for reducing the rejection percentage using seven QC tools. To further understand and validate the obtained results, we need to address other studies related to motivations, advantages, and disadvantages of applying quality control tools.

  16. M073: Monte Carlo generated spectra for QA/QC of automated NAA routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackman, K.R.; Biegalski, S.R.

    2004-01-01

    A quality check for an automated system of analyzing large sets of neutron activated samples has been developed. Activated samples are counted with an HPGe detector, in conjunction with an automated sample changer and spectral analysis tools, controlled by the Canberra GENIE 2K and REXX software. After each sample is acquired and analyzed, a Microsoft Visual Basic program imports the results into a template Microsoft Excel file where the final concentrations, uncertainties, and detection limits are determined. Standard reference materials are included in each set of 40 samples as a standard quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) test. A select group of sample spectra are also visually reviewed to check the peak fitting routines. A reference spectrum was generated in MCNP 4c2 using an F8, pulse height, tally with a detector model of the actual detector used in counting. The detector model matches the detector resolution, energy calibration, and counting geometry. The generated spectrum also contained a radioisotope matrix that was similar to what was expected in the samples. This spectrum can then be put through the automated system and analyzed along with the other samples. The automated results are then compared to expected results for QA/QC assurance.

  17. Monte Carlo generated spectra for QA/QC of automated NAA routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackman, K.R.; Biegalski, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    A quality check for an automated system of analyzing large sets of neutron activated samples has been developed. Activated samples are counted with an HPGe detector, in conjunction with an automated sample changer and spectral analysis tools, controlled by the Canberra GENIE 2K and REXX software. After each sample is acquired and analyzed, a Microsoft Visual Basic program imports the results into a template Microsoft Excel file where the final concentrations, uncertainties, and detection limits are determined. Standard reference materials are included in each set of 40 samples as a standard quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) test. A select group of sample spectra are also visually reviewed to check the peak fitting routines. A reference spectrum was generated in MCNP 4c2 using an F8, pulse-height, tally with a detector model of the actual detector used in counting. The detector model matches the detector resolution, energy calibration, and counting geometry. The generated spectrum also contained a radioisotope matrix that was similar to what was expected in the samples. This spectrum can then be put through the automated system and analyzed along with the other samples. The automated results are then compared to expected results for QA/QC assurance. (author)

  18. Quality control of radiolabeled antibodies through simultaneous determination of antibody concentration and specific activity using time-resolved interaction analysis and reverse kinetic fit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.; Mihaylova, D.; Wang, E.; Abrahamsen, L.; Buijs, J.; Bjoerkelund, H.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. With the advent of efficient methods for producing proteins that bind to a defined target, the number of radiolabeled proteins, and in particular antibodies, used for medical imaging and cancer therapy is increasing rapidly. In line with this increase, focus should be put on methods for the quality control (QC). Proper antibody quality is of fundamental importance to guarantee safety and consistent efficacy for the patient. Adequate QC procedures exist for small radiolabeled synthetic compounds like FDG, but antibody based radiopharmaceuticals are different. Proteins are much more complex and fragile than the synthetic compounds, and hence require new methods for adequate characterization and QC. Yet another complication is the labeling where there is a risk that a subpopulation of the protein is damaged to the level that it no longer binds the target. Therefore, a new toolbox is required to fulfill the quality characterization of radiolabeled antibodies. We have developed a QC assay for the simultaneous determination of antibody function, concentration and specific activity. The assay is based on time-resolved detection of the antibody interaction with antigen-coated magnetic beads in LigandTracer instruments. The resulting binding curve is evaluated using reverse kinetic fits, where the known interaction parameters of the antibody-antigen interaction are set constant while as the concentration and signal level are fitted. The assay takes approximately 2 hours and the majority of the time constitutes automated data collection in the instrument. The QC assay has been tested on multiple antibody-antigen interactions and consistently provides repeatable results for concentration and specific activity, both with coefficient of variation (CV) less than 15%. We believe that this QC assay can improve the quality of radiolabeled therapeutic antibodies. (authors)

  19. Quality Assurance Plan for Data Collection: Characterizing and Quantifying Local and Regional Particulate Matter Emissions from Department of Defense Installations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillies, J

    2000-01-01

    ...-post regional visibility effects. This document has been assembled to describe the quality assurance plan for data collection for the different components of the proposed research. Quality control (QC...

  20. Quality control of mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hering, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    Random checks of mammograms allow to clearly assess quality controls concerning correct application and operation of the radiographic system indicated by rich contrast in breast tissue images, complete imaging of the mammary parenchyma, freedom from blurs due to motion, efficient breast compression, correct film labelling and perfect maintenance of the film screen system. In addition to these subjective assessments, the following points should be considered when using objective measurement procedures and phantoms: Testing the correct function of X-ray and radiographic equipment by means of test specimens to measure KV standard (KV=Association of German Panel Doctors), mAS and automatic exposure timer; comparing dose and density to initial values and checking film processing by using a sensitometer. Quality assurance handling varies from one KV to the next. That is why the users need to obtain the guidelines of the respective KV relative to radiological quality assurance and to proceed according to these. (orig.) [de

  1. Evaluation of the Quality Control Program for Diagnostic Radiography and Fluoroscopy Devices in Syria during 2005-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Kharita

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Extensive use of diagnostic radiology is the largest contributor to total population radiation doses. Thus, appropriate equipment and safe practice are necessary for good-quality images with optimal doses. This study aimed to perform quality control (QC audit for radiography and fluoroscopy devices owned by private sector in Syria (2005-2013 to verify compliance of performance of X-ray machines with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. Materials and Methods: In this study, QC audit included 487 X-ray diagnostic machines, (363 radiography and 124 fluoroscopy devices, installed in 306 medical diagnostic radiology centers in 14 provinces in Syria. We employed an X-ray beam analyzer device (NERO model 8000, Victoreen, USA, which was tested and calibrated at the National Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory traceable to the IAEA Network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. Standard QC tool kits were used to evaluate tube and generator of the X-ray machines, which constituted potential (kVp, timer accuracy, radiation output consistency, tube filtration, small and large focal spot sizes, X-ray beam collimation and alignment, as well as high- and low-resolution and entrance surface dose in fluoroscopy. Results: According to our results, most of the assessed operating parameters were in compliance with the standards stipulated by the National Regulatory Authority. In cases of noncompliance for the assessed parameters, maximum value (28.77% pertained to accuracy of kVp calibration for radiography units, while the lowest value (2.42% belonged to entrance surface dose in fluoroscopy systems. Conclusion: Effective QC program in diagnostic radiology leads to obtaining information regarding quality of radiology devices used for medical diagnosis and minimizing the doses received by patients and medical personnel. The findings of this QC program, as the main part of QA program, illustrated that most

  2. External quality control in ground-water sampling and analysis at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.H.; Juracich, S.P.

    1991-11-01

    At the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, external Quality Control (QC) for ground-water monitoring is extensive and has included routine submittal of intra- and interlaboratory duplicate samples, blind samples, and several kinds of blank samples. Examination of the resulting QC data for nine of the constituents found in ground water at the Hanford Site shows that the quality of analysis has generally been within the expectations of precision and accuracy that have been established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The constituents subjected to review were nitrate, chromium, sodium, fluoride, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, ammonium, trichloroethylene, and cyanide. Of these, the fluoride measurements were notable exceptions and were poor by EPA standards. The review has shown that interlaboratory analysis of duplicate samples yields the most useful QC data for evaluating laboratory performance in determining commonly encountered constituents. For rarely encountered constituents, interlaboratory comparisons may be augmented with blind samples (synthetic samples of known composition). Intralaboratory comparisons, blanks, and spikes should be generally restricted to studies of suspected or known sample contamination and to studies of the adequacy of sampling and analytical procedures

  3. Quality control of intelligence research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yan; Xin Pingping; Wu Jian

    2014-01-01

    Quality control of intelligence research is the core issue of intelligence management, is a problem in study of information science This paper focuses on the performance of intelligence to explain the significance of intelligence research quality control. In summing up the results of the study on the basis of the analysis, discusses quality control methods in intelligence research, introduces the experience of foreign intelligence research quality control, proposes some recommendations to improve quality control in intelligence research. (authors)

  4. QA/QC - Practices and procedures in WWER fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keselica, M.

    1999-01-01

    Construction time schedule and commissioning (unit by unit) of the NPP Dukovany as well as structure of electricity generation in the CEZ in 1998 are reviewed. History of QA/QC system establishment and rules (system standards) as well as organization chart of the NPP Dukovany and quality manual of reactor physics department are presented. Standards of worker's qualification and nuclear fuel inspections are discussed. Fuel reliability indicators are presented

  5. Quality control procedures applied to nuclear instruments. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    Quality Control (QC), test procedures for Nuclear Instrumentation are important for assurance of proper and safe operation of the instruments, especially with regard to equipment related to radiological safety, human health and national safety. Correct measurements of radiation parameters must be ensured, i.e., accurate measurement of the number of radioactive events, counting times and in some cases accurate measurements of the radiation energy and occurring time of the nuclear events. There are several kinds of testing on nuclear instruments, for example, type-testing done by suppliers, acceptance testing made by the end users, Quality Control tests after repair and Quality Assurance/Quality Controls tests made by end-users. All of these tests are based in many cases on practical guidelines or on the experience of the own specialist, the available standards on this topic also need to be adapted to specific instruments. The IAEA has provided nuclear instruments and supported the operational maintenance efforts of the Member States. Although Nuclear Instrumentation is continuously upgraded, some older or aged instruments are still in use and in good working condition. Some of these instruments may not, however, meet modern requirements for the end-user therefore, Member States, mostly those with emerging economies, modernize/refurbish such instruments to meet the end-user demands. As a result, new instrumentation which is not commercially available, or modernized/refurbished instruments, need to be tested or verified with QC procedures to meet national or international certification requirements. A technical meeting on QC procedures applied to nuclear instruments was organized in Vienna from 23 to 24 August 2007. Existing and required QC test procedures necessary for the verification of operation and measurement of the main characteristics of nuclear instruments was the focus of discussion at this meeting. Presentations made at the technical meeting provided

  6. Implementation of a Quality Control using portal imaging dynamic MLC; Implementacion de un programa de control de calidad de MLC dinamico mediante imagen portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz Freire, C. J.; Vazquez Galinanes, A.; Collado Chamorro, P. M.; Diaz Pascual, V.; Gomez Amez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, S.; Ossola Lentati, G. A

    2011-07-01

    The precision in the correct beam irradiation in the treatment of highly modulated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) depends largely on the characteristics and behavior of the multi leaf collimator (MLC). Quality control (QC) of this element is essential to ensure proper delivery of the beams calculated. It is important to know the absolute position of each sheet, the motion characteristics of each behavior and stability. Among the numerous methods for carrying out the QC MLC, the use of portal imaging is a practical and high resolution. This paper describes the development of a quality control program based dynamic MLC portal image, self-developed software that enables analysis and the results of two years experience following the implementation of IMRT treatments at our center. (Author)

  7. Establishing quality control ranges for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus: a cornerstone to develop reference strains for Korean clinical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kuk; Choi, Seung Jun; Shin, Saeam; Lee, Wonmok; Pinto, Naina; Shin, Nari; Lee, Kwangjun; Hong, Seong Geun; Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Hyukmin; Kim, Heejung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Sun Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-11-01

    Quality control (QC) processes are being performed in the majority of clinical microbiology laboratories to ensure the performance of microbial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing by using ATCC strains. To obtain these ATCC strains, some inconveniences are encountered concerning the purchase cost of the strains and the shipping time required. This study was focused on constructing a database of reference strains for QC processes using domestic bacterial strains, concentrating primarily on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Three strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus) that showed legible results in preliminary testing were selected. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and zone diameters (ZDs) of eight antimicrobials for each strain were determined according to the CLSI M23. All resulting MIC and ZD ranges included at least 95% of the data. The ZD QC ranges obtained by using the CLSI method were less than 12 mm, and the MIC QC ranges extended no more than five dilutions. This study is a preliminary attempt to construct a bank of Korean QC strains. With further studies, a positive outcome toward cost and time reduction can be anticipated.

  8. Proposed quality control guidelines for National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards Susceptibility Tests using the veterinary antimicrobial agent tiamulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, M A; Jones, R N; Walter, D H

    2001-01-01

    Quality control guidelines for standardized antimicrobial susceptibility test methods are critical for the continuing accuracy of these clinical tests. In this report, quality control limits were proposed for the veterinary antimicrobial agent tiamulin with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges of three or four log(2) dilution steps in two different medium formulations. Disk diffusion zone diameter ranges were proposed for tiamulin tested against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ATCC 27090 (12-18 mm) and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 (25-32 mm). The data from eight participating laboratories produced 100% of results within proposed MIC limits (8-32 microg/mL), and 95.8-97.0% of zones were found within suggested zone diameter QC guidelines. These proposed QC ranges should be validated by in-use results from veterinary clinical laboratories.

  9. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  10. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  11. Improving of Quality Control and Quality Assurance in 14C and 3H Laboratory; Participation in the IAEA Model Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obelic, B.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Users of laboratory's analytical results are increasingly requiring demonstrable proofs of the reliability and credibility of the results using internationally accepted standards, because the economic, ecological, medical and legal decisions based on laboratory results need to be accepted nationally and internationally. Credibility, respect and opportunities of the laboratories are improved when objective evidence on the reliability and quality of the results can be given. This is achieved through inculcation of a quality culture through definition of well-defined procedures and controls and operational checks characteristic of quality assurance and quality control (Q A/QC). IAEA launched in 1999 a two-and-a-half year model project entitled Quality Control and Quality Assurance of Nuclear Analytical Techniques with participation of laboratories using alpha, beta and/or gamma spectrometry from CEE and NIS countries. The project started to introduce and implement QA principles in accordance with the ISO-17025 guide, leading eventually to a level at which the QA system is self-sustainable and might be appropriate for formal accreditation or certification by respective national authorities. Activities within the project consist of semi-annual reports, two training workshops, two inspection visits of the laboratories by IAEA experts and proficiency tests. The following topics were considered: organisation requirements, acceptance criteria and non-conformance management of QC, internal and external method validation, statistical analyses and uncertainty evaluation, standard operation procedures and quality manual documentation. 14 C and 3 H Laboratory of the Rudjer Boskovic Institute has been one of ten laboratories participating in the Project. In the Laboratory all the procedures required in the quality control were included implicitly, while during the Model Project much effort has been devoted to elaboration of explicit documentation. Since the beginning

  12. The development of quality assurance program for cyberknife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Sun; Lee, Dong Han; Kang, Young Nam

    2006-01-01

    Standardization quality assurance (QA)program of Cyberknife for suitable circumstances in Korea has not been established. In this research, we investigated the development of QA program for Cyberknife and evaluation of the feasibility under applications. Considering the feature of constitution for systems and the therapeutic methodology of Cyberknife, the list of quality control (QC) was established and divided dependent on the each period of operations. And then all these developed QC lists were categorized into three groups such as basic QC, delivery specific QC, and patient specific QC based on the each purpose of QA. In order to verify the validity of the established QA program, this QC lists was applied to two Cyberknife centers. The acceptable tolerance was based on the undertaking inspection list from the Cyberknife manufacturer and the QC results during last three years of two Cyberknife centers in Korea. The acquired measurement results were evaluated for the analysis of the current QA status and the verification of the propriety for the developed QA program. The current QA status of two Cyberknife centers was evaluated from the accuracy of all measurements in relation with application of the established QA program. Each measurement result was verified having a good agreement within the acceptable tolerance limit of the developed QA program. It is considered that the developed QA program in this research could be established the standardization of QC methods for Cyberknife and confirmed the accuracy and stability for the image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy

  13. Quality control of analyses of mercury in hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, B.; Friberg, L.; Bigras, L.; Kirkbride, J.; Kennedy, P.; Kjellstroem, T.

    1988-01-01

    A quality control programme for mercury determinations in hair was developed within a study of 'Mental effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure in New Zealand children'. Hair was obtained from seven females with a mercury concentration of about 0.5-4 μg Hg/g. The hair was cut into 1-5 cm pieces and pulverized by liquid nitrogen grinding using a ring mill. In order to obtain a series of QC samples with varying Hg concentrations, different amounts of powder from all the samples and a reference sample of pulverized hair (11.2 μg Hg/g) were mixed. The mercury concentrations in the original samples and the mixtures were determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA). In total four laboratories participated in the interlaboratory comparison. All laboratories used the cold vapor AAS technique and Hg monitor model 1235, LDC for determinations after wet digestion of the samples. (orig./RB)

  14. Nuclear analytical methods in quality control of microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Weizhi

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative calibration and quality control have been a major bottleneck in microanalysis due to the lack of natural-matrix CRMs certified at sample sizes compatible with those of unknown samples. A solution is described to characterize sampling behavior for individual elements, so as to identify elements homogeneous enough at stated sample size levels in given CRMs/RMs. By using a combination of several nuclear analytical techniques, INAA-EDXRF-μPIXE, sampling behavior for individual elements can be characterized at sample size levels from grams down to pg. Natural-matrix CRMs specifically for QC of microanalysis may thus be created. Additional information in certificates of these new generation CRMs is imagined. (author)

  15. A Quadrupole Dalton-based multi-attribute method for product characterization, process development, and quality control of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weichen; Jimenez, Rod Brian; Mowery, Rachel; Luo, Haibin; Cao, Mingyan; Agarwal, Nitin; Ramos, Irina; Wang, Xiangyang; Wang, Jihong

    2017-10-01

    During manufacturing and storage process, therapeutic proteins are subject to various post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as isomerization, deamidation, oxidation, disulfide bond modifications and glycosylation. Certain PTMs may affect bioactivity, stability or pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics profile and are therefore classified as potential critical quality attributes (pCQAs). Identifying, monitoring and controlling these PTMs are usually key elements of the Quality by Design (QbD) approach. Traditionally, multiple analytical methods are utilized for these purposes, which is time consuming and costly. In recent years, multi-attribute monitoring methods have been developed in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, these methods combine high-end mass spectrometry with complicated data analysis software, which could pose difficulty when implementing in a quality control (QC) environment. Here we report a multi-attribute method (MAM) using a Quadrupole Dalton (QDa) mass detector to selectively monitor and quantitate PTMs in a therapeutic monoclonal antibody. The result output from the QDa-based MAM is straightforward and automatic. Evaluation results indicate this method provides comparable results to the traditional assays. To ensure future application in the QC environment, this method was qualified according to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guideline and applied in the characterization of drug substance and stability samples. The QDa-based MAM is shown to be an extremely useful tool for product and process characterization studies that facilitates facile understanding of process impact on multiple quality attributes, while being QC friendly and cost-effective.

  16. Organizing quality control programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjardemaal, O.

    1989-01-01

    When procuring new equipment, performance and safety should be specified, if possible by reference to international standards. Some of the characteristics of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard for X-ray generators, in particular the accuracy of the operating data, are described. The quality control tests to be performed after installation comprise acceptance test, status test and constancy test. The first two involve absolute measurements and will be the responsibility of physicists or engineers. Apparently limiting values stipulated by users are a factor of two lower than the limits of the IEC standard. By means of an example it is shown that modern X-ray generators can meet the lower limits of the users without problems. In order to obtain optimum initial quality when procuring new equipment operating data, limiting values must be specified and must be verified by acceptance testing, etc. However, in many countries physicists and engineers are not available for this job. A relatively uncomplicated test object can be used by radiographers for checks on fluoroscopic systems. The findings from such tests in Denmark are compared with other published findings and good agreement is found. Therefore it is proposed that such uncomplicated tests could form the basis for quality evaluation. (author)

  17. Quality control of scintillation cameras (planar and SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaekhoon, E.S.

    2008-01-01

    Regular quality control is one of the corner stones of nuclear medicine and a prerequisite for adequate diagnostic imaging. Many papers have been published on quality control of planar and SPECT imaging system up to now, however only minor attenuation has been given to the assessment of the performance of imaging systems. In this research we are going to discuss a comprehensive set of test procedures including regular quality control. Our purpose is to go through analysis of the methods and results then to test our hypothesis which state that there is strong relationship between regular and proper evaluation of quality control and the continuity of better medical services in nuclear medicine department. The selection of the tests is discussed and the tests are described, then results are presented. In addition action thresholds are proposed. The quality control tests can be applied to systems with either a moving detector or a moving image table, and to both detector with a large field of view and detectors with a small field of view. The tests presented on this research do not required special phantoms or sources other than those used for quality control of stationary gamma camera and SPECT. They can be applied for acceptance testing and for performance testing in a regular quality assurance program. The data has been evaluated based on me diso software in comparing with IAEA expert software and system specification within the reference values. Our final results confirm our hypothesis, there are some comments about the characteristics and performance of this system that being observed and solved, then a departmental protocol for routine quality control (Q.C) has being established.(Author)

  18. Quality control of radiodiagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Diaz, M.; Castaneda Arronte, M.J.; Matorras Galan, P.; Diaz-Caneja Rodriguez, N.; Gutierrez Diaz Velarde, I.

    1993-01-01

    Since May 1990, a program of quality control of diagnostic X-ray equipment is underway in the University Hospital Marques de Valdecilla. This includes the design and application of measuring specifications and procedures corresponding to the different parameters of the equipment. The specified values are presented, as are those obtained for geometric and exposition parameters using the equipment. The specifications for the geometric parameters are fulfilled in an large proportion (between 52 and 86%) of the units, and the rest can easily be adjusted. However, 85% of the units can be made to operate with a field larger than that of the screen of the image monitor and approximately half of them can operate at a shorter focus-to-patient distance than that specified. With respect to the exposition parameters, in general, these units do not fulfill the specifications and their behavior is not uniform. The results obtained indicate that the equipment studied could be made to comply with the proposed specifications if a Maintenance Program were initiated in coordination with that of Quality Control. (Author)

  19. Building a Quality Controlled Database of Meteorological Data from NASA Kennedy Space Center and the United States Air Force's Eastern Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, James C.; Barbre. Robert E., Jr.; Decker, Ryan K.; Orcutt, John M.

    2018-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (EV44) has provided atmospheric databases and analysis in support of space vehicle design and day-of-launch operations for NASA and commercial launch vehicle programs launching from the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), co-located on the United States Air Force's Eastern Range (ER) at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The ER complex is one of the most heavily instrumented sites in the United States with over 31 towers measuring various atmospheric parameters on a continuous basis. An inherent challenge with large sets of data consists of ensuring erroneous data is removed from databases, and thus excluded from launch vehicle design analyses. EV44 has put forth great effort in developing quality control (QC) procedures for individual meteorological instruments, however no standard QC procedures for all databases currently exists resulting in QC databases that have inconsistencies in variables, methodologies, and periods of record. The goal of this activity is to use the previous efforts by EV44 to develop a standardized set of QC procedures from which to build meteorological databases from KSC and the ER, while maintaining open communication with end users from the launch community to develop ways to improve, adapt and grow the QC database. Details of the QC procedures will be described. As the rate of launches increases with additional launch vehicle programs, it is becoming more important that weather databases are continually updated and checked for data quality before use in launch vehicle design and certification analyses.

  20. Survey of Equipment Quality Control in Radiotherapy Centers in Croatia: First Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, S.; Diklic, A.; Smilovic Radojcic, Dj.; Svabic, M.; Kasabasic, M.; Ivkovic, A.; Faj, D.

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of advanced radiation therapy techniques into clinical practice has a huge influence on tumour control as well as normal tissue sparing. Introduction of Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) into clinical practice results in precise 'tailoring' of dose distributions and according to that in reduction of irradiated volumes. This is not possible without, for the application of advanced radiation therapy techniques constructed, linear accelerators. They must be very precise, well tuned and maintained. In this way the milestone of radiation therapy quality assurance programme is machine quality control (QC). First step in development of quality control programme is existence of written QC protocols. The survey of existence of written QC protocols showed the lack of written protocols for QC procedures in Croatian radiotherapy departments. In this way regular implementation of the procedures are usually left to the conscience of the medical physicists. In the IAEA granted projects CRO6008 and RER9093, we harmonized existing QC protocols between radiation therapy departments at University hospitals Rijeka and Osijek and developed the new ones. The protocols made according to international guidelines are publicly available at websites of the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety and Croatian medical physics society in order to help other radiotherapy departments in Croatia to develop their own ones. Next step was reviewing of QC practices in different centres and exchanging experiences. For that purpose we defined a set of tests, according to the existing QC protocols. Then, on-site measurements were done to check QC parameters of linear accelerators and simulators in six radiation therapy centres in Croatia. In this paper we present the tests preformed, devices and analysing tools used, along with the overall results. Tests were preformed in six radiotherapy centres in Croatia on nine linear

  1. An elementary components of variance analysis for multi-center quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, P.J.; Rodbard, D.

    1977-01-01

    The serious variability of RIA results from different laboratories indicates the need for multi-laboratory collaborative quality control (QC) studies. Statistical analysis methods for such studies using an 'analysis of variance with components of variance estimation' are discussed. This technique allocates the total variance into components corresponding to between-laboratory, between-assay, and residual or within-assay variability. Components of variance analysis also provides an intelligent way to combine the results of several QC samples run at different evels, from which we may decide if any component varies systematically with dose level; if not, pooling of estimates becomes possible. We consider several possible relationships of standard deviation to the laboratory mean. Each relationship corresponds to an underlying statistical model, and an appropriate analysis technique. Tests for homogeneity of variance may be used to determine if an appropriate model has been chosen, although the exact functional relationship of standard deviation to lab mean may be difficult to establish. Appropriate graphical display of the data aids in visual understanding of the data. A plot of the ranked standard deviation vs. ranked laboratory mean is a convenient way to summarize a QC study. This plot also allows determination of the rank correlation, which indicates a net relationship of variance to laboratory mean. (orig.) [de

  2. Laboratory QA/QC improvements for small drinking water systems at Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), a 310 square mile facility located near Aiken, S.C., is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the US Department of Energy. SRS has 28 separate drinking water systems with average daily demands ranging from 0.0002 to 0.5 MGD. All systems utilize treated groundwater. Until recently, the water laboratories for each system operated independently. As a result, equipment, reagents, chemicals, procedures, personnel, and quality control practices differed from location to location. Due to this inconsistency, and a lack of extensive laboratory OA/QC practices at some locations, SRS auditors were not confident in the accuracy of daily water quality analyses results. The Site`s Water Services Department addressed these concerns by developing and implementing a practical laboratory QA/QC program. Basic changes were made which can be readily adopted by most small drinking water systems. Key features of the program include: Standardized and upgraded laboratory instrumentation and equipment; standardized analytical procedures based on vendor manuals and site requirements; periodic accuracy checks for all instrumentation; creation of a centralized laboratory to perform metals digestions and chlorine colorimeter accuracy checks; off-site and on-site operator training; proper storage, inventory and shelf life monitoring for reagents and chemicals. This program has enhanced the credibility and accuracy of SRS drinking water system analyses results.

  3. Interaction between production control and quality control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bij, van der J.D.; Ekert, van J.H.W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a qualitative study on interaction between systems for production control and quality control within industrial organisations. Production control and quality control interact in a sense. Good performance for one aspect often influences or frustrates the performance of the other. As far as

  4. Quality control in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leme, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: objectives of the quality control in nuclear medicine; the necessity of the quality control in nuclear medicine; guidelines and recommendations. An appendix is given concerning the guidelines for the quality control and instrumentation in nuclear medicine. (M.A.) [pt

  5. Printing quality control automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapeznikova, O. V.

    2018-04-01

    One of the most important problems in the concept of standardizing the process of offset printing is the control the quality rating of printing and its automation. To solve the problem, a software has been developed taking into account the specifics of printing system components and the behavior in printing process. In order to characterize the distribution of ink layer on the printed substrate the so-called deviation of the ink layer thickness on the sheet from nominal surface is suggested. The geometric data construction the surface projections of the color gamut bodies allows to visualize the color reproduction gamut of printing systems in brightness ranges and specific color sectors, that provides a qualitative comparison of the system by the reproduction of individual colors in a varying ranges of brightness.

  6. Sci-Fri AM: Quality, Safety, and Professional Issues 01: CPQR Technical Quality Control Suite Development including Quality Control Workload Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, Kyle; Nielsen, Michelle; Brown, Erika; Diamond, Kevin; Frenière, Normand; Grant, John; Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie; Schella, Jason; Schreiner, L. John; Tantot, Laurent; Barajas, Eduardo Villareal; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    A close partnership between the Canadian Partnership for Quality Radiotherapy (CPQR) and the Canadian Organization of Medical Physicist’s (COMP) Quality Assurance and Radiation Safety Advisory Committee (QARSAC) has resulted in the development of a suite of Technical Quality Control (TQC) Guidelines for radiation treatment equipment, that outline specific performance objectives and criteria that equipment should meet in order to assure an acceptable level of radiation treatment quality. The framework includes consolidation of existing guidelines and/or literature by expert reviewers, structured stages of public review, external field-testing and ratification by COMP. The adopted framework for the development and maintenance of the TQCs ensures the guidelines incorporate input from the medical physics community during development, measures the workload required to perform the QC tests outlined in each TQC, and remain relevant (i.e. “living documents”) through subsequent planned reviews and updates. This presentation will show the Multi-Leaf Linear Accelerator document as an example of how feedback and cross-national work to achieve a robust guidance document. During field-testing, each technology was tested at multiple centres in a variety of clinic environments. As part of the defined feedback, workload data was captured. This lead to average time associated with testing as defined in each TQC document. As a result, for a medium-sized centre comprising 6 linear accelerators and a comprehensive brachytherapy program, we evaluate the physics workload to 1.5 full-time equivalent physicist per year to complete all QC tests listed in this suite.

  7. Sci-Fri AM: Quality, Safety, and Professional Issues 01: CPQR Technical Quality Control Suite Development including Quality Control Workload Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkoske, Kyle; Nielsen, Michelle; Brown, Erika; Diamond, Kevin; Frenière, Normand; Grant, John; Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie; Schella, Jason; Schreiner, L. John; Tantot, Laurent; Barajas, Eduardo Villareal; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Royal Victoria Hospital, Trillium Health Partners, CPQR, Juravinski Cancer Centre, CIUSSS MCQ - CHAUR, Cape Breton Health Care Complex, Centre d’oncologie Dr. Léon-Richard / Dr. Léon Richard Oncology Centre, QEII Health Sciences Centre, Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    A close partnership between the Canadian Partnership for Quality Radiotherapy (CPQR) and the Canadian Organization of Medical Physicist’s (COMP) Quality Assurance and Radiation Safety Advisory Committee (QARSAC) has resulted in the development of a suite of Technical Quality Control (TQC) Guidelines for radiation treatment equipment, that outline specific performance objectives and criteria that equipment should meet in order to assure an acceptable level of radiation treatment quality. The framework includes consolidation of existing guidelines and/or literature by expert reviewers, structured stages of public review, external field-testing and ratification by COMP. The adopted framework for the development and maintenance of the TQCs ensures the guidelines incorporate input from the medical physics community during development, measures the workload required to perform the QC tests outlined in each TQC, and remain relevant (i.e. “living documents”) through subsequent planned reviews and updates. This presentation will show the Multi-Leaf Linear Accelerator document as an example of how feedback and cross-national work to achieve a robust guidance document. During field-testing, each technology was tested at multiple centres in a variety of clinic environments. As part of the defined feedback, workload data was captured. This lead to average time associated with testing as defined in each TQC document. As a result, for a medium-sized centre comprising 6 linear accelerators and a comprehensive brachytherapy program, we evaluate the physics workload to 1.5 full-time equivalent physicist per year to complete all QC tests listed in this suite.

  8. SU-E-T-103: Development and Implementation of Web Based Quality Control Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studinski, R; Taylor, R; Angers, C; La Russa, D; Clark, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Historically many radiation medicine programs have maintained their Quality Control (QC) test results in paper records or Microsoft Excel worksheets. Both these approaches represent significant logistical challenges, and are not predisposed to data review and approval. It has been our group's aim to develop and implement web based software designed not just to record and store QC data in a centralized database, but to provide scheduling and data review tools to help manage a radiation therapy clinics Equipment Quality control program. Methods: The software was written in the Python programming language using the Django web framework. In order to promote collaboration and validation from other centres the code was made open source and is freely available to the public via an online source code repository. The code was written to provide a common user interface for data entry, formalize the review and approval process, and offer automated data trending and process control analysis of test results. Results: As of February 2014, our installation of QAtrack+ has 180 tests defined in its database and has collected ∼22 000 test results, all of which have been reviewed and approved by a physicist via QATrack+'s review tools. These results include records for quality control of Elekta accelerators, CT simulators, our brachytherapy programme, TomoTherapy and Cyberknife units. Currently at least 5 other centres are known to be running QAtrack+ clinically, forming the start of an international user community. Conclusion: QAtrack+ has proven to be an effective tool for collecting radiation therapy QC data, allowing for rapid review and trending of data for a wide variety of treatment units. As free and open source software, all source code, documentation and a bug tracker are available to the public at https://bitbucket.org/tohccmedphys/qatrackplus/

  9. SU-E-T-103: Development and Implementation of Web Based Quality Control Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studinski, R; Taylor, R; Angers, C; La Russa, D; Clark, B [The Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Ctr., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Historically many radiation medicine programs have maintained their Quality Control (QC) test results in paper records or Microsoft Excel worksheets. Both these approaches represent significant logistical challenges, and are not predisposed to data review and approval. It has been our group's aim to develop and implement web based software designed not just to record and store QC data in a centralized database, but to provide scheduling and data review tools to help manage a radiation therapy clinics Equipment Quality control program. Methods: The software was written in the Python programming language using the Django web framework. In order to promote collaboration and validation from other centres the code was made open source and is freely available to the public via an online source code repository. The code was written to provide a common user interface for data entry, formalize the review and approval process, and offer automated data trending and process control analysis of test results. Results: As of February 2014, our installation of QAtrack+ has 180 tests defined in its database and has collected ∼22 000 test results, all of which have been reviewed and approved by a physicist via QATrack+'s review tools. These results include records for quality control of Elekta accelerators, CT simulators, our brachytherapy programme, TomoTherapy and Cyberknife units. Currently at least 5 other centres are known to be running QAtrack+ clinically, forming the start of an international user community. Conclusion: QAtrack+ has proven to be an effective tool for collecting radiation therapy QC data, allowing for rapid review and trending of data for a wide variety of treatment units. As free and open source software, all source code, documentation and a bug tracker are available to the public at https://bitbucket.org/tohccmedphys/qatrackplus/.

  10. Quality assurance and quality control for radiotherapy/medical oncology in Europe: guideline development and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, V; Glimelius, B; Frascino, V

    2013-09-01

    The past two decades have brought tremendous changes to the practice of radiation oncology and medical oncology. To manage all the complexities related to the new technologies and the new drugs, the radiation and medical oncologists have to enhance their clinical action and professional skill profile. To accomplish this they have to find reliable tools in the quality of their medical practice and in future research activities. Quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) for radiation and medical oncologists mean to clarify the different components of the clinical decision, to supervise with proper methodology the required steps needed to accomplish the agreed outcomes and to control them. Quality for radiation and medical oncology means to supervise each clinical and technical component of the whole process to guarantee that all steps together will arrive at the final and best possible outcome. Key components are guidelines, specialization and a multidisciplinary approach. The research of global quality could represent a further complexity, but it is the best tool to give a perspective and a chance to further improvements of our disciplines and to promote better outcome in all cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality control in the design, fabrication and operation of the ITER magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.

    2006-01-01

    The ITER magnets are a complex system involving interfaces between many advanced technologies (superconductors, forging/welding/machining of massive structures, cryogenics, composites and moulding, high voltage electrical), yet at the same time form part of the ITER 'basic machine' which is required to operate at the design parameters, broadly failure free, for the design life of the tokamak. This imposes special quality control problems for the ITER project integration by the ITER International Team (IT) through the design, fabrication and operation. The magnets are not a test bed for new technology but in spite of this must use it, successfully. There is little previous experience of such a system but full functionality is required from the start, with limited opportunity for adjustment. And, finally, costs and schedule must be contained. The procurement strategy for the machine, with magnet components being supplied 'in kind', requires particular attention to the specifications, scheduling and quality control (QC). Special issues here are the testing requirements on magnet components, especially before final installation but also at critical intermediate stages. Unnecessary or ineffective quality control procedures cause delay and high costs, and divert attention from critical items. The main points of the magnet QC programme are summarised, including the use of codes and standards, qualification, manufacturing quality assurance, commissioning and in-service inspection

  12. Workshop on measurement quality assurance for ionizing radiation: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, J.A.; Swinth, K.L. [comps.

    1993-12-31

    This workshop was held to review the status of secondary level calibration accreditation programs, review related measurement accreditation programs, document lessons learned, and to present changes in programs due to new national priorities involving radioactivity measurements. Contents include: fundamentals of measurement quality assurance (MQA), standards for MQA programs; perspectives and policies; complete MQA programs; future MQA programs; QA/QC programs--radioactivity; QA/QC programs--dosimetry; laboratory procedures for QA/QC; in-house control of reference dosimetry laboratories; in-house controls of radioactivity laboratories; and poster session. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Workshop on measurement quality assurance for ionizing radiation: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, J.A.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This workshop was held to review the status of secondary level calibration accreditation programs, review related measurement accreditation programs, document lessons learned, and to present changes in programs due to new national priorities involving radioactivity measurements. Contents include: fundamentals of measurement quality assurance (MQA), standards for MQA programs; perspectives and policies; complete MQA programs; future MQA programs; QA/QC programs--radioactivity; QA/QC programs--dosimetry; laboratory procedures for QA/QC; in-house control of reference dosimetry laboratories; in-house controls of radioactivity laboratories; and poster session. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  14. Quality assurance and quality control in mammography: a review of available guidance worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cláudia; Pascoal, Ana; Sakellaris, Taxiarchis; Koutalonis, Manthos

    2013-10-01

    Review available guidance for quality assurance (QA) in mammography and discuss its contribution to harmonise practices worldwide. Literature search was performed on different sources to identify guidance documents for QA in mammography available worldwide in international bodies, healthcare providers, professional/scientific associations. The guidance documents identified were reviewed and a selection was compared for type of guidance (clinical/technical), technology and proposed QA methodologies focusing on dose and image quality (IQ) performance assessment. Fourteen protocols (targeted at conventional and digital mammography) were reviewed. All included recommendations for testing acquisition, processing and display systems associated with mammographic equipment. All guidance reviewed highlighted the importance of dose assessment and testing the Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) system. Recommended tests for assessment of IQ showed variations in the proposed methodologies. Recommended testing focused on assessment of low-contrast detection, spatial resolution and noise. QC of image display is recommended following the American Association of Physicists in Medicine guidelines. The existing QA guidance for mammography is derived from key documents (American College of Radiology and European Union guidelines) and proposes similar tests despite the variations in detail and methodologies. Studies reported on QA data should provide detail on experimental technique to allow robust data comparison. Countries aiming to implement a mammography/QA program may select/prioritise the tests depending on available technology and resources. •An effective QA program should be practical to implement in a clinical setting. •QA should address the various stages of the imaging chain: acquisition, processing and display. •AEC system QC testing is simple to implement and provides information on equipment performance.

  15. QC-LDPC code-based cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the fundamentals of cryptographic primitives based on quasi-cyclic low-density parity-check (QC-LDPC) codes, with a special focus on the use of these codes in public-key cryptosystems derived from the McEliece and Niederreiter schemes. In the first part of the book, the main characteristics of QC-LDPC codes are reviewed, and several techniques for their design are presented, while tools for assessing the error correction performance of these codes are also described. Some families of QC-LDPC codes that are best suited for use in cryptography are also presented. The second part of the book focuses on the McEliece and Niederreiter cryptosystems, both in their original forms and in some subsequent variants. The applicability of QC-LDPC codes in these frameworks is investigated by means of theoretical analyses and numerical tools, in order to assess their benefits and drawbacks in terms of system efficiency and security. Several examples of QC-LDPC code-based public key cryptosystems are prese...

  16. Quality control of CT systems by automated monitoring of key performance indicators: a two‐year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujila, Robert; Poludniowski, Gavin; Fransson, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method of performing routine periodical quality controls (QC) of CT systems by automatically analyzing key performance indicators (KPIs), obtainable from images of manufacturers' quality assurance (QA) phantoms. A KPI pertains to a measurable or determinable QC parameter that is influenced by other underlying fundamental QC parameters. The established KPIs are based on relationships between existing QC parameters used in the annual testing program of CT scanners at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. The KPIs include positioning, image noise, uniformity, homogeneity, the CT number of water, and the CT number of air. An application (MonitorCT) was developed to automatically evaluate phantom images in terms of the established KPIs. The developed methodology has been used for two years in clinical routine, where CT technologists perform daily scans of the manufacturer's QA phantom and automatically send the images to MonitorCT for KPI evaluation. In the cases where results were out of tolerance, actions could be initiated in less than 10 min. 900 QC scans from two CT scanners have been collected and analyzed over the two‐year period that MonitorCT has been active. Two types of errors have been registered in this period: a ring artifact was discovered with the image noise test, and a calibration error was detected multiple times with the CT number test. In both cases, results were outside the tolerances defined for MonitorCT, as well as by the vendor. Automated monitoring of KPIs is a powerful tool that can be used to supplement established QC methodologies. Medical physicists and other professionals concerned with the performance of a CT system will, using such methods, have access to comprehensive data on the current and historical (trend) status of the system such that swift actions can be taken in order to ensure the quality of the CT examinations, patient safety, and minimal disruption of service

  17. Decision theory applied to image quality control in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, Patrícia S; Caous, Cristofer A; Arantes, Paula R; Amaro, Edson; de Souza, Fernando M Campello

    2008-11-13

    The present work aims at the application of the decision theory to radiological image quality control (QC) in diagnostic routine. The main problem addressed in the framework of decision theory is to accept or reject a film lot of a radiology service. The probability of each decision of a determined set of variables was obtained from the selected films. Based on a radiology service routine a decision probability function was determined for each considered group of combination characteristics. These characteristics were related to the film quality control. These parameters were also framed in a set of 8 possibilities, resulting in 256 possible decision rules. In order to determine a general utility application function to access the decision risk, we have used a simple unique parameter called r. The payoffs chosen were: diagnostic's result (correct/incorrect), cost (high/low), and patient satisfaction (yes/no) resulting in eight possible combinations. Depending on the value of r, more or less risk will occur related to the decision-making. The utility function was evaluated in order to determine the probability of a decision. The decision was made with patients or administrators' opinions from a radiology service center. The model is a formal quantitative approach to make a decision related to the medical imaging quality, providing an instrument to discriminate what is really necessary to accept or reject a film or a film lot. The method presented herein can help to access the risk level of an incorrect radiological diagnosis decision.

  18. Commercial jet fuel quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    The paper discusses the purpose of jet fuel quality control between the refinery and the aircraft. It describes fixed equipment, including various types of filters, and the usefulness and limitations of this equipment. Test equipment is reviewed as are various surveillance procedures. These include the Air Transport Association specification ATA 103, the FAA Advisory Circular 150/5230-4, the International Air Transport Association Guidance Material for Fuel Quality Control and Fuelling Service and the Guidelines for Quality Control at Jointly Operated Fuel Systems. Some past and current quality control problems are briefly mentioned.

  19. Requirements for quality control of analytical data for the Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, J.

    1992-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was established for the investigation and remediation of inactive US Department of Energy (DOE) sites and facilities that have been declared surplus in terms of their previous uses. The purpose of this document is to Specify ER requirements for quality control (QC) of analytical data. Activities throughout all phases of the investigation may affect the quality of the final data product, thus are subject to control specifications. Laboratory control is emphasized in this document, and field concerns will be addressed in a companion document Energy Systems, in its role of technical coordinator and at the request of DOE-OR, extends the application of these requirements to all participants in ER activities. Because every instance and concern may not be addressed in this document, participants are encouraged to discuss any questions with the ER Quality Assurance (QA) Office, the Analytical Environmental Support Group (AESG), or the Analytical Project Office (APO)

  20. Direct infusion mass spectrometry metabolomics dataset: a benchmark for data processing and quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Jennifer A; Weber, Ralf J M; Broadhurst, David I; Viant, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Direct-infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) metabolomics is an important approach for characterising molecular responses of organisms to disease, drugs and the environment. Increasingly large-scale metabolomics studies are being conducted, necessitating improvements in both bioanalytical and computational workflows to maintain data quality. This dataset represents a systematic evaluation of the reproducibility of a multi-batch DIMS metabolomics study of cardiac tissue extracts. It comprises of twenty biological samples (cow vs. sheep) that were analysed repeatedly, in 8 batches across 7 days, together with a concurrent set of quality control (QC) samples. Data are presented from each step of the workflow and are available in MetaboLights. The strength of the dataset is that intra- and inter-batch variation can be corrected using QC spectra and the quality of this correction assessed independently using the repeatedly-measured biological samples. Originally designed to test the efficacy of a batch-correction algorithm, it will enable others to evaluate novel data processing algorithms. Furthermore, this dataset serves as a benchmark for DIMS metabolomics, derived using best-practice workflows and rigorous quality assessment. PMID:25977770

  1. Evaluation of capillary zone electrophoresis for the quality control of complex biologic samples: Application to snake venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kpaibe, André P S; Ben-Ameur, Randa; Coussot, Gaëlle; Ladner, Yoann; Montels, Jérôme; Ake, Michèle; Perrin, Catherine

    2017-08-01

    Snake venoms constitute a very promising resource for the development of new medicines. They are mainly composed of very complex peptide and protein mixtures, which composition may vary significantly from batch to batch. This latter consideration is a challenge for routine quality control (QC) in the pharmaceutical industry. In this paper, we report the use of capillary zone electrophoresis for the development of an analytical fingerprint methodology to assess the quality of snake venoms. The analytical fingerprint concept is being widely used for the QC of herbal drugs but rarely for venoms QC so far. CZE was chosen for its intrinsic efficiency in the separation of protein and peptide mixtures. The analytical fingerprint methodology was first developed and evaluated for a particular snake venom, Lachesis muta. Optimal analysis conditions required the use of PDADMAC capillary coating to avoid protein and peptide adsorption. Same analytical conditions were then applied to other snake venom species. Different electrophoretic profiles were obtained for each venom. Excellent repeatability and intermediate precision was observed for each batch. Analysis of different batches of the same species revealed inherent qualitative and quantitative composition variations of the venoms between individuals. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. INFORMATION SYSTEM QUALITY CONTROL KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Nikolaevich Babeshko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of the educational system is associated with the need to control the quality of educational services. Quality control knowledge is an important part of the scientific process. The penetration of computers into all areas of activities changing approaches and technologies that previously they were used.

  3. Frontiers in statistical quality control

    CERN Document Server

    Wilrich, Peter-Theodor

    2004-01-01

    This volume treats the four main categories of Statistical Quality Control: General SQC Methodology, On-line Control including Sampling Inspection and Statistical Process Control, Off-line Control with Data Analysis and Experimental Design, and, fields related to Reliability. Experts with international reputation present their newest contributions.

  4. US quality control in Italy: present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbis, S.; Musacchio, C.; Guiot, C.; Spagnolo, R.

    2011-02-01

    US diagnostic equipments are widely diffused in Italy but, in spite of recommendations (e.g. ISPESL-Ministry of Health (1999) and SIRM (Società Italiana di Radiologia Medica, 2004), US quality controls are restricted to only a few public sanitary structure and a national (or even regional) quality assurance program for testing the performances of the US equipments is still missing. A joint Research Centre among the three Piedmontese Universities and INRIM, partially funded by Regione Piemonte, has been established in 2009 as Reference Centre for Medical Ultrasounds (CRUM). In addition to research, development and training tasks, the Centre aims at the local diffusion of the quality assurance in clinical US equipments. According to data from the Ministry of Health (2006), around 7 % of the Italian US diagnostic equipments (946 over 13526) are located in Piedmont: mostly (75.6%) in public hospitals, 9.3 % in conventionated hospitals, 4.3% in public and 10.8% in private territorial structures. The goal is the provision of a regional database, which progressively includes data related to acceptance test, status and QC tests and maintenance, in order to drive equipment turnover and carefully monitoring the overall equipment efficiency. Moreover, facilities are available at CRUM for monitoring both beam geometry and acoustic power and performing quantitative assessment of the delivered energy intensity.

  5. A national quality control scheme for serum HGH assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, W.M.; McKenzie, I.

    1979-01-01

    In the autumn of 1975 the Supraregional Assay Service established a Quality Control Sub-Committee and the intra-laboratory QC Scheme for Growth Hormone (HGH) assays which is described here has served, in many respects, as a pilot scheme for protein RIA. Major improvements in accuracy, precision and between-laboratory agreement can be brought about by intensively interactive quality control schemes. A common standard is essential and should consist of ampoules used for one or only a small number of assays. Accuracy and agreement were not good enough to allow the overall means to serve as target values but a group of 11 laboratories were sufficiently accurate to provide a 'reference group mean' to so serve. Gross non-specificity was related to poor assay design and was quickly eliminated. Within-laboratory between-batch variability was much worse than that normally claimed for simple protein hormone RIA. A full report on this Scheme will appear shortly in Annals of Clinical Biochemistry. (Auth.)

  6. Quality planning for major plant design modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulee, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the approach and activities undertaken by Public Service Electric and Gas Company's (PSE and G's) nuclear quality assurance (QA) department to support major plant design modifications conducted during refueling outages at Salem Generating Station. It includes the planning and implementation of quality plans developed to provide both QA and quality control (QC) coverage of modification performed by contracted service organizations

  7. Embankment quality and assessment of moisture control implementation : tech transfer summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The motivation for this project was based on work by : Iowa State University (ISU) researchers at a few recent : grading projects that demonstrated embankments were : being constructed outside moisture control limits, even : though the contractor QC ...

  8. Quality assurance programme and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez de Buergo, L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper analyses the requirements for the quality assurance and control in nuclear power plant projects which are needed to achieve safe, reliable and economic plants. The author describes the structure for the establishment of a nuclear programme at the national level and the participation of the different bodies involved in a nuclear power plant project. The paper ends with the study of a specific case in Spain. (NEA) [fr

  9. Data exploration, quality control and statistical analysis of ChIP-exo/nexus experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Rene; Chung, Dongjun; Grass, Jeffrey; Landick, Robert; Keles, Sündüz

    2017-09-06

    ChIP-exo/nexus experiments rely on innovative modifications of the commonly used ChIP-seq protocol for high resolution mapping of transcription factor binding sites. Although many aspects of the ChIP-exo data analysis are similar to those of ChIP-seq, these high throughput experiments pose a number of unique quality control and analysis challenges. We develop a novel statistical quality control pipeline and accompanying R/Bioconductor package, ChIPexoQual, to enable exploration and analysis of ChIP-exo and related experiments. ChIPexoQual evaluates a number of key issues including strand imbalance, library complexity, and signal enrichment of data. Assessment of these features are facilitated through diagnostic plots and summary statistics computed over regions of the genome with varying levels of coverage. We evaluated our QC pipeline with both large collections of public ChIP-exo/nexus data and multiple, new ChIP-exo datasets from Escherichia coli. ChIPexoQual analysis of these datasets resulted in guidelines for using these QC metrics across a wide range of sequencing depths and provided further insights for modelling ChIP-exo data. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Identification of Performance Problems in a Commercial Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Enzyme Immunoassay by Multiuser External Quality Control Monitoring and Real-Time Data Analysis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J.; Swantee, C.; Lee, B.; Gunning, H.; Chow, A.; Sidaway, F.; Sherlock, C.; Garceau, R.; Dimech, W.; Malloch, L.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2005, a pilot program was implemented in Canadian laboratories to monitor the performance of the Abbott human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1/2) gO enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Two different external quality control (QC) reagents and a “real-time” software analysis program were evaluated. In November 2005, higher-than-expected calibrator rate values in these kits were first reported at the Ontario Ministry of Health (Etobicoke), followed by the Alberta Provincial Public Healt...

  11. Quality control of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallen, O.; Komarov, E.

    1973-01-01

    The International Pharmacopoeia published by WHO constitutes a collection of recommended specifications for pharmaceutical preparations which are not intended to have legal status in any country, but serve as references so that national specifications can be established on a similar basis in any country. Like any pharmacopoeia, it contains monographs for the quality con trol of drugs by means of chemical, physical and simple biological methods, as well as appendices describing general methods. The work on the International Pharmacopoeia is carried out by WHO with the aid of the Expert Advisory Panel on the International Pharmacopoeia and Pharmaceutical Preparations and other specialists from various countries and the Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations. (author)

  12. Results of a two-year quality control program for a helical tomotherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broggi, Sara; Mauro Cattaneo, Giovanni; Molinelli, Silvia; Maggiulli, Eleonora; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Longobardi, Barbara; Perna, Lucia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Image-guided helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new modality for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with helical irradiation: the slip ring continuously rotates while the couch moves into the bore. The radiation source (Linac, 6 MV) is collimated into a fan beam and modulated by means of a binary multileaf collimator (MLC). A xenon detector array, opposite the radiation source, allows a megavoltage-CT (MVCT) acquisition of patient images for set-up verification. The aim of this paper is to report the results of a two-year quality control (QC) program for the physical and dosimetric characterization of an HT unit installed at our Institute and clinically activated in November 2004, in order to monitor and verify the stability and the reliability of this promising radiation treatment unit. Materials and methods: Conventional Linac acceptance protocols (ATP) and QC protocols were adapted to HT with the addition of specific items reflecting important differences between the two irradiation modalities. QC tests can be summarized as: (a) mechanical and geometrical characterization of the system's components: evaluation of alignment among radiation source-gantry rotation plan-jaws-MLC-MVCT; (b) treatment beam configuration in static condition: depth dose curves (PDD) and profiles, output factors, output reproducibility and linearity; (c) dynamic component characterization: accuracy and reproducibility of MLC positioning; rotational output reproducibility and linearity, leaf latency, couch movement constancy; (d) gantry-couch and MLC-gantry synchronization; and (e) MVCT image quality. Peculiar periodicity specific tolerance and action levels were defined. Ionization chambers (Exradin A1SL 0.056 cc), films (XOmat-V/EDR2), water and solid water phantoms were used to perform quality assurance measurements. Results: Over a two-year period the final average output variation after possible beam output adjustment was -0.2 ± 1% for the

  13. Patient dosimetry and quality control in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I. I.

    2007-08-01

    In the first part of the study, entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients in radiography were estimated from x-ray tube output parameters for a sample of 346 radiographs. The mean ESDs estimated in the hospitals ranged from 0.17 to 0.27 mGy for chest PA, 1.04-2.26 mGy for skull AP/PA, 0.83-1.32 mGy for skull LAT, 1.31-1.89 mGy for pelvis AP, 1.46-3.33 mGy for Lumbar Spine AP and 2.9-9.9 mGy for Lumbar Spine LAT. With the exception of chest PA examination at two hospitals, mean ESDs were found to be within the established international reference doses. In addition, study was performed to compare two methods used for effective dose calculation in diagnostic radiology. Initially, ED values were calculated from ESD values using NRPB-SR262 Monte Carlo data and XDOSE software. Next, the energy imparted to patients was computed using values for entrance skin exposure-area product and half-value layer. Effective doses were then determined from energy imparted using ED/ε conversion factors proposed in the literature. Mean ED values calculated using the two methods were: 21.3-23.4, 14.1-12.8, 7.9-8.5, 232-226, 215-223 and 91-85.6 μSv for chest PA, Skull AP/PA, Skull LAT, Pelvis AP, Lumbar Spine AP and Lumbar Spine LAT examinations, respectively. The values obtained were in agreement between themselves and with data reported in the literature. In the second part, a protocol for quality control (QC) tests has been drafted based on various national and international recommendations. Tests were included for various parts of the imaging chain, i.e. x-ray tube and generator; x-ray tube control system; laser printer and display station; image quality and patient dose. Preliminary tolerance levels have been set for the various tests, after initial measurements. To check the suitability of the QC tests and the stated tolerance levels, measurements were made at the University Hospital Gasthuisberg in Leuven, the Netherland, for equipment used for paediatric radiology and a unit used

  14. Quality control of labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matucha, M.

    1979-01-01

    Some advantages and disadvantages of methods used for quality control of organic labelled compounds (1 31 I, 14 C) are shortly discussed. The methods used are electrophoresis, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometry, radiogas and thin-layer chromatography. (author)

  15. [Quality control in herbal supplements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelker, Luisa

    2005-01-01

    Quality and safety of food and herbal supplements are the result of a whole of different elements as good manufacturing practice and process control. The process control must be active and able to individuate and correct all possible hazards. The main and most utilized instrument is the hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) system the correct application of which can guarantee the safety of the product. Herbal supplements need, in addition to standard quality control, a set of checks to assure the harmlessness and safety of the plants used.

  16. Accelerator based-boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)-clinical QA and QC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Tanaka, Hiroki; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Yong, Liu; Kashino, Genro; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-particle and recoil Li atom yielded by the reaction ( 10 B, n), due to their high LET properties, efficiently and specifically kill the cancer cell that has incorporated the boron. Efficacy of this boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been demonstrated mainly in the treatment of recurrent head/neck and malignant brain cancers in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KUR). As the clinical trial of BNCT is to start from 2009 based on an accelerator (not on the Reactor), this paper describes the tentative outline of the standard operation procedure of BNCT for its quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) along the flow of its clinical practice. Personnel concerned in the practice involve the attending physician, multiple physicians in charge of BNCT, medical physicists, nurses and reactor stuff. The flow order of the actual BNCT is as follows: Pre-therapeutic evaluation mainly including informed consent and confirmation of the prescription; Therapeutic planning including setting of therapy volume, and of irradiation axes followed by meeting for stuffs' agreement, decision of irradiating field in the irradiation room leading to final decision of the axis, CT for the planning, decision of the final therapeutic plan according to Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS) and meeting of all related personnel for the final confirmation of therapeutic plan; and BNCT including the transport of patient to KUR, dripping of boronophenylalanine, setting up of the patient on the machine, blood sampling for pharmacokinetics, boron level measurement for decision of irradiating time, switch on/off of the accelerator, confirmation of patient's movement in the irradiated field after the neutron irradiation, blood sampling for confirmation of the boron level, and patient's leave from the room. The QA/QC check is principally to be conducted with the two-person rule. The purpose of the clinical trial is to establish the usefulness of BNCT

  17. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-05: Semi-Automated, Open Source MRI Quality Assurance and Quality Control Program for Multi-Unit Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung, J; Stefan, W; Reeve, D; Stafford, RJ

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Phantom measurements allow for the performance of magnetic resonance (MR) systems to be evaluated. Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report No. 100 Acceptance Testing and Quality Assurance Procedures for MR Imaging Facilities, American College of Radiology (ACR) MR Accreditation Program MR phantom testing, and ACR MRI quality control (QC) program documents help to outline specific tests for establishing system performance baselines as well as system stability over time. Analyzing and processing tests from multiple systems can be time-consuming for medical physicists. Besides determining whether tests are within predetermined limits or criteria, monitoring longitudinal trends can also help prevent costly downtime of systems during clinical operation. In this work, a semi-automated QC program was developed to analyze and record measurements in a database that allowed for easy access to historical data. Methods: Image analysis was performed on 27 different MR systems of 1.5T and 3.0T field strengths from GE and Siemens manufacturers. Recommended measurements involved the ACR MRI Accreditation Phantom, spherical homogenous phantoms, and a phantom with an uniform hole pattern. Measurements assessed geometric accuracy and linearity, position accuracy, image uniformity, signal, noise, ghosting, transmit gain, center frequency, and magnetic field drift. The program was designed with open source tools, employing Linux, Apache, MySQL database and Python programming language for the front and backend. Results: Processing time for each image is <2 seconds. Figures are produced to show regions of interests (ROIs) for analysis. Historical data can be reviewed to compare previous year data and to inspect for trends. Conclusion: A MRI quality assurance and QC program is necessary for maintaining high quality, ACR MRI Accredited MR programs. A reviewable database of phantom measurements assists medical physicists with processing and monitoring of large datasets

  18. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-05: Semi-Automated, Open Source MRI Quality Assurance and Quality Control Program for Multi-Unit Institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, J; Stefan, W; Reeve, D; Stafford, RJ [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Phantom measurements allow for the performance of magnetic resonance (MR) systems to be evaluated. Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report No. 100 Acceptance Testing and Quality Assurance Procedures for MR Imaging Facilities, American College of Radiology (ACR) MR Accreditation Program MR phantom testing, and ACR MRI quality control (QC) program documents help to outline specific tests for establishing system performance baselines as well as system stability over time. Analyzing and processing tests from multiple systems can be time-consuming for medical physicists. Besides determining whether tests are within predetermined limits or criteria, monitoring longitudinal trends can also help prevent costly downtime of systems during clinical operation. In this work, a semi-automated QC program was developed to analyze and record measurements in a database that allowed for easy access to historical data. Methods: Image analysis was performed on 27 different MR systems of 1.5T and 3.0T field strengths from GE and Siemens manufacturers. Recommended measurements involved the ACR MRI Accreditation Phantom, spherical homogenous phantoms, and a phantom with an uniform hole pattern. Measurements assessed geometric accuracy and linearity, position accuracy, image uniformity, signal, noise, ghosting, transmit gain, center frequency, and magnetic field drift. The program was designed with open source tools, employing Linux, Apache, MySQL database and Python programming language for the front and backend. Results: Processing time for each image is <2 seconds. Figures are produced to show regions of interests (ROIs) for analysis. Historical data can be reviewed to compare previous year data and to inspect for trends. Conclusion: A MRI quality assurance and QC program is necessary for maintaining high quality, ACR MRI Accredited MR programs. A reviewable database of phantom measurements assists medical physicists with processing and monitoring of large datasets

  19. Fuel cycle and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, W.

    1979-01-01

    The volume of the fuel cycle is described in its economic importance and its through put, as it is envisaged for the Federal Republic of Germany. Definitions are given for quality continuing usefulness of an object and translated into quality criteria. Requirements on performance of fuel elements are defined. The way in which experimental results are translated into mass production of fuel rods, is described. The economic potential for further quality effort is derived. Future ways of development for quality control organisation and structure are outlined. (Auth.)

  20. SAQC: SNP Array Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling-Hui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays containing hundreds of thousands of SNPs from the human genome have proven useful for studying important human genome questions. Data quality of SNP arrays plays a key role in the accuracy and precision of downstream data analyses. However, good indices for assessing data quality of SNP arrays have not yet been developed. Results We developed new quality indices to measure the quality of SNP arrays and/or DNA samples and investigated their statistical properties. The indices quantify a departure of estimated individual-level allele frequencies (AFs from expected frequencies via standardized distances. The proposed quality indices followed lognormal distributions in several large genomic studies that we empirically evaluated. AF reference data and quality index reference data for different SNP array platforms were established based on samples from various reference populations. Furthermore, a confidence interval method based on the underlying empirical distributions of quality indices was developed to identify poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. Analyses of authentic biological data and simulated data show that this new method is sensitive and specific for the detection of poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. Conclusions This study introduces new quality indices, establishes references for AFs and quality indices, and develops a detection method for poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. We have developed a new computer program that utilizes these methods called SNP Array Quality Control (SAQC. SAQC software is written in R and R-GUI and was developed as a user-friendly tool for the visualization and evaluation of data quality of genome-wide SNP arrays. The program is available online (http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/genetics/quality/SAQC.htm.

  1. Quality control of flow cytometry data analysis for evaluation of minimal residual disease in bone marrow from acute leukemia patients during treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorklund, E.; Matinlauri, I.; Tierens, A.

    2009-01-01

    before implementation of MRD at cutoff level 10 as one of stratifying parameters in next Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (NOPHO) treatment program for ALL. In 4 quality control (QC) rounds 15 laboratories determined the MRD levels in 48 follow-up samples from 12 ALL patients treated...... according to NOPHO 2000. Analysis procedures were standardized. For each QC round a compact disc containing data in list-mode files was sent out and results were submitted to a central laboratory. At cutoff level 10, which will be applied for clinical decisions, laboratories obtained a high concordance (91......Low levels of leukemia cells in the bone marrow, minimal residual disease (MRD), are considered to be a powerful indicator of treatment response in acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL). A Nordic quality assurance program, aimed on standardization of the flow cytometry MRD analysis, has been established...

  2. Quality-Controlled Wind Data from the Kennedy Space Center 915 Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Rachel L.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has installed a five-instrument 915-Megahertz (MHz) Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) system that records atmospheric wind profile properties. The purpose of these profilers is to fill data gaps between the top of the KSC wind tower network and the lowest measurement altitude of the KSC 50-MHz DRWP. The 915-MHz DRWP system has the capability to generate three-dimensional wind data outputs from approximately 150 meters (m) to 6,000 m at roughly 15-minute (min) intervals. NASA s long-term objective is to combine the 915-MHz and 50-MHz DRWP systems to create complete vertical wind profiles up to 18,300 m to be used in trajectory and loads analyses of space vehicles and by forecasters on day-of-launch (DOL). This analysis utilizes automated and manual quality control (QC) processes to remove erroneous and unrealistic wind data returned by the 915-MHz DRWP system. The percentage of data affected by each individual QC check in the period of record (POR) (i.e., January to April 2006) was computed, demonstrating the variability in the amount of data affected by the QC processes. The number of complete wind profiles available at given altitude thresholds for each profiler in the POR was calculated and outputted graphically, followed by an assessment of the number of complete wind profiles available for any profiler in the POR. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the QC process on a day of a known weather event.

  3. Frontiers in statistical quality control

    CERN Document Server

    Wilrich, Peter-Theodor

    2001-01-01

    The book is a collection of papers presented at the 5th International Workshop on Intelligent Statistical Quality Control in Würzburg, Germany. Contributions deal with methodology and successful industrial applications. They can be grouped in four catagories: Sampling Inspection, Statistical Process Control, Data Analysis and Process Capability Studies and Experimental Design.

  4. Quality control of conventional diagnostic radiology equipment in Serbia and Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj, O.; Kosutic, D.; Markovic, S.

    2003-01-01

    There are more than 1500 diagnostic X-ray tubes in service in Serbia and Montenegro. Diagnostic X-ray equipment is checked on annual basis. X-ray equipment Qc protocols have been adopted from several international standards and guidelines [1,2], which have been modified according our practice and measuring equipment. According our inventory, about one half of all installed units is used for conventional X-ray diagnostics, 10% are mobile units, 2% of all in units in operation are mammographic devices an another 2% are computed tomography units. In addition there are about 600 dental X-ray units, which is 36% of all units. It is worth mentioning that almost 30 % of all installed units have single-phase generators, another 25% are tree phase (six and twelve pulse) generators and nearly 9% are high frequency units. Majority of units was installed more than 25 years ago. The Quality Control (QC) in radiography is a central part of QA programme, which deals with equipment maintenance and monitoring. QA in diagnostic radiology is a mean of maintaining standards in imaging and working towards minimizing patient and staff doses. As a part of QA programme in diagnostic radiology, the performance characteristics of 96 conventional X-ray units were measured in six months period during 2003. The diagnostic units were located in hospitals all over the country. They represent 25% of the total conventional diagnostic units of the country. About one half of measured X-ray units were new-installed. QC program has positive effect on X-ray equipment performance in a period of a few years. It is essential to perform QC tests for all installed X-ray units at least on annual basis. This would lead to production of consistent X-ray images, with minimal retake rate and hence, will contribute to decreasing of the patient dose. Patient doses are determined by multitude factors which interact in very complicated manner. It is very important to perform real patient dose measurements in

  5. Principles and Practices for Quality Assurance and Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Berwyn E.

    1999-01-01

    Quality assurance and quality control are vital parts of highway runoff water-quality monitoring projects. To be effective, project quality assurance must address all aspects of the project, including project management responsibilities and resources, data quality objectives, sampling and analysis plans, data-collection protocols, data quality-control plans, data-assessment procedures and requirements, and project outputs. Quality control ensures that the data quality objectives are achieved as planned. The historical development and current state of the art of quality assurance and quality control concepts described in this report can be applied to evaluation of data from prior projects.

  6. Quality Control - Nike.Inc

    OpenAIRE

    Walter G. Bishop

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the illustration of quality control approach, which has been adopted by several organizations, in order to manage and improve their production processes. The approach is referred as total quality management (TQM). This study will discuss the implementation of TQ, within the working environment of Nike Inc. One of the major objectives behind the implementation of TQ is to reduce or completely eliminate potential errors and flaws, within the manufacturing...

  7. Quality assurance, quality control and quality audit in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassileva, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:The lecture aims to present contemporary view of quality assurance in X-Ray diagnosis and its practical realization in Bulgaria. In the lecture the concepts of quality assurance, quality control and clinical audit will be defined and their scope will be considered. An answer of the following questions will be given: why is it necessary to determine the dose of patient in X-ray studies, what is the reference dose level and how it is used for dosimetric quantity which characterized the patient's exposure in X-ray, mammography and CT scans and how they are measured, who conducted the measurement and how to keep the records, what are the variations of doses in identical tests and what defines them? The findings from a national survey of doses in diagnostic radiology, conducted in 2008-2009 and the developed new national reference levels will be presented. The main findings of the first tests of radiological equipment and the future role of quality control as well as the concept of conducting clinical audit and its role in quality assurance are also presented. Quality assurance of the diagnostic process with minimal exposure of patients is a strategic goal whose realization requires understanding, organization and practical action, both nationally and in every hospital. To achieve this the important role of education and training of physicians, radiological technicians and medical physicists is enhanced

  8. Quality control of imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, P.S.

    1992-01-01

    Quality assurance in nuclear medicine refers collectively to all aspects of a nuclear medicine service. It would include patient scheduling, radiopharmaceutical preparation and dispensing, radiation protection of patients, staff and general public, preventive maintenance and the care of instruments, methodology, data interpretation and records keeping, and many other small things which contribute directly or indirectly to the overall quality of a nuclear medicine service in a hospital. Quality Control, on the other hand, refers to a signal component of the system and is usually applied in relation to a specific instrument and its performance

  9. Quality control for dose calibrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, L.C.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear medicine laboratories are required to assay samples of radioactivity to be administered to patients. Almost universally, these assays are accomplished by use of a well ionization chamber isotope calibrator. The Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (Institute for Radiological Protection and Dosimetry) of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (National Commission for Nuclear Energy) is carrying out a National Quality Control Programme in Nuclear Medicine, supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The assessment of the current needs and practices of quality control in the entire country of Brazil includes Dose Calibrators and Scintillation Cameras, but this manual is restricted to the former. Quality Control Procedures for these Instruments are described in this document together with specific recommendations and assessment of its accuracy. (author)

  10. An International Coordinated Effort to Further the Documentation & Development of Quality Assurance, Quality Control, and Best Practices for Oceanographic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, M.; Waldmann, C.; Hermes, J.; Tamburri, M.

    2017-12-01

    Many oceanographic observation groups create and maintain QA, QC, and best practices (BP) to ensure efficient and accurate data collection and quantify quality. Several entities - IOOS® QARTOD, AtlantOS, ACT, WMO/IOC JCOMM OCG - have joined forces to document existing practices, identify gaps, and support development of emerging techniques. While each group has a slightly different focus, many underlying QA/QC/BP needs can be quite common. QARTOD focuses upon real-time data QC, and has produced manuals that address QC tests for eleven ocean variables. AtlantOS is a research and innovation project working towards the integration of ocean-observing activities across all disciplines in the Atlantic Basin. ACT brings together research institutions, resource managers, and private companies to foster the development and adoption of effective and reliable sensors for coastal, freshwater, and ocean environments. JCOMM promotes broad international coordination of oceanographic and marine meteorological observations and data management and services. Leveraging existing efforts of these organizations is an efficient way to consolidate available information, develop new practices, and evaluate the use of ISO standards to judge the quality of measurements. ISO standards may offer accepted support for a framework for an ocean data quality management system, similar to the meteorological standards defined by WMO (https://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/qassurance.html). We will first cooperatively develop a plan to create a QA/QC/BP manual. The resulting plan will describe the need for such a manual, the extent of the manual, the process used to engage the community in creating it, the maintenance of the resultant document, and how these things will be done. It will also investigate standards for metadata. The plan will subsequently be used to develop the QA/QC/BP manual, providing guidance which advances the standards adopted by IOOS, AtlantOS, JCOMM, and others.

  11. When Spreadsheets Become Software - Quality Control Challenges and Approaches - 13360

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fountain, Stefanie A.; Chen, Emmie G.; Beech, John F.; Wyatt, Elizabeth E.; Quinn, Tanya B.; Seifert, Robert W.; Bonczek, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a preliminary waste acceptance criteria (PWAC) development, several commercial models were employed, including the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance model (HELP) [1], the Disposal Unit Source Term - Multiple Species model (DUSTMS) [2], and the Analytical Transient One, Two, and Three-Dimensional model (AT123D) [3]. The results of these models were post-processed in MS Excel spreadsheets to convert the model results to alternate units, compare the groundwater concentrations to the groundwater concentration thresholds, and then to adjust the waste contaminant masses (based on average concentration over the waste volume) as needed in an attempt to achieve groundwater concentrations at the limiting point of assessment that would meet the compliance concentrations while maximizing the potential use of the landfill (i.e., maximizing the volume of projected waste being generated that could be placed in the landfill). During the course of the PWAC calculation development, one of the Microsoft (MS) Excel spreadsheets used to post-process the results of the commercial model packages grew to include more than 575,000 formulas across 18 worksheets. This spreadsheet was used to assess six base scenarios as well as nine uncertainty/sensitivity scenarios. The complexity of the spreadsheet resulted in the need for a rigorous quality control (QC) procedure to verify data entry and confirm the accuracy of formulas. (authors)

  12. Performance and quality control of Clear-PEM detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Pedro; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Miguel; Moura, Rui; Ortigao, Catarina; Rodrigues, Pedro; Da Silva, Jose C.; Trindade, Andreia; Varela, Joao

    2007-01-01

    Clear-PEM is a dedicated PET scanner for breast and axilla cancer diagnosis, under development within the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, aiming at the detection of tumors down to 2 mm in diameter. The camera consists of two planar detector heads with active dimensions 16.0x14.5 cm 2 . Each head has 96 Clear-PEM detector modules consisting of 32 LYSO:Ce pixels with dimensions 2x2x20 mm 3 packed in a 4x8 BaSO 4 reflector matrix compressed between two Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays in a double-readout configuration for Depth-of-Interaction (DoI) determination. The modules are individually measured and characterized before being grouped into Supermodules (comprised of 24 modules). Measured properties include photo-peak position, relative gain dispersion, energy resolution, cross-talk and DoI resolution. Optical inspection of matrices was also performed with the aid of a microscope, to search for pixel misalignments and matrix defects. Modules' performance was thoroughly evaluated with a 511 keV collimated beam to exactly determine DoI resolution. In addition, a fast quality control (QC) procedure using flood irradiations from a 137 Cs source was applied systematically. The overall performance of the 24 detector modules complies with the design goals of the Clear-PEM detector, showing energy resolution around 15%, DoI resolution of about 2 mm and gain dispersion among pixels of 15%

  13. When Spreadsheets Become Software - Quality Control Challenges and Approaches - 13360

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fountain, Stefanie A.; Chen, Emmie G.; Beech, John F. [Geosyntec Consultants, Inc., 1255 Roberts Boulevard NW, Suite 200, Kennesaw, GA 30144 (United States); Wyatt, Elizabeth E. [LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC, 761 Veterans Ave, Kevil, KY 42053 (United States); Quinn, Tanya B. [Geosyntec Consultants, Inc., 2002 Summit Boulevard NE, Suite 885, Atlanta, GA 30319 (United States); Seifert, Robert W. [Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, United States Department of Energy, 5600 Hobbs Rd, Kevil, KY 42053 (United States); Bonczek, Richard R. [Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, United States Department of Energy, 1017 Majestic Drive, Lexington, KY 40513 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    As part of a preliminary waste acceptance criteria (PWAC) development, several commercial models were employed, including the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance model (HELP) [1], the Disposal Unit Source Term - Multiple Species model (DUSTMS) [2], and the Analytical Transient One, Two, and Three-Dimensional model (AT123D) [3]. The results of these models were post-processed in MS Excel spreadsheets to convert the model results to alternate units, compare the groundwater concentrations to the groundwater concentration thresholds, and then to adjust the waste contaminant masses (based on average concentration over the waste volume) as needed in an attempt to achieve groundwater concentrations at the limiting point of assessment that would meet the compliance concentrations while maximizing the potential use of the landfill (i.e., maximizing the volume of projected waste being generated that could be placed in the landfill). During the course of the PWAC calculation development, one of the Microsoft (MS) Excel spreadsheets used to post-process the results of the commercial model packages grew to include more than 575,000 formulas across 18 worksheets. This spreadsheet was used to assess six base scenarios as well as nine uncertainty/sensitivity scenarios. The complexity of the spreadsheet resulted in the need for a rigorous quality control (QC) procedure to verify data entry and confirm the accuracy of formulas. (authors)

  14. Creating a comprehensive quality-controlled dataset of severe weather occurrence in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenemeijer, P.; Kühne, T.; Liang, Z.; Holzer, A.; Feuerstein, B.; Dotzek, N.

    2010-09-01

    Ground-truth quality-controlled data on severe weather occurrence is required for meaningful research on severe weather hazards. Such data are collected by observation networks of several authorities in Europe, most prominently the National Hydrometeorological Institutes (NHMS). However, some events challenge the capabilities of such conventional networks by their isolated and short-lived nature. These rare and very localized but extreme events include thunderstorm wind gusts, large hail and tornadoes and are poorly resolved by synoptic observations. Moreover, their detection by remote-sensing techniques such as radar and satellites is in development and has proven to be difficult. Using the fact that all across across Europe there are many people with a special personal or professional interest in such events, who are typically organized in associations, allows pursuing a different strategy. Data delivered to the European Severe Weather Database is recorded and quality controlled by ESSL and a large number of partners including the Hydrometeorological Institutes of Germany, Finland, Austria, Italy and Bulgaria. Additionally, nine associations of storm spotters and centres of expertise in these and other countries are involved. The two categories of organizations (NHMSes/other) each have different privileges in the quality control procedure, which involves assigning a quality level of QC0+ (plausibility checked), QC1 (confirmed by reliable sources) or QC2 (verified) to each of the reports. Within the EWENT project funded by the EU 7th framework programme, the RegioExakt project funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research, and with support from the German Weather Service (DWD), several enhancements of the ESWD have been and will be carried out. Completed enhancements include the creation of an interface that allows partner organizations to upload data automatically, in the case of our German partner "Skywarn Germany" in near-real time. Moreover, the

  15. The need for a formalised system of Quality Control for environmental policy-science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, Piers; Ridd, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Research science used to inform public policy decisions, herein defined as "Policy-Science", is rarely subjected to rigorous checking, testing and replication. Studies of biomedical and other sciences indicate that a considerable fraction of published peer-reviewed scientific literature, perhaps half, has significant flaws. To demonstrate the potential failings of the present approaches to scientific Quality Control (QC), we describe examples of science associated with perceived threats to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. There appears a serious risk of efforts to improve the health of the GBR being directed inefficiently and/or away from the more serious threats. We suggest the need for a new organisation to undertake quality reviews and audits of important scientific results that underpin government spending decisions on the environment. Logically, such a body could also examine policy science in other key areas where governments rely heavily upon scientific results, such as education, health and criminology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of statistical and analytical techniques for use in national quality control schemes for steroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.W.; Gaskell, S.J.; Fahmy, D.R.; Joyce, B.G.; Groom, G.V.; Griffiths, K.; Kemp, K.W.; Nix, A.B.J.; Rowlands, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Adopting the rationale that the improvement of intra-laboratory performance of immunometric assays will enable the assessment of national QC schemes to become more meaningful, the group of participating laboratories has developed statistical and analytical techniques for the improvement of accuracy, precision and monitoring of error for the determination of steroid hormones. These developments are now described and their relevance to NQC schemes discussed. Attention has been focussed on some of the factors necessary for improving standards of quality in immunometric assays and their relevance to laboratories participating in NQC schemes as described. These have included the 'accuracy', precision and robustness of assay procedures as well as improved methods for internal quality control. (Auth.)

  17. Recombinant human G6PD for quality control and quality assurance of novel point-of-care diagnostics for G6PD deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kahn

    Full Text Available A large gap for the support of point-of-care testing is the availability of reagents to support quality control (QC of diagnostic assays along the supply chain from the manufacturer to the end user. While reagents and systems exist to support QC of laboratory screening tests for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency, they are not configured appropriately to support point-of-care testing. The feasibility of using lyophilized recombinant human G6PD as a QC reagent in novel point-of-care tests for G6PD deficiency is demonstrated.Human recombinant G6PD (r-G6PD was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Aliquots were stored at -80°C. Prior to lyophilization, aliquots were thawed, and three concentrations of r-G6PD (representing normal, intermediate, and deficient clinical G6PD levels were prepared and mixed with a protective formulation, which protects the enzyme activity against degradation from denaturation during the lyophilization process. Following lyophilization, individual single-use tubes of lyophilized r-G6PD were placed in individual packs with desiccants and stored at five temperatures for one year. An enzyme assay for G6PD activity was used to ascertain the stability of r-G6PD activity while stored at different temperatures.Lyophilized r-G6PD is stable and can be used as a control indicator. Results presented here show that G6PD activity is stable for at least 365 days when stored at -80°C, 4°C, 30°C, and 45°C. When stored at 55°C, enzyme activity was found to be stable only through day 28.Lyophilized r-G6PD enzyme is stable and can be used as a control for point-of-care tests for G6PD deficiency.

  18. Frontiers in statistical quality control

    CERN Document Server

    Wilrich, Peter-Theodor

    1997-01-01

    Like the preceding volumes, and met with a lively response, the present volume is collecting contributions stressed on methodology or successful industrial applications. The papers are classified under four main headings: sampling inspection, process quality control, data analysis and process capability studies and finally experimental design.

  19. Quality manual for the Danish greenhouse gas inventory. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, O.-K.; Plejdrup, M.S.; Winther, M. [and others

    2013-02-15

    This report outlines the quality work undertaken by the emission inventory group at the Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University in connection with the preparation and reporting of the Danish greenhouse gas inventory. This report updates and expands on the first version of the quality manual published in 2005. The report fulfils the mandatory requirements for a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) plan as lined out in the UNFCCC reporting guidelines and the specifications related to reporting under the Kyoto Protocol. The report describes all elements of the internal QC procedures as well as the QA and verification activities carried out in connection with the Danish greenhouse gas inventory. (Author)

  20. Quality manual for the Danish greenhouse gas inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Winther, Morten

    The report outlines the quality work undertaken by the emission inventory group at the Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University in connection with the preparation and reporting of the Danish greenhouse gas inventory. The report updates and expands on the first version of the quality...... manual published in 2005. The report fulfils the mandatory requirements for a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) plan as lined out in the UNFCCC reporting guidelines and the specifications related to reporting under the Kyoto Protocol. The report describes all elements of the internal QC...... procedures as well as the QA and verification activities carried out in connection with the Danish greenhouse gas inventory....

  1. Quality control of next-generation sequencing library through an integrative digital microfluidic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaitrong, Numrin; Kim, Hanyoup; Renzi, Ronald F; Bartsch, Michael S; Meagher, Robert J; Patel, Kamlesh D

    2012-12-01

    We have developed an automated quality control (QC) platform for next-generation sequencing (NGS) library characterization by integrating a droplet-based digital microfluidic (DMF) system with a capillary-based reagent delivery unit and a quantitative CE module. Using an in-plane capillary-DMF interface, a prepared sample droplet was actuated into position between the ground electrode and the inlet of the separation capillary to complete the circuit for an electrokinetic injection. Using a DNA ladder as an internal standard, the CE module with a compact LIF detector was capable of detecting dsDNA in the range of 5-100 pg/μL, suitable for the amount of DNA required by the Illumina Genome Analyzer sequencing platform. This DMF-CE platform consumes tenfold less sample volume than the current Agilent BioAnalyzer QC technique, preserving precious sample while providing necessary sensitivity and accuracy for optimal sequencing performance. The ability of this microfluidic system to validate NGS library preparation was demonstrated by examining the effects of limited-cycle PCR amplification on the size distribution and the yield of Illumina-compatible libraries, demonstrating that as few as ten cycles of PCR bias the size distribution of the library toward undesirable larger fragments. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Results of the Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program for April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Cheryl L.

    2012-07-19

    A total of 58 urine samples and 10 fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010) to General Engineering Laboratories, South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am 235U, 238U, elemental uranium and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year as well as four tissue samples for 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am and 241Pu. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.3% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 33% of the analyses processed by GEL during the third year of this contract were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 21 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty (Table 4).

  3. Results of The Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program For April 1, 2010 Through March 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Cheryl L.

    2012-07-19

    A total of 76 urine samples and 10 spiked fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011) to GEL Laboratories, LLC in South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for 14C, Sr, for 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 235U, 238U, 238U-mass and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.1% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 31% of the analyses processed by GEL during the first year of contract 112512 were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 23 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty except the slightly elevated relative bias for 243,244Cm (Table 4).

  4. [Current situations and problems of quality control for medical imaging display systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Setojima, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Katsumi; Takada, Katsumi; Okuno, Teiichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Nakajima, Tadashi; Fujisawa, Ichiro

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic imaging has been shifted rapidly from film to monitor diagnostic. Consequently, Japan medical imaging and radiological systems industries association (JIRA) have recommended methods of quality control (QC) for medical imaging display systems. However, in spite of its need by majority of people, executing rate is low. The purpose of this study was to validate the problem including check items about QC for medical imaging display systems. We performed acceptance test of medical imaging display monitors based on Japanese engineering standards of radiological apparatus (JESRA) X-0093*A-2005 to 2009, and performed constancy test based on JESRA X-0093*A-2010 from 2010 to 2012. Furthermore, we investigated the cause of trouble and repaired number. Medical imaging display monitors had 23 inappropriate monitors about visual estimation, and all these monitors were not criteria of JESRA about luminance uniformity. Max luminance was significantly lower year-by-year about measurement estimation, and the 29 monitors did not meet the criteria of JESRA about luminance deviation. Repaired number of medical imaging display monitors had 25, and the cause was failure liquid crystal panel. We suggested the problems about medical imaging display systems.

  5. Quality assurance and statistical control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, K.

    1991-01-01

    In scientific research laboratories it is rarely possible to use quality assurance schemes, developed for large-scale analysis. Instead methods have been developed to control the quality of modest numbers of analytical results by relying on statistical control: Analysis of precision serves...... to detect analytical errors by comparing the a priori precision of the analytical results with the actual variability observed among replicates or duplicates. The method relies on the chi-square distribution to detect excess variability and is quite sensitive even for 5-10 results. Interference control...... serves to detect analytical bias by comparing results obtained by two different analytical methods, each relying on a different detection principle and therefore exhibiting different influence from matrix elements; only 5-10 sets of results are required to establish whether a regression line passes...

  6. A Computerized QC Analysis of TLD Glow Curves for Personal Dosimetry Measurements Using Tag QC Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primo, S.; Datz, H.; Dar, A.

    2014-01-01

    The External Dosimetry Lab (EDL) at the Radiation Safety Division at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC) is ISO 17025 certified and provides its services to approximately 13,000 users throughout the country from various sectors such as medical, industrial and academic. About 95% of the users are monitored monthly for X-rays, radiation using Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) cards that contain three LiF:Mg,Ti elements and the other users, who work also with thermal neutrons, use TLD cards that contain four LiF:Mg,Ti elements. All TLD cards are measured with the Thermo 8800pc reader. Suspicious TLD glow curve (GC) can cause wrong dose estimation so the EDL makes great efforts to ensure that each GC undergoes a careful QC procedure. The current QC procedure is performed manually and through a few steps using different softwares and databases in a long and complicated procedure: EDL staff needs to export all the results/GCs to be checked to an Excel file, followed by finding the suspicious GCs, which is done in a different program (WinREMS), According to the GC shapes (Figure 1 illustrates suitable and suspicious GC shapes) and the ratio between the elements result values, the inspecting technician corrects the data. The motivation for developing the new program is the complicated and time consuming process of our the manual procedure to the large amount of TLDs each month (13,000), similarly to other Dosimetry services that use computerized QC GC analysis. it is important to note that only ~25% of the results are above the EDL recorded level (0.10 mSv) and need to be inspected. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to describe a new program, TagQC, which allows a computerized QC GC analysis that identifies automatically, swiftly, and accurately suspicious TLD GC

  7. Integrated multi-level quality control for proteomic profiling studies using mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrett Jennifer H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomic profiling using mass spectrometry (MS is one of the most promising methods for the analysis of complex biological samples such as urine, serum and tissue for biomarker discovery. Such experiments are often conducted using MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight and SELDI-TOF (surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight MS. Using such profiling methods it is possible to identify changes in protein expression that differentiate disease states and individual proteins or patterns that may be useful as potential biomarkers. However, the incorporation of quality control (QC processes that allow the identification of low quality spectra reliably and hence allow the removal of such data before further analysis is often overlooked. In this paper we describe rigorous methods for the assessment of quality of spectral data. These procedures are presented in a user-friendly, web-based program. The data obtained post-QC is then examined using variance components analysis to quantify the amount of variance due to some of the factors in the experimental design. Results Using data from a SELDI profiling study of serum from patients with different levels of renal function, we show how the algorithms described in this paper may be used to detect systematic variability within and between sample replicates, pooled samples and SELDI chips and spots. Manual inspection of those spectral data that were identified as being of poor quality confirmed the efficacy of the algorithms. Variance components analysis demonstrated the relatively small amount of technical variance attributable to day of profile generation and experimental array. Conclusion Using the techniques described in this paper it is possible to reliably detect poor quality data within proteomic profiling experiments undertaken by MS. The removal of these spectra at the initial stages of the analysis substantially improves the

  8. The German quality system for waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmerhagen, I.; Berg, H.P.; Brennecke, P.

    1993-01-01

    The Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS)--Federal Office for Radiation protection--has to guarantee that the requirements resulting from different regulations concerning planning, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of a waste repository are fulfilled. In addition, the results of the safety assessments lead to nuclear-specific requirements on the design of the plant as well as to requirements on the radioactive waste packages intended to be disposed of. Therefore, the implementation of a quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) system is an essential task in order to ensure that the designed quality is achieved so that the necessary precaution against damage is taken. In this paper, a detailed description of QA and QC to be applied to the planned Konrad repository as well as the basic principles and the present status of the waste package QC are indicated and discussed

  9. WE-AB-206-01: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagzebski, J. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound and to provide updates in ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The first half of this workshop will include two presentations reviewing diagnostic ultrasound QA/QC and ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The second half of the workshop will include live demonstrations of basic QC tests. An array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be available for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations and on-site instructors. The targeted attendees are medical physicists in diagnostic imaging. Learning Objectives: Gain familiarity with common elements of a QA/QC program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging dentify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools Learn ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements Jennifer Walter is an employee of American College of Radiology on Ultrasound Accreditation.

  10. WE-AB-206-01: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagzebski, J.

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound and to provide updates in ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The first half of this workshop will include two presentations reviewing diagnostic ultrasound QA/QC and ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The second half of the workshop will include live demonstrations of basic QC tests. An array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be available for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations and on-site instructors. The targeted attendees are medical physicists in diagnostic imaging. Learning Objectives: Gain familiarity with common elements of a QA/QC program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging dentify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools Learn ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements Jennifer Walter is an employee of American College of Radiology on Ultrasound Accreditation.

  11. Quality Assurance/Quality Control Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanslau, Melody; Young, Janelle

    The production of a quality and safe food product is essential to the success of any food manufacturing facility. Because of this great importance, a career in quality can be extremely rewarding. Without happy customers willing to buy a product, a company would not be able to survive. Quality issues such as foreign objects, spoiled or mislabeled product, failure to meet net weight requirements, or a recall can all turn customers away from buying a product. The food industry is a customer-driven market in which some consumers are brand loyal based on a history of high quality or in which a single bad experience with a product will turn them away for a lifetime. With this said, the main role of a quality department is to help ensure that quality issues such as these are eliminated or kept to a minimum to maintain or increase the number of customers purchasing their product.

  12. Does quality control matter? Surface urban heat island intensity variations estimated by satellite-derived land surface temperature products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jiameng; Zhan, Wenfeng; Huang, Fan; Quan, Jinling; Hu, Leiqiu; Gao, Lun; Ju, Weimin

    2018-05-01

    The temporally regular and spatially comprehensive monitoring of surface urban heat islands (SUHIs) have been extremely difficult, until the advent of satellite-based land surface temperature (LST) products. However, these LST products have relatively higher errors compared to in situ measurements. This has resulted in comparatively inaccurate estimations of SUHI indicators and, consequently, may have distorted interpretations of SUHIs. Although reports have shown that LST qualities are important for SUHI interpretations, systematic investigations of the response of SUHI indicators to LST qualities across cities with dissimilar bioclimates are rare. To address this issue, we chose eighty-six major cities across mainland China and analyzed SUHI intensity (SUHII) derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data. The LST-based SUHII differences due to inclusion or exclusion of MODIS quality control (QC) flags (i.e., ΔSUHII) were evaluated. Our major findings included, but are not limited to, the following four aspects: (1) SUHIIs can be significantly impacted by MODIS QC flags, and the associated QC-induced ΔSUHIIs generally accounted for 24.3% (29.9%) of the total SUHII value during the day (night); (2) the ΔSUHIIs differed between seasons, with considerable differences between transitional (spring and autumn) and extreme (summer and winter) seasons; (3) significant discrepancies also appeared among cities located in northern and southern regions, with northern cities often possessing higher annual mean ΔSUHIIs. The internal variations of ΔSUHIIs within individual cities also showed high heterogeneity, with ΔSUHII variations that generally exceeded 5.0 K (3.0 K) in northern (southern) cities; (4) ΔSUHIIs were negatively related to SUHIIs and cloud cover percentages (mostly in transitional seasons). No significant relationship was found in the extreme seasons. Our findings highlight the need to be extremely cautious when using LST

  13. Control of quality in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The present protocol of quality control/quality assurance in mammography is the result of the work of two regional projects realised in Latin America within the frame of ARCAL with the support of the IAEA. The first is ARCAL LV (RLA/6/043) project on quality assurance/quality control in mammography studies which analysed the present situation of the mammography in the member countries of the project which include: Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic and Republic of Venezuela and the second is ARCAL XLIX (RLA/9/035) project, whose members were Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Chile, Mexico, and Peru, worked the application of Basic Safety Standards for the protection against ionising radiation with the aim to improve radiation protection in X-ray diagnosis medical practices through the implementation of the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) related to x-ray diagnosis in selected hospitals located in each country involved in the project. The work of both projects had been consolidated and harmonized in the present publication

  14. Quality assurance and quality control procedures in river water radioecological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalbandyan, A.; Stepanyan, A.

    2006-01-01

    For recent decades the issue of radioactive pollution of environmental components has acquired a global character as a result of nuclear weapon testing, accidents in NPPs, development of nuclear technologies and so on. A study object of this research is river water as it is known to be radionuclide transport and accumulation mediums and radioactive elements in river water are available as radioactive salts and mechanic and biological pollutants. Moreover, river water is widely used for various economic and commercial purposes and serves a drinking water supply source as well. The ongoing research is performed in the frame of a NATO/OSCE project 'South Caucasus River Monitoring'. The topicality of the problem dictates a necessity of getting credible and compatible results. For adequate radioactive pollution assessment, decisive are the application and keeping standard QA/QC procedures at all the stages of radioecological monitoring. In our research we apply the following ISO standard-based QA/QC procedures: sampling (emphasizing sample identification: sample collection site, date and method), sample transportation (keeping sample conservation and storing requirements), sample treatment and preparation in the lab, radiometric measurements of samples with regard for the time that past from sampling moment to analysis, control and calibration of analytic instruments, control analysis of samples. The obtained data are processed through standard statistic methods of QC to check measurement errors. Gamma-spectrometric measurements are maid using a Genie-2000 (Canberra) software that includes a separate program for measurement QC. The ultimate outcomes are arranged in special protocols (analysis and sampling tasks protocols, sampling task form, field measurement protocol, sample chain of custody form, sample analysis protocol) and compiled in appropriate databases

  15. quality control of the radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukarra, Hajer; Boubakri, Rania

    2006-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the quality control of two radio pharmaceutical. Our study was carried out on the rat. These results enable us to draw the following conclusions: - the control of the purity of the cerebral tracers (Cytectrenes) is carried out by HPLC by using a detector of radioactivity which offers a great sensitivity. - the radiochemical output of marking of Kit MDP determined by thin chromatography of layer is 99%. - The study of the biodistribution in the rat showed an affinity raised for the feet bone. - These results are in conformity with the European pharmacopoeia, which enables us to require a marketing authorization. (author)

  16. Radiation measurements and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Accurate measurements are essential to research leading to a successful radiation process and to the commissioning of the process and the facility. On the other hand, once the process is in production, the importance to quality control of measuring radiation quantities (i.e., absorbed dose, dose rate, dose distribution) rather than various other parameters of the process (i.e. conveyor speed, dwell time, radiation field characteristics, product dimensions) is not clearly established. When the safety of the product is determined by the magnitude of the administered dose, as in radiation sterilization, waste control, or food preservation, accuracy and precision of the measurement of the effective dose are vital. Since physical dose measurements are usually simpler, more reliable and reproducible than biological testing of the product, there is a trend toward using standardized dosimetry for quality control of some processes. In many industrial products, however, such as vulcanized rubber, textiles, plastics, coatings, films, wire and cable, the effective dose can be controlled satisfactorily by controlling process variables or by product testing itself. In the measurement of radiation dose profiles by dosimetry, it is necessary to have suitable dose meter calibrations, to account for sources of error and imprecision, and to use correct statistical procedures in specifying dwell times or conveyor speeds and source and product parameters to achieve minimum and maximum doses within specifications. (author)

  17. Accounting for human factor in QC and QA inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of human error during QC/QA inspection have been identified. The method of accounting for the effects of human error in QC/QA inspections was developed. The result of evaluation of the proportion of discrepant items in the population is affected significantly by human factor

  18. Metrology and quality control handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    This book tries to present the fundamentals of metrology and quality control in brief surveys. Compromises had to be made in order to reduce the material available to a sensible volume for the sake of clarity. This becomes evident by the following two restrictions which had to made: First, in dealing with the theoretical principles of metrology and quality control, mere reference had to be made in many cases to the great variety of special literature without discussing it to explain further details. Second, in dealing with the application of metrology and quality control techniques in practice, only the basic qantities of the International System of Units (SI) could be taken into account as a rule. Some readers will note that many special measuring methods and equipment known to them are not included in this book. I do hope, however, that this short-coming will show to have a positive effect, too. This book will show the reader how to find the basic quantities and units from the derived quantities and units, and the steps that are necessary to solve any kind of measuring task. (orig./RW) [de

  19. Study on the internal quality control of thyroid hormones assays in a hospital laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Haiqiang; Chu Shaolin; Ye Peihong; Lei Qiufang; Chai Luhua; Xia Wei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: With the aim of providing more reliable information for clinical diagnosis, this study investigated the possible causes of the occasional instability of thyroid hormones (T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 TSH) assays in this laboratory and tried to seek plausible explanation for some seemingly contradictory (mismatching) readings of the laboratory reports. Methods: Regular monitoring and checks were enforced on laboratory equipment from sampling pipet to gamma-counters. Results of separation with PR reagent and solid - phase coated tube were compared for superiority (FT 3 ). Collected specimens were tested in monthly sets; this study consisted of 10 sets with total 964 specimens. Serum T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 levels were measured with RIA. For every hormone tested, values of parameters of the standard cure (B 0 , NSB, a, b, r, ED 20 , ED 50 , ED 80 , ABCV) were recorded in detail, from which the QC (quality control) table was derived. For complementary sake , mean level in patients' sera was noted along with the quality control sera. Shewart control chart was drawn for quick reference. Serum TSH levels were measured with IRMA; the parameters involved were: B 0 NSB, ED 80 , ED 50 , ED 20 , standard point deviation. Results: Among the 964 specimens tested, there were 154 specimens with seemingly contradictory (mismatching) results, of which, the majority (n=145) were not erroneous and were compatible with the clinical manifestations of thyroid dysfunction other than plain simple hyper-or hypothyroidism. Only 9 (5.8% of the 154) were due to technical errors (defective technic in removing the supernatant n=7, lipid blood separated with PR reagent n=2). Conclusion: Faulty technic in separation is the main source of random error. From the data of this laboratory, authors believe that solid-phase separation method is better than the conventional homogenous-phase separation method and is the preferred one. With meticulous adherence to standard laboratory procedures and

  20. Quality management in BNCT at a nuclear research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerwein, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.sauerwein@uni-due.de [NCTeam, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Moss, Raymond [ESE Unit, Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Westerduinweg 3, P.O. Box 2 NL-1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn [NCT Physics, Nassaulaan 12, 1815GK Alkmaar (Netherlands); Rassow, Juergen [NCTeam, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Wittig, Andrea [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Marburg, Philipps-University Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Each medical intervention must be performed respecting Health Protection directives, with special attention to Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC). This is the basis of safe and reliable treatments. BNCT must apply QA programs as required for performance and safety in (conventional) radiotherapy facilities, including regular testing of performance characteristics (QC). Furthermore, the well-established Quality Management (QM) system of the nuclear reactor used has to be followed. Organization of these complex QM procedures is offered by the international standard ISO 9001:2008.

  1. Quality control in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinova, I.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear medicine comprises diagnosis and therapy of the diseases with radiopharmaceuticals. The ambition of all specialists in our country is their activity to reach European standards. In this connection, a Commission for external audit was formed to evaluate the quality of work in the centers of nuclear medicine. This Commission create a long-lasting programme based on the objective European criteria and the national standard of nuclear medicine, having in mind to increase quality of the work and the expert evaluation of activity in every center. The program comprises measures for quality control of instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, performed investigations, obtained results and the whole organization from the receiving of the isotopes to the results of the patients. The ambition is most of the centers to fulfill the requirements. As a conclusion it could be said that not only the quality of everyday nuclear medicine work is enough to increase the prestige of the specialty. It is also necessary we to have understanding expert and financial support from corresponding institutions, incl. Ministry of health for a delivery of a new, contemporary instrumentation with new possibilities. Thus it would be possible Bulgarian patients to reach the high technology apparatuses for an early functional diagnosis of the diseases and optimal treatment, which possibility have the patients from the developed countries. (author)

  2. Quality control programme for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos de Araujo, A.M.; Viegas, C.C.B.; Viamonte, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    A 3 years pilot programme started in January 2000 with 33 philanthropic cancer institutions that provides medical services to 60% of the patients from the national social security system. Brazil has today 161 radiotherapy services (144 operating with megavoltage equipment). These 33 institutions are distributed over 19 Brazilian states. The aim of this programme is: To create conditions to allow the participants to apply the radiotherapy with quality and efficacy; To promote up dating courses for the physicians, physicists and technicians of these 33 Institutions. With the following objectives: To recommend dosimetric and radiological protection procedures in order to guarantee the tumor prescribed dose and safe working conditions; To help in establishing and implementing these procedures. The main activities are: local quality control evaluations, postal TLD audits in reference conditions, postal TLD audits in off axis conditions and training. The local quality control program has already evaluated 22 institutions with 43 machines (25 Co-60 and 18 linear accelerators). In these visits we perform dosimetric, electrical, mechanical and safety tests. As foreseen, we found more problems among the old Co-60 machines i.e., field flatness, size, symmetry and relative output factors; lasers positioning system alignment; optical distance indicator; radiation and light field coincidence; optical and mechanical distance indicators agreement, than among the linear accelerators i.e., field flatness and size; lasers positioning system alignment; tray interlocking and wedge filter factors

  3. Quality assurance and quality control of nuclear analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cincu, Emanuelathor

    2001-01-01

    Test and analytical laboratories in East and Central European countries need to prove the reliability and credibility of their economic, environmental, medical and legal decisions and their capacity of issuing reliable, verifiable reports. These demands imposed by the European Union aimed at avoiding a possible barrier to trade for the developing countries. In June 1999, in order to help Member States to develop according to EU objectives and the overall situation of the European market, IAEA launched a new co-operation programme designed to help the nuclear analytical laboratories in nuclear institutions and universities of Member States by training in the use of some Nuclear Analytical Techniques (NAT) that include: alpha, beta and gamma-ray spectrometry, radiochemical and neutron activation analysis, total reflection X-ray fluorescence. The Regional IAEA Project, named 'Quality Assurance/Quality Control of Nuclear Analytical Techniques' (NAT) aims at implementing the QA principles via a system of defined consecutive steps leading to a level on which the QA system is self-sustainable for formal accreditation or certification and satisfies the EU technical performance criteria; the requirements are in accordance with the new ISO/IEC 17025 Standard/Dec.1999 'General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories' - First edition. The Horia Hulubei National Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering, IFIN-HH, was admitted for participation in the IAEA Project in June 1999 account taken of its experience in the QA and metrology fields and its performance in the fields of beta and gamma-ray spectrometry, and radiochemical and neutron activation analysis, employed in both basic research and applications for external clients. Two working groups of specialists with the QA and Standardization and Metrology Departments and six analytical groups with the departments of Nuclear Applied Physics, Life Physics and Ionising Radiation Metrology are

  4. Family Control and Earnings Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bona Sánchez

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo analiza la relación entre el control familiar y la calidad de la información contable en un contexto en el que el tradicional conflicto de agencia entre directivos y accionistas se desplaza a la divergencia de intereses entre accionistas controladores y minoritarios. Los resultados alcanzados muestran que, en comparación con las no familiares, las empresas de naturaleza familiar divulgan unos resultados de mayor calidad, tanto en términos de menores ajustes por devengo discrecionales como de mayor capacidad de los componentes actuales del resultado para predecir los cash flows futuros. Además, el aumento en los derechos de voto en manos de la familia controladora incrementa la calidad de los resultados contables. La evidencia obtenida se muestra consistente con la presencia de un efecto reputación/vinculación a largo plazo asociado a la empresa familiar. Adicionalmente, el trabajo refleja que a medida que disminuye la divergencia entre los derechos de voto y de cash flow en manos de la familia controladora, aumenta la calidad de la información contable.PALABRAS CLAVE: derechos de voto, divergencia, empresa familiar, calidad delresultado, reputación, beneficios privados.This work examines the relationship between family control and earnings quality in a context where the salient agency problem shifts away from the classical divergence between managers and shareholders to conflicts between the controlling owner and minority shareholders. The results reveal that, compared to non-family firms, family firms reveal higher earnings quality in terms of both lower discretionary accruals and greater predictability of future cash flows. They also show a positive relationship between the level of voting rights held by the controlling family and earnings quality. The evidence is consistent with the presence of a reputation/long-term involvement effect associated with the family firm. Moreover, the work reflects that, as the divergence

  5. Physicians, radiologists, and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, W.F.

    1973-01-01

    Factors involved in quality control in medical x-ray examinations to achieve the least possible exposure to the patient are discussed. It would be hoped that film quality will remain in the position of paramount importance that it must in order to achieve the greatest amount of diagnostic information on each radiographic examination. At the same time, it is hoped that this can be done by further reducing the exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation by the methods that have been discussed; namely, education of the physician, radiologist, and technologist, modern protective equipment and departmental construction, efficient collimation whether automatic or manual, calibration and output measurement of the radiographic and fluoroscopic units, ongoing programs of education within each department of radiographic facility, film badge monitoring, education of and cooperation with the nonradiologic physician, and hopefully, more intensive programs by the National and State Bureaus and Departments of Radiological Health in education and encouragement to the medical community. (U.S.)

  6. Quality control of pesticide products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-15

    In light of an established need for more efficient analytical procedures, this publication, which documents the findings of an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on “Quality Control of Pesticide Products”, simplifies the existing protocol for pesticide analysis while simultaneously upholding existing standards of quality. This publication includes both a report on the development work done in the CRP and a training manual for use by pesticide analysis laboratories. Based on peer reviewed and internationally recognized methods published by the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) and the Collaborative International Pesticides Analytical Council (CIPAC), this report provides laboratories with versatile tools to enhance the analysis of pesticide chemicals and to extend the scope of available analytical repertoires. Adoption of the proposed analytical methodologies promises to reduce laboratories’ use of solvents and the time spent on reconfiguration and set-up of analytical equipment.

  7. Quality control of pesticide products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-07-01

    In light of an established need for more efficient analytical procedures, this publication, which documents the findings of an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on “Quality Control of Pesticide Products”, simplifies the existing protocol for pesticide analysis while simultaneously upholding existing standards of quality. This publication includes both a report on the development work done in the CRP and a training manual for use by pesticide analysis laboratories. Based on peer reviewed and internationally recognized methods published by the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) and the Collaborative International Pesticides Analytical Council (CIPAC), this report provides laboratories with versatile tools to enhance the analysis of pesticide chemicals and to extend the scope of available analytical repertoires. Adoption of the proposed analytical methodologies promises to reduce laboratories’ use of solvents and the time spent on reconfiguration and set-up of analytical equipment

  8. Water quality control system and water quality control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itsumi, Sachio; Ichikawa, Nagayoshi; Uruma, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kazuya; Seki, Shuji

    1998-01-01

    In the water quality control system of the present invention, portions in contact with water comprise a metal material having a controlled content of iron or chromium, and the chromium content on the surface is increased than that of mother material in a state where compression stresses remain on the surface by mechanical polishing to form an uniform corrosion resistant coating film. In addition, equipments and/or pipelines to which a material controlling corrosion potential stably is applied on the surface are used. There are disposed a cleaning device made of a material less forming impurities, and detecting intrusion of impurities and removing them selectively depending on chemical species and/or a cleaning device for recovering drain from various kinds of equipment to feedwater, connecting a feedwater pipeline and a condensate pipeline and removing impurities and corrosion products. Then, water can be kept to neutral purified water, and the concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen in water are controlled within an optimum range to suppress occurrence of corrosion products. (N.H.)

  9. Quality control in breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubiak, Rosangela Requi; Messias, Pricila Cordeiro; Santos, Marilia Fernanda; Urban, Linei Augusta B.D.

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of death among women, with estimated 57,000 new cases in 2014. The mammography (2D) plays an important role in the early detection of breast cancer, but in some cases can be difficult to detect malignant lesions due overlap of breast tissues. The Breast Digital Tomosynthesis (BDT: 3D) reduces the effects of overlap, providing improved characterization of mammographic findings. However, the dose may double as compared to the mammography. This study presents results of Contrast Ratio Noise tests (CRN) and quality image on a Siemens mammography equipment Mammomat Inspiration with tomosynthesis. The CRN was determined with plates Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of 20 to 70 mm thickness and an aluminum plate of 10 mm 2 and 0.2 mm thickness. Image quality was assessed with the ACR Breast Simulator. In assessment of image quality, the detectability of fibers and masses was identical in 2D and 3D systems. Were visualized 4.5 fibers and 4 mass in both modes. In 2D mode groups have been identified 3.5 microcalcifications, and 3D were 3 groups. The Mean Glandular Dose for the simulator in 2D mode was 1.17 mGy and 2.35 mGy for the 3D mode. The result reinforces the importance of quality control in the process of obtaining the images and obtained in accordance CRN values, ensuring image quality and dose compatible in 2D and 3D processes

  10. Quality control in breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubiak, R.R.; Messias, P.C.; Santos, M.F., E-mail: requi@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologia Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento Academico de Fisica; Urban, L.A.B.D., E-mail: lineiurban@hotmail.com [Diagnostico Avancado por Imagem, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Brazil, breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of death among women, with estimated 57,000 new cases in 2014. The mammography (2D) plays an important role in the early detection of breast cancer, but in some cases can be difficult to detect malignant lesions due overlap of breast tissues. The Digital Breasts Tomosynthesis (DBT: 3D) reduces the effects of overlap, providing improved characterization of mammographic findings. However, the dose may double as compared with mammography. This study presents results of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and image quality evaluation on Siemens mammography equipment Mammomat Inspiration with tomosynthesis. The CNR was determined with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layers of 20 to 70 mm thick and an aluminum foils of 0,2 mm thickness and area of 10 mm². Image quality was assessed with the ACR Breast Simulator. In the evaluation of image quality, the detectability of fibers and masses was identical in 2D and 3D systems. Displaying fibers were 4,5 and 4 mass in both modes. In 2D mode were identified 3,5 microcalcifications groups, and 3D showed 3 groups. The Mean Glandular Dose (MGD) for the simulator in 2D mode was 1,17 mGy and 2,35 mGy for the 3D mode. The result reinforces the importance of quality control in the process of obtaining the images and obtained in accordance CNR values, ensuring image quality and compatible dose in 2D and 3D processes. (author)

  11. Quality control in breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubiak, R.R.; Messias, P.C.; Santos, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of death among women, with estimated 57,000 new cases in 2014. The mammography (2D) plays an important role in the early detection of breast cancer, but in some cases can be difficult to detect malignant lesions due overlap of breast tissues. The Digital Breasts Tomosynthesis (DBT: 3D) reduces the effects of overlap, providing improved characterization of mammographic findings. However, the dose may double as compared with mammography. This study presents results of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and image quality evaluation on Siemens mammography equipment Mammomat Inspiration with tomosynthesis. The CNR was determined with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layers of 20 to 70 mm thick and an aluminum foils of 0,2 mm thickness and area of 10 mm². Image quality was assessed with the ACR Breast Simulator. In the evaluation of image quality, the detectability of fibers and masses was identical in 2D and 3D systems. Displaying fibers were 4,5 and 4 mass in both modes. In 2D mode were identified 3,5 microcalcifications groups, and 3D showed 3 groups. The Mean Glandular Dose (MGD) for the simulator in 2D mode was 1,17 mGy and 2,35 mGy for the 3D mode. The result reinforces the importance of quality control in the process of obtaining the images and obtained in accordance CNR values, ensuring image quality and compatible dose in 2D and 3D processes. (author)

  12. [Does implementation of benchmarking in quality circles improve the quality of care of patients with asthma and reduce drug interaction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Broge, Björn; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Schneider, Antonius

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this cluster-randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of quality circles (QCs) working either with general data-based feedback or with an open benchmark within the field of asthma care and drug-drug interactions. Twelve QCs, involving 96 general practitioners from 85 practices, were randomised. Six QCs worked with traditional anonymous feedback and six with an open benchmark. Two QC meetings supported with feedback reports were held covering the topics "drug-drug interactions" and "asthma"; in both cases discussions were guided by a trained moderator. Outcome measures included health-related quality of life and patient satisfaction with treatment, asthma severity and number of potentially inappropriate drug combinations as well as the general practitioners' satisfaction in relation to the performance of the QC. A significant improvement in the treatment of asthma was observed in both trial arms. However, there was only a slight improvement regarding inappropriate drug combinations. There were no relevant differences between the group with open benchmark (B-QC) and traditional quality circles (T-QC). The physicians' satisfaction with the QC performance was significantly higher in the T-QCs. General practitioners seem to take a critical perspective about open benchmarking in quality circles. Caution should be used when implementing benchmarking in a quality circle as it did not improve healthcare when compared to the traditional procedure with anonymised comparisons. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Pre-emptive Quality Control Protects the ER from Protein Overload via the Proximity of ERAD Components and SRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisae Kadowaki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cells possess ER quality control systems to adapt to ER stress and maintain their function. ER-stress-induced pre-emptive quality control (ER pQC selectively degrades ER proteins via translocational attenuation during ER stress. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. Here, we find that most newly synthesized endogenous transthyretin proteins are rerouted to the cytosol without cleavage of the signal peptide, resulting in proteasomal degradation in hepatocytes during ER stress. Derlin family proteins (Derlins, which are ER-associated degradation components, reroute specific ER proteins, but not ER chaperones, from the translocon to the proteasome through interactions with the signal recognition particle (SRP. Moreover, the cytosolic chaperone Bag6 and the AAA-ATPase p97 contribute to the degradation of ER pQC substrates. These findings demonstrate that Derlins-mediated substrate-specific rerouting and Bag6- and p97-mediated effective degradation contribute to the maintenance of ER homeostasis without the need for translocation.

  14. 40 CFR 51.359 - Quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality control. 51.359 Section 51.359....359 Quality control. Quality control measures shall insure that emission testing equipment is calibrated and maintained properly, and that inspection, calibration records, and control charts are...

  15. QA/QC For Radon Concentration Measurement With Charcoal Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelic, G.; Zivanovic, M.; Rajacic, M.; Krneta Nikolic, J.; Todorovic, D.

    2015-01-01

    The primary concern of any measuring of radon or radon progeny must be the quality of the results. A good quality assurance program, when properly designed and diligently followed, ensures that laboratory staff will be able to produce the type and quality of measurement results which is needed and expected. Active charcoal detectors are used for testing the concentration of radon in dwellings. The method of measurement is based on radon adsorption on coal and measurement of gamma radiation of radon daughters. Upon closing the detectors, the measurement was carried out after achieving the equilibrium between radon and its daughters (at least 3 hours) using NaI or HPGe detector. Radon concentrations as well as measurement uncertainties were calculated according to US EPA protocol 520/5-87-005. Detectors used for the measurements were calibrated by 226Ra standard of known activity in the same geometry. Standard and background canisters are used for QA and QC, as well as for the calibration of the measurement equipment. Standard canister is a sealed canister with the same matrix and geometry as the canisters used for measurements, but with the known activity of radon. Background canister is a regular radon measurement canister, which has never been exposed. The detector background and detector efficiency are measured to ascertain whether they are within the warning and acceptance limits. (author).

  16. 2. Product quality control and assurance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Product quality control and assurance are dealt with in relation to reliability in nuclear power engineering. The topics treated include product quality control in nuclear power engineering, product quality assurance of nuclear power plant equipment, quality assurance programs, classification of selected nuclear power equipment, and standards relating to quality control and assurance and to nuclear power engineering. Particular attention is paid to Czechoslovak and CMEA standards. (P.A.). 2 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs

  17. Internal quality control: best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinns, Helen; Pitkin, Sarah; Housley, David; Freedman, Danielle B

    2013-12-01

    There is a wide variation in laboratory practice with regard to implementation and review of internal quality control (IQC). A poor approach can lead to a spectrum of scenarios from validation of incorrect patient results to over investigation of falsely rejected analytical runs. This article will provide a practical approach for the routine clinical biochemistry laboratory to introduce an efficient quality control system that will optimise error detection and reduce the rate of false rejection. Each stage of the IQC system is considered, from selection of IQC material to selection of IQC rules, and finally the appropriate action to follow when a rejection signal has been obtained. The main objective of IQC is to ensure day-to-day consistency of an analytical process and thus help to determine whether patient results are reliable enough to be released. The required quality and assay performance varies between analytes as does the definition of a clinically significant error. Unfortunately many laboratories currently decide what is clinically significant at the troubleshooting stage. Assay-specific IQC systems will reduce the number of inappropriate sample-run rejections compared with the blanket use of one IQC rule. In practice, only three or four different IQC rules are required for the whole of the routine biochemistry repertoire as assays are assigned into groups based on performance. The tools to categorise performance and assign IQC rules based on that performance are presented. Although significant investment of time and education is required prior to implementation, laboratories have shown that such systems achieve considerable reductions in cost and labour.

  18. Control of mitochondrial integrity in ageing and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szklarczyk, R.J.; Nooteboom, M.; Osiewacz, H.D.

    2014-01-01

    Various molecular and cellular pathways are active in eukaryotes to control the quality and integrity of mitochondria. These pathways are involved in keeping a 'healthy' population of this essential organelle during the lifetime of the organism. Quality control (QC) systems counteract processes that

  19. 14 CFR 21.139 - Quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality control. 21.139 Section 21.139... PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Certificates § 21.139 Quality control. The applicant must show that he has established and can maintain a quality control system for any product, for which he...

  20. Quality and reliability control on assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1976-01-01

    Taking as an example electronic assemblies in printed circuit board engineering, quality control during manufacture is dealt with. After giving a survey of four phases of quality and reliability control, some specific methods of quality control are dealt with by means of a flowchart, and by some examples the necessity and the success of these measures are shown. (RW) [de

  1. 7 CFR 930.44 - Quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality control. 930.44 Section 930.44 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Control § 930.44 Quality control. (a) Quality standards. The Board may establish, with the approval of the...

  2. 33 CFR 385.21 - Quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality control. 385.21 Section... Processes § 385.21 Quality control. (a) The Corps of Engineers and the non-Federal sponsor shall prepare a quality control plan, in accordance with applicable Corps of Engineers regulations, for each product that...

  3. 7 CFR 981.42 - Quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality control. 981.42 Section 981.42 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Quality Control § 981.42 Quality control. (a) Incoming. Except as provided in this...

  4. Association between product quality control and process quality control of bulk milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, A.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of dairy-milk quality is based on product quality control (testing bulk-milk samples) and process quality control (auditing dairy farms). It is unknown whether process control improves product quality. To quantify possible association between product control and process control a

  5. Modern requirements to quality assurance and control in nuclear fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    This lecture have shown a new type of quality assurance management has already successfully introduced in various industries and now starts to be used increasingly in the nuclear fuel industry. Static authority regulations and a tendency to bureaucratic understanding and handling of these regulations lead to a delayed start and a relatively slow progress of these quality strategies in the nuclear fuel technology. However, the economic pressure of strong competition and increasing demands of the utilities as the user of nuclear fuel result in a more determined introduction also to this area. The different use of statistical methods of two different fuel vendors are shown. Vendor A uses old fashioned methods. The focus is on the expensive final product control and few emphasis is on design of experiments and process control. Consequently, this vendor will have high costs, not only for QC and rejection but also for repair and replace actions after delivery. To the contrary, vendor B invests primarily in the design of experiments and process control. This vendor will profit only from lower direct costs but also from being at the front line of technical development and from enjoying a satisfied and happy customer. Many well examined quality management tools are available today which help not only to improve the quality but also decrease the costs. Still, the progress in using these techniques in nuclear fuel technology is limited and not comparable to the progress in other industries like automobile production or the electronic industry. (author)

  6. SU-F-T-139: Meeting the Challenges of Quality Control in the TOPAS Monte Carlo Simulation Toolkit for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, D; Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Perl, J [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Faddegon, B [UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo particle transport simulation (MC) codes have become important tools in proton therapy and biology, both for research and practice. TOPAS is an MC toolkit serving users worldwide (213 licensed users at 95 institutions in 21 countries). It provides unprecedented ease in 4D placement of geometry components, beam sources and scoring through its user-friendly and reproducible parameter file interface. Quality control (QC) of stochastic simulation software is inherently difficult, and the versatility of TOPAS introduces additional challenges. But QC is vital as the TOPAS development team implements new features, addresses user feedback and reacts to upgrades of underlying software (i.e. Geant4). Methods: Whenever code is committed to our repository, over 50 separate module tests are automatically triggered via a continuous integration service. They check that the various module options execute successfully and that their results are statistically consistent with previous reference values. Prior to each software release, longer end-to-end tests automatically validate TOPAS against experimental data and a TOPAS benchmark. These include simulating multiple properties of spread-out Bragg peaks, validating nuclear models, and searching for differences in patient simulations. Results: Continuous integration has proven effective in catching regressions at the time they are introduced, particularly when implementing new features that involve refactoring code (e.g. multithreading and ntuple output). Code coverage statistics highlight untested portions of code and guide development of new tests. The various end-to-end tests demonstrate that TOPAS accurately describes the physics of proton therapy within clinical tolerances. Conclusion: The TOPAS QC strategy of frequent short tests and pre-release long tests has led to a more reliable tool. However, the versatility of TOPAS makes it difficult to predict how users might combine different modules, and so QC

  7. Technical Note: Display window setting: An important factor for detecting subtle but clinically relevant artifacts in daily CT quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zaiyang; Bruesewitz, Michael R; Sheedy, Emily N; Powell, Michele A; Kramer, Jacqualynn C; Supalla, Randall R; Colvin, Chance M; Bechel, Jessica R; Favazza, Christopher P; Kofler, James M; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H; Yu, Lifeng

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of display window setting on technologist performance detecting subtle but clinically relevant artifacts in daily computed tomography (CT) quality control (dQC) images. Fifty three sets of dQC images were retrospectively selected, including 30 sets without artifacts, and 23 with subtle but clinically relevant artifacts. They were randomized and shown to six CT technologists (two new and four experienced). Each technologist reviewed all images in each of two sessions, one with a display window width (WW) of 100 HU, which is currently recommended by the American College of Radiology, and the other with a narrow WW of 40 HU, both at a window level of 0 HU. For each case, technologists rated the presence of image artifacts based on a five point scale. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the artifact detection performance. At a WW of 100 HU, the AUC (95% confidence interval) was 0.658 (0.576, 0.740), 0.532 (0.429, 0.635), and 0.616 (0.543, 0.619) for the experienced, new, and all technologists, respectively. At a WW of 40 HU, the AUC was 0.768 (0.687, 0.850), 0.546 (0.433, 0.658), and 0.694 (0.619, 0.769), respectively. The performance significantly improved at WW of 40 HU for experienced technologists (p = 0.009) and for all technologists (p = 0.040). Use of a narrow display WW significantly improved technologists' performance in dQC for detecting subtle but clinically relevant artifacts as compared to that using a 100 HU display WW.

  8. Quality control analysis at the hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1979-01-01

    Quality control analysis is an integral part of quality assurance. In a system as with radiopharmaceuticals where part of the finishing of the product takes place at individual hospitals, the need for quality control analysis at the hospital can be discussed. Data are presented that stresses the importance of quality control by the manufacturer as a basis for limitation of such work at hospitals. A simplified programme is proposed

  9. Quality control guarantees the safety of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1994-01-01

    While radiotherapy equipment has seen some decisive improvements in the last few decades, the technology has also become more complicated. The advanced equipment produces increasingly good treatment results, but the condition of the equipment must be controlled efficiently so as to eliminate any defects that might jeopardise patient safety. The quality assurance measures that are taken to show that certain equipment functions as required are known as quality control. The advanced equipment and stricter requirements set for the precision of radiotherapy have meant that more attention must be paid to quality control. The present radiation legislation stipulates that radiotherapy equipment must undergo regular quality control. The implementation of the quality control is supervised by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Hospitals carry out quality control in accordance with a programme approved by STUK, and STUK inspectors periodically visit hospitals to check the results of quality control. (orig.)

  10. Radiopharmaceutical quality control-Pragmatic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The quality control must be considered in a practical manner. The radiopharmaceuticals are drugs. They must satisfy the quality assurance control. These products are then conform to Pharmacopeia. But sometimes the user must control some data especially radiochemical purity and pH value. On all the administered solutions four controls are compulsory: radionuclide identity, administered radioactivity, organoleptic character and pH

  11. Expert database system for quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anne J.; Li, Zhi-Cheng

    1993-09-01

    There are more competitors today. Markets are not homogeneous they are fragmented into increasingly focused niches requiring greater flexibility in the product mix shorter manufacturing production runs and above allhigher quality. In this paper the author identified a real-time expert system as a way to improve plantwide quality management. The quality control expert database system (QCEDS) by integrating knowledge of experts in operations quality management and computer systems use all information relevant to quality managementfacts as well as rulesto determine if a product meets quality standards. Keywords: expert system quality control data base

  12. Quality control of activity detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surma, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The conditions decided on radiometric measurements quality as geometry, background, calibration etc. have been described. The testing methods for achieving high quality of radioactivity measurements using nuclear medicine instruments have been recommended

  13. The Ocean Observatories Initiative Data Management and QA/QC: Lessons Learned and the Path Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaro, M.; Belabbassi, L.; Garzio, L. M.; Knuth, F.; Smith, M. J.; Kerfoot, J.; Crowley, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) is a multi-decadal, NSF-funded program that will provide long-term, near real-time cabled and telemetered measurements of climate variability, ocean circulation, ecosystem dynamics, air-sea exchange, seafloor processes, and plate-scale geodynamics. The OOI platforms consist of seafloor sensors, fixed moorings, and mobile assets containing over 700 operational instruments in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Rutgers University operates the Cyberinfrastructure (CI) component of the OOI, which acquires, processes and distributes data to scientists, researchers, educators and the public. It will also provide observatory mission command and control, data assessment and distribution, and long-term data management. The Rutgers Data Management Team consists of a data manager and four data evaluators, who are tasked with ensuring data completeness and quality, as well as interaction with OOI users to facilitate data delivery and utility. Here we will discuss the procedures developed to guide the data team workflow, the automated QC algorithms and human-in-the-loop (HITL) annotations that are used to flag suspect data (whether due to instrument failures, biofouling, or unanticipated events), system alerts and alarms, long-term data storage and CF (Climate and Forecast) standard compliance, and the lessons learned during construction and the first several months of OOI operations.

  14. The Use of Signal Dimensionality for Automatic QC of Seismic Array Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C. A.; Stead, R. J.; Begnaud, M. L.; Draganov, D.; Maceira, M.; Gomez, M.

    2014-12-01

    A significant problem in seismic array analysis is the inclusion of bad sensor channels in the beam-forming process. We are testing an approach to automated, on-the-fly quality control (QC) to aid in the identification of poorly performing sensor channels prior to beam-forming in routine event detection or location processing. The idea stems from methods used for large computer servers, when monitoring traffic at enormous numbers of nodes is impractical on a node-by-node basis, so the dimensionality of the node traffic is instead monitored for anomalies that could represent malware, cyber-attacks or other problems. The technique relies upon the use of subspace dimensionality or principal components of the overall system traffic. The subspace technique is not new to seismology, but its most common application has been limited to comparing waveforms to an a priori collection of templates for detecting highly similar events in a swarm or seismic cluster. We examine the signal dimension in similar way to the method addressing node traffic anomalies in large computer systems. We explore the effects of malfunctioning channels on the dimension of the data and its derivatives, and how to leverage this effect for identifying bad array elements. We show preliminary results applied to arrays in Kazakhstan (Makanchi) and Argentina (Malargue).

  15. 30 CFR 74.6 - Quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality control. 74.6 Section 74.6 Mineral... of the CMDPSU will be maintained in production through adequate quality control procedures, MSHA and... DUST SAMPLING DEVICES Approval Requirements for Coal Mine Dust Personal Sampler Unit § 74.6 Quality...

  16. Employee quality, monitoring environment and internal control

    OpenAIRE

    Chunli Liu; Bin Lin; Wei Shu

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of internal control employees (ICEs) on internal control quality. Using special survey data from Chinese listed firms, we find that ICE quality has a significant positive influence on internal control quality. We examine the effect of monitoring on this result and find that the effect is more pronounced for firms with strict monitoring environments, especially when the firms implement the Chinese internal control regulation system (CSOX), have higher institutional ow...

  17. Development of a portable quality control application using a tablet-type electronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Tomohiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Akimoto, Mami; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Ishihara, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    Our aim was to develop a portable quality control (QC) application using a thermometer, a barometer, an angle gauge, and a range finder implemented in a tablet-type consumer electronic device (CED) and to assess the accuracies of the measurements made. The QC application was programmed using Java and OpenCV libraries. First, temperature and atmospheric pressure were measured over 30 days using the temperature and pressure sensors of the CED and compared with those measured by a double-tube thermometer and a digital barometer. Second, the angle gauge was developed using the accelerometer of the CED. The roll and pitch angles of the CED were measured from 0 to 90° at intervals of 10° in the clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) directions. The values were compared with those measured by a digital angle gauge. Third, a range finder was developed using the tablet's built-in camera and image-processing capacities. Surrogate markers were detected by the camera and their positions converted to actual positions using a homographic transformation method. Fiducial markers were placed on a treatment couch and moved 100 mm in 10-mm steps in both the lateral and longitudinal directions. The values were compared with those measured by the digital output of the treatment couch. The differences between CED values and those of other devices were compared by calculating means ± standard deviations (SDs). The means ± SDs of differences in temperature and atmospheric pressure were -0.07 ± 0.25°C and 0.05 ± 0.10 hPa, respectively. The means ± SDs of the difference in angle was -0.17 ± 0.87° (0.15 ± 0.23° degrees excluding the 90° angle). The means ± SDs of distances were 0.01 ± 0.07 mm in both the lateral and longitudinal directions. Our portable QC application was accurate and may be used instead of standard measuring devices. Our portable CED is efficient and simple when used in the field of medical physics. © 2018 American Association of

  18. A windows based automated quality control system for the ICP-AES analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerth, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    High sample volume analytical laboratories typically require automation of tasks to maximize efficiency and productivity. Typical approaches target instrument operation and data reporting (LIMS), but frequently ignore the data evaluation and run time QC aspects. Automation of these steps can save up to 50% of the time it takes to analyze, evaluate, and report data from a typical ICP-AES run. The program developed in this project addresses this need by performing a CLP-style evaluation of the run time QC data included in an instrument run. Written in Microcraft Visual Basic 3.0, it makes use of a Microsoft Access database to store method parameters and QC sample results for control charting. In operation, the analyst enters method background data (e.g., control samples types and acceptance criteria for each analyte), which is then stored in the method database. Once the method parameters are entered, instrument data files may be imported for review. Upon import, the run is automatically checked against desired QC criteria, QC sample data are added to the database, and failing samples flagged appropriately. Analytes passing all QC checks are flagged for upload to the laboratory LIMS. The analyst may then review the run sample by sample, and, if desired, override the computer upload flag. An exception report may be generated detailing samples that require reanalysis

  19. Problems of quality assurance and quality control in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angerstein, W.

    1986-01-01

    Topical problems of quality assurance and quality control in diagnostic radiology are discussed and possible solutions are shown. Complex units are differentiated with reference to physicians, technicians, organization of labour, methods of examination and indication. Quality control of radiologic imaging systems should involve three stages: (1) simple tests carried out by radiologic technicians, (2) measurements by service technicians, (3) testing of products by the manufacturer and independent governmental or health service test agencies. (author)

  20. Quality control in tile production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalviainen, Heikki A.; Kukkonen, Saku; Hyvarinen, Timo S.; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1998-10-01

    This work studies visual quality control in ceramics industry. In tile manufacturing, it is important that in each set of tiles, every single tile looks similar. For example, the tiles should have similar color and texture. Our goal is to design a machine vision system that can estimate the sufficient similarity or same appearance to the human eye. Currently, the estimation is usually done by human vision. Differing from other approaches our aim is to use accurate spectral representation of color, and we are comparing spectral features to the RGB color features. A laboratory system for color measurement is built. Experimentations with five classes of brown tiles are presented. We use chromaticity RGB features and several spectral features for classification with the k-NN classifier and with a neural network, called Self-Organizing Map. We can classify many of the tiles but there are several problems that need further investigations: larger training and test sets are needed, illuminations effects must be studied further, and more suitable spectral features are needed with more sophisticated classifiers. It is also interesting to develop further the neural approach.

  1. TU-F-18A-01: Preliminary Results of a Prototype Quality Control Process for Spectral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nute, J; Jacobsen, M; Pennington, J; Cody, D; Chandler, A; Imai, Y; Baiu, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A prototype quality control (QC) phantom and analysis process has been designed specifically to monitor dual-energy CT and address the current lack of quantitative oversight of the spectral capabilities of these scanners. Methods: A prototype solid water phantom was designed with multiple material inserts, and to support both head and body protocols. Inserts included tissue equivalent and material rods (iodine, iron, calcium) at various concentrations. The oval body phantom, measuring 30cm×40cm×15cm, was scanned using four dual-energy protocols with CTDIvol ranges of 19.6–62mGy (0.516 pitch) and 10.3–32.5mGy (0.984 pitch), and rotation times ranging from 0.5-1sec. The circular head phantom, measuring 22cm in diameter by 15cm, was scanned using three dual-energy protocols with CTDIvol ranges of 67–132.6mGy (0.531 pitch) and 36.7–72.7mGy (0.969 pitch), and rotation times ranging from 0.5–0.9sec. All images were reconstructed at 50, 70, 110 and 140 keV, and using a water-iodine material basis pair. The images were evaluated for iodine quantification accuracy and stability of monoenergetic reconstructions. The phantom was scanned twice on ten GE 750HD CT scanners to evaluate inter-scanner agreement, as well as ten times on a single scanner over a oneweek period to evaluate intra-scanner repeatability. Results: Preliminary analysis revealed consistent (inter- and intra-scanner) iodine quantification accuracy within 10% was only achieved for protocols in the upper half of dose levels assessed when grouped by pitch. Although all scanners undergo rigorous daily single-energy QC, iodine quantification accuracy from one scanner unexpectedly deviated from the other nine substantially. In general, inter-scanner agreement and intra-scanner repeatability varied with dose, rotation time and reconstructed keV. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate the need for a dual-energy QC process to ensure inter-scanner agreement and intra-scanner repeatability. In

  2. Towards machine learned quality control: A benchmark for sharpness quantification in digital pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Gabriele; Rajanna, Arjun R; Corsale, Lorraine; Schüffler, Peter J; Yagi, Yukako; Fuchs, Thomas J

    2018-04-01

    Pathology is on the verge of a profound change from an analog and qualitative to a digital and quantitative discipline. This change is mostly driven by the high-throughput scanning of microscope slides in modern pathology departments, reaching tens of thousands of digital slides per month. The resulting vast digital archives form the basis of clinical use in digital pathology and allow large scale machine learning in computational pathology. One of the most crucial bottlenecks of high-throughput scanning is quality control (QC). Currently, digital slides are screened manually to detected out-of-focus regions, to compensate for the limitations of scanner software. We present a solution to this problem by introducing a benchmark dataset for blur detection, an in-depth comparison of state-of-the art sharpness descriptors and their prediction performance within a random forest framework. Furthermore, we show that convolution neural networks, like residual networks, can be used to train blur detectors from scratch. We thoroughly evaluate the accuracy of feature based and deep learning based approaches for sharpness classification (99.74% accuracy) and regression (MSE 0.004) and additionally compare them to domain experts in a comprehensive human perception study. Our pipeline outputs spacial heatmaps enabling to quantify and localize blurred areas on a slide. Finally, we tested the proposed framework in the clinical setting and demonstrate superior performance over the state-of-the-art QC pipeline comprising commercial software and human expert inspection by reducing the error rate from 17% to 4.7%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. An elementary components of variance analysis for multi-centre quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, P.J.; Rodbard, D.

    1978-01-01

    The serious variability of RIA results from different laboratories indicates the need for multi-laboratory collaborative quality-control (QC) studies. Simple graphical display of data in the form of histograms is useful but insufficient. The paper discusses statistical analysis methods for such studies using an ''analysis of variance with components of variance estimation''. This technique allocates the total variance into components corresponding to between-laboratory, between-assay, and residual or within-assay variability. Problems with RIA data, e.g. severe non-uniformity of variance and/or departure from a normal distribution violate some of the usual assumptions underlying analysis of variance. In order to correct these problems, it is often necessary to transform the data before analysis by using a logarithmic, square-root, percentile, ranking, RIDIT, ''Studentizing'' or other transformation. Ametric transformations such as ranks or percentiles protect against the undue influence of outlying observations, but discard much intrinsic information. Several possible relationships of standard deviation to the laboratory mean are considered. Each relationship corresponds to an underlying statistical model and an appropriate analysis technique. Tests for homogeneity of variance may be used to determine whether an appropriate model has been chosen, although the exact functional relationship of standard deviation to laboratory mean may be difficult to establish. Appropriate graphical display aids visual understanding of the data. A plot of the ranked standard deviation versus ranked laboratory mean is a convenient way to summarize a QC study. This plot also allows determination of the rank correlation, which indicates a net relationship of variance to laboratory mean

  4. Quality control methods for linear accelerator radiation and mechanical axes alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Becker, Nathan; Amin, Md Nurul; Norrlinger, Bernhard; Jaffray, David A

    2018-06-01

    The delivery accuracy of highly conformal dose distributions generated using intensity modulation and collimator, gantry, and couch degrees of freedom is directly affected by the quality of the alignment between the radiation beam and the mechanical axes of a linear accelerator. For this purpose, quality control (QC) guidelines recommend a tolerance of ±1 mm for the coincidence of the radiation and mechanical isocenters. Traditional QC methods for assessment of radiation and mechanical axes alignment (based on pointer alignment) are time consuming and complex tasks that provide limited accuracy. In this work, an automated test suite based on an analytical model of the linear accelerator motions was developed to streamline the QC of radiation and mechanical axes alignment. The proposed method used the automated analysis of megavoltage images of two simple task-specific phantoms acquired at different linear accelerator settings to determine the coincidence of the radiation and mechanical isocenters. The sensitivity and accuracy of the test suite were validated by introducing actual misalignments on a linear accelerator between the radiation axis and the mechanical axes using both beam steering and mechanical adjustments of the gantry and couch. The validation demonstrated that the new QC method can detect sub-millimeter misalignment between the radiation axis and the three mechanical axes of rotation. A displacement of the radiation source of 0.2 mm using beam steering parameters was easily detectable with the proposed collimator rotation axis test. Mechanical misalignments of the gantry and couch rotation axes of the same magnitude (0.2 mm) were also detectable using the new gantry and couch rotation axis tests. For the couch rotation axis, the phantom and test design allow detection of both translational and tilt misalignments with the radiation beam axis. For the collimator rotation axis, the test can isolate the misalignment between the beam radiation axis

  5. Shipping/Receiving and Quality Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Shipping receiving, quality control, large and precise inspection and CMM machines. Coordinate Measuring Machines, including "scanning" probes, optical comparators,...

  6. Quality control of static irradiation processing products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Jianzhong; Chen Xiulan; Cao Hong; Zhai Jianqing

    2002-01-01

    Based on the irradiation processing practice of the nuclear technique application laboratory of Yangzhou Institute of Agricultural Science, the quality control of irradiation processing products is discussed

  7. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Ti, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Ga, In, La, Li, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sn, Sr, Te, Th, Tl, U, V, W, Y, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry following a near-total digestion in a mixture of HCl, HNO3, HClO4, and HF. Separate methods were used for Hg, Se, total C, and carbonate-C on this same size fraction. Only Ag, In, and Te had a large percentage of concentrations below the detection limit. Quality control (QC) of the analyses was monitored at three levels: the laboratory performing the analysis, the USGS QC officer, and the principal investigator for the study. This level of review resulted in an average of one QC sample for every 20 field samples, which proved to be minimally adequate for such a large-scale survey. Additional QC samples should be added to monitor within-batch quality to the extent that no more than 10 samples are analyzed between a QC sample. Only Cr (77%), Y (82%), and Sb (80%) fell outside the acceptable limits of accuracy (% recovery between 85 and 115%) because of likely residence in mineral phases resistant to the acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset of 73 of these samples was analyzed for a suite of

  8. Establishment for quality control of experimental animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Soo Kwan; Kim, Tae Kyoung

    1999-06-01

    Until now, because we have imported experimental animal from foreign experimental animal corporation, we could have saved money by establishing the quality control of animal in barrier system. In order to improve the quality of animal experiment and efficiency of biomedical study, it is indispensable to control many factors that effect in the experiment. Therefore, it is essential to organize the system of laboratory animal care for enhancing reliability and revivability of experimental results. The purpose of the present investigation was to establish the quality control system of experimental animals that we can provide good quality animals according to the experimental condition of each investigator although the exact quality control system to estimate the infection of bacteria and virus easily remains ill-defined yet. Accordingly, we established the useful quality control system for microbiologic monitoring and environmental monitoring to protect experimental animal from harmful bacteria and virus

  9. Establishment for quality control of experimental animal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Soo Kwan; Kim, Tae Kyoung

    1999-06-01

    Until now, because we have imported experimental animal from foreign experimental animal corporation, we could have saved money by establishing the quality control of animal in barrier system. In order to improve the quality of animal experiment and efficiency of biomedical study, it is indispensable to control many factors that effect in the experiment. Therefore, it is essential to organize the system of laboratory animal care for enhancing reliability and revivability of experimental results. The purpose of the present investigation was to establish the quality control system of experimental animals that we can provide good quality animals according to the experimental condition of each investigator although the exact quality control system to estimate the infection of bacteria and virus easily remains ill-defined yet. Accordingly, we established the useful quality control system for microbiologic monitoring and environmental monitoring to protect experimental animal from harmful bacteria and virus.

  10. Reinforcing of QA/QC programs in radiotherapy departments in Croatia: Results of treatment planning system verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurković, Slaven; Švabić, Manda; Diklić, Ana; Smilović Radojčić, Đeni; Dundara, Dea [Clinic for Radiotherapy and Oncology, Physics Division, University Hospital Rijeka, Rijeka (Croatia); Kasabašić, Mladen; Ivković, Ana [Department for Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Faj, Dario, E-mail: dariofaj@mefos.hr [Department of Physics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia)

    2013-04-01

    Implementation of advanced techniques in clinical practice can greatly improve the outcome of radiation therapy, but it also makes the process much more complex with a lot of room for errors. An important part of the quality assurance program is verification of treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric verifications in anthropomorphic phantom were performed in 4 centers where new systems were installed. A total of 14 tests for 2 photon energies and multigrid superposition algorithms were conducted using the CMS XiO TPS. Evaluation criteria as specified in the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Reports Series (IAEA TRS) 430 were employed. Results of measurements are grouped according to the placement of the measuring point and the beam energy. The majority of differences between calculated and measured doses in the water-equivalent part of the phantom were in tolerance. Significantly more out-of-tolerance values were observed in “nonwater-equivalent” parts of the phantom, especially for higher-energy photon beams. This survey was done as a part of continuous effort to build up awareness of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) importance in the Croatian radiotherapy community. Understanding the limitations of different parts of the various systems used in radiation therapy can systematically improve quality as well.

  11. Quality Control in Production Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prístavka Miroslav

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The tools for quality management are used for quality improvement throughout the whole Europe and developed countries. Simple statistics are considered one of the most basic methods. The goal was to apply the simple statistical methods to practice and to solve problems by using them. Selected methods are used for processing the list of internal discrepancies within the organization, and for identification of the root cause of the problem and its appropriate solution. Seven basic quality tools are simple graphical tools, but very effective in solving problems related to quality. They are called essential because they are suitable for people with at least basic knowledge in statistics; therefore, they can be used to solve the vast majority of problems.

  12. Quality control of mammographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana Lopez, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    High quality in mammography is a difficult objective to achieve, that is the reason for what efforts are made in order to improve equipment, to offer good combinations screen-film, and professional staff dedicated to this technique [es

  13. Employee quality, monitoring environment and internal control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of internal control employees (ICEs on internal control quality. Using special survey data from Chinese listed firms, we find that ICE quality has a significant positive influence on internal control quality. We examine the effect of monitoring on this result and find that the effect is more pronounced for firms with strict monitoring environments, especially when the firms implement the Chinese internal control regulation system (CSOX, have higher institutional ownership or attach greater importance to internal control. Our findings suggest that ICEs play an important role in the design and implementation of internal control systems. Our study should be of interest to both top managers who wish to improve corporate internal control quality and regulators who wish to understand the mechanisms of internal control monitoring.

  14. Quality control education in the community college

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J. Griffen; Wilson, Steve

    1966-01-01

    This paper describes the Quality Control Program at Daytona Beach Junior College, including course descriptions. The program in quality control required communication between the college and the American Society for Quality Control (ASQC). The college has machinery established for certification of the learning process, and the society has the source of teachers who are competent in the technical field and who are the employers of the educational products. The associate degree for quality control does not have a fixed program, which can serve all needs, any more than all engineering degrees have identical programs. The main ideas which would be common to all quality control programs are the concept of economic control of a repetitive process and the concept of developing individual potentialities into individuals who are needed and productive.

  15. Related regulation of quality control of industrial products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This book introduce related regulation of quality control of industrial products, which includes regulations of industrial products quality control, enforcement ordinance of industrial products quality control, enforcement regulation of quality control of industrial products, designated items with industrial production quality indication, industrial production quality test, and industrial production quality test organization and management tips of factory quality by grade.

  16. Quality control of nuclear medicine instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mould, R.F.

    1983-09-01

    The proceedings of a conference held by the Hospital Physicists' Association in London 1983 on the quality control of nuclear medicine instrumentation are presented. Section I deals with the performance of the Anger gamma camera including assessment during manufacture, acceptance testing, routine testing and long-term assessment of results. Section II covers interfaces, computers, the quality control problems of emission tomography and the quality of software. Section III deals with radionuclide measurement and impurity assessment and Section IV the presentation of images and the control of image quality. (U.K.)

  17. Developing methods of controlling quality costs

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbunova A. V.; Maximova O. N.; Ekova V. A.

    2017-01-01

    The article examines issues of managing quality costs, problems of applying economic methods of quality control, implementation of progressive methods of quality costs management in enterprises with the view of improving the efficiency of their evaluation and analysis. With the aim of increasing the effectiveness of the cost management mechanism, authors introduce controlling as a tool of deviation analysis from the standpoint of the process approach. A list of processes and corresponding eva...

  18. Guidance on the application of quality assurance for characterizing a low-level radioactive waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittiglio, C.L. Jr.; Starmer, R.J.; Hedges, D.

    1990-10-01

    This document provides the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's staff guidance to an applicant on meeting the quality control (QC) requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Section 61.12 (10 CFR 61.12), for a low-level waste disposal facility. The QC requirements combined with the requirements for managerial controls and audits are the basis for developing a quality assurance (QA) program and for the guidance provided herein. QA guidance is specified for site characterization activities necessary to meet the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 61 and to limit exposure to or the release of radioactivity. 1 tab

  19. Quality assurance/quality control summary report on phase 2 of the Clinch River remedial investigation at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, S.K.; Anderson, H.M.; Benson, S.B.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Brandt, C.C.; Chavannes, C.M.; Cook, R.B.; Evans, D.A.; Ford, C.J.; Harris, R.A.; Horwedel, B.M.; Jackson, B.L.

    1996-12-01

    Quality assurance (QA) objectives for Phase 2 were that (1) scientific data generated would withstand scientific and legal scrutiny; (2) data would be gathered using appropriate procedures for sample collection, sample handling and security, chain of custody, laboratory analyses, and data reporting; (3) data would be of known precision and accuracy; and (4) data would meet data quality objectives defined in the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan. A review of the QA systems and quality control (QC) data associated with the Phase 2 investigation is presented to evaluate whether the data were of sufficient quality to satisfy Phase 2 objectives. The data quality indicators of precision, accuracy, representativeness, comparability, completeness, and sensitivity were evaluated to determine any limitations associated with the data. Data were flagged with qualifiers that were associated with appropriate reason codes and documentation relating the qualifiers to the reviewer of the data. These qualifiers were then consolidated into an overall final qualifier to represent the quality of the data to the end user. In summary, reproducible, precise, and accurate measurements consistent with CRRI objectives and the limitations of the sampling and analytical procedures used were obtained for the data collected in support of the Phase 2 Remedial Investigation.

  20. Quality assurance/quality control summary report on phase 2 of the Clinch River remedial investigation at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holladay, S.K.; Anderson, H.M.; Benson, S.B.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Brandt, C.C.; Chavannes, C.M.; Cook, R.B.; Evans, D.A.; Ford, C.J.; Harris, R.A.; Horwedel, B.M.; Jackson, B.L.

    1996-12-01

    Quality assurance (QA) objectives for Phase 2 were that (1) scientific data generated would withstand scientific and legal scrutiny; (2) data would be gathered using appropriate procedures for sample collection, sample handling and security, chain of custody, laboratory analyses, and data reporting; (3) data would be of known precision and accuracy; and (4) data would meet data quality objectives defined in the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan. A review of the QA systems and quality control (QC) data associated with the Phase 2 investigation is presented to evaluate whether the data were of sufficient quality to satisfy Phase 2 objectives. The data quality indicators of precision, accuracy, representativeness, comparability, completeness, and sensitivity were evaluated to determine any limitations associated with the data. Data were flagged with qualifiers that were associated with appropriate reason codes and documentation relating the qualifiers to the reviewer of the data. These qualifiers were then consolidated into an overall final qualifier to represent the quality of the data to the end user. In summary, reproducible, precise, and accurate measurements consistent with CRRI objectives and the limitations of the sampling and analytical procedures used were obtained for the data collected in support of the Phase 2 Remedial Investigation

  1. Fuel manufacture and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepenack, H.; Raab, K.

    1975-01-01

    The different steps in fuel and fuel element manufacturing from the conversion of UF 6 to UO 2 to the assembling of the whole fuel element are shortly described. Each of this fabrication steps must satisfy well-defined quality criteria which are checked in certain analyses or tests. (RB) [de

  2. Quality Control in Mammography: Image Quality and Patient Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj Bjelac, O.; Arandjic, D.; Boris Loncar, B.; Kosutic, D.

    2008-01-01

    Mammography is method of choice for early detection of breast cancer. The purpose of this paper is preliminary evaluation the mammography practice in Serbia, in terms of both quality control indicators, i.e. image quality and patient doses. The survey demonstrated considerable variations in technical parameters that affect image quality and patients doses. Mean glandular doses ranged from 0.12 to 2.8 mGy, while reference optical density ranged from 1.2 to 2.8. Correlation between image contrast and mean glandular doses was demonstrated. Systematic implementation of quality control protocol should provide satisfactory performance of mammography units and maintain satisfactory image quality and keep patient doses as low as reasonably practicable. (author)

  3. Guest Foreword from Michael Thomas CMG QC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Thomas

    2012-04-01

    precedents and thought in a unique legal market in which ideas drawn from Islamic law, civil law and common law can intermingle and blend. It is not surprising therefore to see that this new publication will be dedicated to the subject of international law, both public and private. Its laudable aim is to promote legal discourse around the world, and to promote a wider international understanding of contemporary legal issues for the common benefit. As an open access, bilingual journal, addressing topics concerning any jurisdiction, I hope it will reach a wide audience, and fulfil its aim of promoting understanding between different cultures. I am sure that the journal will not only benefit Qatar’s legal community by advancing academic and practice-based legal discussion. I am also confident that it will stimulate thought in the global legal community at large. May I wish it every success and a long life. Michael Thomas CMG QC

  4. Quality assurance guidance for low-level radioactive waste disposal facility: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittiglio, C.L. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This document provides guidance to an applicant on meeting the quality control (QC) requirements for a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility. The QC requirements are the basis for developing of a quality assurance (QA) program and for the guidance provided herein. The criteria are basic to any QA program. The document specifically establishes QA guidance for the design, construction, and operation of those structures, systems, components, as well as, for site characterization activities necessary to meet the performance objectives and to limit exposure to our release of radioactivity. 7 refs

  5. Quality control in the radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzyski, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive waste management as in industrial activities must mantain in all steps a quality control programme. This control extended from materials acquisition, for waste treatment, to the package deposition is one of the most important activities because it aims to observe the waste acceptance criteria in repositories and allows to guarantee the security of the nuclear facilities. In this work basic knowledges about quality control in waste management and some examples of adopted procedures in other countries are given. (author) [pt

  6. KWARTA (Quality Assurance in the Radiotherapy centres of the Antwerp province): Quality control of the contract therapy machine and treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ost, B; Schaeken, B; Vanregemorter, J [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Middelheim, Antwerp (Belgium); Bellekens, L [Sint-Vincentius Ziekenhuis, Antwerp (Belgium); Cardoen, R; Pieters, D [Medisch Instituut Sint Augustinus, Wilrijk (Belgium); Goossens, H [Sint-Elisabeth Ziekenhuis, Turnhout (Belgium); Haest, K; Mertens, N [Sint Norbertus Ziekenhuis, Duffel (Belgium)

    1995-12-01

    During the first year of the provincial QA project, joint procedures were set up for the routine quality control of linear accelerators, Cobalt treatment machines and simulators. A set of standard forms was produced for use in all centres, respecting the differences in each individual machine. Since forms are now in use in all centres, the second year of the project mainly focused on the QA/QC of the contract therapy machine and treatment planning system. QC measurements for the contract therapy machines were performed in air or in a phantom. Since the output was checked with the same ionisation chamber (0.33 cc flat chamber calibrated for 50 kV) and the same type of electrometer in all centres, the results could be compared mutually and with the reference values. The major parameter groups, tested for the treatment planning system were: isodose distribution (visual control of all square fields in the database of the system), PDD data (analysing of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, 30 x 30 cm{sup 2} and 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} open or wedged fields), output factors, wedge and tray factors, inverse square law, geometrical testing of the digitizer - screen - printer and geometrical and densitometrical testing of the CT images - screen - printer. Between 496 and 1243 parameters were investigated in the different centres (depending on the presence of the electron data). Irregularities (0 % to 4 % of the total investigated parameters) were reported to the respective physicist.

  7. Control by quality: proposition of a typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujo, P; Pillet, M

    The application of Quality tools and methods in industrial management has always had a fundamental impact on the control of production. It influences the behavior of the actors concerned, while introducing the necessary notions and formalizations, especially for production systems with little or no automation, which constitute a large part of the industrial activity. Several quality approaches are applied in the workshop and are implemented at the level of the control. In this paper, the authors present a typology of the various approaches that have successively influenced control, such as statistical process control, quality assurance, and continuous improvement. First the authors present a parallel between production control and quality organizational structure. They note the duality between control, which is aimed at increasing productivity, and quality, which aims to satisfy the needs of the customer. They also note the hierarchical organizational structure of these two systems of management with, at each level, the notion of a feedback loop. This notion is fundamental to any kind of decision making. The paper is organized around the operational, tactical, and strategic levels, by describing for each level the main methods and tools for control by quality. The overview of these tools and methods starts at the operational level, with the Statistical Process Control, the Taguchi technique, and the "six sigma" approach. On the tactical level, we find a quality system approach, with a documented description of the procedures introduced in the firm. The management system can refer here to Quality Assurance, Total Productive Maintenance, or Management by Total Quality. The formalization through procedures of the rules of decision governing the process control enhances the validity of these rules. This leads to the enhancement of their reliability and to their consolidation. All this counterbalances the human, intrinsically fluctuating, behavior of the control

  8. An introduction to statistical process control in research proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramwell, David

    2013-12-16

    Statistical process control is a well-established and respected method which provides a general purpose, and consistent framework for monitoring and improving the quality of a process. It is routinely used in many industries where the quality of final products is critical and is often required in clinical diagnostic laboratories [1,2]. To date, the methodology has been little utilised in research proteomics. It has been shown to be capable of delivering quantitative QC procedures for qualitative clinical assays [3] making it an ideal methodology to apply to this area of biological research. To introduce statistical process control as an objective strategy for quality control and show how it could be used to benefit proteomics researchers and enhance the quality of the results they generate. We demonstrate that rules which provide basic quality control are easy to derive and implement and could have a major impact on data quality for many studies. Statistical process control is a powerful tool for investigating and improving proteomics research work-flows. The process of characterising measurement systems and defining control rules forces the exploration of key questions that can lead to significant improvements in performance. This work asserts that QC is essential to proteomics discovery experiments. Every experimenter must know the current capabilities of their measurement system and have an objective means for tracking and ensuring that performance. Proteomic analysis work-flows are complicated and multi-variate. QC is critical for clinical chemistry measurements and huge strides have been made in ensuring the quality and validity of results in clinical biochemistry labs. This work introduces some of these QC concepts and works to bridge their use from single analyte QC to applications in multi-analyte systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Standardization and Quality Control in Proteomics. Copyright © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier

  9. Sensometrics for Food Quality Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per B.

    2011-01-01

    The industrial development of innovative and succesful food items and the measuring of food quality in general is difficult without actually letting human beings evaluate the products using their senses at some point in the process. The use of humans as measurement instruments calls for special...... attention in the modelling and data analysis phase. In this paper the focus is on sensometrics – the „metric“ side of the sensory science field. The sensometrics field is introduced and related to the fields of statistics, chemometrics and psychometrics. Some of the most commonly used sensory testing...

  10. Computer controlled quality of analytical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.P.; Huff, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    A PDP 11/35 computer system is used in evaluating analytical chemistry measurements quality control data at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. This computerized measurement quality control system has several features which are not available in manual systems, such as real-time measurement control, computer calculated bias corrections and standard deviation estimates, surveillance applications, evaluaton of measurement system variables, records storage, immediate analyst recertificaton, and the elimination of routine analysis of known bench standards. The effectiveness of the Barnwell computer system has been demonstrated in gathering and assimilating the measurements of over 1100 quality control samples obtained during a recent plant demonstration run. These data were used to determine equaitons for predicting measurement reliability estimates (bias and precision); to evaluate the measurement system; and to provide direction for modification of chemistry methods. The analytical chemistry measurement quality control activities represented 10% of the total analytical chemistry effort

  11. TRAINING SYSTEM OF FUTURE SPECIALISTS: QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Romanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is development of innovative strategy of quality control training of engineers and skilled workers (hereinafter – future specialists in educational professional organizations on the principles of social partnership.Methods. Theoretic: theoretic and methodological analysis, polytheoretic synthesis, modeling. Empirical: research and generalization of the system, process and competence – based approaches experience, experiment, observation, surveys, expert evaluation, SWOT-analysis as a method of strategic planning which is to identify the internal and external factors (socio-cultural of the organization surrounding.Results. The strategy of the development of the process of quality control training in educational professional organizations and a predictive model of the system of quality control training for future engineers and workers have been created on the analysis and synthesis of a quantitative specification of the quality, the obtained experience and success in control training of future specialists in educational professional organizations in recent economic and educational conditions.Scientific novelty. There has been built a predicative model of quality control training of future specialists to meet modern standards and the principles of social partnership; the control algorithm of the learning process, developed in accordance with the standards (international of quality ISO in the implementation of the quality control systems of the process approach (matrix-based responsibility, competence and remit of those responsible for the education process in the educational organization, the «problem» terms and diagnostic tools for assessing the quality of professional training of future specialists. The perspective directions of innovation in the control of the quality of future professionals training have been determined; the parameters of a comprehensive analysis of the state of the system to ensure the

  12. QA/QC Reflected in ISO 11137; The Role of Dosimetry in the Validation Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, A.

    2007-01-01

    Standardized dosimetry (ISO/ASTM standards) - as a tool of QC - has got key role for the validation of the sterilization and ford irradiation processes, as well as to control the radiation processing of polymer products. In radiation processing, validation and process control (e.g. sterilization, food irradiation) depend on the measurement of absorbed dose. These measurements shall be performed using a dosimetric system or systems having a known level of accuracy and precision (European standard EN552:1994). In presented lecture different aspects of the operational qualification during the radiation processing of polymer products are described

  13. Quality control and performance evaluation of k0-based neutron activation analysis at the Portuguese research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, H.M.; Freitas, M.C.; Blaauw, M.; Almeida, S.M.; Dionisio, I.; Canha, N.H.

    2010-01-01

    The quality control (QC) and performance evaluation for the k 0 -based neutron activation analysis (k 0 -NAA) at the Portuguese research reactor (RPI) has been developed with the intention of using the method to meet the demands of trace element analysis for the applications in environmental, epidemiological and nutritional studies amongst others. The QC and performance evaluation include the following aspects: (1) estimation of the overall/combined standard uncertainty from the primary uncertainty sources; (2) validation of the method using a synthetic multi-element standard (SMELS); and (3) analysis of the certified reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA): NIST-SRM-1633a and NIST-SRM-1648 and the reference material from the International Atomic Energy Agency: IAEA-RM-336, for the purpose of controlling the overall accuracy and precision of the analytical results. The obtained results revealed that the k 0 -NAA method established at the RPI was fit for the purpose. The overall/combined standard uncertainty was estimated for elements of interest in the intended applications. The laboratory's analytical results as compared to the assigned values with the bias were less than 12% for most elements, except for a few elements which biased within 13-18%. The u-score values for most elements were less than |1.64|, except for Co, La and Ti within |1.64|-|1.96| and Sc, Cr, K and Sb within |1.96|-|2.58|. The NIST-1633a was also analyzed over 14 months for the purpose of evaluating the reproducibility of the method. The quality factors of k 0 -NAA established at RPI were evaluated, proving that the method meets the requirements of trace element analysis, which is also considering the method's performance for which the k 0 -NAA affords a specific, rapid and convenient capability for the intended applications.

  14. CONCRETE STRUCTURES' QUALITY CONTROL IN PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Dolaček-Alduk, Zlata; Blanda, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    The Croatian civil engineering is characterized by a lack of systematic approach to planning, control and quality assurance in all phases of project realization. The results obtained in establishing the quality management system in some segments of civil engineering production represent initial trends in solving this problem. Benefits are of two types: the achievement of quality for the contractor and obtaining that quaity is being achieved for clients. Execution of concrete structures is a c...

  15. Implementation of regional centres for SPECT QC/QA in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robilotta, C.C.; Dias-Neto, A.L.; Abe, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Silva, D.C. da; Martini, J.C.; Brunetto, S.; Ney, C.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: SPECT technology was introduced in Brazil at the early 80s and, presently, there are more than 230 systems installed in the whole country. In order to establish a quality standard for these systems, a RCP was submitted and received partial support from IAEA for the implementation of regional centres, so that clinics in different regions could be evaluated using the same protocols. Materials and Methods: Six centres were created in 5 public (federal and state) universities and one private philanthropic medical school in: USP-Sao Paulo, UNICAMP-Campinas, CNEN-Rio de Janeiro, UFBA-Salvador, UFPE-Recife and FM/Santa Casa-Porto Alegre. All sites have teaching and technical supports available and there is at least one nuclear medicine physicist in charge. The basic QC/QA set included: 57 Co sheet source, orthogonal hole phantom, quadrant bar phantom, calibrated sources for dose calibrator ( 57 Co, 133 Ba, and 137 Cs) and a DeLuxe SPECT phantom from Data Spectrum Corp. Basic and complete/acceptance protocols were defined as the reference procedures. Measurements and evaluations were performed in 21 (<10%) centres and inter-comparisons were made amongst the groups. Results: Some information about the centres and evaluated systems are presented. A large number of the visited clinics never had any QC tests done except for the manufacturer's installation tests and the daily uniformity test. On the average, most of the cameras needed tuning and one of them had to have the PM tubes re-coupled. The main difficulties encountered by all groups were the lack of physicists in almost all the visited clinics and the inadequate training of many local technologists, especially in the remote areas. In spite of the misunderstanding and scepticism from some of the visited MDs, the majority recognized the importance of proper QC/QA testing. Conclusions: It was shown that regional centres are essential if one aims quality and reliability in the nuclear medicine clinics, especially in a

  16. A quality control manual for oral radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, J.E.; Ferreira, R.S.; Bessa, S.O.; Domingues, C.; Gomes, C.A.; Oliveira, S.L.G.; Ortiz, J.A.P.

    1988-01-01

    A quality control manual for oral radiology is showed. The X-ray equipment used for this activity is described, such as the X-ray tube, collimator. The high tension in X-ray tube, the spectra, the quality and the quantity of radiation and the X-ray intensity are also analysed. (C.G.C.) [pt

  17. Quality control of gamma radiation measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surma, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of quality control and assurance of gamma radiation measuring systems has been described in detail. The factors deciding of high quality of radiometric measurements as well as statistical testing and calibration of measuring systems have been presented and discussed

  18. Net analyte signal based statistical quality control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skibsted, E.T.S.; Boelens, H.F.M.; Westerhuis, J.A.; Smilde, A.K.; Broad, N.W.; Rees, D.R.; Witte, D.T.

    2005-01-01

    Net analyte signal statistical quality control (NAS-SQC) is a new methodology to perform multivariate product quality monitoring based on the net analyte signal approach. The main advantage of NAS-SQC is that the systematic variation in the product due to the analyte (or property) of interest is

  19. The regulatory maze of quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    The appropriateness of specific procedures within a quality control program becomes difficult to assess when an attempt is made to collate all of the available information. This task is discussed from the perspective of the Joint Commission (JCAH Accreditation Manual), HHS(quality assurance program recommendations), equipment manufacturers maintenance schedules, and radiology administrative cost concerns

  20. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Biotoxin Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the pathogen methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  1. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Radiochemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the radiochemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  2. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Pathogen Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the biotoxin methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  3. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Chemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the chemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  4. Metallographic quality control of welding and brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    The value of metallography in assuring integrity in the fabrication of metal and components in energy systems is summarized. Metallography also plays an integral role in quality control of welded and brazed joints

  5. Quality Controlled Local Climatological Data (QCLCD) Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Quality Controlled Local Climatological Data (QCLCD) contains summaries from major airport weather stations that include a daily account of temperature extremes,...

  6. Quality control during construction of power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartstern, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper traces the background and examines the necessity for a program to control quality during the construction phase of a power plant. It also attempts to point out considerations for making these programs cost effective

  7. Data Quality Control: Challenges, Methods, and Solutions from an Eco-Hydrologic Instrumentation Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksson, D.; Jones, A. S.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Cox, C.; Dastrup, D.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few decades, advances in electronic dataloggers and in situ sensor technology have revolutionized our ability to monitor air, soil, and water to address questions in the environmental sciences. The increased spatial and temporal resolution of in situ data is alluring. However, an often overlooked aspect of these advances are the challenges data managers and technicians face in performing quality control on millions of data points collected every year. While there is general agreement that high quantities of data offer little value unless the data are of high quality, it is commonly understood that despite efforts toward quality assurance, environmental data collection occasionally goes wrong. After identifying erroneous data, data managers and technicians must determine whether to flag, delete, leave unaltered, or retroactively correct suspect data. While individual instrumentation networks often develop their own QA/QC procedures, there is a scarcity of consensus and literature regarding specific solutions and methods for correcting data. This may be because back correction efforts are time consuming, so suspect data are often simply abandoned. Correction techniques are also rarely reported in the literature, likely because corrections are often performed by technicians rather than the researchers who write the scientific papers. Details of correction procedures are often glossed over as a minor component of data collection and processing. To help address this disconnect, we present case studies of quality control challenges, solutions, and lessons learned from a large scale, multi-watershed environmental observatory in Northern Utah that monitors Gradients Along Mountain to Urban Transitions (GAMUT). The GAMUT network consists of over 40 individual climate, water quality, and storm drain monitoring stations that have collected more than 200 million unique data points in four years of operation. In all of our examples, we emphasize that scientists

  8. Utility view on QA/QC of WWER-440 fuel design and manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, P.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the legislation implements in the Czech Republic, QA/QC system at CEZ, demonstration and development program (purchaser point of view), audit of QA/QC system for fuel design and manufacturing as well as QA/QC records are discussed

  9. Use of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device for multileaf collimator quality control and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S J K; Budgell, G J; MacKay, R I

    2005-01-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and quality control is a time-consuming procedure typically involving the processing, scanning and analysis of films to measure leaf and collimator positions. Faster and more reliable calibration procedures are required for these tasks, especially with the introduction of intensity modulated radiotherapy which requires more frequent checking and finer positional leaf tolerances than previously. A routine quality control (QC) technique to measure MLC leaf bank gain and offset, as well as minor offsets (individual leaf position relative to a reference leaf), using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed. The technique also tests the calibration of the primary and back-up collimators. A detailed comparison between film and EPID measurements has been performed for six linear accelerators (linacs) equipped with MLC and amorphous silicon EPIDs. Measurements of field size from 4 to 24 cm with the EPID were systematically smaller than film measurements over all field sizes by 0.4 mm for leaves/back-up collimators and by 0.2 mm for conventional collimators. This effect is due to the gain calibration correction applied by the EPID, resulting in a 'flattening' of primary beam profiles. Linac dependent systematic differences of up to 0.5 mm in individual leaf/collimator positions were also found between EPID and film measurements due to the difference between the mechanical and radiation axes of rotation. When corrections for these systematic differences were applied, the residual random differences between EPID and film were 0.23 mm and 0.26 mm (1 standard deviation) for field size and individual leaf/back-up collimator position, respectively. Measured gains (over a distance of 220 mm) always agreed within 0.4 mm with a standard deviation of 0.17 mm. Minor offset measurements gave a mean agreement between EPID and film of 0.01 ± 0.10 mm (1 standard deviation) after correction for the tilt of the

  10. Developing methods of controlling quality costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunova A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines issues of managing quality costs, problems of applying economic methods of quality control, implementation of progressive methods of quality costs management in enterprises with the view of improving the efficiency of their evaluation and analysis. With the aim of increasing the effectiveness of the cost management mechanism, authors introduce controlling as a tool of deviation analysis from the standpoint of the process approach. A list of processes and corresponding evaluation criteria in the quality management system of enterprises is introduced. Authors also introduce the method of controlling quality costs and propose it for the practical application, which allows them to determine useful and unnecessary costs at the existing operating plant. Implementing the proposed recommendations in the system of cost management at an enterprise will allow to improve productivity of processes operating and reduce wasted expense on the quality of the process on the basis of determining values of useful and useless costs of quality according to criteria of processes functioning in the system of quality management.

  11. Evaluation of effective energy for QA and QC: measurement of half-value layer using radiochromic film density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotanda, R.; Takeda, Y.; Gotanda, T.; Oishi Hospital, Hiroshima; Tabuchi, A.; Kawasaki Hospital, Okayama; Yamamoto, K.; Osaka Cancer Prevention and Detection Centre, Osaka; Kuwano, T.; Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardovascular Diseases, Osaka; Yatake, H.; Kaizuka City Hospital, Osaka; Katsuda, T.

    2009-01-01

    The effective energy of diagnostic x-rays is important for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC). However, the half-value layer (HVL), which is necessary to evaluate the effective energy, is not ubiquitously monitored because ionization-chamber dosimetry is time-consuming and complicated. To verify the applicability of GAFCHROMIC XR type R (GAF-R) film for HVL measurement as an alternative to monitoring with an ionization chamber, a single-strip method for measuring the HVL has been evaluated. Calibration curves of absorbed dose versus film density were generated using this single-strip method with GAF-R film, and the coefficient of determination (r2) of the straight-line approximation was evaluated. The HVLs (effective energies) estimated using the GAF-R film and an ionization chamber were compared. The coefficient of determination (r2) of the straight-line approximation obtained with the GAF-R film was more than 0.99. The effective energies (HVLs) evaluated using the GAF-R film and the ionization chamber were 43.25 keV (5.10 m m) and 39.86 keV (4.45 mm), respectively. The difference in the effective energies determined by the two methods was thus 8.5%. These results suggest that GAF-R might be used to evaluate the effective energy from the film-density growth without the need for ionization-chamber measurements.

  12. Quality assurance and quality control in mammography: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BenComo, Jose A.

    2000-01-01

    A mammogram is among the most technically demanding radiographic procedures. The early detection of breast cancer relies on the radiologist's ability to perceive subtle changes in the image that are only perceptible with high-quality imaging. Early detection of breast cancer is only as reliable as the mammogram with which a diagnosis is made, and a mammogram is only as accurate as the system that produces it. A quality assurance (QA) program maximizes the likelihood that the mammographic images will provide adequate diagnostic information for the least possible radiation exposure and cost to the patient. The QA program monitors each phase of operation of the imaging facility beginning with the request for an examination and ending with the interpretation of the referring physician and ensures that the imaging equipment used for the examination will yield the information desired. Because image quality is the most important technical aspect of mammography, this review summarizes the most important QA and quality control issues

  13. Quality control and analysis of radiotracer compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, G.; Thomson, R.

    1977-01-01

    Special emphasis was on the problems and errors possible in quality control and analysis. The principles underlying quality control were outlined, and analytical techniques applicable to radiotracers were described. Chapter concluded with a selection of examples showing the effects of impurities on the use of radiotracers. The subject of quality control and analysis was treated from the viewpoint of the user and those research workers who need to synthesize and analyze their own radiochemicals. The quality characteristics for radiotracers are of two kinds, valuable or attributive. These were discussed in the chapter. For counting low radioactive concentration, scintillation techniques are in general use, whereas ionization techniques are now used mainly for the measurement of high radioactive concentrations or large quantities of radioactivity, for scanning chromatograms, and a number of very specific purposes. Determination of radionuclidic purity was discussed. Use of radiotracers in pharmaceuticals were presented. 4 figures, 6 tables

  14. Network-based production quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yongjin; Tseng, Bill; Chiou, Richard

    2007-09-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of remote quality control using a host of advanced automation equipment with Internet accessibility. Recent emphasis on product quality and reduction of waste stems from the dynamic, globalized and customer-driven market, which brings opportunities and threats to companies, depending on the response speed and production strategies. The current trends in industry also include a wide spread of distributed manufacturing systems, where design, production, and management facilities are geographically dispersed. This situation mandates not only the accessibility to remotely located production equipment for monitoring and control, but efficient means of responding to changing environment to counter process variations and diverse customer demands. To compete under such an environment, companies are striving to achieve 100%, sensor-based, automated inspection for zero-defect manufacturing. In this study, the Internet-based quality control scheme is referred to as "E-Quality for Manufacturing" or "EQM" for short. By its definition, EQM refers to a holistic approach to design and to embed efficient quality control functions in the context of network integrated manufacturing systems. Such system let designers located far away from the production facility to monitor, control and adjust the quality inspection processes as production design evolves.

  15. 20. Quality assurance and quality control in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrejn, B.

    1989-01-01

    Quality control principles to be applied when taking over and using nuclear medicine instrumentation are given. Such instrumentation includes activity meters, gamma detectors for in vitro measurements (manual or automated instruments), gamma detectors for in vivo measurements (with one or several probes), 'movable' scintigraphs and 'steady' scintigraphs (gamma cameras). (Z.S.)

  16. Application of sigma metrics for the assessment of quality control in clinical chemistry laboratory in Ghana: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrifa, Justice; Gyekye, Seth A; Owiredu, William K B A; Ephraim, Richard K D; Essien-Baidoo, Samuel; Amoah, Samuel; Simpong, David L; Arthur, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Sigma metrics provide a uniquely defined scale with which we can assess the performance of a laboratory. The objective of this study was to assess the internal quality control (QC) in the clinical chemistry laboratory of the University of Cape Cost Hospital (UCC) using the six sigma metrics application. We used commercial control serum [normal (L1) and pathological (L2)] for validation of quality control. Metabolites (glucose, urea, and creatinine), lipids [triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)], enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (AST)], electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride) and total protein were assessed. Between-day imprecision (CVs), inaccuracy (Bias) and sigma values were calculated for each control level. Apart from sodium (2.40%, 3.83%), chloride (2.52% and 2.51%) for both L1 and L2 respectively, and glucose (4.82%), cholesterol (4.86%) for L2, CVs for all other parameters (both L1 and L2) were >5%. Four parameters (HDL-C, urea, creatinine and potassium) achieved sigma levels >1 for both controls. Chloride and sodium achieved sigma levels >1 for L1 but sigma levels 1 for L2. Glucose and ALP achieved a sigma level >1 for both control levels whereas TG achieved a sigma level >2 for both control levels. Unsatisfactory sigma levels (six sigma levels for the laboratory.

  17. Characterization and quality control of avalanche photodiode arrays for the Clear-PEM detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Conceicao; Amaral, Pedro; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Miguel; Luyten, Joan; Moura, Rui; Ortigao, Catarina; Rato, Pedro; Varela, Joao

    2007-01-01

    Clear-PEM is a Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) prototype being developed in the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN. This device is a dedicated PET camera for mammography, based on LYSO:Ce scintillator crystals, Avalanche PhotoDiodes (APD) and a fast, low-noise electronics readout system, designed to examine both the breast and the axillary lymph node areas, and aiming at the detection of tumors down to 2 mm in diameter. The prototype has two planar detector heads, each composed of 96 detector modules. The Clear-PEM detector module is composed of a matrix of 32 identical 2x2x20 mm 3 LYSO:Ce crystals read at both ends by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays (4x8) for Depth-of-Interaction (DoI) capability. The APD arrays were characterized by the measurement of gain and dark current as a function of bias voltage, under controlled temperature conditions. Two independent setups were used. The full set of 398 APD arrays followed a well-defined quality control (QC) protocol, aiming at the rejection of arrays not complying within defined specifications. From a total of 398 arrays, only 2 (0.5%) were rejected, reassuring the trust in these detectors for prototype assembly and future developments

  18. A pilot study to evaluate the application of a generic protein standard panel for quality control of biomarker detection technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdivia Hernan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein biomarker studies are currently hampered by a lack of measurement standards to demonstrate quality, reliability and comparability across multiple assay platforms. This is especially pertinent for immunoassays where multiple formats for detecting target analytes are commonly used. Findings In this pilot study a generic panel of six non-human protein standards (50 - 10^7 pg/mL of varying abundance was prepared as a quality control (QC material. Simulated "normal" and "diseased" panels of proteins were prepared in pooled human plasma and incorporated into immunoassays using the Meso Scale Discovery® (MSD® platform to illustrate reliable detection of the component proteins. The protein panel was also evaluated as a spike-in material for a model immunoassay involving detection of ovarian cancer biomarkers within individual human plasma samples. Our selected platform could discriminate between two panels of the proteins exhibiting small differences in abundance. Across distinct experiments, all component proteins exhibited reproducible signal outputs in pooled human plasma. When individual donor samples were used, half the proteins produced signals independent of matrix effects. These proteins may serve as a generic indicator of platform reliability. Each of the remaining proteins exhibit differential signals across the distinct samples, indicative of sample matrix effects, with the three proteins following the same trend. This subset of proteins may be useful for characterising the degree of matrix effects associated with the sample which may impact on the reliability of quantifying target diagnostic biomarkers. Conclusions We have demonstrated the potential utility of this panel of standards to act as a generic QC tool for evaluating the reproducibility of the platform for protein biomarker detection independent of serum matrix effects.

  19. Potential of dynamically harmonized Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance cell for high-throughput metabolomics fingerprinting: control of data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habchi, Baninia; Alves, Sandra; Jouan-Rimbaud Bouveresse, Delphine; Appenzeller, Brice; Paris, Alain; Rutledge, Douglas N; Rathahao-Paris, Estelle

    2018-01-01

    Due to the presence of pollutants in the environment and food, the assessment of human exposure is required. This necessitates high-throughput approaches enabling large-scale analysis and, as a consequence, the use of high-performance analytical instruments to obtain highly informative metabolomic profiles. In this study, direct introduction mass spectrometry (DIMS) was performed using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instrument equipped with a dynamically harmonized cell. Data quality was evaluated based on mass resolving power (RP), mass measurement accuracy, and ion intensity drifts from the repeated injections of quality control sample (QC) along the analytical process. The large DIMS data size entails the use of bioinformatic tools for the automatic selection of common ions found in all QC injections and for robustness assessment and correction of eventual technical drifts. RP values greater than 10 6 and mass measurement accuracy of lower than 1 ppm were obtained using broadband mode resulting in the detection of isotopic fine structure. Hence, a very accurate relative isotopic mass defect (RΔm) value was calculated. This reduces significantly the number of elemental composition (EC) candidates and greatly improves compound annotation. A very satisfactory estimate of repeatability of both peak intensity and mass measurement was demonstrated. Although, a non negligible ion intensity drift was observed for negative ion mode data, a normalization procedure was easily applied to correct this phenomenon. This study illustrates the performance and robustness of the dynamically harmonized FT-ICR cell to perform large-scale high-throughput metabolomic analyses in routine conditions. Graphical abstract Analytical performance of FT-ICR instrument equipped with a dynamically harmonized cell.

  20. Quality control in 99m technetium radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    This work means about the quality control in Tc radiopharmaceuticals preparation at hospitalary levels. Several steps must be used in a Nuclear Medicine Laboratory, such as proceeding,radiopharmaceuticals kits preparation, and dispensation materials,glasses,stopper,physical aspects,identification,ph control,storage,and reactif kits

  1. PACS quality control and automatic problem notifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Jones, Douglas; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1997-05-01

    One side effect of installing a clinical PACS Is that users become dependent upon the technology and in some cases it can be very difficult to revert back to a film based system if components fail. The nature of system failures range from slow deterioration of function as seen in the loss of monitor luminance through sudden catastrophic loss of the entire PACS networks. This paper describes the quality control procedures in place at the University of Florida and the automatic notification system that alerts PACS personnel when a failure has happened or is anticipated. The goal is to recover from a failure with a minimum of downtime and no data loss. Routine quality control is practiced on all aspects of PACS, from acquisition, through network routing, through display, and including archiving. Whenever possible, the system components perform self and between platform checks for active processes, file system status, errors in log files, and system uptime. When an error is detected or a exception occurs, an automatic page is sent to a pager with a diagnostic code. Documentation on each code, trouble shooting procedures, and repairs are kept on an intranet server accessible only to people involved in maintaining the PACS. In addition to the automatic paging system for error conditions, acquisition is assured by an automatic fax report sent on a daily basis to all technologists acquiring PACS images to be used as a cross check that all studies are archived prior to being removed from the acquisition systems. Daily quality control is preformed to assure that studies can be moved from each acquisition and contrast adjustment. The results of selected quality control reports will be presented. The intranet documentation server will be described with the automatic pager system. Monitor quality control reports will be described and the cost of quality control will be quantified. As PACS is accepted as a clinical tool, the same standards of quality control must be established

  2. Exposure parameters in fluoroscopy equipment. Quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, M.; Castaneda, M.J.; Matorras, P.; Diaz-Caneja, N.; Gutierrez, I.

    1992-01-01

    Within the quality control program in Diagnostic Radiology currently being undertaken at the 'Marques de Valdecilla' University Hospital, the corresponding specification and procedure prototypes for the control of conventional radioscopy equipment have been elaborated and applied. This paper presents the values proposed in the specifications and those obtained for the following radioscopy equipment parameters: reference kerma, and its reproducibility, kerma linearity, maximum kerma at the skin, and total filtration. The results obtained indicate that the equipment studied could comply with specified requirements if a Maintenance Program were to be implemented in coordination with the Quality Control Program. (author)

  3. SU-C-9A-02: Structured Noise Index as An Automated Quality Control for Nuclear Medicine: A Two Year Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, J; Christianson, O; Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Flood-field uniformity evaluation is an essential element in the assessment of nuclear medicine (NM) gamma cameras. It serves as the central element of the quality control (QC) program, acquired and analyzed on a daily basis prior to clinical imaging. Uniformity images are traditionally analyzed using pixel value-based metrics which often fail to capture subtle structure and patterns caused by changes in gamma camera performance requiring additional visual inspection which is subjective and time demanding. The goal of this project was to develop and implement a robust QC metrology for NM that is effective in identifying non-uniformity issues, reporting issues in a timely manner for efficient correction prior to clinical involvement, all incorporated into an automated effortless workflow, and to characterize the program over a two year period. Methods: A new quantitative uniformity analysis metric was developed based on 2D noise power spectrum metrology and confirmed based on expert observer visual analysis. The metric, termed Structured Noise Index (SNI) was then integrated into an automated program to analyze, archive, and report on daily NM QC uniformity images. The effectiveness of the program was evaluated over a period of 2 years. Results: The SNI metric successfully identified visually apparent non-uniformities overlooked by the pixel valuebased analysis methods. Implementation of the program has resulted in nonuniformity identification in about 12% of daily flood images. In addition, due to the vigilance of staff response, the percentage of days exceeding trigger value shows a decline over time. Conclusion: The SNI provides a robust quantification of the NM performance of gamma camera uniformity. It operates seamlessly across a fleet of multiple camera models. The automated process provides effective workflow within the NM spectra between physicist, technologist, and clinical engineer. The reliability of this process has made it the preferred

  4. Quality assurance/quality control training for plant operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergbauer, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most important tasks during the period of plant operation is to ensure the effectiveness of the information links inside the utility and the nuclear industry. To make use of all information, experience and knowledge as well as to make sure that instructions are followed, it is necessary to provide rules, instructions and training for all people involved. QA/QC-training for plant operation and maintenance must deliver a consciousness of men in a way that e.g. instructions or procedures are followed strictly, the management is informed about deviations and mistakes, alterations are carried out with approval only, safety systems are kept integer all the time and interfaces are linked together properly. By means of examples about staff organization, control room and shift rules, work permit procedures and use of an information feedback system QA measures shall be demonstrated. (orig.)

  5. Quality Control and Quality Assurance of Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) has played important roles in cancer treatment for more than one century. The development of RT techniques allows high-dose irradiation to tumors while reducing the radiation doses delivered to surrounding normal tissues. However, RT is a complex process and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to ensure that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. The aim of this study is to help the radio therapists in identifying a system for QA that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. Recent advances in RT focus on the need for a systematic RT QA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), to focus available QA resources optimally on the process components. External audit programs are also effective. Additionally, Clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Both postal dosimetry audit and clinical trial RTQA, especially for advanced technologies, in collaboration with global networks, will serve to enhance patient safety and quality of care

  6. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  7. Development of the gaharu oil quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Saw Peng; Mohd Fajri Osman; Shyful Azizi Abdul Rahman; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim; Mat Rasol Awang

    2010-01-01

    Gaharu (Agar wood) is a secondary metabolite produces by the Aquilaria spp. and accumulates in the plant cell in oleoresin form. The essential oil known as gaharu oil can be extracted from this oleoresin gaharu via varies extraction method such as the water distillation, solvent extraction, pressurize extraction and etc. The gaharu oil extracted through different methods will give different fragrances. Besides, different source of materials will also give different in chemical profiles. In gaharu oil trading market, most of the buyers request quality assurance from the gaharu oil manufacturer to assure the gaharu oil purchased meets their standard requirement. Since there is a demand on gaharu oil quality assurance then it become a need to develop the gaharu oil quality control method in order to have a standard quality control of gaharu oil presented in a certificate of analysis and verified by laboratory. (author)

  8. Quality control in diagnostic radiology - patient dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prlic, I; Radalj, Z; Brumen, V; Cerovac, H [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Laboratory for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry, Zagreb (Croatia); Gladic, J [Institute for Physics, Laboratory for Solid State Physics, Zagreb (Croatia); Tercek, V [Clinical Hospital Sisters of Mercy, Health Physics Department, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1997-12-31

    In order to establish the Quality Criteria for diagnostic radiographic images in the radiology departments in Republic of Croatia we have started the several Quality Control projects on the field. The measurements are performed according to some methodology recommendations in our law but the methodology, measurement principles, measurement equipment, phantoms, measurable parameters for the good use by radiographers, statistical and numerical evaluation, dosimetric philosophy etc. where first recognized as a private/or group hazard of each person involved in the procedure of evaluation of diagnostic radiology images/diagnosis. The important quality elements of the imaging process are: the diagnostic quality of the radiographic image, the radiation dose to the patient and the choice of the radiographic technique. This depends on the x-ray unit (tube) radiation quality, image processing quality and final image evaluation quality. In this paper we will show how the Quality Control measurements can be easily connected to the dose delivered to the patient for the known diagnostic procedure and how this can be used by radiographers in their daily work. The reproducibility of the x-ray generator was checked before the service calibration and after the service calibration. The table of kV dependence and output dose per mAs was calculated and the ESD (entrance surface dose) was measured/calculated for the specific diagnostic procedure. After the phantom calculation were made and the dose prediction for the given procedure was done, measurements were done on the patients (digital dosemeters, TLD and film dosemeter combinations). We are claiming that there is no need to measure each patient if the proper Quality Control measurements are done and the proper table of ESD for each particular x-ray tube in diagnostic departments is calculated for the radiographers daily use. (author). 1 example, 1 fig., 13 refs.

  9. Quality assurance and quality control programme in use at the individual monitoring service of ITN-DPRSN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, J.G.; Novais, I.; Rangel, S.; Flores, E. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. de Proteccao Radiologica e Seguranca Nuclear Estrada Nacional, Sacavem (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    The Individual Monitoring Service (I.M.S.) of the Departamento de Proteccao Radiologica e Seguranca Nuclear (D.P.R.S.N.) at the Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (I.T.N.) in Portugal operates a thermoluminescence dosimetry system to monitor approximately 3,000 workers for external radiation exposure on a monthly basis. The workers come from nearly 230 facilities in the medical, research and conventional industry fields of activity and almost 85% of the people monitored in 2005 are from medical facilities. The TLD system in use is based on two Harshaw 6600 automatic readers and on the Harshaw 8814 T.L. card and holder containing two detector elements of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) for the evaluation of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07). All the workers are monitored on a monthly basis using whole body dosemeters. The I.M.S. has implemented a Quality Assurance and Quality Control (Q.A./Q.C.) programme that covers all the aspects of monitoring, from the monitoring request of a customer to the final issue of a dose report. The main aspects of the Q.A./Q.C. programme implemented at the I.M.S. will be presented in this paper using fluxograms and schemes. Several issues will be addressed, e.g., administrative procedures, technical procedures, dealing with complaints, training of staff, etc. The relationship of the I.M.S. with external entities like the customer, the regulatory authority, the central dose registry, the calibration facility, suppliers, maintenance providers, etc. will be mentioned on the administrative procedures described as well as on the technical procedures where applicable. The main technical procedures will be presented in this paper and references will be made to a TLD Quality Control database internally developed and designed for the storage of important Q.C. parameters like the element correction coefficients, reader calibration factors, electronic quality control data generated on a daily basis, and the study of their evolution with time. (author)

  10. Quality assurance and quality control programme in use at the individual monitoring service of ITN-DPRSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, J.G.; Novais, I.; Rangel, S.; Flores, E.

    2006-01-01

    The Individual Monitoring Service (I.M.S.) of the Departamento de Proteccao Radiologica e Seguranca Nuclear (D.P.R.S.N.) at the Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (I.T.N.) in Portugal operates a thermoluminescence dosimetry system to monitor approximately 3,000 workers for external radiation exposure on a monthly basis. The workers come from nearly 230 facilities in the medical, research and conventional industry fields of activity and almost 85% of the people monitored in 2005 are from medical facilities. The TLD system in use is based on two Harshaw 6600 automatic readers and on the Harshaw 8814 T.L. card and holder containing two detector elements of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) for the evaluation of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07). All the workers are monitored on a monthly basis using whole body dosemeters. The I.M.S. has implemented a Quality Assurance and Quality Control (Q.A./Q.C.) programme that covers all the aspects of monitoring, from the monitoring request of a customer to the final issue of a dose report. The main aspects of the Q.A./Q.C. programme implemented at the I.M.S. will be presented in this paper using fluxograms and schemes. Several issues will be addressed, e.g., administrative procedures, technical procedures, dealing with complaints, training of staff, etc. The relationship of the I.M.S. with external entities like the customer, the regulatory authority, the central dose registry, the calibration facility, suppliers, maintenance providers, etc. will be mentioned on the administrative procedures described as well as on the technical procedures where applicable. The main technical procedures will be presented in this paper and references will be made to a TLD Quality Control database internally developed and designed for the storage of important Q.C. parameters like the element correction coefficients, reader calibration factors, electronic quality control data generated on a daily basis, and the study of their evolution with time. (author)

  11. Quality control in paediatric nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.; Hahn, K.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear medicine examinations in children require a maximum in quality. This is true for the preparation of the child and parents, the imaging procedure, processing and documentation. It is necessary that quality control through all steps is performed regularly. The aim must be that the children receive a minimum radiation dose, while there needs to be a high quality in imaging and clinical information from the study. Furthermore the child should not be too much psychologically affected by the nuclear medicine examination. (orig.) [de

  12. Frontiers in statistical quality control 11

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of this edited volume is on three major areas of statistical quality control: statistical process control (SPC), acceptance sampling and design of experiments. The majority of the papers deal with statistical process control, while acceptance sampling and design of experiments are also treated to a lesser extent. The book is organized into four thematic parts, with Part I addressing statistical process control. Part II is devoted to acceptance sampling. Part III covers the design of experiments, while Part IV discusses related fields. The twenty-three papers in this volume stem from The 11th International Workshop on Intelligent Statistical Quality Control, which was held in Sydney, Australia from August 20 to August 23, 2013. The event was hosted by Professor Ross Sparks, CSIRO Mathematics, Informatics and Statistics, North Ryde, Australia and was jointly organized by Professors S. Knoth, W. Schmid and Ross Sparks. The papers presented here were carefully selected and reviewed by the scientifi...

  13. Quality control procedures in positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, T.; Jones, T.; Heather, J.; Gilardi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The derivation of physiological parameters in positron tomography relies on accurate calibration of the tomograph. Normally, the calibration relates image pixel count density to the count rate from an external blood counter per unit activity concentration in each device. The quality control of the latter is simple and relies on detector stability assessed by measurement of a standard source of similar geometry to a blood sample. The quality control of the tomographic data depends on (i) detector stability, (ii) uniformity of calibration and normalisation sources and (iii) reproducibility of the attenuation correction procedure. A quality control procedure has been developed for an 8 detector ring (15 transaxial plane) tomograph in which detector response is assessed by acquiring data from retractable transmission ring sources. These are scanned daily and a print out of detector efficiencies is produced as well as changes from a given data. This provides the raw data from which decisions on recalibration or renormalisation are made. (orig.)

  14. Quality control of the activity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Marlon da Silva Brandão; Sá, Lídia Vasconcelos de

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To carry out a comparative analysis of national and international standards regarding the quality control of the activity meter used in Nuclear Medicine Services in Brazil. Material and methods: Quality control protocols from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) were pointed out and compared with requirements from both regulatory Brazilian agencies, National Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) and National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Results: The daily routine tests recommended by the regulatory agencies do not have significant differences; in contrast the tests with higher periodicities like (accuracy, linearity and precision) have differences discrepant. Conclusion: In view of the comparative analysis carried out, it is suggested that the national recommendations for the quality control tests of the activity meter should be checked and evaluated, with emphasis on the semiannual and annual periodicity tests. (author)

  15. Quality control of 11C-carfentanil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaojun; Zhang Jinming; Tian Jiahe; Xiang Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    To study the quality control of 11 C-Carfentanil injection, physical, chemical and biological identification were used. The chemical and radiochemical purity of 11 C-Carfentanil Injection were detected by HPLC and Flower Count system; measured the quantity of product by LC-MS, specific activity was calculated later; The PTS was used to detect endotoxin, and other quality control methods were put up to guarantee the security of its clinical application. The produce appeared colorless and transparent, the radiochemical purity was more than 98%, content of the endotoxin was less than 5 EU/mL. The result showed that 11 C-Carfentanil injection had fulfilled pharmaceutical quality control request and could be applied safely to animal experiment and clinical diagnosis. (authors)

  16. Protein quality control in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Rebula, Caio A.

    2014-01-01

    to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system...... to be particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about...... these mechanisms in mammalian cells. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of nuclear protein quality control, in particular regarding substrate recognition and proteasomal degradation....

  17. Diamond drilling for nuclear waste QC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, Martin.

    1990-01-01

    Specialised diamond core drilling equipment could soon have a role to play in the safe disposal of intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW). Equipment to core and extract samples for quality checking from cement-filled steel waste drums by techniques compatible with eventual remote-handling operations in a 'hot-cell' is being developed. All coring tests carried out to date have been on simulant waste: 200 litre drums containing mixtures of Ordinary Portland Cement, Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag and Pulverised Fuel Ash. No radioactive materials have yet been used for the coring trials. The coring equipment and the diamond coring bits are described. (author)

  18. Quality control assessment data for planning radiotherapy with VMAT Technique made at the Hospital Sao Lucas, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; Avaliacao dos dados de controle de qualidade para planejamentos radioterapicos com a tecnica VMAT realizados no Hospital Sao Lucas, Porto Alegre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leidens, Matheus; Lopes, Juliane S.; Estacio, Daniela R.; Bonatto, Larisse N.; Sansson, Angela; Sbaraini, Patricia; Duarte, Lucas O.; Silva, Ana M. Marques da, E-mail: juliane.lopes@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the procedures used for quality control (QC) for each individual patient, planned with the volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy technique (VMAT), used in the routine of the institution's radiotherapy service. The QC of 29 plans, from August 2015 to October 2015, in 15 cases of prostate, and 14 of head and neck. During QC, verification planning were created, performed before starting the treatment. Two evaluations were performed: gamma analysis (γ), which compares the measured and calculated dose distribution, verified through the EPID (Electronic Portal Imaging Device); and the verification of point dose delivered at the isocenter treatment, using a simulator object with an ionization chamber. The method involved the creation of verification plans of treatments and their evaluation and phantom. The results of analysis, for prostate and head and neck were, on average, (96.0 ± 2.2)% and (98.8 ± 1.4)%, respectively. For the prostate, in 93.3% of the cases examined, the differences between the dose measured by the ionization chamber and that generated by the verification plan were lower than 5%, and for CP, 92.9%. The treatment planning in the service, on average, obeyed the acceptance criteria and the dose differences of analysis. Thus, the procedures performed in the treatments using the VMAT of the institution are suitable for clinical application. (author)

  19. Fast QC-LDPC code for free space optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Qi; Udeh, Chinonso Paschal; Wu, Rangzhong

    2017-02-01

    Free Space Optical (FSO) Communication systems use the atmosphere as a propagation medium. Hence the atmospheric turbulence effects lead to multiplicative noise related with signal intensity. In order to suppress the signal fading induced by multiplicative noise, we propose a fast Quasi-Cyclic (QC) Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) code for FSO Communication systems. As a linear block code based on sparse matrix, the performances of QC-LDPC is extremely near to the Shannon limit. Currently, the studies on LDPC code in FSO Communications is mainly focused on Gauss-channel and Rayleigh-channel, respectively. In this study, the LDPC code design over atmospheric turbulence channel which is nether Gauss-channel nor Rayleigh-channel is closer to the practical situation. Based on the characteristics of atmospheric channel, which is modeled as logarithmic-normal distribution and K-distribution, we designed a special QC-LDPC code, and deduced the log-likelihood ratio (LLR). An irregular QC-LDPC code for fast coding, of which the rates are variable, is proposed in this paper. The proposed code achieves excellent performance of LDPC codes and can present the characteristics of high efficiency in low rate, stable in high rate and less number of iteration. The result of belief propagation (BP) decoding shows that the bit error rate (BER) obviously reduced as the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) increased. Therefore, the LDPC channel coding technology can effectively improve the performance of FSO. At the same time, the BER, after decoding reduces with the increase of SNR arbitrarily, and not having error limitation platform phenomenon with error rate slowing down.

  20. A quality control program for radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, C.E. de; Sibata, C.H.; Cecatti, E.R.; Kawakami, N.S.; Alexandre, A.C.; Chiavegatti Junior, M.

    1982-01-01

    An extensive quality control program was established covering the following areas: physical parameters of the therapeutical machines, dosimetric standards, preventive maintenance of radiation sources and measuring instruments. A critical evaluation of this program was done after two years (1977-1979) of routine application and the results will be presented. The fluctuation on physical parameters strongly supports the efforts and cost of a quality control program. This program has certainly improved the accuracy required on the delivery of the prescribed dose for radiotherapy treatment. (Author) [pt

  1. Quality control of nuclear medicine instruments 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This document gives detailed guidance on the quality control of various instruments used in nuclear medicine. A first preliminary document was drawn up in 1979. A revised and extended version, incorporating recommended procedures, test schedules and protocols was prepared in 1982. The first edition of ''Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments'', IAEA-TECDOC-317, was printed in late 1984. Recent advances in the field of nuclear medicine imaging made it necessary to add a chapter on Camera-Computer Systems and another on SPECT Systems. Figs and tabs

  2. Quality control of nuclear medicine instruments, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This document gives detailed guidance on the quality control of various instruments used in nuclear medicine. A first preliminary document was drawn up in 1979. A revised and extended version, incorporating recommended procedures, test schedules and protocols was prepared in 1982. The first edition of 'Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments', IAEA-TECDOC-317, was printed in late 1984. Recent advances in the field of nuclear medicine imaging made it necessary to add a chapter on Camera-Computer Systems and another on SPECT Systems

  3. HPLC for quality control of polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, P. R.; Sykes, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as a quality control tool for polyimide resins and prepregs are presented. A data base to help establish accept/reject criteria for these materials was developed. This work is intended to supplement, not replace, standard quality control tests normally conducted on incoming resins and prepregs. To help achieve these objectives, the HPLC separation of LARC-160 polyimide precursor resin was characterized. Room temperature resin aging effects were studied. Graphite reinforced composites made from fresh and aged resin were fabricated and tested to determine if changes observed by HPLC were significant.

  4. Statistical quality control a loss minimization approach

    CERN Document Server

    Trietsch, Dan

    1999-01-01

    While many books on quality espouse the Taguchi loss function, they do not examine its impact on statistical quality control (SQC). But using the Taguchi loss function sheds new light on questions relating to SQC and calls for some changes. This book covers SQC in a way that conforms with the need to minimize loss. Subjects often not covered elsewhere include: (i) measurements, (ii) determining how many points to sample to obtain reliable control charts (for which purpose a new graphic tool, diffidence charts, is introduced), (iii) the connection between process capability and tolerances, (iv)

  5. Technical quality control - constancy controls for digital mammography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.; Landmark, I.D.; Bredholt, K.; Hauge, I.H.R.

    2009-04-01

    To ensure the quality of mammographic images, so-called constancy control tests are performed frequently. The report contains a programme for constancy control of digital mammography systems, encompassing the mammography unit, computed radiography (CR) systems, viewing conditions and displays, printers, and procedures for data collection for patient dose calculations. (Author)

  6. Internal Quality Control Practices in Coagulation Laboratories: recommendations based on a patterns-of-practice survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, A; Aslan, B; Raby, A; Moffat, K A; Selby, R; Padmore, R

    2015-12-01

    Internal quality control (IQC) procedures are crucial for ensuring accurate patient test results. The IQMH Centre for Proficiency Testing conducted a web-based survey to gather information on the current IQC practices in coagulation testing. A questionnaire was distributed to 174 Ontario laboratories licensed to perform prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). All laboratories reported using two levels of commercial QC (CQC); 12% incorporate pooled patient plasma into their IQC program; >68% run CQC at the beginning of each shift; 56% following maintenance, with reagent changes, during a shift, or with every repeat sample; 6% only run CQC at the beginning of the day and 25% when the instruments have been idle for a defined period of time. IQC run frequency was determined by manufacturer recommendations (71%) but also influenced by the stability of test (27%), clinical impact of an incorrect test result (25%), and sample's batch number (10%). IQC was monitored using preset limits based on standard deviation (66%), precision goals (46%), or allowable performance limits (36%). 95% use multirules. Failure actions include repeating the IQC (90%) and reporting patient results; if repeat passes, 42% perform repeat analysis of all patient samples from last acceptable IQC. Variability exists in coagulation IQC practices among Ontario clinical laboratories. The recommendations presented here would be useful in encouraging standardized IQC practices. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The study of the precision and accuracy of quality control in DXA bone mineral densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Jian; Xu Hao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the precision and accuracy of quality control (QC) in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) bone mineral densitometry so as to raise the reliability and necessity of the results. Methods: 1) Short-term precision trial: 30 people and 30 SD male rats were chosen, and a precision trail was performed. Each people was scanned twice and reposited in next study. The precision and the least significant change (LSC) of each examinated region were calculated. The short-term precision trail of the rats was performed in the similar way. 2) Accuracy trial: measured the body phantom supplied by factor daily, and compared the results with real value, then calculated the accuracy and correction factor. A Shewhart chart was set up based on average values. Results: 1) People's coefficient of variation (CV) and LSC in the lumbar and proximal femur were 0.7%-2.2% and 0.018-0.048 g/cm 2 . Rats' whole body short-term precision was 0.9%. 2) The average accuracy of DXA densitometer was -0.81%, the correction factor was 0.992. The average bone mineral density measured in successive 25 d was 1.244 g/cm 2 , the standard deviation (SD) was 0.008. Conclusion: The precision and accuracy trail can help to get the information about the working state of the instrument and to analyze the measured results, and can effectively raise the reliability of the measure. (authors)

  8. Control cards as a statistical quality control resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Živan Drenovac

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 This paper proves that applying of statistical methods can significantly contribute increasing of products and services quality, as well as increasing of institutions rating. Determining of optimal, apropos anticipatory and limitary values, is based on sample`s statistical analyze. Control cards represent very confident instrument, which is simple for use and efficient for control of process, by which process is maintained in set borders. Thus, control cards can be applied in quality control of procesess of weapons and military equipment production, maintenance of technical systems, as well as for seting of standards and increasing of quality level for many other activities.

  9. A Comparison of Power Quality Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Černek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on certain types of FACTS (Flexibile AC Transmission System controllers, which can be used for improving the power quality at the point of connection with the power network. It focuses on types of controllers that are suitable for use in large buildings, rather than in transmission networks. The goal is to compare the features of the controllers in specific tasks, and to clarify which solution is best for a specific purpose. It is in some cases better and cheaper to use a combination of controllers than a single controller. The paper also presents the features of a shunt active harmonic compensator, which is a very modern power quality controller that can be used in many cases, or in combination with other controllers. The comparison was made using a matrix diagram that, resulted from mind mapsand other analysis tools. The paper should help engineers to choose the best solution for improving the power quality in a specific power network at distribution level.

  10. 222-S Laboratory Quality Assurance Plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meznarich, H.K.

    1995-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan provides,quality assurance (QA) guidance, regulatory QA requirements (e.g., 10 CFR 830.120), and quality control (QC) specifications for analytical service. This document follows the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) issued Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP). In addition, this document meets the objectives of the Quality Assurance Program provided in the WHC-CM-4-2, Section 2.1. Quality assurance elements required in the Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (QAMS-004) and Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans (QAMS-005) from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are covered throughout this document. A quality assurance index is provided in the Appendix A. This document also provides and/or identifies the procedural information that governs laboratory operations. The personnel of the 222-S Laboratory and the Standards Laboratory including managers, analysts, QA/QC staff, auditors, and support staff shall use this document as guidance and instructions for their operational and quality assurance activities. Other organizations that conduct activities described in this document for the 222-S Laboratory shall follow this QA/QC document

  11. External quality control of Pléiades orthoimagery – Part II: Geometric testing and validation of a Pléiades-1B orthoproduct covering Maussane test site

    OpenAIRE

    GRAZZINI Jacopo; AASTRAND Paer

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the current report is to provide with a final statement on the geometric capabilities of Pléiades sensors through the Quality Control (QC) of Pléiades-1B orthocorrected imagery following the recent validation of Pléiades-1A. Namely, the validation process aims at measuring the influence of different factors on the geometric accuracy of Pléiades-1B orthoimagery. For that purpose, a light benchmarking is implemented as: • a single far-from-nadir image datasetis evaluated using 2 ...

  12. Testing and Quality Assurance of the Control System During NIF Commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casavant, D.; Carey, R.; Cline, B.; Lagin, L.; Ludwigsen, P.; Reddi, U.; Van Arsdall, P.

    2003-01-01

    The strategy used to develop the National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System (NIF ICCS) calls for incremental cycles of construction and formal test to deliver nearly one million lines of code. Software releases that implement specific functionality are approved for deployment when offline tests conducted in the ICCS Integration and Test Facility verify functional, performance and interface requirements using test procedures derived from system requirements. At this stage of the project the controls team has delivered approximately 3/4 of the planned software by performing dozens of development and test cycles within offline test facilities and followed by online tests to confirm integrated operation in the NIF. Test incidents are recorded and tracked from development to successful deployment by the verification team, with hardware and software changes approved by the appropriate change control board. Project metrics are generated by the Software Quality Assurance manager and monitored by ICCS management. Test results are summarized and reported to responsible individuals and Project managers under a work authorization and permit process that assesses risk and evaluates control system upgrade readiness. NIF is well into the first phases of its laser commissioning program to characterize and operate the first four laser beams and target systems. The integrated control system has successfully fired over 100 coordinated shots into beam diagnostics and an initial set of target diagnostics in the 10-m diameter target chamber. Extensive experience has been gained by integrating controls in prototype laboratories and in the NIF. This paper will discuss NIF's software QC and QA processes, capabilities of offline test facilities, and metrics collection

  13. Testing and Quality Assurance of the Control System During NIF Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casavant, D; Carey, R; Cline, B; Lagin, L; Ludwigsen, P; Reddi, U; Van Arsdall, P

    2003-10-13

    The strategy used to develop the National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System (NIF ICCS) calls for incremental cycles of construction and formal test to deliver nearly one million lines of code. Software releases that implement specific functionality are approved for deployment when offline tests conducted in the ICCS Integration and Test Facility verify functional, performance and interface requirements using test procedures derived from system requirements. At this stage of the project the controls team has delivered approximately 3/4 of the planned software by performing dozens of development and test cycles within offline test facilities and followed by online tests to confirm integrated operation in the NIF. Test incidents are recorded and tracked from development to successful deployment by the verification team, with hardware and software changes approved by the appropriate change control board. Project metrics are generated by the Software Quality Assurance manager and monitored by ICCS management. Test results are summarized and reported to responsible individuals and Project managers under a work authorization and permit process that assesses risk and evaluates control system upgrade readiness. NIF is well into the first phases of its laser commissioning program to characterize and operate the first four laser beams and target systems. The integrated control system has successfully fired over 100 coordinated shots into beam diagnostics and an initial set of target diagnostics in the 10-m diameter target chamber. Extensive experience has been gained by integrating controls in prototype laboratories and in the NIF. This paper will discuss NIF's software QC and QA processes, capabilities of offline test facilities, and metrics collection.

  14. Data Organization for Quality Control Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahaya Talib; Glam Hadzir Patai Mohamad; Wan Hamirul Bahrin Wan Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Test data and results for quality control of Mo-99/ Tc-99m generator shall be organized properly. A computer program was developed using Visual Basic 6.0 to process test data, store data and results to specific folder, generate test reports and certificates. Its performance has been evaluated and tested. (author)

  15. Water quality control program in experimental circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cegalla, Miriam A.

    1996-01-01

    The Water Quality Control Program of the Experimental Circuits visualizes studying the water chemistry of the cooling in the primary and secondary circuits, monitoring the corrosion of the systems and studying the mechanism of the corrosion products transport in the systems. (author)

  16. Studies of quality control procedures for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivanovic, M.; Trott, N.G.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, a short description is given of a radiopharmaceutical preparation suite set up at the Royal Marsden Hospital and an account is presented of methods used for quality control of radiopharmaceuticals and of the results obtained over a period of about two and a half years

  17. Materials, methods and quality control, ch. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vader, H.L.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the chemical reagents, the 125 I-labelled angiotensin I, the antiserum and the standards is given. A modified measuring method with the New England Nuclear kit for angiotensin I radioimmunoassay is presented as well as the quality control data

  18. Guidelines for radriopharmaceutical quality control in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    This document has been prepared to assist hospital administrators in ensuring that adequate quality control is performed on radiopharmaceuticals administered to their patients. Three sets of guidelines are presented, the degree of sophistication being dependent on the amount of hospital involvement in the radiopharmaceutical preparation

  19. Quality Control Of Selected Pesticides With GC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasali, H. [Benaki Phytopathological Institute Laboratory of Physical and Chemical Analysis of Pesticides, Ekalis (Greece)

    2009-07-15

    The practical quality control of selected pesticides with GC is treated. Detailed descriptions are given on materials and methods used, including sample preparation and GC operating conditions. The systematic validation of multi methods is described, comprising performance characteristics in routine analysis, like selectivity, specificity etc. This is illustrated by chromatograms, calibration curves and tables derived from real laboratory data. (author)

  20. Outsourcing University Degrees: Implications for Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Julie; Crosling, Glenda; Edwards, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Education institutions worldwide have and continue to seek opportunities to spread their offerings abroad. While the provision of courses to students located overseas through partner institutions has many advantages, it raises questions about quality control that are not as applicable to other forms of international education. This paper uses a…

  1. Application of Sigma Metrics Analysis for the Assessment and Modification of Quality Control Program in the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory of a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sahar; Mustansar, Tazeen

    2017-03-01

    Sigma is a metric that quantifies the performance of a process as a rate of Defects-Per-Million opportunities. In clinical laboratories, sigma metric analysis is used to assess the performance of laboratory process system. Sigma metric is also used as a quality management strategy for a laboratory process to improve the quality by addressing the errors after identification. The aim of this study is to evaluate the errors in quality control of analytical phase of laboratory system by sigma metric. For this purpose sigma metric analysis was done for analytes using the internal and external quality control as quality indicators. Results of sigma metric analysis were used to identify the gaps and need for modification in the strategy of laboratory quality control procedure. Sigma metric was calculated for quality control program of ten clinical chemistry analytes including glucose, chloride, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, albumin, direct bilirubin, total bilirubin, protein and creatinine, at two control levels. To calculate the sigma metric imprecision and bias was calculated with internal and external quality control data, respectively. The minimum acceptable performance was considered as 3 sigma. Westgard sigma rules were applied to customize the quality control procedure. Sigma level was found acceptable (≥3) for glucose (L2), cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, direct bilirubin and creatinine at both levels of control. For rest of the analytes sigma metric was found control levels (8.8 and 8.0 at L2 and L3, respectively). We conclude that analytes with the sigma value quality control procedure. In this study application of sigma rules provided us the practical solution for improved and focused design of QC procedure.

  2. The Quality Control Algorithms Used in the Process of Creating the NASA Kennedy Space Center Lightning Protection System Towers Meteorological Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Brenton, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The methodology and the results of the quality control (QC) process of the meteorological data from the Lightning Protection System (LPS) towers located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39B (LC-39B) are documented in this paper. Meteorological data are used to design a launch vehicle, determine operational constraints, and to apply defined constraints on day-of-launch (DOL). In order to properly accomplish these tasks, a representative climatological database of meteorological records is needed because the database needs to represent the climate the vehicle will encounter. Numerous meteorological measurement towers exist at KSC; however, the engineering tasks need measurements at specific heights, some of which can only be provided by a few towers. Other than the LPS towers, Tower 313 is the only tower that provides observations up to 150 m. This tower is located approximately 3.5 km from LC-39B. In addition, data need to be QC'ed to remove erroneous reports that could pollute the results of an engineering analysis, mislead the development of operational constraints, or provide a false image of the atmosphere at the tower's location.

  3. Accuracy and Quality Assessment of EUS-FNA: A Single-Center Large Cohort of Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ephraim Bluen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thorough quality control (QC study with systemic monitoring and evaluation is crucial to optimizing the effectiveness of EUS-FNA. Methods. Retrospective analysis was composed of investigating consecutive patient files that underwent EUS-FNA. QC specifically focused on diagnostic accuracy, impacts on preexisting diagnoses, and case management. Results. 268 patient files were evaluated. EUS-FNA cytology helped establish accurate diagnoses in 92.54% (248/268 of patients. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy were 83%, 100%, 100%, 91.6%, and 94%, respectively. The most common biopsy site was the pancreas (68%. The most accurate location for EUS-FNA was the esophagus, 13/13 (100%, followed by the pancreas (89.6%. EUS-FNA was least informative for abdominal lymph nodes (70.5%. After FNA and followup, eight false negatives for tumors were found (3%, while 7.5% of samples still lacked a definitive diagnosis. Discussion. QC suggests that the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA might be improved further by (1 taking more FNA passes from suspected lesions, (2 optimizing needle selection (3 having an experienced echo-endoscopist available during the learning curve, and (4 having a cytologist present during the procedure. QC also identified remediable reporting errors. In conclusion, QC study is valuable in identifying weaknesses and thereby augmenting the effectiveness of EUS-FNA.

  4. Implementation of basic quality control tests for malaria medicines in Amazon Basin countries: results for the 2005-2010 period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribluda, Victor S; Barojas, Adrian; Añez, Arletta; López, Cecilia G; Figueroa, Ruth; Herrera, Roxana; Nakao, Gladys; Nogueira, Fernando Ha; Pianetti, Gerson A; Povoa, Marinete M; Viana, Giselle Mr; Gomes, Margarete S Mendonça; Escobar, Jose P; Sierra, Olga L Muñoz; Norena, Susana P Rendon; Veloz, Raúl; Bravo, Marcy Silva; Aldás, Martha R; Hindssemple, Alison; Collins, Marilyn; Ceron, Nicolas; Krishnalall, Karanchand; Adhin, Malti; Bretas, Gustavo; Hernandez, Nelly; Mendoza, Marjorie; Smine, Abdelkrim; Chibwe, Kennedy; Lukulay, Patrick; Evans, Lawrence

    2012-06-15

    collected from the public sector, 1,445/1,663 (86.9%). Results indicate that 193/1,663 (11.6%) were found not to meet quality specifications. Most failures were reported during visual and physical inspection, 142/1663 (8.5%), and most of these were due to expired medicines, 118/142 (83.1%). Samples failing TLC accounted for 27/1,663 (1.6%) and those failing disintegration accounted for 24/1,663 (1.4%). Medicines quality failures decreased significantly during the last two years. Basic tests revealed that the quality of medicines in the public sector improved over the years, since the implementation of this type of quality monitoring programme in 2005. However, the lack of consistent confirmatory tests in the quality control (QC) laboratory, utilizing methods that can also evaluate additional quality attributes, could still mask quality issues. In the future, AMI countries should improve coordination with their health authorities and their QC lab consistently, to provide a more complete picture of malaria medicines quality and support the implementation of corrective actions. Facilities in the private and informal sectors also should be included when these sectors constitute an important source of medicines used by malaria patients.

  5. Implementation of basic quality control tests for malaria medicines in Amazon Basin countries: results for the 2005–2010 period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pribluda Victor S

    2012-06-01

    from seven AMI countries was evaluated, mostly collected from the public sector, 1,445/1,663 (86.9%. Results indicate that 193/1,663 (11.6% were found not to meet quality specifications. Most failures were reported during visual and physical inspection, 142/1663 (8.5%, and most of these were due to expired medicines, 118/142 (83.1%. Samples failing TLC accounted for 27/1,663 (1.6% and those failing disintegration accounted for 24/1,663 (1.4%. Medicines quality failures decreased significantly during the last two years. Conclusions Basic tests revealed that the quality of medicines in the public sector improved over the years, since the implementation of this type of quality monitoring programme in 2005. However, the lack of consistent confirmatory tests in the quality control (QC laboratory, utilizing methods that can also evaluate additional quality attributes, could still mask quality issues. In the future, AMI countries should improve coordination with their health authorities and their QC lab consistently, to provide a more complete picture of malaria medicines quality and support the implementation of corrective actions. Facilities in the private and informal sectors also should be included when these sectors constitute an important source of medicines used by malaria patients.

  6. The role and relevance of quality assurance to quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the development of Quality Assurance as a total management technique, incorporating manufacturing and construction Quality Control, to give confidence of satisfactory in-service performance. The application of QA to the Heysham 2 and Torness AGR projects design and construction is defined with particular reference to the development of a QA requirements specification, delegation of QA responsibility through the hierarchy of purchasers and suppliers of plant and material, the role of the QA organization and QA auditing. The paper discusses the effectiveness and benefits of QA and the problems identified in its application and implementation. The problems, their solutions and longer term improvements to reduce the costs of QA as well as enhancing confidence in the satisfactory performance of future nuclear projects, are described. (author)

  7. Quality control of PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelova, J.; Zajcharov, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The aim of this work is to undertake a review of the methods for checking and adjusting the computer and positron emission tomography in the Hospital 'Alexandrovska' by the attached to the equipment phantoms according to the manufacturer prescription in order to fulfill its requirements for the entry of the main parameters image within certain limits. Materials and Methods: At the start of work a check of the lasers setting for patient positioning and 'heat' of the X-ray tube scanner to better image quality were made. Daily verification procedures on the image quality of CT through the water phantom and weekly - 'air' calibration were carried out. In positron part, daily control involves setting the resolution and sensitivity of the scanner through built Ga68 phantom. When commissioning, after repair and at least once a year, it is necessary to verify the accuracy of registration of the pulses from the crystal with a water phantom of known volume and the coincidence between CT and PET image. Results: The process of quality control is interactive. The results are displayed in tables and graphically, with the goal the individual values to fall within the determined by manufacturers range and to meet the standards for image quality. If necessary, the procedure repeats several times until it is fulfilled. Conclusion: Ensuring the quality of the image in positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography, is inextricably linked to accurate and precise diagnosis of tumor processes in the human body

  8. Quality and Control of Water Vapor Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from the geostationary satellites such as GOES, Meteosat, and GMS provides synoptic views of dynamical events on a continual basis. Because the imagery represents a non-linear combination of mid- and upper-tropospheric thermodynamic parameters (three-dimensional variations in temperature and humidity), video loops of these image products provide enlightening views of regional flow fields, the movement of tropical and extratropical storm systems, the transfer of moisture between hemispheres and from the tropics to the mid- latitudes, and the dominance of high pressure systems over particular regions of the Earth. Despite the obvious larger scale features, the water vapor imagery contains significant image variability down to the single 8 km GOES pixel. These features can be quantitatively identified and tracked from one time to the next using various image processing techniques. Merrill et al. (1991), Hayden and Schmidt (1992), and Laurent (1993) have documented the operational procedures and capabilities of NOAA and ESOC to produce cloud and water vapor winds. These techniques employ standard correlation and template matching approaches to wind tracking and use qualitative and quantitative procedures to eliminate bad wind vectors from the wind data set. Techniques have also been developed to improve the quality of the operational winds though robust editing procedures (Hayden and Veldon 1991). These quality and control approaches have limitations, are often subjective, and constrain wind variability to be consistent with model derived wind fields. This paper describes research focused on the refinement of objective quality and control parameters for water vapor wind vector data sets. New quality and control measures are developed and employed to provide a more robust wind data set for climate analysis, data assimilation studies, as well as operational weather forecasting. The parameters are applicable to cloud-tracked winds as well with minor

  9. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project No. 02 103 Innovative Low Cost Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Good, Morris S.; Mathews, Royce; Morra, Marino; Panetta, Paul D.; Pardini, Allan F.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Tucker, Brian J.; Weier, Dennis R.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lowden, Richard A.; Miller, James H.

    2006-02-28

    This Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project was tasked with exploring, adapting, developing and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to automate nuclear coated particle fuel inspection so as to provide the United States (US) with necessary improved and economical Quality Assurance and Control (QA/QC) that is needed for the fuels for several reactor concepts being proposed for both near term deployment [DOE NE & NERAC, 2001] and Generation IV nuclear systems. Replacing present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, with higher speed automated nondestructive methods will make fuel production for advanced reactors economically feasible. For successful deployment of next generation reactors that employ particle fuels, or fuels in the form of pebbles based on particles, extremely large numbers of fuel particles will require inspection at throughput rates that do not significantly impact the proposed manufacturing processes. The focus of the project is nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies that can be automated for production speeds and make either: (I) On Process Measurements or (II) In Line Measurements. The inspection technologies selected will enable particle “quality” qualification as a particle or group of particles passes a sensor. A multiple attribute dependent signature will be measured and used for qualification or process control decisions. A primary task for achieving this objective is to establish standard signatures for both good/acceptable particles and the most problematic types of defects using several nondestructive methods.

  10. 42 CFR 84.40 - Quality control plans; filing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality control plans; filing requirements. 84.40... Control § 84.40 Quality control plans; filing requirements. As a part of each application for approval or... proposed quality control plan which shall be designed to assure the quality of respiratory protection...

  11. 21 CFR 211.22 - Responsibilities of quality control unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibilities of quality control unit. 211.22... Personnel § 211.22 Responsibilities of quality control unit. (a) There shall be a quality control unit that... have been fully investigated. The quality control unit shall be responsible for approving or rejecting...

  12. 30 CFR 28.30 - Quality control plans; filing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality control plans; filing requirements. 28... PROTECTION FOR TRAILING CABLES IN COAL MINES Quality Control § 28.30 Quality control plans; filing... part, each applicant shall file with MSHA a proposed quality control plan which shall be designed to...

  13. A scanning point source for quality control of FOV uniformity in GC-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, H.; Minear, G.; Dobrozemsky, G.; Nowotny, R.; Koenig, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: PET imaging with coincidence cameras (GC-PET) requires additional quality control procedures to check the function of coincidence circuitry and detector zoning. In particular, the uniformity response over the field of view needs special attention since it is known that coincidence counting mode may suffer from non-uniformity effects not present in single photon mode. Materials and methods: An inexpensive linear scanner with a stepper motor and a digital interface to a PC with software allowing versatile scanning modes was developed. The scanner is used with a source holder containing a Sodium-22 point source. While moving the source along the axis of rotation of the GC-PET system, a tomographic acquisition takes place. The scan covers the full axial field of view of the 2-D or 3-D scatter frame. Depending on the acquisition software, point source scanning takes place continuously while only one projection is acquired or is done in step-and-shoot mode with the number of positions equal to the number of gantry steps. Special software was developed to analyse the resulting list mode acquisition files and to produce an image of the recorded coincidence events of each head. Results: Uniformity images of coincidence events were obtained after further correction for systematic sensitivity variations caused by acquisition geometry. The resulting images are analysed visually and by calculating NEMA uniformity indices as for a planar flood field. The method has been applied successfully to two different brands of GC-PET capable gamma cameras. Conclusion: Uniformity of GC-PET can be tested quickly and accurately with a routine QC procedure, using a Sodium-22 scanning point source and an inexpensive mechanical scanning device. The method can be used for both 2-D and 3-D acquisition modes and fills an important gap in the quality control system for GC-PET

  14. Quality Controlling CMIP datasets at GFDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, L. W.; Radhakrishnan, A.; Balaji, V.; Adcroft, A.; Krasting, J. P.; Nikonov, S.; Mason, E. E.; Schweitzer, R.; Nadeau, D.

    2017-12-01

    As GFDL makes the switch from model development to production in light of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP), GFDL's efforts are shifted to testing and more importantly establishing guidelines and protocols for Quality Controlling and semi-automated data publishing. Every CMIP cycle introduces key challenges and the upcoming CMIP6 is no exception. The new CMIP experimental design comprises of multiple MIPs facilitating research in different focus areas. This paradigm has implications not only for the groups that develop the models and conduct the runs, but also for the groups that monitor, analyze and quality control the datasets before data publishing, before their knowledge makes its way into reports like the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) Assessment Reports. In this talk, we discuss some of the paths taken at GFDL to quality control the CMIP-ready datasets including: Jupyter notebooks, PrePARE, LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP/Python/Perl): technology-driven tracker system to monitor the status of experiments qualitatively and quantitatively, provide additional metadata and analysis services along with some in-built controlled-vocabulary validations in the workflow. In addition to this, we also discuss the integration of community-based model evaluation software (ESMValTool, PCMDI Metrics Package, and ILAMB) as part of our CMIP6 workflow.

  15. Determination and evaluation of air quality control. Manual of ambient air quality control in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmann, E.

    1997-07-01

    Measurement of air pollution emissions and ambient air quality are essential instruments for air quality control. By undertaking such measurements, pollutants are registered both at their place of origin and at the place where they may have an effect on people or the environment. Both types of measurement complement each other and are essential for the implementation of air quality legislation, particularly, in compliance with emission and ambient air quality limit values. Presented here are similar accounts of measurement principles and also contains as an Appendix a list of suitability-tested measuring devices which is based on information provided by the manufacturers. In addition, the guide of ambient air quality control contains further information on discontinuous measurement methods, on measurement planning and on the assessment of ambient air quality data. (orig./SR)

  16. Control of Bank Consolidated Financial Statements Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita S. Ambarchyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author presents the multiple linear regression model of bank consolidated financial statements quality. The article considers six characteristics that can be used to estimate the level of bank consolidated financial statements quality. The multiple linear regression model was developed, using the results of point-based system of consolidated financial statements of thirty European bank and financial groups on the basis of the developed characteristics. The author offers to use the characteristic significance factor in the process of consolidated financial statements appraisal by points. The constructed regression model is checked on accuracy and statistical significance. The model can be used by internal auditors and financial analytics as an instrument for bank and non-bank consolidated financial statements quality control

  17. Quality Risk Management: Putting GMP Controls First.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Kevin; Greene, Anne; Zwitkovits, Michael; Calnan, Nuala

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a practical way in which current approaches to quality risk management (QRM) may be improved, such that they better support qualification, validation programs, and change control proposals at manufacturing sites. The paper is focused on the treatment of good manufacturing practice (GMP) controls during QRM exercises. It specifically addresses why it is important to evaluate and classify such controls in terms of how they affect the severity, probability of occurrence, and detection ratings that may be assigned to potential failure modes or negative events. It also presents a QRM process that is designed to directly link the outputs of risk assessments and risk control activities with qualification and validation protocols in the GMP environment. This paper concerns the need for improvement in the use of risk-based principles and tools when working to ensure that the manufacturing processes used to produce medicines, and their related equipment, are appropriate. Manufacturing processes need to be validated (or proven) to demonstrate that they can produce a medicine of the required quality. The items of equipment used in such processes need to be qualified, in order to prove that they are fit for their intended use. Quality risk management (QRM) tools can be used to support such qualification and validation activities, but their use should be science-based and subject to as little subjectivity and uncertainty as possible. When changes are proposed to manufacturing processes, equipment, or related activities, they also need careful evaluation to ensure that any risks present are managed effectively. This paper presents a practical approach to how QRM may be improved so that it better supports qualification, validation programs, and change control proposals in a more scientific way. This improved approach is based on the treatment of what are called good manufacturing process (GMP) controls during those QRM exercises. A GMP control can be considered

  18. Long term high resolution rainfall runoff observations for improved water balance uncertainty and database QA-QC in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitew, M. M.; Goodrich, D. C.; Demaria, E.; Heilman, P.; Kautz, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Walnut Gulch is a semi-arid environment experimental watershed and Long Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) site managed by USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center for which high-resolution long-term hydro-climatic data are available across its 150 km2 drainage area. In this study, we present the analysis of 50 years of continuous hourly rainfall data to evaluate runoff control and generation processes for improving the QA-QC plans of Walnut Gulch to create high-quality data set that is critical for reducing water balance uncertainties. Multiple linear regression models were developed to relate rainfall properties, runoff characteristics and watershed properties. The rainfall properties were summarized to event based total depth, maximum intensity, duration, the location of the storm center with respect to the outlet, and storm size normalized to watershed area. We evaluated the interaction between the runoff and rainfall and runoff as antecedent moisture condition (AMC), antecedent runoff condition (ARC) and, runoff depth and duration for each rainfall events. We summarized each of the watershed properties such as contributing area, slope, shape, channel length, stream density, channel flow area, and percent of the area of retention stock ponds for each of the nested catchments in Walnut Gulch. The evaluation of the model using basic and categorical statistics showed good predictive skill throughout the watersheds. The model produced correlation coefficients ranging from 0.4-0.94, Nash efficiency coefficients up to 0.77, and Kling-Gupta coefficients ranging from 0.4 to 0.98. The model predicted 92% of all runoff generations and 98% of no-runoff across all sub-watersheds in Walnut Gulch. The regression model also indicated good potential to complement the QA-QC procedures in place for Walnut Gulch dataset publications developed over the years since the 1960s through identification of inconsistencies in rainfall and runoff relations.

  19. Microbiological Quality Control of Probiotic Products

    OpenAIRE

    Astashkina, A.P.; Khudyakova, L.I.; Kolbysheva, Y.V.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiological quality control of probiotic products such as Imunele, Dannon, Pomogayka showed that they contain living cultures of the Lactobacillus Bifidobacterium genus in the amount of 107 CFU/ml, which corresponds to the number indicated on the label of products. It is identified that the survival rate of test-strains cultured with pasteurized products does not exceed 10%. The cell concentration of target-microorganisms was reduced by 20-45% after the interaction with living probiotic b...

  20. Mitochondrial quality control in cardiac diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Campos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis is a hallmark of cardiac diseases. Therefore, maintenance of mitochondrial integrity through different surveillance mechanisms is critical for cardiomyocyte survival. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings on the central role of mitochondrial quality control processes including regulation of mitochondrial redox balance, aldehyde metabolism, proteostasis, dynamics and clearance in cardiac diseases, highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets.

  1. Quality control and the multicrystal counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, G.C.; Davis, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability of multicrystal counters for use in counting large numbers of radioimmunoassay samples is studied. In particular, the dependencies of the outputs from the array of detectors, and hence their degree of matching, on the count rate and volume of the samples being counted are investigated. Quality control procedures are described to assist in the assurance of consistent performance of the counter in the clinical situation. (U.K.)

  2. The software quality control for gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte, L.

    1986-01-01

    One of major problems with wich the quality control program of an environmental measurements laboratory is confronted is the evaluation of the performances of software packages for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra. A program of tests for evaluating the performances of the software package (SPECTRAN-F, Canberra Inc.) used by our laboratory is being carried out. In this first paper the results of a preliminary study concerning the evaluation of the performance of the doublet analysis routine are presented

  3. Quality control of estrogen receptor assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godolphin, W; Jacobson, B

    1980-01-01

    Four types of material have been used for the quality control of routine assays of estrogen receptors in human breast tumors. Pieces of hormone-dependent Nb rat mammary tumors gave a precision about 40%. Rat uteri and rat tumors pulverized at liquid nitrogen temperature and stored as powder yielded precision about 30%. Powdered and lyophilised human tumors appear the best with precision as good as 17%.

  4. DIAGNOSTIC OF CNC LATHE WITH QC 20 BALLBAR SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Józwik

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the evaluation of the influence of the feedmotion speed on the value of selected geometric errors of CNC lathe CTX 310 eco by DMG, indentified by QC 20 Ballbar system. Diagnostically evaluated were: the deviation of the axis squareness, reversal spike, and backlash. These errors determine the forming of the dimensional and shape accuracy of a machine tool. The article discusses the process of the CNC diagnostic test, the diagnostic evaluation and formulates guidelines on further CNC operation. The results of measurements were presented in tables and diagrams.

  5. Quantifying viruses and bacteria in wastewater—Results, interpretation methods, and quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, Donna S.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Mailot, Brian E.; Spencer, Susan K.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Elber, Ashley G.; Riddell, Kimberly R.; Gellner, Terry M.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR), used for wastewater treatment in Ohio and elsewhere in the United States, have pore sizes small enough to theoretically reduce concentrations of protozoa and bacteria, but not viruses. Sampling for viruses in wastewater is seldom done and not required. Instead, the bacterial indicators Escherichia coli (E. coli) and fecal coliforms are the required microbial measures of effluents for wastewater-discharge permits. Information is needed on the effectiveness of MBRs in removing human enteric viruses from wastewaters, particularly as compared to conventional wastewater treatment before and after disinfection. A total of 73 regular and 28 quality-control (QC) samples were collected at three MBR and two conventional wastewater plants in Ohio during 23 regular and 3 QC sampling trips in 2008-10. Samples were collected at various stages in the treatment processes and analyzed for bacterial indicators E. coli, fecal coliforms, and enterococci by membrane filtration; somatic and F-specific coliphage by the single agar layer (SAL) method; adenovirus, enterovirus, norovirus GI and GII, rotavirus, and hepatitis A virus by molecular methods; and viruses by cell culture. While addressing the main objective of the study-comparing removal of viruses and bacterial indicators in MBR and conventional plants-it was realized that work was needed to identify data analysis and quantification methods for interpreting enteric virus and QC data. Therefore, methods for quantifying viruses, qualifying results, and applying QC data to interpretations are described in this report. During each regular sampling trip, samples were collected (1) before conventional or MBR treatment (post-preliminary), (2) after secondary or MBR treatment (post-secondary or post-MBR), (3) after tertiary treatment (one conventional plant only), and (4) after disinfection (post-disinfection). Glass-wool fiber filtration was used to concentrate enteric viruses from large volumes, and small

  6. Statistical process control for radiotherapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlicki, Todd; Whitaker, Matthew; Boyer, Arthur L.

    2005-01-01

    Every quality assurance process uncovers random and systematic errors. These errors typically consist of many small random errors and a very few number of large errors that dominate the result. Quality assurance practices in radiotherapy do not adequately differentiate between these two sources of error. The ability to separate these types of errors would allow the dominant source(s) of error to be efficiently detected and addressed. In this work, statistical process control is applied to quality assurance in radiotherapy for the purpose of setting action thresholds that differentiate between random and systematic errors. The theoretical development and implementation of process behavior charts are described. We report on a pilot project is which these techniques are applied to daily output and flatness/symmetry quality assurance for a 10 MV photon beam in our department. This clinical case was followed over 52 days. As part of our investigation, we found that action thresholds set using process behavior charts were able to identify systematic changes in our daily quality assurance process. This is in contrast to action thresholds set using the standard deviation, which did not identify the same systematic changes in the process. The process behavior thresholds calculated from a subset of the data detected a 2% change in the process whereas with a standard deviation calculation, no change was detected. Medical physicists must make decisions on quality assurance data as it is acquired. Process behavior charts help decide when to take action and when to acquire more data before making a change in the process

  7. 7 CFR 58.642 - Quality control tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality control tests. 58.642 Section 58.642... Procedures § 58.642 Quality control tests. All mix ingredients shall be subject to inspection for quality and condition throughout each processing operation. Quality control tests shall be made on flow line samples as...

  8. 7 CFR 58.928 - Quality control tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality control tests. 58.928 Section 58.928... Procedures § 58.928 Quality control tests. All dairy products and other ingredients shall be subject to inspection for quality and condition throughout each processing operation. Quality control tests shall be...

  9. 7 CFR 58.335 - Quality control tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality control tests. 58.335 Section 58.335... Procedures § 58.335 Quality control tests. All milk, cream and related products are subject to inspection for quality and condition throughout each processing operation. Quality control tests shall be made on flow...

  10. Subspace Dimensionality: A Tool for Automated QC in Seismic Array Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C. A.; Stead, R. J.; Begnaud, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the great resolving power of seismic arrays, the application of automated processing to array data is critically important in treaty verification work. A significant problem in array analysis is the inclusion of bad sensor channels in the beamforming process. We are testing an approach to automated, on-the-fly quality control (QC) to aid in the identification of poorly performing sensor channels prior to beam-forming in routine event detection or location processing. The idea stems from methods used for large computer servers, when monitoring traffic at enormous numbers of nodes is impractical on a node-by node basis, so the dimensionality of the node traffic is instead monitoried for anomalies that could represent malware, cyber-attacks or other problems. The technique relies upon the use of subspace dimensionality or principal components of the overall system traffic. The subspace technique is not new to seismology, but its most common application has been limited to comparing waveforms to an a priori collection of templates for detecting highly similar events in a swarm or seismic cluster. In the established template application, a detector functions in a manner analogous to waveform cross-correlation, applying a statistical test to assess the similarity of the incoming data stream to known templates for events of interest. In our approach, we seek not to detect matching signals, but instead, we examine the signal subspace dimensionality in much the same way that the method addresses node traffic anomalies in large computer systems. Signal anomalies recorded on seismic arrays affect the dimensional structure of the array-wide time-series. We have shown previously that this observation is useful in identifying real seismic events, either by looking at the raw signal or derivatives thereof (entropy, kurtosis), but here we explore the effects of malfunctioning channels on the dimension of the data and its derivatives, and how to leverage this effect for

  11. SQC: secure quality control for meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhicong; Lin, Huang; Fellay, Jacques; Kutalik, Zoltán; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2017-08-01

    Due to the limited power of small-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS), researchers tend to collaborate and establish a larger consortium in order to perform large-scale GWAS. Genome-wide association meta-analysis (GWAMA) is a statistical tool that aims to synthesize results from multiple independent studies to increase the statistical power and reduce false-positive findings of GWAS. However, it has been demonstrated that the aggregate data of individual studies are subject to inference attacks, hence privacy concerns arise when researchers share study data in GWAMA. In this article, we propose a secure quality control (SQC) protocol, which enables checking the quality of data in a privacy-preserving way without revealing sensitive information to a potential adversary. SQC employs state-of-the-art cryptographic and statistical techniques for privacy protection. We implement the solution in a meta-analysis pipeline with real data to demonstrate the efficiency and scalability on commodity machines. The distributed execution of SQC on a cluster of 128 cores for one million genetic variants takes less than one hour, which is a modest cost considering the 10-month time span usually observed for the completion of the QC procedure that includes timing of logistics. SQC is implemented in Java and is publicly available at https://github.com/acs6610987/secureqc. jean-pierre.hubaux@epfl.ch. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Development of phantom periapical for control quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, J.M.S.; Sales Junior, E.S.; Ferreira, F.C.L.; Paschoal, C.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a dental phantom with cysts for evaluation of periapical radiographs that was tested in private dental offices in the city of Maraba, northern Brazil. Through some tests with the object simulator (phantom) were obtained 12 periapical radiographs (one in each of the offices visited) that waking up to the standards of Ordinance No. 453 were visually evaluated by observing the physical parameters of exposure (kVp and mA), time revelation of the radiographic film, later the other radiographs were visually compared with C6 ray set as the default. Among the results, it was found that only two of the twelve rays cysts could not be viewed and, therefore, these two images were deemed unsuitable for accurate diagnosis in the 10 images the cysts could be displayed, however according the images have different qualities comparisons. In addition, it can be concluded that the performance of the phantom was highly satisfactory showing to be efficient for use in quality control testing of dental X-rays, the quality control of radiographs and continuing education of dental professionals for a price much more accessible. (authors)

  13. Quality Management of CERN Vacuum Controls

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniotti, F; Fortescue-Beck, E; Gama, J; Gomes, P; Le Roux, P; Pereira, H; Pigny, G

    2014-01-01

    The vacuum controls Section (TE-VSC-ICM) is in charge of the monitoring, maintenance and consolidation of the control systems of all accelerators and detectors in CERN; this represents 6 000 instruments distributed along 128 km of vacuum chambers, often of heterogeneous architectures and of diverse technical generations. In order to improve the efficiency of the services provided by ICM, to vacuum experts and to accelerator operators, a Quality Management Plan is being put into place. The first step was the standardization of the naming convention across different accelerators. The traceability of problems, requests, repairs, and other actions, has also been put into place (VTL). This was combined with the effort to identify each individual device by a coded label, and register it in a central database (MTF). Occurring in parallel, was the gathering of old documents and the centralization of information concerning architectures, procedures, equipment and settings (EDMS). To describe the topology of control c...

  14. Microbiological quality control practices at Australian Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, M.

    1987-01-01

    As a domestic manufacturer of therapeutic substances, Australian Radioisotopes (ARI) must adhere to guidelines set out by the Commonwealth Department of Health in the Code of Good Manufacturing Practices for Therapeutic Goods 1983 (GMP). The GMP gives guidelines for staff training, building requirements, sanitation, documentation and quality control practices. These guidelines form the basis for regular audits performed by officers of the National Biological Standards Laboratories. At Lucas Heights, ARI has combined the principles of the GMP with the overriding precautions introduced for environmental and staff safety and protection. Its policy is to maintain a high level of quality assurance for product identity, purity and sterility and apyrogenicity during all stages of product manufacture

  15. Basic quality control in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikstrom, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Along the route toward regular performance of Quality Control in the Diagnostic Imaging sector there are a number of balances to negotiate: Patient/Staff safety considerations vs Regulatory compliance vs Performance of modern equipment vs Clinic's Productivity. At first glance these ambitions may seem in conflict. The tests performed to meet regulatory requirements may or may not bear any semblance to real clinical measurement scenarios. And the process of collecting the data from the quality assurance tests may induce a system down- time that adversely affects the clinic's overall productivity. Furthermore, the time it takes to complete the analysis of the test data and provide the report required to take the facility back into operation is time wasted for patients waiting for a diagnostic imaging exam

  16. ANALYSIS OF QUALITY COSTS FOR STATISTICA QUALITY CONTROL PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chiadamrong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Quality has become one or the most important force leading to organizational success and company growth in national and international markets. The return-on-investment from strong and effective quality programs is providing excellent profitability results in firms with effective quality strategies. Due to the wide variation in quality results, the search for the genuine keys to success in quality has become a matter of deep concern to management of companies. This paper suggests a way to quantifying quality costs. As a result, the appropriate quality strategies can be adjusted and set to match with each company situation based on the categorization of the quality costs suggested. This outcome can, then, be used as a guideline for manufactures in setting their suitable quality program, which establishes the proper balance between the costs and customer services.

  17. 40 CFR 75.21 - Quality assurance and quality control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... quality assurance audit or any other audit, the system is out-of-control. The owner or operator shall... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality assurance and quality control... assurance and quality control requirements. (a) Continuous emission monitoring systems. The owner or...

  18. Distributed sensor architecture for intelligent control that supports quality of control and quality of service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poza-Lujan, Jose-Luis; Posadas-Yagüe, Juan-Luis; Simó-Ten, José-Enrique; Simarro, Raúl; Benet, Ginés

    2015-02-25

    This paper is part of a study of intelligent architectures for distributed control and communications systems. The study focuses on optimizing control systems by evaluating the performance of middleware through quality of service (QoS) parameters and the optimization of control using Quality of Control (QoC) parameters. The main aim of this work is to study, design, develop, and evaluate a distributed control architecture based on the Data-Distribution Service for Real-Time Systems (DDS) communication standard as proposed by the Object Management Group (OMG). As a result of the study, an architecture called Frame-Sensor-Adapter to Control (FSACtrl) has been developed. FSACtrl provides a model to implement an intelligent distributed Event-Based Control (EBC) system with support to measure QoS and QoC parameters. The novelty consists of using, simultaneously, the measured QoS and QoC parameters to make decisions about the control action with a new method called Event Based Quality Integral Cycle. To validate the architecture, the first five Braitenberg vehicles have been implemented using the FSACtrl architecture. The experimental outcomes, demonstrate the convenience of using jointly QoS and QoC parameters in distributed control systems.

  19. Distributed Sensor Architecture for Intelligent Control that Supports Quality of Control and Quality of Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose-Luis Poza-Lujan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a study of intelligent architectures for distributed control and communications systems. The study focuses on optimizing control systems by evaluating the performance of middleware through quality of service (QoS parameters and the optimization of control using Quality of Control (QoC parameters. The main aim of this work is to study, design, develop, and evaluate a distributed control architecture based on the Data-Distribution Service for Real-Time Systems (DDS communication standard as proposed by the Object Management Group (OMG. As a result of the study, an architecture called Frame-Sensor-Adapter to Control (FSACtrl has been developed. FSACtrl provides a model to implement an intelligent distributed Event-Based Control (EBC system with support to measure QoS and QoC parameters. The novelty consists of using, simultaneously, the measured QoS and QoC parameters to make decisions about the control action with a new method called Event Based Quality Integral Cycle. To validate the architecture, the first five Braitenberg vehicles have been implemented using the FSACtrl architecture. The experimental outcomes, demonstrate the convenience of using jointly QoS and QoC parameters in distributed control systems.

  20. A Computerized QC Analysis of TLD Glow Curves for Personal Dosimetry Measurements Using TagQC Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primo, S.; Datz, H.; Dar, A.

    2014-01-01

    The External Dosimetry Lab (EDL) at the Radiation Safety Division at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC) is ISO 17025 certified and provides its services to approximately 13,000 users throughout the country from various sectors such as medical, industrial and academic. About 95% of the users are monitored monthly for X-rays, and radiation using Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) cards that contain three LiF:Mg,Ti elements and the other users, who work also with thermal neutrons, use TLD cards that contain four LiF:Mg,Ti elements. All TLD cards are measured with the Thermo 8800pc reader.Suspicious TLD glow curve (GC) can cause wrong dose estimation so the EDL makes great efforts to ensure that each GC undergoes a careful QC procedure. The current QC procedure is performed manually and through a few steps using different softwares and databases in a long and complicated procedure: EDL staff needs to export all the results/GCs to be checked to an Excel file, followed by finding the suspicious GCs, which is done in a different program (WinREMS), According to the GC shapes (Figure 1 illustrates suitable and suspicious GC shapes) and the ratio between the elements result values, the inspecting technician corrects the data