WorldWideScience

Sample records for qatar

  1. Qatar Exoplanet Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsubai, Khalid; Mislis, Dimitris; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I.

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of Qatar-3b, Qatar-4b, and Qatar-5b, three new transiting planets identified by the Qatar Exoplanet Survey. The three planets belong to the hot Jupiter family, with orbital periods of PQ3b=2.50792 days, PQ4b=1.80539 days, and PQ5b=2.87923 days. Follow-up spectroscopic...

  2. Islamic Archaeology in Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan

    2014-01-01

    with the Qatar Museums Authority, have revealed vital evidence on developments in urban topography and planning, water systems, the arrangement of commercial and private space, commerce and inter-regional trade, relationships with hinterlands, and material culture horizons. The implications of these discoveries...

  3. Islamic Archaeology in Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Three years of archaeological research at Al Zubarah on the northwest coast of the Qatar peninsula has produced detailed information on social, cultural, and economic structures of a major trading town of the Gulf in the 18th and 19th centuries CE. Detailed investigations, undertaken in partnership...

  4. Qatar Exoplanet Survey : Qatar-3b, Qatar-4b and Qatar-5b

    CERN Document Server

    Alsubai, Khalid A; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I; Latham, David W; Bieryla, Allyson; Buchhave, Lars A; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Bramich, D M; Pyrzas, Stylianos; Vilchez, Nicolas P E; Mancini, Luigi; Southworth, John; Evans, Daniel F; Henning, Thomas; Ciceri, Simona

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Qatar-3b, Qatar-4b, and Qatar-5b, three new transiting planets identified by the Qatar Exoplanet Survey (QES). The three planets belong to the hot Jupiter family, with orbital periods of $P_{Q3b}$=2.5079204 days, $P_{Q4b}$=1.8053949 days, and $P_{Q5b}$=2.8792319 days. Follow-up spectroscopic observations reveal the masses of the planets to be $M_{Q3b}$=4.31$M_{\\rm J}$, $M_{Q4b}$=5.85$M_{\\rm J}$, and $M_{Q5b}$=4.32$M_{\\rm J}$, while model fits to the transit light curves yield radii of $R_{Q3b}$=1.096$R_{\\rm J}$, $R_{Q4b}$=1.552$R_{\\rm J}$, and $R_{Q5b}$=1.107$R_{\\rm J}$. No evidence of eccentric orbit is seen in the radial velocity curve of any of the planets. The host stars are typical main sequence stars with masses and radii $M_{Q3}$=1.145$M_{\\odot}$, $M_{Q4}$=0.954$M_{\\odot}$, $M_{Q5}$=1.128$M_{\\odot}$ and $R_{Q3}$=1.272$R_{\\odot}$, $R_{Q4}$=1.115$R_{\\odot}$ and $R_{Q5}$=1.076$R_{\\odot}$ for the Qatar-3, 4 and 5 respectively. All three new planets can be classified as heavy hot ...

  5. Qatar Islamic Archaeology and Heritage Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Report on the archaeological fieldwork at Al Zubarah and environs for the Qatar Museums Authority......Report on the archaeological fieldwork at Al Zubarah and environs for the Qatar Museums Authority...

  6. Qatar Islamic Archaeology and Heritage Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Report on the archaeological fieldwork at Al Zubarah and environs for the Qatar Museums Authority......Report on the archaeological fieldwork at Al Zubarah and environs for the Qatar Museums Authority...

  7. Entwicklung des Emirates Qatar : Strategien - Probleme - Erfolge

    OpenAIRE

    Baldus, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Qatar boomt. Da es hierzu keine ganzheitlichen Forschungsarbeiten gibt, werden in dieser Arbeit die neuesten Entwicklungen und Planungen mit hoher Aktualität und Praxisrelevanz erstmals erfasst und analysiert. Der Autor führt Informationssplitter von internationalen Organisationen und eigene Recherchen in ein ganzheitliches Bild zusammen. Qatar ist sich bewusst, dass Wachstum endlich sein kann. Welche Möglichkeiten hat das kleine Qatar von der Globalisierung zu profitieren und für sich Vortei...

  8. Qatar and the Arab Spring

    KAUST Repository

    Coates Ulrichsen, Kristian

    2014-11-15

    This chapter examines how Qatar assumed an extraordinarily visible and interventionist role during the Arab Spring upheaval in 2011. It argues that, after an initial period of caution in January 2011, Qatari officials quickly recognised the changing contours of the Arab Spring and pragmatically readjusted their policy-responses. The lack of domestic constraints on decision-making enabled officials, led by the Emir and the Prime minister, to reposition Qatar (somewhat improbably) as a champion of the popular uprisings in North Africa and later as a key external player in the Syrian Civil War. The chapter also provides historical context to Qatar’s close relationship with the Muslim Brotherhood, and documents why Qatari officials saw the outbreak of the uprisings as far more of an opportunity than a challenge.

  9. Study of Some Lichens of Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The desert regions of North and central Qatar were surveyed for lichens. Twelve species were reported. The most common lichens are of the crustose type and all fungi of the lichens collected are Ascomycete.

  10. Pharmacovigilance in Qatar: a survey of pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, K

    2013-11-01

    Active national pharmacovigilance programmes are needed to monitor adverse drug reaction (ADR) data in local populations. The objective of this study was to describe the knowledge, experiences, attitudes and perceived barriers to reporting of suspected ADRs by pharmacists in Qatar. A 27-item web-based survey was answered by 116 pharmacists (25% response rate). Knowledge of ADR terminology and reporting purpose was high, but only 29.3% had ever made a suspected ADR report in Qatar. Most respondents expressed positive attitudes towards the pharmacist's role in pharmacovigilance. Inability to recognize a potential ADR or access a reporting form were perceived as barriers. Enhanced training and efficiency in report submissions were identified as facilitators to future participation. Hospital pharmacists were 7 times more likely to have reported a suspected ADR in Qatar. Pharmacists in Qatar are willing to engage in pharmacovigilance activities if supported by increased training and transparency in the reporting process.

  11. Hospital information system survey in qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ali, Rashid; Reti, Shane; Feldman, Henry; Safran, Charles; Niaz, Rashid; Erskine, Alistair; Elmagarmid, Ahmed; Al-Musleh, Abdulwahab

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare can be enhanced by the effective use of information technology to improve the quality and safety of care and many healthcare providers are adopting advanced health information technology to improve their healthcare delivery process. Qatar is a relatively young Middle Eastern country with an ambitious and progressive national strategy to develop its healthcare system, including an advanced e-health infrastructure delivering the right medical information at the right time to clinicians and patients. To assess the effectiveness of such programs, it is important to have a pre-intervention baseline from which comparisons, performance against target measures and forward thinking strategic planning can be grounded. This study presents the first published campus wide survey of Hospital Information Systems in large public and private hospitals in Qatar. To qualitatively assess and describe the current state of Hospital Information Systems in large hospitals in Qatar, and to establish a baseline or reference point for Qatar's readiness for, and adoption of Hospital Information Systems.

  12. A Knowledge Economy Assessment of Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2006-01-01

    This knowledge economy assessment of Qatar ranks it using the following indices: the Knowledge Economy Index (KEI), Knowledge Index, Economic Incentive and Institutional Regime, Education, Innovation and Information Infrastructure (ICT). The assessment compares Quatar to the rest of the 131 countries in the Knowledge Assessment Methodology (KAM). In more detail, it is compared to Finland, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Singapore and United Arab Emirates. Qatar s current KEI is 5.83. It ranks higher th...

  13. Qatar Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    In this view of the Qatar Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf, (25.0N, 51.0E) a large oil spill, seen as a large dark toned mass in the water covers much of the surface of the western Persian Gulf. Qatar is one of several of the oil rich United Arab Emirate states. Oil spills and oil pollution of the environment are common occurrances associated with oil tanker loading operations.

  14. Towards Activating School Libraries in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Kaabi, M.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis examines school libraries in Qatar between 2002-2012, assessing purpose, operation and evaluation and mapping provision against policy during this critical period of evolution of educational and digital development. It also considers research practice and communication in the school library sector in Qatar. The research is unique in providing a comprehensive study of school libraries at national and local levels, involving librarians, academics, students and parents through a mixe...

  15. Impact of noncommunicable diseases in the State of Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Kaabi SK; Atherton A

    2015-01-01

    Salma Khalaf Al-Kaabi, Andrew Atherton Supreme Council of Health, Doha, Qatar Abstract: This study, commissioned by the Supreme Council of Health in the State of Qatar, focuses on the main noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally and regionally, in order to gauge their potential impact on Qatar. The research shows that the Gulf Cooperation Council is projected to be affected dramatically by NCDs in the coming years. The top five NCDs that will affect Qatar in terms of economic burden and disa...

  16. Uncommon opportunistic yeast bloodstream infections from Qatar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taj-Aldeen, S.J.; AbdulWahab, A.; Kolecka, A.; Deshmukh, A.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Boekhout, T.

    2014-01-01

    Eleven uncommon yeast species that are associated with high mortality rates irrespective of antifungal therapy were isolated from 17/187 (201 episodes) pediatric and elderly patients with fungemia from Qatar. The samples were taken over a 6-year period (January 2004-December 2010). Isolated species

  17. Sustainable solutions for domestic solid waste management in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    AHMAD, Farah

    2016-01-01

    Due to the fact that Qatar has increased its investments and projects worldwide, Qatar has become one of the world’s fastest growing economy and highest paid GDP. As a result, the population has increased in the last few years. This increase in population is associated with an increase in generated waste and accumulation of waste. Waste generation and accumulation is associated with hazards and is harmful to people and the environment. In line with Qatar National Vision 2030, it is important ...

  18. Immigranternes vilkår i Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Carmen Louise R.; Nielsen, Celine Suhr; Christensen, Caroline; Kalkerup, Nikoline Mari; Wittenkamp, Emily; Hansen, Natasja Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study seeks to discover possible solutions to improve living and working conditions for migrant workers in Qatar. It will focus on the migrants in the construction industry. We use qualitative method as our methodological foundation, consisting of our own prepared elite interviews. They will be used as empirical research, supporting our analysis. The theory, involving Karl Marx and Guy Standing, will also reinforce our study, strengthening the results we achieve. The...

  19. Survey of Macrofungi (including Truffles in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roda F Al-Thani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen macrofungal genera belonging to 11 families and 7 orders were identified. These were isolated from different habitats (semi- desert, gardens, park, decayed roots of dead trees and under trees in Qatar. Macrofungi are defined here as ascomycetes and basidiomycetes with large, conspicuous spore-bearing structures that form above or beneath ground. This study indicated that the distribution of macrofungi is dependent on the plant community and the environmental conditions.

  20. The epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bener Abdulbari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem in many countries all over the world and especially in Middle East, Asia, East-Europe, and Africa. The aim of our study was to assess the incidence of viral hepatitis A, B and C in Qatar and compare it with other countries. This is a retrospective cohort study, which was conducted at Hamad General Hospital, State of Qatar from 2002-2006. Patients who were screened and diagnosed with viral hepatitis were included in this study. The diagnostic classification of definite viral hepatitis was made in accordance with criteria based on the International Classification of Disease tenth revision (ICD-10. A total of 527 cases of hepatitis C, 396 cases of hepatitis B, 162 cases of hepatitis A and 108 cases of unspecified were reported during the year 2006. Reported incidence rate per 10,000 populations during the year 2006 for hepatitis A was 1.9, hepatitis B 4.7, and Hepatitis C 6.3. The proportion of hepatitis B and C was significantly higher in male population than females across the years (2002-2006. Hepatitis A was more prevalent in children below 15 years (72.3%, hepatitis B in adults aged above 15 years, and hepatitis C in the population above 35 years of age. The incidence of hepatitis A has been declining in Qataris and increasing in expatriates. There was a significant relationship in gender and age group of the patients with hepatitis A, B and C. We conclude that hepatitis has become a national health issue in Qatar. The incidence rate of hepatitis in Qatar is comparable to its neighboring countries, United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia. There is a need for further research on hepatitis and the associated risk factors.

  1. Groundwater vulnerability mapping of Qatar aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalousha, Husam Musa

    2016-12-01

    Qatar is one of the most arid countries in the world with limited water resources. With little rainfall and no surface water, groundwater is the only natural source of fresh water in the country. Whilst the country relies mainly on desalination of seawater to secure water supply, groundwater has extensively been used for irrigation over the last three decades, which caused adverse environmental impact. Vulnerability assessment is a widely used tool for groundwater protection and land-use management. Aquifers in Qatar are carbonate with lots of fractures, depressions and cavities. Karst aquifers are generally more vulnerable to contamination than other aquifers as any anthropogenic-sourced contaminant, especially above a highly fractured zone, can infiltrate quickly into the aquifer and spread over a wide area. The vulnerability assessment method presented in this study is based on two approaches: DRASTIC and EPIK, within the framework of Geographical Information System (GIS). Results of this study show that DRASTIC vulnerability method suits Qatar hydrogeological settings more than EPIK. The produced vulnerability map using DRASTIC shows coastal and karst areas have the highest vulnerability class. The southern part of the country is located in the low vulnerability class due to occurrence of shale formation within aquifer media, which averts downward movement of contaminants.

  2. The Zubarah Archaeology and Heritage Park - State of Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinzel, Moritz; Thuesen, Ingolf

    2010-01-01

    The Poster summarized the Masterplan for the Heritage Park in NW-Qatar and the componants of the Project presented at SMARTdoc Heritage Symposium in Philladelphia in November 2010......The Poster summarized the Masterplan for the Heritage Park in NW-Qatar and the componants of the Project presented at SMARTdoc Heritage Symposium in Philladelphia in November 2010...

  3. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in feral cats in Qatar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boughattas, Sonia; Behnke, Jerzy; Sharma, Aarti; Abu-Madi, Marawan

    ...]. Cats were introduced to Qatar in the 1960s to control the high rodent population in the country, but subsequently they in turn reproduced rapidly [4]. The current density of cats in Qatar may pose a risk for humans, as cats are natural hosts for a wide range of zoonotic pathogens, including T. gondii. The overall seroprevalence of T. gondii a...

  4. Applying Concepts of Critical Pedagogy to Qatar's Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Michael H.; Amatullah, Tasneem

    2016-01-01

    Qatar is in the midst of a systemic education reform, Education For a New Era, steered by RAND's (a nonprofit research organization) analysis and report of Qatar's Educational system. Driven by a neoliberal agenda, the reform includes international curricula, curriculum standards, teacher licensure, and professional standards for school leaders…

  5. Pharmacy students' attitudes toward pharmaceutical care in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hajj MS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Maguy Saffouh El Hajj,1 Ayat S Hammad,1 Hebatalla M Afifi2 1College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 2National Centre for Cancer Care and Research (NCCCR, Doha, Qatar Objectives: The study objectives were to investigate Qatar pharmacy students’ attitudes toward pharmaceutical care (PC, to identify the factors that influence their attitudes, and to recognize their perceived barriers for PC provision. Methods: A cross-sectional and online survey of Qatar pharmacy students was conducted. Results: Over 4 weeks, 46 surveys were submitted (88% response rate. All respondents agreed that the pharmacist’s primary responsibility is to prevent and resolve medication therapy problems. Most respondents believed that PC provision is professionally rewarding and that all pharmacists should provide PC (93% and 91% of respondents, respectively. Highly perceived barriers for PC provision included lack of access to patient information (76%, inadequate drug information sources (55%, and time constraints (53%. Professional year and practical experience duration were inversely significantly associated with four and five statements, respectively, out of the 13 Standard Pharmaceutical Care Attitudes Survey statements, including the statements related to the value of PC, and its benefit in improving patient health and pharmacy practitioners’ careers. Conclusion: Qatar pharmacy students had positive attitudes toward PC. Efforts should be exerted to overcome their perceived barriers. Keywords: Qatar, pharmaceutical care, pharmacy, student

  6. UCL Qatar and the Institute of Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo Rehren

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Setting up a new department is an exciting process, and particularly so in a location such as Qatar. It is hard work – and rich in experiences. The most pleasant new experience so far has been to welcome our first-ever cohort of 30 Masters’ students, enrolled across our three different degree programmes (Fig. 1. As expected, the MA in Museum and Gallery Practice recruited best, with about half of all students on this one-year MA. Across the board, our student body is as international and as diverse as one could hope for at UCL in such a location; just under one third of our students are Qatari nationals, together with a handful of others already living in the country before they enrolled. In addition to students from Syria and Jordan, about one third is from the US and across Europe, and from as far away as Panama and China. Even out here in Doha, it is UCL as a Global University. And since we are here, among other reasons, to bring a truly international education to the people of Qatar and the region, this is a great success in its own right

  7. QATAR Airways Celebrates the Arrival of the First DOHA2006 Asian Games Branded Aircraft A Vibrant New Look for QATAR Airways New Airbus A330

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Doha, QATAR: August 31, 2005 Qatar Airways, the Official Airline for the 15th Asian Games Doha 2006, and the Doha Asian Games Organising Committee (DAGOC), today unveiled the first Qatar Airways Airbus A330 themed aircraft to promote the biggest ever sporting event to be staged in the region.

  8. QATAR Airways Celebrates the Arrival of the First DOHA2006 Asian Games Branded Aircraft A Vibrant New Look for QATAR Airways New Airbus A330

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

      Doha, QATAR: August 31, 2005 Qatar Airways, the Official Airline for the 15th Asian Games Doha 2006, and the Doha Asian Games Organising Committee (DAGOC), today unveiled the first Qatar Airways Airbus A330 themed aircraft to promote the biggest ever sporting event to be staged in the region.……

  9. Isolation of MERS Coronavirus from a Dromedary Camel, Qatar, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, V. Stalin; Farag, Elmoubasher A.B.A.; Reusken, Chantal B.E.M.; Lamers, Mart M.; Pas, Suzan D.; Voermans, Jolanda; Smits, Saskia L.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Al-Mawlawi, Naema; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E.; El-Sayed, Ahmed M.; Mohran, Khaled A.; Ghobashy, Hazem; Alhajri, Farhoud; Al-Thani, Mohamed; Al-Marri, Salih A.; El-Maghraby, Mamdouh M.; Koopmans, Marion P.G.

    2014-01-01

    We obtained the full genome of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from a camel in Qatar. This virus is highly similar to the human England/Qatar 1 virus isolated in 2012. The MERS-CoV from the camel efficiently replicated in human cells, providing further evidence for the zoonotic potential of MERS-CoV from camels. PMID:25075761

  10. Classification tree analysis of factors affecting parking choices in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Shaaban, K.; Pande, A

    2015-01-01

    Qatar has experienced a significant population growth in the past decade. The growth has been accompanied by an increase in automobile ownership rates leading to parking problems especially in the capital city of Doha. The objective of this study was to find the factors affecting people's choice of parking in this rich developing country when different parking options are available. Two commercial centers located in the city of Doha, Qatar were selected for this study; the City Center mall an...

  11. Perceptions and Impacts of the Oil Crash in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Eskandar, Glnar; Ewers, Michael; Diop, Abdoulaye; Le, Kien

    2016-01-01

    Qatari citizens, especially those employed in the public sector, are less likely than other people living in Qatar to be aware of the recent decline in oil prices. Among citizens who are aware, moreover, most seem to believe that they are insulated from economic hardship. If Qatar wishes to manage the expectations of citizens regarding the state’s role in providing for economic welfare, consistent public messaging is necessary to raise awareness of anticipated changes. Given cu...

  12. Impact of noncommunicable diseases in the State of Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Kaabi SK

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Salma Khalaf Al-Kaabi, Andrew Atherton Supreme Council of Health, Doha, Qatar Abstract: This study, commissioned by the Supreme Council of Health in the State of Qatar, focuses on the main noncommunicable diseases (NCDs globally and regionally, in order to gauge their potential impact on Qatar. The research shows that the Gulf Cooperation Council is projected to be affected dramatically by NCDs in the coming years. The top five NCDs that will affect Qatar in terms of economic burden and disability-adjusted life years are cardiovascular diseases, mental health and behavioral disorders, cancer, respiratory diseases, and diabetes. Whilst these diseases have diverse effects on patients, their causes can be traced to “… common lifestyle-related, or behavioral, risk factors such as tobacco use, a diet heavy in fat, and physical inactivity”. The total direct and indirect costs to the Gulf Cooperation Council calculated for the above five NCDs were $36.2 billion in 2013, which equates to 150% of the officially recorded annual health care expenditure. If this trajectory is maintained, spending per head of population in Qatar will reach $2,778 by 2022. These figures demonstrate not only the potential financial impact of the main NCDs, but also give an idea of how the current health system is working to address them.Keywords: cardiovascular disease, mental health, cancer, diabetes, respiratory disease, national health strategy, State of Qatar

  13. Qatar's School Transportation System: Supporting Safety, Efficiency, and Service Quality. Monograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Keith; Younossi, Obaid; Al-Dafa, Maryah; Culbertson, Shelly; Mattock, Michael G.; Light, Thomas; Rohr, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    In consideration of the many challenges associated with Qatar's continued growth and demographic changes, the government of Qatar is interested in updating its school transportation system (STS). This volume assesses the perspectives of parents and school administrators on Qatar's STS, identifies a vision and goals for the STS, reviews…

  14. An assessment of Qatar's coral communities in a regional context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, John A; Smith, Edward G; Warren, Christopher; Dupont, Jennifer

    2016-04-30

    Qatar's once extensive coral communities have undergone considerable change in recent decades. We quantitatively surveyed three coral assemblages in Qatar to assess current status, and compared these against 14 sites in Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates to evaluate Qatar in a larger biogeographic context. Umm Al-Arshan had the highest species richness of 17 sites examined in the southern Arabian Gulf, as well as the highest coral cover and the only Acropora observed on sites in Qatar. Coral cover and richness were more modest at Fuwayrit and Al-Ashat, reflecting greater impacts from earlier stress events. Two distinct communities were identified across the southern Gulf, with Umm Al-Arshan clustering with high-cover, mixed merulinid/poritid assemblages that were less impacted by earlier bleaching and long-term stress, while Fuwayrit and Al-Ashat grouped with a lower-cover, stress-tolerant community characteristic of more extreme environments in the southern Gulf. We recommend implementation of a nation-wide baseline assessment of coral communities to guide development of an MPA network and long-term coral monitoring program for Qatar.

  15. Road traffic fatalities in Qatar Jordan and UAE

    OpenAIRE

    Elawad, Elmogiera

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smeed’s equation is a widely used model for prediction of traffic fatalities but has been found inadequate for use in developing countries. We applied regression analysis to time-series data on vehicles, population and traffic fatalities in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Jordan and Qatar. The data were fitted to exponential models for fatality prediction, producing an average absolute error of 20.9% for Qatar, 10.9% for Jordan and 5.5% for the UAE. We found a strong linear relations...

  16. Science Education Reform in Qatar: Progress and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ziad

    2016-01-01

    Science education reform in Qatar has had limited success. In the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS), Qatari 4th and 8th grade students have shown progress in science achievement, but they remain significantly below the international average. Also, in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), Qatari…

  17. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  18. Source identification of beached oil at Al Zubarah, Northwestern Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Kaabi, Nasser S.; Kristensen, Mette; Zouari, Nabil

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Gulf was contaminated with a large quantity of crude oil during the Gulf War in 1991. Some of the oil beached on the shorelines of the Northwest coast of Qatar. It was discovered, during a sampling campaign in 2015, that the shorelines were contaminated with both fresh oil and heavily...

  19. Impact of noncommunicable diseases in the State of Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kaabi, Salma Khalaf; Atherton, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This study, commissioned by the Supreme Council of Health in the State of Qatar, focuses on the main noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally and regionally, in order to gauge their potential impact on Qatar. The research shows that the Gulf Cooperation Council is projected to be affected dramatically by NCDs in the coming years. The top five NCDs that will affect Qatar in terms of economic burden and disability-adjusted life years are cardiovascular diseases, mental health and behavioral disorders, cancer, respiratory diseases, and diabetes. Whilst these diseases have diverse effects on patients, their causes can be traced to “… common lifestyle-related, or behavioral, risk factors such as tobacco use, a diet heavy in fat, and physical inactivity”. The total direct and indirect costs to the Gulf Cooperation Council calculated for the above five NCDs were $36.2 billion in 2013, which equates to 150% of the officially recorded annual health care expenditure. If this trajectory is maintained, spending per head of population in Qatar will reach $2,778 by 2022. These figures demonstrate not only the potential financial impact of the main NCDs, but also give an idea of how the current health system is working to address them. PMID:26170702

  20. Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Gastrointestinal Pathogens in Migrant Workers in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Humphrey, John M.; Ranbhise, Sanjay; Ibrahim, Emad; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E.; Farag, Elmoubasher; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Marshall J Glesby

    2016-01-01

    The causes of infectious diarrhea among the migrant worker population in Qatar are not well understood. We conducted a prospective observational study to understand the demographic and clinical characteristics and infectious causes of diarrhea among migrant workers in Doha, Qatar. A total of 126 male workers presenting to the Qatar Red Crescent Worker's Health Center outpatient clinic or emergency department were studied over a 5-month period in 2015–2016. Epidemiologic surveys were administe...

  1. Arranging marriage; negotiating risk: genetics and society in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilshaw, Susie; Al Raisi, Tasneem; Alshaban, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers how the globalized discourse of genetic risk in cousin marriage is shaped, informed and taken up in local moral worlds within the context of Qatar. This paper investigates the way Qataris are negotiating the discourse on genetics and risk. It is based on data from ongoing ethnographic research in Qatar and contributes to anthropological knowledge about this understudied country. Participants were ambivalent about genetic risks and often pointed to other theories of causation in relation to illness and disability. The discourse on genetic risk associated with marrying in the family was familiar, but for some participants the benefits of close marriage outweighed potential risks. Furthermore, the introduction of mandatory pre-marital screening gave participants confidence that risks were monitored and minimized.

  2. Estimates of Potential Evapotranspiration Over The State of Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Bazaraa, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    Several methods for the estimation of potential evapotranspiration are reported in the literature covering a wide variation in the complexity of calculation and nature of climatic data required. Five of the more commonly used methods (Blaney-Criddle, Thomthwaite, Pan Evaporation, Radiation and Penman) are used to estimate mean monthly potential evapotranspiration values using data from three agro-hydro-meteorological stations sited in the north, central and south-western areas of Qatar. The r...

  3. Qatar: Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    founder of Wahhabism, belonged.1 Thus, Qatar officially subscribes to Wahhabism, a conservative Islamic tradition that it shares with Saudi Arabia...Conoco-Phillips are minority stakeholders) in an LNG terminal in Texas that is seeking U.S. government approval to expand the facility to the point where...develop Qatar’s housing, water , roads, airports, and shipping infrastructure in part to promote economic diversification, as well as to prepare to host

  4. Secondhand smoke emission levels in waterpipe cafes in Doha, Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mulla, Ahmad; Fanous, Nadia; Seidenberg, Andrew B; Rees, Vaughan W

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to the emissions of a tobacco waterpipe is associated with increased health risks among its users as well as those exposed to its secondhand smoke. Waterpipe use is an emerging concern to the tobacco control community, particularly among countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region. In 2002, Qatar adopted legislation that prohibited cigarette smoking inside public venues, but exempted tobacco waterpipe smoking. To inform the development and enforcement of effective policy, the impact of cigarette and waterpipe use on indoor air quality was monitored in waterpipe cafes in Doha, Qatar. Particulate matter (PM2.5) levels were measured inside and outside of a sample of 40 waterpipe cafes and 16 smoke-free venues in Doha, Qatar between July and October 2012. In addition, the number of waterpipes being smoked and the number of cigarette smokers were counted within each venue. Non-paired and paired sample t tests were used to assess differences in mean PM2.5 measurements between venue type (waterpipe vs smoke-free) and environment (indoor vs outdoor). The mean PM2.5 level inside waterpipe venues (476 μg/m(3)) was significantly higher than the mean PM2.5 level inside smoke-free venues (17 μg/m(3); pwaterpipe venues (35 μg/m(3); pwaterpipe cafes in Doha, Qatar, potentially endangering the health of employees and patrons. To protect the public from the dangers of secondhand tobacco smoke, and to change social norms around tobacco use, smoke-free policies that apply to all forms of combusted tobacco products, including the waterpipe, are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Breastfeeding practice and determinants among Arab mothers in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kohji, Sadriya; Said, Hana A; Selim, Nagah A

    2012-04-01

    To assess the breastfeeding practices of Arab mothers by measuring breastfeeding indicators, and to identify the related determinants that affect maternal practices in Qatar. Using interview administered questionnaires, we carried out this cross-sectional study with cluster sampling of 770 Arab mothers of children below 24 months of age attending primary health care centers in Qatar from June to October 2009. Early initiation of breastfeeding was found in 57%, exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months in 18.9%, and continued breastfeeding at one year in 49.9% of mothers. Children ever breastfed comprised 97.9%, continued breastfeeding at 2 years old comprised 45.4%, and predominant breastfeeding 11.9%. The proportion of children who were appropriately breastfed was 29%. The `rooming in` rate was 43.9%. Receiving breast milk substitutes, exposure to advertisements for artificial teats, and employment status showed a significant relation with both early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding. On demand feeding was related to exclusive breastfeeding, and `rooming in` and mode of delivery was related to early initiation. Breastfeeding practice among Arab mothers in Qatar is not at an acceptable level. Core indicators, optional indicators, and health facility indicators for breastfeeding practice are not at the desired World Health Organization recommended levels.

  6. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in feral cats in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughattas, Sonia; Behnke, Jerzy; Sharma, Aarti; Abu-Madi, Marawan

    2017-01-18

    Cats are essential in the life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii as they can shed the environmentally resistant oocysts after acquiring infection. Human populations living in cities with high densities of feral cats are therefore likely to be at risk of infection. The current study is the first to estimate the seroprevalence of T. gondii in the feral cat population in Qatar. We investigated the seroprevalence of T. gondii among 495 adult cats from urban and suburban districts in Qatar. Using results from the Modified Agglutination Test, we fitted statistical models with host sex, area and season as explanatory factors and seropositivity as the outcome. The analysis revealed an overall seroprevalence of 82%. Seroprevalence was significantly higher in the summer season (P = 0.006). No significant difference was detected (P > 0.05) between seroprevalence in female and male cats and in cats from urban and suburban districts of Qatar. Despite the seasonal difference, the observed seroprevalence of T. gondii suggests high environmental contamination throughout the year, with some female cats generating more intense responses compared to males. Both findings merit further investigations.

  7. An exploratory study on medications in Qatar homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available N Kheir1, MS El Hajj1, K Wilbur1, RML Kaissi1, A Yousif21College of Pharmacy, 2College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, QatarBackground: Drug therapy is the most often used intervention for treatment and prevention of disease. However, if used inappropriately, drugs can cause more harm than good. Improper drug storage and disposal can have a direct impact on public safety, the environment, and the health care services. The purpose of this study was to characterize medications stored in Qatar homes and to explore their methods of storage and disposal, and to identify the public's source of information related to medicines.Methods: For the purpose of this cross-sectional exploratory study, a list of telephone numbers was generated from Qatar's telephone directory using a systematic sampling method. Individuals consenting to participate were interviewed using a multipart pretested survey instrument.Results: Data were collected from a total of 49 homes. Most respondents did not have a designated compartment or box specifically for storing medications. The majority of drugs (48% were kept in bedrooms and a number of respondents were keeping their drugs in the fridge and in the kitchen. The most often stored classes of medicines were analgesics, antihistamines, nutritional supplements, and medications used for the respiratory system. Most respondents disposed of unwanted medicines by throwing them in the trash. In about 15% of cases, the dosage of drug taken was different from the instructions on the label. Sharing of prescription medicines was not uncommon. The majority of respondents sought information related to drugs from doctors.Conclusion: These findings raise concerns about how medications are stored and disposed of in the community. The fact that no household routinely returned unwanted medications to a pharmacy for proper disposal places the environment at risk. There is a need for more societal awareness about the safe handling

  8. Small Steps Lead to Quality Assurance and Enhancement in Qatar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Attiyah, Asma; Khalifa, Batoul

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of Qatar University's history since it was started in 1973. Its primary focus is on the various small, but important, steps taken by the University to address the needs of quality assurance and enhancement. The Qatar University Reform Plan is described in detail. Its aims are to continually improve the quality…

  9. 76 FR 38614 - Transportation Infrastructure/Multimodal Products and Services Trade Mission to Doha, Qatar, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... investments in infrastructure and economic diversification, resulting in significant export opportunities for... development of Qatar and the U.A.E. also may have great potential. Applications from companies selling... Mission to Qatar and the U.A.E. must complete and timely submit an application package for consideration...

  10. Qatar biomedical and cancer publications in PubMed between 2000 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A; Taha, Fatma Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the past trends of biomedical and cancer publications from Qatar listed on PubMed for the years 2000-2012. These findings were then compared with the corresponding global number of publications. PubMed was searched for cancer publications, clinical trials, publications on humans or other species. Searching for "Qatar*" in the "Affiliation" field yielded the lowest number of publications; searching for "Qatar*" in the "Affiliation" or in "Title/Abstract" yielded a moderate number of results and searching for "Qatar*" in the "Affiliation" or "Title/Abstract" or "Text Word" fields yielded the highest number of publications. The annual percentage change (APC) from one year to the next was calculated for the population and each type of publication. Information on the population of Qatar was gathered from the website of Qatar Statistics Authority to determine the correlation of papers published per 1000 population. The number of publications retrieved from PubMed was not particularly different for each variation of search carried out. However, the most representative number of publications was retrieved upon searching for "Qatar*" in the "Affiliation" or in "Title/Abstract" fields. Between the years 2000 and 2012, the total number of biomedical publications from Qatar increased 24 times with an average APC of 33.4%, which was found to be more than the APC of the population in Qatar which averaged at 9%. The number of biomedical publications per 1000 population increased from 0.02 in 2000 to 0.15% in 2012. Most publications retrieved were humans studies and occasionally were for other animal species. Cancer publications in Qatar represented 16.9% of the total publications and the number of cancer publications per 1000 population increased from 0% in 2000 to 0.02% in 2012. Publications classified as clinical trials represented 4.6% of Qatar biomedical publications. Publication of cancer clinical trials were very rare (0.4%). Despite the

  11. Al-Zubarah and its Hinterland, North Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan George; Barnes, Richard Hugh; Macumber, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    of al-Zubarah and its hinterland, as well as initial reconnaissance of other north Qatar sites. This paper will focus on the results of the work in and around al-Zubarah, including the mapping of the site, the geomorphological and archaeological investigation of its hinterland including associated sites......, and two areas of investigative open-area excavations within the town of al-Zubarah. Overall, the extraordinary complexity of the natural and human environment encountered through this work is being revealed, and suggests that in the future many more rewarding outcomes can be expected in the study...

  12. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Waters in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almulla, Hessa Ibrahim; King, Nigel M; Alnsour, Hamza Mohammad; Sajnani, Anand K

    2016-12-01

    Fluoridation of drinking water has been recognized as one of the most effective ways of achieving community-wide exposure to the caries prevention effects of fluoride (F). A vast majority of people in Qatar use bottled water for drinking. Use of bottled water without knowing the F level may expose children to dental caries risk if the F level is lower than optimal or to dental fluorosis if the F level is too high. The aim of this study was to determine the F concentration of bottled water available in Qatar. A total of 32 brands of bottled water were evaluated. The F concentrations displayed on the labels were recorded. The F ion-selective electrode method was used to measure the F concentration in water samples, and three measurements were taken for every sample to ensure reproducibility. The p value was set at 0.05. The F concentration ranged from 0.06 to 3.0 ppm with a mean value of 0.8 ppm (±0.88). The F levels were provided by the manufacturers on the labels of 60 % of the samples, but this was significantly lower than the measured F levels (p water that was produced in Saudi Arabia had significantly higher levels of F when compared to those produced in other countries (p water. Furthermore, there was a significant disparity between the F levels which were measured and those that were provided on the labels.

  13. Recent warming trend in the coastal region of Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Way Lee; Saleem, Ayman; Sadr, Reza

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze long-term temperature-related phenomena in the eastern portion of the Middle East, focusing on the coastal region of Qatar. Extreme temperature indices were examined, which were defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices, for Doha, Qatar; these indices were then compared with those from neighboring countries. The trends were calculated for a 30-year period (1983-2012), using hourly data obtained from the National Climatic Data Center. The results showed spatially consistent warming trends throughout the region. For Doha, 11 of the 12 indices studied showed significant warming trends. In particular, the warming trends were represented by an increase in the number of warm days and nights and a decrease in the number of cool nights and days. The high-temperature extremes during the night have risen at more than twice the rate of their corresponding daytime extremes. The intensity and frequency of hot days have increased, and the minimum temperature indices exhibited a higher rate of warming. The climatic changes in Doha are consistent with the region-wide heat-up in recent decades across the Middle East. However, the rapid economic expansion, increase of population since the 1990s, and urban effects in the region are thought to have intensified the rapidly warming climate pattern observed in Doha since the turn of the century.

  14. Perception of aging and ageism among women in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; D'Souza, Reshma; Al-Roomi, Khaldoon

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the perceptions of age and aging among women in Qatar. Respondents consisted of 250 women aged between 20 and 70 years, selected from those attending the health centers in Doha city, the capital of Qatar. They were interviewed using a pretested validated questionnaire, and data were collected through direct face-to-face interviews using the incidental sampling method. It was found that physical appearance and mental alertness were the most important criteria for defining aging in men and women. A statistically significant association was found between age of respondents and physical criteria for aging such as hair color (p < .000) in women and body image in men (p < .0298). As for aging characteristics, decreasing hearing ability (p < .000), performance as before (p < .004), more irritability (p < .0227), ability to travel alone (p < .0429), needs check up (p < .001), and needs a geriatric home (p < .001) were statistically associated with age of women studied. Both positive (socializing factors, independence, housework, retirement, and geriatric care) and negative stereotyping (care for self, learning capabilities, irritability, and worries) with regard to aging were evident among the Qatari women. In general, Qatari women had several positive attitudes toward aging. Such attitudes could be utilized in any health promotion for elderly people.

  15. Oral health knowledge, behaviour and practices among school children in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sultan Al-Darwish

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The oral health knowledge in Qatar is below the satisfactory level. Parents were the most popular source of oral health knowledge for the children followed by dentists, school teachers, and media.

  16. 31 March 2016 - Qatar Foundation Research and Development Executive Vice President H. Al-Ibrahim signing a Cooperation Agreement with CERN Director-General F. Gianotti.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    Dr Hamad Al-Ibrahim Executive Vice President, Qatar Foundation Research and Development. Were present: CERN International Relations Unit, Adviser for Qatar P. Fassnacht; CERN Director for Research and Computing E. Elsen; Texas A&M Professor of Physics A. Safonov ; CERN Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle; Professor of Physics, Qatar University I.Al-Qaradawi; Executive Vice President H. Al-Ibrahim; CERN Director-General F. Gianotti; Ambassador Faisal Bin Abdulla Al-Henzab to the UNOG; Director of Research Computing, Texas A&M, Qatar O. Bouhali; Vice Dean, Texas A&M, Qatar E. Massad; Executive Director, Research Coordination & Special Initiatives, Qatar Foundation R&D D. Khoury.

  17. MIGRANTS’ IDENTITY: A STUDY OF SECOND GENERATION MIGRANT LABOR IN QATAR

    OpenAIRE

    Muslu, Hazal

    2015-01-01

    Second generation migrants who were born or grew up in Qatar and studied in the same schools and environment with their Qatari counterparts represent a different case than migrant labor workers who move to Qatar through a sponsorship agreement for temporary purposes. The identity construction of second generation of middle class migrants is an issue that requires a further research since the research on international migration in the GCC countries tends to focus on low-income migrant workers ...

  18. The frequency of polycystic ovary syndrome in young reproductive females in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif E; Rahman S; Zia Y; Rizk NM

    2016-01-01

    Elham Sharif,1 Sumaya Rahman,1 Yumna Zia,1 Nasser M Rizk1,2 1Biomedical Sciences Department, College of Health Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 2Physiology Department, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Abstract: This was a prospective cross-sectional study in which 126 female students between the ages of 18 and 30 years were evaluated for the frequency of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) through clinical interview, questionnaire, and anthrop...

  19. Qatar Airways Official Partner of China Team At 15th Doha Asian Games 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Asian Games was held from Dec.1-15 this year in Qatar's capital Doha,which attracted more than 10,500 athletes and team officials from 45 countries competing in 39sports.As Official Airline of the 15th Asian Games,Qatar Airways delivers its award-winning Five Star service to visitors to the Games,whether they are participating or are spectators.

  20. Perception and intentions to quit among waterpipe smokers in Qatar: a cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Jaam, M.; Al-Marridi, W.; Fares, H.; Izham, M.; Kheir, N; Awaisu, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the perceptions and attitudes of waterpipe (shisha) smokers in Qatar regarding the health risks associated with addiction and to determine their intentions to quit. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 181 self-reported waterpipe smokers. Participants were approached in public places as well as in shisha cafes in Qatar. The questionnaire included items related to perception, attitude and intention to quit. Both descriptive and inferential statistics...

  1. Validation of an Arabic version of the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Wilbur, Kerry; Al Hammaq, Abdulla O.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Several instruments evaluate patient-reported outcomes in diabetes mellitus (DM), but almost none are validated for use in Arabic language. The aim of this study is to test the psychometric properties and responsiveness of the Arabic version of the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQs) in Qatar. Methods: Ambulatory Arabic speaking DM patients were interviewed at two consecutive time points in Doha, Qatar. The 8-item DTSQs was administered in conjunction with the Medical ...

  2. The cultural life script of Qatar and across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    Cultural life scripts (CLS) are culturally shared cognitive representations of the expected order and timing of important life events in a prototypical life. Through three studies data from Qatar were analysed and compared to previously collected data from Denmark, Turkey, and the US. In Study 1 we...... gender. In Study 2 important personal life story events were collected from 83 Qatari undergraduates in order to explore the overlap between remembered life events and CLS events. Study 3 was a reanalysis of CLS data from Denmark, Turkey, and the US. There was a considerable overlap of events across...... cultures, but we also found that the Qatari CLS showed more gender differences and contained more religious and positive events compared to the other three countries....

  3. The distribution of Blastocystis subtypes in isolates from Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Madi, Marawan; Aly, Mahmoud; Behnke, Jerzy M; Clark, C Graham; Balkhy, Hanan

    2015-09-17

    Blastocystis is a common single-celled intestinal parasite of humans and other animals comprising at least 17 genetically distinct small subunit ribosomal RNA lineages (subtypes (STs)), nine of which have been found in humans. The geographic distribution of Blastocystis subtypes is variable, but the subtypes present in Qatar are at present unknown. Stool samples were collected from randomly selected, apparently healthy subjects arriving in Qatar for the first time. Blastocystis subtypes were determined by sequencing of the small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) PCR products. Phylogenetic analyses were done using Maximum Composite Likelihood method. 71.1 % of samples were positive for Blastocystis infection based on PCR-detection methodology compared to only 6.9 % by microscopy. Prevalence of Blastocystis did not differ between the sexes nor between age classes. However, there was a regional difference in prevalence with subjects arriving from Africa showing the highest (87.6 %), those from Western Asia intermediate (68.6 %) and from Eastern Asia the lowest prevalence (67.6 %). Genetic analysis detected only three STs. ST3 was the most common (69.3 %) and ST2 was the rarest (3.5 %), while ST1 had a prevalence of 27.2 %. ST2 showed a regional variation, being absent from the 64 Western Asian Blastocystis-positive subjects. Both ST1 and ST3 showed significant differences in prevalence between the sexes. This is the first report exploring the distribution of Blastocystis subtypes in our region. We recommend that stool screening via microscopy for the presence of Blastocystis should be abandoned since it is extremely insensitive. In future, the prevalence of Blastocystis infections should be based on PCR methodology and we predict that in the years ahead diagnostic PCR will become the tool of choice. More work is needed to identify the full range of Blastocystis subtypes that circulate in our region.

  4. Meting at Qatar confirms the new OPEC pragmatism; Reuniao no Qatar confirma o novo pragmatismo da OPEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussena, Sadek

    2007-07-01

    On June 11, the the members of OPEC had a meeting at Qatar, and based on the current oil prices, decided not reducing their production quotes, maintaining the production total limit at 25.4 millions of b/d, established before the entering of American troops in Baghdad on April 22. Therefore, the OPEC prefers to consolidated his profits taking advantage of the positive news from prior weeks. Some factors seems to sustain the prices at an elevated level: the late retaking of Iraq exportations; the doubts on the real production capacity of the PDVSA; the inventories at under level to that recent years; the reduced production of Saudi Arab in June; and the support required by the non OPEC largest producers, including Mexico, Russia and Norwegian.

  5. Getting Its Ducks in a Row? Qatar Foundation's Agreement with HEC Paris and the Launch of the Qatar Foundation Management, Education and Research Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Observatory on Borderless Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Last week, private, non-profit organisation the Qatar Foundation (QF) announced a partnership agreement with French business institution HEC Paris to offer executive education programmes. According to the terms of the agreement, a full-time faculty will provide executive and short certificate programmes and corporate-specific training, including…

  6. Attitudes toward Science among Grades 3 through 12 Arab Students in Qatar: Findings from a Cross-Sectional National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ziad; Summers, Ryan; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad; Wang, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed students' attitudes toward science in Qatar. A cross-sectional, nationwide probability sample representing all students enrolled in grades 3 through 12 in the various types of schools in Qatar completed the "Arabic Speaking Students' Attitudes toward Science Survey" (ASSASS). The validity and reliability of the…

  7. Prevalence of microplastics in the marine waters of Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Azenith B; Al-Maslamani, Ibrahim; Obbard, Jeffrey Philip

    2016-10-15

    Microplastics are firmly recognized as a ubiquitous and growing threat to marine biota and their associated marine habitats worldwide. The evidence of the prevalence of microplastics was documented for the first time in the marine waters of Qatar's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). An optimized and validated protocol was developed for the extraction of microplastics from plankton-rich seawater samples without loss of microplastic debris present and characterized using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. In total 30 microplastic polymers have been identified with an average concentration of 0.71particlesm(-3) (range 0-3particlesm(-3)). Polypropylene, low density polyethylene, polyethylene, polystyrene, polyamide, polymethyl methacrylate, cellophane, and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene polymers were characterized with majority of the microplastics either granular shape, sizes ranging from 125μm to 1.82mm or fibrous with sizes from 150μm to 15.98mm. The microplastics are evident in areas where nearby anthropogenic activities, including oil-rig installations and shipping operations are present.

  8. Photometric investigation of hot exoplanets: TrES-3b and Qatar-1b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Erdem, A.; Budding, E.

    2017-08-01

    New photometric follow-up observations of transitting 'hot Jupiters' TrES-3b and Qatar-1b are presented. Weighted mean values of the solutions of light curves in R-filter for both planetary systems are reported and compared with the previous results. The transit light curves were analysed using the WINFITTER code. The physical properties of the planets were estimated. The planet radii are found to be Rp = 1.381 ± 0.033RJ for TrES-3b and Rp = 1.142 ± 0.025RJ for Qatar-1b. Transit times and their uncertainties were also determined and a new linear ephemeris was computed for both systems. Analysis of transit times showed that a significant signal could not be determined for TrES-3b, while weak evidence was found for Qatar-1b, which might be tested using more precise future transit times.

  9. A review of cyberbullying legislation in Qatar: Considerations for policy makers and educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foody, Mairéad; Samara, Muthanna; El Asam, Aiman; Morsi, Hisham; Khattab, Azhar

    Cyberbullying is a worldwide problem affecting mental health, education, safety and general well-being for individuals across the globe. Despite the widespread availability of the Internet, research into prevalence rates of cyberbullying in Qatar is lacking and legislating for the crime has been slow to develop. Recently there have been some positive initiatives in the country such as a Cybercrime Prevention Law, the development of a National ICT Strategy, and a website detailing safe practice guidelines for Internet usage. However, the implementation and usage of these initiatives are still limited and there is a lack of awareness of cyberbullying in Qatar. As a result, the risk factors and consequences among school-aged children are unknown. The current paper presents an evaluation of the legislative and public policy solutions to cyberbullying available in Qatar, and outlines the critical challenges that could potentially face educators in shaping best practice guidelines for the future.

  10. Bringing humanity into view: action research with Qatar's ambulance service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Gill; Wiggins, Liz

    2017-08-21

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to argue for the widening of attention in healthcare improvement efforts, to include an awareness of the humanity of people who work in the sector and an appreciation of the part human connection plays in engagement around good quality work. Theoretical frameworks and research approaches which draw on action-based, interpretive and systemic thinking are proposed, as a complement to current practices. Design/methodology/approach The paper describes the early stages of an action research (AR) project, which used the appreciative inquiry "4D" framework to conduct participative inquiry in Hamad Medical Corporation's ambulance service in Qatar, in which staff became co-researchers. Findings The co-researchers were highly motivated to work with improvement goals as a result of their participation in the AR. They, and their managers, saw each other and the work in new ways and discovered that they had much to offer. Research limitations/implications This was a small-scale pilot project, from which findings must be considered tentative. The challenges of establishing good collaboration across language, culture and organisational divides are considerable. Practical implications Appreciative and action-oriented inquiry methods can serve not only to find things out, but also to highlight and give value to aspects of humanity in the workplace that are routinely left invisible in formal processes. This, in turn, can help with quality improvement. Originality/value This paper is a challenge to the orthodox way of viewing healthcare organisations, and improvement processes within them, as reliant on control rather than empowerment. An alternative is to actively include the agency, sense-making capacity and humanity of those involved.

  11. Composition of Atmospheric Dust from Qatar in the Arabian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigiterhan, O.; Al-Ansari, I. S.; Abdel-Moati, M.; Al-Ansi, M.; Paul, B.; Nelson, A.; Turner, J.; Murray, J. W.; Alfoldy, B. Z.; Mahfouz, M. M. K.; Giamberini, M.

    2015-12-01

    Samples of atmospheric dust from Qatar have been collected and analyzed for major and trace elemental composition. Twenty-one samples were collected in 2014 and 2015 from Doha, Al Khor, Katara, Sealine, and Al Waab by a variety of techniques. Some samples were collected during the megastorms that occurred in April 2015. Back trajectories were determined for each sample using the NOAA HYSPLIT model over a 50 hour time interval. Our samples were about equally divided between northerly (n=12; northern Saudi Arabia, Kuwait or Iraq) and southerly (n=8; SE Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Oman) sources. One sample originated directly westward, in Saudi Arabia. Samples were microwave-assisted total acid digested (HF+HCl+HNO3) and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). There are only 12 out of 23 elements for which the Qatari dust was enriched relative to upper continental crust (UCC). Calcium was especially enriched at 400% relative to UCC. About 33% of the total sample mass was CaCO3, reflecting the composition of surface rocks in the source areas. Of the elements typically associated with anthropogenic activity, Ag, Ni and Zn were the most enriched relative to UCC, with enrichment factors of 182%, 233% and 209%, respectively. Others like Pb and V were not significantly enriched, with enrichment factors of 25% and 3%, respectively. The major elements Al, Mn and Fe were depleted relative to UCC because of the strong enrichment in CaCO3, with enrichment factors of -58%, -35% and -45% respectively. We separately averaged the samples with northern and southern origins to see if composition could be used to identify source. Only three elements had a statistical difference. Pb and Na were higher in the samples from the Se while Cr was higher in those from the north.

  12. Predictors of Reintubation in Trauma Intensive Care Unit: Qatar Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Mahmood

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the causes, predictors and outcomes of re-intubation. Methods: Retrospective analysis of data collected from the trauma data base registry was conducted to identify the extubation failure cases in Trauma ICU at Hamad General Hospital, the only Level I trauma center in Qatar between January 2009 and December 2010. Demographics, mechanism of Injury, complications, injury severity score (ISS, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, ICU-length of stay (LOS, and mortality were analyzed among trauma patients who need reintubation within 48 hrs after extubation (group 1 compared to successfully extubated patients (group 2. Result: A total of 954 patients were admitted to the trauma ICU, of which 343 were intubated orotracheally. The mean age of patients was 32±12 years with male predominance (95%. Motor vehicle crash (41%, pedestrian injury (20% and falls (18% were the most common mechanisms of injury. Reintubation (group 1 was required in 24 patients (7%. Patients in group 1 had higher rate of head injury mainly SAH (88%, pneumonia (79% and pulmonary contusion (58%. The mean ICU-LOS was higher in the reintubated patients (p=0.010 in comparison to group 2. Forty-six percent of reintubated patients required tracheostomy. The mean age, ISS, GCS and tube size was comparable among the two groups. Furthermore, reintubation was not associated with higher mortality rate (p=0.910. However, Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP (odd ratio=3.61 [95% CI 1.25-10.44]; p=0.020 and ventilator days (odd ratio=1.09 [95% CI 1.024-1.153]; p=0.006 were independent predictors of reintubation by multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Re-intubation is associated with increased ICU-LOS and need for tracheostomy. VAP and prolonged intubation are independent predictors of re-intubation. Our finding addresses the value of prevention and early treatment of infection in intubated patients. This study may represent an audit of local practice as well.

  13. Occupational exposure to dromedaries and risk for MERS-CoV infection, Qatar, 2013–2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); E. Farag (Elmoubasher); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); K.A. Mohran (Khaled A.); G-J. Godeke (Gert-Jan); V.S. Raj (Stalin); F. Alhajri (Farhoud); S.A. Al-Marri (Salih); H.E. Al Romaihi (Hamad); M. Al-Thani (Mohamed); B.J. Bosch (Berend Jan); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); A.M. El-Sayed (Ahmed M.); A.K. Ibrahim; N. Al-Molawi; M.A. Müller (Marcel); S.K. Pasha; C. Drosten (Christian); M.M. AlHajri (Mohd); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe determined the presence of neutralizing antibodies to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in persons in Qatar with and without dromedary contact. Antibodies were only detected in those with contact, suggesting dromedary exposure as a risk factor for infection. Findings also s

  14. Occupational Exposure to Dromedaries and Risk for MERS-CoV Infection, Qatar, 2013-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusken, Chantal B E M; Farag, Elmoubasher A B A; Haagmans, Bart L; Mohran, Khaled A; Godeke, Gert-Jan; Raj, Stalin; Alhajri, Farhoud; Al-Marri, Salih A; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E; Al-Thani, Mohamed; Bosch, Berend-Jan; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; El-Sayed, Ahmed M; Ibrahim, Adel K; Al-Molawi, N; Müller, Marcel A; Pasha, Syed K; Drosten, Christian; AlHajri, Mohd M; Koopmans, Marion P G

    2015-01-01

    We determined the presence of neutralizing antibodies to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in persons in Qatar with and without dromedary contact. Antibodies were only detected in those with contact, suggesting dromedary exposure as a risk factor for infection. Findings also showed eviden

  15. Evaluation of clinical pharmacy services offered for palliative care patients in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Kyle John; Mohamad, Alaa Adil; AlYafei, Sumaya AlSaadi

    2014-09-01

    Palliative care is an emerging concept in the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council, a political and economic union of Arab states bordering the Persian Gulf, namely Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Clinical pharmacy services have not yet been evaluated in this region. The objectives of this study were to create a baseline inventory of clinical pharmacy interventions in palliative care and to assess the perceived importance of interventions made. This was a prospective, single-center characterization study. Interventions were documented from September 30 to December 1, 2013. They were characterized into predetermined categories and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Physician acceptance rate and intervention rate per patient were calculated. Classification categories were sent to 10 practicing pharmacists in each of Qatar and Canada, who ranked the categories on the basis of perceived importance. A total of 96 interventions were documented, giving 3 interventions per patient and an acceptance rate of 81%. Discontinuing therapy (29%), initiating therapy (25%), and provision of education/counseling (13.5%) were most common. No differences were found between rankings from pharmacists in Qatar or Canada. Clinical pharmacy interventions are frequent, and those relating to alterations in drug therapy are most common. Interventions align with the perceived importance from pharmacists in both Qatar and Canada.

  16. Qatar's Educational System in the Technology-Driven Era: Long Story Short

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkouti, Ibrahim Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Qatar's educational system. Specifically, it focuses on the national educational reform that has been unfolding since 2003, tracks its progress, and describes the extent to which educational technology is utilized within Qatari institutions of the higher education. The paper ends with recommendations for practice…

  17. The implications of the relative risk for road mortality on road safety programmes in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consunji, Rafael J; Peralta, Ruben R; Al-Thani, Hassan; Latifi, Rifat

    2015-04-01

    The epidemiology of road deaths and in particular the relative risk for road mortality (RRRM) in Qatar has not been fully defined. This study will analyse and compare the proportionate mortality and age-specific death rates from road traffic injuries (RTIs) and make recommendations for targeted injury prevention programmes for road safety in Qatar. Data from the Qatar Statistics Authority (QSA), for the year 2010, was collected and analysed. All deaths classified as 'ICD-10 (V89) Motor- or Nonmotor-Vehicle, Accident Type of Vehicle Unspecified' were included. There were 247 RTI related deaths in Qatar in 2010. An overall death rate was computed at 14.4 deaths per 100 000 population. The RRRM varied over 10 times among different populations with Qatari males (QM) having an increased RRRM from 10 years of age, those aged 20-29 years had the highest RRRM of 10.2. The lowest RRRM was for Qatari females who did not have a single reported road fatality in 2010. Populations with a significantly elevated RRRM (ie, RRRM>1.0) were non-Qatari men older than 50 years and Qatari males from the age of 10 onward. Proven and definite programmes must be implemented to reduce these unnecessary deaths among the populations at the highest risk. Multidisciplinary approaches must be implemented and their efficacy evaluated.

  18. Behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete using steel slag coarse aggregate produced in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnahhal Wael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of Qatar suffers from the shortage of natural resources needed for concrete production. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the feasibility of using by-product recycled materials as aggregates to maintain the concrete construction industry. Several types of recyclable materials are currently used in concrete. One of the potential resources of recycled concrete is steel slag. Knowing that Steel slag is the most significant solid waste generated by Qatar Steel Company in Qatar, replacing of natural coarse aggregate with steel slag aggregate will have a significant environmental and economic impact to the state of Qatar. This paper presents the compression and flexural test results of different concrete mixes made of steel slag coarse aggregate combined with a newly developed basalt chopped fibres. The parameters investigated included the volume fraction of the fibre used and the type of coarse aggregates (natural aggregates “Gabbro” and steel slag aggregates. Plain concrete specimens containing natural coarse aggregates and steel slag aggregates with no fibres added were also tested to serve as control. Test results showed that adding the basalt chopped fibres to the concrete mixes enhanced their flexural tensile strengths at different percentages. In addition, the compressive strength of concrete made with steel slag aggregate was higher than that made with natural gabbro aggregate. Test results clearly showed that steel slag aggregates can be used as sustainable and eco-friendly alternative materials in concrete structures.

  19. International Trends in Health Science Librarianship Part 18: The Middle East (Iran, Qatar and Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatkar, Kimia; Ayatollahi, Haleh; Havlin, Tracy; Neves, Karen; Şendir, Mesra

    2016-06-01

    This is the 18th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is the Middle East (Iran, Qatar and Turkey). The next feature column will investigate trends in the Balkan States JM.

  20. Little Steps at Improving Preschool Teachers Practices through Counseling Skills in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Aisha; Nasser, Ramzi

    2012-01-01

    The study focused on the effects of basic counseling skills program, such as listening, understanding, respecting, and empathizing, to elementary school teachers in Qatar. Through a three-hour intervention program, the authors used a self-reported questionnaire, interview questions and classroom observations to examine changes in how preschool…

  1. Alignment of Teacher-Developed Curricula and National Standards in Qatar's National Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Ramzi; Zaki, Eman; Allen, Nancy; Al Mula, Badria; Al Mutawaha, Fatma; Al Bin Ali, Hessa; Kerr, Tricia

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the degree to which teacher developed curriculum was aligned with the national standards in Qatar. Three sources of data included teacher response to a questionnaire, teacher interviews and expert rating of the alignment of teacher-developed materials with curriculum standards. A survey and interview questions measured…

  2. The 2010-2011 excavation season at Al Zubarah, north-west Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Tobias; al-Naimi, Faisal; Yeomans, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the results of the 2010–2011 archaeological fieldwork at the late eighteenth–twentieth-century abandoned city of al-Zubarah in north-west Qatar. The excavations in five areas inside the town, covering courtyard houses, a suq, a palatial compound, and a midden are dis...

  3. A road map to Translational Medicine in Qatar and a model for the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincola, Francesco M; Sheikh, Javaid I

    2012-08-29

    Translational Medicine (TM) in Qatar is part of a concerted effort of the Qatari medical and scientific leadership supported by a strong political will by Qatari authorities to deliver world-class health care to Qatari residents while participating in the worldwide quest to bridge the gap between bench-to-bedside-to-community. TM programs should embrace the Qatar National vision for research to become an international hub of excellence in research and development, based on intellectual merit, contributing to global knowledge and adhering to international standards, to innovate by translating new and original ideas into useful applications, to be inclusive at the national and international level, to build and maintain a competitive and diversified economy and ultimately improve the health and well-being of the Qatar's population. Although this writing focuses on Qatar, we hope that the thoughts expressed here may be of broader use for the development of any TM program particularly in regions where an established academic community surrounded by a rich research infrastructure and/or a vibrant biotechnology enterprise is not already present.

  4. 76 FR 32953 - Transportation Infrastructure/Multimodal Products and Services Trade Mission to Doha, Qatar, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... investments in infrastructure and economic diversification, resulting in significant export opportunities for... development of Qatar and the U.A.E. also may have great potential. Applications from companies selling... complete and timely submit an application package for consideration by the U.S. Department of Commerce. All...

  5. Exploring the Relationship between Organizational Learning and Career Resilience among Faculty Members at Qatar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Two main purposes guide this study. The first is to assess the level of individual, group, and organizational learning at Qatar University (QU), and the level of career resilience among its faculty members. The second is to explore the relationships between these levels of learning at QU and the career resilience of its faculty members.…

  6. Quality of Life of Caregivers of Children with Autism in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheir, Nadir; Ghoneim, Ola; Sandridge, Amy L.; Al-Ismail, Muna; Hayder, Sara; Al-Rawi, Fadhila

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Caring for a child diagnosed with autism could affect the quality of life of the caregiver in various different ways. No previous research has assessed the quality of lives of caregivers of children with autism in Qatar. Methods: Caregivers of a child with autism between 3 and 17 years old were recruited from child rehabilitation…

  7. Letter regarding article "Primary coronary angioplasty for ST-°©‐Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Qatar: First nationwide program"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Badreldin Elshazly

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor: In their article “Primary Coronary Angioplasty for ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI in Qatar: First Nationwide Program”, Gehani et al. developed an impressive plan to implement primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI for the first time in Qatar [1]. As a graduate of Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, I have witnessed immense improvement in the Qatari healthcare system over the past few years. From building the new state of the art Heart Hospital to developing the first unified nationwide primary PCI program in the world, there is no doubt that Qatar has made an immense leap towards implementing world-class cardiovascular healthcare in the Middle East.

  8. Transit Timing Variation Measurements of WASP-12b and Qatar-1b: No Evidence Of Additional Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2017-02-01

    WASP-12b and Qatar-1b are transiting hot Jupiters for which previous works have suggested the presence of transit timing variations (TTVs) indicative of additional bodies in these systems—an Earth-mass planet in WASP-12 and a brown-dwarf mass object in Qatar-1. Here, we present 23 new WASP-12b and 18 new Qatar-1b complete (or nearly complete) transit observations. We perform global system fits to all of our light curves for each system, as well as RV and stellar spectroscopic parameters from the literature. The global fits provide refined system parameters and uncertainties for each system, including precise transit center times for each transit. The transit model residuals of the combined and five minute binned light curves have an rms of 183 and 255 parts per million (ppm) for WASP-12b and Qatar-1b, respectively. Most of the WASP-12b system parameter values from this work are consistent with values from previous studies, but have ∼40%–50% smaller uncertainties. Most of the Qatar-1b system parameter values and uncertainties from this work are consistent with values recently reported in the literature. We find no convincing evidence for sinusoidal TTVs with a semi-amplitude of more than ∼35 and ∼25 s in the WASP-12b and Qatar-1b systems, respectively.

  9. Radioactivity levels in the marine environment along the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qaradawi, Ilham; Abdel-Moati, Mohamed; Al-Yafei, Mohsin Al-Ansi; Al-Ansari, Ebrahim; Al-Maslamani, Ibrahim; Holm, Elis; Al-Shaikh, Ismail; Mauring, Alexander; Pinto, Primal V; Abdulmalik, Dana; Amir, Amina; Miller, Mark; Yigiterhan, Oguz; Persson, Bertil

    2015-01-15

    A study on (137)Cs, (40)K, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, and (238)U was carried out along the EEZ of Qatar. Results serve as the first ever baseline data. The level of (137)Cs (mean value 1.6 ± 0.4 Bq m(-3)) in water filters was found to be in the same order of magnitude as reported by others in worldwide marine radioactivity studies. Results are also in agreement with values reported from other Gulf regions. The computed values of sediment-water distribution coefficients Kd, are lower than the values given by IAEA. Measurements were carried out for bottom sediments, biota samples like fish, oyster, sponge, seashell, mangrove, crab, shrimp, starfish, dugong and algae. The 'concentration factors' reported for biota samples are below the levels published by IAEA and cause no significant impact on human health for seafood consumers in Qatar.

  10. Remote sensing of Qatar nearshore habitats with perspectives for coastal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christopher; Dupont, Jennifer; Abdel-Moati, Mohamed; Hobeichi, Sanaa; Palandro, David; Purkis, Sam

    2016-04-30

    A framework is proposed for utilizing remote sensing and ground-truthing field data to map benthic habitats in the State of Qatar, with potential application across the Arabian Gulf. Ideally the methodology can be applied to optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of mapping the nearshore environment to identify sensitive habitats, monitor for change, and assist in management decisions. The framework is applied to a case study for northeastern Qatar with a key focus on identifying high sensitivity coral habitat. The study helps confirm the presence of known coral and provides detail on a region in the area of interest where corals have not been previously mapped. Challenges for the remote sensing methodology associated with natural heterogeneity of the physical and biological environment are addressed. Recommendations on the application of this approach to coastal environmental risk assessment and management planning are discussed as well as future opportunities for improvement of the framework.

  11. Developing an interprofessional continuing education symposium for health care educators in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Pamela S; Chappell, Kathy; Decker, Sharon; Moore, Donald; Pilcher, Jobeth; Scanlon, Noel; Sherman, Lawrence

    2014-12-01

    An international interprofessional continuing education symposium was developed and implemented by a global faculty team in Qatar in March 2014. This symposium was undertaken as part of the country's goal of improving the quality of health care. After an extensive planning process, health care educators engaged in multiple types of learning experiences to enrich their knowledge and skills. Evaluation data support the value of this experience.

  12. Comparison of intestinal parasitic infection in newly arrived and resident workers in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Madi Marawan A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid growth of Qatar in the last two decades has been associated with an enormous expansion of building programs in its cities and in the provision of new service industries. This in turn has attracted a large influx of immigrant workers seeking employment in jobs associated with food handling, domestic service and the building industry. Many of these immigrants come from countries in the tropics and subtropics where intestinal parasitic infections are common. Methods We analyzed intestinal parasitic infections recorded in 2008 among immigrant and long-term resident workers in Doha city, Qatar (n = 1538. Stool examinations were carried out at the Hamad Medical Corporation and at the Medical Commission in Doha using standard procedures. Results Overall, 21.5% of subjects were infected with at least one of the species recorded (8 helminth and 4 protozoan species; the highest prevalence was for hookworms = 8.3% and there were strong regional effects on prevalence of helminths, with subjects from North East Africa and Nepal showing particularly high prevalence. Most helminths declined in prevalence in subjects that acquired residency status in Qatar, especially among female subjects, but there was a marked exception among male Nepalese workers, who continued to harbour helminth infections (notably hookworms after they became residents. Contrary to all other regional groups the prevalence of Giardia duodenalis was higher among Nepalese residents compared with new arrivals, while Blastocystis hominis infections were more common among residents of all regions, and especially among North East Africans. Conclusions Our analysis has identified male Nepalese workers as a particular risk group continuing to harbour hookworm infection and G. duodenalis as residents, and subjects from North East Africa are as particularly likely to acquire B. hominis infection after settling in the country. These conclusions have important

  13. Hospital organizational structures, culture, change and effectiveness: The case of Hamad Medical Corporation in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. This thesis presents health care organizations as heterogenic and highly complex in nature with particular normative structures underpinning their formal rational structures. It seeks to explore the evolution of organization structure as applied to a medical corporation in Qatar and to examine the nature of organizational culture and multi professional cohesiveness. In doing so it assesses a ...

  14. Persian Gulf-based SWFs and Financial Hubs in Bahrain, Dubai and Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Asim Ali; Shatha Al-Aswad

    2012-01-01

    Competitive branding between Bahrain, Qatar and UAE has occurred on different levels of investment through the medium of the Gulf State Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWFs). This has happened across a number of sectors: oil and gas, finance, real estate, automotive and entertainment, but Vision 2030 for the three states gives a sense of duplicating strategies. As they aim to diversify their economies and create jobs, they have also duplicated efforts, perhaps leading to a misallocation of resources....

  15. Somatic survival and organ donation among brain-dead patients in the state of Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Saibu; Thomas, Merlin; Ibrahim, Wanis H; Abdussalam, Ahmed; Chandra, Prem; Ali, Husain Shabbir; Raza, Tasleem

    2016-10-31

    The Qatari law, as in many other countries, uses brain death as the main criteria for organ donation and cessation of medical support. By contrast, most of the public in Qatar do not agree with the limitation or withdrawal of medical care until the time of cardiac death. The current study aims to examine the duration of somatic survival after brain death, organ donation rate in brain-dead patients as well as review the underlying etiologies and level of support provided in the state of Qatar. This is a retrospective study of all patients diagnosed with brain death over a 10-year period conducted at the largest tertiary center in Qatar (Hamad General Hospital). Among the 53 patients who were diagnosed with brain death during the study period, the median and mean somatic survivals of brain-dead patients in the current study were 3 and 4.5 days respectively. The most common etiology was intracranial hemorrhage (45.3 %) followed by ischemic stroke (17 %). Ischemic stroke patients had a median survival of 11 days. Organ donation was accepted by only two families (6.6 %) of the 30 brain dead patients deemed suitable for organ donation. The average somatic survival of brain-dead patients is less than one week irrespective of supportive measures provided. Organ donation rate was extremely low among brain-dead patients in Qatar. Improved public education may lead to significant improvement in resource utilization as well as organ transplant donors and should be a major target area of future health care policies.

  16. The most common mosquitoes at Al- Rayyan municipality (Qatar state) and their potential for transmitting malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Rabab Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    During the period from December 2014 to April 2015, a mosquito survey (Diptera: Culicidae) was conducted at Al Rayyan Municipality, western region of Qatar. The survey aimed to identify the most common mosquitoes species in the study area and assess their potential in transmitting malaria. In all, 37 collection sites were visited throughout the study period revealing 312 mosquitoes. Larvae were collected as well as adults. The pH of larvae breeding sites was also measured in the laboratory. A...

  17. Measurement and Modeling of NO2 Traffic-Related Air Pollution in Doha, Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Naimi, Noora Abdulla

    2013-01-01

    Six major intersections along C-ring road of Qatar were investigated for NO2 emission. NO2 is considered to be a marker of vehicular pollution thus in this study, its relationship was established with traffic volume in each intersection during December 2012 and March-April 2013. Significant differences were established between the NO2 concentration in each intersection. Higher concentrations were observed in areas with high traffic volume. The magnitude of the dispersion of the NO2 emission ...

  18. Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Gastrointestinal Pathogens in Migrant Workers in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, John M; Ranbhise, Sanjay; Ibrahim, Emad; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E; Farag, Elmoubasher; Abu-Raddad, Laith J; Glesby, Marshall J

    2016-12-07

    The causes of infectious diarrhea among the migrant worker population in Qatar are not well understood. We conducted a prospective observational study to understand the demographic and clinical characteristics and infectious causes of diarrhea among migrant workers in Doha, Qatar. A total of 126 male workers presenting to the Qatar Red Crescent Worker's Health Center outpatient clinic or emergency department were studied over a 5-month period in 2015-2016. Epidemiologic surveys were administered to all subjects and the prevalence of 22 different stool pathogens was determined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (FilmArray(®) Gastrointestinal PCR). A target pathogen was identified in 62.7% of subjects. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli was the most prevalent pathogen and was detected in 24.6% of subjects, followed by Salmonella (22.2%), enteroaggregative E. coli (15.1%), Giardia lamblia (9.5%), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (8.7%). Multiple pathogens were identified in 49.3% of positive stool samples. In a multivariable analysis, the presence of a heart rate ≥ 90 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-10.0) and > 5 fecal leukocytes/high-power field (adjusted OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2-7.0) were significant predictors of detecting an acute inflammatory pathogen by PCR. Use of multiplex PCR enabled the detection of gastrointestinal pathogens in a high proportion of cases, illustrating the utility of this diagnostic tool in epidemiologic studies of infectious diarrhea.

  19. The private-public literacy divide amid educational reform in Qatar: What does PISA tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Jehanzeb R.

    2015-04-01

    The education system in Qatar comprises of both private schools, which receive money through student fees, and public schools, which are fully government-funded. In the mid-2000s, Qatar started its transition towards an independent school model with the aim of eventually converting all public schools into government-supported independent schools. The idea was to give public schools more autonomy in terms of hiring decisions, adoption of curriculum and textbooks, and budget spending, enabling them to emulate some of the private schools' strategies for turning out successful students. This study examines evidence from the 2006-2012 administrations of the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) in Qatar in order to evaluate whether or not recent educational reform efforts in this country have succeeded in bridging the literacy divide between private and public schools. The results, presented in a number of detailed tables and discussed in the last part of the article, indicate that there is a significant difference in key literacy skills between the two types of schools. Private schools were found to outperform their public counterparts in areas such as mathematics, reading and science, both before and after controlling for important student-level differences, and this gap has evidently persisted from 2006 to 2012.

  20. Demographic data and hemodialysis population dynamics in Qatar: A five year survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fituri Omar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis was initiated in Qatar in 1981, since then the hemodialysis population has been expanding rapidly. This report describes the demographics and outcome of our hemo-dialysis patients during a five years study period. Data of all the patients on regular hemodialysis from January 1 st , 2002 to December 31 st , 2006 were included in this study was collected from the medical records and entered into an especially designed questionnaire. The prevalence of end stage kidney disease in Qatar is 624 patients per million populations with an incidence of 202 patients per million populations per year. Currently, 278 patients are on hemodialysis, 65% of them are Qatari, males represent 51%, whereas 44.6% are between 65-74 years of age. Diabetic nephropathy is the commonest cause of end stage kidney disease (48%, followed by primary glomerulonephritis and hypertensive glomerulopathy. Arteriovenous fistula was the vascular access in 57% of patients. The incidence of Hepatitis B, C and Human immunodeficiency virus had been stable throughhout the study period though our hemodialysis population had increased by 1.5 fold. The first and five years survival rates of our patients were 84 and 53% respectively. Qatar has one of the highest rates of dialysis patients with a good long-term survival report. Peritoneal dialysis remained to be the key solution for the rapidly expanding patients′ pool. Maintenance of national registry of dialysis patients and improving our organ transplant program is an essential goal.

  1. Perception and intentions to quit among waterpipe smokers in Qatar: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaam, M; Al-Marridi, W; Fares, H; Izham, M; Kheir, N; Awaisu, A

    2016-03-21

    To evaluate the perceptions and attitudes of waterpipe (shisha) smokers in Qatar regarding the health risks associated with addiction and to determine their intentions to quit. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 181 self-reported waterpipe smokers. Participants were approached in public places as well as in shisha cafes in Qatar. The questionnaire included items related to perception, attitude and intention to quit. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were performed for data analyses, with P ≤ 0.05 considered statistically significant. About 44% of the respondents believed that waterpipe smoking was safer than cigarette smoking, and more than 70% would not mind if their children became involved in waterpipe smoking. More than half of the current smokers wanted to quit smoking shisha at some point, and 17% identified health concerns as the main motivating factor for their intention to quit. A large proportion of shisha smokers viewed shisha as a safer alternative to cigarettes, yet they admitted to intending to quit. These findings underscore the need to design educational interventions and awareness campaigns as well as impose stringent laws on waterpipe smoking in public places in Qatar.

  2. Satisfaction with a 2-day communication skills course culturally tailored for medical specialists in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L; Alyafei, Khalid; Afana, Abdelhamid; Al-Romaihi, Sheyma; Yassin, Mohammed; Elnashar, Maha; Al-Arab, Banan; Al-Khal, Abdullatif

    2017-01-01

    Health-care communication skills training may be particularly needed in the Arabian Gulf countries because of the variety of cultures within the physician and patient populations. This study describes the implementation and results of a communication skills training program for physicians in Qatar that assessed previous training, and effect of previous training on participants' course evaluations. We conducted a 2-day communication skills training course covering seven culturally adapted modules. Educational strategies included large and small group work with the standardized patient, demonstration videos, and lectures. At the end, participants completed a course evaluation survey. Data analysis performed with SPSS; frequencies and percentages were calculated, and Chi-square test applied to evaluate statistical significance. A total of 410 physicians in Qatar have participated in the course over a period of 2 years. Evaluation ratings of the course were high. Participants rated the module on Breaking Bad News as the most useful, and the small group role-play as the most helpful course component. One-third of participants had previously participated in experiential communication skills training. There was no association between previous experience and evaluation of the course. Physicians in Qatar positively evaluated a 2-day communication skills course, though the majority of participants did not have any previous exposure to experiential communication skills training.

  3. A road map to Translational Medicine in Qatar and a model for the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Translational Medicine (TM in Qatar is part of a concerted effort of the Qatari medical and scientific leadership supported by a strong political will by Qatari authorities to deliver world-class health care to Qatari residents while participating in the worldwide quest to bridge the gap between bench-to-bedside-to-community. TM programs should embrace the Qatar National vision for research to become an international hub of excellence in research and development, based on intellectual merit, contributing to global knowledge and adhering to international standards, to innovate by translating new and original ideas into useful applications, to be inclusive at the national and international level, to build and maintain a competitive and diversified economy and ultimately improve the health and well-being of the Qatar’s population. Although this writing focuses on Qatar, we hope that the thoughts expressed here may be of broader use for the development of any TM program particularly in regions where an established academic community surrounded by a rich research infrastructure and/or a vibrant biotechnology enterprise is not already present.

  4. Medical education and research environment in Qatar: a new epoch for translational research in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouchane, Lotfi; Mamtani, Ravinder; Al-Thani, Mohammed H; Al-Thani, Al-Anoud M; Ameduri, Marco; Sheikh, Javaid I

    2011-01-27

    Recent advances in medical technology and key discoveries in biomedical research have the potential to improve human health in an unprecedented fashion. As a result, many of the Arab Gulf countries, particularly Qatar are devoting increasing resources toward establishing centers of excellence in biomedical research. However, there are challenges that must be overcome. The low profile of private medical institutions and their negligible endowments in the region are examples of such challenges. Business-type government controlled universities are not the solution for overcoming the challenges facing higher education and research programs in the Middle East.During the last decade, Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development has attracted six branch campuses of American Institutions of higher learning to the Education City in Qatar, a 2500-acre area, which is rapidly becoming a model of integrating higher education and research in the region. Not-for profit, time-tested education institutions from abroad in public-private partnership with local organizations offer favorable conditions to build robust research programs in the region. Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q) of Cornell University is an example such an institution. It is the first and only medical school in Qatar.WCMC-Q's interwoven education, research and public health based framework lays a sturdy foundation for developing and implementing translational medicine research programs of importance to the State of Qatar and Middle Eastern nations. This approach is yielding positive results. Discoveries from this program should influence public policy in a positive fashion toward reducing premature mortality and morbidity due to diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer, examples of health conditions commonly encountered in Qatar.

  5. Medical education and research environment in Qatar: a new epoch for translational research in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameduri Marco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in medical technology and key discoveries in biomedical research have the potential to improve human health in an unprecedented fashion. As a result, many of the Arab Gulf countries, particularly Qatar are devoting increasing resources toward establishing centers of excellence in biomedical research. However, there are challenges that must be overcome. The low profile of private medical institutions and their negligible endowments in the region are examples of such challenges. Business-type government controlled universities are not the solution for overcoming the challenges facing higher education and research programs in the Middle East. During the last decade, Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development has attracted six branch campuses of American Institutions of higher learning to the Education City in Qatar, a 2500-acre area, which is rapidly becoming a model of integrating higher education and research in the region. Not-for profit, time-tested education institutions from abroad in public-private partnership with local organizations offer favorable conditions to build robust research programs in the region. Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q of Cornell University is an example such an institution. It is the first and only medical school in Qatar. WCMC-Q's interwoven education, research and public health based framework lays a sturdy foundation for developing and implementing translational medicine research programs of importance to the State of Qatar and Middle Eastern nations. This approach is yielding positive results. Discoveries from this program should influence public policy in a positive fashion toward reducing premature mortality and morbidity due to diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer, examples of health conditions commonly encountered in Qatar.

  6. Patient perceptions of pharmacist roles in guiding self-medication of over-the-counter therapy in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Wilbur

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Kerry Wilbur1, Samah El Salam1, Ebrahim Mohammadi21Qatar University College of Pharmacy, Doha, Qatar; 2Qatar Petroleum Medical Services, Doha, QatarBackground: Self-care, including self-medication with over-the-counter (OTC drugs, facilitates the public’s increased willingness to assume greater responsibility for their own health. Direct consultation with pharmacists provides efficient professional guidance for safe and appropriate OTC use.Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize patient perceptions of pharmacists and use of nonprescription therapy in an ambulatory care population in Qatar. Methods: Patients having prescriptions filled at one organization’s private medical clinics during two distinct two-week periods were invited to participate in a short verbal questionnaire. Awareness of pharmacist roles in guiding OTC drug selection was assessed, as were patient preferences for OTC indications. Attitudes towards pharmacist and nurse drug knowledge and comfort with direct dispensing were also evaluated.Results: Five hundred seventy patients participated representing 29 countries. Most respondents were men (92.1% with mean age of 38.3 years. Almost 1 in 7 did not know medical complaints could be assessed by a pharmacist (15.3% and 1 in 5 (21.9% were unaware pharmacists could directly supply OTC therapy. The majority (85.3% would be interested in this service. In general, respondents were more comfortable with medication and related advice supplied by pharmacists as opposed to nursing professionals.Conclusion: Patients were familiar with the roles of pharmacists as they pertain to selfmedication with OTC therapy and described the desire to use such a service within this Qatar ambulatory health care setting.Keywords: patient, self-medication, over-the-counter, pharmacist, Qatar

  7. Road traffic fatalities in Qatar, Jordan and the UAE: estimates using regression analysis and the relationship with economic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, A; Hussain, S J; Al-Malki, M a; Shotar, M M; Al-Said, M F; Jadaan, K S

    2010-03-01

    Smeed's equation is a widely used model for prediction of traffic fatalities but has been inadequate for use in developing countries. We applied regression analysis to time-series data on vehicles, exponential models for fatality prediction, producing an average absolute error of 20.9% for Qatar, 10.9% for population and traffic fatalities in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Jordan and Qatar. The data were fitted to Jordan and 5.5% for the UAE. We found a strong linear relationship between gross domestic product and fatality rate.

  8. Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Gastrointestinal Pathogens in Migrant Workers in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, John M.; Ranbhise, Sanjay; Ibrahim, Emad; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E.; Farag, Elmoubasher; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2016-01-01

    The causes of infectious diarrhea among the migrant worker population in Qatar are not well understood. We conducted a prospective observational study to understand the demographic and clinical characteristics and infectious causes of diarrhea among migrant workers in Doha, Qatar. A total of 126 male workers presenting to the Qatar Red Crescent Worker's Health Center outpatient clinic or emergency department were studied over a 5-month period in 2015–2016. Epidemiologic surveys were administered to all subjects and the prevalence of 22 different stool pathogens was determined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (FilmArray® Gastrointestinal PCR). A target pathogen was identified in 62.7% of subjects. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli was the most prevalent pathogen and was detected in 24.6% of subjects, followed by Salmonella (22.2%), enteroaggregative E. coli (15.1%), Giardia lamblia (9.5%), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (8.7%). Multiple pathogens were identified in 49.3% of positive stool samples. In a multivariable analysis, the presence of a heart rate ≥ 90 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–10.0) and > 5 fecal leukocytes/high-power field (adjusted OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2–7.0) were significant predictors of detecting an acute inflammatory pathogen by PCR. Use of multiplex PCR enabled the detection of gastrointestinal pathogens in a high proportion of cases, illustrating the utility of this diagnostic tool in epidemiologic studies of infectious diarrhea. PMID:27928081

  9. Emergence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii producing OXA-23 Carbapenemase in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Rolain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to describe the molecular support of carbapenem resistance from randomly selected clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii as a pilot study from the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC, Qatar. Results of our report will be used to study carbapenemases using molecular techniques in all isolated MDR A. baumannii. Forty-eight MDR A. baumannii were randomly selected from isolates preserved at HMC. Identification of all isolates was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Antibiotic resistance was tested phenotypically by Phoenix and confirmed by Etest. The molecular support of carbapenemases (blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaNDM was investigated by real-time PCR. The epidemiologic relatedness of the isolates was verified by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of CsuE and blaOXA-51 genes. All 48 isolates were identified as A. baumannii and were confirmed to be resistant to most antibiotics, especially meropenem, imipenems, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, amikacin, gentamicin and most of the β-lactams; they were sensitive to colistin. All the isolates were positive for blaOXA-23 and negative for the other tested carbapenemase genes. Clonality analysis demonstrated that different lineages were actually circulating in Qatar; and we suggest that an outbreak occurred in the medical intensive care unit of HMC between 2011 and 2012. Here we report the emergence of MDR A. baumannii producing the carbapenemase OXA-23 in Qatar.

  10. The Driver Behaviour Questionnaire in Arab Gulf countries: Qatar and United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Ozkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo

    2008-07-01

    Manchester Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ) is one of the most widely used instruments for measuring self-reported driving style and investigating the relationship between driving behaviour and accident involvement. In spite of the fact that Arab Gulf countries have a higher road accident fatality rate compared to European countries and USA, the DBQ has not been used in Arab countries so far. The aim of the present study was to investigate the factor structure of the DBQ, then to examine the relationships between the factors of the DBQ and accident involvement, and finally to compare DBQ scores between the two gulf countries: Qatar and United Arab Emirates (UAE). In this study, 1110 Qatari (263 females and 847 males) and 1286 UAE drivers (294 females and 992 males) filled a survey questionnaire including the DBQ and background information. The results showed that UAE drivers scored higher on almost all DBQ items than Qatari drivers. Surprisingly, only very small differences between men and women on the DBQ item scores were found in UAE. Factor analysis resulted in four factors, which were named as errors, pushing-speeding violations, lapses, and aggression-speeding violations. However, there were a number of differences in the factor structure of the DBQ in UAE and Qatar when compared to the theoretical four-factor structure of the DBQ. Reliabilities of some subscales were also questionably lower than in the original British data. Logistic regression analyses showed that errors, lapses, and aggression-speeding violations predicted accident involvement in Qatar but not in UAE after controlling the effect of the demographic variables (age, sex, and annual mileage).

  11. Prevalence of dental caries among 12–14 year old children in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Darwish, Mohammed; El Ansari, Walid; Bener, Abdulbari

    2014-01-01

    Background To ensure the oral health of a population, clinicians must deliver appropriate dental services, and local communities need to have access to dental care facilities. However, establishment of this infrastructure must be based on reliable information regarding disease prevalence and severity in the target population. Objectives The aims of this study were to measure the incidence of dental caries in school children aged 12–14 throughout Qatar, including the influence of socio-demographic factors. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Qatar from October 2011 to March 2012. A total of 2113 children aged 12–14 were randomly selected from 16 schools located in different geographic areas. Three calibrated examiners using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria to diagnose dental caries performed the clinical examinations. Data analyses were subsequently conducted. Results The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth index values were respectively 4.62 (±3.2), 4.79 (±3.5), and 5.5 (±3.7), for 12, 13, and 14 year-old subjects. Caries prevalence was 85%. The mandibular incisors and canines were least affected by dental caries, while maxillary and mandibular molars exhibited the highest incidence of dental caries. Dental caries were affected by socio-demographic factors; significant differences were detected between female and male children, where more female children showed dental caries than male children. In addition, children residing in semi-urban areas showed more dental caries than in urban areas. Conclusion Results indicated that dental caries prevalence among school children in Qatar has reached critical levels, and is influenced by socio-demographic factors. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth values obtained in this study were the second highest detected in the Eastern Mediterranean region. PMID:25057232

  12. Prevalence of dental caries among 12-14 year old children in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Darwish, Mohammed; El Ansari, Walid; Bener, Abdulbari

    2014-07-01

    To ensure the oral health of a population, clinicians must deliver appropriate dental services, and local communities need to have access to dental care facilities. However, establishment of this infrastructure must be based on reliable information regarding disease prevalence and severity in the target population. The aims of this study were to measure the incidence of dental caries in school children aged 12-14 throughout Qatar, including the influence of socio-demographic factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Qatar from October 2011 to March 2012. A total of 2113 children aged 12-14 were randomly selected from 16 schools located in different geographic areas. Three calibrated examiners using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria to diagnose dental caries performed the clinical examinations. Data analyses were subsequently conducted. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth index values were respectively 4.62 (±3.2), 4.79 (±3.5), and 5.5 (±3.7), for 12, 13, and 14 year-old subjects. Caries prevalence was 85%. The mandibular incisors and canines were least affected by dental caries, while maxillary and mandibular molars exhibited the highest incidence of dental caries. Dental caries were affected by socio-demographic factors; significant differences were detected between female and male children, where more female children showed dental caries than male children. In addition, children residing in semi-urban areas showed more dental caries than in urban areas. Results indicated that dental caries prevalence among school children in Qatar has reached critical levels, and is influenced by socio-demographic factors. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth values obtained in this study were the second highest detected in the Eastern Mediterranean region.

  13. Validation of an Arabic version of the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Kerry; Al Hammaq, Abdulla O

    2016-03-01

    Several instruments evaluate patient-reported outcomes in diabetes mellitus (DM), but almost none are validated for use in Arabic language. The aim of this study is to test the psychometric properties and responsiveness of the Arabic version of the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQs) in Qatar. Ambulatory Arabic speaking DM patients were interviewed at two consecutive time points in Doha, Qatar. The 8-item DTSQs was administered in conjunction with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Measure (WHOQOL-Bref) to assess convergent validity. Reliability was evaluated by internal consistency and item analysis. Construct validity was evaluated using "known groups" comparisons (including gender, insulin use, and HbA1c). Sensitivity of DTSQs scores to the subject's metabolic conditions was determined. One hundred subjects (mean age 50.7) participated. Half (54%) were female. The majority (93%) had Type 2 DM, but 39 (42%) were using insulin. Results revealed satisfactory internal consistency. Metabolic measures (fasting blood glucose and AIC) had significant inverse correlations with DTSQs scores (interview 1, Pearson's r=-0.333 and r=-0.401, respectively, pSF-36 and WHOQOL-Bref were correlated with the DTSQ, indicating a good concurrent validity. As in prior studies, women demonstrated poorer treatment satisfaction. The Qatar Arabic DTSQs version was found to be a reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of treatment satisfaction in Arabic diabetes mellitus patients in the country. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oral health knowledge, behaviour and practices among school children in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Darwish, Mohammed Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the oral health knowledge behaviour and practices among school children in Qatar. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in Qatar from October 2011 to April 2012. A total of 2200 school children aged 12–14 years were approached from 16 schools of different areas. The information about oral health knowledge and sources of information was obtained through a self-administrated questionnaire. Data analyses were performed. Results: The overall response rate was (96%). Only (25.8%) of children reported a high level of oral health knowledge. After each meal, tooth brushing was observed by a very low percentage of children (3.7%). About 44.6% of children recognized dental floss as a cleaning device for between the teeth. A large number of children (32.5%) thought incorrectly that one must visit the dentist only in case of pain. A great majority was not aware of cariogenic potential of soft drinks (39%) and sweetened milk (97.8%). Less than half (38.9%) of children actually had heard about fluoride. Only (16.8%) correctly answered the question about sign of tooth decay. Slightly, less than half (48.4%) could not define the meaning of plaque. Parents were the most popular (69.1%), source of oral health information for the children. Conclusion: The oral health knowledge in Qatar is below the satisfactory level. Parents were the most popular source of oral health knowledge for the children followed by dentists, school teachers, and media. PMID:27605993

  15. Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar: results from a National Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Mohamed Hamad; Al-Thani, Al Anoud Mohammed; Cheema, Sohaila; Sheikh, Javaid; Mamtani, Ravinder; Lowenfels, Albert B; Al-Chetachi, Walaa Fattah; Almalki, Badria Ali; Hassan Khalifa, Shamseldin Ali; Haj Bakri, Ahmad Omar; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine optimum measurements for abdominal obesity and to assess the prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar. Design National health survey. Setting Qatar National STEPwise Survey conducted by the Supreme Council of Health during 2012. Participants 2496 Qatari citizens aged 18–64 representative of the general population. Primary and secondary outcome measures Measure of obesity (body mass index, waist circumference or waist-to-height ratio) that best identified the presence of at least 2 other factors of metabolic syndrome; cut-off values of waist circumference; frequency of metabolic syndrome. Results Waist circumference ≥102 for men and ≥94 cm for women was the best predictor of the presence of other determinants of metabolic syndrome (raised blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). Using these values, we identified 28% of Qataris with metabolic syndrome, which is considerably lower than the estimate of 37% calculated using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Restricting the analysis to participants without known elevated blood pressure, elevated blood sugar or diabetes 16.5% would be classified as having metabolic syndrome. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased steadily with age (OR=3.40 (95% CI 2.02 to 5.74), OR=5.66 (3.65 to 8.78), OR=10.2 (5.98 to 17.6) and OR=18.2 (7.01 to 47.5) for those in the age group ‘30–39’, ‘40–49’, ‘50–59’, ‘60–64’ vs ‘18–29’; pmetabolic syndrome in Qatar. Approximately 28% of adult Qatari citizens satisfy the criteria for metabolic syndrome, which increased significantly with age. Education and physical activity were inversely associated with this syndrome. PMID:27601485

  16. The frequency of polycystic ovary syndrome in young reproductive females in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif E

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Elham Sharif,1 Sumaya Rahman,1 Yumna Zia,1 Nasser M Rizk1,2 1Biomedical Sciences Department, College of Health Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 2Physiology Department, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Abstract: This was a prospective cross-sectional study in which 126 female students between the ages of 18 and 30 years were evaluated for the frequency of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS through clinical interview, questionnaire, and anthropometric measurements. The diagnostic criteria of the US National Institutes of Health criteria were used. Menstrual irregularities (MI were identified, and clinical hyperandrogenism was evaluated by self-assessment of hirsutism using modified Ferriman–Gallwey score. Blood analysis was done for measurement of prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and the androgen hormones. Of all the students, 37 (30.8% had MI, 38 (31.7% had clinical hirsutism, 37 (30.8% had acne, and 76 (63.3% had a family history of type 2 diabetes. The estimated frequency of PCOS was 18.33% according to the US National Institutes of Health definition. Hormonal analysis demonstrated a significant increase in androgens (total testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and free testosterone, and a significant decrease in sex hormone-binding globulin in our PCOS group, with a P-value <0.05. This study revealed a higher level of the androgen hormones among PCOS subjects with a frequency of PCOS (18.33% similar to the global estimates of 10%–20%. Keywords: polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS, hyperandrogenism, HA, hirsutism, menstrual irregularities, MI, frequency, hormonal profile, phenotype, Qatar, biochemical profile

  17. Leveraging the World Cup: Mega Sporting Events, Human Rights Risk, and Worker Welfare Reform in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Sarath Ganji

    2016-01-01

    Qatar will realize its decades-long drive to host a mega sporting event when, in 2022, the opening ceremony of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) World Cup commences. By that time, the Qatari government will have invested at least $200 billion in real estate and development projects, employing anywhere between 500,000 and 1.5 million foreign workers to do so. The scale of these preparations is staggering — and not necessarily positive. Between 2010 and 2013, more tha...

  18. The oil cycle, the Federal Reserve, and the monetary and exchange rate policies of Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Supporters of the Arab oil-exporting countries’ decades-long fixed exchange rate regime argue that since, oil is traded in United States (US) dollars, pegging to the dollar is optimal. However, the weakening relationship between oil prices and the US economy in terms of the Federal Reserve’s expansionary monetary stance amid soaring oil prices for much of the previous decade has raised questions about the viability of the peg. Using Qatar as a case study, this paper empirically analyzes wheth...

  19. Measuring and estimating solar direct normal Irradiance using LIDAR, solar station and satellite data in qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Bachour, Dunia Antoine; Fernández Sánchez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    La medición precisa de la Irradiancia Directa Normal (DNI) es esencial para el diseño e implementación de proyectos CSP (energía solar concentrada). Qatar cuenta con abundante radiación solar; por lo tanto, el aprovechamiento de la misma es de gran interés en esta región, en particular para sistemas de concentración solar. Antes de embarcarse en dichos proyectos, se debe contar con datos de irradiancia directa normal confiables y de buena calidad. Actualmente, los mapas existentes de radiació...

  20. Measuring and estimating solar direct normal Irradiance using LIDAR, solar station and satellite data in qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Bachour, Dunia Antoine

    2015-01-01

    La medición precisa de la Irradiancia Directa Normal (DNI) es esencial para el diseño e implementación de proyectos CSP (energía solar concentrada). Qatar cuenta con abundante radiación solar; por lo tanto, el aprovechamiento de la misma es de gran interés en esta región, en particular para sistemas de concentración solar. Antes de embarcarse en dichos proyectos, se debe contar con datos de irradiancia directa normal confiables y de buena calidad. Actualmente, los mapas existen...

  1. Arab Women in the Gulf and the Narrative of Change: the Case of Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golkowska Krystyna Urbisz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The dramatic transformation of the Arabian Gulf since the discovery of petroleum resources has called for a new perspective on the situation of women in the region. Qatar is an example of fast-paced industrialization, modernization and profound socio-cultural changes. As the environment transforms literally from day to day, new identities are being forged and social roles renegotiated. The leadership’s vision for the country speaks of gender equality and opportunity for all. This article asks how young Qatari women’s personal stories fit into the national narrative of change and what they see as the best path to agency and empowerment.

  2. Archaeological excavations at the settlement of al-Furayhah (Freiha), north-west Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rees, Gareth; al-Na'imi, Faisal; Richter, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Two seasons of excavation and survey at the late Islamic town of al-Furay¿ah (commonly, Freiha) in north-west Qatar are providing an insight into the development, occupation, and final abandonment of this once-prominent settlement. This paper presents the interim results of fieldwork, focusing fi...... and the fort. This long-term migration pattern is complemented by evidence of regular collapse and reconstruction in the mosque and domestic courtyard buildings. These may indicate short-term abandonment as well as fluctuations in the economy of the settlement and the region as a whole....

  3. Changing trends in intestinal parasitic infections among long-term-residents and settled immigrants in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doiphode Sanjay H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid socio-economic development in Qatar in the last two decades has encouraged a mass influx of immigrant workers, the majority of whom originate from countries with low socio-economic levels, inadequate medical care and many are known to carry patent intestinal helminth and protozoan infections on arrival in Qatar. Some eventually acquire residency status but little is known about whether they continue to harbour infections. Methods We examined 9208 hospital records of stool samples that had been analysed for the presence of intestinal helminth and protozoan ova/cysts, over the period 2005-2008, of subjects from 28 nationalities, but resident in Qatar and therefore not recent arrivals in the country. Results Overall 10.2% of subjects were infected with at least one species, 2.6% with helminths and 8.0% with protozoan species. Although hookworms, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Hymenolepis nana were observed, the majority of helminth infections (69% were caused by hookworms, and these were largely aggregated among 20.0-39.9 year-old male subjects from Nepal. The remaining cases of helminth infection were mostly among Asian immigrants. Protozoan infections were more uniformly spread across immigrants from different regions when prevalence was calculated on combined data, but this disguised three quite contrasting underlying patterns for 3 taxa of intestinal protozoa. Blastocystis hominis, Giardia duodenalis and non-pathogenic amoebae were all acquired in childhood, but whereas prevalence of B. hominis rose to a plateau and then even further among the elderly, prevalence of G. duodenalis fell markedly in children aged 10 and older, and stayed low (Entamoeba coli, E. hartmanni, Endolimax nana and Iodamoeba buetschlii peaked in the 30.0-39.9 age group and only then dropped to very low values among the oldest subjects examined. A worrying trend in respect of both helminth and protozoan parasites was the

  4. Employing nation branding in the Middle East - United Arab Emirates (UAE and Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeineddine Cornelia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Branding represents the instrument through which an entity communicates and identifies itself in the consumer’s perception. National branding is a similar mean employed at country level. Nation branding is crucial in order to attract investment, boost exports and attract tourists and talented workforce. Nation branding stands between public diplomacy and economic benefits. An adequate policy of Nation Branding-based on a positive, credible and economically reliable image- can be able to extend the range of potential customers and of potential investors. With the aim of better understanding the new challenges, opportunities and threats existent in a globalized economy, the paper evaluates nation branding in the context of UAE and Qatar. The paper examines nation-branding as a driver for boosting the economy, taking into account that clichés and stereotypes (especially in the context of the Middle East can influence our perception towards one country or another. The analysis explores the strategy adopted in order that Dubai becomes the flagship-brand of the UAE. Abu Dhabi complements this strategy, driving UAE to the position of the most valuable brand in the Middle East. The paper further enquires the case of Qatar and compares it with the branding process of the UAE. Qatar has established various branding resources such as the Al Jazeera news network, international sport events and several cultural and educational exchange programs with international profile. The UAE strives to become an influencer in the global economy, overriding its dependence on hydrocarbon reserves. Qatar is richer in hydrocarbon reserves than the UAE; nevertheless, it shares the interest of detaching itself from the rentier economy. The study explores the fact that from 2014-onwards the global oil economy was hit hard, as the price of the oil barrel is at an historic low, thus it has become stringent for the Persian Gulf countries to diversify the revenue sources. As a

  5. Birth seasonality in captive bovids at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP), Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Piening Schuler, Y; Hammer, C.; Clauss, Marcus; S. Hammer

    2009-01-01

    Twenty six African and/or Asian bovid species kept at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation, Qatar (latitude 25 °N, longitude 51 °E, altitude < 100m above sea level) were evaluated for their birth seasonality. A broad range of breeding patterns could be observed, from breeding throughout the whole year (e.g. blackbuck, dorcas gazelle, idmi gazelle, Speke´s gazelle), to explicit seasonality (e.g. mouflon, nilgai, Nubian ibex, wild goat) in breeding patterns. In general, natural breeding ...

  6. D Model of AL Zubarah Fortress in Qatar - Terrestrial Laser Scanning VS. Dense Image Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, T.; Mechelke, K.; Maziull, L.

    2015-02-01

    In September 2011 the fortress Al Zubarah, built in 1938 as a typical Arabic fortress and restored in 1987 as a museum, was recorded by the HafenCity University Hamburg using terrestrial laser scanning with the IMAGER 5006h and digital photogrammetry for the Qatar Museum Authority within the framework of the Qatar Islamic Archaeology and Heritage Project. One goal of the object recording was to provide detailed 2D/3D documentation of the fortress. This was used to complete specific detailed restoration work in the recent years. From the registered laser scanning point clouds several cuttings and 2D plans were generated as well as a 3D surface model by triangle meshing. Additionally, point clouds and surface models were automatically generated from digital imagery from a Nikon D70 using the open-source software Bundler/PMVS2, free software VisualSFM, Autodesk Web Service 123D Catch beta, and low-cost software Agisoft PhotoScan. These outputs were compared with the results from terrestrial laser scanning. The point clouds and surface models derived from imagery could not achieve the same quality of geometrical accuracy as laser scanning (i.e. 1-2 cm).

  7. Child discipline in Qatar and Palestine: A comparative study of ICAST-R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldeeb, Nehal; Halileh, Samia; Alyafei, Khalid A; Ghandour, Rula; Dargham, Soha; Giacaman, Rita; Kamal, Madeeha; Imseeh, Sawsan; Korayem, Mona; Nasr, Shiraz; Mahfoud, Ziyad; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen; Mahmoud, Mohamed H; Tawfik, Hassan; Lynch, Margaret A; Mian, Marcellina

    2016-11-01

    To compare the nature and determinants of child discipline in Qatar and Palestine among young adults through retrospective survey to develop legislation, policies and interventions for effective prevention of child maltreatment, and educational materials to promote positive discipline among parents and caregivers. Cross-sectional random household surveys were conducted in each country (Qataris N=697, Palestinians N=2064) using ISPCAN Child Abuse Screening Tool-Retrospective (ICAST-R) for young adults (18-24 years), to investigate child discipline methods into the maltreatment range. Qatari young adults were more educated (pdiscipline they received in childhood was not reasonable and not justified compared to Palestinian participants. The more advantaged Qatari population was less likely to experience disciplinary methods that experts developing the ICAST-R defined as abuse compared to Palestinians where the higher incidence of child abuse could be attributed to lower economic advantage, lower level of education and greater exposure to violence. Suggestions are made for future studies in Qatar and Palestine to develop survey methodology with a more culturally appropriate level of intrusion, such as indirect yet meaningful child maltreatment questions.

  8. A course-based cross-cultural interaction among pharmacy students in Qatar and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Kyle John; Taylor, Jeff; Khalifa, Sherief I; Jorgenson, Derek

    2015-03-25

    To develop, implement, and evaluate a course-based, cross-cultural student interaction using real-time videoconferencing between universities in Canada and Qatar. A professional skills simulation practice session on smoking cessation was run for students in Qatar (n=22) and Canada (n=22). Students role played cases in small group situations and then interacted with colleagues from the other country regarding culturally challenging situations and communication strategies. Students were assessed on analytical content and communication skills through faculty member and peer evaluation. Cultural competency outcomes were assessed using a postsession survey. Overall, 92.3% of respondents agreed that learning was enhanced through the cross-cultural exchange, and 94.9% agreed that insight was gained into the health-related issues and needs of people from another culture. A course-based, cross-cultural interaction was an effective method to incorporate cultural competency principles into student learning. Future initiatives should increase direct student interaction and focus on culturally sensitive topics.

  9. The cultural life script of Qatar and across cultures: effects of gender and religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    Cultural life scripts (CLS) are culturally shared cognitive representations of the expected order and timing of important life events in a prototypical life. Through three studies data from Qatar were analysed and compared to previously collected data from Denmark, Turkey, and the US. In Study 1 we examined the CLS of Qatar in order to determine whether the clear segregation of men and women as well as the centrality of religion in this society would influence the CLS. A total of 55 Qatari undergraduates completed the standard CLS task, imaging a Qatari infant of their own as well as the opposite gender. In Study 2 important personal life story events were collected from 83 Qatari undergraduates in order to explore the overlap between remembered life events and CLS events. Study 3 was a reanalysis of CLS data from Denmark, Turkey, and the US. There was a considerable overlap of events across cultures, but we also found that the Qatari CLS showed more gender differences and contained more religious and positive events compared to the other three countries.

  10. Norm in soil and sludge samples in Dukhan oil Field, Qatar state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kinani, A.T.; Hushari, M.; Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Alsadig, I.A., E-mail: mmhushari@moe.gov.qa [Radiation and Chemical Protection Department, Ministry of Environment, Doha (Qatar)

    2015-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to measure the activity concentrations of Naturally Occurring radioactive Materials (NORM) produced as a buy products in oil production. The analyses of NORM give available information for guidelines concerning radiation protection. Recently NORM subjected to restricted regulation issued by high legal authority at Qatar state. Twenty five samples of soil from Dukhan onshore oil field and 10 sludge samples collected from 2 offshore fields at Qatar state. High resolution low-level gamma-ray spectrometry used to measure gamma emitters of NORM. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclide in 22 samples from Dukhan oil field, were with average worldwide values . Only three soil samples have high activity concentration of Ra-226 which is more than 185 Bq/kg the exempted level for NORM in the Quatrain regulation. The natural radionuclide activity concentrations of 10 sludge samples from offshore oil fields was greater than 1100Bq/kg the exempted values of NORM set by Quatrain regulation so the sludge need special treatments. The average hazards indices (H{sub ex} , D , and Ra{sub eq}), for the 22 samples were below the word permissible values .This means that the human exposure to such material not impose any radiation risk. The average hazards indices (H{sub ex} , D , and Ra{sub eq}), for 3 soil samples and sludge samples are higher than the published maximal permissible. Thus human exposure to such material impose radiation risk. (author)

  11. A detection of the secondary eclipse of Qatar-1b in the Ks-band

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, Patricia; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Diaz, Marcos; Birkby, Jayne; López-Morales, Mercedes; Fortney, Jonathan J

    2016-01-01

    Qatar-1b is a close-orbiting hot-Jupiter ($R_p\\simeq 1.18$ $R_J$, $M_p\\simeq 1.33$ $M_J$) around a metal-rich K-dwarf, with orbital separation and period of 0.023 AU and 1.42 days, respectively. We have observed the secondary eclipse of this exoplanet in the Ks-band with the objective of deriving a brightness temperature for the planet and providing further constraints to the orbital configuration of the system. We obtained near-infrared photometric data from the ground by using the OMEGA2000 instrument at the 3.5 m telescope at Calar Alto (Spain), in staring mode, with the telescope defocused. We have used Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify correlated systematic trends in the data. A Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis was performed in order to model the correlated systematics and fit for the secondary eclipse of Qatar-1b using the occultation model by Mandel & Agol (2002). We measured a secondary eclipse depth of $0.196\\%^{+0.071\\%}_{-0.051\\%}$, which indicates a brightness temperature in the ...

  12. The Admission and Academic Placement of Students from: Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Yemen Arab Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. K., Ed.

    Information is provided on the educational systems of Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and the Yemen Arab Republic in order to assist U.S. colleges and universities as they work with international student agencies and representatives from these countries. For each country, placement recommendations are offered, along with notes to…

  13. Effects of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction on Science Achievement and Interest in Science: Evidence from Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan

    2012-01-01

    The author sought to investigate the effects of inquiry-based science instruction on science achievement and interest in science of 5,120 adolescents from 85 schools in Qatar. Results of hierarchical linear modeling analyses revealed the substantial positive effects of science teaching and learning with a focus on model or applications and…

  14. University Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Factors That Facilitate Technology Integration into Their Instruction: An Exploratory Case Study in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkouti, Ibrahim Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative, exploratory case study was designed to elicit faculty members' perceptions of the factors that facilitate technology integration into their instruction. The study was conducted at a midsized higher education institution in Qatar. Davis's (1986) technology acceptance model (TAM) is the conceptual framework that guided this study…

  15. Effects of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction on Science Achievement and Interest in Science: Evidence from Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan

    2012-01-01

    The author sought to investigate the effects of inquiry-based science instruction on science achievement and interest in science of 5,120 adolescents from 85 schools in Qatar. Results of hierarchical linear modeling analyses revealed the substantial positive effects of science teaching and learning with a focus on model or applications and…

  16. 75 FR 66360 - Transportation and Energy Products and Services Trade Mission; Doha, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ..., press releases to general and trade media, direct mail, notices by industry trade associations and other... releases to general and trade media, direct mail, broadcast fax, notices by industry trade associations and... International Trade Administration Transportation and Energy Products and Services Trade Mission; Doha, Qatar...

  17. Developing Intercultural Competence in Future Student Affairs Professionals through a Graduate Student Global Study Course to Doha, Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Paige; Getz, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a 2-week global study course to Doha, Qatar for graduate students in the higher education leadership and student affairs program at the University of San Diego. The course sought to develop intercultural competence with a specific focus on understanding Qatari and Middle Eastern perspectives and culture, understanding the…

  18. Qatar Airways Touches Down in Dar es Salaam Airline Launches First Route Of 2007 To Tanzania's Commercial Hub Award-Winning Carrier Expands Operations In Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Qatar Airways has celebrated the launch of its first new route of 2007 with its inaugural flight to Tanzania touching down in the country's commercial capital of Dar es Salaam to a fanfare of music and dance.

  19. Physician and medical student perceptions and expectations of the pediatric clerkship: a Qatar experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendaus MA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A Hendaus,1,2 Shabina Khan,1 Samar Osman,1 Yasser Alsamman,2 Tushar Khanna,2 Ahmed H Alhammadi1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, General Academic Pediatrics Division, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, 2Weill Cornell Medical College-Qatar, Al Rayyan, Qatar Background: The average number of clerkship weeks required for the pediatric core rotation by the US medical schools is significantly lower than those required for internal medicine or general surgery. Objective: The objective behind conducting this survey study was to explore the perceptions and expectations of medical students and pediatric physicians about the third-year pediatric clerkship. Methods: An anonymous survey questionnaire was distributed to all general pediatric physicians at Hamad Medical Corporation and to students from Weill Cornell Medical College-Qatar. Results: Feedback was obtained from seven attending pediatricians (100% response rate, eight academic pediatric fellow physicians (100% response rate, 36 pediatric resident physicians (60% response rate, and 36 medical students (60% response rate. Qualitative and quantitative data values were expressed as frequencies along with percentages and mean ± standard deviation and median and range. A P-value <0.05 from a 2-tailed t-test was considered to be statistically significant. Participants from both sides agreed that medical students receive <4 hours per week of teaching, clinical rounds is the best environment for teaching, adequate bedside is provided, and that there is no adequate time for both groups to get acquainted to each other. On the other hand, respondents disagreed on the following topics: almost two-thirds of medical students perceive postgraduate year 1 and 2 pediatric residents as the best teachers, compared to 29.4% of physicians; 3 weeks of inpatient pediatric clerkship is enough for learning; the inpatient pediatric environment is safe and friendly; adequate feedback is provided by physicians to

  20. Patterns in place of cancer death in the State of Qatar: a population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mohsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: International studies show that most people prefer to die at home; however, hospitals remain the most common place of death (PoD. This study aims to investigate the patterns in PoD and the associated factors, which are crucial for end-of-life cancer care enhancement. METHOD: This retrospective, population-based study analyzed all registered cancer deaths in Qatar between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2012 (n = 1,224. The main outcome measures were patient characteristics: age, gender, nationality, cancer diagnosis, year of death, and PoD. Time trends for age-standardized proportions of death in individual PoDs were evaluated using chi-square analysis. Odds ratio (OR were determined for variables associated with the most preferred (acute palliative care unit [APCU] and hematology/oncology ward versus least preferred (ICU and general medicine ward PoDs in Qatar, stratified by nationality. RESULTS: The hematology/oncology ward was the most common PoD (32.4%; 95% CI 26.7-35.3% followed by ICU (31.4%; 95% CI 28.7-34.3%, APCU (26.9%; 95% CI 24.3-29.6%, and general medicine ward (9.2%; 95% CI 7.6-11.1%. APCU trended upward (+0.057/year; p<0.001, while the hematology/oncology ward trended downward (-0.055/year; p<0.001. No statistically significant changes occurred in the other PoDs; home deaths remained low (0.4%; 95% Cl 0.38-0.42. Qataris who died from liver cancer (OR 0.23 and aged 65 or older (OR 0.64 were less likely to die in the APCU or hematology/oncology ward (p<0.05. Non-Qataris who died from pancreatic cancer (OR 3.12 and female (OR 2.05 were more likely to die in the APCU or hematology/oncology ward (p<0.05. Both Qataris and non-Qataris who died from hematologic malignancy (OR 0.18 and 0.41, respectively were more likely to die in the ICU or general medicine ward (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: A high percentage of cancer deaths in Qatar occur in hospital. As home was the preferred PoD for most people, effective home care and hospice

  1. Concerns and considerations among caregivers of a child with autism in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheir Nadir M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism impacts the lives of the family looking after a child with the condition in different ways, and forces family members to modify their daily lives to suit their reality. To our knowledge, no previous research investigated concern and considerations of parents/caregivers of children with autism in Qatar or the Arabic speaking Middle Eastern region. Methods Caregivers of a child who was between the age of 3 to17 years old at the time of the study and who was diagnosed with ASD (Autistic Group or AG were recruited from the two main developmental pediatric and children rehabilitation clinics in Qatar. The control group (non-autism group, or NAG was represented by caregivers of a non-autistic child between the age of 3 to 17 years old at the time of the study and who were visiting a family clinic of a primary health care facility for routine medical check-up. Data collected from both groups included related to the child (e.g. the child’s date of birth, his/her relation to the caregiver, number of siblings, number of hours of sleep in a day, number of hours spent watching television or videos prior to age 3, time spent indoors prior to age 3, absenteeism from school, and use of a nanny to care for the child and to the caregiver (education level, profession, level of consanguinity using the phylogram method. In addition to these questions, caregivers in the AG were asked specific questions around maternal concern and considerations in respect to the future of their children and the specialized services they receive. Results Children in the autism group spent more time indoors, watching television, or sleeping than children in the non-autism group. Only around 40% of caregivers in the autism group said they would encourage their child to get married and become a parent when s/he grows up. A number of caregivers of children with autism frequently utilize specialized rehabilitation services; others did express their needs for

  2. Stigma associated with mental illness: perspectives of university students in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolezzi M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Monica Zolezzi,1,2 Nawal Bensmail,2 Farah Zahrah,2 Salma Mawfek Khaled,3 Tayseer El-Gaili4 1Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, 2College of Pharmacy, 3Research Unit, Social and Economic Survey Research Institute, 4Student Counseling Center, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Background: Stigma in relation to mental illness is one of the main factors inhibiting people from seeking help. Studies have been undertaken looking into the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs (KAB about mental illness among residents in Qatar; however, none have looked specifically at students in higher education. The aim of this study was to understand the KAB toward mental illness among students at a Qatari university and determine if there are any differences based on gender, nationality, and college type. Methods: A convenience sample of students from all genders, colleges, and nationalities was approached to participate in a survey that consisted of four sections: demographic, beliefs, attitudes, and help-seeking and treatment preferences associated with mental illness. Chi-square testing was performed to test for differences in the distribution of proportions of our primary outcomes (students’ beliefs, attitudes, and help-seeking and treatment preferences. Results: A total of 282 students completed the survey. The majority of the participating students were females (59.3%, non-Qataris (64.3%, and enrolled in science-based colleges (62.7%. Beliefs reflecting poor mental health literacy, such as “medications to treat mental illness can cause addiction”, “mental illness is not like any other illness”, or that “mental illness is a punishment from God”, were reported by a majority of students (84.4%, 56.7%, and 50.2%, respectively. Stigmatizing attitudes that were endorsed by a majority of students included believing that people with mental illness cannot have regular jobs (60.2%, that people with mental illness are dangerous (65.7%, and that they would not marry

  3. Burnout and sources of stress among medical residents at Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afana, Abdelhamid; Ghannam, Jess; Ho, Evelyn Y; Al-Khal, Abdullatif; Al-Arab, Banan; Bylund, Carma L

    2017-02-21

    This study aimed to describe the experiences of stress and burnout and sociodemographic factors associated with dimensions of stress among medical residents at Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar. Medical residents participating in a stress management course were asked to complete an anonymous survey. The survey included demographic questions, the Abbreviated Maslach Inventory, and 4 open-ended questions on experiences with stress. Of the 150 residents participating in the stress management course, 142 responded to the survey, listing an average of 2.2 types of stressors, with workload and workplace relationships as the most frequent. They listed an average of 3.1 coping strategies, most frequently seeking out social support and entertainment. Responses indicated low depersonalization, high personal accomplishment, high satisfaction with medicine and high emotional exhaustion. Training to improve coping and reduce burnout is recommended.

  4. Characterization of Qatar's surface carbonates for CO2 capture and thermochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakosimos, Konstantinos E.; Al-Haddad, Ghadeer; Sakellariou, Kyriaki G.; Pagkoura, Chrysa; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.

    2017-06-01

    Samples of surface carbonates were collected from three different areas of the Qatar peninsula. We employed material characterization techniques to examine the morphology and composition of the samples, while their CO2 capture capacity was assessed via multiple successive calcination-carbonation cycles. Our samples were mainly calcite and dolomite based. Calcite samples showed higher initial capacity of around 11 mmol CO2 g-1 which decayed rapidly to less than 2 mmol CO2 g-1. On the other hand, dolomite samples showed an excellent stability (˜15 cycles) with a capacity of 6 mmol CO2 g-1. The performance of the dolomite samples is better compared to other similar natural samples, from literature. A promising result for future studies towards improving their performance by physical and chemical modification.

  5. Exploring corporate social responsibility's global and Glocal practices in Qatar: A practitioner and stakeholder perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Gualtieri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analysed corporate social responsibility (CSR in the state of Qatar, aiming to determine the discipline’ global and glocal dimensions. The study investigated the notion that CSR remains western-driven in contrast to the scholarly trend that increasingly values national variables. Given the importance of CSR, the relationship between theory and contextual influences becomes a central element to evaluate the opportunity for specific corollaries to mainstream CSR. The methodology deployed for the study included a literature review, and interviews with practitioners and stakeholders. The results showed that although CSR as a concept is valid per se, an appropriate approach would value the operating environment as a key determinant, appreciating that specific cultural contexts necessitate variations to the mainstream theory.

  6. Truth-telling and cancer diagnoses: physician attitudes and practices in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Del Pozo, Pablo; Fins, Joseph J; Helmy, Ismail; El Chaki, Rim; El Shazly, Tarek; Wafaradi, Deena; Mahfoud, Ziyad

    2012-01-01

    There is limited information regarding physicians' attitudes toward revealing cancer diagnoses to patients in the Arab world. Using a questionnaire informed by a seminal study carried out by Oken in 1961, our research sought to determine present-day disclosure practices in Qatar, identify physician sociodemographic variables associated with truth-telling, and outline trends related to future practice. A sample of 131 physicians was polled. Although nearly 90% of doctors said they would inform cancer patients of their diagnosis, ∼66% of respondents stated that they made exceptions to their policy, depending on patient characteristics. These data suggest that clinical practices are somewhat discordant on professed beliefs about the ethical propriety of disclosure.

  7. Predictions Burden of Diabetes and Economics Cost: Contributing Risk Factors of Changing Disease Prevalence and its Pandemic Impact to Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, A; Al-Hamaq, A O A A

    2016-09-01

    Background: The Middle East region is predicted to have one of the highest prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in the world. The risk of diabetes continues to increase worldwide and its public health burden is unevenly distributed across socioeconomic strata. This burden is not only related to health care costs, but also to indirect costs caused by loss of productivity from disability and premature mortality. Aim: This study aims to estimate the economics cost of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus [T2DM] among adults in Qatar using national data, and to quantify the potential effect of a suggested preventive intervention program. Design: It is an observational cohort study. Setting: The survey was based on registry at the Hamad General Hospital and Primary Health Care (PHC) centers in the State of Qatar. Subject: This study consisted of patients above 25 years of age with diagnosed diabetes mellitus registered at Hamad General Hospital and Primary Health Care (PHC) centers during January 2004 to July 2014. Methods: We developed a dynamic model in which actual incidence, prevalence, and life expectancy data are used and alternative assumptions about future trends in these parameters can be incorporated. Linear regression model has been performed to forecast the burden of diabetes in oil-rich country. Results: According to the dynamic model, a 10% increased in the number of diabetic patients in the State of Qatar from 33 610 in 2005 to 122 000 in 2012 (about 1% annually). The annual diabetes incidence rate was higher in women than in men during a period between 2005 to 2015 years. The static model forecasted as 10% increase over 10 years. The relative increase in prevalence of diabetes and number of diabetic people are higher in women than in men (16.6%; 17.5% and 18.4% in men vs. 22.6%; 23.8% and 25.1% in women). Most of the increase in prevalence of diabetes is projected to occur in younger age groups where it is estimated to increase among age groups of 50-59 years and

  8. Oncology nurses' perceptions of end-of-life care in a tertiary cancer centre in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libo-On, Izette Larraine M; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J

    2017-02-02

    Nurses who work in oncology settings may lack the knowledge and skills required for end-of-life (EoL) care. A clear understanding of nurses' perceptions of EoL care is crucial for the successful improvement of care for terminally ill patients with cancer. Although many studies have underlined nurses' perspectives on EoL care, this is the first such study conducted on oncology nurses in Qatar. This study primarily sought to measure nurses' perceptions of EoL care at the National Center for Cancer Care and Research (NCCCR) in Qatar. A quantitative, cross-sectional, self-reported study. Nurses at the NCCCR reported their perceptions of EoL care using the Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale, which consisted of 30 items scored on a five-point Likert scale. Seventy-eight nurses working in oncology settings completed the tool. Approximately one third (33-35%) of the participants had positive perceptions of EoL care. The majority (67%) of the participants were uncertain or ambivalent regarding EoL events and situations. There was no significant relationship between the participants' profiles and their perceptions of EoL care. However, very few of them had completed educational courses in death and dying. Nurses have an important impact on EoL care, and continuous education is necessary to improve their confidence when they work with dying patients and their families. An in-house programme to help nurses cope with compassionate exhaustion and humanistic and relational care is highly recommended.

  9. Molecular Genetic Diversity of Date (Phoenix dactylifera) Germplasm in Qatar based on Microsatellite Markers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Talaat

    2016-01-25

    Depending on morphological traits alone, studying the genetic diversity of date palm is a very difficult task since morphological characteristics are highly affected by the environment. DNA markers are excellent option that can help and enhance the discriminatory power of morphological characteristics. To study the genetic diversity among date palm cultivars grown in Qatar, fifteen Date palm samples were collected from Qatar University Experimental Farm. DNAs were extracted from fresh leaves by using commercial DNeasy Plant System Kit (Qiagen, Inc., Valencia, CA). Total of 18 (Inter Simple Sequence Repeat) ISSR single primers were used to amplify DNA fragments using genomic DNA of the 15 samples. First screening was done to test the ability of these primers to amplify clear bands using Date palm genomic DNA. All 18 ISSR primers successfully produced clear bands in the first screening. Then, each primer was used separately to genotype the whole set of 15 Date palm samples. Total of 4794 bands were generated using 18 ISSR primers for the 15 Date palm samples. On average, each primer generated 400 bands. The Number of amplified bands varied from cultivar to cultivar. The highest number of bands was obtained using Primers 2, 5 and 12 for the 15 (470 bands), while the lowest number of bands were obtained by Primers 1, 7 and 8 where they produced only 329 bands. Markers were scored for the presence and absence of the corresponding band among the different cultivars. Data were subjected to cluster analysis. A similarity matrix was constructed and the similarity values were used for cluster analysis.

  10. Remote Sensing and Spectral Characteristics of Desert Sand from Qatar Peninsula, Arabian/Persian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Howari

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing data can provide valuable information about the surface expression of regional geomorphologic and geological features of arid regions. In the present study, several processing techniques were applied to reveal such in the Qatar Peninsula. Those included preprocessing for radiometric and geometric correction, various enhancement methods, classification, accuracy assessment, contrast stretching, color composition, and principal component analyses. Those were coupled with field groundtruthing and lab analyses. Field groundtruthing included one hundred and forty measurements of spectral reflectance for various sediment exposures representing main sand types in the four studied parts in Qatar. Lab investigations included grain size analysis, X-ray diffraction and laboratory measurements of spectral reflectance. During the course of this study three sand types have been identified: (i sabkha-derived salt-rich, quartz sand, and (ii beach-derived calcareous sand and (iii aeolian dune quartz. Those areas are spectrally distinct in the VNIR, suggesting that VNIR spectral data can be used to discriminate them. The study found that the main limitation of the ground spectral reflectance study is the difficulty of covering large areas. The study also found that ground and laboratory spectral radiance are generally higher in reflectance than those of Landsat TM. This is due to several factors such as atmospheric conditions, the low altitude or different scales. Whereas for areas with huge size of dune sand, the Landsat TM spectral has higher reflectance than those from field and laboratory. The study observed that there is a good correspondence or correlation of the wavelengths maximum sensitivity between the three spectral measurements i.e lab, field and space-borne measurements.

  11. Qatar Connection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Chinese oil conglomerates sign big contracts with the Gulf nation for liquefied natural gas to stem their deficit Two of China’s biggest oil companies inked major long-term deals on April 10 to buy liquefied natural gas(LNG) from Qatargas Operating Co. In the first deal,Qatargas and its part- ner,Shell Oil Corp.,agreed to sell 3 million tons of LNG annually to China National

  12. Developing a green metric mechanism versus LEED for tall buildings in Qatar: evaluation-based case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galal A Ibrahim, Hatem [Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, College of Engineering, Qatar University (Qatar)], E-mail: hatem_ibrahim@hotmail.com

    2011-07-01

    Qatar, with its large and growing economy is one of the busiest construction sites in the world. In Doha, numerous tall buildings have been constructed to provide office space and meet life style property demand. The aim of this paper is to develop a new green metrics system for Doha tall buildings. This green metrics system distributes credits based on indoor thermal comfort, energy consumption, water management and innovation in design. The system was applied in the Tornado tower, a 52-storey office building situated in Doha's West Bay area and compared with the LEED system. It was found that the new metrics system developed herein is better suited to Doha's tall buildings than the LEED system. This paper presented a new green metrics system which will be helpful in determining the environmental performance of tall buildings in Qatar.

  13. Endogenous endophthalmitis and liver abscess syndrome secondary due to Klebsiella pneumoniae:report of three cases from Qatar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed; AR; Mohamad; Al; Ani; Abdel-Naser; Elzouki; Ali; Rahil; Fouad; Al-Ani

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare but devastating disease that may frequently result in visual loss despite appropriate and early antibiotic treatment Recent reports have suggested an increased incidence of endogenous endophthalmitis in East Asia,particularly in Taiwan,where the major source of infection has been liver abscess secondary to Klebsiella pneumoniae.Here we report three cases who presented in Qatar with severe endogenous endophthalmitis associated with Klebsiella pneumonia septicemia secondary to pyogenic liver abscess in a diabetes mellitus underlying.

  14. Medical education and research environment in Qatar: a new epoch for translational research in the Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    Ameduri Marco; Al-Thani Al-Anoud M; Al-Thani Mohammed H; Mamtani Ravinder; Chouchane Lotfi; Sheikh Javaid I

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in medical technology and key discoveries in biomedical research have the potential to improve human health in an unprecedented fashion. As a result, many of the Arab Gulf countries, particularly Qatar are devoting increasing resources toward establishing centers of excellence in biomedical research. However, there are challenges that must be overcome. The low profile of private medical institutions and their negligible endowments in the region are examples of such ch...

  15. Endogenous endophthalmitis and liver abscess syndrome secondary due to Klebsiella pneumoniae: report of three cases from Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed AR Mohamad Al Ani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare but devastating disease that may frequently result in visual loss despite appropriate and early antibiotic treatment. Recent reports have suggested an increased incidence of endogenous endophthalmitis in East Asia, particularly in Taiwan, where the major source of infection has been liver abscess secondary to Klebsiella pneumoniae. Here we report three cases who presented in Qatar with severe endogenous endophthalmitis associated with Klebsiella pneumonia septicemia secondary to pyogenic liver abscess in a diabetes mellitus underlying.

  16. Ferricretes of the Early Tertiary Dammam Formation in the Dukhan Area, Western Qatar: mineralogy, geochemistry, and environment of deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir, Sobhi J. [صبحي جابر نصر; Al-Saad, Hamad; Al-Sayigh, Abdul Razak; Al-Harthy, Abdul Rahman; Almishwat, Ali; Dill, Harald

    2003-01-01

    Ferricretes of the Middle Eocene Dammam Formation, Western Qatar, were investigated using petrographic and ore microscopy, IR TGA, XRD, and geochemical analyses. The ferricretes mainly consist of goethite, which is very varigated in habit and texture. Geochemical analyses show that the ferricretes consist of impure chemical sediments, iron hydroxides plus variable amounts of carbonate and siliciclastic materials. The ferricretes resemble with respect to texture, mineralogy and chemistry mo...

  17. Hepatitis E--an important cause of imported non-A, non-B hepatitis among migrant workers in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidrawi, R G; Skidmore, S J; Coleman, J C; Dayton, R; Murray-Lyon, I M

    1994-08-01

    In 1985, Glynn et al. [Journal of Medical Virology 17:371-375] reported on epidemic viral hepatitis in Qatar and concluded that 72% (91/126) had acute enterically transmitted non-A, non-B viral hepatitis (ET-NANBH). Most of the patients (98%) presented within 8 weeks of arrival in Qatar and were migrant workers from the Indian subcontinent. The data was reanalysed for evidence of infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV). Seventy-eight of 91 (86%) of stored sera were still suitable for analysis since collection in 1981. A newly described enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for both IgG and IgM anti-HEV was used (Abbott Laboratories, Delkenheim, Germany); 59/78 (76%) were positive for either or both assays. All but two were from the Indian subcontinent. The data suggest that HEV was the major cause of ET-NANBH in Qatar in 1981, particularly among newly arrived migrant workers from the Indian subcontinent.

  18. Study exploring depression and cardiovascular diseases amongst Arabic speaking patients living in the State of Qatar: Rationale and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Al Suwaidi, Jassim M; Alqahtani, Awad; Assad, Nidal; Qader, Najla Abdul; Byrne, Carolyn; Singh, Rajvir; Fung, Tak Shing

    2012-01-01

    In Qatar, cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death. Studies show that depression is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality among cardiovascular patients. Thus, early detection of, and intervention for, depression among cardiovascular patients can reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and save health care costs. To date there is no study in the Gulf region exploring depression among cardiovascular patients. The goals of our three-phase research program are to (1) understand the mental health issues, specifically depression, as experienced by cardiovascular patients living in the State of Qatar; (2) identify and implement strategies that would prevent depression and assist patients to deal with depression; and (3) evaluate, facilitate, and sustain strategies that are effective at reducing depression and foster its treatment among cardiovascular patients. This paper describe phase I of the research program. Using both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies, we will investigate (1) the prevalence and severity of depression among patients who have confirmed diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases (2) how contextual factors such as social, cultural, and economic factors contribute to the risk of depression and its management among cardiovascular patients, and (3) formulate effective intervention strategies that are expected to increase awareness, prevention of and treatment for depression among cardiovascular patients, thus reducing cardiovascular diseases morbidity and mortality in Qatar.

  19. The Qatar National Historic Environment Record: a Platform for the Development of a Fully-Integrated Cultural Heritage Management Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, R. T. H.; Tonner, T. W. W.; Al-Naimi, F. A.; Dingwall, L. M.; Al-Hemaidi, N.

    2013-07-01

    The development of the Qatar National Historic Environment Record (QNHER) by the Qatar Museums Authority and the University of Birmingham in 2008 was based on a customised, bilingual Access database and ArcGIS. While both platforms are stable and well supported, neither was designed for the documentation and retrieval of cultural heritage data. As a result it was decided to develop a custom application using Open Source code. The core module of this application is now completed and is orientated towards the storage and retrieval of geospatial heritage data for the curation of heritage assets. Based on MIDAS Heritage data standards and regionally relevant thesauri, it is a truly bilingual system. Significant attention has been paid to the user interface, which is userfriendly and intuitive. Based on a suite of web services and accessed through a web browser, the system makes full use of internet resources such as Google Maps and Bing Maps. The application avoids long term vendor ''tie-ins'' and as a fully integrated data management system, is now an important tool for both cultural resource managers and heritage researchers in Qatar.

  20. Patient Perspectives on Language Discordance During Healthcare Visits: Findings From the Extremely High-Density Multicultural State of Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahim, Huda; Elnashar, Maha; Khidir, Amal; Killawi, Amal; Hammoud, Maya; Al-Khal, Abdul Latif; Fetters, Michael D

    2017-04-01

    Reducing language and cultural barriers in healthcare are significant factors in resolving health disparities. Qatar's rapidly growing multicultural population presents new challenges to the healthcare system. The purpose of this research was to explore patients' perspectives about language discordance, and the strategies used to overcome language barriers during patients' visits. Participants were recruited and interviewed from four language groups (Arabic = 24, English = 20, Hindi = 20, and Urdu = 20), all of whom were living in Qatar and utilizing Hamad General Hospital-Outpatient Clinics as a source of their healthcare services. Using qualitative analysis procedures, relevant themes and codes were generated and data analyzed using Atlas-ti. As for results, most participants had experienced or witnessed language barriers during their outpatient clinics visits. Participants essentially were unfamiliar with professional medical interpreters and described their adaptive solutions, for example utilizing incidental interpreters, stringing together fragments of multiple languages, and using body language. Those not speaking mainstream languages of Hamad General Hospital (English and Arabic) were more vulnerable to health disparities due to language barriers. Despite the patient impetus to do something, patient-reported adaptive strategies could compromise patients' safety and access to quality healthcare. Polices tackling the language barrier need to be reviewed in Qatar's multicultural healthcare system and similar settings.

  1. Determination of 137Cs activity in soil from Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Nasir, Tabassum; Al Mugren, K. S.; Alkhomashi, N.; Al-Dahan, N.; Al-Dosari, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Bukhari, S.; Matthews, M.; Regan, P. H.; Santawamaitre, T.; Malain, D.; Habib, A.; Al-Dosari, Hanan; Al Sadig, Ibrahim; Daar, Eman

    2016-10-01

    With interest in establishing baseline concentrations of 137Cs in soil from the Qatarian peninsula, we focus on determination of the activity concentrations in 129 soil samples collected across the State of Qatar prior to the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. As such, the data provides the basis of a reference map for the detection of releases of this fission product. The activity concentrations were measured via high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a hyper-pure germanium detector enclosed in a copper-lined passive lead shield that was situated in a low-background environment. The activity concentrations ranged from 0.21 to 15.41 Bq/kg, with a median value of 1 Bq/kg, the greatest activity concentration being observed in a sample obtained from northern Qatar. Although it cannot be confirmed, it is expected that this contamination is mainly due to releases from the Chernobyl accident of 26 April 1986, there being a lack of data from Qatar before the accident. The values are typically within but are sometimes lower than the range indicated by data from other countries in the region. The lower values than those of others is suggested to be due to variation in soil characteristics as well as metrological factors at the time of deposition.

  2. Newborn screening for remethylation disorders and vitamin B12 deficiency-evaluation of new strategies in cohorts from Qatar and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramer, Gwendolyn; Abdoh, Ghassan; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Shahbeck, Noora; Ali, Rehab; Mahmoud, Laila; Fang-Hoffmann, Junmin; Hoffmann, Georg F; Al Rifai, Hilal; Okun, Jürgen G

    2017-04-01

    Newborn screening is a precondition for early diagnosis and successful treatment of remethylation disorders and classical homocystinuria (cystathionine-ß-synthase deficiency). Newborn screening for classical homocystinuria using total homocysteine measurement in dried blood spots has been very successfully performed for many years for newborns from Qatar. A new optimized newborn screening strategy for remethylation disorders and homocystinuria was developed and evaluated for newborns from Qatar using total homocysteine measurement as first-tier and methionine, methionine-phenylalanine-ratio and propionylcarnitine as second-tiers. Proposed cut-offs were also retrospectively evaluated in newborn screening samples of 12 patients with remethylation disorders and vitamin B12 deficiency from Qatar and Germany. Over a 12 months period, the proposed strategy led to a decrease in the recall rate in homocysteine screening for Qatar from 1.09% to 0.68%, while allowing for additional systematic inclusion of remethylation disorders and vitamin B12 deficiency into the screening panel for Qatar. In the evaluated period the applied strategy would have detected all patients with classical homocystinuria identified by the previous strategy and in addition 5 children with maternal nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency and one patient with an isolated remethylation disorder. Additional retrospective evaluation of newborn screening samples of 12 patients from Germany and Qatar with remethlyation disorders or vitamin B12 deficiency showed that all of these patients would have been detected by the cut-offs used in the proposed new strategy. In addition, an adapted strategy for Germany using methionine, methionine-phenylalanine-ratio and propionylcarnitine as first-tier, and homocysteine as a second-tier test was also positively evaluated retrospectively. The proposed strategy for samples from Qatar allows inclusion of remethylation disorders and vitamin B12 deficiency in the screening

  3. Leveraging the World Cup: Mega Sporting Events, Human Rights Risk, and Worker Welfare Reform in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarath Ganji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Qatar will realize its decades-long drive to host a mega sporting event when, in 2022, the opening ceremony of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA World Cup commences. By that time, the Qatari government will have invested at least $200 billion in real estate and development projects, employing anywhere between 500,000 and 1.5 million foreign workers to do so. The scale of these preparations is staggering — and not necessarily positive. Between 2010 and 2013, more than 1,200 labor migrants working in Qatar’s construction sector died, with another 4,000 deaths projected by the start of the event. Foreign workers are subject to conditions of forced labor, human trafficking, and indefinite detention. Advocacy groups cite deplorable living and working conditions, coupled with lax legal protections for workers, as the main culprits. Absent significant improvements in worker welfare, Qatar’s World Cup will be remembered as a human rights tragedy.This article examines whether it is possible for Qatar’s World Cup to forge a different legacy, as an agent of change on behalf of worker welfare reform. In examining the issue, the article takes a two-fold approach. First, it locates the policy problem of worker welfare abuses in the context of the migration life cycle. The migration life cycle represents the range of activities that mediate the relationship between an individual migrant and the labor migration system — from the time the migrant first considers working overseas to his employment abroad to his eventual return to the home country. An understanding of worker welfare abuses in Qatar does not begin or end with reports of migrant deaths. A much broader pattern of abuse exists that, if ignored, will undermine effective policy responses.Second, the article frames worker welfare as a matter that lies at the intersection of business and human rights. Mega events are large-scale, internationally recognized activities

  4. Pharmacist characteristics, medication use perceptions, and professional satisfaction: a first national survey in the state of Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maguy Saffouh El Hajj

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Maguy Saffouh El Hajj1, Nadir Kheir1, Manal Zaidan2, Peter J Jewesson11College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 2Pharmacy Department, Al Amal Cancer Centre, Doha, QatarPurpose: To characterize the professional demographics, opinions about the medication use process, perceived public satisfaction with pharmacy services, and professional satisfaction of pharmacists practicing in the state of Qatar.Materials and methods: The study was designed as a hypothesis-generating, online, anonymous, opinion survey of practicing pharmacists in Qatar.Results: Two hundred and sixty-four survey accesses were recorded during the 6-week study period, and 250 surveys containing responses to one or more questions were included in the analysis. Eighty-four percent of respondents reported graduating at least 5 years prior to the survey, and 86% held a baccalaureate degree in pharmacy as their highest degree. The most common source of the highest degree was one of five countries (Egypt, Jordan, India, Sudan, or Pakistan. Forty-five percent of respondents were working in a hospital setting, and 33% were in a community pharmacy. The lowest incidence of agreement across the 10 drug procurement and distribution process statements was observed for the adequacy of medication supplies statements (33% of all respondents. The highest incidence of agreement across the eight medication use process statements was for the statement pertaining to infrequent dispensing errors (68%, and the lowest incidence of agreement was observed for the statement pertaining to the adequacy of patient monitoring (30%. The pharmacist was chosen as the best candidate to resolve perceived unmet medication needs for four of eight statements, whereas physicians were most frequently chosen for three of the four remaining statements. Respondents' perceptions regarding patient satisfaction with the different elements of the medication use process revealed that the lowest incidence of agreement

  5. Stigma associated with mental illness: perspectives of university students in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolezzi, Monica; Bensmail, Nawal; Zahrah, Farah; Khaled, Salma Mawfek; El-Gaili, Tayseer

    2017-01-01

    Background Stigma in relation to mental illness is one of the main factors inhibiting people from seeking help. Studies have been undertaken looking into the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs (KAB) about mental illness among residents in Qatar; however, none have looked specifically at students in higher education. The aim of this study was to understand the KAB toward mental illness among students at a Qatari university and determine if there are any differences based on gender, nationality, and college type. Methods A convenience sample of students from all genders, colleges, and nationalities was approached to participate in a survey that consisted of four sections: demographic, beliefs, attitudes, and help-seeking and treatment preferences associated with mental illness. Chi-square testing was performed to test for differences in the distribution of proportions of our primary outcomes (students’ beliefs, attitudes, and help-seeking and treatment preferences). Results A total of 282 students completed the survey. The majority of the participating students were females (59.3%), non-Qataris (64.3%), and enrolled in science-based colleges (62.7%). Beliefs reflecting poor mental health literacy, such as “medications to treat mental illness can cause addiction”, “mental illness is not like any other illness”, or that “mental illness is a punishment from God”, were reported by a majority of students (84.4%, 56.7%, and 50.2%, respectively). Stigmatizing attitudes that were endorsed by a majority of students included believing that people with mental illness cannot have regular jobs (60.2%), that people with mental illness are dangerous (65.7%), and that they would not marry someone with a mental illness (88.9%). Additionally, 33.6% of students indicated they would be ashamed to mention if someone in their family or they themself, had a mental illness. A vast majority of students (86.3%) indicated to prefer family and friend’s support as treatment

  6. Study protocol: Mother and Infant Nutritional Assessment (MINA) cohort study in Qatar and Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naja, Farah; Nasreddine, Lara; Al Thani, Al Anoud; Yunis, Khaled; Clinton, Michael; Nassar, Anwar; Farhat Jarrar, Sara; Moghames, Patricia; Ghazeeri, Ghina; Rahman, Sajjad; Al-Chetachi, Walaa; Sadoun, Eman; Lubbad, Nibal; Bashwar, Zelaikha; Bawadi, Hiba; Hwalla, Nahla

    2016-05-04

    The Middle East and North Africa region harbors significant proportions of stunting and wasting coupled with surging rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Recent evidence identified nutrition during the first 1000 days of life as a common denominator not only for optimal growth but also for curbing the risk of NCDs later in life. The main objective of this manuscript is to describe the protocol of the first cohort in the region to investigate the association of nutrition imbalances early in life with birth outcomes, growth patterns, as well as early determinants of non-communicable diseases. More specifically the cohort aims to 1) examine the effects of maternal and early child nutrition and lifestyle characteristics on birth outcomes and growth patterns and 2) develop evidence-based nutrition and lifestyle guidelines for pregnant women and young children. A multidisciplinary team of researchers was established from governmental and private academic and health sectors in Lebanon and Qatar to launch the Mother and Infant Nutritional Assessment 3-year cohort study. Pregnant women (n = 250 from Beirut, n = 250 from Doha) in their first trimester are recruited from healthcare centers in Beirut, Lebanon and Doha, Qatar. Participants are interviewed three times during pregnancy (once every trimester) and seven times at and after delivery (when the child is 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months old). Delivery and birth data is obtained from hospital records. Data collection includes maternal socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics, dietary intake, anthropometric measurements, and household food security data. For biochemical assessment of various indicators of nutritional status, a blood sample is obtained from women during their first trimester. Breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices, dietary intake, as well as anthropometric measurements of children are also examined. The Delphi technique will be used for the development of the nutrition and lifestyle

  7. Projected changes in climate extremes over Qatar and the Arabian Gulf region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundeti, K.; Kanikicharla, K. K.; Al sulaiti, M.; Khulaifi, M.; Alboinin, N.; Kito, A.

    2015-12-01

    The climate of the State of Qatar and the adjacent region is dominated by subtropical dry, hot desert climate with low annual rainfall, very high temperatures in summer and a big difference between maximum and minimum temperatures, especially in the inland areas. The coastal areas are influenced by the Arabian Gulf, and have lower maximum, but higher minimum temperatures and a higher moisture percentage in the air. The global warming can have profound impact on the mean climate as well as extreme weather events over the Arabian Peninsula that may affect both natural and human systems significantly. Therefore, it is important to assess the future changes in the seasonal/annual mean of temperature and precipitation and also the extremes in temperature and wind events for a country like Qatar. This study assesses the performance of the Coupled Model Inter comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations in present and develops future climate scenarios. The changes in climate extremes are assessed for three future periods 2016-2035, 2046-2065 and 2080-2099 with respect to 1986-2005 (base line) under two RCPs (Representative Concentrate Pathways) - RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. We analyzed the projected changes in temperature and precipitation extremes using several indices including those that capture heat stress. The observations show an increase in warm extremes over many parts in this region that are generally well captured by the models. The results indicate a significant change in frequency and intensity of both temperature and precipitation extremes over many parts of this region which may have serious implications on human health, water resources and the onshore/offshore infrastructure in this region. Data from a high-resolution (20km) AGCM simulation from Meteorological Research Institute of Japan Meteorological Agency for the present (1979-2003) and a future time slice (2075-2099) corresponding to RCP8.5 have also been utilized to assess the impact of climate change on

  8. Sport events and climate for visitors--the case of FIFA World Cup in Qatar 2022.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzarakis, Andreas; Fröhlich, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    The effect of weather on sport events is not well studied. It requires special attention if the event is taking place at a time and place with extreme weather situations. For the world soccer championship in Qatar (Doha 2022), human biometeorological analysis has been performed in order to identify the time of the year that is most suitable in terms of thermal comfort for visitors attending the event. The analysis is based on thermal indices like Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET). The results show that this kind of event may be not appropriate for visitors, if it is placed during months with extreme conditions. For Doha, this is the period from May to September, when conditions during a large majority of hours of the day cause strong heat stress for the visitors. A more appropriate time would be the months November to February, when thermally comfortable conditions are much more frequent. The methods applied here can quantify the thermal conditions and show limitations and possibilities for specific events and locations.

  9. Early years education in Qatar: The good practice guide in theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamader Al-Thani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Qatar’s massive education reform, Education for a New Era has dramatically shaped the educational landscape by implementing professional and curriculum standards and introducing best pedagogical practices at all levels. The current concern with Qatar’s educational reform is not so much the adopted policies but rather the implementation of these policies into classroom practices. This study examines several kindergartens in Qatar to explore the issues and concerns regarding the implementation of the Supreme Education Counsel’s The Early Years Education Good Practice Guide (GPG; a policy document providing evidence-based, needs based, culturally responsive appropriate early childhood teaching methods and materials. This research study includes focus groups with 22 kindergarten teachers/academic coordinators and classroom observations. By providing what Fullan (2000 terms an “inside, inside out and outside story”, we examine both the practices being utilized in kindergartens and obstacles that prevent teachers from implementing the GPG from the perspective of teachers and other early childhood school personnel. Finally, we provide possible recommendations regarding the implementation of the GPG.

  10. Knowledge and use of folic acid among pregnant Arabian women residing in Qatar and Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Abdelmonem S; Al-Kharusi, Balqees M

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and use of folic acid among pregnant Arabian women in Qatar and Oman. Three hundred pregnant women were interviewed during their second trimester based on a questionnaire developed for the study. Results of the survey indicated that 94% of the women knew about folic acid, 41.3% knew it should be taken periconceptionally, 58.5% knew that it prevents birth defects and 34.4% were able to identify five or more food sources of folic acid. The majority (88.7%) of women was taking the supplement, 85.0% were taking it regularly and 13.2% took it before getting pregnant. Knowledge and use were significantly influenced by ethnicity, age, education level, employment and family income. Periconceptional use of supplement was lowest among younger women (4.9%) and illiterate and least educated women (5.3%). It was concluded that high level of knowledge of folic acid was not reflected as successful use of the folic acid supplement.

  11. Who Provides Professional Development? A Study of Professional Development in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Freeman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that understanding what is offered as professional development frames what matters in English language teaching in a national education system. Analyzing these offerings articulates the values and perceptions of the work environment in which teachers live professionally. The Learning4Teaching (L4T project is a multi-country series of national studies that examine public-sector English language teachers’ experiences of professional development. The studies document 1 the learning opportunities provided in the national context, 2 how teachers view participating in these opportunities, and 3 what they believe they take from them. Drawing on data from the first phase of the study (#1 above, this paper examines the provision of professional development to ELT teachers in the ‘independent’ (public school sector in Qatar between 2012 and 2015. Of the 150 events offered during this period, 50% concerned teaching methodology. The university/training center sector provided the bulk of professional development (79% of events. The professional development offerings presented teachers with a view of English language teaching as: highly focused on methodological expectations and skills; driven by a set of policy priorities around managing the learning environment, assessment, and standards; in which methodological knowledge and skills are seen as the currency of a teaching identity.

  12. Exome sequencing identifies potential risk variants for Mendelian disorders at high prevalence in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L; Fakhro, Khalid; Hackett, Neil R; Salit, Jacqueline; Fuller, Jennifer; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Gharbiah, Maey; Malek, Joel A; Zirie, Mahmoud; Jayyousi, Amin; Badii, Ramin; Al-Nabet Al-Marri, Ajayeb; Chouchane, Lotfi; Stadler, Dora J; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing of families of related individuals has been highly successful in identifying genetic polymorphisms responsible for Mendelian disorders. Here, we demonstrate the value of the reverse approach, where we use exome sequencing of a sample of unrelated individuals to analyze allele frequencies of known causal mutations for Mendelian diseases. We sequenced the exomes of 100 individuals representing the three major genetic subgroups of the Qatari population (Q1 Bedouin, Q2 Persian-South Asian, Q3 African) and identified 37 variants in 33 genes with effects on 36 clinically significant Mendelian diseases. These include variants not present in 1000 Genomes and variants at high frequency when compared with 1000 Genomes populations. Several of these Mendelian variants were only segregating in one Qatari subpopulation, where the observed subpopulation specificity trends were confirmed in an independent population of 386 Qataris. Premarital genetic screening in Qatar tests for only four out of the 37, such that this study provides a set of Mendelian disease variants with potential impact on the epidemiological profile of the population that could be incorporated into the testing program if further experimental and clinical characterization confirms high penetrance. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  13. Integration of solar process heat into an existing thermal desalination plant in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, S.; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Aboumadi, M.; Pandian, Y.; Dersch, J.; Krüger, D.; Al-Rasheed, A. S.; Krüger, J.; Ottenburger, U.

    2016-05-01

    The water supply of many countries in the Middle East relies mainly on water desalination. In Qatar, the water network is completely fed with water from desalination plants. One of these power and desalination plants is located in Ras Abu Fontas, 20 km south of the capital Doha. The heat required for thermal desalination is provided by steam which is generated in waste heat recovery boilers (HRB) connected to gas turbines. Additionally, gas fired boilers or auxiliary firing in the HRBs are used in order to decouple the water generation from the electricity generation. In Ras Abu Fontas some auxiliary boilers run 24/7 because the HRB capacity does not match the demand of the desalination units. This paper contains the techno-economic analysis of two large-scale commercial solar field options, which could reduce the fuel consumption significantly. Both options employ parabolic trough technology with a nominal saturated steam output of 350 t/h at 15 bar (198°C, 240 MW). The first option uses direct steam generation without storage while the second relies on common thermal oil in combination with a molten salt thermal storage with 6 hours full-load capacity. The economic benefit of the integration of solar power depends mainly on the cost of the fossil alternative, and thus the price (respectively opportunity costs) of natural gas. At a natural gas price of 8 US-/MMBtu the internal rate of return on equity (IRR) is expected at about 5%.

  14. Motor vehicle injuries in Qatar: time trends in a rapidly developing Middle Eastern nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Ravinder; Al-Thani, Mohammed H; Al-Thani, Al-Anoud Mohammed; Sheikh, Javaid I; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2012-04-01

    Despite their wealth and modern road systems, traffic injury rates in Middle Eastern countries are generally higher than those in Western countries. The authors examined traffic injuries in Qatar during 2000-2010, a period of rapid population growth, focusing on the impact of speed control cameras installed in 2007 on overall injury rates and mortality. During the period 2000-2006, prior to camera installation, the mean (SD) vehicular injury death rate per 100,000 was 19.9±4.1. From 2007 to 2010, the mean (SD) vehicular death rates were significantly lower: 14.7±1.5 (p=0.028). Non-fatal severe injury rates also declined, but mild injury rates increased, perhaps because of increased traffic congestion and improved notification. It is possible that speed cameras decreased speeding enough to affect the death rate, without affecting overall injury rates. These data suggest that in a rapidly growing Middle Eastern country, photo enforcement (speed) cameras can be an important component of traffic control, but other measures will be required for maximum impact.

  15. Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia outbreak in captive wild ungulates at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation, State of Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Abdi; Schulz, Julia; Thiaucourt, François; Taha, Abid; Hammer, Sven

    2007-03-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae is a highly contagious and serious respiratory disease of domestic goats, characterized by coughing, severe respiratory distress, and high mortality rates. The lesions at necropsy are mainly a fibrinous pleuropneumonia with increased straw-colored pleural fluid. An outbreak of CCPP in wild goat (Capra aegagrus), Nubian ibex (Capra ibex nubiana), Laristan mouflon (Ovis orientalis laristanica), and gerenuk (Litocranius walleri) occurred at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in the State of Qatar. The disease was suspected because of the clinical symptoms and the necropsy findings and was confirmed by the isolation and identification of the causative organism. This new finding indicates that CCPP should be considered a potential threat to wildlife and the conservation of endangered ruminant species, especially in the Middle East, where it is enzootic because of its presence in chronic carriers. Susceptible imported animals should be quarantined and vaccinated. The preferred samples for diagnosis are the pleural fluid, which contains high numbers of Mycoplasma, and sections of hepatized lung, preferably at the interface of normal and diseased tissues. Samples must be shipped to diagnostic laboratories rapidly, and appropriate cool conditions must be maintained during shipping.

  16. Management of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: experience in newly developing Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahaldin, Ahmed Harith; Bener, Abdulbari; ElHakeem, Amr A M; Abdulhadi, Khaled

    2004-01-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a medical emergency that requires urgent diagnosis and treatment, and the adaptation of a proper protocol for management is a priority. In most cases, such treatment is rather controversial and depends on a variety of factors. The aim of this study was to determine and identify as early as possible those factors that play the important role in the prognosis of the condition, to describe the experience, and to suggest a treatment protocol that can be adopted in a tertiary hospital, such as Hamad General Hospital. Our study was retrospective and descriptive. It was conducted in the ear, nose, and throat outpatient clinics at Hamad General Hospital and the ear, nose, and throat wards at Rumailah Hospital. We enrolled a total of 21 patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The treatment protocol that was adopted--consisting of high-dose steroid therapy, full-dose antiviral drug (acyclovir), and a histamine analog, betahistine--resulted in hearing improvement in 57.4% of cases. Then the possible good and bad prognostic factors were discussed. The results of our study revealed that the steroid therapy protocol practiced in Qatar resulted in hearing improvement in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Good prognostic factors include early diagnosis, marked reduction of symptoms, and improved shape of the audiometric curve.

  17. Sport events and climate for visitors—the case of FIFA World Cup in Qatar 2022

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzarakis, Andreas; Fröhlich, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    The effect of weather on sport events is not well studied. It requires special attention if the event is taking place at a time and place with extreme weather situations. For the world soccer championship in Qatar (Doha 2022), human biometeorological analysis has been performed in order to identify the time of the year that is most suitable in terms of thermal comfort for visitors attending the event. The analysis is based on thermal indices like Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET). The results show that this kind of event may be not appropriate for visitors, if it is placed during months with extreme conditions. For Doha, this is the period from May to September, when conditions during a large majority of hours of the day cause strong heat stress for the visitors. A more appropriate time would be the months November to February, when thermally comfortable conditions are much more frequent. The methods applied here can quantify the thermal conditions and show limitations and possibilities for specific events and locations.

  18. Measuring patients' satisfaction with pharmaceutical services at a public hospital in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudair, Imran Fahmi; Raza, Syed Asif

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study pharmacy service impact on patient satisfaction and to determine what factors saliently link with pharmaceutical service performance at Hamad General Hospital. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was designed using the literature and consultation with Hamad General Hospital medical experts. The questionnaire contained 22 items that focused on five influencing factors: promptness; attitude; supply; location; medication education; and respondent demographic aspects. A total of 220 respondents completed the questionnaire. An exploratory factor analysis was used to group items and a structural equation model was developed to test causality between five factors along with their influence on patient satisfaction. The study establishes statistical evidence that patient satisfaction is positively influenced by service promptness, pharmacist attitude, medication counseling, pharmacy location and waiting area. Several socio-demographic characteristics have statistically different effect on satisfaction, notably: gender; marital status; health status; age; educational level; and ethnicity. However, medication supply did not influence patient satisfaction. Pharmaceutical services are recognized as an essential healthcare-system component. Their impact on customer satisfaction has been investigated in many countries; however, there is no such study in Qatar. The findings identify pharmaceutical service performance indicators and provide guidelines to improve Qatari pharmaceutical services.

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury in Qatar: Age Matters—Insights from a 4-Year Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moamena El-Matbouly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Overall traumatic brain injury (TBI incidence and related death rates vary across different age groups. Objectives. To evaluate the incidence, causes, and outcome of TBI in adolescents and young adult population in Qatar. Method. This was a retrospective review of all TBIs admitted to the trauma center between January 2008 and December 2011. Demographics, mechanism of injury, morbidity, and mortality were analyzed in different age groups. Results. A total of 1665 patients with TBI were admitted; the majority were males (92% with a mean age of 28 ± 16 years. The common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle crashes and falls from height (51% and 35%, resp.. TBI was incidentally higher in young adults (34% and middle age group (21%. The most frequent injuries were contusion (40%, subarachnoid (25%, subdural (24%, and epidural hemorrhage (18%. The mortality rate was 11% among TBI patients. Mortality rates were 8% and 12% among adolescents and young adults, respectively. The highest mortality rate was observed in elderly patients (35%. Head AIS, ISS, and age were independent predictors for mortality. Conclusion. Adolescents and adults sustain significant portions of TBI, whereas mortality is much higher in the older group. Public awareness and injury prevention campaigns should target young population.

  20. The stellar obliquity, planet mass, and very low albedo of Qatar-2 from K2 Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Fei; Yu, Liang; Albrecht, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The Qatar-2 transiting exoplanet system was recently observed by the {\\it Kepler} telescope as part of {\\it K2} Campaign 6. The photometric time series has one-minute time sampling and a precision of about 690~ppm, after filtering out artifacts and spurious trends. We identify dozens of starspot-crossing events, when the planet eclipsed a relatively dark region of the stellar photosphere. The observed patterns in the sequence of these events demonstrate that the planet always transits over the same range of stellar latitudes, and therefore that the stellar obliquity is less than about 10$^\\circ$. We support this conclusion with two different modeling approaches: one based on explicit identification and timing of the events, and the other based on fitting the light curves with a spotted-star model. We are also able to refine the usual transit parameters and measure the stellar rotation period ($18.5 \\pm 1.9$~days), corresponding to a 'gyrochronological' age of $1.4 \\pm 0.3$ Gyr. Coherent flux variations with t...

  1. Recurring sets of recurring starspots on exoplanet-host Qatar-2

    CERN Document Server

    Močnik, T; Hellier, C

    2016-01-01

    We announce the detection of recurring sets of recurring starspot occultation events in the short-cadence K2 lightcurve of Qatar-2, a K dwarf star transited every 1.34 d by a hot Jupiter. In total we detect 30 individual starspot occultation events, 28 of which form nine sets of recurring events with the longest set consisting of five occultation events in consecutive transits. Moreover, three sets of spot occultations were found to be from the same starspot over two full stellar rotations, setting a minimum starspot lifetime to 40 d. Another starspot reappeared after one stellar rotation. Starspot analysis provided a robust stellar rotational period measurement of $18.0\\pm0.1$ d and indicates that the system is aligned, having an obliquity of $0\\pm8^{\\circ}$. A pronounced rotational modulation in the lightcurve has a period of $18.2\\pm1.6$ d, in agreement with the rotational period derived from the starspot occultations. We tentatively detect an ellipsoidal modulation in the phase-curve, with a semi-amplitud...

  2. Severe respiratory illness associated with a novel coronavirus--Saudi Arabia and Qatar, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    CDC is working closely with the World Health Organization (WHO) and other partners to better understand the public health risk presented by a recently detected, novel coronavirus. This virus has been identified in two patients, both previously healthy adults who suffered severe respiratory illness. The first patient, a man aged 60 years from Saudi Arabia, was hospitalized in June 2012 and died; the second patient, a man aged 49 years from Qatar with onset of symptoms in September 2012 was transported to the United Kingdom for intensive care. He remains hospitalized on life support with both pulmonary and renal failure. Person-to-person or health-care-associated transmission has not been identified to date. Interim case definitions based on acute respiratory illness and travel history were issued by WHO on September 29 and include criteria for "patient under investigation," "probable case," and "confirmed case". This information is current as of October 4. Updates on the investigation and the WHO case definition are available at http://www.who.int/csr/don/en/index.html.

  3. Exclusive breast feeding and prevention of diarrheal diseases: a study in Qatar Aleitamento materno exclusivo na prevenção de doenças diarréicas: um estudo realizado no Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to explore the relationships between breast feeding and diarrhea and to assess the effect of exclusive breast feeding (EBF on reducing the risk of diarrhea in Qatar. METHODS: this is a cross sectional survey carried out at the Well baby clinics and Pediatric clinics in the 11 Primary Health Care Centers and Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, in Qatar. A multistage sampling design was used and a representative sample of 1500 Qatari infants and preschool children with an age range of 0-3 years and mothers agedbetween 18 to 47 years were surveyed during the period from October 2006 to September 2008 in Qatar. Out of the 1500 mothers, 1278 agreed to participate in this study, with a response rate of 85.2%. Questionnaires were administered to women who were attending Primary Health Care (PHC Centers for child immunization. Data about the child gathered included date of birth, gender, birth order, consanguinity, socio-economic conditions, age of mother, level of education of mother, occupation, mode of breast feeding, sterilization of bottle and incident of diarrhea during the interview. Univariate statistical methods were performed for statistical analysis. RESULTS: of the 1278 infants studied, more than half (59.3% were exclusively breastfed, and the mean duration was11.4 (SD=6.7. The risk for presenting diarrhea was higher in formula fed (48.7% and partiallybreastfed children (37.3% when compared to EBF(32.5%. CONCLUSION: EBF plays an important role in reducing the incidence and severity of infantile diarrhea.OBJETIVOS: investigar a relação entre a amamentação e a diarréia e avaliar o efeito do aleitamento maternao exclusivo (AME na redução do risco de diarréia noQatar. MÉTODOS: um estudo transversal realizado nos Well Baby Clinics and Pediatric Clinics dos 11 centros de atenção básica do Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, no Qatar. Um desenho amostral de múltiplos estágios foi empregado com

  4. High proportion of MERS-CoV shedding dromedaries at slaughterhouse with a potential epidemiological link to human cases, Qatar 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmoubasher A. B. A. Farag

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two of the earliest Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS cases were men who had visited the Doha central animal market and adjoining slaughterhouse in Qatar. We show that a high proportion of camels presenting for slaughter in Qatar show evidence for nasal MERS-CoV shedding (62/105. Sequence analysis showed the circulation of at least five different virus strains at these premises, suggesting that this location is a driver of MERS-CoV circulation and a high-risk area for human exposure. No correlation between RNA loads and levels of neutralizing antibodies was observed, suggesting limited immune protection and potential for reinfection despite previous exposure.

  5. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection: Molecular Epidemiology, Genotyping, Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors among Arab Women in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Anushree; Skariah, Sini; Dargham, Soha R.; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Mohamed-Nady, Nady; Amuna, Paul; Al-Thani, Asma A. J.; Sultan, Ali A.

    2017-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infections are known to cause cervical cancer worldwide, however, limited information is currently available on prevalence, types distribution and risk factors for HPV infection in the Arab countries. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study exclusively of women of Arabic origin residing in Qatar (n = 406) who were selected from the Women’s Hospital at Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) and Health Centers of the Primary Health Care Corporation in Doha, Qatar over the period March 2013 to August 2014. Socio-demographic, behavioral and clinical data were collected. Four hundred and six cervical smears and 292 blood samples were included in the study. HPV typing was done using HPV type-specific primers-based real-time PCR, and Sanger sequencing. HPV-IgG and IgM were quantified using ELISA assays. The prevalence of HPV infection amongst Qatari and non-Qatari Arab women were 9.8% and 6.1%, respectively and 7.6% and 16.7% in women with normal and abnormal cytology, respectively. HPV 81 was the most commonly found genotype in women with normal cytology (34.5%), whereas HPV 81, 16 and 59 in women with abnormal cytology (25.0% each). All the HPV DNA positive women were seronegative and HPV-IgG prevalence was higher in Qatari women than in non-Qatari Arab women. None of the studied factors had any significant association with HPV-DNA positivity or HPV-IgG seropositivity. The overall identified HPV DNA prevalence and HPV seroprevalence among Arab women in Qatar were on the low side compared to global levels. PMID:28046025

  6. Influenza immunization coverage for healthcare workers in a community hospital in Qatar (2011-2012 and 2012-2013 seasons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcell, Humberto Guanche; Ramirez, Eduardo Crespo

    2014-02-01

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for all healthcare workers (HCW) to prevent transmission within healthcare facilities. We conducted a descriptive study on influenza vaccination coverage during 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 campaigns in a community hospital in Qatar. 61.7% of the HCW were immunized in the first campaign, with an increase of up to 71.1% (p<0.05) in the second one, which was mainly due to better compliance of doctors (46.9% and 69.2%, respectively). Our results show proper coverage rates according US standards and highlight the need to implement additional strategies to improve health workers adherence of influenza, vaccination.

  7. Seat belt and mobile phone use among vehicle drivers in the city of Doha, Qatar: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Ziyad R; Cheema, Sohaila; Alrouh, Hekmat; Al-Thani, Mohammed Hamad; Al-Thani, Al Anoud Mohammed; Mamtani, Ravinder

    2015-09-22

    In Qatar traffic injuries and fatalities are of serious concern. Mobile phone use whilst driving has been associated with increased risk of vehicular collisions and injuries. Seat belt use has been demonstrated to save lives and reduce the severity of road traffic injuries. Whereas previously published studies may have looked at all front passengers, this study aims to obtain reliable estimates of the prevalence of seat belt and mobile phone use among vehicle drivers in the city of Doha, Qatar. Additionally, we aim to investigate the association of these behaviors with other variables namely gender, time of the day and type of vehicle. An observational study on 2,011 vehicles was conducted in 2013. Data were collected at ten sites within Doha city over a two-week period. Two trained observers surveyed each car and recorded observations on a data collection form adapted from a form used in a 2012 Oklahoma observational study. Associations were assessed using the Chi-squared test or Fisher's exact test. A p-value of .05 or less was considered statistically significant. Overall, 1,463 (72.7 %) drivers were found using a seat belt (95 % CI: 70.8-74.7 %) and 150 (7.5 %) their mobile phones (95 % CI: 6.3-8.6 %) during the observation period. Mobile phone use was significantly associated with not using a seat belt and driving a sport utility vehicle. Significantly lower rates of seat belt use were observed in the early morning and late afternoon. No gender differences were observed. Seatbelt use in Doha was found to be similar to countries in the region but lower than those in western countries. Also, studies from other high-income locations, reported lower rates of mobile phone use while driving than in Doha. Despite road traffic crashes being one of the leading causes of death in Qatar, three out of 10 drivers in Doha, Qatar, do not use a seat belt and about one in 12 use a mobile phone while driving. More efforts, in the form of awareness campaigns and increased law

  8. Evaluation of the atmospheric model WRF on the Qatar peninsula for a converging sea-breeze event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan Sobhana, Sandeepan; Nayak, Sashikant; Panchang, Vijay

    2016-04-01

    Qatar, a narrow peninsula covering an area of 11437 sq km, extends northwards into the Arabian Gulf for about 160km and has a maximum width of 88km. The convex shape of the coast-line and narrowness of the peninsula results in the Qatar region experiencing complex wind patterns. The geometry is favorable for formation of the land-sea breeze from both coastal sides of the peninsula. This can lead to the development of sea breeze convergence zones in the middle of the country. Although circulations arising from diurnal thermal contrast of land and water are amongst most intensively studied meteorological phenomena, there is no reported study for the Qatar peninsula and very few studies are reported for the Arabian Gulf region as whole. It is necessary to characterize the wind field for applications such as assessing air pollution, renewable energy etc. A non-hydrostatic mesoscale model, Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) with a nested high resolution grid permits the investigation of such fine scale phenomena. Data from eighteen land based Automated Weather Stations (AWS) and two offshore buoys deployed and maintained by the Qatar Meteorological Department were analyzed. Based on the analysis a clear case of sea breeze convergence were seen on 18 September 2015. Model simulations were used to investigate the synoptic conditions associated with the formation of this event. The season is characterized by week ambient north westerly wind over the Arabian Gulf. The WRF model performance is validated using observed in-situ data. Model simulations show that vertical extent of sea breeze cell was up to 1 km and the converging sea breeze regions were characterized with high vertical velocities. The WRF simulation also revealed that with high resolution, the model is capable of reproducing the fine scale patterns accurately. The error of predictions in the inner domain (highest resolution) are found to be relatively lower than coarse resolution domain. The maximum wind speed

  9. Mishandling and exposure of farm workers in Qatar to organophosphate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomar, Basem; Al-Saad, Khalid; Nriagu, Jerome

    2014-08-01

    We used a combination of subjective (questionnaire) and objective (urinary metabolites) measurements to evaluate factors that can predict the exposure of farm workers in Qatar to organophosphate pesticides and to assess whether the levels of exposure are associated with any self-reported health outcomes. The results show that pesticides were being extensively mishandled in the farms. Very few (pesticide they were using, and about one-third of the participants did not know the amount of pesticides to be applied to the crops. Nearly all (96%) of the participants had participated in mixing pesticides together before use and few (29%) used protective clothing while engaged in this operation. A significant number of participants (18%) had no knowledge that pesticides are a health hazard. At least one dialkyllphosphate (DAP) metabolite was detected in every worker. The geometric mean (GM) concentration of the dimethylalkylphosphates (DMAP) was 108 nM (range, from below the limit of detection (LOD) to 351 nM), and the GM for the diethylalkylphosphates (DEAP) was 43 nM (range, LOD-180 nM). The GM for total concentration of the metabolites (DAP) of 146 nM (maximum value estimated to be 531 nM) is below the values that have been reported for farmers in some countries, but higher than the levels in the general populations of many countries. We explored the influence of metal exposure and found consistent and negative relationships between the DAP metabolites and the concentrations of most of the trace elements in the urine of the farm workers; the negative associations were statistically significant for Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, As, and Pb. We suspect that the negative associations are not source-dependent but may be reflective of antagonistic relationships in human metabolism of OPPs and trace metals; hence we recommend that metals should be included as co-factors in assessing the health effects of OPP exposure.

  10. Library Collaboration with Medical Humanities in an American Medical College in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Birch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The medical humanities, a cross-disciplinary field of practice and research that includes medicine, literature, art, history, philosophy, and sociology, is being increasingly incorporated into medical school curricula internationally. Medical humanities courses in Writing, Literature, Medical Ethics and History can teach physicians-in-training communication skills, doctor-patient relations, and medical ethics, as well as empathy and cross-cultural understanding. In addition to providing educational breadth and variety, the medical humanities can also play a practical role in teaching critical/analytical skills. These skills are utilized in differential diagnosis and problem-based learning, as well as in developing written and oral communications. Communication skills are a required medical competency for passing medical board exams in the U.S., Canada, the UK and elsewhere. The medical library is an integral part of medical humanities training efforts. This contribution provides a case study of the Distributed eLibrary at the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar in Doha, and its collaboration with the Writing Program in the Premedical Program to teach and develop the medical humanities. Programs and initiatives of the DeLib library include: developing an information literacy course, course guides for specific courses, the 100 Classic Books Project, collection development of ‘doctors’ stories’ related to the practice of medicine (including medically-oriented movies and TV programs, and workshops to teach the analytical and critical thinking skills that form the basis of humanistic approaches to knowledge. This paper outlines a ‘best practices’ approach to developing the medical humanities in collaboration among the medical library, faculty and administrative stakeholders.

  11. Library collaboration with medical humanities in an american medical college in qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Sally; Magid, Amani; Weber, Alan

    2013-11-01

    The medical humanities, a cross-disciplinary field of practice and research that includes medicine, literature, art, history, philosophy, and sociology, is being increasingly incorporated into medical school curricula internationally. Medical humanities courses in Writing, Literature, Medical Ethics and History can teach physicians-in-training communication skills, doctor-patient relations, and medical ethics, as well as empathy and cross-cultural understanding. In addition to providing educational breadth and variety, the medical humanities can also play a practical role in teaching critical/analytical skills. These skills are utilized in differential diagnosis and problem-based learning, as well as in developing written and oral communications. Communication skills are a required medical competency for passing medical board exams in the U.S., Canada, the UK and elsewhere. The medical library is an integral part of medical humanities training efforts. This contribution provides a case study of the Distributed eLibrary at the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar in Doha, and its collaboration with the Writing Program in the Premedical Program to teach and develop the medical humanities. Programs and initiatives of the DeLib library include: developing an information literacy course, course guides for specific courses, the 100 Classic Books Project, collection development of 'doctors' stories' related to the practice of medicine (including medically-oriented movies and TV programs), and workshops to teach the analytical and critical thinking skills that form the basis of humanistic approaches to knowledge. This paper outlines a 'best practices' approach to developing the medical humanities in collaboration among the medical library, faculty and administrative stakeholders.

  12. The Stellar Obliquity, Planet Mass, and Very Low Albedo of Qatar-2 from K2 Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fei; Winn, Joshua N.; Yu, Liang; Albrecht, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The Qatar-2 transiting exoplanet system was recently observed in short-cadence mode by Kepler as part of K2 Campaign 6. We identify dozens of starspot-crossing events, when the planet eclipses a relatively dark region of the stellar photosphere. The observed patterns of these events demonstrate that the planet always transits over the same range of stellar latitudes and, therefore, that the stellar obliquity is less than about 10°. We support this conclusion with two different modeling approaches: one based on explicit identification and timing of the events and the other based on fitting the light curves with a spotted-star model. We refine the transit parameters and measure the stellar rotation period (18.5 ± 1.9 days), which corresponds to a “gyrochronological” age of 1.4 ± 0.3 Gyr. Coherent flux variations with the same period as the transits are well modeled as the combined effects of ellipsoidal light variations (15.4 ± 4.8 ppm) and Doppler boosting (14.6 ± 5.1 ppm). The magnitudes of these effects correspond to a planetary mass of 2.6+/- 0.9 {M}{Jup} and 3.9+/- 1.5 {M}{Jup}, respectively. Both of these independent mass estimates agree with the mass determined by the spectroscopic Doppler technique (2.487+/- 0.086 {M}{Jup}). No occultations are detected, giving a 2σ upper limit of 0.06 on the planet’s visual geometric albedo. We find no evidence for orbital decay, although we are only able to place a weak lower bound on the relevant tidal quality factor: {Q}\\star \\prime > 1.5× {10}4 (95% confidence).

  13. Attitudes toward science among grades 3 through 12 Arab students in Qatar: findings from a cross-sectional national study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ziad; Summers, Ryan; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad; Wang, Shuai

    2016-03-01

    This study assessed students' attitudes toward science in Qatar. A cross-sectional, nationwide probability sample representing all students enrolled in grades 3 through 12 in the various types of schools in Qatar completed the 'Arabic Speaking Students' Attitudes toward Science Survey' (ASSASS). The validity and reliability of the 32-item instrument, encompassing five sub-scales, have already been shown to be robust. The present analysis focused on responses from 1978 participants representing the students who completed the ASSASS in Arabic. Descriptive statistics were computed and a competing pair of multiple indicators multiple causes models is presented that attempt to link patterns in students' responses to the ASSASS with a set of indicators. The final model retained student age, gender, nationality (i.e. Qatari vs. Non-Qatari Arab), and school type as indicators. Findings from this study suggest that participants' attitudes toward science decrease with age, and that these attitudes and related preferences are influenced by students' nationality and the type of school they attend. Equally important, the often-reported advantages for male over female precollege students in terms of attitudes toward science were much less prominent in the present study.

  14. Species, sex, size and male maturity composition of previously unreported elasmobranch landings in Kuwait, Qatar and Abu Dhabi Emirate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A B M; McCarthy, I D; Carvalho, G R; Peirce, R

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents data from the first major survey of the diversity, biology and fisheries of elasmobranchs in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf. Substantial landings of elasmobranchs, usually as gillnet by-catch, were recorded in Kuwait, Qatar and the Emirate of Abu Dhabi (part of the United Arab Emirates), although larger elasmobranchs from targeted line fisheries were landed in Abu Dhabi. The elasmobranch fauna recorded was distinctive and included species that are undescribed, rare and have a highly restricted known distribution. Numerical abundance was dominated by sharks (c. 80%), of which carcharhinids were by far the most important. The milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus and whitecheek shark Carcharhinus dussumieri together comprised just under half of all recorded individuals. Around 90% of recorded sharks were small (50-90 cm total length, L(T) ) individuals, most of which were mature individuals of species with a small maximum size (shark species) and include some notable differences from other locations in the Indo-West Pacific Ocean. A number of concerns regarding the sustainability of the fishery were highlighted by this study, notably that most of the batoid species recorded are classed by the IUCN Red List as vulnerable, endangered, data deficient or not evaluated. Despite their considerable elasmobranch landings, none of the three countries sampled have developed a 'Shark Plan' as encouraged to do so under the FAO International Plan of Action: Sharks. Furthermore, Kuwait and Qatar currently report zero or no elasmobranch landings to the FAO.

  15. An assessment of the current treatment landscape for rheumatology patients in Qatar: Recognising unmet needs and moving towards solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi, Samar Al; Hammoudeh, Mohammed; Mounir, Mohamed; Mueller, Ruediger B; Wells, Alvin F; Sarakbi, Housam Aldeen

    2017-04-01

    Objective This study assessed the mode of application (oral, intravenous or subcutaneous (SC)) currently employed in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients from Qatar in comparison with patients' individual preferences for the mode of application of their treatment. Methods This study included 294 RA patients visiting three clinics at the main referral hospital in Qatar who were interviewed using a standard questionnaire to determine their preference of mode of application for their disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment in relation to their currently employed mode of application. Results The majority of patients were female (76%), and 93% of male patients and 61% of female patients in the study clinics were of a nationality other than Qatari. The highest patient preference recorded was for an oral therapy (69%), compared with injection (23%) and intravenous (8%) therapy. In total, 85% of patients expressed a preference to remain on oral therapy compared with 63% and 58% of intravenous and SC injection patients indicating a preference to remain on their current method of administration. Conclusions This high preference for oral therapies highlights the considerable need for incorporation of new oral targeted synthetic DMARD therapies into clinical practice within the region.

  16. Investigating chlorophyll and nitrogen levels of mangroves at Al-Khor, Qatar: an integrated chemical analysis and remote sensing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naimi, Noora; Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Balakrishnan, Perumal

    2016-05-01

    Mangroves are unique ecosystems that dominate tropical and subtropical coastlines around the world. They provide shelter and nursery to wide variety of species such as fish and birds. Around 73 species of mangroves were recognized around the world. In Qatar, there is only one mangrove species Avicennia marina that is predominant along the northeastern coast. Assessing the health of these valuable ecosystems is vital for protection, management, and conservation of those resources. In this study, an integrated approach of chemical and remote sensing analysis was implemented to investigate the current status of the mangrove trees in Al-Khor, Qatar. Fifteen different A. marina trees from different locations in the mangrove forest were examined for their chlorophyll and nitrogen content levels. Soil analysis was also conducted to understand the effect of moisture on nitrogen availability. Results shows that currently, mangroves are in a good status in terms of nitrogen availability and chlorophyll levels which are related and both are key factors for photosynthesis. Remote sensing techniques were used for chlorophyll prediction. The results showed that these methods have the potential to be used for chlorophyll prediction and estimation.

  17. Living In and Out of the Host Society. Aspects of Nepalese Migrants' Experience of Division in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Bruslé

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the place that Nepalese immigrant workers occupy in Qatar, a country where migrants' social and spatial positions are determined by their nationality and qualifications. The article uses visual images, mainly photographs, to illustrate the divided nature of society in Qatar. While trying to adopt the migrants' point of view, the author spent time both in the place where they live, that is the labor camps, and in central Doha where migrants spend their free time. Thus, except for the work place, pictures were taken both in private and public spaces to outline migrants' living spaces. They illustrate the strong constraints migrants have to face in everyday life. For the author himself, pictures are a means of taking a closer look at these places, once back from a field trip. By playing with different scales, zooming from the labor camp setting to the details of how rooms are arranged, pictures enable us to grasp the multiple facets of segregation and the way Nepalese migrant workers draw on their own resources to make foreign places their own. However, the adjustments made to these living spaces continue to reflect their lowly position in a highly segmented society. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1002319

  18. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) RNA and neutralising antibodies in milk collected according to local customs from dromedary camels, Qatar, April 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusken, C B; Farag, E A; Jonges, M; Godeke, G J; El-Sayed, A M; Pas, S D; Raj, V S; Mohran, K A; Moussa, H A; Ghobashy, H; Alhajri, F; Ibrahim, A K; Bosch, B J; Pasha, S K; Al-Romaihi, H E; Al-Thani, M; Al-Marri, S A; AlHajri, M M; Haagmans, B L; Koopmans, M P

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) were detected in serum and milk collected according to local customs from 33 camels in Qatar, April 2014. At one location, evidence for active virus shedding in nasal secretions and/or faeces was observed for 7/12 camels; viral RN

  19. Facing Human Capital Challenges of the 21st Century: Education and Labor Market Initiatives in Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriella; Karoly, Lynn A.; Constant, Louay; Salem, Hanine; Goldman, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    Countries in the Arab region are faced with the challenge of developing their populations' skills and technical knowledge, or human capital, in order to compete in the 21st century global economy. The authors describe the education and labor market initiatives implemented or under way in four countries in the Arab region -- Lebanon, Oman, Qatar,…

  20. Facing Human Capital Challenges of the 21st Century: Education and Labor Market Initiatives in Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriella; Karoly, Lynn A.; Constant, Louay; Salem, Hanine; Goldman, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    Countries in the Arab region are faced with the challenge of developing their populations' skills and technical knowledge, or human capital, in order to compete in the 21st century global economy. The authors describe the education and labor market initiatives implemented or under way in four countries in the Arab region -- Lebanon, Oman, Qatar,…

  1. Characteristics and determinants of adult patients with acute poisoning attending the accident and emergency department of a teaching hospital in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudair, I F; Jassim, Z; Hanssens, Y; Alsaad, W A

    2013-09-01

    Data about etiologic and demographic characteristics of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar are lacking. This prospective observational study was undertaken to analyze characteristics and possible determinants of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar. During 2010, 18,073 patients attended the emergency department of Hamad General Hospital, a teaching hospital in Qatar. Out of them, 599 (3.3%) patients were diagnosed as "poisoning case" with either chemical or pharmaceutical substances. The prevalence rate of poisoning incidence was 35.3/100,000 population. Seven patients died, corresponding with a case-fatality rate of 0.39/1000. The majority were male (65%) and the mean age was 34 years. The poisons involved were mainly chemicals (61.6%) and pharmaceuticals (38.4%). Female, mainly single, suffered more intentional poisoning compared to male. Of the patients aged 60 years and above (7.2%), the majority (95.3%) suffered unintentional poisoning with pharmaceuticals; 56% with warfarin, 12% with digoxin and 7% with insulin. Multivariate analysis shows that female gender, single status, younger than 35 years of age, being poisoned by pharmaceutical products, and the need for hospitalization are significant determinants for acute intentional poisoning after adjusting all other possible covariates. The findings of this study can be used to establish awareness and prophylactic campaigns in Qatar.

  2. Addressing Sustainable International Branch Campus Development through an Organizational Structure Lens: A Comparative Analysis of China, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgos, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The growth of international branch campuses (IBCs) in China, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) accounts for a significant portion of the overall growth of IBCs globally. Conversely the largest exporter of IBCs globally is the United States, with several U.S. IBCs located in each of these importing countries. With the intention of focusing…

  3. High-precision multi-band time-series photometry of exoplanets Qatar-1b and TrES-5b

    CERN Document Server

    Mislis, D; Tregloan-Reed, J; Ciceri, S; Southworth, J; D'Ago, G; Bruni, I; Baştürk, Ö; Alsubai, K A; Bachelet, E; Bramich, D M; Henning, Th; Hinse, T C; Iannella, A L; Parley, N; Schroeder, T

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Qatar-1 and TrES-5 transiting exoplanetary systems, which contain Jupiter-like planets on short-period orbits around K-dwarf stars. Our data comprise a total of 20 transit light curves obtained using five medium-class telescopes, operated using the defocussing technique. The average precision we reach in all our data is $RMS_{Q} = 1.1$ mmag for Qatar-1 ($V = 12.8$) and $RMS_{T} = 1.0$ mmag for TrES-5 ($V = 13.7$). We use these data to refine the orbital ephemeris, photometric parameters, and measured physical properties of the two systems. One transit event for each object was observed simultaneously in three passbands ($gri$) using the BUSCA imager. The QES survey light curve of Qatar-1 has a clear sinusoidal variation on a period of $P_{\\star} = 23.697 \\pm 0.123$\\,d, implying significant starspot activity. We searched for starspot crossing events in our light curves, but did not find clear evidence in any of the new datasets. The planet in the Qatar-1 system did not transit the...

  4. Detection of secondary eclipses of WASP-10b and Qatar-1b in the Ks band and the correlation between Ks-band temperature and stellar activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Patricia; Barrado, David; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Diaz, Marcos; López-Morales, Mercedes; Birkby, Jayne; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hodgkin, Simon

    2017-10-01

    The Calar Alto Secondary Eclipse study was a program dedicated to observe secondary eclipses in the near-IR of two known close-orbiting exoplanets around K-dwarfs: WASP-10b and Qatar-1b. Such observations reveal hints on the orbital configuration of the system and on the thermal emission of the exoplanet, which allows the study of the brightness temperature of its atmosphere. The observations were performed at the Calar Alto Observatory (Spain). We used the OMEGA2000 instrument (Ks band) at the 3.5m telescope. The data was acquired with the telescope strongly defocused. The differential light curve was corrected from systematic effects using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique. The final light curve was fitted using an occultation model to find the eclipse depth and a possible phase shift by performing a MCMC analysis. The observations have revealed a secondary eclipse of WASP-10b with depth of 0.137%, and a depth of 0.196% for Qatar-1b. The observed phase offset from expected mid-eclipse was of -0.0028 for WASP-10b, and of -0.0079 for Qatar-1b. These measured offsets led to a value for |ecosω| of 0.0044 for the WASP-10b system, leading to a derived eccentricity which was too small to be of any significance. For Qatar-1b, we have derived a |ecosω| of 0.0123, however, this last result needs to be confirmed with more data. The estimated Ks-band brightness temperatures are of 1647 K and 1885 K for WASP-10b and Qatar-1b, respectively. We also found an empirical correlation between the (R'HK) activity index of planet hosts and the Ks-band brightness temperature of exoplanets, considering a small number of systems.

  5. Epidemiology, Clinical Features and Outcome of Liver Abscess: A single Reference Center Experience in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtak Talib Abbas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the etiology, clinical presentation, management and outcome of liver abscess in adult patients admitted at Hamad general hospital, Qatar. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted to involve all adult patients who sequentially encountered episodes of liver abscess during the period from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010. Blood cultures were drawn from all patients in the first 24 hours after admission. In addition, all patients had stool examinations and indirect Hemagglutination test for Entameba histolytica. Aspiration of abscess was done under CT guidance and aspirated pus was sent for gram stain and culture. Results: In total, 67 patients were admitted with liver abscess; 56 patients with pyogenic liver abscess and 11 with amebic liver abscess. There were 61 (91% males and six (9% females and their mean age was 47.4 ± 18.5 years. Fever, abdominal pain and vomiting were the commonest presenting features. Of the 56 pyogenic liver abscess patients, four discharged against medical advice and seven refused all invasive procedures and were treated with antibiotics for six weeks. The remaining 44 (79% patients were treated with antibiotics and one or more invasive procedures, while one patient was treated surgically. The commonest organism isolated was Klebseilla pneumonia found in 21 patients (38%. The mean duration of hospitalization was 13.6 ± 8.1 days; the mean duration of antibiotic therapy was 34.7 ± 40.6 days, and one patient died. In contrast, all amebic liver abscess patients underwent ultrasound guided aspiration and showed good response to metronidazole treatment. Their mean duration of hospitalization was 7.7 ± 4.1 days, mean duration of therapy was 11.8 ± 2.1 days, and all patients were cured. Conclusion: Pyogenic liver abscess was more common than amebic liver abscess with Klebseilla pneumonia being the commonest organism. With good medical measures and early drainage of liver abscess, surgical

  6. Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

  7. Seroprevalence and epidemiological correlates of Toxoplasma gondii infections among patients referred for hospital-based serological testing in Doha, Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Molawi Naema

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The city of Doha in Qatar has a high density of feral cats and there is a high risk of toxoplasmosis for the resident human population. No data currently exist for the prevalence of infection with Toxoplasma gondii in the city. Methods We analysed the serological response to Toxoplasma gondii of 1625 subjects referred for routine hospital based serological tests in Doha, Qatar. Prevalence of current/recent infection was assessed through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the presence of specific anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies, and previous history of infection through IgG. Results Overall prevalence of IgG responses was 29.8% and this did not differ between the sexes nor between the three years of the study although there was a marked age effect. Among children less than 1 year old prevalence was 22.9%, but then dropped to in utero from immune mothers. Prevalence then increased steadily to peak at 41.2% among the oldest age class (>45 years. The prevalence of IgG antibody also varied significantly with region of origin, with higher rates for subjects from Africa, followed by those from the Eastern Mediterranean or Asia and lowest rates for subjects from the Arabian Peninsula. No IgM antibodies were detected in any subjects younger than 19 years, but prevalence increased to plateau at 7 – 9% in subjects aged over 20 years, and also varied with region of origin. In this case prevalence was highest among subjects from the Arabian Peninsula and least among those from Asia. Prevalence of IgM was higher among male subjects but did not vary between the three years of the study. Conclusion Although these data are based on a selected subset of the population, they nevertheless provide the first evidence that toxoplasmosis is endemic in Qatar in the human population, and that both age and region of origin play a role in the epidemiology of the infection. Concerns relating to the role of high density of feral cats in

  8. Reexamination of the relationship between the prevalence of hepatitis C virus and parenteral antischistosomal therapy among Egyptians resident in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derbala M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Moutaz Derbala,1,2 Prem Chandra,3 Aliaa Amer,4 Anil John,1 Manik Sharma,1 Ashraf Amin,1 Ragesh Babu Thandassery,1 Amr Faris5 1Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, Hamad Hospital, 2Medical Department, Weill Cornell Medical College, Qatar Branch, 3Medical Research Center, Hamad Medical Corporation, 4Laboratory Medicine and Pathology Department, 5Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Hamad Hospital, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Egypt has the highest prevalence of recorded hepatitis C virus (HCV worldwide, estimated nationally at 14.7%, which is attributed to extensive iatrogenic transmission during the era of parenteral antischistosomal therapy (PAT mass-treatment campaigns. The objective of our study was to attempt to highlight to what extent HCV transmission is ongoing and discuss the possible risk factors. We studied the prevalence of HCV among 7.8% of Egyptians resident in Qatar in relation to age, socioeconomic status, and PAT and discuss the possible risk factors. HCV testing was conducted in 2,335 participants, and results were positive for 13.5%, and 8.5% for those aged below 35 years. The prevalence of HCV in the PAT-positive population was 23.7% (123 of 518, 95% confidence interval [CI] 20.2%–27.6% compared with 11.2% in the PAT-negative group. Significantly higher HCV prevalence occurred in participants who were older than 50 years (23%, 95% CI 19.3%–27.1% compared to those aged 45–50 years (19.3%, 95% CI 15.2%–23.8%, 35–45 years (11.1%, 95% CI 8.9%–13.7%, and less than 35 years (8.5%, 95% CI 6.8%–10.4% (P<0.0001. Insignificant higher prevalence occurred in the low socioeconomic group (14.2%, 95% CI 11.3%–17.4%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that increasing age, history of PAT, bilharziasis, and praziquantel were common risk factors, but there was no relation with dental care. Host genetic predisposition seems to be a plausible underlying factor for susceptibility among Egyptians and intense ongoing infection

  9. A retrospective drug use evaluation of cabergoline for lactation inhibition at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlSaad D

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Doua AlSaad,1 Samah ElSalem,1 Palli Valapila Abdulrouf,1 Binny Thomas,1,2 Tayseer Alsaad,3 Afif Ahmed,1 Moza AlHail4 1Department of Pharmacy, Women’s Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 2Department of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, UK; 3Department of Pediatrics, Hamad General Hospital, 4Clinical Support Service Unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Background: Breastfeeding is considered as gold standard for infant nutrition and should be interrupted only when a compelling indication exists. Certain medical conditions such as abortion, stillbirth, HIV infection, or infant galactosemia and certain medications such as chemotherapy necessitate lactation inhibition to protect the health of mother and infant. Drug use evaluation (DUE studies are done to explore the current practice in a setting and help to identify areas in which further information and education may be needed by clinicians.Objective: The aim of this study was to conduct a DUE of cabergoline to assess indications for lactation inhibition, dosage regimen, and its safety.Method: A retrospective cross-sectional DUE study was conducted over a period of 4 months from September 1, 2013, till December 31, 2013, at the Women’s Hospital, Qatar. All cabergoline prescriptions written for lactation inhibition within 10 days of delivery or abortion were included in the study. A descriptive data analysis was undertaken.Results: Of the 85 patients included, stillbirth (50.6% was considered as the main reason for lactation inhibition, followed by abortion (27.1% and neonatal death (12.9%. The remaining 9.4% of the patients had live baby, and the majority of them were prescribed cabergoline for lactation inhibition because their maternal medical conditions required the use of drugs with insufficient safety data (n=6. Seventy-four percent of patients received cabergoline at accurate time and dose. However, 14% of the patients had preexisting

  10. Statin Selection in Qatar Based on Multi-indication Pharmacotherapeutic Multi-criteria Scoring Model, and Clinician Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Badriyeh, Daoud; Fahey, Michael; Alabbadi, Ibrahim; Al-Khal, Abdullatif; Zaidan, Manal

    2015-12-01

    Statin selection for the largest hospital formulary in Qatar is not systematic, not comparative, and does not consider the multi-indication nature of statins. There are no reports in the literature of multi-indication-based comparative scoring models of statins or of statin selection criteria weights that are based primarily on local clinicians' preferences and experiences. This study sought to comparatively evaluate statins for first-line therapy in Qatar, and to quantify the economic impact of this. An evidence-based, multi-indication, multi-criteria pharmacotherapeutic model was developed for the scoring of statins from the perspective of the main health care provider in Qatar. The literature and an expert panel informed the selection criteria of statins. Relative weighting of selection criteria was based on the input of the relevant local clinician population. Statins were comparatively scored based on literature evidence, with those exceeding a defined scoring threshold being recommended for use. With 95% CI and 5% margin of error, the scoring model was successfully developed. Selection criteria comprised 28 subcriteria under the following main criteria: clinical efficacy, best publish evidence and experience, adverse effects, drug interaction, dosing time, and fixed dose combination availability. Outcome measures for multiple indications were related to effects on LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and C-reactive protein. Atorvastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin exceeded defined pharmacotherapeutic thresholds. Atorvastatin and pravastatin were recommended as first-line use and rosuvastatin as a nonformulary alternative. It was estimated that this would produce a 17.6% cost savings in statins expenditure. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the evaluation's outcomes against input uncertainties. Incorporating a comparative evaluation of statins in Qatari practices based on a locally developed, transparent, multi

  11. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary health care physicians towards evidence-based medicine in Doha, Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kubaisi, N J; Al-Dahnaim, L A; Salama, R E

    2010-11-01

    Physicians worldwide are being encouraged to apply evidence-based medicine (EBM) to improve their clinical care. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was carried to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding EBM among 182 primary care physicians in Doha, Qatar. The current promotion of EBM was welcomed by most physicians (98.4%). While 92.2% had access to the Internet, this was mostly at home. The major perceived barriers to practising EBM in primary care were lack of free personal time (75.3%), limited resources and facilities (62.6%), no library in the locality (61.0%) and lack of training workshops and courses (61.0%). There was a statistically significant association between years since graduation and welcoming the EBM concept as well as with frequency of reading journals.

  12. Testing connections between exo-atmospheres and their host stars. GEMINI-N/GMOS ground-based transmission spectrum of Qatar-1b

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Essen, C.; Cellone, S.; Mallonn, M.; Albrecht, S.; Miculán, R.; Müller, H. M.

    2017-07-01

    Till date, only a handful exo-atmospheres have been well characterized, mostly by means of the transit method. Some classic examples are HD 209458b, HD 189733b, GJ-436b, and GJ-1214b. Data show exoplanet atmospheres to be diverse. However, this is based on a small number of cases. Here we focus our study on the exo-atmosphere of Qatar-1b, an exoplanet that looks much like HD 189733b regarding its host star's activity level, their surface gravity, scale height, equilibrium temperature and transit parameters. Thus, our motivation relied on carrying out a comparative study of their atmospheres, and assess if these are regulated by their environment. In this work we present one primary transit of Qatar-1b obtained during September, 2014, using the 8.1 m GEMINI North telescope. The observations were performed using the GMOS-N instrument in multi-object spectroscopic mode. We collected fluxes of Qatar-1 and six more reference stars, covering the wavelength range between 460 and 746 nm. The achieved photometric precision of 0.18 parts-per-thousand in the white light curve, at a cadence of 165 s, makes this one of the most precise datasets obtained from the ground. We created 12 chromatic transit light curves that we computed by integrating fluxes in wavelength bins of different sizes, ranging between 3.5 and 20 nm. Although the data are of excellent quality, the wavelength coverage and the precision of the transmission spectrum are not sufficient to neither rule out or to favor classic atmospheric models. Nonetheless, simple statistical analysis favors the clear atmosphere scenario. A larger wavelength coverage or space-based data is required to characterize the constituents of Qatar-1b's atmosphere and to compare it to the well known HD 189733b. On top of the similarities of the orbital and physical parameters of both exoplanets, from a long Hα photometric follow-up of Qatar-1, presented in this work, we find Qatar-1 to be as active as HD 189733. The white light curve

  13. Challenges to conservation: land use change and local participation in the Al Reem Biosphere Reserve, West Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sillitoe Paul

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One response to humanity's unsustainable use of natural resources and consequent degradation, even destruction of the environment, is to establish conservation areas to protect Nature and preserve biodiversity at least in selected regions. In Qatar, the government has shown strong support for this approach, confronted by the environmental consequences of oil and gas extraction and rapid urban development, by designating about one-tenth of the country a conservation area. Located in the west of the peninsula, it comprises the Al Reem Reserve, subsequently declared a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. Several approaches have figured in conservation, currently popular is co-management featuring participation of the local population, which recognises that people's activities often contribute to today's environment, with the promotion of bio-cultural diversity. However, these assumptions may not hold where rapid social and cultural change occurs, as in Qatar. We explore the implications of such change, notably in land use. We detail changes resulting with the move from nomadic to sedentary lifestyles: in land access, which now features tribal-state control, and herding strategies, which now feature migrant labour and depend on imported fodder and water, underwritten by the country's large gas and oil revenues. Current stocking arrangements - animals herded in much smaller areas than previously - are thought responsible for the degradation of natural resources. The place of animals, notably camels, in Qatari life, has also changed greatly, possibly further promoting overstocking. Many local people disagree. What are the implications of such changes for the participatory co-management of conservation areas? Do they imply turning the clock back to centrally managed approaches that seek to control access and local activities?

  14. The GAPS programme with HARPS-N at TNG. I: Observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and characterisation of the transiting system Qatar-1

    CERN Document Server

    Covino, E; Barbieri, M; Mancini, L; Nascimbeni, V; Claudi, R; Desidera, S; Gratton, R; Lanza, A F; Sozzetti, A; Biazzo, K; Affer, L; Gandolfi, D; Munari, U; Pagano, I; Bonomo, A S; Cameron, A Collier; Hébrard, G; Maggio, A; Messina, S; Micela, G; Molinari, E; Pepe, F; Piotto, G; Ribas, I; Santos, N C; Southworth, J; Shkolnik, E; Triaud, A H M J; Bedin, L; Benatti, S; Boccato, C; Bonavita, M; Borsa, F; Borsato, L; Brown, D; Carolo, E; Ciceri, S; Cosentino, R; Damasso, M; Faedi, F; Fiorenzano, A F Martínez; Latham, D W; Lovis, C; Mordasini, C; Nikolov, N; Poretti, E; Rainer, M; López, R Rebolo; Scandariato, G; Silvotti, R; Smareglia, R; Alcala, J M; Cunial, A; Di Fabrizio, L; Di Mauro, M P; Giacobbe, P; Granata, V; Harutyunyan, A; Knapic, C; Lattanzi, M; Leto, G; Lodato, G; Malavolta, L; Marzari, F; Molinaro, M; Nardiello, D; Pedani, M; Prisinzano, L; Turrini, D

    2013-01-01

    A long-term multi-purpose observational programme has started with HARPS-N@TNG aimed to characterise the global architectural properties of exoplanetary systems. In this first paper we fully characterise the transiting system Qatar-1. We exploit HARPS-N high-precision radial velocity measurements obtained during a transit to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect in the Qatar-1 system, and out-of-transit measurements to redetermine the spectroscopic orbit. New photometric transit light-curves are analysed and a spectroscopic characterisation of the host star atmospheric parameters is performed based on various methods (line equivalent widths ratios, spectral synthesis, spectral energy distribution). We achieved a significant improvement in the accuracy of the orbital parameters and derived the spin-orbit alignment of the system; this information, combined with the spectroscopic determination of the host star properties, allows us to derive the fundamental physical parameters for star and planet (masses and ra...

  15. Mapping Qatar’s Cognitive Macro-Structure: A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis to Make Industry-Specific Recommendations for Engaging Female Entrepreneurship in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Bachir, Abir

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose - As individual conduct is inextricably intertwined with environmental structure and perceived process, this paper reviews these three variables and their impact to female entrepreneurial activity in Qatar. Design - The first chapter uses a qualitative exploration of the role and potential of human capital within the national social construct. The second chapter summarizes an analysis of the larger economic and political cognitive construct enterprising female entrepre...

  16. Role of pharmacist in cardiovascular disease-related health promotion and in hypertension and dyslipidemia management: a cross-sectional study in the State of Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Mahfoud, Ziyad R; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Alkhiyami, Dania; Alasmar, Aya Riyad

    2016-06-01

    In Qatar, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have recently become the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Prevention, detection and management of CVD risk factors reduce CVD chance. The study objectives were to assess Qatar pharmacists' involvement in CVD health promotion, to identify the activities that they currently provide to patients with CVD risk factors, to describe their attitudes towards their involvement in CVD prevention and to assess their perceived barriers for provision of CVD prevention services We conducted a cross-sectional survey of community and ambulatory pharmacists in Qatar. Pharmacist characteristics, involvement in CVD-related activities along with their attitudes and perceived barriers were analysed using frequency distributions. Bivariate linear regression models were used to test for associations between CVD health promotion activity score and each variable. Variables with a P-value of 0.20 or less were included in the multivariate model. A total of 141 pharmacists completed the survey (response rate 60%). More than 70% responded with rarely or never to 6 out of the 10 CVD health promotion activities. Eighty-four per cent and 68% always or often describe to patients the appropriate time to take antihypertensive medications and the common medication adverse effects, respectively. Yet, 50% rarely or never review the medication refill history or provide adherence interventions. Lack of CVD educational materials was the top perceived barrier (55%) in addition to lack of having private counselling area (44.6%), and lack of time (38.3%). Females and community pharmacists were more involved in CVD health promotion (P = 0.046 and P = 0.017, respectively) than their counterparts. Health promotion practice increased with increasing attitudes score and decreased with increased barriers score (P = 0.012 and P = 0.001). The scope of pharmacy practice in CVD prevention is limited in Qatar. Efforts need to be exerted to increase

  17. Structural and physical properties of the dust particles in Qatar and their influence on the PV panel performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa, Brahim; Isaifan, Rima J.; Madhavan, Vinod E.; Abdallah, Amir A.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, extensive R&D has been conducted, both by industry and academia, to significantly raise the conversion efficiency of commercial photovoltaic (PV) modules. The installation of PV systems aimed at optimizing solar energy yield is primarily dictated by its geographic location and installation design to maximize solar exposure. However, even when these characteristics have been addressed appropriately, there are other factors that adversely affect the performance of PV systems, namely the temperature-induced voltage decrease leading to a PV power loss, and the dust accumulation (soiling). The latter is the lesser acknowledged factor that significantly influences the performance of PV installations especially in the Middle East region. In this paper we report on the investigation of the structural and physical properties of the desert-dust particles in the State of Qatar. The dust particles were collected directly from the PV panels installed in desert environment and characterized by different techniques, including scanning electron, optical and atomic force microscopies, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive, UV-Vis, micro-Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The vibrating sample magnetometry analyses were also conducted to study the magnetic properties of the dust particles. The influence of the dust accumulation on the PV panel performance was also presented and discussed.

  18. Structural and physical properties of the dust particles in Qatar and their influence on the PV panel performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa, Brahim; Isaifan, Rima J; Madhavan, Vinod E; Abdallah, Amir A

    2016-08-16

    Recently, extensive R&D has been conducted, both by industry and academia, to significantly raise the conversion efficiency of commercial photovoltaic (PV) modules. The installation of PV systems aimed at optimizing solar energy yield is primarily dictated by its geographic location and installation design to maximize solar exposure. However, even when these characteristics have been addressed appropriately, there are other factors that adversely affect the performance of PV systems, namely the temperature-induced voltage decrease leading to a PV power loss, and the dust accumulation (soiling). The latter is the lesser acknowledged factor that significantly influences the performance of PV installations especially in the Middle East region. In this paper we report on the investigation of the structural and physical properties of the desert-dust particles in the State of Qatar. The dust particles were collected directly from the PV panels installed in desert environment and characterized by different techniques, including scanning electron, optical and atomic force microscopies, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive, UV-Vis, micro-Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The vibrating sample magnetometry analyses were also conducted to study the magnetic properties of the dust particles. The influence of the dust accumulation on the PV panel performance was also presented and discussed.

  19. International note: exploring differences in native and immigrant adolescents' mathematics achievement and dispositions towards mathematics in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan; Melkonian, Michael; Khine, Myint Swe

    2015-04-01

    The burgeoning immigrant population in major immigrant-receiving countries in North America and Europe has necessitated researchers and policymakers in these countries to examine the academic success of children of immigration and the factors contributing to their academic success. However, there is sparse research on the academic trajectories of children of immigration in other continents, such as Asia. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to examine first- and second-generation immigrant adolescents' mathematics achievement and dispositions towards mathematics in comparison to their native peers in one of the Middle Eastern countries in Asia, Qatar. The results of the study indicated that both first- and second-generation immigrant adolescents tended to have higher mathematics achievement, intrinsic motivation to learn mathematics, instrumental motivation to learn mathematics, mathematics self-efficacy, and mathematics self-concept than did their native counterparts. Moreover, immigrant adolescents tended to have lower mathematics anxiety than did their native peers. The study also revealed significant differences between first- and second-generation immigrant adolescents with respect to their mathematics achievement and dispositions towards mathematics. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural and physical properties of the dust particles in Qatar and their influence on the PV panel performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa, Brahim; Isaifan, Rima J.; Madhavan, Vinod E.; Abdallah, Amir A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, extensive R&D has been conducted, both by industry and academia, to significantly raise the conversion efficiency of commercial photovoltaic (PV) modules. The installation of PV systems aimed at optimizing solar energy yield is primarily dictated by its geographic location and installation design to maximize solar exposure. However, even when these characteristics have been addressed appropriately, there are other factors that adversely affect the performance of PV systems, namely the temperature-induced voltage decrease leading to a PV power loss, and the dust accumulation (soiling). The latter is the lesser acknowledged factor that significantly influences the performance of PV installations especially in the Middle East region. In this paper we report on the investigation of the structural and physical properties of the desert-dust particles in the State of Qatar. The dust particles were collected directly from the PV panels installed in desert environment and characterized by different techniques, including scanning electron, optical and atomic force microscopies, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive, UV-Vis, micro-Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The vibrating sample magnetometry analyses were also conducted to study the magnetic properties of the dust particles. The influence of the dust accumulation on the PV panel performance was also presented and discussed. PMID:27526667

  1. Using game theory approach to interpret stable policies for Iran's oil and gas common resources conflicts with Iraq and Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Maryam; Bahrini, Aram; Shayanrad, Sepideh

    2015-08-01

    Oil and gas as the non-renewable resources are considered very valuable for the countries with petroleum economics. These resources are not only diffused equally around the world, but also they are common in some places which their neighbors often come into conflicts. Consequently, it is vital for those countries to manage their resource utilization. Lately, game theory was applied in conflict resolution of common resources, such as water, which is a proof of its efficacy and capability. This paper models the conflicts between Iran and its neighbors namely Qatar and Iraq between their oil and gas common resources using game theory approach. In other words, the future of these countries will be introduced and analyzed by some well-known 2 × 2 games to achieve a better perspective of their conflicts. Because of information inadequacy of the players, in addition to Nash Stability, various solution concepts are used based on the foresight, disimprovements, and knowledge of preferences. The results of mathematical models show how the countries could take a reasonable strategy to exploit their common resources.

  2. Mossbauer Effect Study of the Hyper fine Structure of the Different Phases of Iron in the Portland Cement Produced in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Eissa, N. A. [نبيل عيسى; Sallam, H. A.; Al-Houty, L.; Al-Mauraikhy, M.

    1981-01-01

    Various samples of the raw materials used in the manufacture of Portland cement in Qatar, the clinker produced and the cement itself were studied by using Mossbauer Effect and X-ray diffraction analysis in order to investigate the hyperfine structure of the iron forms present and the distribution of these forms among the different phases of the cement. The results obtained revealed the presence of five forms of iron in the cement clinker (a) Fe3"1" ions in octahedral sites existed in the ferr...

  3. The impact of dietary and lifestyle factors on the risk of dental caries among young children in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Al Darwish, Mohammed S; Tewfik, Ihab; Hoffmann, Georg F

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between dietary intake, type of feeding during infancy, other lifestyle and sociodemographic factors, and dental caries. A cross-sectional study. The study was carried out on children younger than 16 years of age who visited Primary Health Care Centers. The study was carried out over a period from October 2010 to June 2011 in Qatar. A random sample of 1752 children aged 6-15 years old who visited the Primary Health Care Centers was approached, and parents of 1284 children provided their consent and fulfilled the inclusion criteria (corresponding to a response rate of 73%). The study was based on a questionnaire that included variables such as sociodemographic information, lifestyle, family history, and feeding patterns during infancy, information on oral hygiene practices, and clinical examination. The status of dental caries was recorded on the basis of the WHO criteria. The prevalence of dental caries [decayed, missed, or filled tooth (DMFT)] in the permanent dentition among children was 73% [95% confidence interval (CI): 71-75%], with a mean DMFT value of 4.5 (SD: 4.2). The numbers of children consuming sea food, cod liver oil, and vitamin-D-fortified milk less than once a week were significantly higher in the dental caries group compared with those without caries (11.7 vs. 8.3%; P=0.05, 92.4 vs. 87.5%; P=0.005, and 10.6 vs. 6.3%; P=0.011, respectively). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that being female [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.41; 95% CI: 1.07-1.84], having a BMI greater than the 95th percentile versus less than the 85th percentile (adjusted OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.17-3.84), a monthly household income of at least 10 000 QAR (adjusted OR: 2.61; 95% CI: 1.69-4.02), consumption of cod liver oil less than once a week (adjusted OR: 2.13; 95% CI: 1.35-3.37), 1-year increase in age (adjusted OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.01-1.11), being formula fed during infancy (adjusted OR: 2.27; 95% CI: 1

  4. Association of lipid profile and waist circumference as cardiovascular risk factors for overweight and obesity among school children in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizk NM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nasser M Rizk, Mervat YousefHealth Sciences Department, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, QatarBackground: Childhood obesity is a national as well as worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of overweight and obesity among Qatari children with lipid profile and waist circumference as adverse cardiovascular risk factors in children aged 6–11 years. International Obesity Task Force reference values were used to screen for overweight and obesity.Methods: A cross-sectional study in a randomly selected sample was conducted in 315 Qatari primary school students aged 6–11 years. Anthropometric measurements, including body weight, height, waist circumference, and body mass index were calculated for 151 girls and 164 boys. Weight categories were based on International Obesity Task Force reference values. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and triglycerides were measured, and atherogenic index was calculated.Results: In total, 31.71% of boys and 32.78% of girls were overweight or obese. Overweight and obese children screened against International Obesity Task Force reference values had a significantly increased risk of high waist circumference (P < 0.0001, hypertriglyceridemia (P = 0.002, low HDL-C (P = 0.017, and atherogenic index (P = 0.021 compared with children who were not overweight or obese. The partial correlation coefficient for the cardiovascular risk marker of waist circumference indicated a positive significant association with total cholesterol (r = 0.465, P = 0.003, triglycerides (r = 0.563, P < 0.001, and LDL-C (r = 0.267, P = 0.003, and a significant negative association with HDL-C (r = −0.361, P = 0.004. Overweight and obesity significantly increase the odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence interval (CIs of cardiovascular risk factors as follows: hypertriglyceridemia (OR 6.34, CI 2.49–13

  5. Community structure and activity of a highly dynamic and nutrient-limited hypersaline microbial mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roda Al-Thani

    Full Text Available The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1-L4 in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively, the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging, oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor, and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1. Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%-42% of the identified bacteria. Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3, evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4 was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer. Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%-97%, whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%. Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods.

  6. Disinfection by-products of chlorine dioxide (chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes): Occurrence in drinking water in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otoum, Fatima; Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Ahmed, Talaat A; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed; Ali, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water, namely, chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes (THMs), was investigated. Two-hundred-ninety-four drinking water samples were collected from seven desalination plants (DPs), four reservoirs (R), and eight mosques (M) distributed within various locations in southern and northern Qatar. The ClO2 concentration levels ranged from 0.38 to <0.02 mg L(-1), with mean values of 0.17, 0.12, and 0.04 mg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorite levels varied from 13 μg L(-1) to 440 μg L(-1), with median values varying from 13 to 230 μg L(-1), 77-320 μg L(-1), and 85-440 μg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorate levels varied from 11 μg L(-1) to 280 μg L(-1), with mean values varying from 36 to 280 μg L(-1), 11-200 μg L(-1), and 11-150 μg L(-1) in the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The average concentration of THMs was 5 μg L(-1), and the maximum value reached 77 μg L(-1) However, all of the DBP concentrations fell within the range of the regulatory limits set by GSO 149/2009, the World Health Organization (WHO), and Kahramaa (KM).

  7. A retrospective drug use evaluation of cabergoline for lactation inhibition at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSaad, Doua; ElSalem, Samah; Abdulrouf, Palli Valapila; Thomas, Binny; Alsaad, Tayseer; Ahmed, Afif; AlHail, Moza

    2016-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding is considered as gold standard for infant nutrition and should be interrupted only when a compelling indication exists. Certain medical conditions such as abortion, stillbirth, HIV infection, or infant galactosemia and certain medications such as chemotherapy necessitate lactation inhibition to protect the health of mother and infant. Drug use evaluation (DUE) studies are done to explore the current practice in a setting and help to identify areas in which further information and education may be needed by clinicians. Objective The aim of this study was to conduct a DUE of cabergoline to assess indications for lactation inhibition, dosage regimen, and its safety. Method A retrospective cross-sectional DUE study was conducted over a period of 4 months from September 1, 2013, till December 31, 2013, at the Women’s Hospital, Qatar. All cabergoline prescriptions written for lactation inhibition within 10 days of delivery or abortion were included in the study. A descriptive data analysis was undertaken. Results Of the 85 patients included, stillbirth (50.6%) was considered as the main reason for lactation inhibition, followed by abortion (27.1%) and neonatal death (12.9%). The remaining 9.4% of the patients had live baby, and the majority of them were prescribed cabergoline for lactation inhibition because their maternal medical conditions required the use of drugs with insufficient safety data (n=6). Seventy-four percent of patients received cabergoline at accurate time and dose. However, 14% of the patients had preexisting hypertensive disorder and 58.3% of them were diagnosed as uncontrolled hypertension. Conclusion The current DUE study found that cabergoline was mainly used to inhibit lactation for patients with stillbirth, abortion, and neonatal death. In mothers who use medications for other medical conditions, benefits and risks of breastfeeding should be carefully balanced before prescribing cabergoline. Current prescribing pattern

  8. Screening for hepatitis C in average and high-risk populations of Qatar using rapid point-of-care testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaabi, Saad; John, Anil K; Al Dweik, Nazeeh; Ullah Wani, Hameed; Babu Thandassary, Ragesh; Derbala, Moutaz F; Al Ejji, Khalid; Sultan, Khaleel; Pasic, Fuad; Al Mohannadi, Munnera; Yacoub, Rafae; Butt, Mohd Tariq; Singh, Rajvir

    2015-01-01

    Background Screening for hepatitis C has been found to be beneficial in high-risk individuals and ‘baby boomers’. Objective Our aim was to screen for hepatitis C in average and high-risk individuals and compare the disease characteristics and response to treatment among the screened group (SG) and non-screened group (NSG). Method Community-based screening for hepatitis C was done in the average and high-risk populations of Qatar. Screening was done using rapid point-of-care testing. All patients with stage 1 fibrosis on liver biopsy were treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Results In total, 13,704 people were screened and 272 (2%, 95% CI (1.8–2.2%) had positive antibodies to hepatitis C. During the same period, 237 non-screened patients (NSG) with hepatitis C were referred for treatment. Alanine and aspartate aminotransferases (ALT, AST) and overall fibrosis were significantly lower in the SG as compared with the NSG (p = 0.04, 0.04 and 0.01, respectively). The response to treatment was similar in the SG as compared with the NSG (sustained viral response 61.7 % versus 69.1%, p = 0.55). Average-risk patients had significantly lower ALT levels (p = 0.04) but had similar response to treatment as the high-risk individuals (sustained viral response 63.2 % versus 61%, p = 0.87). Conclusion Screening detects hepatitis C with lesser fibrosis but does not result in better response to pegylated interferon and ribavirin as compared with non-screened patients. PMID:26279845

  9. Community Structure and Activity of a Highly Dynamic and Nutrient-Limited Hypersaline Microbial Mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Thani, Roda

    2014-03-21

    The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1–L4) in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively), the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging), oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor), and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing) decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1). Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%–42% of the identified bacteria). Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus) were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3), evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4) was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer). Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%–97%), whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%). Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods.

  10. Effect of salinity on carbon and sulfur cycles in Umm Alhool sabkha microbial mat ecosystem in Qatar

    KAUST Repository

    Alnajjar, Mohammad Ahmad

    2012-10-19

    Microbial mats are only present under extreme conditions, where grazing by higher organisms is limited. Therefore, microbial mats may provide insight into extraterrestrial life, due to their adaptations to extreme temperatures, desiccation or salinity. They are faced with a diurnal cycle with variable length based on their location, which exposes them to extreme salinity conditions (i.e., water withdrawal and high evaporation). Cyanobacteria in the photic zone of a mat ecosystem supply the other microorganism with the required organic material to produce energy and grow. Subsequently, this will reproduce the nutrients needed by the phototrophs through elemental re-mineralization. In this work, we investigated the effect of water salinity that covers the microbial mat ecosystem of Umm Alhool sabkha, Qatar, regarding the most important processes within microbial mats: photosynthesis and sulfate reduction (SR). Our results showed that both photosynthetic and sulfate reduction rates decreased with increasing the salinity. The microbial community structure, assessed by 454 pyro-sequencing, revealed that the cyanobacterial community structure changed in response to the change in salinity. This was not the case for the sulfate reducer community structure, which stayed as it is in the mats incubated at different salinities. Therefore, we speculate that salinity affects the photosynthetic community structure, and consequently affects the photosynthetic activity of the whole ecosystem. However, sulfate reduction rates decreased due to less organic material supply from the upper layers and not due to change in microbial community structure of SR. Other factors such as the activity of the enzymes could also have an effect on SRR, but it was not investigated in this study.

  11. Determination of the activity concentration levels of the artificial radionuclide137Cs in soil samples collected from Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Nasir, Tabassum; Al Mugren, K. S.; Alkhomashi, N.; Al-Dahan, N.; Al-Dosari, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Bukhari, S.; Regan, P. H.; Santawamaitre, T.; Malain, D.; Habib, A.; Al-Dosari, Hanan; Daar, Eman

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to establish the first baseline measurements for radioactivity concentration of the artificial radionuclide 137Cs in soil samples collected from the Qatarian peninsula. The work focused on the determination of the activity concentrations levels of man-made radiation in 129 soil samples collected across the landscape of the State of Qatar. All the samples were collected before the most recent accident in Japan, “the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident”. The activity concentrations have been measured via high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a hyper-pure germanium detector situated in a low-background environment with a copper inner-plated passive lead shield. A radiological map showing the activity concentrations of 137Cs is presented in this work. The concentration wasfound to range from 0.21 to 15.41 Bq/kg. The highest activity concentration of 137Cs was observed in sample no. 26 in North of Qatar. The mean value was found to be around 2.15 ± 0.27 Bq/kg. These values lie within the expected range relative to the countries in the region. It is expected that this contamination is mainly due to the Chernobyl accident on 26 April 1986, but this conclusion cannot be confirmed because of the lack of data before this accident.

  12. Genetic testing and genomic analysis: a debate on ethical, social and legal issues in the Arab world with a focus on Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shanti, Hatem; Chouchane, Lotfi; Badii, Ramin; Gallouzi, Imed Eddine; Gasparini, Paolo

    2015-11-14

    In 2013 both Saudi Arabia and Qatar launched genome projects with the aim of providing information for better diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases and, ultimately to realize personalized medicine by sequencing hundred thousands samples. These population based genome activities raise a series of relevant ethical, legal and social issues general, related to the specific population structure as well as to the Islamic perspective on genomic analysis and genetic testing. To contribute to the debate, the Authors after reviewing the existing literature and taking advantage of their professional experience in the field and in the geographic area, discuss and provide their opinions. In particular, the Authors focus on the impact of consanguinity on population structure and disease frequency in the Arab world, on genetic testing and genomic analysis (i.e. technical aspects, impact, etc.) and on their regulations. A comparison between the Islamic perspective and the ethical, social and legal issues raised in other population contexts is also carried. In conclusion, this opinion article with an up-to-date contribution to the discussion on the relevance and impact of genomic analysis and genetic testing in the Arab world, might help in producing specific national guidelines on genetic testing and genomic analysis and help accelerate the implementation and roll out of genome projects in Muslim countries and more specifically in Qatar, and other countries of the Gulf.

  13. Relationships between anthropometric measures and athletic performance, with special reference to repeated-sprint ability, in the Qatar national soccer team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Girard, Olivier; Forchino, Fabricio; Al Haddad, Hani; Dos Santos, Gilvan A; Millet, Grégoire P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine potential relationships between anthropometric parameters and athletic performance with special consideration to repeated-sprint ability (RSA). Sixteen players of the senior male Qatar national soccer team performed a series of anthropometric and physical tests including countermovement jumps without (CMJ) and with free arms (CMJwA), straight-line 20 m sprint, RSA (6 × 35 m with 10 s recovery) and incremental field test. Significant (P sprinting times and r = 0.54 for maximal sprinting speed) with the exception of the sprint decrement score (Sdec). The sum of six skinfolds and adipose mass index were largely correlated with Sdec (r = 0.68, P 0.05, respectively) or any standard athletic tests. Multiple regression analyses indicated that muscular cross-sectional area for mid-thigh, adipose index, straight-line 20 m time, maximal sprinting speed and CMJwA are the strongest predictors of Sdec (r(2) = 0.89) and TT (r(2) = 0.95) during our RSA test. In the Qatar national soccer team, players' power-related qualities and RSA are associated with a high muscular profile and a low adiposity. This supports the relevance of explosive power for the soccer players and the larger importance of neuromuscular qualities determining the RSA.

  14. Assessment of learning and study strategies of university students in Qatar using an Arabic translation of the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Haitham M; Nasser, Ramzi

    2014-06-01

    413 (119 men, 294 women) undergraduate university students in Qatar completed an Arabic version of the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) measuring Anxiety, Attitude, Concentration, Information Processing, Motivation, Self-testing, Selecting Main Ideas, Study Aids, Time Management, and Test Strategies. The students' learning and study strategies scores were similar to those reported in the literature. Factor analysis indicated the same general factors as in the original study. Internal consistency estimates ranged from .62 to .88. Nine of the 10 scales (i.e., all with the exception of the Study Aids) significantly correlated with students' GPAs. Scores obtained from these scales provide valid assessments of Qatar University students' use of learning and study strategies related to skill, will, and self-regulation components of strategic learning and also academic achievement. There also were statistically significant differences between higher and lower achieving students in their learning and study strategies. This study also explored the use of the LASSI as a predictive measure of academic achievement. Anxiety and test strategies were significant predictors of academic achievement as measured by students' GPA.

  15. Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, Yemen Arab Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in 17 foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, and…

  16. Patient responses to research recruitment and follow-up surveys: findings from a diverse multicultural health care setting in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khidir, Amal; Asad, Humna; Abdelrahim, Huda; Elnashar, Maha; Killawi, Amal; Hammoud, Maya; Al-Khal, Abdul Latif; Haddad, Pascale; Fetters, Michael D

    2016-01-26

    Health care researchers working in the Arabian Gulf need information on how to optimize recruitment and retention of study participants in extremely culturally diverse settings. Implemented in Doha, Qatar in 2012 with 4 language groups, namely Arabic, English, Hindi, and Urdu, this research documents persons' responses to recruitment, consent, follow-up, and reminder procedures during psychometric testing of the Multicultural Assessment Instrument (MAI), a novel self- or interviewer-administered survey. Bilingual research assistants recruited adults in outpatient clinics by approaching persons in particular who appeared to be from a target language group. Participants completed the MAI, a second acculturation instrument used for content-validity assessment, and a demographics questionnaire. Participants were asked to take the MAI again in 2-3 weeks, in person or by post, to assess test-retest reliability. Recruitment data were analyzed by using nonparametric statistics. Of 1503 persons approached during recruitment, 400 enrolled (27%)-100 per language group. The enrollment rates in the language groups were: Arabic-32%; English-33%; Hindi-18%; Urdu-30%. The groups varied somewhat in their preferences regarding consent procedure, follow-up survey administration, contact mode for follow-up reminders, and disclosure of personal mailing address (for postal follow-up). Over all, telephone was the preferred medium for follow-up reminders. Of 64 persons who accepted a research assistant's invitation for in-person follow-up, 40 participants completed the interview (follow-up rate, 63%); among 126 persons in the postal group with a deliverable address, 29 participants mailed back a completed follow-up survey (response rate, 23%). Researchers in the Arabian Gulf face challenges to successfully identify, enroll, and retain eligible study participants. Although bilingual assistants-often from the persons' own culture-recruited face-to-face, and our questionnaire contained no

  17. Patient responses to research recruitment and follow-up surveys: findings from a diverse multicultural health care setting in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Khidir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care researchers working in the Arabian Gulf need information on how to optimize recruitment and retention of study participants in extremely culturally diverse settings. Implemented in Doha, Qatar in 2012 with 4 language groups, namely Arabic, English, Hindi, and Urdu, this research documents persons’ responses to recruitment, consent, follow-up, and reminder procedures during psychometric testing of the Multicultural Assessment Instrument (MAI, a novel self- or interviewer-administered survey. Methods Bilingual research assistants recruited adults in outpatient clinics by approaching persons in particular who appeared to be from a target language group. Participants completed the MAI, a second acculturation instrument used for content-validity assessment, and a demographics questionnaire. Participants were asked to take the MAI again in 2–3 weeks, in person or by post, to assess test-retest reliability. Recruitment data were analyzed by using nonparametric statistics. Results Of 1503 persons approached during recruitment, 400 enrolled (27 %—100 per language group. The enrollment rates in the language groups were: Arabic-32 %; English-33 %; Hindi-18 %; Urdu-30 %. The groups varied somewhat in their preferences regarding consent procedure, follow-up survey administration, contact mode for follow-up reminders, and disclosure of personal mailing address (for postal follow-up. Over all, telephone was the preferred medium for follow-up reminders. Of 64 persons who accepted a research assistant’s invitation for in-person follow-up, 40 participants completed the interview (follow-up rate, 63 %; among 126 persons in the postal group with a deliverable address, 29 participants mailed back a completed follow-up survey (response rate, 23 %. Conclusions Researchers in the Arabian Gulf face challenges to successfully identify, enroll, and retain eligible study participants. Although bilingual assistants

  18. SU-E-P-57: Radiation Doses Assessment to Paediatric Patients for Some Digital Diagnostic Radiology Examination in Emergency Department in Qatar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, I; Aly, A; Al Naemi, H [Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha (Qatar)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation doses to pediatric patients undergoing standard radiographic examinations using Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) in Paediatric emergency center of Hamad General Hospital (HGH) in state of Qatar and compared with regional and international Dose Reference Levels (DRLs). Methods: Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was measured for 2739 patients for two common X-ray examinations namely: Chest AP/PA, Abdomen. Exposure factors such as kV, mAs and Focal to Skin Distance (FSD) were recorded for each patient. Tube Output was measured for a range of selected kV values. ESD for each individual patient was calculated using the tube output and the technical exposure factors for each examination. The ESD values were compared with the some international Dose Reference Levels (DRL) for all types of examinations. Results: The most performed procedure during the time of this study was chest PA/PA (85%). The mean ESD values obtained from AP chest, PA chest and AP abdomen ranged 91–120, 80–84 and 209 – 659 µGy per radiograph for different age’s groups respectively. Two protocols have been used for chest AP and PA using different radiological parameters, and the different of ESD values for chest PA and were 41% for 1 years old child, 57% for 5 years old for chest AP. Conclusion: The mean ESD were compared with those found in literature and were found to be comparable. The radiation dose can be reduced more for Chest AP and PA examination by optimization of each investigation and hence more studies are required for this task. The results presented will serve as a baseline data needed for deriving local reference doses for pediatric X-ray examinations in this local department and hence it can be applied in the whole Qatar.

  19. Can Source Triangulation Be Used to Overcome Limitations of Self-Assessments? Assessing Educational Needs and Professional Competence of Pharmacists Practicing in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheir, Nadir; Al-Ismail, Muna Said; Al-Nakeeb, Reem

    2017-01-01

    Continuing professional development activities should be designed to meet the identified personal goals of the learner. This article aims to explore the self-perceived competency levels and the professional educational needs of pharmacists in Qatar and to compare these with observations of pharmacy students undergoing experiential training in pharmacies (students) and pharmacy academics, directors, and managers (managers). Three questionnaires were developed and administered to practicing pharmacists, undergraduate pharmacy students who have performed structured experiential training rotations in multiple pharmacy outlets in Qatar and pharmacy managers. The questionnaires used items extracted from the National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities (NAPRA) Professional competencies for Canadian pharmacists at entry to practice and measured self- and observed pharmacists' competency and satisfaction with competency level. Training and educational needs were similar between the pharmacists and observers, although there was trend for pharmacists to choose more fact-intensive topics compared with observers whose preferences were toward practice areas. There was no association between the competency level of pharmacists as perceived by observers and as self-assessed by pharmacists (P ≤ .05). Pharmacists' self-assessed competency level was consistently higher than that reported by students (P ≤ .05). The results suggest that the use of traditional triangulation might not be sufficient to articulate the professional needs and competencies of practicing pharmacists as part of a strategy to build continuing professional development programs. Pharmacists might have a limited ability to accurately self-assess, and observer assessments might be significantly different from self-assessments which present a dilemma on which assessment to consider closer to reality. The processes currently used to evaluate competence may need to be enhanced through the use of well

  20. Tuberculosis in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaida AL-Suwaidi

    2015-01-01

    Hamad Medical Corporation is CAP accredited, and the lab is also CAP accredited. External quality assurance covers microscopy, culture and drug susceptibility testing. All TB care, including care for MDR-TB and latent TB infection, are available free of charge for Qatari and non-Qatari residents.

  1. Assessment of heavy metal accumulation and performance Of some physiological parameters in zea mays l. And Vic1a faba l. Grown on soil amended by sewage Sludge resulting from sewage water Treatment in the state of qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Mazen, A. M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Pot experiment was conducted to explore extent of concerns regarding agricultural use of sewage sludge for crop production in the state of Qatar. Extent of heavy metal accumulation and its subsequent impact on physiological performance in Zea mays and Viciafaba plants grown on sludge - amended soils was explored. Analysis revealed that all tested heavy metals were several times higher in pure sludge compared to pure garden soil. Plants grown in sludge -mixed soil accumulated large amounts of ...

  2. The GAPS programme with HARPS-N at TNG. I. Observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and characterisation of the transiting system Qatar-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covino, E.; Esposito, M.; Barbieri, M.; Mancini, L.; Nascimbeni, V.; Claudi, R.; Desidera, S.; Gratton, R.; Lanza, A. F.; Sozzetti, A.; Biazzo, K.; Affer, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Munari, U.; Pagano, I.; Bonomo, A. S.; Collier Cameron, A.; Hébrard, G.; Maggio, A.; Messina, S.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Pepe, F.; Piotto, G.; Ribas, I.; Santos, N. C.; Southworth, J.; Shkolnik, E.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Bedin, L.; Benatti, S.; Boccato, C.; Bonavita, M.; Borsa, F.; Borsato, L.; Brown, D.; Carolo, E.; Ciceri, S.; Cosentino, R.; Damasso, M.; Faedi, F.; Martínez Fiorenzano, A. F.; Latham, D. W.; Lovis, C.; Mordasini, C.; Nikolov, N.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Rebolo López, R.; Scandariato, G.; Silvotti, R.; Smareglia, R.; Alcalá, J. M.; Cunial, A.; Di Fabrizio, L.; Di Mauro, M. P.; Giacobbe, P.; Granata, V.; Harutyunyan, A.; Knapic, C.; Lattanzi, M.; Leto, G.; Lodato, G.; Malavolta, L.; Marzari, F.; Molinaro, M.; Nardiello, D.; Pedani, M.; Prisinzano, L.; Turrini, D.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Our understanding of the formation and evolution of planetary systems is still fragmentary because most of the current data provide limited information about the orbital structure and dynamics of these systems. The knowledge of the orbital properties for a variety of systems and at different ages yields information on planet migration and on star-planet tidal interaction mechanisms. Aims: In this context, a long-term, multi-purpose, observational programme has started with HARPS-N at TNG and aims to characterise the global architectural properties of exoplanetary systems. The goal of this first paper is to fully characterise the orbital properties of the transiting system Qatar-1 as well as the physical properties of the star and the planet. Methods: We exploit HARPS-N high-precision radial velocity measurements obtained during a transit to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect in the Qatar-1 system, and out-of-transit measurements to redetermine the spectroscopic orbit. New photometric-transit light-curves were analysed and a spectroscopic characterisation of the host star atmospheric parameters was performed based on various methods (line equivalent width ratios, spectral synthesis, spectral energy distribution). Results: We achieved a significant improvement in the accuracy of the orbital parameters and derived the spin-orbit alignment of the system; this information, combined with the spectroscopic determination of the host star properties (rotation, Teff, log g, metallicity), allows us to derive the fundamental physical parameters for star and planet (masses and radii). The orbital solution for the Qatar-1 system is consistent with a circular orbit and the system presents a sky-projected obliquity of λ = - 8.4 ± 7.1 deg. The planet, with a mass of 1.33 ± 0.05 MJ, is found to be significantly more massive than previously reported. The host star is confirmed to be metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.20 ± 0.10) and slowly rotating (vsinI = 1.7 ± 0.3 km s-1

  3. Structural equation model for estimating risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Middle Eastern setting: evidence from the STEPS Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Faleh Mohamed Hussain; Reka, Husein; Renwick, Matthew J; Roman, Gabriela D; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Aims Understanding type 2 diabetes mellitus is critical for designing effective diabetes prevention policies in Qatar and the Middle East. Methods Using the Qatar 2012 WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance survey, a subsample of 1224 Qatari participants aged 18–64 years was selected. Subjects had their fasting blood glucose levels tested, had not been diagnosed with or treated for diabetes, had a fasting time >12 hours and were not pregnant. We applied a hypothesized structural equation model (SEM) to assess sociodemographic, behavioral, anthropometric and metabolic variables affecting persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results There is a direct effect of triglyceride levels (0.336) and body mass index (BMI) (0.164) on diabetes status. We also found that physical activity levels negatively affect BMI (−0.148) and positively affect high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (0.106); sociodemographic background negatively affects diet (−0.522) and BMI (−0.352); HDL positively affects total cholesterol (0.230) and has a negative effect on BMI (−0.108), triglycerides (−0.128) and waist circumference (−0.104). Diet has a positive effect on triglycerides (0.281) while family history of diabetes negatively affects total cholesterol (−0.104). BMI has a positive effect on waist circumference (0.788) and mediates the effects of physical activity over diabetes status (−0.028). BMI also mediates the effects that sociodemographic factors (−0.058) and physical activity (−0.024) have on diabetes status. BMI and HDL (−0.002) together mediate the effect of physical activity on diabetes status and similarly HDL and tryglycerides (−0.005) also mediate the effect of physical activity on diabetes status. Finally diet and tryglycerides mediate the effects that sociodemographic factors have on diabetes status (−0.049). Conclusions This study's main finding is that triglyceride levels and BMI are the main variables directly affecting diabetes status in the Qatari

  4. A Case Study On the Relative Influence of Free Tropospheric Subsidence, Long Range Transport and Local Production in Modulating Ozone Concentrations over Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Mohammed; Ackermann, Luis; Fountoukis, Christos; Gladich, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    The Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI) operates a network of air quality monitoring stations (AQMS) around the Doha metropolitan area and an ozonesonde station with regular weekly launches and occasional higher frequency launch experiments (HFLE). Six ozonesondes were launched at 0700 LT/0400 UTC and 1300 LT/1000 UTC over a three day period between 10-12 September, 2013. We present the analysis of the ozonesonde data coupled with regional chemical transport modeling over the same time period using WRF-Chem validated against both the ozonesonde and surface AQMS measurements. The HFLE and modeling show evidence of both subsidence and transboundary transport of ozone during the study period, coupled with a strong sea breeze circulation on the 11th of September resulting in elevated ozone concentrations throughout the boundary layer. The development of the sea breeze during the course of the day and influence of the early morning residual layer versus daytime production is quantified. The almost complete titration of ozone in the morning hours of 11 September, 2013 is attributed to local vehicular emissions of NOx and stable atmospheric conditions prevailing over the Doha area. The relative contribution of long range transport of ozone along the Arabian Gulf coast and local urban emissions are discussed.

  5. Knowledge and Perceptions of Pharmacy Students in Qatar on Anti-Doping in Sports and on Sports Pharmacy in Undergraduate Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaisu, Ahmed; Mottram, David; Rahhal, Alaa; Alemrayat, Bayan; Ahmed, Afif; Stuart, Mark; Khalifa, Sherief

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To assess pharmacy students' knowledge and perceptions of doping and anti-doping in sports and to explore the curricular needs for undergraduate pharmacy in the field of sports pharmacy. Methods. A cross-sectional, descriptive, web-based survey of pharmacy students was conducted at Qatar University College of Pharmacy from March to May 2014. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results. Eighty respondents completed the online survey (80% response rate). Sixty percent were unaware of the World Anti-Doping Agency, and 85% were unaware of the International Pharmaceutical Federation's statement on the pharmacist's role in anti-doping. Students' knowledge score regarding the prohibited status of drugs that may be used by athletes was around 50%. Fourth-year pharmacy students had significantly higher knowledge scores than the other groups of students. Respondents acknowledged the important role of health care professionals, including pharmacists, as advisors on the safe and effective use of drugs in sports. Ninety percent of the students supported the inclusion of sports pharmacy in the curriculum. Conclusion. Pharmacy students indicated a strong desire to play a role in doping prevention and ensure safe and rational use of drugs among athletes. They suggested requiring an education and training strategy for sports pharmacy in undergraduate pharmacy curricula.

  6. The CSR strategies of the MNCs to ensure the labor rights of migrant workers: the 2022 FIFA World Cup Project in Qatar : (The case study based on Migrant Workers of Bangladesh)

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad, Nandita; Slobodian, Nataliia

    2012-01-01

    Title: The CSR strategies of the MNCs to ensure the labor rights of migrant workers: the 2022 FIFA World Cup Project in Qatar (Case study based on Migrant Workers of Bangladesh)Authors: Nandita Farhad and Nataliia SlobodianSupervisor: Charles WoolfsonDate: May 30th, 2012Background: The Corporate social responsibility (CSR) became at the forefront of corporate strategy of many businesses. However, the area of human and labor rights as a part of CSR of the business is not deeply studied, especi...

  7. Rasch Measurement Analysis of a 25-Item Version of the Mueller/McCloskey Nurse Job Satisfaction Scale in a Sample of Nurses in Lebanon and Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Clinton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mueller/McCloskey Nurse Job Satisfaction Scale (MMSS is widely used, but its psychometric characteristics have not been sufficiently validated for use in Middle Eastern countries. The objective of our methodological study was to determine the psychometric suitability of a 25-item version of the MMSS (MMSS-25 for use in middle-income and high-income Middle Eastern countries. A total of 1,322 registered nurses, 859 in Lebanon and 463 in Qatar, completed the MMSS-25 as part of a cross-sectional multinational investigation of nursing shortages in the region. We used the Rasch rating scale model to investigate the psychometric performance of the MMSS-25. We identified possible item bias among MMSS-25 items. We conducted confirmatory factor analyses (CFA to compare the fit to our data of five factor structures reported in the literature. We concluded that irrespective of administration in English or Arabic, the MMSS-25 is not sufficiently productive of measurement for use in the region. A core set of 13 items (MMSS-13, Cronbach’s α = .82 loading on five dimensions eliminates redundant MMSS items and is suitable for initial screening of nurses’ satisfaction. Of the five factor structures we examined, the MMSS-13 was the only close fit to our data (comparative fit index = 0.951; Tucker–Lewis index = 0.931; root mean square error of approximation = 0.051; p value = .401. The MMSS-13 has psychometric characteristics superior to MMSS-25, but additional items are required to meet the research-specific objectives of future studies of nurses’ job satisfaction in Middle Eastern countries.

  8. An Examination of Income Effect on Consumers’ Ethical Evaluation of Counterfeit Drugs Buying Behaviour: A Cross-Sectional Study in Qatar and Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadl, Abubakr Abdelraouf; Maraghi, Fatima Abdulla; Mohammad, Khadijah Shhab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are limited studies on consumer behaviour toward counterfeit products and the determining factors that motivate willingness to purchase counterfeit items. Aim This study aimed to fill this literature gap through studying differences in individual ethical evaluations of counterfeit drug purchase and whether that ethical evaluation affected by difference in income. It is hypothesized that individuals with lower/higher income make a more/less permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drug purchase. Materials and Methods To empirically test the research assumption, a comparison was made between people who live in the low-income country Sudan and people who live in the high-income country Qatar. The study employed a face-to-face structured interview survey methodology to collect data from 1,170 subjects and the Sudanese and Qatari samples were compared using independent t-test at alpha level of 0.05 employing SPSS version 22.0. Results Sudanese and Qatari individuals were significantly different on all items. Sudanese individuals scored below 3 for all Awareness of Societal Consequences (ASC) items indicating that they make more permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drug purchase. Both groups shared a basic positive moral agreement regarding subjective norm indicating that influence of income is not evident. Conclusion Findings indicate that low-income individuals make more permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drugs purchase when highlighting awareness of societal consequences used as a deterrent tool, while both low and high-income individuals share a basic positive moral agreement when subjective norm dimension is exploited to discourage unethical buying behaviour. PMID:27790465

  9. An Examination of Income Effect on Consumers' Ethical Evaluation of Counterfeit Drugs Buying Behaviour: A Cross-Sectional Study in Qatar and Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadl, Abubakr Abdelraouf; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Maraghi, Fatima Abdulla; Mohammad, Khadijah Shhab

    2016-09-01

    There are limited studies on consumer behaviour toward counterfeit products and the determining factors that motivate willingness to purchase counterfeit items. This study aimed to fill this literature gap through studying differences in individual ethical evaluations of counterfeit drug purchase and whether that ethical evaluation affected by difference in income. It is hypothesized that individuals with lower/higher income make a more/less permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drug purchase. To empirically test the research assumption, a comparison was made between people who live in the low-income country Sudan and people who live in the high-income country Qatar. The study employed a face-to-face structured interview survey methodology to collect data from 1,170 subjects and the Sudanese and Qatari samples were compared using independent t-test at alpha level of 0.05 employing SPSS version 22.0. Sudanese and Qatari individuals were significantly different on all items. Sudanese individuals scored below 3 for all Awareness of Societal Consequences (ASC) items indicating that they make more permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drug purchase. Both groups shared a basic positive moral agreement regarding subjective norm indicating that influence of income is not evident. Findings indicate that low-income individuals make more permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drugs purchase when highlighting awareness of societal consequences used as a deterrent tool, while both low and high-income individuals share a basic positive moral agreement when subjective norm dimension is exploited to discourage unethical buying behaviour.

  10. A Study on the use of Facebook, RSS, Blogs and Twitter (Web2.0) among selected academic libraries from 6 Gulf countries namely: Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman and Kuwait

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper aims to explore and study the current usage trends of Web2.0 namely Facebook, RSS, Blogs and Twitter among selected higher education institutions’ libraries in 6 gulf countries namely: Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman and Kuwait. Websites of the selected libraries would be compared on the extent of the usage of these tools, the participation level and their purpose. The author would also share his opinion and suggestions on improving the current trends pertaining to the area of Web2.0 and libraries. The impact and importance of Web2.0 on libraries cannot be disputed. Since gaining popularity in mid-2000, libraries around the globe have jumped onto the Web2.0 bandwagon. Among the common examples of Web2.0 used by libraries today are namely: social networking sites, blogs, wikis, folksonomies and video sharing sites. Libraries are using Web2.0 to (among others): • market their services / resources to their community, • announce latest library news, • provide their online guides / notes for their resources among others. Though such tools have been implemented by most libraries around the world, some of the challenges faced by libraries are: •participation level – casting the net to a wider audience •selection of web2.0 tools •effectiveness of present web2.0 tools used by the libraries

  11. Ultra-trace determination of (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu by triple quadruple collision/reaction cell-ICP-MS/MS: Establishing a baseline for global fallout in Qatar soil and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Mohamed A; Helal, Abdul-Fattah I; Al-Kinani, Athab T; Balakrishnan, Perumal

    2016-03-01

    The development of practical, fast, and reliable methods for the ultra-trace determination of anthropogenic radionuclides (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu by triple quadruple collision/reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CRC-ICP-MS/MS) were investigated in term of its accuracy and precision for producing reliable results. The radionuclides were extracted from 1 kg of the environmental soil samples by concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acids. The leachate solutions were measured directly by triple quadrupole CRC-ICP-MS/MS. For quality assurance, a chemical separation of the concerned radionuclides was conducted and then measured by single quadrupole-ICP-MS. The developed methods were next applied to measure the anthropogenic radionuclides (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu in soil samples collected throughout the State of Qatar. The average concentrations of (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu were 0.606 fg/g (3.364 Bq/kg), 0.619 fg/g (2.038 Bq/kg), 0.034 fg/g (0.0195 Bq/kg), 65.59 fg/g (0.150 Bq/kg), and 12.06 fg/g (0.103 Bq/kg), respectively.

  12. Púrpura trombocitopênica idiopática na infância: estudo de base populacional no Catar Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in childhood: a population-based study in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Al-Mulla

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Definir o padrão da púrpura trombocitopênica idiopática (PTI (aguda/crônica, e descrever seus sintomas e características clínicas em crianças com menos de 14 anos de idade em uma sociedade árabe recentemente desenvolvida. MÉTODOS: Este estudo descritivo retrospectivo foi realizado no Departamento de Pediatria do Hospital Geral de Hamad, Hamad Medical Corporation, Catar. Foram incluídas neste estudo 50 crianças com idade inferior a 14 anos e diagnóstico de PTI durante o período de 2000 a 2005. RESULTADOS: Das crianças estudadas (50, 62% foram diagnosticadas com PTI aguda e 38% com PTI crônica. A PTI aguda foi mais prevalente em meninos (64,5% em comparação com meninas (35,5%, enquanto que a PTI crônica apresentou uma distribuição quase igual em meninos (57,9% e meninas (42,1%. História de infecção viral foi comum em casos de PTI tanto aguda (71% quanto crônica (63,2%; 68% das crianças com PTI apresentaram contagem de plaquetas abaixo de 20x10(9/L ao diagnóstico. A maioria das crianças estudadas (74% foi tratada com imunoglobulina intravenosa. CONCLUSÕES: O estudo revelou uma alta incidência de PTI entre as crianças no Catar. As descobertas do estudo são semelhantes às de outros relatos internacionais.OBJECTIVE: To find the pattern of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP (acute/chronic and to describe presenting features and clinical characteristics of the disease in children below 14 years of age in a newly developed Arabian society. METHODS: This retrospective, descriptive study was carried out at the Pediatric Department of the Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar. A total of 50 children below 14 years of age who were diagnosed with ITP during the period 2000-2005 were included. RESULTS: Among the studied children (50, 62% were diagnosed with acute ITP and 38% with chronic ITP. Acute ITP was more prevalent in boys (64.5% when compared with girls (35.5%, whereas for chronic ITP

  13. Toxoplasmosis in Sand cats (Felis margarita) and other animals in the Breeding Centre for Endangered Arabian Wildlife in the United Arab Emirates and Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation, the State of Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Pas, An; Rajendran, C; Kwok, O C H; Ferreira, L R; Martins, J; Hebel, C; Hammer, S; Su, C

    2010-09-20

    The Sand cat (Felis margarita) is a small-sized felid found in sand and stone deserts ranging from the north of Africa to Asia, with the Arabian Peninsula as its centre of distribution. The Sand cat captive breeding program at the Breeding Centre for Endangered Arabian Wildlife (BCEAW), Sharjah, UAE, has experienced high newborn mortality rates, and congenital toxoplasmosis was recently recognized as one of the causes of this mortality. In the present study, one 18-month-old Sand cat (FM019) died of acute toxoplasmosis-associated hepatitis and pneumonitis acquired after birth; Toxoplasma gondii was demonstrated in histological sections which reacted with T. gondii polyclonal antibodies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). T. gondii DNA was found by PCR of extracted DNA from liver and lung tissues of this cat. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in serum examined in 1:1600 dilution in the modified agglutination test (MAT); its 2-year-old cage mate seroconverted (MAT titer 1:3200) at the same time. Another Sand cat (FM017) was euthanized because of ill health when 3 years old; its MAT titer was >1:3200, and T. gondii tissue cysts were found in brain, heart, ocular muscles and skeletal muscle, confirmed by IHC. Viable T. gondii was isolated by bioassays in mice inoculated with tissues of another chronically infected Sand cat (FM002); T. gondii was not found in histological sections of this cat. T. gondii antibodies were found in several species of animals tested, notably in 49 of 57 wild felids at BCEAW. A 7-year-old Sand cat (3657) from Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP), Doha, State of Qatar died of acute visceral toxoplasmosis with demonstrable T. gondii tachyzoites by IHC, and T. gondii DNA by PCR, and a MAT titer of >3200. T. gondii antibodies were found in 21 of 27 of wild felids at AWWP. PCR-RFLP genotyping at 10 genetic loci revealed that these T. gondii isolates from Sand cat (FM002 and FM019) at BCEAW have an atypical genotype, which was previously reported in T

  14. Citizens’ attitudes towards migrant workers in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Diopa, Abdoulaye; Trung Lea, Kien; Johnstonb, Trevor; Ewersa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Public attitudes play a critical role in shaping policies towards immigration and the status of migrant workers. Facing growing pressure from international human rights organizations, media and other groups, the Gulf Cooperation Council states have begun efforts to reform the current kafala system, which prevails throughout the region. Yet despite these efforts, relatively little is known about what citizens actually think of this policy, let alone their more general attitudes ...

  15. Qatar: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-24

    2004, the Emir issued a new labor law , which gives Qatari nationals the right to form associations with legal status and allows workers to go on strike...foreign workforce. Critics charge that the labor law places additional restrictions on guest workers by prohibiting non-citizens from forming labor

  16. Qatar: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-04

    Global Terrorist (SDGT) for allegedly acting as an Al Qaeda financier.22 Nuaymi is the president of the leadership council of the Switzerland -based Al...authorities protested the Taliban’s use of the name “Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan” and the display of the former Taliban government flag at the...representing the Afghan Taliban as an emirate government or sovereign.”26 Qatari officials took steps to remove the disputed placards and flag . Afghan

  17. Qatar: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    demands for effective , transparent government. Thus far, the emir has avoided much regional or domestic criticism of the centralized political system...experts are arguing that although the global credit crunch and resulting recession significantly lowered the value of many Qatari real estate and local...infrastructure; and energy, water, and food supplies. To respond to these challenges, Qatari authorities have embarked on a series of parallel

  18. Public Acceptance of Taxation in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Ewers, Michael; Eskander, Glnar , [ إسكندر، وجلنار ; Shockley, Bethany,, [ شوكلي ، وبثناي

    2016-01-01

    Most Gulf countries have acknowledged that the traditional rentier system requires basic economic reform, and VAT could prove a more stable source of government revenue for oil producing countries. Results from two separate survey experiments implemented by SESRI show that, for both Qatari citizens and most expatriates, taxation is not anathema. Rather, for Qataris, not cutting current benefits is more important than adding new expenses, even though the final cost to the state may be the same...

  19. Transcultural aspects of psychiatric patients in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Islam, M F

    1978-01-01

    The illness behaviour of Qatari psychiatric patients is defined by the nature of their symptomatology. The importance of somatic symptoms in determining the patient role and patient-doctor relationship is discussed in the light of cultural characteristics of the Qatari community. Delusory cultural beliefs related to possession, sorcery and envy provide a conceptual framework for explanation of many disorders. Inter-generational conflict is an important factor in neurotic disorders. Failure to report symptoms in an abstract fashion is characteristic of qatari patients. The cultural and religious heritage absorbs many behaviours which would otherwise be considered symptomatic of psychiatric disorder.

  20. Qatar: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    economic growth reached 9% in 2009, in spite of the global recession , and will remain strong for the medium term.6 The IMF expects Qatar’s fiscal...regional economic experts are arguing that although the global credit crunch and resulting recession have significantly lowered the value of many Qatari...of a new generation of Persian Gulf leaders alongside the sons of the late Shaikh Zayed of Abu Dhabi and Shaikh Mohammed bin Rashid of Dubai .13

  1. Strategies in New Broadcasting of Non-western Media---The Case of Al Jazeera on the Diplomatic Policies of Qatar%非西方媒体的新闻报道策略--以半岛电视台对卡塔尔的外交政策报道为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱晶晶

    2014-01-01

    在以西方媒体为主导的全球传播领域中,非西方媒体如何扩展其影响力,值得思深。半岛电视台作为非西方媒体的一个典型代表,其对所在国家卡塔尔的外交政策报道的报道特征和策略具有独特性。半岛电视台在进行报道时,其报道态度的公正、信息来源的丰富和对新媒体资源的灵活运用,值得非西方媒体学习和参考。%In the field of communication dominated by western media, it deserves our serious consideration as to how extend the influence of non-western media. As a representative of non-western media, Al Jazeera boasts uniqueness in its broadcasting of the diplomatic policies of Qatar. The fairness, enriched sources of information and the flexible employment of new media resources are the main points that non-western media should learn.

  2. Exoticism, Individual Creation in the Islamic Cultural Context —— Architectural Design of Villas in Doha Cultural Village, Qatar%异域风情,伊斯兰文化背景下的个性化创作——卡塔尔多哈文化村别墅单体设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章静; 陈斯濯

    2011-01-01

    通过介绍卡塔尔多哈文化村别墅这一在独特的伊斯兰文化背景下,采取全球合作的设计方式完成的项目,以及两个单体设计的创作理念,提出应当尽可能把建筑作为独一无二的艺术品来创造,提升建筑品质,满足人们对建筑的功能及审美的需求,增加其附加值,延长其生命力,减少反复拆建带来的浪费,利于社会的可持续发展。%Through the introduction of Doha Culture Village, Qatar, which was designed by those architects individually, who come from different countries and with different culture background, and the design concept of two villas of this project, the idea that the architecture should be designed artistically and specifically is proposed. The artistic building can meet the demand for function and beauty, have a high value and a long life. Then, the waste can be reduced, which is the elementary requirement of sustainable development.

  3. Müslüman Tüketicilerin İsraf Kavramına Bakışı: Türkiye, Katar ve Endonezya Ölçeğinde Kültürlerarası Bir Mukayese / The Perspective of Muslim Consumers on Extravagance: A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study in Turkey, Qatar and Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Terzi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Perspective of Muslim Consumers on Extravagance: A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study in Turkey, Qatar and Indonesia Abstract Islam encourages people to earn halal -or lawful- and sets certain rules on spending. In Quran spending in the way of Allah is praised (57:7 and besides this, eating, drinking and spending extravagantly is forbidden (6:141; 4:6; 7:31; 17:29. In Quran the term “extravagance” refers to various meanings (10:12; 3:146-147; 10:83; 5:32; 7:80-81; 7:31; 17:29. In daily life it means excessive or unnecessary expenditure or outlay of resources. In this regard the viewpoint of Muslim individuals on such phenomena which is forbidden in Quran becomes more crucial. A survey is conducted in Turkey, Qatar and Indonesia to compare the viewpoint of individuals which are adherents of the same religion but from different cultures. Müslüman Tüketicilerin İsraf Kavramına Bakışı: Türkiye, Katar ve Endonezya Ölçeğinde Kültürlerarası Bir Mukayese Öz İslam dini insanın helal yollardan kazanç elde etmesini teşvik etmiş, harcama noktasında belli kurallar getirmiştir. Kuran’da Allah yolunda harcama övülmüş (57:7, harcamada aşırıya gitmek (6:141; 4:6, ihtiyaçtan fazla yiyip içmek (7:31, israf etmek (17:29 yasaklanmıştır. Kuran’da birçok yerde geçen “israf” terimi çeşitli manalarda kullanılmış olsa da (bkz: 10:12; 3:146-147; 10:83; 5:32; 7:80-81; 7:31; 17:29 günlük hayatta gereksiz yere para, zaman, emek vb.ni harcama, savurganlık olarak ifade edilmektedir. Bu bakımdan Kuran’da yasaklanmış bir davranış biçimi olan israf olgusuna Müslüman bireylerin bakış açısı önemli hale gelmektedir. Bu bakış açısını ölçmek amacıyla Türkiye, Katar ve Endonezya’da anket çalışması yapılmıştır. Araştırma sonucunda israf kavramının bireysel ve toplumsal olmak üzere iki boyutu tespit edilmiş, bu boyutlar çerçevesinde kültürler arasında çeşitli y

  4. Attitudes Towards Migrant Workers in the GCC: Evidence from Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Diop, Abdoulaye; Tessler, Mark; Trung Le, Kien; Al-Emadi, Darwish; Howell, David

    2012-01-01

    With the majority of Qatar’s total population made up of foreigners (high-skilled and low-skilled migrant workers), Qatari nationals may feel that there are significant challenges for their society; despite the absence of employment competition, this may lead many Qataris to see problems as well as benefits in the presence of these migrant workers in their country. Using a split-sample technique, Qataris’ attitudes towards these foreigners were assessed. Results suggest that Qa...

  5. Religiosity, health and happiness: significant relations in adolescents from Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have revealed positive associations between religiosity, health and happiness. However, the vast majority of these studies were carried out on native English-speaking participants. The objective of this study was to estimate the relations between religiosity, health and happiness among a sample (N = 372) of Qatari adolescents (M age = 15.2). The students responded to five self-rating scales to assess religiosity, mental health, physical health, happiness and satisfaction with life. Boys obtained a higher mean score on mental health than did their female counterparts. All the correlations between the rating scales were significant and positive. Principal component analysis disclosed one component and labelled 'Religiosity, health and happiness' in both sexes. The multiple stepwise regression indicated that the predictors of religiosity were the self-ratings of satisfaction with life and happiness in boys, whereas the predictors among girls were satisfaction with life and physical health. On the basis of the responses of the present sample, it was concluded that those who consider themselves as religious were more happy, satisfied with their life and healthy. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. The Influence of culture on goal perception: Qatar versus Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottsen, Christina L.; Koppel, Jonathan; Johannessen, Kim Berg

    2016-01-01

    Expectations of control put forth by societal norms impose a constant influence on goal perception. To examine the influence of culture on perception of personal goals, 124 Middle Easterners and 128 Scandinavians rated their perceived locus of control, generated goals and evaluated goal...... characteristics. Findings show several cultural and gender differences, most notably in perceived locus of control, unhappiness despite goal achievement and adherence to cultural life script. Many differences were qualified by interactions, suggesting that Middle Eastern men deviate from Middle Eastern women...... and Scandinavians of both sexes. The Middle Eastern men demonstrated greater ambivalence regarding goal achievement, and contrary to previous findings from other cultural samples, they also showed a significant positive association between internal and external control. Furthermore , goals generated by Middle...

  7. Identity Issues: Expatriate Professors Teaching and Researching in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Michael H.; Nasser, Ramzi

    2015-01-01

    Today, academics are more transient, working outside their home countries, than at any other time in the history of academics especially in the Arab World were there is great demand for faculty members educated in Western' culture and academia. However, many of these professors face considerable social, professional and academic challenges in…

  8. THE PERFORMANCE ARENA AT THE AL SHAQAB ACADEMY, DOHA, QATAR%AL SHAQAB马术学院表演中心,多哈,卡塔尔

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安德鲁·里德

    2012-01-01

    Al Shaqab马术训练学校是卡塔尔基金开发建设之教育城项目的其中一部分。马术学校的总平面布局采用环形布置,设置在周边位置的各类小型辅助设施,包括马厩、骑术训练场及医院等,将椭圆形的Emirs马厩及菱形的表演中心围合在中央位置。使长350m高34m的表演中心成为整个规划的中心焦点。

  9. Adult Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in Qatar:clinical pattern of ten cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi Yousef Khan; Mohammed Abukhattab; Mohammed AbuKamar; Deshmukh Anand

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical presentation, underlying diseases, antimicrobial susceptibility, treatment and outcome of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis patients. Methods:This retrospective study involved all patients with 15 years of age or older who admitted to Hamad General Hospital with culture proven Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2012. Results: A total of ten cases were identified (nine males and one female). Their mean age was (43.3±12.8) years. Eight patients (80%) had nosocomial meningitis with neurosurgery being the most frequent associated condition. Fever and altered consciousness were the most frequent symptom. Cerebrospinal fluid showed elevated protein and glucose levels. Gram stain showed Gram-negative rods in 50%of cases, while positive cerebrospinal fluid culture results were found in all patients. Multidrug resistance was observed in two cases, and all patients had received appropriate empirical and definitive antibiotic treatments. The mean duration of intravenous antimicrobial treatment was (19.3±7.0) d and all patients with external ventricular drains underwent removal of the device, while in-hospital mortality was 50%. Conclusions: The number of cases was too small to come up with therapeutic and prognostic conclusions. Further large-scale prospective study is needed.

  10. Changes in student perceptions after a semester-long interprofessional education activity in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle J. Wilby, PharmD

    2016-12-01

    الاستنتاجات: نرى أنه من الممكن تطبيق تجربة الفصل الدراسي الكامل في التعليم المتداخل بين التخصصات في الشرق الأوسط. ويجب أن تركز الفعاليات المستقبلية والأبحاث مستقبلا على تعزيز التعاون والتواصل المتداخل بين التخصصات لتعزيز سلوك الطالب والإعداد النهائي للممارسة المهنية المتداخلة.

  11. Investigations in the Zubarah Hinterland at Murayr and Furayhah, North-West Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rees, Gareth; Richter, Tobias; Walmsley, Alan George

    2011-01-01

    Surveys and evaluative excavations within the settlements of Murayr and al-Furayhah aimed to characterize the scale and type of occupation within them and to understand their relationship with al-Zubarah and with their surrounding landscape. Forts located at both settlements evidenced large......-scale investment in construction, which appeared to post-date the foundation of al-Zubarah. Work is ongoing and further investigations targeted on features identified by these surveys will begin to discover how the lives of the hinterland populations were affected by the establishment and the demise of the new...... town. Investigations at these sites will add to the results of excavations within the town of al-Zubarah and aid our understanding of how this settlement, located in an area that did not naturally lend itself to large-scale settlement, survived and thrived. This success may have been helped by good...

  12. Who Provides Professional Development? A Study of Professional Development in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Donald; Reynolds, Dudley; Toledo, Will; Abu-Tineh, Abdullah Mohammad Hamdan

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that understanding what is offered as professional development frames what matters in English language teaching in a national education system. Analyzing these offerings articulates the values and perceptions of the work environment in which teachers live professionally. The "Learning4Teaching" ("L4T") project…

  13. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Prevalence, hypertrophy patterns, and their clinical and ECG findings in a hospital at Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif M Helmy

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of HCM in our population group is 0.13% with a male predominance (12:1. There was a diversity of clinical presentation, ECG abnormalities and patterns of LV hypertrophy among HCM patients.

  14. Epidemiology and Outcome of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in a Heterogeneous ICU Population in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Shabbir Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study is to collect data on epidemiology, microbiology, and outcome of VAP in our ICUs for reevaluation of the therapeutic strategies. Methods. This retrospective study involved all adult patients, 15 years of age or older, diagnosed with VAP in multidisciplinary ICUs at Hamad General Hospital between January 2010 and December 2012. Results. A total of 106 patients were enrolled. The mean incidence of VAP was 5.0 per 1000 ventilator-days. It was predominant among younger age group (<60 years, male patients (80.2%, and trauma ICU admissions (49.0%. The most common comorbidity was hypertension (34% and polytrauma (36.8% was the most frequent admission diagnosis. 30-day mortality was 23.6% and it was significantly higher in ≥60 years age group, female gender, patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic respiratory disease, ≥1 comorbidity, and poor functional status, smokers, medical and surgical ICU admissions, and patients with previous stay in medical/surgical wards, inappropriate empirical therapy, and admission diagnosis of respiratory failure. Gram-negative bacilli were the most frequent respiratory specimen isolates, Pseudomonas spp. being the most common. Majority of our Acinetobacter isolates were multidrug resistant. Conclusion. The incidence of VAP in our ICUs was low. Higher mortality rates were observed in certain subgroup of patients. Resistance to commonly used antimicrobials is likely to require reevaluation of the therapeutic strategies at our institution.

  15. Investigations in the Zubarah Hinterland at Murayr and Furayhah, North-West Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rees, Gareth; Richter, Tobias; Walmsley, Alan George

    2011-01-01

    Surveys and evaluative excavations within the settlements of Murayr and al-Furayhah aimed to characterize the scale and type of occupation within them and to understand their relationship with al-Zubarah and with their surrounding landscape. Forts located at both settlements evidenced large......, and investigations in an around the fort aimed to characterize the scale and function of the settlement....

  16. Influence of Clerkship on Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry across Cultures: United States and Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgut, F. Tuna; Polan, H. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assure adequate treatment for patients with mental illness worldwide, medical schools must impart positive attitudes toward psychiatry. The authors examined the effect of culture on changes in attitudes toward psychiatry among medical students receiving the same psychiatry clerkship curriculum in two different countries. Methods: A…

  17. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of human Brucella melitensis isolates from Qatar between 2014 - 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, A.; Hagen, F.; Sharabasi, O.A.; Abraham, M.; Wilson, G.; Doiphode, S.; Maslamani, M.A.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic disease affecting humans and animals and is endemic in many parts of the world including the Gulf Cooperation Council region (GCC). The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of B

  18. Public versus Private Schools in Qatar: Is There a Literacy Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Jehanzeb R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that performance-related differences between private and public schools disappear once student background characteristics are accounted for. However, given the sometimes significant variation in economic, social and cultural norms across countries these findings may not have universal relevance. The main purpose of…

  19. Who Provides Professional Development? A Study of Professional Development in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that understanding what is offered as professional development frames what matters in English language teaching in a national education system. Analyzing these offerings articulates the values and perceptions of the work environment in which teachers live professionally. The Learning4Teaching (L4T) project is a multi-country series of national studies that examine public-sector English language teachers’ experiences of professional develo...

  20. University Students' Knowledge and Attitude toward HIV/AIDS in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khenji, Abdul Hameed; Al Kuwari, Mohd; Al Khal, Abdul Latif; Al Thani, Asma

    2012-01-01

    Introduction HIV/AIDS is one of the most complex health problems of the 21st century and has become a pandemic disease that threatens the world population. Young people are particularly vulnerable to the HIV, worldwide over half of all new infections are among young people. The primary prevention to control the spread of HIV infection through awareness and changing behavior remains at the highest priority for HIV/AIDS control. Objectives The aim of the study was to assess the knowled...

  1. A Reconstructed Vision of Environmental Science Literacy: The Case of Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khishfe, Rola

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) develop a conceptual framework for environmental science literacy; and consequently (b) examine the potential of science standards/curricula to prepare environmentally literate citizens. The framework comprised four pillars: science content knowledge, scientific inquiry, nature of science (NOS), and…

  2. Adult Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in Qatar:clinical pattern of ten cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi; Yousef; Khan; Mohammed; Abukhattab; Mohanuned; Abukamar; Deshmukh; Anand

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To describe the clinical presentation,underlying diseases,antimicrobial susceptibility,treatment and outcome of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis patients.Methods:This retrospective study involved all patients with 15 years of age or older who admit ted to Hamad General Hospital with culture proven Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis from January 1,2007 to December 31,2012.Results:A total of ten cases were identified mine males and one female).Their mean age was i43.3±12.8) years.Eight patients(80%) had nosocomial meningitis with neurosurgery being the most frequent associated condition.Fever and altered consciousness were the most frequent symptom.Cerebrospinal fluid showed elevated protein and glucose levels.Oram slain showed Gram—negative rods in 50%of cases,while positive cerebrospinal fluid culture results were found in all patients.Multidrug resistance was observed in two cases,and all patients had received appropriate empirical and definitive antibiotic treatments.The mean duration of intravenous antimicrobial treatment was(19.3±7.0) d and all patients with external ventricular drains underwent removal of the device,while in—hospital mortality was 50%.Conclusions:The number of cases was too small to come up with therapeutic and prognostic conclusions.Further large-scale prospective study is needed.

  3. The Coliform Bacteria in the Wastewater Ponds of Doha City, Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    al Thani, Roda F. [روضة فهد آل ثاني

    2003-01-01

    The microbiological study of the wastewater and its sediment around Abu-Hamour pond (untreated wastewater pond) and Abu-NakhIa pond (treated wastewater pond), located on the outskirts of Doha City, revealed that coliform bacteria were prominently present in the former than in the latter one. E.coli. Was present in the coastal wastewater in all sites around both ponds. Yet, E. coli. was present in wet soils around theses ponds primarily near the discharge sites where new water is constantly po...

  4. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of human Brucella melitensis isolates from Qatar between 2014 - 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, A.; Hagen, F.; Sharabasi, O.A.; Abraham, M.; Wilson, G.; Doiphode, S.; Maslamani, M.A.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic disease affecting humans and animals and is endemic in many parts of the world including the Gulf Cooperation Council region (GCC). The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of

  5. Discharge against medical advice in a pediatric emergency center in the State of Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Abdulateef

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze cases that had left the Pediatric Emergency Center Al Sadd, Doha (PEC against medical advice, with the aim of developing policies to help reduce this occurrence. Methodology: All patients that were admitted to the main PEC observation room for treatment and/or investigation and subsequently left against medical advice from February 18, 2007 to June 18, 2007, were followed by a phone call, and a questionnaire, which was completed by the departmental patient representative. Results: 99,133 patients attended the facility during the study period. Of those, 106 left the facility against medical advice. Ninety-four guardians were successfully contacted. 90% of the cases were in children below 2 years of age. In 87% of the cases the mother was the main decision maker for leaving against medical advice. Domestic obligations were the leading cause of DAMA (discharge against medical advice, reported in 45% of the cases. Respondents reported that the consequences of DAMA were well explained by medical staff before they left the facility however, they had not met with the departmental patient representative during their stay. Conclusion:As the majority of DAMA cases occurred in infants, medical staff should address the concerns of this group early on in the course of treatment. Maintaining communication and providing support, in particular for mothers of higher risk groups may help to reduce the rate of DAMA cases.

  6. 卡塔尔摩天"仙人掌"%Cactus-style Syscraper of Qatar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李忠东

    2011-01-01

    @@ 不久前,卡塔尔市新建的市政事务及农业(MMAA)办公大楼交付使用.这个出自曼谷美学建筑师之手的"杰作"造型别具一格,酷似一个高耸入云的仙人掌.据介绍,摩天大楼和毗邻的植物园圆顶设计的灵感都源于仙人掌.

  7. A Reconstructed Vision of Environmental Science Literacy: The Case of Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khishfe, Rola

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) develop a conceptual framework for environmental science literacy; and consequently (b) examine the potential of science standards/curricula to prepare environmentally literate citizens. The framework comprised four pillars: science content knowledge, scientific inquiry, nature of science (NOS), and…

  8. A review of Meckel-Gruber syndrome--incidence and outcome in the state of Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Belushi, Mariam; Al Ibrahim, Abdullah; Ahmed, Mayada; Ahmed, Badredeen; Khenyab, Najat; Konje, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber (MKS) syndrome is a lethal autosomal abnormality diagnosed most commonly from classical findings on ultrasound scan after the late first trimester. There are few reports of cases followed up antenatally until delivery. We report here one of the largest series of 19 cases diagnosed antenatally from as early as 11 weeks gestation with 5 born alive. Of the 12 cases followed up antenatally, 7 were stillbirths while 5 were live births. The absence of obvious polycystic kidneys and severe oligohydramnios were prognostic features consistent with a live birth; however, mortality was 100% within a few weeks of delivery. The incidence of 2/1000 live births in the local population is similar to that reported from similar groups where consanguinity is more than 40%. The recurrence rate was high with 50% of the parous patients having had an affected baby. We conclude that diagnosis in early pregnancy does not require the classical triad of encephalocele, polydactyly and polycystic kidneys as some of these features do not manifest on imaging until much later.

  9. The frequency of polycystic ovary syndrome in young reproductive females in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Elham; Rahman, Sumaya; Zia, Yumna; Rizk, Nasser M

    2017-01-01

    This was a prospective cross-sectional study in which 126 female students between the ages of 18 and 30 years were evaluated for the frequency of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) through clinical interview, questionnaire, and anthropometric measurements. The diagnostic criteria of the US National Institutes of Health criteria were used. Menstrual irregularities (MI) were identified, and clinical hyperandrogenism was evaluated by self-assessment of hirsutism using modified Ferriman–Gallwey score. Blood analysis was done for measurement of prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and the androgen hormones. Of all the students, 37 (30.8%) had MI, 38 (31.7%) had clinical hirsutism, 37 (30.8%) had acne, and 76 (63.3%) had a family history of type 2 diabetes. The estimated frequency of PCOS was 18.33% according to the US National Institutes of Health definition. Hormonal analysis demonstrated a significant increase in androgens (total testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and free testosterone), and a significant decrease in sex hormone-binding globulin in our PCOS group, with a P-value <0.05. This study revealed a higher level of the androgen hormones among PCOS subjects with a frequency of PCOS (18.33%) similar to the global estimates of 10%–20%. PMID:28031728

  10. Feline patent Toxoplasma-like coccidiosis among feral cats (Felis catus) in Doha city, Qatar and its immediate surroundings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Madi, Marawan A; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2014-09-01

    Doha city has a high feral cat population and studies of hospital records in Doha have shown that human toxoplasmosis also occurs. Clearly, there is a need to understand the role of cats as vectors of human toxoplasmosis in the city and as a first step we assessed the extent of patent Toxoplasma-like coccidial infections among feral cats. Oocysts in cat faeces were detected between June 2008 and April 2010, from a range of locations radiating out of the city centre in concentric semi circular/elliptic rings and by north, west and south divisions within each of the rings. In total 4,652 cats were sampled and overall prevalence of oocysts was 9.1%. Prevalence was 10.1% in the first summer, and then dropped to 8.4% in the following winter and further to 6.8% in the next summer before rising to 10.6% in the final winter of the study; this interaction between annual period and season was significant. There were also significant changes in prevalence across each of the consecutive months of the study, but no clear pattern was evident. Prevalence did not vary significantly by city sector and there was no difference in prevalence between the host sexes. We conclude therefore, that despite minor and significant perturbations, the prevalence of patent Toxoplasma-like coccidial infections among cats in Doha is remarkably stable throughout the year, across years and spatially within the city's districts.

  11. Is Adherence to Imatinib Mesylate Treatment Among Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Associated with Better Clinical Outcomes in Qatar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dewik, Nader I.; Morsi, Hisham M.; Samara, Muthanna M.; Ghasoub, Rola S.; Gnanam, Cinquea C.; Bhaskaran, Subi K.; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J.; Al-Jurf, Rana M.; Ismail, Mohamed A.; AlSharshani, Mohammed M.; AlSayab, Ali A.; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg I.; Khatib, Rani B.; Yassin, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite the revolutionary success of introducing tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib mesylate (IM), for treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a substantial proportion of patients’ treatments fail. AIM This study investigates the correlation between patient adherence and failure of TKIs’ treatment in a follow-up study. METHODS This is a follow-up study of a new cohort of CML patients. Adherence to IM is assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS 6 TrackCap, AARDEX Ltd). The 9-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, medication possession ratio (MPR) calculation, and the electronic medical records are used for identifying potential factors that influence adherence. Clinical outcomes are assessed according to the European Leukemia Net 2013 guidelines via reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction measurement of the level of BCR-ABL1 transcripts in peripheral blood. Response is classified at the hematological, cytogenetic, and molecular levels into optimal, suboptimal, or failure. RESULTS A total of 36 CML patients (5 citizens and 31 noncitizen residents) consented to participate in the study. The overall mean MEMS score was 89. Of the 36 patients, 22 (61%) were classified as adherent (mean: 95) and 14 (39%) were classified as nonadherent (mean: 80.2). Adherent patients were significantly more likely to obtain optimal response (95%) compared to the nonadherent group (14.3%; P health-care teams, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and patients are essential components for maximizing the benefits of TKI therapy and could rectify this problem. The preliminary results show that patients’ response to treatment may be directly linked to patients’ adherence to treatment. However, further in-depth and specific analysis may be necessary in a larger cohort. PMID:27721664

  12. Shedding Light on the Roots of Dissatisfaction with Health Care Services in the State of Qatar An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with health care performance is an important source of information about health system quality as perceived by the public. It has long term negative impacts on: *Relationship between health care users and health care providers *Health related behaviors *Health outcomes Fund by SESRI and the Supreme Council of Health (SCH)

  13. Relationship between Employees' Beliefs regarding Training Benefits and Employees' Organizational Commitment in a Petroleum Company in the State of Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Emadi, Mohammed Asad Shareef; Marquardt, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between the beliefs of senior staff Qatari national employees regarding training benefits as measured by the benefits of employee training, and employees' organizational commitment as measured by the three-component model of organizational commitment. This relationship was assessed through a quantitative…

  14. A study of reasons of non-compliance of psychiatric treatment and patients' attitudes towards illness and treatment in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Dafeeah, Elnour E; Salem, Mohamad O

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the extent of psychiatric patients' compliance and non-compliance with treatment and examine the factors that affect compliance. Patients were recruited who were between 16 and 60 years of age and who were hospitalized with a psychiatric disorder and treated in the outpatient clinics of the psychiatry department. A total of 689 patients were approached and 564 patients agreed to participate in the study, a response rate of 81.8%. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire that asked about socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, nationality, level of education, occupation, marital status, and life style habits); medication(s) prescribed and the participant's response; the degree of social supervision (rated subjectively by the patient as "poor," "good," or "very good"); data also were obtained from clinical records. Data analyses explored significant associations between compliance and non-compliance and a group of relevant variables. Of the 564 patients studied, 328 (58.2%) were compliant with treatment and 236 (41.8%) were non-compliant. There was no significant difference between compliance and non-compliance in terms of gender (p = 0.471). Patients between 21-30 years of age were significantly more compliant with drug treatment than not. Non-compliance was more common among patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (28.4%), followed by depression (14.4%), and bipolar affective disorder (12.7%) (p = 0.001). Only 25% of compliant patients and 26.3% of non-compliant patients used non-psychotropic medication. Social supervision (40%) was very poor in non-compliant patients whereas 49.4% of compliant patients had very good family support. Notable reasons for non-compliance were irregular attendance to clinic (55.5%), ignorance about side effects of medication (61%), free medicine (45.8%), and a lack of education about medication (58.1%). This study revealed that non-compliance rates among psychiatry patients were comparable to the rates reported in other studies. The findings suggest that there is a need to provide community-level mental health education and proper counseling to psychiatry patients.

  15. The Qatar-Nepal Remittance Corridor : Enhancing the Impact and Integrity of Remittance Flows by Reducing Inefficiencies in the Migration Process

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, Isaku; Gabi G. Afram

    2011-01-01

    Remittance inflows play a crucial role in Nepal's economy. Officially recorded remittances already amounted to almost a quarter of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2009. The 2008-09 global economic crises resulted in slower growth of remittance inflows in Nepal, leading directly to lower disposable income. This is a telling reminder of the importance of promoting a supportive environmen...

  16. Improving physician's adherence to completing vaccination schedules for patients with type 2 diabetes attending non-communicable diseases clinics in West Bay Health Center, Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Hassan; Bashwar, Zelaikha; Al-Ali, Amal; Salem, Mohamed; Abdelbagi, Isameldin

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete vaccination for patients with type 2 diabetes attending non-communicable diseases (NCD) clinics is an issue that could affect patient's health and wellness negatively and puts patients at high risk of serious diseases. We aimed to improve physicians adherence to complete vaccination schedule for patients with type 2 diabetes attending NCD clinics in west bay health center according to American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendation by 25% by January 2015. In the pre-intervention phase: the quality improvement team designed a checklist to collect the percentage of physician's adherence of prescription of the recommended vaccination for patients with type 2 diabetes. The percentage of complete vaccination in patients with diabetes attending NCD clinic in West Bay Health Center was 20% . In the intervention phase the intervention was in the form of: the creation a vaccination form and attached to the (NCD) progress note; to distribute and remind the physicians about the ADA guidelines vaccination recommendations; a summary of the vaccination schedule developed and attached to (NCD) form; development of vaccination reminder posters and posters in the waiting area, nurse station, and physician clinics and education and orientation sessions for NCD clinic staff. In the post-intervention phase the average percentage of complete vaccination in patients with diabetes attending NCD clinic in West Bay Health Center increased to 69%.

  17. Epidemiology of candidemia in Qatar, the Middle East : Performance of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of Candida species, species distribution, outcome, and susceptibility pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taj-Aldeen, S. J.; Kolecka, A.; Boesten, R.; Alolaqi, A.; Almaslamani, M.; Chandra, P.; Meis, J. F.; Boekhout, T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to Candida spp. constitute the predominant group of hospital-based fungal infections worldwide. A retrospective study evaluated the performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identi

  18. Epidemiology of candidemia in Qatar, the Middle East: performance of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of Candida species, species distribution, outcome, and susceptibility pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taj-Aldeen, S.J.; Kolecka, A.; Boesten, R.; Alolaqi, A.; Almaslamani, M.; Chandra, P.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Boekhout, T.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to Candida spp. constitute the predominant group of hospital-based fungal infections worldwide. A retrospective study evaluated the performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the ident

  19. Epidemiology of candidemia in Qatar, the Middle East: performance of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of Candida species, species distribution, outcome, and susceptibility pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taj-Aldeen, S.J.; Kolecka, A.; Boesten, R.; Alolaqi, A.; Almaslamani, M.; Chandra, P.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Boekhout, T.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to Candida spp. constitute the predominant group of hospital-based fungal infections worldwide. A retrospective study evaluated the performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the

  20. Epidemiology of candidemia in Qatar, the Middle East : Performance of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of Candida species, species distribution, outcome, and susceptibility pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taj-Aldeen, S. J.; Kolecka, A.; Boesten, R.; Alolaqi, A.; Almaslamani, M.; Chandra, P.; Meis, J. F.; Boekhout, T.

    Introduction Bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to Candida spp. constitute the predominant group of hospital-based fungal infections worldwide. A retrospective study evaluated the performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the

  1. AIRLINE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Qatar Airlines Teams Up With Langham Hotels International Qatar Airlines has recently inked an agree- ment with Langham Hotels International.Accordingly, Qatar Airlines will of- fer QMiles to members of the hotel’s advantage program who visit any hotels of Langham Hotels International.

  2. 卡塔尔主权财富基金与“一带一路”战略下的中卡金融合作%Qatar's Sovereign Wealth Fund and the Financial Cooperation of China and Qatar from the Perspective of the Belt and Road Initiative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑾

    2016-01-01

    卡塔尔主权财富基金是中东地区主要的主权财富基金之一,既具有中东主权财富基金的一般特征,即来源于能源交易的贸易顺差和实现国家财富代际转移的目的;也具有特殊性,即为配合卡塔尔国家“品牌化”战略的多样性的资金运作方式.中国与卡塔尔是战略伙伴关系,特别是近年来中卡之间的经济与贸易合作日益频繁.以双方主权财富基金合作为主体的金融合作,既是双方建立和强化战略伙伴关系的题中之意,也是中国“一带一路”战略下实现中国与中东地区资金融通的重要一步.

  3. Association of PPARγ2 gene variant Pro12Ala polymorphism with hypertension and obesity in the aboriginal Qatari population known for being consanguineous

    OpenAIRE

    Bener, Aabdulbari; Al-Hamaq, Abdulla; Mohammad, Ramzi; Yousafzai,Mohammed T.; Darwish,Sara

    2013-01-01

    Abdulbari Bener,1,2 Sarah Darwish,3 Abdulla OAA Al-Hamaq,4 Ramzi M Mohammad,5,6 Mohammad T Yousafzai1 1Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar; 2Department of Evidence for Population Health Unit, School of Epidemiology and Health Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 3Department of Endocrinology, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 4Qatar Diab...

  4. Ultra-trace determination of Strontium-90 in environmental soil samples from Qatar by collision/reaction cell-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CRC-ICP-MS/MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Meer, S. H.; Amr, M. A. [Central Laboratories Unit, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Helal, A.I. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Al-Kinani, A.T. [Minstery of Environment, Doha (Qatar)

    2013-07-01

    Because of the very low level of {sup 90}Sr in the environmental soil samples and its determination by beta counting may take several weeks, we developed a procedure for ultra-trace determination of {sup 90}Sr using collision reaction cell-inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (CRC-ICP-MS/MS, Agilent 8800). Soil samples were dried at 105 deg. C and then heated in a furnace at 550 deg. C to remove any organics present. 500 g of each soil samples were aliquoted into 2000 ml glass beakers. Each Soils samples were soaked in 2 ppm Sr solution carrier to allow determination of chemical yield. The solid to liquid ratio was 1:1. Finally the soil samples were dried at 105 deg. C. Five hundred milliliters concentrated nitric acid and 250 ml hydrochloric acid volumes were added on 500 g soil samples. The samples were digested on hot plate at 80 deg. C to prevent spraying with continuous manual mixing. The leachate solution was separated. The solids were rinsed with 500 ml deionized water, warmed on a hot plate and the leachate plus previous leachate were filtered and the total volume was reduced to 500 ml by evaporation. Final leachate volume was transferred to a centrifuge tubes. The centrifuge tubes were centrifuged at 3,500 rpm for 10 min. The leachate was transferred to a 1 L beaker and heated on a hot plate to evaporate the leachate to dryness. The reside was re-dissolved in 100 ml of 2% HNO{sub 3} and reduced by evaporation to 10 mL. The solution was measured directly by CRC-ICP-MS/MS by setting the first quadruple analyzer to m/z 90 and introducing oxygen gas into the reaction cell for elimination isobar interference from zirconium-90. The method was validated by measurements of standard reference materials and applied on environmental soil samples. The overall time requirement for the measurement of strontium-90 by CRC-ICP-MS/MS is 2 days, significantly shorter than any radioanalytical protocol currently available. (authors)

  5. Risk of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter spp. in Food Animals and Their Products in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hussni O; Stipetic, Korana; Salem, Ahmed; McDonough, Patrick; Chang, Yung Fu; Sultan, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 E. coli, and Campylobacter spp. are among the top-ranked pathogens that threaten the safety of food supply systems around the world. The associated risks and predisposing factors were investigated in a dynamic animal population using a repeat-cross-sectional study design. Animal and environmental samples were collected from dairy and camel farms, chicken processing plants, and abattoirs and analyzed for the presence of these pathogens using a combination of bacterial enrichment and real-time PCR tests without culture confirmation. Data on putative risk factors were also collected and analyzed. E. coli O157:H7 was detected by PCR at higher levels in sheep and camel feces than in cattle feces (odds ratios [OR], 6.8 and 21.1, respectively). Although the genes indicating E. coli O157:H7 were detected at a relatively higher rate (4.3%) in fecal samples from dairy cattle, they were less common in milk and udder swabs from the same animals (1 and 2%, respectively). Among the food adulterants, E. coli O103 was more common in cattle fecal samples, whereas O26 was more common in sheep feces and O45 in camel feces compared with cattle (OR, 2.6 and 3.1, respectively). The occurrence of E. coli in the targeted populations differed by the type of sample and season of the year. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli were more common in sheep and camel feces than in cattle feces. Most of the survey and surveillance of E. coli focused on serogroup O157 as a potential foodborne hazard; however, based on the PCR results, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serotypes appeared to be more common, and efforts should be made to include them in food safety programs.

  6. Fifa 2006 World Cup Final Match Football up for Auction at Redch out to Asia Charity Gala Dinner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Doha, QATAR - High-flying Qatar Airways entered a piece of history today by flying the 2006 FIFA World Cup Final match football which is set to raise a significant amount of money at this week's Reach Out To Asia (ROTA) charity Gala Dinner in Doha.

  7. Fifa 2006 World Cup Final Match Football up for Auction at Redch out to Asia Charity Gala Dinner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

      Doha, QATAR - High-flying Qatar Airways entered a piece of history today by flying the 2006 FIFA World Cup Final match football which is set to raise a significant amount of money at this week's Reach Out To Asia (ROTA) charity Gala Dinner in Doha.……

  8. AIRLINE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Qatar Airways Carrier’s Privilege Club wins unprecedented number of accolades at 19th annual Freddie Award Airline presented with Stateside honors weeks ahead of U.S.A. launch As Qatar Airways prepares for its historic launch of sched- uled flights to th

  9. Improving Finance for Qatari Education Reform. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Galama, Titus; Constant, Louay; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Tanner, Jeffery C.; Goldman, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Qatar's education reform, which included implementation of a new finance system, appears to be providing schools with adequate funding but is still struggling with issues of transparency and swift policy shifts that have been difficult to accommodate. [For full report, "Developing a School Finance System for K-12 Reform in Qatar", see…

  10. Under the Yoke: Europe’s Natural Gas Dependency on Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    environmental impact. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Gazprom, Nord Stream, South Stream, Nabucco, fracking , Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, Qatar, Nigeria, Turkmenistan...WORD COUNT: 7,185 PAGES: 38 KEY TERMS: Gazprom, Nord Stream, South Stream, Nabucco, fracking , Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, Qatar, Nigeria...extraction technique known as hydraulic fracturing or " fracking ". North America’s use of this technique is already increasing availability and

  11. Exporting Acting Curricula from the Midwest to the Mideast: Seriously?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Qatar can afford to purchase pretty much anything--including top-quality American university education. However, given the vast differences in culture, dress, religion, and social mores, along with youth's global unemployment rates and their hankering for all things technological, does it make sense for Qatar to import a course in acting? Many…

  12. Improving Finance for Qatari Education Reform. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Galama, Titus; Constant, Louay; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Tanner, Jeffery C.; Goldman, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Qatar's education reform, which included implementation of a new finance system, appears to be providing schools with adequate funding but is still struggling with issues of transparency and swift policy shifts that have been difficult to accommodate. [For full report, "Developing a School Finance System for K-12 Reform in Qatar", see…

  13. Exporting Acting Curricula from the Midwest to the Mideast: Seriously?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Qatar can afford to purchase pretty much anything--including top-quality American university education. However, given the vast differences in culture, dress, religion, and social mores, along with youth's global unemployment rates and their hankering for all things technological, does it make sense for Qatar to import a course in acting?…

  14. 78 FR 30896 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... for political stability and economic progress in the Middle East. Qatar requests these capabilities to... from missile threats. The proposed purchase of LAIRCM will enhance the safety of Qatar's political leadership, promoting stability and global engagement of a friendly country. The proposed sale of...

  15. 76 FR 60469 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... that are night vision goggle compatible and sun light readable. The pilots and aircrew have common... SEAHAWK Multi- Mission Helicopters, 13 T-700 GE 401C Engines (12 installed and 1 spare), communication... 2011. Policy Justification Qatar--MH-60R Multi-Mission Helicopters The Government of Qatar...

  16. AIRLINE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Qatar Airways Qatar Airways has reached milestone agreements with 50 airlines around the world for interline electronic ticket-ing enabling passengers to travel without a paper ticket to a wider choice of destinations. With the recent additions of Lufthansa and British

  17. An American Honors Program in the Arab Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yyelland, Byrad

    2012-01-01

    The first Western honors program to be established in the Arab Gulf is offered in Doha, Qatar, on a small satellite campus of an American university. Doha is the capital city of Qatar, a sovereign Arab state physically located on a small peninsula bordering Saudi Arabia in the south and jutting into the Persian Gulf. With a population of only 1.7…

  18. Biological survey of the Al Zubarah buffer zone, 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provencal, Philippe

    A survey of names of fish and other marine animals in Qatar Arabic gathered during the field season of 2012 at the Al Zubbara site.......A survey of names of fish and other marine animals in Qatar Arabic gathered during the field season of 2012 at the Al Zubbara site....

  19. Improving Finance for Qatari Education Reform. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Galama, Titus; Constant, Louay; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Tanner, Jeffery C.; Goldman, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Qatar's education reform, which included implementation of a new finance system, appears to be providing schools with adequate funding but is still struggling with issues of transparency and swift policy shifts that have been difficult to accommodate. [For full report, "Developing a School Finance System for K-12 Reform in Qatar", see ED504832.

  20. AIRLINE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    QATAR AIRWAYS INCREASES FLIGHTS TO SHANGHAI Qatar Airways has expanded its highly popular Doha-Shanghai route with the introduction of a fourth weekly scheduled flight. The extra flight operates to Shanghai every Thursday night from Doha, returning to the Qatari capital early Saturday morning. The Doha-Shanghai flights operate non-

  1. Epidemiology of headache in Arab countries

    OpenAIRE

    Benamer, Hani T. S.; Deleu, Dirk; Grosset, Donald

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiology of headache in Arab countries was systematically reviewed through Medline identification of four papers reporting headache prevalence in the Arab nations of Qatar, Saudi Arabia (2 papers) and Oman. The prevalence of headache varied from 8 to 12% in Saudi Arabia to 72.5% in Qatar and 83.6% in Oman. Headache was commoner in females and younger people. The prevalence of tension headache was 3.1–9.5% in Saudi Arabia and the 1-year prevalence in Qatar was 11.2%. The migraine preva...

  2. 新闻回顾

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Generous Donationfrom Qatar to the ACWF On the eve of International Women's Day, Saleh AlBouanin, Qatar Ambassador to China, formally donatedUSS500,000 to the All-China Women's Federation (ACWF)in the name of Her Highness Sheikha Mozah Nasser, Con-sort of the Emir of the State of Qatar and President of theSupreme Council for Family Affairs. Gu Xiulian, Vice Presi-dent of the ACWF spoke highly of the contribution HerHighness had made to the friendship and exchanges between

  3. Conceptualizing the Qatari-African foreign policy and economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conceptualizing the Qatari-African foreign policy and economic relations: the case of soft ... relations strategies with select, geo-politically important African states, ... Keywords: Soft Power; Qatar; Africa; Sudan; Somalia; International Relations; ...

  4. The Pharmd Program: Prospects and Challenges in Nigeria | Erah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in many countries including United Kingdom, Canada, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United ... and several new job prospects in academic/research institutions, hospitals, ... and doctors, adequate remuneration for PharmD holders in public service, ...

  5. A meta analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jonny Karunia Fajar

    2016-08-10

    Aug 10, 2016 ... The Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics (2017) 18, 19–28. HOSTED BY ..... Pakistan, Palestine, Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia,. Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan,. Thailand ...

  6. 78 FR 71038 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Iraq Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen Dated: November 20, 2013. Danielle Rolfes, International...

  7. 78 FR 32011 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Iraq Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen Dated: May 20, 2013. Danielle Rolfes, International Tax...

  8. 77 FR 49864 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Iraq Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen Dated: August 13, 2012. Danielle Rolfes, Acting International...

  9. 78 FR 10690 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Iraq Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen Dated: February 7, 2013. Danielle Rolfes, International...

  10. 76 FR 5250 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen, Republic of Iraq is not included in this list, but its...

  11. 78 FR 54370 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Iraq Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen Dated: August 26, 2013. Danielle Rolfes, International...

  12. 76 FR 49836 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Republic of Iraq is not included in this list, but its...

  13. 77 FR 7660 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen Iraq is not included in this list, but its status with respect...

  14. 76 FR 67791 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... meaning of section ] 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen Iraq is not included in this list, but its status with respect...

  15. 77 FR 68886 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Iraq Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen Dated: November 6, 2012. Danielle Rolfes, International...

  16. 76 FR 27377 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Republic of. Iraq is not included in this list, but...

  17. 75 FR 74769 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation with an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Republic of Iraq is not included in this list, but its...

  18. 75 FR 22679 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen, Republic of Iraq is not included in this list, but its...

  19. 75 FR 44842 - List of Countries Requiring Cooperation With an International Boycott

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986). Kuwait Lebanon Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen, Republic of Iraq is not included in this list, but its...

  20. 78 FR 79078 - Designation of 2 individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13224 of September 23, 2001, “Blocking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... (Yemen) issued 13 Jun 2010 expires 13 Jun 2016; alt. Passport 01772281 (Yemen); Personal ID Card 1987853... 2014; Personal ID Card 25463401784 (Qatar) expires 06 Dec 2019 (individual) . Dated: December 18,...

  1. 75 FR 60846 - Bureau of Consular Affairs; Registration for the Diversity Immigrant (DV-2012) Visa Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...'' and then select a specific ``Job Family.'' For example, select Architecture and Engineering and click... Israel Japan Jordan Kuwait Laos Lebanon Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Nepal North Korea Oman Qatar Saudi...

  2. Analysis of Resistance to Antimicrobials and Presence of Virulence/Stress Response Genes in Campylobacter Isolates from Patients with Severe Diarrhoea: e0119268

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haitham Ghunaim; Jerzy M Behnke; Idil Aigha; Aarti Sharma; Sanjay H Doiphode; Anand Deshmukh; Marawan M Abu-Madi

    2015-01-01

    ... (erythromycin and ciprofloxacin) have been losing efficacy in recent years. In a sample of 174 genotyped isolates from the stools of patients with severe diarrhoea in Qatar, collected between 2005 and 2012, 63.2...

  3. JPRS Report, Near East & South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-13

    and 36 metric tons of sulphur were produced. Expansion is going on now in the Qatar Chemical Fertilizer Com- pany and the Qatar Petrochemical...completed at the end of 1990. As for sales, 88 metric tons of ethylene, 153 metric tons of polyethylene and 32 metric tons of sulphur were sold. He...materials, hospital and medical appliances and surgical gloves and plastic syringes, ferro-silicon, sodium bicarbonate, refined salt, kaoline , felspar

  4. Is ketamine a lifesaving agent in childhood acute severe asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Hendaus MA; Jomha FA; Alhammadi AH

    2016-01-01

    Mohamed A Hendaus,1,2 Fatima A Jomha,3 Ahmed H Alhammadi1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, Section of Academic General Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, 2Department of Clinical Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Doha, Qatar; 3School of Pharmacy, Lebanese International University, Khiara, Lebanon Abstract: Children with acute severe asthma exacerbation are at risk of developing respiratory failure. Moreover, conventional aggressive management might be futile in acute ...

  5. The Idle Threat? An Assessment of the Economic, Military and Strategic Consequences of an Iranian Closure of the Strait of Hormuz

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    able to use the Dolphin pipeline to transport LNG to the UAE, however, non Middle Eastern countries are its biggest importers. And in 2008 “Qatar...because the Dolphin Pipeline transports natural gas from Qatar to the UAE and Oman. However, the UAE does depend on other imports, including...Fighter – Multirole 2.024 (1) Fighter - Ground Attack / Strike 355 Airborne Laser Platform 1 Airborne Early Warning and Control 32 Intelligence

  6. Zubara

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Ingolf; Walmsley, Alan George

    2010-01-01

    Præsentation af projektet, Qatar Islamic Archaeology and Heritage, og de arkæologiske undersøgelser af Al Zubarah, en by fra 17-tallet. Emiratet Qatar er ét af verdens rigeste lande på gas og olie. I 2009 blev der iværksat et stort arkæologisk projekt, som Københavns Universitet er blevet inviteret...

  7. Zubara

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Ingolf; Walmsley, Alan George

    2010-01-01

    Præsentation af projektet, Qatar Islamic Archaeology and Heritage, og de arkæologiske undersøgelser af Al Zubarah, en by fra 17-tallet. Emiratet Qatar er ét af verdens rigeste lande på gas og olie. I 2009 blev der iværksat et stort arkæologisk projekt, som Københavns Universitet er blevet inviteret...

  8. AIRLINE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Qatar Airways Award-winning Qatar Airways has become the first airline in the world to introduce live digital satellite TV beamed direct to every passenger on their individual seatback TV systems at 35,000 feet. Yet another first for one of the world's fastest growing airlines is the introduction of a system offering a multitude of European and Middle East TV channels on five of its fleet of Airbus A330 long-haul aircraft.

  9. QCRI at TREC 2014: Applying the KISS Principle for the TTG Task in the Microblog Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    QCRI at TREC 2014: Applying the KISS principle for the TTG task in the Microblog Track Walid Magdy Qatar Computing Research Institute Qatar...straightforward ( KISS ) by using a simple implementation of Jaccard similarity to measure the distance between tweets in the top N retrieved results and...1. REPORT DATE NOV 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE QCRI at TREC 2014: Applying the KISS

  10. Epidemiology of headache in Arab countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamer, Hani T S; Deleu, Dirk; Grosset, Donald

    2010-02-01

    The epidemiology of headache in Arab countries was systematically reviewed through Medline identification of four papers reporting headache prevalence in the Arab nations of Qatar, Saudi Arabia (2 papers) and Oman. The prevalence of headache varied from 8 to 12% in Saudi Arabia to 72.5% in Qatar and 83.6% in Oman. Headache was commoner in females and younger people. The prevalence of tension headache was 3.1-9.5% in Saudi Arabia and the 1-year prevalence in Qatar was 11.2%. The migraine prevalence was 2.6-5% in Saudi Arabia and 7.9% in Qatar, while the 1-year migraine prevalence was 10.1% in Oman. The results show a migraine prevalence within that estimated worldwide. However, it is clear that epidemiological data from Arab countries are lacking, and there is disparity in the reported prevalence from Saudi Arabia when compared with its two neighbours, Qatar and Oman. Wider study adopting the same methodology in the six Gulf countries (Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates and Kuwait) is needed to examine variations in headache and migraine prevalence.

  11. Middle East:The Cost of Construction Projects to be Bidded by Qatar\\Emirates\\Saudi and Kuwait Over 10 Billion USD This Year%卡阿沙科4国招标项目总价逾百亿美元

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛序谋

    2004-01-01

    @@ 日本和韩国最近发表的中东地区有关国家(伊拉克不包括在内)今年建设工程市场的调查资料显示,根据他们所掌握的情况,今年,卡塔尔、阿联酋、沙特阿拉伯和科威特等4国将计划招标建设的工程项目金额已超过了110亿美元.现在很多国家的建筑施工企业和相关企业已开始瞄上这些项目,着手详细摸底工作,积极准备参加竞标,日本、中国和韩国的企业在这一地区的竞争尤为激烈.其中电力建设将成为竞争的热点.

  12. Al-Zubarah Archaeological Park as a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinzel, Moritz; Thuesen, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 the Qatar Museums Authorities initiated a long-term archaeological and heritage project in order to study the archaeology and history of the northern Qatar peninsula with a particular focus on the ruins of al-Zubarah, one of the most important pearl-fishing towns in the region. The project...... includes large-scale excavation and heritage work that will develop the site of al-Zubarah into a heritage park, which is at present on the UNESCO World Heritage provisional list. The poster paper presents the strategies for the heritage master plan, including procedures for site management, preservation...

  13. Civil society and democratization in the Arab Gulf

    OpenAIRE

    Gengler, Justin; Tessler, Mark; Al-Emadi, Darwish; Diop, Abdoulaye

    2011-01-01

    qatar has been a notable exception to the wave of popular political mobilization that has struck Arab countries since January 2011. This is particularly so given the prominent role of its state-owned television station Al Jazeera in supporting many — though not all — of the uprisings. Why has Qatar been seemingly immune to the protest wave? Its wealth matters, of course, but other wealthy countries like Libya and Bahrain have experienced turmoil. Some new insights into this question can be fo...

  14. CPAFFC President Chen Haosu Leads Chinese Goodwill Delegation to Five Gulf Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>An 11-member Chinese Goodwill Delegation headed by CPAFFC President Chen Haosu visited Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Oman and Saudi Arabia from November 25 to December 8, 2005 at the invitation of the Central Municipal Council of Qatar, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Kuwait, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bahrain, the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Oman and the Saudi Arabia-China Friendship Association. During the visit, the delegation had substantial meetings on cooperation with relevant organizations of the five countries. The visit has played a positive role in enhancing friendship between the

  15. Post Oil America and a Renewable Energy Policy Leads to the Abrogation of the Middle East to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    was the biggest customer for steel, rubber, sheet steel, lead, leather …and the largest industry in the nation.”29 The automobile and oil led to a...currently consists of the countries of Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Indonesia, Kuwait, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Nigeria , Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates

  16. Labor immigration in the Arab Gulf states: patterns, trends and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A

    1986-09-01

    This is an overview of recent labor immigration in Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Attention is given to factors contributing to the dependence of these countries on migrant labor, the impact of the decline in oil revenues, and future trends in the size and skill composition of the foreign labor supply.

  17. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in dromedary camels: An outbreak investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.L. Haagmans (Bart); S.H.S. Al Dhahiry (Said); C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); V.S. Raj (Stalin); M. Galiano (Monica); R.H. Myers (Richard); G-J. Godeke (Gert-Jan); M. Jonges (Marcel); E. Farag (Elmoubasher); A. Diab (Ayman); H. Ghobashy (Hazem); F. Alhajri (Farhoud); M. Al-Thani (Mohamed); S.A. Al-Marri (Salih); H.E. Al Romaihi (Hamad); A. Al Khal (Abdullatif); A. Bermingham (Alison); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M.M. AlHajri (Mohd); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection in people. Previous studies suggested dromedary camels were a reservoir for this virus. We tested for the presence of MERS-CoV in dromedary camels from a farm in Qatar link

  18. 77 FR 13379 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Order Granting Approval of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ..., Poland, Qatar, Russia, Singapore, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad... terrorism, riot or labor disruption or any similar intervening circumstance. The Fund intends to provide... from the following regions: Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. Within...

  19. Framing Journalism Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusharif, Ibrahim N.

    2014-01-01

    Examining the growth, incentives, and progress of overseas campuses of major American educational institutions is an important academic pursuit. To have a complete picture, one must also consider the impact these branch campuses are having on the lives of their students. The Northwestern University in Qatar's journalism program was invited to…

  20. RHM 1(1).indb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mike

    Research in Hospitality Management 2011, 1(1): 9–17. Printed in ... hospitality industry as well. TripAdvisor is the ... Qatar, Dubai and Abu Dhabi, an industry representative body, .... for the people who invest heavily in a first class hotel and do.

  1. 76 FR 7153 - Secretarial Business Development Mission; Transportation Infrastructure/Multimodal Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... International Trade Administration Secretarial Business Development Mission; Transportation Infrastructure... business development mission for multi-modal transportation and infrastructure development products and... relevant products and services. The mission will help U.S. companies already doing business in Qatar or the...

  2. making extractive investments work for africa's development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    strategy that combines trade inducements, increased investment flows, aid for infrastructure and ... mineral resource sector and other sectors of the economy through beneficiation ... 5 UNECA (n 2). 6 Market Trading Info, “State of Qatar – Economic Review”. .... the opportunity for Africa's expanding labour force to engage in.

  3. RHM 1(1).indb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mike

    perspective of tourism, this research examines the branding strategies of Qatar. To the Qatari, the ..... as you are”], represents the core of our new identity'. He states that ... in the Middle East were analysed to assess the impact of their tourism ...

  4. Prevalence of common phobias and their socio-demographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The overall prevalence of phobia in children and adolescents in Qatar was higher than rates found in other epidemiologic .... Obese (>30 Kg/M2). 23(6.9). 12(9.5) ..... students and its relation to self-esteem and Body image. Can J.

  5. EDITORIAL COMMENTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    the EU and Japan), it has also fuelled the economic development of emerging markets ... Middle East and the North Africa region, Qatar has a distinctive potential to ... their ability to enhance both state and human security and to ensure sustainable ... a result of expanding foreign policy options, with African countries now.

  6. Smartphones in Clinical Nursing Practice: A Multiphased Approach to Implementation and Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brad; Davison, C. J.; Moralejo, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Students in the undergraduate nursing program at the University of Calgary-Qatar are required to work with patients in clinical settings under faculty supervision. One of the main goals of clinical courses is to provide students with the opportunity to learn in context and "just-in-time," a much more realistic and memorable learning…

  7. Capturing the Value of Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Stefano; Jamaleddine, Zeina

    2016-03-24

    Assessing the real-world impact of biomedical research is notoriously difficult. Here, we present the framework for building a prospective science-centered information system from scratch that has been afforded by the Sidra Medical and Research Center in Qatar. This experiment is part of the global conversation on maximizing returns on research investment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship between Perceived and Observed Student-Centred Learning Environments in Qatari Elementary Mathematics and Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Stephanie L.; Parker, Dawn; Zimmerman, Whitney; Ikhlief, Atman

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Qatar established educational reform in charter (independent) schools focusing on curriculum standards, student-centred teaching, standards-based assessment, English as the language of instruction, and extensive professional development. A primary area of emphasis was the creation of student-centred mathematics and science classrooms…

  9. al-Jumail – Fischerdorf aus der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts im Nordwesten Katars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinzel, Moritz; Schäfer, Bernadeta

    Entlang der nordwestlichen Küste Katars erstrecken sich Ruinen von zahlreichen verlassenen Dörfern. In einem von der katarischen Museumsbehörde (QMA) und von der Universität Kopenhagen gemeinsam ausgetragenen Projekt (Qatar Islamic Archaeology and Heritage Project - QIAH) wurde erstmalig im Jahr ...

  10. Refractivity Statistics For Two Countries In The Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    Kheirallah, H. N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents and compares the results of refractive index studies for Mersa Matrouh, Egypt, and Doha, Qatar. Statistics for surface refractivity and refractivity gradients at different heights from the surface are computed. The analysis indicate that these two locations suffer from nonstandard propagation conditions which persist even through the day time, particularly during the summer months.

  11. Think Globally, Act Locally: A Library Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Beth E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author presents observations learned while "on loan" from Northwestern University (NU), Evanston, Illinois, to the campus library in Doha, Qatar, (NU-Q) Middle East. The author's ongoing experience is helping her see how important global exposure can be to a library professional's attaining a deeper and wider level…

  12. CTC Sentinel. Volume 6, Issue 8, August 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Akbar Velayati, “the country would become like Qatar or Kuwait . Iran is not prepared to lose this golden counterweight.” See ibid. 5 “Iran: We’re in...Personal interview, Syrian activist from Tel Ka - lakh, north Lebanon, August 7, 2013; personal interview, Lebanese logistical supporter for the rebels

  13. Types, Patterns and Outcomes of Personal Watercraft-Related Trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ayman El-Menyar

    2017 Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research. Original Article ... 2Clinical Research, Trauma Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar. 3Internal ... tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new ..... who died after developing septic shock secondary to missed.

  14. Launching of an American Medical College in the Middle East: "Educational Challenges in a Multicultural Environment"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, David P.; Gotto, Antonio M., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The graduation of the first class of medical students in May 2008 from the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q), Cornell University's branch campus in the Middle East, was the first time that an M.D. degree from an American university was awarded abroad. It marked a milestone in American higher education. The establishment of WCMC-Q is…

  15. A New Landscape: Opportunities and Pitfalls for Universities Expanding in the Persian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiConsiglio, John

    2009-01-01

    Dozens of universities--primarily from the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia--are eyeing the Gulf region as a largely untapped reservoir of academic potential and economic opportunity. During the last few years, UAE states like Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Qatar, and Ras al Khaymah have spent billions to entice top universities. And many colleges…

  16. Conduct of the Persian Gulf War: Final Report to Congress. Chapters 1 through 8. Sanitized Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Marines) Infantry Battalion (Senegal) 6th Mech Infantry Regiment ( Moroccan Forces) JFC-E Troops Qatar Mech Infantry Battalion 1st East Bengal INF BN...ground receiver [GPS] SMCM - surface mine countermeasures [Navy] SME - Squadron Medical Element [USAF] SMESA-Special Middle East Sealift

  17. More Than Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Ying

    2012-01-01

    Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao visited Saudi Arabia,the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Qatar,and participated in the Fifth World Future Energy Summit (WFES) from January 14 to 19.The Chinese premier stated China's stance on world energy supply at the summit and called for strengthening comprehensive cooperation with the three nations,including energy cooperation.

  18. Qatari Women in a Corporatized Higher Education Setting: International Reforms and Their Local Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Muftah, Esraa

    2017-01-01

    Discussions of the difficulties Qatari women experience in higher educational settings are unlikely to be found in international organization or government reports on the State of Qatar. Instead, recent reports have tended to gloss over gender inequalities raising a "successful girl discourse." Drawing on my own teaching experience at…

  19. Iran’s Nuclear Future: Critical U.S. Policy Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    suggested the transfer of two additional Patriot bat- teries each to Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, and the UAE.17 While the GCC states are concerned by...setbacks Iran has faced in the aftermath of the Stux- net computer virus and other sabotage efforts) may be working to at least delay the Iranian program

  20. Does Lecture Capturing Impact Student Performance and Attendance in an Introductory Accounting Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldamen, Husam; Al-Esmail, Rajab; Hollindale, Janice

    2015-01-01

    The study empirically examines the interplay between lecture capturing viewership, performance and attendance for students in the Middle Eastern country of Qatar. The sample consists of 254 students enrolled in an introductory accounting class either in the Fall semester or in the Spring semester. We show a weak positive relationship between…

  1. Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    The S&P Pan Arab indices include stocks from listed companies in the countries of Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco , Oman, Qatar, Saudi...Hup Group signs $85M water deal Turkey’s UB Holdings signs $500M Basrah steel plant deal Petrofac signs $100M offshore maintenance contract with

  2. ACE/AACE Inspection and Analysis Handbook. Part 2. Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-30

    Nigeria Naira Colombia Peso Norway Krone Congo CFA Franc Glman Rial Costs Rica Colon Pakistah Rupee Cuba Peso Panama Balboa Cyprus Pound Paraguay ... Guarani Czechoslovakia Koruna Peru Sol Denmark Krone Philippines Peso Dominican Rep. Peso Poland Zloty Ecuador Sucre Portugal Escudo Egypt Pound Qatar

  3. Picking the Bone: The B-1 Bomber as a Platform for Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    required by the legislation, a two-week segment of the ORA consisted of a remote deployment. The Air Force selected Roswell, New Mexico , as the remote...Lancer Units in Combat, 52. 34 Brig Gen Stephen Wilson, interview by the author, 25 March 2010. 379th AEW/CC, Al Udied , AB Qatar. 35 Major General

  4. Measuring Stability and Security in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    initiatives and responses to disease outbreaks have been very effective this year, reducing cholera cases by 80%, from 4,700 cases in 2007 to 925 cases...Egypt, Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Syria, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Yemen . Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Oman have also indicated

  5. conceptualizing the qatari-african foreign policy and economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    Using a case study approach, this article examines the shifting dimensions of. Qatar's international relations strategies with select, geo-politically important. African states .... resources.19 In later texts, Nye clarifies this division between influence. 12 Joseph S .... Exploring the difficulties and limitations of soft power influence.

  6. Making design 'work' for all user groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Maria Regina Clemesha

    2013-10-01

    Regina Kennedy, an architect and urbanist with a Master's degree in healthcare facility planning and design, who is currently a programme manager at Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), the state of Qatar's 'premier' non-profit healthcare provider, examines how, during the design process, the right principles can be applied to ensure that hospitals and other healthcare facilities 'work' for all user groups.

  7. Collaborating for Success: Team Teaching the Engineering Technical Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Terrence; Long, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This paper will examine the collaborative teaching process undertaken at College of the North Atlantic-Qatar (CNA-Q) by Engineering and the Communication faculties to improve the overall quality of engineering students' capstone projects known as the Technical Thesis. The Technical Thesis is divided into two separate components: a proposal stage…

  8. Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Darwish

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Results indicated that dental caries prevalence among school children in Qatar has reached critical levels, and is influenced by socio-demographic factors. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth values obtained in this study were the second highest detected in the Eastern Mediterranean region.

  9. Educational Games for Early Childhood: Using Tabletop Surface Computers for Teaching the Arabic Alphabet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Ibrahim, Zeinab; Karatsolis, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents initial evaluation regarding the use of simple educational games on tabletop surface computers to teach Kindergarten students in Qatar the Arabic alphabet. This effort is part of the “Arabiyyatii” research project, a 3-year endeavor aimed to teach 5-year-olds Modern Standard...

  10. Accepted into Education City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Qatar's Education City, perhaps the world's most diverse campus, is almost entirely unknown in the United States, but represents the next step in the globalization of American higher education--international franchising. Aided by technology such as online libraries, distance learning and streaming video, U.S. universities offer--and charge tuition…

  11. Relationship between Perceived and Observed Student-Centred Learning Environments in Qatari Elementary Mathematics and Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Stephanie L.; Parker, Dawn; Zimmerman, Whitney; Ikhlief, Atman

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Qatar established educational reform in charter (independent) schools focusing on curriculum standards, student-centred teaching, standards-based assessment, English as the language of instruction, and extensive professional development. A primary area of emphasis was the creation of student-centred mathematics and science classrooms…

  12. Environmental Engineering Education (E3) in the Gulf Co-Operation Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassim, Majeed; Coskuner, Gulnur

    2007-01-01

    The six members of the Gulf Co-operation Countries (GCC)--Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates--are facing enormous environmental challenges associated with rapid urbanisation and industrialisation, especially in the last three decades, due to its role as a global hydrocarbon energy centre. None of these…

  13. Is the University Universal? Mobile (Re)Constitutions of American Academia in the Gulf Arab States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Through ethnographic examples of students' engagement with American universities in the United Arab Emirates and Qatar, I argue that branch campuses have a particularly important relationship with emerging forms of racial consciousness, identity, and politicization among students, both citizen and foreign resident. This entry point is one…

  14. Using daily newspapers to develop professional literacy – a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbur K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kerry WilburCollege of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, QatarBackground: An orientation to the professional landscape is necessary for novices of any health discipline. We describe an assignment aimed to develop the professional literacy of pharmacy students within their local Middle Eastern context.Methods: “Pharmacy and Health Care” is a course designed to introduce first-year students to both historic and contemporary pharmacist roles and responsibilities and to the position of pharmacy within a health care system. An assignment asked students to identify a health-related article recently reported by one of the domestic newspapers in order to exhibit the students’ ability to conceptualize how pharmacists fit into the described health context.Results: The exercise was assigned over three consecutive academic years. A majority of the students (36/60; 60% chose articles reported in one of the three English-language dailies; stories were primarily characterized as Qatar health-related current events or news items (44/60; 73%. The pharmacy students felt the assignment encouraged reading and an appreciation of current pharmacist roles and future opportunities in Qatar health care.Conclusion: A newspaper assignment designed to develop professional literacy would be of benefit in early training years in health care professional degree programs elsewhere in the world; the result would orient students to expected positions in local health care settings and would help envision role expansion.Keywords: pharmacy, health professional education, newspaper

  15. Salafism in Lebanon: Local and Transnational Resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pall, Z.

    2014-01-01

    In my dissertation I look at the anatomy and dynamics of the Salafi da‛wa in North Lebanon. My analysis is based on an eighteen months long ethnographic fieldwork in Lebanon, Kuwait, Qatar and Europe. The study seeks answers how and why Salafism emerged as a key player on the Lebanese Sunni

  16. How the Experience of Assessed Collaborative Writing Impacts on Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of Assessed Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, James

    2016-01-01

    A time-series analysis was used to investigate Arabic undergraduate students' (n = 50) perceptions of assessed group work in a major government institution of higher education in Qatar. A longitudinal mixed methods approach was employed. Likert scale questionnaires were completed over the duration of a collaborative writing event. Additionally,…

  17. Does Lecture Capturing Impact Student Performance and Attendance in an Introductory Accounting Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldamen, Husam; Al-Esmail, Rajab; Hollindale, Janice

    2015-01-01

    The study empirically examines the interplay between lecture capturing viewership, performance and attendance for students in the Middle Eastern country of Qatar. The sample consists of 254 students enrolled in an introductory accounting class either in the Fall semester or in the Spring semester. We show a weak positive relationship between…

  18. Coordinated Economic Development and the Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, D. K.

    This is a discussion of some of the problems that the Advisory Organization for Gulf Industries (AOGI) will face when it undertakes (1) to organize both an information center (node) that will serve the information needs of the Gulf States of Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Oman; and (2) to compile an…

  19. Standards Are Good (For) Business: Standardised Comparison and the Private Sector in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2016-01-01

    The article examines how and why the method of "comparison against standards" has benefited non-state actors and businesses in the education sector. Drawing on brief examples from international standard schools in Qatar, Indonesia and Mongolia, the author examines how the global education industry uses the reference to…

  20. The Federal Government Debt: Its Size and Economic Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    Bahrain; Iran; Iraq; Kuwait; Oman; Qatar; Saudi Arabia; the United Arab Emirates; Algeria; Gabon; Libya; and Nigeria . . The Federal Government Debt: Its...for the budget deficit and the interest payment to rise in tandem , which is not surprising since the deficits represents additional debt which

  1. Isolation, biochemical and molecular characterization of 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-03

    Dec 3, 2007 ... adapted to chlorophenols in the industrial zone at Umm-Saied city (Qatar). ... able methods to treat aromatic compounds because it is ... proposed for application to the biological waste water .... Genomic fingerprinting using REP-PCR based approach ..... DNA extraction kit from bacteria fungi, water.

  2. A Multilevel Analysis of the Role of School Quality and Family Background on Students' Mathematics Achievement in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareshki, Hossein; Hajinezhad, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is investigating the correlation between school quality and family socioeconomic background and students' mathematics achievement in the Middle East. The countries in comparison are UAE, Syria, Qatar, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Lebanon, Jordan, and Bahrain. The study utilized data from IEA's Trends in International…

  3. Shock and volatility spillovers among equity sectors of the Gulf Arab stock markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Hammoudeh (Shawkat); Y. Yuan (Yuan); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractUpon examining own volatility dependency for the three major sectors, namely Service, Industrial and Banking, in four GCC economies (Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and UAE), the empirical findings suggest that Banking seems to be the least sensitive among the sectors to past own volatility,

  4. Frustrerede mikrofonholdere, kritiske øjenvidner og spekulative kommentatorer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    2006-01-01

    forsvar for parlamentarismen. Camilla Dindler: Frustrerede mikrofonholdere, kritiske øjenvidner og spekulative kommentatorer? : de danske journalisters oplevelse af arbejdsvilkår og rolle i Qatar, Kuwait og Irak under Irak-krigen 2003. Lars Nord: Svenska mediers bevakning av Irakkriget 2003. Rune Ottosen...

  5. Shock and volatility spillovers among equity sectors of the Gulf Arab stock markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Hammoudeh (Shawkat); Y. Yuan (Yuan); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractUpon examining own volatility dependency for the three major sectors, namely Service, Industrial and Banking, in four GCC economies (Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and UAE), the empirical findings suggest that Banking seems to be the least sensitive among the sectors to past own volatility,

  6. Planning for Development in the Arab Gulf States: A content Analysis of Current Development Plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This paper analyses current development plans published by the GCC states (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates) in order to explore the region’s future growth trajectory: what barriers to growth are foreseen and how can they be anticipated; what...

  7. Selected Bibliography of Arab Educational Materials, Vol. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahram Center for Scientific Translations, Cairo (Egypt).

    One hundred fifty-four English language annotations of books, articles, and government publications about education in 11 Arab countries are contained in this bibliography. Drawing from materials published in 1976, the bibliography examines education for all age groups and ability levels in Egypt, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi…

  8. Selected Bibliography of Arab Educational Materials Vol. 2, No. 1, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahram Center for Scientific Translations, Cairo (Egypt).

    A total of 176 English language notations of books, articles, and government publications about education in 11 Arab countries are contained in this bibliography. Drawing from materials published in 1977, the bibliography examines education for all age groups and ability levels in Egypt, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia,…

  9. Whose Cultural Competence? Do the Definitions Apply beyond Western Borders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The author looks at the traditional lofty goals set for students in study abroad programs in the United States, such as enhancing students' intercultural skills and helping them become global citizens. But he finds that students at Northwestern University in Qatar are already multiethnic and multicultural and speak at least two languages.…

  10. Language Learning Strategy Use: Perceptions of Female Arab English Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazi, Abdolmehdi

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the patterns of language learning strategy use among 120 female Arabic-speaking students majoring in English at a university in Qatar. Perceptions of strategy use were measured by the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL, ESL/EFL Student Version). The study found that (1) this group of EFL learners featured medium…

  11. Is the University Universal? Mobile (Re)Constitutions of American Academia in the Gulf Arab States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Through ethnographic examples of students' engagement with American universities in the United Arab Emirates and Qatar, I argue that branch campuses have a particularly important relationship with emerging forms of racial consciousness, identity, and politicization among students, both citizen and foreign resident. This entry point is one that…

  12. Salafism in Lebanon: Local and Transnational Resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pall, Z.

    2014-01-01

    In my dissertation I look at the anatomy and dynamics of the Salafi da‛wa in North Lebanon. My analysis is based on an eighteen months long ethnographic fieldwork in Lebanon, Kuwait, Qatar and Europe. The study seeks answers how and why Salafism emerged as a key player on the Lebanese Sunni sociopol

  13. Science Self-Beliefs and Science Achievement of Adolescents in Gulf Cooperation Council Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the predictive effects of science self-beliefs on science achievement for 24,680 13-year-old students from Gulf Cooperation Council member countries--Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates--who participated in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007. The…

  14. Dubai, Aiming to Be an Academic Hub, Strikes a Deal with Michigan State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Zvika

    2007-01-01

    Dubai has long competed with its wealthy Persian Gulf neighbors to become a regional hub of higher education. Yet its Knowledge Village, a collection of nearly 20 foreign-university campuses and local educational institutes, has been overshadowed by Qatar's Education City, which is home to the branch campuses of a number of high-profile American…

  15. Imagining the Past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinzel, Moritz; Tanaka, Mina

    2016-01-01

    experience and to support the dissemination of results of the ongoing excavations. Besides traditional techniques, the Qatar Islamic Archaeology and Heritage Project in cooperation with DNP have developed two mobile applications with AR-elements and interactive components to engage especially young visitors...

  16. Islamic Banking and Economic Growth —

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosab I. Tabash

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores empirically the relationship between the development of Islamic finance system and economic growth and its direction in Qatar. Using econometric analysis, annually time-series data of economic growth and Islamic banks’ financing from 1990 to 2008 were used. We use Islamic banks’ financing funds given by Islamic banks as a proxy for the development of Islamic finance system and Gross Domestic Product (GDP, and Gross Fixed Capital Formation (GFCF as proxies for real economic growth. For the analysis, the unit root test, cointegration test and Granger causality tests were done. The empirical results generally signify that in the long run, Islamic banks’ financing is positive and significantly correlated with economic growth in Qatar which reinforces the idea that a well-functioning banking system promotes economic growth. Furthermore, the results show that Islamic banks’ financing has contributed to the increase of investment in the long term and in a positive way in Qatar. It is one of the first pioneering studies on Islamic Banking and economic growth in Qatar, and the first to be conducted in Middle East as well, thus it has a significant contribution to the body of knowledge The findings of research will be of interest to western and Islamic finance practitioners, policy makers and academicians, who are interested in Islamic finance industry.

  17. To Spray or Not to Spray? Pesticides, Banana Exports, and Food Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, John S.; Tsunehiro Otsuki

    2002-01-01

    How governments regulate food safety and environmental protection, including pesticide residue levels, has important implications for trade. The World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial held in Doha, Qatar in November 2001, included statements on standards, and their impact on market access for developing countries. These issues will continue to be important in trade policy dialogues. It...

  18. The Al-Jazeera News Network: Opportunity or Challenge for U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-23

    openness and its” maverick ” reporting style serves to promote Qatar as a progressive, modern state in the Middle East. Indeed, although the Qatari...in late 2003 in Pakistan, Kuwait, Malaysia , and on some pan-Arab channels, but not Al-Jazeera.43 Although the overall campaign continues, the State

  19. Team Satisfaction and Student Group Performance: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitun, Rami M.; Abdulqader, Khalid Shams; Alshare, Khaled A.

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between team satisfaction and students' performance in group projects in two universities, one from the United States and one from Qatar. The results showed that there is a significant positive correlation between team satisfaction and group performance only for the American students. Demographic factors such…

  20. Alternative Futures for Syria: Regional Implications and Challenges for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    end up blaming U.S. indecision as the cause of their defeat. U.S. relations with Saudi Arabia and Qatar would suffer. Scenario 3: Regime Collapse In...deputy director of the National Counterterrorism Center after a 30-year career at the Central Intelligence Agency. Dr. Brian Nichiporuk (Ph.D., Political

  1. The Posture Triangle: A New Framework for U.S. Air Force Global Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Japan), Kadena (Japan), Andersen (Guam), Ali Al Salem (Kuwait), Al-Udeid (Qatar), and Al-Dhafra (UAE). Exact personnel numbers for South Korea and the... Cronin , Patrick M., Paul S. Giarra, Zachary M. Hosford, and Timothy A Walton, Yokota: Civil- Military Use of U.S. Bases in Japan, Washington, D.C

  2. Prevalence of gestational diabetes and associated maternal and neonatal complications in a fast-developing community: global comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bener A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abdulbari Bener1,2, Najah M Saleh3, Abdulla Al-Hamaq41Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Hamad General Hospital, Department of Public Health and Medical Education, Weill Cornell Medical College, Qatar; 2Department of Evidence for Population Health Unit, School of Epidemiology and Health Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women's Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar; 4Qatar Diabetes Association and Qatar Foundation, QatarBackground: The prevalence of gestational diabetes (GDM is increasing all over the world. Hence, the impact of GDM on maternal and infant health is an important topic of research. No study has been conducted in Qatar to evaluate the outcome of pregnancies complicated by diabetes mellitus.Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of GDM, compare the maternal–neonatal complications among women with GDM and non-GDM pregnant women, and investigate the risk factors and potential outcomes associated with GDM.Design: This is a prospective cohort study.Setting: The survey was carried out at the antenatal clinics of the Women's Hospital, Qatar.Subjects and methods: A representative sample of 2056 pregnant women who attended the antenatal clinics of the Women's Hospital were surveyed during the period from the first week of January 2010 to April 2011. From this sample, 1608 women (78.2% expressed their consent to participate in the study. Questionnaires were administered to pregnant women who were seeking antenatal care at this urban hospital. The questionnaire covered variables related to sociodemographic factors, family history, medical history, maternal complications, and neonatal outcome.Results: The prevalence of GDM in Qatar was 16.3%. Women with GDM were significantly higher in the age group of 35–45 years (45%; P = 0.001. Family history of diabetes (31.7%; P < 0.001, increased parity (55.3%; P = 0

  3. Pharmacists’ knowledge and attitudes about natural health products: a mixed-methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheir N

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nadir Kheir, Hoda Y Gad, Safae E Abu-Yousef College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Al Tarfa, Doha, Qatar Objectives: To explore knowledge and attitude of pharmacists in Qatar towards natural health products (NHPs. Methods: The quantitative component of this study consisted of an anonymous, online, self-administered questionnaire to assess knowledge about NHPs among pharmacists in Qatar. Descriptive statistics and inferential analysis were conducted using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS®. Means and standard deviation were used to analyze descriptive data, and statistical significance was expressed as P-value, where P≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Associations between variables were measured using Pearson correlation. The qualitative component utilized focus group (FG meetings with a purposive sample of community pharmacists. Meetings were conducted until a point of saturation was reached. FG discussions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a framework approach to sort the data according to emerging themes. Results: The majority of participants had average to poor knowledge about NHPs while only around 7% had good knowledge. In the FG meetings, participants considered the media, medical representatives, and old systems of natural health as major source of their knowledge. They criticized undergraduate pharmacy courses (for inadequately preparing pharmacists to deal with NHPs and the pharmacy regulations (for being irrelevant. A perception of NHPs as being “safe” still exists among pharmacists. Conclusions: Pharmacists’ ability to provide effective services associated with NHPs is limited by poor access to evidence-based information and poor knowledge. A perception of NHPs and CAM as 'safe' still exists among pharmacists, and regulations related to NHPs require addressing to follow best practice and ensure patient safety. Keywords: Qatar, focus group, complimentary alternative

  4. Knowledge, awareness, and attitude regarding infection prevention and control among medical students: a call for educational intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim AA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Awab Ali Ibrahim,1 Sittana Shamseldin Elshafie,2 1Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, 2Aspetar, Laboratory Department, Qatar Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar Background: Medical students can be exposed to serious health care-associated infections, if they are not following infection prevention and control (IPC measures. There is limited information regarding the knowledge, awareness, and practices of medical students regarding IPC and the educational approaches used to teach them these practices. Aim: To evaluate the knowledge, awareness, and attitude of medical students toward IPC guidelines, and the learning approaches to help improve their knowledge. Methods: A cross-sectional, interview-based survey included 73 medical students from Weill Cornell Medical College, Qatar. Students completed a questionnaire concerning awareness, knowledge, and attitude regarding IPC practices. Students’ knowledge was assessed by their correct answers to the survey questions. Findings: A total of 48.44% of the respondents were aware of standard isolation precautions, 61.90% were satisfied with their training in IPC, 66.13% were exposed to hand hygiene training, while 85.48% had sufficient knowledge about hand hygiene and practiced it on a routine basis, but only 33.87% knew the duration of the hand hygiene procedure. Conclusion: Knowledge, attitude, and awareness of IPC measures among Weill Cornell Medical Students in Qatar were found to be inadequate. Multifaceted training programs may have to target newly graduated medical practitioners or the training has to be included in the graduate medical curriculum to enable them to adopt and adhere to IPC guidelines. Keywords: infection prevention, education, medical students

  5. Discrepancy in MALDI-TOF MS identification of uncommon Gram-negative bacteria from lower respiratory secretions in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulWahab A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Atqah AbdulWahab,1,2 Saad J Taj-Aldeen,3 Emad Bashir Ibrahim,3 Eman Talaq,4 Marawan Abu-Madi,4 Rashmi Fotedar5 1Department of Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 2Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar; 3Microbiology Division, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 4Department of Health Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 5Biotechnology Center, Ministry of Environment, Doha, Qatar Introduction: Early identification of microbial organisms from respiratory secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF is important to guide therapeutic decisions. The objective was to compare the accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS relative to the conventional phenotypic method in identifying common bacterial isolates, including nonfermenting Gram-negative bacteria, in a cohort of patients with CF. Methods: A total of 123 isolates from 50 patients with CF representing 14 bacterial species from respiratory specimens were identified using MALDI-TOF MS in parallel with conventional phenotypic methods. Discrepancies were confirmed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequencing in five Gram-negative isolates. Results: The MALDI-TOF MS managed to identify 122/123 (99.2% bacterial isolates to the genus level and 118/123 (95.9% were identified to the species level. The MALDI-TOF MS results were 100% consistent to the species level with conventional phenotypic identification for isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and other uncommon organisms such as Chryseobacterium gleum and Enterobacter cloacae. The 5/123 (4.6% isolates misidentified were all Gram-negative bacteria. The isolation of E. cloacae and Haemophilus paraphrohaemolyticus may extend the

  6. A Middle Eastern journey of integrating Interprofessional Education into the healthcare curriculum: a SWOC analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awaisi, Alla; Wilby, Kyle John; Wilbur, Kerry; El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Awaisu, Ahmed; Paravattil, Bridget

    2017-01-17

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is an emerging concept in the Middle East with a number of health professional degree programs continually striving to meet international accreditation requirements to enhance the quality of education and ensure high standards are maintained. Using the College of Pharmacy at Qatar University (CPH QU) as a model, this article describes the IPE initiatives coordinated through the College's IPE Committee, with representation from fourteen programs at four Healthcare institutions: Qatar University; Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar; the University of Calgary in Qatar; and the College of North Atlantic in Qatar. These activities are based on the model proposed by the University of British Columbia across the different pharmacy professional years. Learning objectives for these initiatives were selected from the IPE shared competency domains and competency statements developed for Qatar context. A meeting with six faculty members, who have been instrumental to designing and executing the IPE activities in the previous 2 years, was convened. Faculty members reflected on IPE activities and collaborations with other participating programs. A structured SWOC (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Challenges) framework was used to guide discussion. The discussion was recorded and notes were taken during the meeting. Raised points were categorized into each SWOC category for the final analysis. Implementation of IPE program is a major undertaking with a number of challenges that require invested time to overcome. This article highlights the importance of incorporating IPE into healthcare curricula to graduate students ready for collaborative practice in the workforce. Learning objectives for IPE initiatives need to be based on shared competency domains. When developing and implementing an IPE program it is necessary to align activities under a strong theoretical framework. This should be done under the leadership of an IPE steering group

  7. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolezzi M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Monica Zolezzi Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. Keywords: ECT, medications, drug interactions

  8. AIRLINE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Qatar Airways Award-winning Qatar Airways boosted its tally of international honors by grabbing four key titles at the prestigious 13th World Travel Awards during a glittering ceremony in the Caribbean islands of the Turks and Caicos. The Doha-based airline picked up awards for the World’s Leading Business Class Airline, World’s Leading Airline Inflight Meal Service, Leading Airline in the Middle East as well as Leading Middle East Business Class Airline. The airline gained high praise at the travel industry’s equivalent to the Oscar’s and triumphed as the Leading Airline in the Middle East. It gained the inflight meal service award for the second year in a row.

  9. Approaches to reducing carbon dioxide emissions in the built environment: Low carbon cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Alhorr

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to arrive at projections of CO2 emissions in new cities in Qatar by 2020 using GSAS standards under a number of scenarios coupled with specific interventions that help them meet national and regional targets. The estimated CO2 equivalent savings were calculated using GSAS energy calculator and based on the total area of the registered project and anticipated projects provided by different entities applying GSAS in Qatar. The projected annual savings of CO2 emissions due to energy use reduction can be realised by 2020 when projects planned or under construction are completed. The projected CO2 emission reduction is reported and compared with the international standards.

  10. Global Energy Trade and the Joint Expeditionary Force: Supporting Friends and Influencing Others on the New Silk Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-27

    for supporting the walls at any particular depth is dispensed with. The work of drawing off the liquid is carried out manually by means of leather ...world affairs. The members are Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, the Libya, Nigeria , Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab...industry nonetheless. Africa Africa is rapidly becoming an important oil producer and exporter. It is home to nine oil exporters – Nigeria , Angola

  11. The New NATO Policy Guidelines on Counterterrorism: Analysis, Assessments, and Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    United Nations (UN) peacekeepers and humani- tarian assistance workers . It is possible that 18-year-old Omar Mohamud of Seattle was the second. On...charities; identity theft; tax havens; state sponsorship; income generation from legal businesses; trafficking of migrants , women, drugs; sales of small...Australia, Austria, Finland, Georgia, Japan, Jordan, Republic of Korea, Morocco, New Zealand, Qatar , Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Arab Emirates. 89

  12. The powerless starchitect: How Zaha Hadid became the first person working on the Al-Wakrah stadium that actually did die

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank van der Hoeven

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Starchitect Zaha Hadid won the bid to design one of the planned stadiums for the 2022 FIFA World Cup event in Qatar. Her design for the Al-Wakrah stadium became the centrepiece of a discussion on the role that starchitects play in society. That debate reached a boiling point in August 2014, and resulted in a digital lynching party that sheds serious doubts on the ethics and professionalism of architectural critics and journalists alike.

  13. Iran: Illusion, Reality, and Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    its past— con - temporary, modern, medieval, and ancient—than Iran’s. Nor is any state in the Gulf region more acutely afflicted by a sense of being...concise analysis that con - nects this both real and imagined past to the Iranian present. This analysis focuses on the early role of ideology and...the 19th century, British influence spread to the remainder of the Arab Gulf—Qatar, Abu Dhabi, and Dubai . Given British interests, the newfound Arab

  14. Immigrant workers and language formation: Gulf Pidgin Arabic

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei A. AVRAM

    2014-01-01

    Ever since the oil boom of the 1970s, Saudi Arabia and the countries on the western coast of the Arab Gulf, i.e. Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, Bahrain, and Qatar, have been witnessing both a significant increase in their non-national labour force and considerable urbanization. Most of the immigrant workers come from South and South-East Asia, with smaller number of expatriates from other regions. The overwhelming majority of these foreign workers live and work i...

  15. Evaluating the Validity of the U.S. Military’s Global Empire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    any other provision of law no person shall be subjed to any penally fer failing to comply with a COllection of information If It does na1 display a...Qatar, and the UAE brought 10 Ryan, Kurt J., COL, Exploring Alternatives for Strategic Access to Afghanistan, (Carlisle, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2009...not allocated (released for employment ) without Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) approva1.8 While the CJCSI lays out responsibilities for how to use

  16. Asymmetric Information under the Kafala Sponsorship System: Impacts on Foreign Domestic Workers' Income and Employment Status in the GCC Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Malit, Froilan T.; Naufal, George S

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the legal and policy implications of information asymmetry on foreign domestic workers employed under the Kafala sponsorship system in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. Drawing from ethnographic and field-based observations in large GCC migrant destinations – including Kuwait, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) – we investigate the information flows and market uncertainties between five key stakeholders: labor-receiving governments, labor-sending governm...

  17. Logistics and Maintenance Options to Support the P-8A Poseidon’s Expeditionary Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Currently, the most austere FOL utilized by Navy P-3 squadrons is the U.S. Naval Expeditionary Base, Camp Lemonier , Djibouti, and Africa. Because...the established infrastructure at Camp Lemonier presents three problems with respect to expediting mission, aircraft, and habitability equipment...Aviation Systems Command. Evangelista, D. (2008). Trip report, 2008 pre-deployment site visit: Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, Camp Lemonier , Djibouti and NSA

  18. Defense Trade Data: Sources and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    detailed trade information on such products may be difficult. Recent U.S. concerns have ranged from dependency on rare earths and first level products...BHUTAN BR INDIAN OCEAN TERR EGYPT INDIA IRAN IRAQ ISRAEL JORDAN KOWAIT LEBANON LIBYA MALDIVES MOROCCO NEPAL OMAN PAKISTAN QATAR SAODI...specifically designed or developed for military application and any computer specifically modified for use with any defense article in any category of

  19. Insights from Durban to Doha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedaa Ali

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC or FCCC is an international environmental treaty negotiated at the United Nation Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED, informally known as the Earth Summit [1]. Each year since 1995, the parties to the convention have met at the Conferences of the Parties (COP to assess approaches to climate change and related progress. Annual COP conferences rotate among the five UN regional groups; the African Group last year hosted COP 17 on 29 November 2011 in Durban, South Africa. At COP 17, The State of Qatar and the Republic of Korea from the Asian Group agreed to cooperate in order host and encourage the success of the UN Climate Change Conference, COP 18/CMP 8 (the 18th Conference of Parties to the UNFCCC, plus the 8th session of the Conference of the Parties, serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol, which will take place in Qatar from November 26th through December 7th, 2012 [2]. The countries decided on a joint effort in preparing for the conference to globally promote and implement the green growth agenda. The Republic of Korea stands behind the green economy concept as a strategy to foster sustainable development and poverty eradication. One of the world’s main energy exporters, the State of Qatar expressed its eagerness to secure progress in the UN climate change negotiations and to support developing countries, including Small Island Developing States (SIDS, in adapting to the effects of climate change [2]. Hosting the UN climate change negotiations this year makes Qatar the first OPEC nation to do so.

  20. The second Summer Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, People's Republic of China: preparing youth athletes to compete in the heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito J

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Joao Brito,1 Sebastien Racinais,2 George P Nassis,1,3 1National Sports Medicine Programme, Excellence in Football Project, Aspetar – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar; 2Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, Aspetar – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar; 3School of Physical Education and Sport Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece  All authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: The second Summer Youth Olympic Games will take place August 16–28, 2014 in Nanjing, People's Republic of China during the peak of the summer. Nanjing has been reported as one of the hottest cities in the People's Republic of China, with temperatures reaching as high as 40°C. There is limited clinical evidence of the real risks that youth athletes face when training and competing in the heat, but some recommendations can be made. The estimated average wet bulb globe temperature for Nanjing in August is 32°C, which has been classified as a very high risk/stop play condition for heat illness and injury. Training and competing under extreme heat conditions could stress the thermoregulatory system and adversely affect health and performance. However, current guidelines appear to be inadequate or too conservative, and mostly focus on adult elite athletes. Therefore, proper preventive measures are warranted to reduce the risks of heat illness and injury. With proper heat acclimatization and monitoring, youth athletes can exercise reasonably well and safely in the heat. During the second Summer Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, People's Republic of China, special attention should be devoted to athletes exposed to long and extensive sunny and hot conditions. Keywords: youth sports, heat acclimatization, thermoregulation

  1. Clinical presentations and outcomes of necrotizing fasciitis in males and females over a 13-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissar Shaikh

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Necrotizing fasciitis remains a life threatening entity. Although, NF is more common in males, Qatari females are more likely to develop NF than males. NF of abdominal wall and groin is significantly higher in females. Development of organ failure is more common in males with NF. NF remains a challenging clinical problem in Qatar with a mortality rate ranging from 25 to 27% for both genders.

  2. Evidence from the national health account: the case of Dubai

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidi S

    2014-01-01

    Samer Hamidi School of Health and Environmental Studies, Hamadan Bin Mohammad Smart University, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Introduction: National health accounts (NHAs) provide useful information to aid in understanding the health care financing system. This article aims to present a profile of health system financing in Dubai using data from the NHA. We also aim to compare the provider structure of financing schemes in Dubai with those of the State of Qatar and selected Organization for Ec...

  3. The Gas to Liquids Industry and Natural Gas Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-08

    BP Statistical Review of World Energy , p.20. Other estimates have put natural gas reserves in Qatar at up to 1.2 quadrillion cubic feet. Because...Statistical Review of World Energy 2004, June, 2004. p.12. The other two nations with GTL investment activity, Nigeria with 176 trillion cubic feet of...20 BP Statistical Review of World Energy , June, 2004, p.12. likely to be managed because only a few major energy companies have investment budgets

  4. Learning Arabic through play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Ibrahim, Zeinab; Karatsolis, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the use of educational games in the context of the “Arabiyyatii” research project, a three-year project funded through Qatar National Research Fund. The scope of the project is teaching Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) to kindergarten students (5-6 years old) that are native speak...... to increase students’ engagement in language learning, increase their exposure to MSA, and develop their vocabulary....

  5. Heavy metal, trace element and petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in the Arabian Gulf: Review

    OpenAIRE

    Afnan Mahmood Freije

    2015-01-01

    The Arabian Gulf environmental status was assessed based on studies conducted in Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and United Arab Emirates (UAE) during 1983–2011. This review examines all sorts of pollutions in the Arabian Gulf area over the last three decades. Approximately 50 published studies were reviewed in order to determine the pollution status in the Arabian Gulf regarding heavy metals and organic substances. Three types of environmental pollutions including marine and coas...

  6. Future of gas. LNG between feast and famine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, A.

    2009-05-15

    Between now and 2012, a new wave of LNG (liquid natural gas) supply will wash over markets, with Qatar accounting for half the growth as six new 'mega-trains' come on stream. It will arrive just as gas demand is being hit by the economic crisis. Beyond 2012, the situation will reverse, with growth constrained by lack of new supply. The LNG industry is facing a turbulent decade.

  7. Evidence from the national health account: the case of Dubai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Samer

    2014-01-01

    National health accounts (NHAs) provide useful information to aid in understanding the health care financing system. This article aims to present a profile of health system financing in Dubai using data from the NHA. We also aim to compare the provider structure of financing schemes in Dubai with those of the State of Qatar and selected Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. The author analyzed secondary data published in NHAs for Dubai and Qatar, and data collected by the OECD countries and publicly available from the Statistical Office of the European Union (Eurostat), for 25 OECD countries for comparative analysis. All health financing measures used are as defined in the international System of Health Accounts (SHA). In Dubai, only 33% of current health expenditure (CHE) is funded by the government. However, the public sector is the main source of health funding in Qatar and most OECD countries, with an average of 79% and 72%, respectively. Households in Dubai spent about 22% of CHE, equivalent to an average US$187 per capita, ranking the highest among Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, and compared with 20% of CHE across OECD countries. Hospitals in Dubai accounted for 48% of CHE, which is much higher than Qatar (40%) and the OECD average (36%). The Dubai health care financing system differs substantially from that in OECD countries, as it is more private oriented. The findings point to several potential opportunities for growth and improvement. Policy areas that may be addressed using the information presented in this article are broad and include the following: shift from hospital care to ambulatory and day care, sustainability of health finance, shift the cost of health care to the private sector, introduce cost-containment measures, revise payment systems for health providers, and produce subnational accounts for non-communicable diseases. More investment in the translation of national health account data into policy

  8. Ecophysiology of the holoparasitic angiosperm Cistanche phelypaea (Orobancaceae) in a coastal salt marsh

    OpenAIRE

    FAHMY, Gamal Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Cistanche phelypaea (L.) Cout. (Orobancaceae) was found parasitising the roots of the succulent shrublets Arthrocnemum macrostachyum (Moric.) K.Koch (Chenopodiaceae) in a coastal salt marsh in Qatar. Measurements were conducted to identify soil properties, host, and noninfected plants by soil excavations to expose the haustoria of the parasite attached to the host roots. The water potential, osmotic potential, pressure potential, and chemical analyses were determined in parasite, host, and no...

  9. Democratization in the Gulf Monarchies and American Civil Society

    OpenAIRE

    Azam, M. Nazrul Islam and Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the efforts made by American private sector and civil society actors after 2000 to popularize democratic values and norms in the six Gulf states, namely Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. The study is focused on areas including politics, education, culture, media, human rights, and women empowerment. The paper also deals with approaches adopted, goals and objectives set and strategies devised and employed by the American NGOs regardi...

  10. Gas suppliers meeting market opening; Les fournisseurs de gaz face a l'ouverture du marche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verberg, G.H.B. [Union Internationale de l' Industrie du gaz, (France); Jaidah, N.K. [Qatar Petroleum (Qatar); Eriksen, R. [Statoil (Norway); Alvarez Pelegry, E. [Union Fenosa Gas, Madrid (Spain)

    2003-12-01

    Natural gas, with its environmental advantages, will increase its development in the residential, professional and transportation markets. It will ensure the transition during the progressive implementation of more sustainable energy sources. This paper discusses some possible impacts of the deregulation on the future gas market (investments, risk management, competition, contracts). It is followed by a round table about the expectations of some gas producers (Qatar, Sweden) in front of the development of the European gas market (LNG projects, financing, contracts). (J.S.)

  11. Reassessing the Barriers to Islamic Radicalization in Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    evaluation, and refinement of professional expertise in war, strategy, operations, national security, resource management , and responsible command...insights into the historical and cultural imped- iments in the path of radicalizing its youth. Despite the proximity of the Central Asian Republics to Af...answers to that assumption. How does Islam in Kazakhstan differ from Islam in Turkey, Qatar, and Malaysia , for example? What makes it so distinctive

  12. Inquiry guided learning in a chemical engineering core curriculum: General instructional approach and specific application to the fluid mechanics case

    OpenAIRE

    Atilhan, Mert; Eljack, Fadwa; Alfadala, Hassan; Froyd, Jeffrey E.; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud; Mahalec, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results from a preliminary study of the effectiveness of using inquiry-guided learning instructional strategies both in chemical engineering classrooms and laboratories. For readers unfamiliar with the instructional strategy, the paper describes the general approach and then reports on results of its application for the fluid mechanics course taken by undergraduate students in the Chemical Engineering Department at Qatar University. Inquiry-guided activities were developed...

  13. Parental preference for fluoride varnish: a new concept in a rapidly developing nation

    OpenAIRE

    Hendaus MA; Jama HA; Siddiqui FJ; Elsiddig SA; Alhammadi AH

    2016-01-01

    Mohamed A Hendaus,1,2 Hibaq A Jama,1 Faisal J Siddiqui,1,3 Sohair A Elsiddig,1 Ahmed H Alhammadi1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, General Academic Pediatrics Section, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, 2Department of Clinical Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, 3Pediatric Residency Program, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate parental preference for fluoride varnish in a country where the average percentage of dental caries in y...

  14. The Gulf Moment: Arab Relations Since 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Kuwait City, deporting several Egyptians. All three states pledged urgent aid pack- ages to support Egypt: Kuwait, $4 billion; Saudi Ara- bia, $5 billion... Deportations from Saudi Arabia,” The National, April 16, 2014, available from www.thenational.ae/ business/economy/mena-remittance-dips-2-over-foreign-labour... deportations -from-saudi-arabia#ixzz3GJO62MU4. 24. “In Major Blow to Syria, Qatar Closes Embassy,” Al Arabiya, July 18, 2011, available from

  15. Trade agreements and trade flows: Estimating the effect of free trade agreements on trade flows with an application to the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Scott L. Baier; Jeffrey H. Bergstrand

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the proposed EU-GCC FTA, a free trade agreement (FTA) between the EU and the Gulf Cooperation Counil (GCC), which includes Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. The paper first takes a fresh look at the methodology generally applied to analysis of potential FTAs, and then uses its own enhanced methodology to analyse the proposed EU-GCC FTA.

  16. Fighting Proliferation New Concerns for the Nineties,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    including the giants Bayer and BASF. have built a pesticides plant in Qazvin that was so perfectly conceived for the production of nerve gas that the...opposition when in major cities such as Meshed, Qazvin , Tabriz, Isfahan, and Tehran riots break out and escalate so quickly that the regime must call...174 Pyongyang, North Korea: 184, 205 Qatar: 224 Qazvin , Iran: 231,236 Radar cross sections (RCS): 132, 139, 155 Rafsanjani, All Akbar Hashemi: 230

  17. The powerless starchitect: How Zaha Hadid became the first person working on the Al-Wakrah stadium that actually did die

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Starchitect Zaha Hadid won the bid to design one of the planned stadiums for the 2022 FIFA World Cup event in Qatar. Her design for the Al-Wakrah stadium became the centrepiece of a discussion on the role that starchitects play in society. That debate reached a boiling point in August 2014, and resulted in a digital lynching party that sheds serious doubts on the ethics and professionalism of architectural critics and journalists alike.

  18. Dubai Tower%迪拜高塔

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The design for RMJM 83-storey Dubai Tower is a dynamic and elegantly proportioned skyscraper, rising over 400 metres above the Arabian Gulf. Situated at the prominent water' s edge, this crystalline glass tower is intended to provide an iconic and symbolic reference for Dubai in the neighbouring city of Doha, Qatar. The development will contain world-class retail, offices,hotel, serviced apartments and residential units.

  19. Parental preference for fluoride varnish: a new concept in a rapidly developing nation

    OpenAIRE

    Hendaus MA; Jama HA; Siddiqui FJ; Elsiddig SA; Alhammadi AH

    2016-01-01

    Mohamed A Hendaus,1,2 Hibaq A Jama,1 Faisal J Siddiqui,1,3 Sohair A Elsiddig,1 Ahmed H Alhammadi1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, General Academic Pediatrics Section, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, 2Department of Clinical Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, 3Pediatric Residency Program, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate parental preference for fluoride varnish in a country where the average percentage of dental caries in y...

  20. Iran After the Bomb: How Would a Nuclear-Armed Tehran Behave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    public service of the RAND Corporation. CHILDREN AND FAMILIES EDUCATION AND THE ARTS ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE AND...www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5hZi_jDLvQSt2zT7C1HkzlaH2DuQw Cafiero, Giorgio, “Saudi Arabia and Qatar: Dueling Monarchies,” Foreign Policy

  1. ENHANCING PRODUCED WATER QUALITY USING MODIFIED ACTIVATED CARBON

    OpenAIRE

    AlKaabi, Maryam Ali

    2016-01-01

    The formation produced water from natural gas production process in the North field offshore considered largest volume of waste water in Qatar, which could be considered a potential benefits source for the industry as well as for other domestic uses if it was treated properly, taking in to consideration economical cost and conditions aspects. This project aims to study the physical and chemical characterizations of the produced water associated with natural gas from the North field, in the sa...

  2. Gas to liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, Pat

    2011-04-15

    Sasol, a South African company, along with the Canadian company Talisman, are looking at gas to liquid process opportunities in North America. Sasol decided to launch a study into the feasibility of gas to liquid (GTL) operation in western Canada, and according to previous studies GTL would need a crude barrel price of $85 or higher combined with a gas price of $4 or less to be economical. Sasol is already operating a GTL plant in Qatar.

  3. Longitudinal study on thyroid function in patients with thalassemia major: High incidence of central hypothyroidism by 18 years

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Ashraf T.; Fawzia Al Yafei; Lolwa Al-Naimi; Noora Almarri; Aml Sabt; Mohamed Yassin; Vincenzo De Sanctis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Primary hypothyroidism is one of the most frequent complications observed in-patients suffering from thalassemia. We investigated and reviewed the thyroid function in all thalassemic patients attending the Pediatric Endocrine Clinic of Hamad Medical Center, Doha, Qatar during the last 10 years of follow-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 48 patients with ί-thalassemia major between 5 years and 18 years of age. Thyroid dysfunction was defined as follows: Overt hypothyroidism (l...

  4. Future Opportunities for Bioengagement in the MENA Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    of GMO . 2010. Safat, Kuwait. 19. Interim Executive Committee of the Broader Middle East and North Africa (BMENA) Network for Responsible Science... GMO Detection and Analysis in MENA. 2012. Jordan. 85. Qatar Foundation Annual Research Forum and Arab Expatriate Scientists Network 2012. 2012...Framework Project, UNEF-GP, Editor. 2002-2004: Ankara, Turkey. 92. International workshop on harmonization of GMO Detection and analysis. 2009. Istanbul

  5. ZPEB Soaring in International Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Mingqin; Wang Ximin; Zhang Guangqin; Xu Enxin

    2006-01-01

    @@ The international market share and economy benefits of ZPEB (Zhongyuan Petroleum Exploration Bureau, Sinopec ) are presenting an unprecedented development tendency currently,which holds 83 engineering crews with more than 2000 people have been working in more than 7 countries in the world, including Sudan,Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Qatar, Ecuador,Kazakhstan, Nigeria etc, involving drilling, well workover, geophysical survey, well cementation and other technique service projects.

  6. Economic Factors of Japan’s National Security Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    turning to smaller countries such as Dubai , Abu Dhabi, Qatar, and non- OPEC Oman. Buying more than 50 percent of the oil exported by these countries, Japan...general studies in other systems such as wind power and power generation from marine temperature differences. The Sunshine Project is Japan’s main...relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any states, or in any other manner inconsistent

  7. A case of probable esomeprazole-induced transient liver injury in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Binny Thomas,1-3 Mahmoud Mohamed,1,3,4 Moza Al Hail,1-3 Fatma Alzahra Y Awwad,1 Ramy M Wahba,1 Sabir B Hassan,1 Khalid Omar,1 Wessam El Kassem,1 Palivalappila Abdul Rouf1 1Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 2Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK; 3Qatar University, Doha, 4Weill Cornell Medical College, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar Abstract: We report a case of 22-year-old primigravida presented to Women’s Hospital – Hamad Medical Corporation emergency with severe epigastric pain, nausea, and vomiting. On admission, she was dehydrated with remarkably worsening symptoms. Laboratory findings revealed significantly elevated liver enzymes with unknown etiology. Her past medical history showed an admission for nausea and vomiting 3 weeks previously and she was discharged on antiemetics, and esomeprazole for the first time. Due to the predominantly elevated liver enzymes, the clinical pharmacist discussed the possibility of esomeprazole-induced adverse effects and suggested to suspend esomeprazole based on the evidence from literature review. The liver enzymes showed a substantial improvement within days after the discontinuation of the drug; however, a rechallenge was not done since it could have adversely affected the mother or the fetus. Using the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability scales, the adverse reaction due to esomeprazole was classified as “probably”. Keywords: hyperemesis, drug-induced liver injury, esomeprazole, adverse drug reaction, ADR, proton pump inhibitor

  8. Key challenges for implementing a Canadian-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in a Middle Eastern context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Kyle John; Diab, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    Globalization of medical education is occurring at a rapid pace and many regions of the world are adapting curricula, teaching methods, and assessment tools from established programs. In the Middle East, the use of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) is rare. The College of Pharmacy at Qatar University recently partnered with the University of Toronto and the Supreme Council of Health in Qatar to adapt policies and procedures of a Canadian-based OSCE as an exit-from-degree assessment for pharmacy students in Qatar. Despite many cultural and contextual barriers, the OSCE was implemented successfully and is now an integrated component of the pharmacy curriculum. This paper aims to provide insight into the adoption and implementation process by identifying four major cultural and contextual challenges associated with OSCEs: assessment tools, standardized actors, assessor calibration, and standard setting. Proposed solutions to the challenges are also given. Findings are relevant to international programs attempting to adapt OSCEs into their contexts, as well as Canadian programs facing increasing rates of cultural diversity within student and assessor populations.

  9. The Present and Future Energy Performance of the First Passivhaus Project in the Gulf Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Khalfan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With voluntary and mandatory energy performance standards now becoming more common around the world, schemes to develop low energy buildings have become more apparent in developed countries. The Passivhaus standard, established 25 years ago in Germany, is one the most stringent and promising low energy building standards in Europe. It started as a construction concept applied to residential buildings, but has since spread as a voluntary ultra-low energy efficient standard to different parts of the world. Qatar, a member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC states, announced in 2013 the completion of the first Passivhaus project in the Gulf Region. The current and future performance of the Passivhaus project in Qatar was investigated in this study using current and future climate scenarios. Computer modelling was used to simulate the energy performance of the house and the thermal comfort of the occupants. In addition, on-site measurements were made to corroborate the modelling outcomes. Further, the impacts of climate change on the Passivhaus project was examined, and comparative analyses were undertaken. The findings suggested that the Passivhaus performs well under the current and the future weather data sets. Furthermore, the modelling indicates that the Qatar house is close to achieving the Passivhaus standard.

  10. An experimental performance evaluation of the hybrid FSO/RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, Abir; Touati, Farid; Abdaoui, Abderrazak; Khandakar, Amith; Hussain, Syed Jawad; Bouallegue, Ammar

    2017-02-01

    This paper is a first attempt to study the effects of atmospheric turbulences on hybrid free space optics/ radio frequency (FSO/RF) transmission system in Doha, Qatar. The state of Qatar is characterized by a Mediterranean climate with hot and dry summers with modest cloud coverage highly affected by airborne dust. Due to its sensitivity to atmospheric turbulences, throughout this study, we try to demonstrate the working capabilities of FSO technology as well as to promote an understanding of this technology amongst the countries of the gulf cooperation council (GCC). Moreover, we studied the behavior of RF link during the same period. In order to analyze the transport media, two transmitting subsystems are employed and installed at Qatar University (QU) at two different buildings separated by a distance of 600 m. Each system is composed of a FSO and RF terminal. We have ported an Embedded Linux kernel on Micro-blaze processor build in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Then, we have designed a network sniffer application that can run on the FPGA board. The measurements from the network sniffer applications were carried out during summer season from June up to September 2015. The relation between the measurements and the atmospheric factors, taken from a weather station installed at QU, were also found.

  11. Inferring genome-wide patterns of admixture in Qataris using fifty-five ancestral populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omberg, Larsson; Salit, Jacqueline; Hackett, Neil; Fuller, Jennifer; Matthew, Rebecca; Chouchane, Lotfi; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L; Bustamante, Carlos; Crystal, Ronald G; Mezey, Jason G

    2012-06-26

    Populations of the Arabian Peninsula have a complex genetic structure that reflects waves of migrations including the earliest human migrations from Africa and eastern Asia, migrations along ancient civilization trading routes and colonization history of recent centuries. Here, we present a study of genome-wide admixture in this region, using 156 genotyped individuals from Qatar, a country located at the crossroads of these migration patterns. Since haplotypes of these individuals could have originated from many different populations across the world, we have developed a machine learning method "SupportMix" to infer loci-specific genomic ancestry when simultaneously analyzing many possible ancestral populations. Simulations show that SupportMix is not only more accurate than other popular admixture discovery tools but is the first admixture inference method that can efficiently scale for simultaneous analysis of 50-100 putative ancestral populations while being independent of prior demographic information. By simultaneously using the 55 world populations from the Human Genome Diversity Panel, SupportMix was able to extract the fine-scale ancestry of the Qatar population, providing many new observations concerning the ancestry of the region. For example, as well as recapitulating the three major sub-populations in Qatar, composed of mainly Arabic, Persian, and African ancestry, SupportMix additionally identifies the specific ancestry of the Persian group to populations sampled in Greater Persia rather than from China and the ancestry of the African group to sub-Saharan origin and not Southern African Bantu origin as previously thought.

  12. Emerging resistant serotypes of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elshafie S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sittana Elshafie,1,2 Saad J Taj-Aldeen2,3 1Qatar Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Aspetar, Doha, Qatar; 2Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, 3Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Microbiology Division, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution, vaccine serotype coverage, and antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae serotypes isolated from patients with invasive diseases, after the introduction of pneumococcal 7-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-7. Methods: A total of 134 isolates were collected from blood and cerebrospinal fluid specimens at Hamad Hospital during the period from 2005 to 2009. Isolate serotyping was done using the Quellung reaction. The prevaccination period was considered before 2005. Results: The most common serotypes for all age groups were 3 (12.70%, 14 (11.90%, 1 (11.90%, 19A (9.00%, 9V (5.20%, 23F (5.20%, and 19F (4.50%. Coverage rates for infant <2 years for PCV-7, the 10-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-10, and the 13-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-13 were 34.78%, 52.17%, and 78.26%, respectively. Coverage rates of these vaccines were 50%, 67.86%, and 75% for the 2–5 years age group; 27.12%, 40.68%, and 64.41% for the age group 6–64 years; and 25%, 33.33%, and 66.67% for the ≥65 years age group, respectively. The percentage of nonsusceptible isolates to penicillin, cefotaxime, and erythromycin were 43.86%, 16.66%, and 22.81%, respectively. Thirty-seven isolates (32.46% were multidrug resistant (MDR and belonged to serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, 23F, 1, 9V, 12F, 4, 6B, 3, and 15A. Compared to previous results before the introduction of PCV-7, there was a significant reduction in penicillin-nonsusceptable S. pneumoniae from 66.67% to 43.86%, and a slight insignificant reduction in erythromycin nonsusceptible strains from 27.60% to 22.8%, while there was a significant increase in

  13. EVALUATION OF SPORTS MARKETING EFFICIENCY IN ARAB COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEBRIL MOHAMED R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Purposes of this Study are evaluating the efficiency of sports marketing in the organizations of some Arab countries through the following sub-goals:1-Identify the philosophy of sports organizations towards sports marketing.2- Identify the extent and existence of an organizational unit to perform specialized functions for sports marketing activity.3- Determine the extent of the use effective marketing methods in sporting organizations in order to get the material and technical support required to implement the plans and programs.Research sample consisted of officials, members of boards of directors, and managers of sports bodies' in some Arab countries (Egypt, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Qatar. Two hundred forty Seven board members from Egypt (N 101, United Arab Emirates (N 76, Bahrain (N 40, and Qatar (N30 were involved in the investigation. The Subjects were administered a Questionnaire developed by the researchers.The most important results are Research sample differed (clubs -sporting associations - the Olympic Committee Arab countries (Egypt - Emirates - Bahrain - Qatar in philosophy toward sport marketing. Sample search (clubs -sporting associations - the Olympic Committee Arab countries (Egypt - Emirates - Bahrain - Qatar agree on the sport marketing methods used sporting organizations. There are a difference among sample search sports organizations (clubs - Olympic Committee in Arab countries (Egypt - Emirates - Bahrain - Qatar and there are agreement by the sports federations in marketing efficiency. The most importance Recommendations are :1.Need to add sports fields of investment to create the appropriate field to become sports areas for attracting investment.2.Guarantee the right of return sporting bodies in competitions organized through the radio and television.3.Establishment channels of sports economic. 4.Exempt contributions businessmen and sponsor and the players from taxes.5.Use the name and logo and flag

  14. Association of PPARγ2 gene variant Pro12Ala polymorphism with hypertension and obesity in the aboriginal Qatari population known for being consanguineous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bener A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdulbari Bener,1,2 Sarah Darwish,3 Abdulla OAA Al-Hamaq,4 Ramzi M Mohammad,5,6 Mohammad T Yousafzai1 1Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar; 2Department of Evidence for Population Health Unit, School of Epidemiology and Health Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 3Department of Endocrinology, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 4Qatar Diabetic Associations and Qatar Foundation, Doha, Qatar; 5Department of Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, School of Medicine, MI, USA; 6Department of Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism of the human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2 gene with hypertension and obesity in a highly consanguineous aboriginal Qatari population. Design: A cross-sectional survey conducted from January 2011–December 2012. Setting: Primary health care clinics. Subjects: A random sample of 1,528 Qatari male and female population older than 20 years of age. Materials and methods: Data on age, sex, income, level of education, occupation status, body mass index, and blood pressure and lipid profile were obtained. The Pro12Ala in the PPARγ2 gene was detected on the LightCycler® using two specific probes: (Sensor [G] 5'-CTC CTA TTG ACG CAG AAA GCG-FL and PPAR Anchor 5' LC Red 640- TCC TTC ACT GAT ACA CTG TCT GCA AAC ATA TC-PH. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Result: Out of a total 1,528 participants, 220 were diagnosed with essential hypertension, and 420 were obese. Participants with consanguinity were significantly higher among hypertensive than normotensive (41.9% versus 30.8%; P=0.001. Altogether, more than three-fourths (89% of the participants had a wild genotype (Pro12Pro, 9.8% were

  15. Guest Foreword from Michael Thomas CMG QC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available I am delighted to be invited to attend upon this launch of the International Review of Law, conceived and now delivered into the world by the College of Law of the University of Qatar under Dr. Jon Truby’s leadership. This new and most welcome contribution to global academic writing and contemporary legal criticism, should be of the greatest interest outside Qatar, if only for its provenance. The State of Qatar has become widely known and respected for its vision, its progressive outlook, and its determination to look beyond Arab culture and traditions for new ways of working with the rest of the world for the good of the region as a whole. It has made a bold commitment to engage with the accepted legal principles and processes that have served the needs of global mercantile and commercial activity so well over the last two centuries. his is demonstrated by the generous support given by His Highness the Emir to the Qatar Law Forum 2009, to be repeated in May this year, in which jurists and lawyers of great eminence are brought together in Doha to expound, explain and exchange ideas upon the importance of the rule of law, the universal key to principled and effective government, and the protection of individual freedom and dignity. One may also cite the recently established Civil and Commercial Court, served by appointed judges of international repute from many jurisdictions, that has opened its doors in Doha for dispute resolution and adjudication. I am privileged to chair the Regulatory Tribunal, an independent statuy body composed of lawyers from overseas with specialist experience in market regulation, to which incoming investors can appeal any disputes they make with Qatar Financial Centre (QFC Institutions such as the QFC Regulatory Authority and QFC Authority In the same way, the founding of Qatar University College of Law in 2006 has shown Qatar’s determination to train future generations of Qataris to build on the best of legal

  16. Summative assessment in a doctor of pharmacy program: a critical insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbur K

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Kerry Wilbur College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Background: The Canadian-accredited post-baccalaureate Doctor of Pharmacy program at Qatar University trains pharmacists to deliver advanced patient care. Emphasis on acquisition and development of the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes lies in the curriculum’s extensive experiential component. A campus-based oral comprehensive examination (OCE was devised to emulate a clinical viva voce and complement the extensive formative assessments conducted at experiential practice sites throughout the curriculum. We describe an evaluation of the final exit summative assessment for this graduate program. Methods: OCE results since the inception of the graduate program (3 years ago were retrieved and recorded into a blinded database. Examination scores among each paired faculty examiner team were analyzed for inter-rater reliability and linearity of agreement using intraclass correlation and Spearman’s correlation coefficient measurements, respectively. Graduate student ranking from individual examiner OCE scores was compared with that of other relative ranked student performance. Results: Sixty-one OCEs were administered to 30 graduate students over 3 years by a composite of eleven different pairs of faculty examiners. Intraclass correlation measures demonstrated that examiner team reliability was low and linearity of agreements was inconsistent. Only one examiner team in each respective academic year was found to have statistically significant inter-rater reliability, and linearity of agreements was inconsistent in all years. No association was found between examination performance rankings and other academic parameters. Conclusion: Critical review of our final summative assessment implies it is lacking robustness and defensibility. Measures are in place to continue the quality improvement process and develop and implement an alternative means of evaluation within a more

  17. Inferring genome-wide patterns of admixture in Qataris using fifty-five ancestral populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omberg Larsson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Populations of the Arabian Peninsula have a complex genetic structure that reflects waves of migrations including the earliest human migrations from Africa and eastern Asia, migrations along ancient civilization trading routes and colonization history of recent centuries. Results Here, we present a study of genome-wide admixture in this region, using 156 genotyped individuals from Qatar, a country located at the crossroads of these migration patterns. Since haplotypes of these individuals could have originated from many different populations across the world, we have developed a machine learning method "SupportMix" to infer loci-specific genomic ancestry when simultaneously analyzing many possible ancestral populations. Simulations show that SupportMix is not only more accurate than other popular admixture discovery tools but is the first admixture inference method that can efficiently scale for simultaneous analysis of 50-100 putative ancestral populations while being independent of prior demographic information. Conclusions By simultaneously using the 55 world populations from the Human Genome Diversity Panel, SupportMix was able to extract the fine-scale ancestry of the Qatar population, providing many new observations concerning the ancestry of the region. For example, as well as recapitulating the three major sub-populations in Qatar, composed of mainly Arabic, Persian, and African ancestry, SupportMix additionally identifies the specific ancestry of the Persian group to populations sampled in Greater Persia rather than from China and the ancestry of the African group to sub-Saharan origin and not Southern African Bantu origin as previously thought.

  18. Knowledge and attitudes of health care professionals toward organ donation and transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Alsaied

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify and assess the level of knowledge and attitudes of health care professionals (HCP in Qatar toward organ donation and transplantation, this cross-sectional study was carried out from October 2007 to February 2008 in the Accident and Emergency Departments and Intensive Care Units of the hospitals of the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC. A representative sample of 585 HCP working in the hospitals of the HMC was approached and 418 staff gave consent to participate in the study (71.5%. 36.8% were physicians, 48.6% nurses and 14.6% Emergency Medical Service (EMS technicians. Of the surveyed HCP, 40.7% were males and 59.3% were females. Majority of the staff were in the age group of 30-39 years (58.6%. More than half of the physicians (59.7% and technicians (57.4% assumed that organs can be bought and sold in the State of Qatar. Most of the physicians (76.6% and nurses (75.9% knew that brain-dead persons are eligible for organ donation, whereas only 57.4% of the EMS technicians thought so. Majority of the HCP supported organ donation; physicians (89.0%, nurses (82.3% and technicians (70.5%. The attitude of the physicians (24.0% and nurses (20.2% to donate a kidney to a family member was very poor compared with the attitude of the technicians (44.3%. Although the HCP support organ donation (83%, more than half of the physicians (51.3%, nurses (61.6% and technicians (54.1% wanted to be buried with all their organs intact. The findings, although they give cause for hope, suggest that there is much work yet to be done before organ donation and transplantation can become fully accepted by the medical community in Qatar.

  19. Tribal Militias: An Effective Tool to Counter Al-Qaida and Its Affiliates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Doha, Qatar), July 29, 2007, transcript available from www.aljazeera.net. 33. “Shuyukh al-sahwa bayn mitraqat Al-Qaida wa-sindan al-hukuma” (“The...91. “Bad muhawalat ightiyal shakhsiya qabaliya tawattur shadid bayn Al-Qaida wa’l-qaba’il fi Abyan” (“Following an At- tempt to Assassinate a Tribal...Post, September 10, 2012, available from www.washingtonpost.com. 102. Abd Al-Razzaq Al-Jamal, “Mustaqbal muhafazhat Ibb bad inhiyar al-ittifaq bayn

  20. Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence, 12th International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Malluhi, Qutaibah; Gonzalez, Sara; Bocewicz, Grzegorz; Bucciarelli, Edgardo; Giulioni, Gianfranco; Iqba, Farkhund

    2015-01-01

    The 12th International Symposium on Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence 2015 (DCAI 2015) is a forum to present applications of innovative techniques for studying and solving complex problems. The exchange of ideas between scientists and technicians from both the academic and industrial sector is essential to facilitate the development of systems that can meet the ever-increasing demands of today’s society. The present edition brings together past experience, current work and promising future trends associated with distributed computing, artificial intelligence and their application in order to provide efficient solutions to real problems. This symposium is organized by the Osaka Institute of Technology, Qatar University and the University of Salamanca.

  1. CNPC Constructs Its First LNG Terminal in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) broke ground in mid-April for the construction of its first liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal in Dalian, a port city in northeastern Liaoning Province. This project,with a total investment of over 10 billion yuan (about $1.4 billion), consists of a wharf, a receiving facility and transportation pipelines. It is designed to receive supplies from Qatar, Australia and other overseas markets. CNPC is also building a LNG receiving facility in Rudong county of Eastern China's Jiangsu Province. Experts predicted that by 2020 China would import 10 million tons of LNG annually, stimulating the interests of oil giants to build LNG projects.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial properties of novel double layer nanocomposite electrospun fibers for wound dressing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassiba AJ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alaa J Hassiba,1 Mohamed E El Zowalaty,2 Thomas J Webster,3–5 Aboubakr M Abdullah,6 Gheyath K Nasrallah,7 Khalil Abdelrazek Khalil,8 Adriaan S Luyt,6 Ahmed A Elzatahry1 1Materials Science and Technology Program, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 2School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; 3Department of Chemical Engineering, 4Department of Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 5Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 6Center for Advanced Materials, 7Department of Biomedical Science, College of Health Sciences, Biomedical Research Center, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 8Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates Abstract: Herein, novel hybrid nanomaterials were developed for wound dressing applications with antimicrobial properties. Electrospinning was used to fabricate a double layer nanocomposite nanofibrous mat consisting of an upper layer of poly(vinyl alcohol and chitosan loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs and a lower layer of polyethylene oxide (PEO or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP nanofibers loaded with chlorhexidine (as an antiseptic. The top layer containing AgNPs, whose purpose was to protect the wound site against environmental germ invasion, was prepared by reducing silver nitrate to its nanoparticulate form through interaction with chitosan. The lower layer, which would be in direct contact with the injured site, contained the antibiotic drug needed to avoid wound infections which would otherwise interfere with the healing process. Initially, the upper layer was electrospun, followed sequentially by electrospinning the second layer, creating a bilayer nanofibrous mat. The morphology of the nanofibrous mats was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, showing successful nanofiber

  3. Designing a patient care model with relevance to the cultural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson-Malt, Suzi; Herrin-Griffith, Donna M; Davies, Joanne

    2010-06-01

    Healthcare leaders are challenged to develop new approaches to care that better serve populations and use valuable resources in more effective and efficient ways. The authors discuss a model of care under development at Sidra Medical and Research Center, Qatar, with emphasis on how to translate the best available evidence in a way that is applicable and meaningful for the cultural setting. Strategies that nurse leaders can call upon to engage their team members' cultural intelligence during the planning and design of new processes of care are also discussed.

  4. Evidence from the national health account: the case of Dubai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidi S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Samer Hamidi School of Health and Environmental Studies, Hamadan Bin Mohammad Smart University, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Introduction: National health accounts (NHAs provide useful information to aid in understanding the health care financing system. This article aims to present a profile of health system financing in Dubai using data from the NHA. We also aim to compare the provider structure of financing schemes in Dubai with those of the State of Qatar and selected Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD countries. Methods: The author analyzed secondary data published in NHAs for Dubai and Qatar, and data collected by the OECD countries and publicly available from the Statistical Office of the European Union (Eurostat, for 25 OECD countries for comparative analysis. All health financing measures used are as defined in the international System of Health Accounts (SHA. Results: In Dubai, only 33% of current health expenditure (CHE is funded by the government. However, the public sector is the main source of health funding in Qatar and most OECD countries, with an average of 79% and 72%, respectively. Households in Dubai spent about 22% of CHE, equivalent to an average US$187 per capita, ranking the highest among Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC countries, and compared with 20% of CHE across OECD countries. Hospitals in Dubai accounted for 48% of CHE, which is much higher than Qatar (40% and the OECD average (36%. Conclusion: The Dubai health care financing system differs substantially from that in OECD countries, as it is more private oriented. The findings point to several potential opportunities for growth and improvement. Policy areas that may be addressed using the information presented in this article are broad and include the following: shift from hospital care to ambulatory and day care, sustainability of health finance, shift the cost of health care to the private sector, introduce cost-containment measures, revise

  5. A Cross-cultural Corpus of Annotated Verbal and Nonverbal Behaviors in Receptionist Encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Makatchev, Maxim; Sakr, Majd

    2012-01-01

    We present the first annotated corpus of nonverbal behaviors in receptionist interactions, and the first nonverbal corpus (excluding the original video and audio data) of service encounters freely available online. Native speakers of American English and Arabic participated in a naturalistic role play at reception desks of university buildings in Doha, Qatar and Pittsburgh, USA. Their manually annotated nonverbal behaviors include gaze direction, hand and head gestures, torso positions, and facial expressions. We discuss possible uses of the corpus and envision it to become a useful tool for the human-robot interaction community.

  6. Teaching the Arabic Alphabet to Kindergarteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Ibrahim, Zeinab; Karatsolis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents initial results regarding writing activities in the context of the ALADDIN project. The goal of the project is to teach Modern Standard Arabic in 5-year-old kindergarten students in Qatar. A total of 18 students, enrolled in the ‘Arabic Class’, participated for 9 weeks...... in the activities of the project. All students were native speakers of the Qatari dialect. Learning activities involved both typical instructional methods, and the use of specifically designed tools for tabletop surface computers. The paper focuses on writing activities and on how the affordances of surface...

  7. A Review on the Use of Web 2.0 Tools Among Selected Gulf Libraries Websites

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of Web 2.0 tools by university libraries in the Gulf region namely the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman and Kuwait. The author used the observational method of visiting each of the selected academic libraries in the gulf region. A total of 56 academic library websites was viewed to see whether any Web 2.0 tools have been implemented. Each of the university libraries was randomly selected.

  8. Qatari LNG starts flowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abi-Aad, Naji

    1997-02-01

    A Liquefied natural gas (LNG) project being undertaken by Qatargas (the Qatar Liquefied Gas Company) in Ras Laffan is described in this paper. The first of three planned liquefaction trains for the LNG plant has just been commissioned, with the second under construction and the third to be operational in 1999. Close cooperation with the Chiyoda contractors in Japan has ensured the success of the first part of the scheme. LNG is also to be exported back to Japan to fuel electricity generation plants. (UK)

  9. On asymmetric causal relationships in Petropolitics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balan Feyza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine whether the First Law of Petropolitics denominated by Friedman in 2006 is valid for OPEC countries. To do this, this paper analyses the relationship between political risk and oil supply by applying the asymmetric panel causality test suggested by Hatemi-J (2011 to these countries for the period 1984-2014. The results show that the First Law of Petropolitics is valid for Angola, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, given that positive oil supply shocks significantly lead to negative political stability shocks, and negative oil supply shocks significantly lead to positive shocks in political stability.

  10. International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy of Cancer 2009 Annual Meeting held in Cork, Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Barbara; Casey, Garrett; Möller, Mecker G; Kasahara, Noriyuki; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; Peng, Kah-Whye; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy (ISCGT) of Cancer annual meeting was held from September 2 through September 4, 2009, in Cork, Ireland ( www.iscgt2009.com ). The conference was held in conjunction with the Irish Society for Gene and Cell Therapy third annual meeting, and brought together scientists and clinicians from around the world in a country developing its knowledge economy. Next year's ISCGT meeting will be held in Doha, the capital of Qatar ( www.iscgt.net ), from September 27 through September 29, 2010.

  11. Dataset for petroleum based stock markets and GAUSS codes for SAMEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Ahmed A A; Bertuccelli, Pietro; Otranto, Edoardo

    2017-02-01

    This article includes a unique data set of a balanced daily (Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday) for oil and natural gas volatility and the oil rich economies' stock markets for Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Kuwait, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Bahrain and Oman, using daily data over the period spanning Oct. 18, 2006-July 30, 2015. Additionally, we have included unique GAUSS codes for estimating the spillover asymmetric multiplicative error model (SAMEM) with application to Petroleum-Based Stock Market. The data, the model and the codes have many applications in business and social science.

  12. Dataset for petroleum based stock markets and GAUSS codes for SAMEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A.A. Khalifa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article includes a unique data set of a balanced daily (Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday for oil and natural gas volatility and the oil rich economies’ stock markets for Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Kuwait, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Bahrain and Oman, using daily data over the period spanning Oct. 18, 2006–July 30, 2015. Additionally, we have included unique GAUSS codes for estimating the spillover asymmetric multiplicative error model (SAMEM with application to Petroleum-Based Stock Market. The data, the model and the codes have many applications in business and social science.

  13. Introduction: The Arab Spring in the Arabian Peninsula and its aftermath

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnefoy, Laurent; Louër, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    In the Arabian Peninsula, mobilizations in 2011 against authoritarian rulers took various shapes and followed different rationales. For that matter, Yemen, Bahrain and Oman, where mass-mobilizations took place, are very different from Qatar and the United Arab Emirates where only a small segment of intellectuals demanded reforms. Contestation also met with varying levels of success. As such, Yemen, where President ‘Alī ‘Abdallāh Ṣāliḥ was forced to resign, is again different from Bahrain wher...

  14. Parental preference for fluoride varnish: a new concept in a rapidly developing nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendaus MA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A Hendaus,1,2 Hibaq A Jama,1 Faisal J Siddiqui,1,3 Sohair A Elsiddig,1 Ahmed H Alhammadi1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, General Academic Pediatrics Section, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, 2Department of Clinical Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, 3Pediatric Residency Program, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate parental preference for fluoride varnish in a country where the average percentage of dental caries in young children is up to ~73%. Consequently, the aim of this study, despite being a pilot, was to create a nationwide project in the State of Qatar to promote oral health in children. Methods: A cross-sectional perspective study was conducted at Hamad Medical Corporation in Qatar. Parents of children aged ≤5 years were offered an interview survey. A total of 200 questionnaires were completed (response rate =100%. The study was conducted between December 1, 2014 and March 30, 2015, and included all children aged >1 year and <5 years who came to the outpatient clinics for well-child and sick visits. We also included children who were admitted to the inpatient wards. Results: The mean age of participant children was 2.8±1.1 years. When inquiring regarding parents’ knowledge and awareness of dental health, we found that >90% of families were aware that dental health affects the health of the whole body. The study showed that ~70% of parents were not aware of the existence of fluoride varnish, but would allow a health provider to apply fluoride varnish. Furthermore, ~80% of parents would not stop brushing their child’s teeth and would not skip dentist appointments if varnish was to be applied. Approximately 40% of parents conveyed some concerns regarding the safety of fluoride varnish, despite being considered as a new concept. The main concern was that the child might swallow some of the fluoride. Another important concern expressed by parents was the

  15. Teaching the Arabic Alphabet to Kindergarteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Ibrahim, Zeinab; Karatsolis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents initial results regarding writing activities in the context of the ALADDIN project. The goal of the project is to teach Modern Standard Arabic in 5-year-old kindergarten students in Qatar. A total of 18 students, enrolled in the ‘Arabic Class’, participated for 9 weeks...... in the activities of the project. All students were native speakers of the Qatari dialect. Learning activities involved both typical instructional methods, and the use of specifically designed tools for tabletop surface computers. The paper focuses on writing activities and on how the affordances of surface...

  16. 2016 International Workshop on Nitride Semiconductors (IWN 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Russian Federation 2 D enma r k 1 Qatar 1 N e ·t herlan d s 1 Figure 1. Number of accepted papers per country. According to their guiding principles...I www.mrs.org/conlerence-servlces ~ Be<ouse the Experience Motte11 2 TECHNICAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE A: Fundamentals of Material Growth At: Bulk...in their sleeping rooms at the Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista. ON-SITE DINING OPTIONS Andiamo-authentic and unique Italian bistro and grille

  17. Uncommon gastrointestinal complications of enteric fever in a non-endemic country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Sharma, Manik; Abdelmola, Abdellatif; Derbala, Moutaz F.M.; Al Kaabi, Saad Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Enteric fever is a systemic illness with varying presentation. It is an important infectious disease in developing countries and also in industrialized countries where many migrants reside. Enteric fever can result in complications in different organ systems and delay in identification and prompt treatment can be fatal. The important gastrointestinal complications of enteric fever include hepatitis, intestinal ulcers, bleeding and bowel perforation. We report three relatively uncommon complications of enteric fever in Qatar, a non-endemic country, ileal ulcer presenting with hematochezia; duodenal ulcer with polyserositis, cholestatic hepatitis and bone marrow suppression; enteric fever related peritonitis. PMID:25320692

  18. Uncommon gastrointestinal complications of enteric fever in a non-endemic country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Sharma, Manik; Abdelmola, Abdellatif; Derbala, Moutaz F M; Al Kaabi, Saad Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Enteric fever is a systemic illness with varying presentation. It is an important infectious disease in developing countries and also in industrialized countries where many migrants reside. Enteric fever can result in complications in different organ systems and delay in identification and prompt treatment can be fatal. The important gastrointestinal complications of enteric fever include hepatitis, intestinal ulcers, bleeding and bowel perforation. We report three relatively uncommon complications of enteric fever in Qatar, a non-endemic country, ileal ulcer presenting with hematochezia; duodenal ulcer with polyserositis, cholestatic hepatitis and bone marrow suppression; enteric fever related peritonitis.

  19. Dennis C. Roberts & Susan R. Komives (Eds. (2016. Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munita Dunn-Coetzee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education, edited by Dennis C. Roberts and Susan R. Komives, is a book that resulted from a short-term study-abroad experience between the Universities of Maryland and San Diego with the Qatar Foundation’s Education City in Doha in 2010. This partnership challenged the way in which higher education internalisation was viewed – in such a way that the visit was replicated in 2012 and this book was authored.

  20. Five adults with mild sickle cell anemia share a beta S chromosome with the same haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakioglu, I; Hattori, Y; Kutlar, A; Mathew, C; Huisman, T H

    1985-11-01

    Five adult SS patients from Qatar, Turkey, and South Africa with mild disease, had greatly elevated Hb F and specific patterns of polymorphic sites on their beta S chromosomes. One subject had an alpha-thalassemia (-alpha/-alpha). The haplotypes were the common type #19, associated with severe disease, and type #31, not seen thus far in an SS patient (numbering system of Antonarakis et al). The data suggest that modifications in the DNA of the beta S #31 chromosome promotes the synthesis of gamma chains.