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Sample records for qa approach developed

  1. Graded approach for establishment of QA requirements for Type B packaging of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, R.R.; Woodruff, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    A study that was conducted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the U.S. Congress to assess the effectiveness of quality assurance (QA) activities has demonstrated a need to modify and improve the application of QA requirements for the nuclear industry. As a result, the packaging community, along with the nuclear industry as a whole, has taken action to increase the efficacy of the QA function. The results of the study indicate that a graded approach for establishing QA requirements is the preferred method. The essence of the graded approach is the establishment of applicable QA requirements to an extent consistent with the importance to safety of an item, component, system, or activity. This paper describes the process that is used to develop the graded approach for QA requirements pertaining to Type B packaging

  2. Discussion of Regulatory Guide 7.10, emphasizing the graded approach for establishing QA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, L.; Lake, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    To assist applicants in establishing an acceptable QA program to meet the programmatic elements of Appendix E to 10 CFR Part 71, Regulatory Guide 7.10 was developed. Regulatory Guide 7.10 is organized in three self-contained ANNEXES. Guidance applicable to designer/fabricators, to users, and users of radiographic devices are in separate annexes. QA programs for packaging to transport radioactive material are similar in regard to the various operations a licensee may be involved in. However, the appropriate QA/QC effort to verify the program elements may vary significantly. This is referred to as the graded approach. Appendix A in the guide addresses the graded approach

  3. Applying QA to nuclear-development programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplinger, W.H.

    1981-12-01

    The application of quality assurance (QA) principles to developmental programs is usually accomplished by tailoring or selecting appropriate requirements from large QA systems. Developmental work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) covers the complete range from basic research to in-core reactor tests. Desired requirements are selected from the 18 criteria in ANSI/ASME NQA Standard 1 by the cognizant program engineer in conjunction with the quality engineer. These referenced criteria assure that QA for the program is planned, implemented, and maintained. In addition, the WHC QA Manual provides four categories or levels of QA that are assigned to programs or components within the program. These categories are based on safety, reliability, and consequences of failure to provide a cost effective program

  4. mosaicQA - A General Approach to Facilitate Basic Data Quality Assurance for Epidemiological Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialke, Martin; Rau, Henriette; Schwaneberg, Thea; Walk, Rene; Bahls, Thomas; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2017-05-29

    Epidemiological studies are based on a considerable amount of personal, medical and socio-economic data. To answer research questions with reliable results, epidemiological research projects face the challenge of providing high quality data. Consequently, gathered data has to be reviewed continuously during the data collection period. This article describes the development of the mosaicQA-library for non-statistical experts consisting of a set of reusable R functions to provide support for a basic data quality assurance for a wide range of application scenarios in epidemiological research. To generate valid quality reports for various scenarios and data sets, a general and flexible development approach was needed. As a first step, a set of quality-related questions, targeting quality aspects on a more general level, was identified. The next step included the design of specific R-scripts to produce proper reports for metric and categorical data. For more flexibility, the third development step focussed on the generalization of the developed R-scripts, e.g. extracting characteristics and parameters. As a last step the generic characteristics of the developed R functionalities and generated reports have been evaluated using different metric and categorical datasets. The developed mosaicQA-library generates basic data quality reports for multivariate input data. If needed, more detailed results for single-variable data, including definition of units, variables, descriptions, code lists and categories of qualified missings, can easily be produced. The mosaicQA-library enables researchers to generate reports for various kinds of metric and categorical data without the need for computational or scripting knowledge. At the moment, the library focusses on the data structure quality and supports the assessment of several quality indicators, including frequency, distribution and plausibility of research variables as well as the occurrence of missing and extreme values. To

  5. Developing a meaningful QA trend analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternberg, A.

    1987-01-01

    A trend analysis program is being developed by the nuclear quality assurance (NQA) department at Public Service Electric and Gas Company, adapted from the principles advocated by W. Edwards Deming using statistical process control methods. It deals with identifying performance indicators that monitor the activities of a process considering both inputs and outputs, determining whether the process is stable or unstable, taking actions accordingly, and continuing to monitor the process with the objective of continual improvement of quality

  6. A novel approach to EPID-based 3D volumetric dosimetry for IMRT and VMAT QA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazmi, Abdulaziz; Gianoli, Chiara; Neppl, Sebastian; Martins, Juliana; Veloza, Stella; Podesta, Mark; Verhaegen, Frank; Reiner, Michael; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia

    2018-06-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are relatively complex treatment delivery techniques and require quality assurance (QA) procedures. Pre-treatment dosimetric verification represents a fundamental QA procedure in daily clinical routine in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to develop an EPID-based approach to reconstruct a 3D dose distribution as imparted to a virtual cylindrical water phantom to be used for plan-specific pre-treatment dosimetric verification for IMRT and VMAT plans. For each depth, the planar 2D dose distributions acquired in air were back-projected and convolved by depth-specific scatter and attenuation kernels. The kernels were obtained by making use of scatter and attenuation models to iteratively estimate the parameters from a set of reference measurements. The derived parameters served as a look-up table for reconstruction of arbitrary measurements. The summation of the reconstructed 3D dose distributions resulted in the integrated 3D dose distribution of the treatment delivery. The accuracy of the proposed approach was validated in clinical IMRT and VMAT plans by means of gamma evaluation, comparing the reconstructed 3D dose distributions with Octavius measurement. The comparison was carried out using (3%, 3 mm) criteria scoring 99% and 96% passing rates for IMRT and VMAT, respectively. An accuracy comparable to the one of the commercial device for 3D volumetric dosimetry was demonstrated. In addition, five IMRT and five VMAT were validated against the 3D dose calculation performed by the TPS in a water phantom using the same passing rate criteria. The median passing rates within the ten treatment plans was 97.3%, whereas the lowest was 95%. Besides, the reconstructed 3D distribution is obtained without predictions relying on forward dose calculation and without external phantom or dosimetric devices. Thus, the approach provides a fully automated, fast and easy QA

  7. Waste-management QA training and motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Early in the development of a QA Program for the Waste Management and Geotechnical Projects Directorate, thought was given to establishing a QA Training Program commensurate with the needs and appropriate to the motivation of a staff of more than 130 scientists and project leaders. These individuals, i.e., researchers rather than hardware designers, had no prior experience with QA programs, and from their perception generally did not believe that such controls had any merit. Therefore, historically proven approaches to QA training had to be quickly modified or totally discarded. For instance, due to the mobility and diversity of backgrounds of personnel at SNL, the QA training program had to accommodate many different levels of QA maturity at any given time. Furthermore, since the application of QA to R and D was continuing to profit from project-specific lessons learned, these improvements in the QA program had to be easily and quickly imparted in the general staff's evolving awareness of QA. A somewhat novel approach to QA training has been developed that draws heavily upon SNL's existing In-Hours Technical Education Courses (INTEC) studio capabilities. This training attempts to accommodate individual staff needs and to ensure the required QA skills and awareness for the diverse types of programs addressed

  8. Development approach on usage of radiation and inspection of QA according to the change of approval procedure of safety regulatory guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, B. J.; Ahn, H. Z.; Kim, S. W.; Yoo, S. O.; Kang, S. C.; Yang, S. H.; Han, S. J.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    In accordance with 2001 amendment of the Atomic Energy Act(AEA), KINS also amended its internal 'Regulation on Implementation of Entrusted AEA-related Work'. Up to now the nuclear safety-specialized institute has used its internally developed guidelines in the safety regulation. From now on, however, the institute will enhance the objectivity and transparency by having the instruments approved by the Ministry of Science ad Technology. In this paper, we introduced the major points and directions to be considered to the development of the safety regulatory guides on Inspection for the quality assurance of the nuclear reactor facilities and the use of radioisotopes, and review and inspection for dosimeter reading

  9. Development of database and QA systems for post closure performance assessment on a potential HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    In TSPA of long-term post closure radiological safety on permanent disposal of HLW in Korea, appropriate management of input and output data through QA is necessary. The robust QA system is developed using the T2R3 principles applicable for five major steps in R and D's. The proposed system is implemented in the web-based system so that all participants in TSRA are able to access the system. In addition, the internet based input database for TSPA is developed. Currently data from literature surveys, domestic laboratory and field experiments as well as expert elicitation are applied for TSPA

  10. SU-F-T-182: A Stochastic Approach to Daily QA Tolerances On Spot Properties for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St James, S; Bloch, C; Saini, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton pencil beam scanning is used clinically across the United States. There are no current guidelines on tolerances for daily QA specific to pencil beam scanning, specifically related to the individual spot properties (spot width). Using a stochastic method to determine tolerances has the potential to optimize tolerances on individual spots and decrease the number of false positive failures in daily QA. Individual and global spot tolerances were evaluated. Methods: As part of daily QA for proton pencil beam scanning, a field of 16 spots (corresponding to 8 energies) is measured using an array of ion chambers (Matrixx, IBA). Each individual spot is fit to two Gaussian functions (x,y). The spot width (σ) in × and y are recorded (32 parameters). Results from the daily QA were retrospectively analyzed for 100 days of data. The deviations of the spot widths were histogrammed and fit to a Gaussian function. The stochastic spot tolerance was taken to be the mean ± 3σ. Using these results, tolerances were developed and tested against known deviations in spot width. Results: The individual spot tolerances derived with the stochastic method decreased in 30/32 instances. Using the previous tolerances (± 20% width), the daily QA would have detected 0/20 days of the deviation. Using a tolerance of any 6 spots failing the stochastic tolerance, 18/20 days of the deviation would have been detected. Conclusion: Using a stochastic method we have been able to decrease daily tolerances on the spot widths for 30/32 spot widths measured. The stochastic tolerances can lead to detection of deviations that previously would have been picked up on monthly QA and missed by daily QA. This method could be easily extended for evaluation of other QA parameters in proton spot scanning.

  11. Quality assurance (QA) training at Westinghouse including innovative approaches for achieving an effective QA programme and establishing constructive interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivers, J.H.; Scanga, B.E.

    1982-01-01

    Experience of the Westinghouse Water Reactors Division with indoctrination and training of quality engineers includes training of personnel from Westinghouse divisions in the USA and overseas as well as of customers' personnel. A written plan is prepared for each trainee in order to fit the training to the individual's needs, and to cover the full range of information and activities. The trainee is also given work assignments, working closely with experienced quality engineers. He may prepare inspection plans and audit check lists, assist in the preparation of QA training modules, write procedures, and perform supplier surveillance and data analyses, or make special studies of operating systems. The trainee attends seminars and special courses on work-related technical subjects. Throughout the training period, emphasis is placed on inculcating an attitude of team work in the trainee so that the result of the training is the achievement of both quality and productivity. Certification is extended (given that education/experience/skill requirements are met) to such functions as mechanical equipment quality engineering, electrical equipment quality engineering, and start-up and testing quality engineering. A well-trained quality engineer is equipped to provide technical assistance to other disciplines and, through effective co-operation with others, contributes to the success of the organization's endeavours. (author)

  12. QA at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper opens with a brief overview of the purpose of Fermilab and historical synopsis of the development and current status of quality assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. The paper subsequently addresses some of the more important aspects of interpreting the national standard ANSI/ASME NQA-1 in pure research environments like Fermilab. Highlights of this discussion include, (1) what is hermeneutics and why are hermeneutical considerations relevant for QA, (2) a critical analysis of NQA-1 focussing on teleological aspects of the standard, (3) a description of the hermeneutical approach to NQA-1 used at Fermilab which attempts to capture the true intents of the document without violating the deeply ingrained traditions of quality standards and peer review that have been foundational to the overall success of the paradigms of high-energy physics.

  13. Q&A: Lead Pipe on Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This week, In the Library with Lead Pipe fields professional development and career questions from library school students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The questions they asked ranged from committee work to composing cover letters to conference attendance. Here is the complete list (so you can jump around if you like: [...

  14. Developing a mailed phantom to implement a local QA program in Egypt radiotherapy centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, H. A.; Aletreby, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a simple method that differs from the IAEA/WHO Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) postal quality assurance (QA) program is developed. A small perspex; polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), phantom measured 50 mm × 50 mm × 50 mm is constructed to be used for absorbed dose verification of high-energy photon beams in some major radiotherapy centers in Egypt. The phantom weighted only 140.7 g with two buildup covers weighted 14.8 and 43.19 g for the Cobalt-60 and the 6-MV X-ray beams, respectively. This phantom is aimed for use in the future's external audit/QA services in Egypt for the first time. TLD-700 chips are used for testing and investigating a convenient and national dosimetry QA program. Although the used methodology is comparable to previously introduced but new system; it has smaller size, less weight, and different more available material. Comparison with the previous similar designs is introduced. Theoretical calculations were done by the commercial Eclipse treatment planning system, implementing the pencil beam convolution algorithm to verify the accuracy of the experimental calculation of the dose conversion factor of water to the perspex phantom. The new constructed small phantom and methodology was applied in 10 participating radiotherapy centers. The absorbed dose was verified under the reference conditions for both 60Co and 6-MV high-energy photon beams. The checked beams were within the 5% limit except for four photon beams. There was an agreement of 0.2% between our experimental data and those previously published confirming the validity of the applied method in verifying radiotherapy absorbed dose.

  15. TU-E-BRB-02: DIR QA Options and Research Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, N.

    2015-01-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is developing rapidly and is poised to substantially improve dose fusion accuracy for adaptive and retreatment planning and motion management and PET fusion to enhance contour delineation for treatment planning. However, DIR dose warping accuracy is difficult to quantify, in general, and particularly difficult to do so on a patient-specific basis. As clinical DIR options become more widely available, there is an increased need to understand the implications of incorporating DIR into clinical workflow. Several groups have assessed DIR accuracy in clinically relevant scenarios, but no comprehensive review material is yet available. This session will also discuss aspects of the AAPM Task Group 132 on the Use of Image Registration and Data Fusion Algorithms and Techniques in Radiotherapy Treatment Planning official report, which provides recommendations for DIR clinical use. We will summarize and compare various commercial DIR software options, outline successful clinical techniques, show specific examples with discussion of appropriate and inappropriate applications of DIR, discuss the clinical implications of DIR, provide an overview of current DIR error analysis research, review QA options and research phantom development and present TG-132 recommendations. Learning Objectives: Compare/contrast commercial DIR software and QA options Overview clinical DIR workflow for retreatment To understand uncertainties introduced by DIR Review TG-132 proposed recommendations

  16. TU-E-BRB-02: DIR QA Options and Research Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, N. [University of Texas HSC SA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is developing rapidly and is poised to substantially improve dose fusion accuracy for adaptive and retreatment planning and motion management and PET fusion to enhance contour delineation for treatment planning. However, DIR dose warping accuracy is difficult to quantify, in general, and particularly difficult to do so on a patient-specific basis. As clinical DIR options become more widely available, there is an increased need to understand the implications of incorporating DIR into clinical workflow. Several groups have assessed DIR accuracy in clinically relevant scenarios, but no comprehensive review material is yet available. This session will also discuss aspects of the AAPM Task Group 132 on the Use of Image Registration and Data Fusion Algorithms and Techniques in Radiotherapy Treatment Planning official report, which provides recommendations for DIR clinical use. We will summarize and compare various commercial DIR software options, outline successful clinical techniques, show specific examples with discussion of appropriate and inappropriate applications of DIR, discuss the clinical implications of DIR, provide an overview of current DIR error analysis research, review QA options and research phantom development and present TG-132 recommendations. Learning Objectives: Compare/contrast commercial DIR software and QA options Overview clinical DIR workflow for retreatment To understand uncertainties introduced by DIR Review TG-132 proposed recommendations.

  17. QA and Testing in CERNBOX: the cornerstone of service development and operation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    QA and Testing in CERNBOX (https://cernbox.cern.ch) presents a serious challenge and is critically important: - the service deals with user data directly on their local computers (synchronization clients), at present ~1000 clients connecting daily - the very nature of synchronization is to propagate changes across computers which also means propagating problems if they occur - there is a wide range of supported platforms (MacOSX, Windows, major Linux distributions, mobile platforms) - OS semantics are often incompatible or conflicting: for example HFS is case preserving, NTFS supports the legacy of 8.3 DOS file format, etc. - the operational environment varies enormously, for example: from fast, reliable network inside computing center to unreliable, high-latency, ad-hoc connections from airports - etc. From service development perspective, CERNBOX integrates several complex components which development cycles are disjoint and geographically distributed: - PB-range storage backend (EOS) developed...

  18. Dual purpose QA tool developed for teletherapy unit and CT scan in SNDH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilvant, D.V.; Tamane, C.J.; Pangam, S.B.; Raees, M.D.; Aynoor, S.K.; Pol, P.S.; Verghese, Aju; Ghorpade, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    To make a simple device used in Teletherapy unit and CT scan for depth data measurement. The accurate depth data is essential and very important factor for precise treatment in SAD isocentric setup calculation. In CT scan based treatment planning, the calculation obtained is from the depth given by the CT scan. The success of treatment depends on the same parameters in treatment unit matched with diagnostic CT scan data. To check the depth parameters in both CT scan and Teletherapy unit we have developed a single QA tool in our hospital. As this tool is precise, handy and easily accessible the results obtained from it assures the quality of Teletherapy unit as well as CT scan depth data. This small device resulted data helps a lot in calculations of complicated SAD setup in Telecobalt and also useful in recent new treatment modalities such as IMRT, micro MLC, etc

  19. Development of JAEA sorption database (JAEA-SDB). Update of data evaluation functions and sorption/QA data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachi, Yukio; Suyama, Tadahiro; Ochs, Michael; Ganter, Charlotte

    2011-03-01

    Sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in buffer materials (bentonite) and rocks are the key processes in the safe geological disposal of radioactive waste, because migration of radionuclides in this barrier is expected to be diffusion-controlled and retarded by sorption processes. It is therefore necessary to understand the sorption and diffusion processes and develop database compiling reliable data and mechanistic/predictive models, so that reliable parameters can be set under a variety of geochemical conditions relevant to performance assessment (PA). For this purpose, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed databases of sorption and diffusion parameters in buffer materials (bentonite) and rocks. These sorption and diffusion databases (SDB/DDB) were firstly developed as an important basis for the H12 PA of high-level radioactive waste disposal, and have been provided through the Web. JAEA has been continuing to improve and update the SDB/DDB in view of potential future data needs, focusing on assuring the desired quality level and testing the usefulness of the databases for possible applications to PA-related parameter setting. The present report focuses on developing and updating of the sorption database (JAEA-SDB) as basis of integrated approach for PA-related K d setting. This includes an overview of database structure, contents and functions including additional data evaluation function focusing on multi-parameter dependence, operating method, PA-related applications of the web-based JAEA-SDB. K d data and their QA results are updated by focusing our recent activities on the K d setting and mechanistic model development. As a result, 4,250 K d data from 32 references are added, total K d values in the JAEA-SDB are about 28,540. The QA/classified K d data are about 39% for all K d data in JAEA-SDB. The updated JAEA-SDB is expected to make it possible to obtain quick overview of the available data, and to have suitable access to the respective data

  20. Development of JAEA sorption database (JAEA-SDB). Update of sorption/QA data in FY2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachi, Yukio; Suyama, Tadahiro

    2016-03-01

    Sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in buffer materials (bentonite) and rocks are the key processes in the safe geological disposal of radioactive waste, because migration of radionuclides in these barrier materials is expected to be diffusion-controlled and retarded by sorption processes. It is therefore necessary to understand the sorption and diffusion processes and develop databases compiling reliable data and mechanistic/predictive models, so that reliable parameters can be set under a variety of geochemical conditions relevant to performance assessment (PA). For this purpose, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed databases of sorption and diffusion parameters in bentonites and rocks. These sorption and diffusion databases (SDB/DDB) were firstly developed as an important basis for the H12 PA of high-level radioactive waste disposal, and have been provided through the Web. JAEA has been continuing to improve and update the SDB/DDB in view of potential future data needs, focusing on assuring the desired quality level and testing the usefulness of the databases for possible applications to PA-related parameter setting. The present report focuses on improving and updating of the sorption database (JAEA-SDB) as basis of integrated approach for PA-related K d setting and mechanistic sorption model development. This includes an overview of database structure, contents and functions including additional data evaluation function focusing on statistical data evaluation and grouping of data related to potential perturbations. K d data and their QA results are updated by focusing our recent activities on the K d setting and mechanistic model development. As a result, 11,206 K d data from 83 references were added, total number of K d values in the JAEA-SDB reached about 58,000. The QA/classified K d data reached about 60% for all K d data in JAEA-SDB. The updated JAEA-SDB is expected to make it possible to obtain quick overview of the available data, and to

  1. Construction QA/QC systems: comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willenbrock, J.H.; Shepard, S.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis which compares the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) systems adopted in the highway, nuclear power plant, and U.S. Navy construction areas with the traditional quality control approach used in building construction is presented. Full participation and support by the owner as well as the contractor and AE firm are required if a QA/QC system is to succeed. Process quality control, acceptance testing and quality assurance responsibilities must be clearly defined in the contract documents. The owner must audit these responsibilities. A contractor quality control plan, indicating the tasks which will be performed and the fact that QA/QC personnel are independent of project time/cost pressures should be submitted for approval. The architect must develop realistic specifications which consider the natural variability of material. Acceptance criteria based on the random sampling technique should be used. 27 refs

  2. QA programme documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheibelt, L.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with the following topics: The need for a documented Q.A. program; Establishing a Q.A. program; Q.A. activities; Fundamental policies; Q.A. policies; Quality objectives Q.A. manual. (orig./RW)

  3. Assessing the Dynamic Behavior of Online Q&A Knowledge Markets: A System Dynamics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mostafa; Hesamamiri, Roozbeh; Sadjadi, Jafar; Bourouni, Atieh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to propose a holistic dynamic model for understanding the behavior of a complex and internet-based kind of knowledge market by considering both social and economic interactions. Design/methodology/approach: A system dynamics (SD) model is formulated in this study to investigate the dynamic characteristics of…

  4. SU-F-T-251: The Quality Assurance for the Heavy Patient Load Department in the Developing Country: The Primary Experience of An Entire Workflow QA Process Management in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, J; Wang, J; Peng, J; Chen, J; Hu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To implement an entire workflow quality assurance (QA) process in the radiotherapy department and to reduce the error rates of radiotherapy based on the entire workflow management in the developing country. Methods: The entire workflow QA process management starts from patient registration to the end of last treatment including all steps through the entire radiotherapy process. Error rate of chartcheck is used to evaluate the the entire workflow QA process. Two to three qualified senior medical physicists checked the documents before the first treatment fraction of every patient. Random check of the treatment history during treatment was also performed. A total of around 6000 patients treatment data before and after implementing the entire workflow QA process were compared from May, 2014 to December, 2015. Results: A systemic checklist was established. It mainly includes patient’s registration, treatment plan QA, information exporting to OIS(Oncology Information System), documents of treatment QAand QA of the treatment history. The error rate derived from the chart check decreases from 1.7% to 0.9% after our the entire workflow QA process. All checked errors before the first treatment fraction were corrected as soon as oncologist re-confirmed them and reinforce staff training was accordingly followed to prevent those errors. Conclusion: The entire workflow QA process improved the safety, quality of radiotherapy in our department and we consider that our QA experience can be applicable for the heavily-loaded radiotherapy departments in developing country.

  5. SU-F-T-251: The Quality Assurance for the Heavy Patient Load Department in the Developing Country: The Primary Experience of An Entire Workflow QA Process Management in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, J; Wang, J; Peng, J; Chen, J; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement an entire workflow quality assurance (QA) process in the radiotherapy department and to reduce the error rates of radiotherapy based on the entire workflow management in the developing country. Methods: The entire workflow QA process management starts from patient registration to the end of last treatment including all steps through the entire radiotherapy process. Error rate of chartcheck is used to evaluate the the entire workflow QA process. Two to three qualified senior medical physicists checked the documents before the first treatment fraction of every patient. Random check of the treatment history during treatment was also performed. A total of around 6000 patients treatment data before and after implementing the entire workflow QA process were compared from May, 2014 to December, 2015. Results: A systemic checklist was established. It mainly includes patient’s registration, treatment plan QA, information exporting to OIS(Oncology Information System), documents of treatment QAand QA of the treatment history. The error rate derived from the chart check decreases from 1.7% to 0.9% after our the entire workflow QA process. All checked errors before the first treatment fraction were corrected as soon as oncologist re-confirmed them and reinforce staff training was accordingly followed to prevent those errors. Conclusion: The entire workflow QA process improved the safety, quality of radiotherapy in our department and we consider that our QA experience can be applicable for the heavily-loaded radiotherapy departments in developing country.

  6. Development of the QA/QC Procedures for a Neutron Interrogation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obhodas, Jasmina; Sudac, Davorin; Valkovic, Vladivoj [Ruder Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-07-01

    In order to perform QA/QC procedures for a system dedicated to the neutron interrogation of objects for the presence of threat materials one needs to perform measurements of reference materials (RM) having the same (or similar) atomic ratios as real materials. It is well known that explosives, drugs, and various other benign materials, contain chemical elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen in distinctly different quantities. For example, a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) is characteristic of drugs. Explosives can be differentiated by measurement of both C/O and nitrogen-to-oxygen (N/O) ratios. The C/N ratio of the chemical warfare agents, coupled with the measurement of elements such as fluorine and phosphorus, clearly differentiate them from the conventional explosives. Correlations between theoretical values and experimental results obtained in laboratory conditions for C/O and N/C ratios of simulants of hexogen (RDX), TNT, DLM2, TATP, cocaine, heroin, yperite, tetranitromethane, peroxide methylethyl-ketone, nitromethane and ethyleneglycol dinitrate are presented. (authors)

  7. Enriching consumer health vocabulary through mining a social Q&A site: A similarity-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhe; Chen, Zhiwei; Oh, Sanghee; Hou, Jinghui; Bian, Jiang

    2017-05-01

    The widely known vocabulary gap between health consumers and healthcare professionals hinders information seeking and health dialogue of consumers on end-user health applications. The Open Access and Collaborative Consumer Health Vocabulary (OAC CHV), which contains health-related terms used by lay consumers, has been created to bridge such a gap. Specifically, the OAC CHV facilitates consumers' health information retrieval by enabling consumer-facing health applications to translate between professional language and consumer friendly language. To keep up with the constantly evolving medical knowledge and language use, new terms need to be identified and added to the OAC CHV. User-generated content on social media, including social question and answer (social Q&A) sites, afford us an enormous opportunity in mining consumer health terms. Existing methods of identifying new consumer terms from text typically use ad-hoc lexical syntactic patterns and human review. Our study extends an existing method by extracting n-grams from a social Q&A textual corpus and representing them with a rich set of contextual and syntactic features. Using K-means clustering, our method, simiTerm, was able to identify terms that are both contextually and syntactically similar to the existing OAC CHV terms. We tested our method on social Q&A corpora on two disease domains: diabetes and cancer. Our method outperformed three baseline ranking methods. A post-hoc qualitative evaluation by human experts further validated that our method can effectively identify meaningful new consumer terms on social Q&A. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. SU-F-T-592: A Delivery QA-Free Approach for Adaptive Therapy of Prostate Cancer with Static Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, T; Dooley, J; Zhu, T; Woods, R; Mavroidis, P; Lian, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical implementations of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) are limited mainly by the requirement of delivery QA (DQA) prior to the treatment. Small segment size and small segment MU are two dominant factors causing failures of DQA. The aim of this project is to explore the feasibility of ART treatment without DQA by using a partial optimization approach. Methods: A retrospective simulation study was performed on two prostate cancer patients treated with SMLC-IMRT. The prescription was 180cGx25 fractions with daily CT-on-rail imaging for target alignment. For each patient, seven daily CTs were selected randomly across treatment course. The contours were deformablely transferred from the simulation CT onto the daily CTs and modified appropriately. For each selected treatment, dose distributions from original beams were calculated on the daily treatment CTs (DCT plan). An ART plan was also created by optimizing the segmental MU only, while the segment shapes were preserved and the minimum MU constraint was respected. The overlaps, between PTV and the rectum, between PTV and the bladder, were normalized by the PTV volume. This ratio was used to characterize the difficulty of organs-at-risk (OAR) sparing. Results: Comparing to the original plan, PTV coverage was compromised significantly in DCT plans (82% ± 7%) while all ART plans preserved PTV coverage. ART plans showed similar OAR sparing as the original plan, such as V40Gy=11.2cc (ART) vs 11.4cc (original) for the rectum and D10cc=4580cGy vs 4605cGy for the bladder. The sparing of the rectum/bladder depends on overlap ratios. The sparing in ART was either similar or improved when overlap ratios in treatment CTs were smaller than those in original plan. Conclusion: A partial optimization method is developed that may make the real-time ART feasible on selected patients. Future research is warranted to quantify the applicability of the proposed method.

  9. Physics acceptance and QA procedures for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LoSasso, T.; Ling, C.

    2001-01-01

    QA program for DMLC. We distinguish between the preliminary preparations for clinical DMLC implementation (i.e., acceptance testing and commissioning), the routine QA of DMLC performance (machine QA), and the verification of patient-specific IM fields using DMLC (treatment QA). Since our initial DMLC implementation in 1995, there have been a number of incremental improvements to our overall QA program. These include methods of mechanical and dosimetric measurements, and software tools developed either by us or by the manufacturer. The use of EPID (electronic portal imaging devise), which potentially provide a more efficient, but certainly not 'cost-free' method, awaits improvements in the speed of data acquisition and in spatial resolution. Our current approach integrates existing methods, combining periodic QA and computer verification, to provide the necessary quality assurance in a safe and efficient manner. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  10. WWER fuel performance, development, QA and future prospects at Loviisa NPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loesoenen, P [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1994-12-31

    The essential characteristics of Loviisa fuel service are presented. A brief description is given of the steps in developing the performance values including: burnup dependent linear heat rate for fuel rods, comparison of measured and calculated cladding creep down of some rods, development of average discharge burnup for unit 1 and unit 2, results from experimental irradiation of test rods in research reactors. Some noticeable design changes performed and in-reactor behaviour of the lead fuel assemblies are also discussed. The quality assurance of the fuel procurement and operation is explained. Future prospects are connected with power raise of Loviisa reactors, discontinuing of spent fuel transportation to Russia for final disposal and new WWER fuel deliverers. 4 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs.

  11. Questions/problems of QA/QC personnel training and qualification in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaramamoorthy, K.

    1984-01-01

    In India, nuclear power stations are designed, constructed, commissioned, operated and owned by the Department of Atomic Energy. The Indian nuclear energy programme is based on utilization of indigenous resources for the economic generation of power. The need for self-sufficiency in nuclear fuel fabrication is imperative for a sustained nuclear power programme. Since training of scientific and technical manpower is an important activity in a developing country, a manpower training programme was initiated in India several years before the introduction of nuclear power plants. It is essential to have a very broad based planning of manpower training in all its aspects for the successful implementation of nuclear power plants. The paper deals in detail with the practices of establishing the manpower needs, training of requisite personnel, problems faced and how they were resolved. It also deals with the organizational philosophy and highlights the areas of concern for special training. (orig.)

  12. THE IMPORTANCE OF A SUCCESSFUL QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) PROGRAM FROM A RESEARCH MANAGER'S PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division's Quality Assurance (QA) program and the approaches used to meet QA requirements in the Division. The presentation is a technical manager's perspective of the Division's requirements for and approach to QA in i...

  13. Development of a video image-based QA system for the positional accuracy of dynamic tumor tracking irradiation in the Vero4DRT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebe, Kazuyu, E-mail: nrr24490@nifty.com; Tokuyama, Katsuichi; Baba, Ryuta; Ogihara, Yoshisada; Ichikawa, Kosuke; Toyama, Joji [Joetsu General Hospital, 616 Daido-Fukuda, Joetsu-shi, Niigata 943-8507 (Japan); Sugimoto, Satoru [Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Utsunomiya, Satoru; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hidefumi [Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Court, Laurence [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new video image-based QA system, including in-house software, that can display a tracking state visually and quantify the positional accuracy of dynamic tumor tracking irradiation in the Vero4DRT system. Methods: Sixteen trajectories in six patients with pulmonary cancer were obtained with the ExacTrac in the Vero4DRT system. Motion data in the cranio–caudal direction (Y direction) were used as the input for a programmable motion table (Quasar). A target phantom was placed on the motion table, which was placed on the 2D ionization chamber array (MatriXX). Then, the 4D modeling procedure was performed on the target phantom during a reproduction of the patient’s tumor motion. A substitute target with the patient’s tumor motion was irradiated with 6-MV x-rays under the surrogate infrared system. The 2D dose images obtained from the MatriXX (33 frames/s; 40 s) were exported to in-house video-image analyzing software. The absolute differences in the Y direction between the center of the exposed target and the center of the exposed field were calculated. Positional errors were observed. The authors’ QA results were compared to 4D modeling function errors and gimbal motion errors obtained from log analyses in the ExacTrac to verify the accuracy of their QA system. The patients’ tumor motions were evaluated in the wave forms, and the peak-to-peak distances were also measured to verify their reproducibility. Results: Thirteen of sixteen trajectories (81.3%) were successfully reproduced with Quasar. The peak-to-peak distances ranged from 2.7 to 29.0 mm. Three trajectories (18.7%) were not successfully reproduced due to the limited motions of the Quasar. Thus, 13 of 16 trajectories were summarized. The mean number of video images used for analysis was 1156. The positional errors (absolute mean difference + 2 standard deviation) ranged from 0.54 to 1.55 mm. The error values differed by less than 1 mm from 4D modeling function errors

  14. Development of a video image-based QA system for the positional accuracy of dynamic tumor tracking irradiation in the Vero4DRT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebe, Kazuyu; Tokuyama, Katsuichi; Baba, Ryuta; Ogihara, Yoshisada; Ichikawa, Kosuke; Toyama, Joji; Sugimoto, Satoru; Utsunomiya, Satoru; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Court, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new video image-based QA system, including in-house software, that can display a tracking state visually and quantify the positional accuracy of dynamic tumor tracking irradiation in the Vero4DRT system. Methods: Sixteen trajectories in six patients with pulmonary cancer were obtained with the ExacTrac in the Vero4DRT system. Motion data in the cranio–caudal direction (Y direction) were used as the input for a programmable motion table (Quasar). A target phantom was placed on the motion table, which was placed on the 2D ionization chamber array (MatriXX). Then, the 4D modeling procedure was performed on the target phantom during a reproduction of the patient’s tumor motion. A substitute target with the patient’s tumor motion was irradiated with 6-MV x-rays under the surrogate infrared system. The 2D dose images obtained from the MatriXX (33 frames/s; 40 s) were exported to in-house video-image analyzing software. The absolute differences in the Y direction between the center of the exposed target and the center of the exposed field were calculated. Positional errors were observed. The authors’ QA results were compared to 4D modeling function errors and gimbal motion errors obtained from log analyses in the ExacTrac to verify the accuracy of their QA system. The patients’ tumor motions were evaluated in the wave forms, and the peak-to-peak distances were also measured to verify their reproducibility. Results: Thirteen of sixteen trajectories (81.3%) were successfully reproduced with Quasar. The peak-to-peak distances ranged from 2.7 to 29.0 mm. Three trajectories (18.7%) were not successfully reproduced due to the limited motions of the Quasar. Thus, 13 of 16 trajectories were summarized. The mean number of video images used for analysis was 1156. The positional errors (absolute mean difference + 2 standard deviation) ranged from 0.54 to 1.55 mm. The error values differed by less than 1 mm from 4D modeling function errors

  15. QA [quality assurance] at Fermilab; the hermeneutics of NQA-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1988-06-01

    This paper opens with a brief overview of the purpose of Fermilab and a historical synopsis of the development and current status of quality assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. The paper subsequently addresses some of the more important aspects of interpreting the national standard ANSI/ASME NQA-1 in pure research environments like Fermilab. Highlights of this discussion include, what is hermeneutics and why are hermeneutical considerations relevant for QA, a critical analysis of NQA-1 focussing on teleological aspects of the standard, a description of the hermeneutical approach to NQA-1 used at Fermilab which attempts to capture the true intents of the document without violating the deeply ingrained traditions of quality standards and peer review that have been foundational to the overall success of the paradigms of high-energy physics

  16. QA (quality assurance) at Fermilab; the hermeneutics of NQA-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1988-06-01

    This paper opens with a brief overview of the purpose of Fermilab and a historical synopsis of the development and current status of quality assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. The paper subsequently addresses some of the more important aspects of interpreting the national standard ANSI/ASME NQA-1 in pure research environments like Fermilab. Highlights of this discussion include, what is hermeneutics and why are hermeneutical considerations relevant for QA, a critical analysis of NQA-1 focussing on teleological aspects of the standard, a description of the hermeneutical approach to NQA-1 used at Fermilab which attempts to capture the true intents of the document without violating the deeply ingrained traditions of quality standards and peer review that have been foundational to the overall success of the paradigms of high-energy physics.

  17. IMRT QA using machine learning: A multi-institutional validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Chan, Maria F; Lim, Seng Boh; Scheuermann, Ryan; Deasy, Joseph O; Solberg, Timothy D

    2017-09-01

    To validate a machine learning approach to Virtual intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for accurately predicting gamma passing rates using different measurement approaches at different institutions. A Virtual IMRT QA framework was previously developed using a machine learning algorithm based on 498 IMRT plans, in which QA measurements were performed using diode-array detectors and a 3%local/3 mm with 10% threshold at Institution 1. An independent set of 139 IMRT measurements from a different institution, Institution 2, with QA data based on portal dosimetry using the same gamma index, was used to test the mathematical framework. Only pixels with ≥10% of the maximum calibrated units (CU) or dose were included in the comparison. Plans were characterized by 90 different complexity metrics. A weighted poison regression with Lasso regularization was trained to predict passing rates using the complexity metrics as input. The methodology predicted passing rates within 3% accuracy for all composite plans measured using diode-array detectors at Institution 1, and within 3.5% for 120 of 139 plans using portal dosimetry measurements performed on a per-beam basis at Institution 2. The remaining measurements (19) had large areas of low CU, where portal dosimetry has a larger disagreement with the calculated dose and as such, the failure was expected. These beams need further modeling in the treatment planning system to correct the under-response in low-dose regions. Important features selected by Lasso to predict gamma passing rates were as follows: complete irradiated area outline (CIAO), jaw position, fraction of MLC leafs with gaps smaller than 20 or 5 mm, fraction of area receiving less than 50% of the total CU, fraction of the area receiving dose from penumbra, weighted average irregularity factor, and duty cycle. We have demonstrated that Virtual IMRT QA can predict passing rates using different measurement techniques and across multiple

  18. Changing the image of quality assurance in research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melroy, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The traditional image of quality assurance (QA) in a research and development (R and D) institution has been that of paper work. QA was often perceived as focusing on documentation rather than on contributions to productive work. The recent emphasis on regulation by outside groups and independent verification of QA systems has created an opportunity to reevaluate and change this image. The desired change is to create an understanding that when properly utilized, QA is essential to good project management and fully contributes to the success of technical programs. The change is being accomplished by sharpening the definition of QA systems of improved understanding by line organizations, developing a project QA in a structure that allows selective use of the NQA-1 standard, formation of a graded approach that simplifies QA for R and D projects, and an intense campaign to communicate the value of QA to laboratory personnel

  19. SU-D-BRC-02: Application of Six Sigma Approach to Improve the Efficiency of Patient-Specific QA in Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LAH, J; Shin, D; Manger, R; Kim, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To show how the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) can be used for improving and optimizing the efficiency of patient-specific QA process by designing site-specific range tolerances. Methods: The Six Sigma tools (process flow diagram, cause and effect, capability analysis, Pareto chart, and control chart) were utilized to determine the steps that need focus for improving the patient-specific QA process. The patient-specific range QA plans were selected according to 7 treatment site groups, a total of 1437 cases. The process capability index, Cpm was used to guide the tolerance design of patient site-specific range. We also analyzed the financial impact of this project. Results: Our results suggested that the patient range measurements were non-capable at the current tolerance level of ±1 mm in clinical proton plans. The optimized tolerances were calculated for treatment sites. Control charts for the patient QA time were constructed to compare QA time before and after the new tolerances were implemented. It is found that overall processing time was decreased by 24.3% after establishing new site-specific range tolerances. The QA failure for whole process in proton therapy would lead up to a 46% increase in total cost. This result can also predict how costs are affected by changes in adopting the tolerance design. Conclusion: We often believe that the quality and performance of proton therapy can easily be improved by merely tightening some or all of its tolerance requirements. This can become costly, however, and it is not necessarily a guarantee of better performance. The tolerance design is not a task to be undertaken without careful thought. The Six Sigma DMAIC can be used to improve the QA process by setting optimized tolerances. When tolerance design is optimized, the quality is reasonably balanced with time and cost demands.

  20. SU-D-BRC-02: Application of Six Sigma Approach to Improve the Efficiency of Patient-Specific QA in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LAH, J [Myongji Hospital, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Manger, R; Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To show how the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) can be used for improving and optimizing the efficiency of patient-specific QA process by designing site-specific range tolerances. Methods: The Six Sigma tools (process flow diagram, cause and effect, capability analysis, Pareto chart, and control chart) were utilized to determine the steps that need focus for improving the patient-specific QA process. The patient-specific range QA plans were selected according to 7 treatment site groups, a total of 1437 cases. The process capability index, Cpm was used to guide the tolerance design of patient site-specific range. We also analyzed the financial impact of this project. Results: Our results suggested that the patient range measurements were non-capable at the current tolerance level of ±1 mm in clinical proton plans. The optimized tolerances were calculated for treatment sites. Control charts for the patient QA time were constructed to compare QA time before and after the new tolerances were implemented. It is found that overall processing time was decreased by 24.3% after establishing new site-specific range tolerances. The QA failure for whole process in proton therapy would lead up to a 46% increase in total cost. This result can also predict how costs are affected by changes in adopting the tolerance design. Conclusion: We often believe that the quality and performance of proton therapy can easily be improved by merely tightening some or all of its tolerance requirements. This can become costly, however, and it is not necessarily a guarantee of better performance. The tolerance design is not a task to be undertaken without careful thought. The Six Sigma DMAIC can be used to improve the QA process by setting optimized tolerances. When tolerance design is optimized, the quality is reasonably balanced with time and cost demands.

  1. Accounting for human factor in QC and QA inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of human error during QC/QA inspection have been identified. The method of accounting for the effects of human error in QC/QA inspections was developed. The result of evaluation of the proportion of discrepant items in the population is affected significantly by human factor

  2. NRC overview: Repository QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is on the threshold of an extensive program for characterizing Yucca Mountain in Nevada to determine if it is a suitable site for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Earlier this year, the DOE published the Consultation Draft Site Characterization Plan for the Nevada site, which describes in some detail the studies that need to be performed to determine if the site is acceptable. In the near future, the final site characterization plan (SCP) is expected to be issued and large-scale site characterization activities to begin. The data and analyses that will result from the execution of that plan are expected to be the primary basis for the license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because of the importance of these data and analyses in the assessment of the suitability of the site and in the demonstration of that suitability in the NRC licensing process, the NRC requires in 10CFR60 that site characterization be performed under a quality assurance (QA) program. The QA program is designed to provide confidence that data are valid, retrievable, and reproducible. The documentation produced by the program will form an important part of the record on which the suitability of the site is judged in licensing. In addition, because the NRC staff can review only a selected portion of the data collected, the staff will need to rely on the system of controls in the DOE QA program

  3. The quality assurance process for the ARTSCAN head and neck study - A practical interactive approach for QA in 3DCRT and IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Karl-Axel; Nilsson, Per; Zackrisson, Bjoern; Ohlson, Birgitta; Kjellen, Elisabeth; Mercke, Claes; Alvarez-Fonseca, Mauricio; Billstroem, Anette; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas; Bjoer, Ove; Ekberg, Lars; Friesland, Signe; Karlsson, Magnus; Lagerlund, Magnus; Lundkvist, Lena; Loefroth, Per-Olov; Loefvander-Thapper, Kerstin; Nilsson, Alla; Nyman, Jan; Persson, Essie

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This paper describes the quality assurance (QA) work performed in the Swedish multicenter ARTSCAN (Accelerated RadioTherapy of Squamous cell CArcinomas in the head and Neck) trial to guarantee high quality in a multicenter study which involved modern radiotherapy such as 3DCRT or IMRT. Materials and methods: The study was closed in June 2006 with 750 randomised patients. Radiation therapy-related data for every patient were sent by each participating centre to the QA office where all trial data were reviewed, analysed and stored. In case of any deviation from the protocol, an interactive process was started between the QA office and the local responsible clinician and/or physicist to increase the compliance to the protocol for future randomised patients. Meetings and workshops were held on a regular basis for discussions on various trial-related issues and for the QA office to report on updated results. Results and discussion: This review covers the 734 patients out of a total of 750 who had entered the study. Deviations early in the study were corrected so that the overall compliance to the protocol was very high. There were only negligible variations in doses and dose distributions to target volumes for each specific site and stage. The quality of the treatments was high. Furthermore, an extensive database of treatment parameters was accumulated for future dose-volume vs. endpoint evaluations. Conclusions: This comprehensive QA programme increased the probability to draw firm conclusions from our study and may serve as a concept for QA work in future radiotherapy trials where comparatively small effects are searched for in a heterogeneous tumour population

  4. TU-C-BRE-01: KEYNOTE PRESENTATION - Emerging Frontiers in IMRT QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, J [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    As IMRT treatment processes advance and mature, so must the quality assurance processes being used to validate their delivery. In some respects, treatment delivery advancements (e.g. VMAT) have out-paced QA advancements. The purpose of this session is to describe new processes that are being implemented to bring IMRT QA up-to-date with the treatment delivery advances. It would explore emerging IMRT QA paradigms, including requirements-based IMRT QA which necessitates definition of delivery errors (e.g. patient dose error, leaf positioning error) and development of processes to ensure reliable error detection. Engineeringbased QA approaches, including use of IMRT treatment delivery process trees, fault tree analysis and failure modes effects analysis would be described. Approaches to detect errors such as (1) during treatment delivery validation using exit fluence detectors (e.g. EPIDs); (2) analysis of treatment delivery via use of machine parameter log files; (3) dose recalculation using (3a) treatment planning system; (3b) record-and-verify; or (3c) entrance and exit fluence measurement parameters would be explained. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each method would be discussed. Schemes for error classification and root cause analysis would be described – steps which are essential for future error prevention. For each QA method, testing procedures and results would be presented indicating the types of errors that can be detected, those that cannot be detected, and the reliability of the error detection method (for example determined via ROC analysis). For speakers, we are seeking to engage non-commercially biased experts. Those listed below are a sub-sample of possible qualified individuals.

  5. TU-C-BRE-01: KEYNOTE PRESENTATION - Emerging Frontiers in IMRT QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, J

    2014-01-01

    As IMRT treatment processes advance and mature, so must the quality assurance processes being used to validate their delivery. In some respects, treatment delivery advancements (e.g. VMAT) have out-paced QA advancements. The purpose of this session is to describe new processes that are being implemented to bring IMRT QA up-to-date with the treatment delivery advances. It would explore emerging IMRT QA paradigms, including requirements-based IMRT QA which necessitates definition of delivery errors (e.g. patient dose error, leaf positioning error) and development of processes to ensure reliable error detection. Engineeringbased QA approaches, including use of IMRT treatment delivery process trees, fault tree analysis and failure modes effects analysis would be described. Approaches to detect errors such as (1) during treatment delivery validation using exit fluence detectors (e.g. EPIDs); (2) analysis of treatment delivery via use of machine parameter log files; (3) dose recalculation using (3a) treatment planning system; (3b) record-and-verify; or (3c) entrance and exit fluence measurement parameters would be explained. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each method would be discussed. Schemes for error classification and root cause analysis would be described – steps which are essential for future error prevention. For each QA method, testing procedures and results would be presented indicating the types of errors that can be detected, those that cannot be detected, and the reliability of the error detection method (for example determined via ROC analysis). For speakers, we are seeking to engage non-commercially biased experts. Those listed below are a sub-sample of possible qualified individuals

  6. Utility view on QA/QC of WWER-440 fuel design and manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, P.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the legislation implements in the Czech Republic, QA/QC system at CEZ, demonstration and development program (purchaser point of view), audit of QA/QC system for fuel design and manufacturing as well as QA/QC records are discussed

  7. WE-AB-201-03: TPS Commissioning and QA: Incorporating the Entire Planning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutic, S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  8. WE-AB-201-00: Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  9. WE-AB-201-01: Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomons, G. [Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  10. WE-AB-201-03: TPS Commissioning and QA: Incorporating the Entire Planning Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutic, S. [Washington University School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  11. WE-AB-201-00: Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  12. WE-AB-201-01: Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomons, G.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  13. Taxonomy-Based Approaches to Quality Assurance of Ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Halper

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies are important components of health information management systems. As such, the quality of their content is of paramount importance. It has been proven to be practical to develop quality assurance (QA methodologies based on automated identification of sets of concepts expected to have higher likelihood of errors. Four kinds of such sets (called QA-sets organized around the themes of complex and uncommonly modeled concepts are introduced. A survey of different methodologies based on these QA-sets and the results of applying them to various ontologies are presented. Overall, following these approaches leads to higher QA yields and better utilization of QA personnel. The formulation of additional QA-set methodologies will further enhance the suite of available ontology QA tools.

  14. SU-F-T-464: Development of a Secondary Check Procedure to Evaluated Flatness and Symmetry Discrepancies Detected During Daily Morning QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagar, M; Friesen, S; Lyatskaya, Y; O’Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M [Dana Farber/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A daily QA device is used to monitor output, flatness and symmetry constancy for all linac photon and electron energies. If large deviations from baseline in flatness or symmetry are reported it becomes necessary to crosscheck the measurements with a second device. Setting up another device such as Matrixx (IBA Dosimetry) can be time consuming, due to its warm-up time, and trained personnel may not be readily available to analyze the results. Furthermore, this discrepancy is frequently isolated to a single energy. Unaffected energies could still be used, avoiding further patient delays, if a method to gather data for offline analysis could be developed. We find that optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) provide a quick, simple, and inexpensive solution to this important clinical problem. Methods: The exact geometry of the detectors on the daily tracker (Keithley Therapy Beam Evaluator) was reproduced by placing nanoDot OSLDs (Landauer) on a solid water phantom. A combination of bolus and solid water was placed on top to provide buildup and prevent air gaps. Standard daily measurements of output, flatness and symmetry were taken for 2 photon energies (6x,10x) and 5 electron energies (6e,9e,12e,15e,18e) using the tracker. These measurements were then repeated with the OSLD phantom. Results: The time it took to set up the OSLD phantom was comparable to that of the tracker. The inline and crossline OSLD phantom measurements of flatness and symmetry agreed with the tracker results to within 2%. Conclusion: OSLDs provide a good solution for a quick second check when questionable flatness and symmetry results are detected with the tracker during daily QA.

  15. Current Status of QA For Nuclear Power Plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagoshi, Hitohiko

    1986-01-01

    It is the current status of QA and our QA experiences with nuclear power plants against the background of the Japanese social and business environment. Accordingly, in 1972, 'The Guidance for Quality Assurance in Construction of Nuclear Power Plants' based on U. S. 10CEF50 Appendix B, was published by the Japan Electric Association. 'Jug-4101 The Guide for Quality Assurance of Nuclear Power Plants' has been prepared by referring to the IAEA QA code. The Guide has been accepted by the Japanese nuclear industry and applied to the QA programs of every organization concerned therewith. The Japanese approach to higher quality will naturally be different from that of other countries because of Japan's cultural, social, and economic conditions. Even higher quality is being aimed at through the LWR Improvement and Standardization Program and coordinated quality assurance efforts

  16. SU-E-T-11: A Cloud Based CT and LINAC QA Data Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, R; Grelewicz, Z; Belcher, A; Liu, X [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The current status quo of QA data management consists of a mixture of paper-based forms and spreadsheets for recording the results of daily, monthly, and yearly QA tests for both CT scanners and LINACs. Unfortunately, such systems suffer from a host of problems as, (1) records can be easily lost or destroyed, (2) data is difficult to access — one must physically hunt down records, (3) poor or no means of historical data analysis, and (4) no remote monitoring of machine performance off-site. To address these issues, a cloud based QA data management system was developed and implemented. Methods: A responsive tablet interface that optimizes clinic workflow with an easy-to-navigate interface accessible from any web browser was implemented in HTML/javascript/CSS to allow user mobility when entering QA data. Automated image QA was performed using a phantom QA kit developed in Python that is applicable to any phantom and is currently being used with the Gammex ACR, Las Vegas, Leeds, and Catphan phantoms for performing automated CT, MV, kV, and CBCT QAs, respectively. A Python based resource management system was used to distribute and manage intensive CPU tasks such as QA phantom image analysis or LaTeX-to-PDF QA report generation to independent process threads or different servers such that website performance is not affected. Results: To date the cloud QA system has performed approximately 185 QA procedures. Approximately 200 QA parameters are being actively tracked by the system on a monthly basis. Electronic access to historical QA parameter information was successful in proactively identifying a Linac CBCT scanner’s performance degradation. Conclusion: A fully comprehensive cloud based QA data management system was successfully implemented for the first time. Potential machine performance issues were proactively identified that would have been otherwise missed by a paper or spreadsheet based QA system.

  17. SU-E-T-11: A Cloud Based CT and LINAC QA Data Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, R; Grelewicz, Z; Belcher, A; Liu, X

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The current status quo of QA data management consists of a mixture of paper-based forms and spreadsheets for recording the results of daily, monthly, and yearly QA tests for both CT scanners and LINACs. Unfortunately, such systems suffer from a host of problems as, (1) records can be easily lost or destroyed, (2) data is difficult to access — one must physically hunt down records, (3) poor or no means of historical data analysis, and (4) no remote monitoring of machine performance off-site. To address these issues, a cloud based QA data management system was developed and implemented. Methods: A responsive tablet interface that optimizes clinic workflow with an easy-to-navigate interface accessible from any web browser was implemented in HTML/javascript/CSS to allow user mobility when entering QA data. Automated image QA was performed using a phantom QA kit developed in Python that is applicable to any phantom and is currently being used with the Gammex ACR, Las Vegas, Leeds, and Catphan phantoms for performing automated CT, MV, kV, and CBCT QAs, respectively. A Python based resource management system was used to distribute and manage intensive CPU tasks such as QA phantom image analysis or LaTeX-to-PDF QA report generation to independent process threads or different servers such that website performance is not affected. Results: To date the cloud QA system has performed approximately 185 QA procedures. Approximately 200 QA parameters are being actively tracked by the system on a monthly basis. Electronic access to historical QA parameter information was successful in proactively identifying a Linac CBCT scanner’s performance degradation. Conclusion: A fully comprehensive cloud based QA data management system was successfully implemented for the first time. Potential machine performance issues were proactively identified that would have been otherwise missed by a paper or spreadsheet based QA system

  18. Application of QA geoscience investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of a classical hardware QA program (as currently embodied in DOE/ALO Manual Chapter 08XA; NRC 10CFR Part 50, Appendix B; and other similar documents) into the present geoscience quality assurance programs that address eventual NRC licensing, if required. In the context of this paper, QA will be restricted to the tasks associated with nuclear repositories, i.e. site identification, selection, characterization, verification, and utilization

  19. KINERJA AKADEMIK PASCA SERTIFIKASI AUN-QA PADA PROGRAM STUDI DI INSTITUT PERTANIAN BOGOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelyna Adelyna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the research are to evaluate the academic performance progress of the six study programs of IPB after the certification of AUN-QA. The research was a case study in six study programs that had been certified by AUN-QA until December 2014. This research was conducted with the objectives of defining the relevant indicators of BSC IPB and AUN-QA criteria, analyzing the criteria values of AUN-QA after the AUN-QA certification, analyzing the academic performance based on KPI BSC after the AUN-QA certification, and analyzing the problems in improving academic performance as the basis for the formulation of strategies for improving academic quality. The method used in this research was the balanced scorecard approach (BSC. The results showed that the certification of AUN-QA contains 15 relevant criteria and supports the achievement of BSC IPB. Key performance indicators (KPI BSC IPB supported by the AUN-QA criteria consist of 21 of the 33 indicators of BSC IPB, and 14 of them are relegated to the BSC department indicators. The AUN-QA criteria values on the study program have increased with the highest criterion value in student quality and the lowest one in support staff quality. The weak criteria required to be improved include support staff quality, student assessment, stakeholder feedback, and program specification.Keywords: AUN-QA certification, academic performance, balanced scorecard

  20. Lesson Development for English Learners in Content Area Settings: Key Considerations. Q&A with Sarah Catherine K. Moore, Ph.D. 2016 Educator Effectiveness Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah Catherine K.

    2016-01-01

    In this webinar, Dr. Sarah Catherine K. Moore, Program Director at the Center for Applied Linguistics, outlined factors for content area teachers to consider as they design and deliver lessons for mainstream classrooms that include English learner (EL) students. This Q&A addressed the questions participants had for Dr. Moore following the…

  1. WE-AB-201-02: TPS Commissioning and QA: A Process Orientation and Application of Control Charts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, M. [The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre - UHN (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  2. WE-AB-201-02: TPS Commissioning and QA: A Process Orientation and Application of Control Charts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, M.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  3. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project No. 02 103 Innovative Low Cost Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Good, Morris S.; Mathews, Royce; Morra, Marino; Panetta, Paul D.; Pardini, Allan F.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Tucker, Brian J.; Weier, Dennis R.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lowden, Richard A.; Miller, James H.

    2006-02-28

    This Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project was tasked with exploring, adapting, developing and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to automate nuclear coated particle fuel inspection so as to provide the United States (US) with necessary improved and economical Quality Assurance and Control (QA/QC) that is needed for the fuels for several reactor concepts being proposed for both near term deployment [DOE NE & NERAC, 2001] and Generation IV nuclear systems. Replacing present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, with higher speed automated nondestructive methods will make fuel production for advanced reactors economically feasible. For successful deployment of next generation reactors that employ particle fuels, or fuels in the form of pebbles based on particles, extremely large numbers of fuel particles will require inspection at throughput rates that do not significantly impact the proposed manufacturing processes. The focus of the project is nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies that can be automated for production speeds and make either: (I) On Process Measurements or (II) In Line Measurements. The inspection technologies selected will enable particle “quality” qualification as a particle or group of particles passes a sensor. A multiple attribute dependent signature will be measured and used for qualification or process control decisions. A primary task for achieving this objective is to establish standard signatures for both good/acceptable particles and the most problematic types of defects using several nondestructive methods.

  4. MO-FG-202-03: Efficient Data Collection of Continuous 2D and Discrete Relative Dosimetric Data for Annual LINAC QA Using TrueBeam Developer Mode and a 1D Scanning Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, N; Schmidt, M [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Nguyen, N [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Belley, M [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Price, M [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method to exploit real-time dynamic machine and couch parameter control during linear accelerator (LINAC) beam delivery to facilitate efficient performance of TG-142 suggested, Annual LINAC QA tests. Methods: Varian’s TrueBeam Developer Mode (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) facilitates control of Varian’s TrueBeam LINAC via instructions provided in Extensible Markup Language (XML) files. This allows machine and couch parameters to be varied dynamically, in real-time, during beam delivery. Custom XML files were created to allow for the collection of (1) continuous Tissue Maximum Ratios (TMRs), (2) beam profiles, and (3) continuous output factors using a 1D-scanning tank. TMRs were acquired by orienting an ionization chamber (IC) at isocenter (depth=25cm) and synchronizing a depth scan towards the water surface while lowering the couch at 1mm/s. For beam profiles, the couch was driven laterally and longitudinally while logging IC electrometer readings. Output factors (OFs) where collected by continually varying field sizes (4×4 to 30×30-cm{sup 2}) at a constant speed of 6.66 mm/s. To validate measurements, comparisons were made to data collected using traditional methods (e.g. 1D or 3D tank). Results: All data collecting using the proposed methods agreed with traditionally collected data (TMRs within 1%, OFs within 0.5% and beam profile agreement within 1% / 1mm) while taking less time to collect (factor of approximately 1/10) and with a finer sample resolution. Conclusion: TrueBeam developer mode facilitates collection of continuous data with the same accuracy as traditionally collected data with a finer resolution in less time. Results demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in sampled resolution and an order of magnitude reduction in collection time compared to traditional acquisition methods (e.g. 3D scanning tank). We are currently extending this approach to perform other TG-142 tasks.

  5. QA [Quality Assurance] role in advanced energy activities: Towards an /open quotes/orthodox/close quotes/ Quality Program: Canonizing the traditions at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodnarczuk, M.W.

    1988-02-01

    After a brief description of the goal of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) this paper poses and answers three questions related to Quality Assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. First, what is the difference between 'orthodox' and 'unorthodox' QA and is there a place for 'orthodox' QA at a laboratory like Fermilab? Second, are the deeper philosophical and cultural frameworks of high-energy physics acommodating or antagonistic to an 'orthodox' QA Program? Finally, faced with the task of developing an institutional QA program for Fermilab where does one begin? The paper is based on experience with the on-going development and implementation of an institutional QA Program at Fermilab. 10 refs

  6. Multimodal follow-up questions to multimodal answers in a QA system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooten, B.W.; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a dialogue manager (DM) for a multimodal interactive Question Answering (QA) system. Our QA system presents answers using text and pictures, and the user may pose follow-up questions using text or speech, while indicating screen elements with the mouse. We developed a corpus of

  7. Developing regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Lars Axelsson presented SSM progress on oversight of LMfS/SC since the Chester 1 Workshop in 2007. Current SSM approaches for safety culture oversight include targeted safety management and safety culture inspections, compliance inspections which cover aspects of safety management/safety culture and multi-disciplinary team inspections. Examples of themes for targeted inspections include management of ambiguous operational situations or other weak signals, understanding of and attitudes to Human Performance tools, the Safety Department's role and authority and Leadership for safety. All regulatory activities provide inputs for the SSM yearly safety evaluation of each licensee. A form has been developed to capture safety culture observations from inspections and other interactions with licensees. Analysis will be performed to identify patterns and provide information to support planning of specific Safety Culture activities. Training has been developed for regulatory staff to enhance the quality of regulatory interventions on safety culture. This includes a half-day seminar to provide an overview of safety culture, and a workshop which provides more in-depth discussion on cultural issues and how to capture those during regulatory activities. Future plans include guidance for inspectors, and informal seminars on safety culture with licensees

  8. Manufacturing and QA of adaptors for LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhu Murthy, V.; Dwivedi, J.; Goswami, S.G.; Soni, H.C.; Mainaud Durand, H.; Quesnel, J.P.; )

    2006-01-01

    The LHC low beta quadrupoles, have very tight alignment tolerances and are located in areas with strong radiation field. They require remote re-alignment, by motorized jacks, based on the feedback of alignment sensors of each magnet. Jacks designed to support arc cryomagnets of LHC are modified and motorized with the help of adaptors. Two types of adapters, for vertical and transverse axes of the jacks, were developed and supplied through collaboration between RRCAT, DAE, India and CERN, Geneva. This paper describes their functional requirements, manufacture and quality assurance (QA). (author)

  9. Applications of QA to RandD support of HLW programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryder, D.E.

    1988-05-01

    The application of a formal QA program to any discipline or organization can be difficult to achieve and to do so with a research and development organization has special challenges that are somewhat unique. This paper describes how a QA program based upon a national consensus standard (developed for application to the design, construction and operation of nuclear facilities) has been successfully applied to some of the research and development activities in support of the High Level Waste Programs. This description includes a discussion on the importance of being creative when interpreting the QA standard, a brief overview of the QA program that was developed and the results achieved during implementation of the QA program. 4 refs., 4 figs

  10. Application of QA grading to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project items and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, R.B.; Smith, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Grading is the act of selecting the quality assurance (QA) measures necessary to develop and maintain confidence in the quality of an item or activity. The list of QA measures from which this selection is made are the 20 criteria of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Quality Assurance Requirements Document

  11. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 06: Patient-specific QA Procedure for Gated VMAT SABR Treatments using 10x Beam in Flattening-Filter Free Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestrovic, Ante; Chitsazzadeh, Shadi; Wells, Derek M.; Gray, Stephen [University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a highly sensitive patient specific QA procedure for gated VMAT stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) treatments. Methods: A platform was constructed to attach the translational stage of a Quasar respiratory motion phantom to a pinpoint ion chamber insert and move the ion chamber inside the ArcCheck. The Quasar phantom controller uses a patient-specific breathing pattern to translate the ion chamber in a superior-inferior direction inside the ArcCheck. With this system the ion chamber is used to QA the correct phase of the gated delivery and the ArcCheck diodes are used to QA the overall dose distribution. This novel approach requires a single plan delivery for a complete QA of a gated plan. The sensitivity of the gating QA procedure was investigated with respect to the following parameters: PTV size, exhale duration, baseline drift, gating window size. Results: The difference between the measured dose to a point in the penumbra and the Eclipse calculated dose was under 2% for small residual motions. The QA procedure was independent of PTV size and duration of exhale. Baseline drift and gating window size, however, significantly affected the penumbral dose measurement, with differences of up to 30% compared to Eclipse. Conclusion: This study described a highly sensitive QA procedure for gated VMAT SABR treatments. The QA outcome was dependent on the gating window size and baseline drift. Analysis of additional patient breathing patterns is currently undergoing to determine a clinically relevant gating window size and an appropriate tolerance level for this procedure.

  12. SU-E-T-468: Implementation of the TG-142 QA Process for Seven Linacs with Enhanced Beam Conformance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woollard, J; Ayan, A; DiCostanzo, D; Grzetic, S; Hessler, J; Gupta, N [OH State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a TG-142 compliant QA process for 7 Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators (linacs) with enhanced beam conformance and dosimetrically matched beam models. To ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs, the QA process should include a common set of baseline values for use in routine QA on all linacs. Methods: The TG 142 report provides recommended tests, tolerances and frequencies for quality assurance of medical accelerators. Based on the guidance provided in the report, measurement tests were developed to evaluate each of the applicable parameters listed for daily, monthly and annual QA. These tests were then performed on each of our 7 new linacs as they came on line at our institution. Results: The tolerance values specified in TG-142 for each QA test are either absolute tolerances (i.e. ±2mm) or require a comparison to a baseline value. The results of our QA tests were first used to ensure that all 7 linacs were operating within the suggested tolerance values provided in TG −142 for those tests with absolute tolerances and that the performance of the linacs was adequately matched. The QA test results were then used to develop a set of common baseline values for those QA tests that require comparison to a baseline value at routine monthly and annual QA. The procedures and baseline values were incorporated into a spreadsheets for use in monthly and annual QA. Conclusion: We have developed a set of procedures for daily, monthly and annual QA of our linacs that are consistent with the TG-142 report. A common set of baseline values was developed for routine QA tests. The use of this common set of baseline values for comparison at monthly and annual QA will ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs.

  13. SU-E-T-468: Implementation of the TG-142 QA Process for Seven Linacs with Enhanced Beam Conformance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woollard, J; Ayan, A; DiCostanzo, D; Grzetic, S; Hessler, J; Gupta, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a TG-142 compliant QA process for 7 Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators (linacs) with enhanced beam conformance and dosimetrically matched beam models. To ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs, the QA process should include a common set of baseline values for use in routine QA on all linacs. Methods: The TG 142 report provides recommended tests, tolerances and frequencies for quality assurance of medical accelerators. Based on the guidance provided in the report, measurement tests were developed to evaluate each of the applicable parameters listed for daily, monthly and annual QA. These tests were then performed on each of our 7 new linacs as they came on line at our institution. Results: The tolerance values specified in TG-142 for each QA test are either absolute tolerances (i.e. ±2mm) or require a comparison to a baseline value. The results of our QA tests were first used to ensure that all 7 linacs were operating within the suggested tolerance values provided in TG −142 for those tests with absolute tolerances and that the performance of the linacs was adequately matched. The QA test results were then used to develop a set of common baseline values for those QA tests that require comparison to a baseline value at routine monthly and annual QA. The procedures and baseline values were incorporated into a spreadsheets for use in monthly and annual QA. Conclusion: We have developed a set of procedures for daily, monthly and annual QA of our linacs that are consistent with the TG-142 report. A common set of baseline values was developed for routine QA tests. The use of this common set of baseline values for comparison at monthly and annual QA will ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs

  14. QA manpower requirement for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, M.

    1980-01-01

    To ensure the quality of the plant, QA activities are to be performed by the owner, the main contractor, the subcontractors and the Licensing Authority. The responsibilities of the QA-personnel of these organizations comprise as a minimum the control of the quality assurance systems and the proof of the quality requirements. Numbers of the required QA-personnel, designated for different tasks and recommended educational levels and professional qualifications will be given. (orig./RW)

  15. QA success stories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, R.B.

    1982-07-01

    Many manufacturers who have implemented quality programs are claiming substantial benefits from them. They consider costs due to quality in the same light as design development or manufacturing improvement, as an investment. Benefits include reduced scrap, rework and warranty claims and increased sales. They have proven that a strong quality program can have a very positive financial impact on a business

  16. MO-A-16A-01: QA Procedures and Metrics: In Search of QA Usability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiaseelan, V [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Thomadsen, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Radiation therapy has undergone considerable changes in the past two decades with a surge of new technology and treatment delivery methods. The complexity of radiation therapy treatments has increased and there has been increased awareness and publicity about the associated risks. In response, there has been proliferation of guidelines for medical physicists to adopt to ensure that treatments are delivered safely. Task Group recommendations are copious, and clinical physicists' hours are longer, stretched to various degrees between site planning and management, IT support, physics QA, and treatment planning responsibilities.Radiation oncology has many quality control practices in place to ensure the delivery of high-quality, safe treatments. Incident reporting systems have been developed to collect statistics about near miss events at many radiation oncology centers. However, tools are lacking to assess the impact of these various control measures. A recent effort to address this shortcoming is the work of Ford et al (2012) who recently published a methodology enumerating quality control quantification for measuring the effectiveness of safety barriers. Over 4000 near-miss incidents reported from 2 academic radiation oncology clinics were analyzed using quality control quantification, and a profile of the most effective quality control measures (metrics) was identified.There is a critical need to identify a QA metric to help the busy clinical physicists to focus their limited time and resources most effectively in order to minimize or eliminate errors in the radiation treatment delivery processes. In this symposium the usefulness of workflows and QA metrics to assure safe and high quality patient care will be explored.Two presentations will be given:Quality Metrics and Risk Management with High Risk Radiation Oncology ProceduresStrategies and metrics for quality management in the TG-100 Era Learning Objectives: Provide an overview and the need for QA usability

  17. MO-A-16A-01: QA Procedures and Metrics: In Search of QA Usability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathiaseelan, V; Thomadsen, B

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy has undergone considerable changes in the past two decades with a surge of new technology and treatment delivery methods. The complexity of radiation therapy treatments has increased and there has been increased awareness and publicity about the associated risks. In response, there has been proliferation of guidelines for medical physicists to adopt to ensure that treatments are delivered safely. Task Group recommendations are copious, and clinical physicists' hours are longer, stretched to various degrees between site planning and management, IT support, physics QA, and treatment planning responsibilities.Radiation oncology has many quality control practices in place to ensure the delivery of high-quality, safe treatments. Incident reporting systems have been developed to collect statistics about near miss events at many radiation oncology centers. However, tools are lacking to assess the impact of these various control measures. A recent effort to address this shortcoming is the work of Ford et al (2012) who recently published a methodology enumerating quality control quantification for measuring the effectiveness of safety barriers. Over 4000 near-miss incidents reported from 2 academic radiation oncology clinics were analyzed using quality control quantification, and a profile of the most effective quality control measures (metrics) was identified.There is a critical need to identify a QA metric to help the busy clinical physicists to focus their limited time and resources most effectively in order to minimize or eliminate errors in the radiation treatment delivery processes. In this symposium the usefulness of workflows and QA metrics to assure safe and high quality patient care will be explored.Two presentations will be given:Quality Metrics and Risk Management with High Risk Radiation Oncology ProceduresStrategies and metrics for quality management in the TG-100 Era Learning Objectives: Provide an overview and the need for QA usability

  18. Waste management R ampersand D Quality Assurance: An alternative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosseau, D.A.; Harlan, C.P.; Cochrell, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development and initial implementation of a Quality Assurance (QA) Program for technical activities associated with assessing compliance of an existing DOE nuclear waste site with applicable environmental regulations. The requirements for establishing the QA program are defined, along with the approach and emphasis used to develop the program. The structure of the program and the various levels of QA plans and procedures are briefly discussed. Initial implementation efforts are summarized. The QA program was developed by and for the project participants and was structured according to the major technical requirements of the project. The QA plans and procedures are written for the convenience and use of the technical staff and not merely to satisfy auditor expectations. Every effort was made to avoid an 18-point approach typical of many QA programs patterned after the dictates of the industry recognized ''national consensus standards.'' Flexibility is emphasized due to the nature of the research and development activities associated with the technical program. Recommendations are provided for using this alternative approach to QA program development for similar technical efforts elsewhere. 10 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  19. QA engineering for the LCP USA magnet manufacturers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, C.E.; Batey, J.E.; Burn, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the QA and QC efforts and results used in fabricating the superconducting magnets of competing designs being developed by American Manufacturers for testing in the ORNL Large Coil Test Facility. Control of the design, materials and processes to assure proper functioning of the magnets in the test facility as well as the content of archival data being compiled is discussed

  20. TURVA-2012: Handling QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellman, Margit; Hellae, Pirjo; Pastina, Barbara; Smith, Paul; Myllymaa, Samu

    2014-01-01

    Posiva applies a management system that complies with the ISO 9001:2008 standard for all activities, including the production of safety case reports, and requires the application of the same quality assurance principles from all its contractors and suppliers. The ISO standard was first launched in 1997 and has since been subject to continuous maintenance, updating and several internal and external audits. The purpose of Posiva's quality management system is to ensure, in a documented and traceable way, that Posiva's products - whether in the form of abstract knowledge and information, published reports or physical objects - fulfil the requirements set for them. The general quality objectives, requirements and instructions defined in Posiva's management system also form the foundation for the quality management of safety case activities. The quality management of the safety case follows the Posiva's general management system, which is based on the ISO 9001:2008 standard and management through processes, but also applies the principle of a graded approach similar to the safety guides for nuclear facilities. This means that the primary emphasis in the quality control and assurance of safety case activities is placed on those activities that have a direct bearing on the arguments and conclusions on the long-term safety of disposal, whereas standard quality measures are applied in the supporting work. The quality management of the safety case aims at traceability and transparency of the key data, assumptions, modelling and calculations. Regarding the activities related to ONKALO, the management system also takes into account the regulatory requirements of YVL Guide 1.4 'Management System for Nuclear Facilities' (which will be subject to revision in 2013). (authors)

  1. Follow-up utterances in QA dialogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooten, B.W.; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The processing of user follow-up utterances by a QA system is a topic which is still in its infant stages, but enjoys growing interest in the QA community. In this paper, we discuss the broader issues related to handling follow-up utterances in a real-life "information kiosk" setting. With help of a

  2. Patient QA systems for rotational radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredh, Anna; Scherman, J.B.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors.......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors....

  3. QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Koeberg's system for quality assurance was discussed with the Quality Assurance Programme Manager for Koeberg Construction. An American style of quality assurance, practised on French technology is used for Koeberg. The quality assurance that is practised at Koeberg, also affected other industries in South Africa

  4. Plutonium immobilization project development and testing quality assurance program description - February 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, L. M.; Ziemba, J.

    1999-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Immobilization Development and Testing organization (LLNL ID and T) is a Participant in the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The LLNL D and T has lead responsibilities for form characterization and qualification, ceramic form development, process/equipment development with plutonium, and process systems testing and validation for both conversion and immobilization. This work must be performed in accordance with the graded approach of a Quality Assurance (QA) Program. A QA Program has been developed at LLNL to meet the requirements of the DOE/MD Quality Assurance Requirements. The LLNL QA Program consists of a Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and Quality Implementing Procedures. These documents interface and are a subset of the overall PIP QA Program Documents. The PIP QA Program is described in the PIP ID and T QA Plan, PIP QAPD, and QA Procedures. Other Participant Organizations also must document and describe their PIP compliant QA Programs in a QAPD and implementing procedures. The purpose of this LLNL QAPD is to describe the organization, management processes, QA Controls for Grading, functional responsibilities, levels of authority, and interfaces for those managing, performing, and assessing the adequacy of work

  5. Poster - 44: Development and implementation of a comprehensive end-to-end testing methodology for linac-based frameless SRS QA using a modified commercial stereotactic anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Derek; Mutanga, Theodore [University of Toronto, Carlo Fidani Peel Regional Cancer Center (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: An end-to-end testing methodology was designed to evaluate the overall SRS treatment fidelity, incorporating all steps in the linac-based frameless radiosurgery treatment delivery process. The study details our commissioning experience of the Steev (CIRS, Norfolk, VA) stereotactic anthropomorphic head phantom including modification, test design, and baseline measurements. Methods: Repeated MR and CT scans were performed with interchanging inserts. MR-CT fusion accuracy was evaluated and the insert spatial coincidence was verified on CT. Five non-coplanar arcs delivered a prescription dose to a 15 mm spherical CTV with 2 mm PTV margin. Following setup, CBCT-based shifts were applied as per protocol. Sequential measurements were performed by interchanging inserts without disturbing the setup. Spatial and dosimetric accuracy was assessed by a combination of CBCT hidden target, radiochromic film, and ion chamber measurements. To facilitate film registration, the film insert was modified in-house by etching marks. Results: MR fusion error and insert spatial coincidences were within 0.3 mm. Both CBCT and film measurements showed spatial displacements of 1.0 mm in similar directions. Both coronal and sagittal films reported 2.3 % higher target dose relative to the treatment plan. The corrected ion chamber measurement was similarly greater by 1.0 %. The 3 %/2 mm gamma pass rate was 99% for both films Conclusions: A comprehensive end-to-end testing methodology was implemented for our SRS QA program. The Steev phantom enabled realistic evaluation of the entire treatment process. Overall spatial and dosimetric accuracy of the delivery were 1 mm and 3 % respectively.

  6. Automated QA framework for PetaScale data challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Buren, G; Didenko, L; Lauret, J; Oldag, E; Ray, L

    2011-01-01

    Over the lifetime of the STAR Experiment, a large investment of workforce time has gone into a variety of QA efforts, including continuous processing of a portion of the data for automated calibration and iterative convergence and quality assurance purposes. A rotating workforce coupled with ever-increasing volumes of information to examine led to sometimes inconsistent or incomplete reporting of issues, eventually leading to additional work. The traditional approach of manually screening a data sample was no longer adequate and doomed to eventual failure with planned future growth in data extents. To prevent this collapse we have developed a new system employing user-defined reference histograms, permitting automated comparisons and nagging of issues. Based on the ROOT framework at its core, the front end is a web based service allowing shift personnel to visualize the results, and to set test parameters and thresholds defining success or failure. The versatile and flexible approach allows for a slew of histograms to be configured and grouped into categories (results and thresholds may depend on experimental triggers and data types) ensuring framework evolution with the years of running to come. Historical information is also saved to track changes and allow for rapid convergence of future tuning. Database storage and processing of data are handled outside the web server for security and fault tolerance.

  7. A general approach to the construction of 'very accurate' or 'definitive' methods by radiochemical NAA and the role of these methods in QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybczynski, R.

    1998-01-01

    Constant progress in instrumentation and methodology of inorganic trace analysis is not always paralleled by improvement in reliability of analytical results. Our approach to construction of 'very accurate' methods for the determination of selected trace elements in biological materials by RNAA is based on an assumption that: (i) The radionuclide in question should be selectively and quantitatively isolated from the irradiated sample by a suitable radiochemical scheme, optimized with respect to this particular radionuclide, yielding finally the analyte in the state of high radiochemical purity what assures interference-free measurement by gamma-ray spectrometry. (ii) The radiochemical scheme should be based on ion exchange and/or extraction column chromatography resulting in an easy automatic repetition of an elementary act of distribution of the analyte and accompanying radionuclides between stationary and mobile phases. (iii) The method should have some intrinsic mechanisms incorporated into the procedure preventing any possibility of making gross errors. Based on these general assumptions, several more specific rules for devising of 'very accurate' methods were formulated and applied when elaborating our methods for the determination of copper, cobalt, nickel, cadmium, molybdenum and uranium in biological materials. The significance of such methods for Quality Assurance is pointed out and illustrated by their use in the certification campaign of the new Polish biological CRMs based on tobacco

  8. QA CLASSIFICATION ANALYSIS OF GROUND SUPPORT SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. W. Gwyn

    1996-01-01

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine if the permanent function Ground Support Systems (CI: BABEEOOOO) are quality-affecting items and if so, to establish the appropriate Quality Assurance (QA) classification

  9. Architecture Approach in System Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Burita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe a practical solution of architecture approach in system development. The software application is the system which optimizes the transport service. The first part of the paper defines the enterprise architecture, its parts and frameworks. Next is explained the NATO Architecture Framework (NAF, a tool for command and control systems development in military environment. The NAF is used for architecture design of the system for optimization of the transport service.

  10. Worldwide QA networks for radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.; Svensson, H.; Ibbott, G.

    2002-01-01

    institutions participating in the U.S. National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) co-operative clinical trials. The RPC currently monitors approximately 1300 centres throughout the USA, Canada and several other countries. The audit tools include, in addition to mailed TLD, review of the institution's dosimetry data, the treatment records of patients entered into trials, and the institution's QA programme. Anthropomorphic phantoms have been developed to evaluate specific treatment techniques. Other currently operating external audit programmes have been either associated with national and international clinical trial groups, similarly to RPC, e.g. EORTC (European Organisation for Research in Treatment of Cancer) in Europe, MRC (Medical Research Council) in the UK, or have been one-off national dosimetry intercomparison exercises, carried out to test various levels of radiotherapy dosimetry, e.g. in Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Australia. Some individual countries have set up comprehensive regular audits of radiotherapy centres, including QA programmes, equipment and dosimetry, e.g. Finland, New Zealand. The IAEA supports its Member States in developing national programmes for TLD based QA audits in radiotherapy dosimetry and whenever possible, establishes links between the national programmes and the IAEA's Dosimetry Laboratory. It disseminates its standardised TLD methodology and provides technical back up to national TLD networks assuring at the same time traceability to primary dosimetry standards. There are several countries (Argentina, Algeria, Brazil, China, Colombia, Cuba, Czech Republic, India, Israel, Malaysia, Philippines, Poland and Vietnam) that have established TLD programmes to audit radiotherapy beams in their countries with assistance of the IAEA. Recently a new IAEA project has been initiated for national TLD audits in non-reference conditions as significant numbers of deviations in non-reference situations, as used clinically on patients, have been

  11. Tolerance limits and methodologies for IMRT measurement-based verification QA: Recommendations of AAPM Task Group No. 218.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miften, Moyed; Olch, Arthur; Mihailidis, Dimitris; Moran, Jean; Pawlicki, Todd; Molineu, Andrea; Li, Harold; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Shi, Jie; Xia, Ping; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Low, Daniel A

    2018-04-01

    Patient-specific IMRT QA measurements are important components of processes designed to identify discrepancies between calculated and delivered radiation doses. Discrepancy tolerance limits are neither well defined nor consistently applied across centers. The AAPM TG-218 report provides a comprehensive review aimed at improving the understanding and consistency of these processes as well as recommendations for methodologies and tolerance limits in patient-specific IMRT QA. The performance of the dose difference/distance-to-agreement (DTA) and γ dose distribution comparison metrics are investigated. Measurement methods are reviewed and followed by a discussion of the pros and cons of each. Methodologies for absolute dose verification are discussed and new IMRT QA verification tools are presented. Literature on the expected or achievable agreement between measurements and calculations for different types of planning and delivery systems are reviewed and analyzed. Tests of vendor implementations of the γ verification algorithm employing benchmark cases are presented. Operational shortcomings that can reduce the γ tool accuracy and subsequent effectiveness for IMRT QA are described. Practical considerations including spatial resolution, normalization, dose threshold, and data interpretation are discussed. Published data on IMRT QA and the clinical experience of the group members are used to develop guidelines and recommendations on tolerance and action limits for IMRT QA. Steps to check failed IMRT QA plans are outlined. Recommendations on delivery methods, data interpretation, dose normalization, the use of γ analysis routines and choice of tolerance limits for IMRT QA are made with focus on detecting differences between calculated and measured doses via the use of robust analysis methods and an in-depth understanding of IMRT verification metrics. The recommendations are intended to improve the IMRT QA process and establish consistent, and comparable IMRT QA

  12. Using a User-Interactive QA System for Personalized E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dawei; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Qingtian; Hao, Tianyong; Min, Feng; Wenyin, Liu

    2008-01-01

    A personalized e-learning framework based on a user-interactive question-answering (QA) system is proposed, in which a user-modeling approach is used to capture personal information of students and a personalized answer extraction algorithm is proposed for personalized automatic answering. In our approach, a topic ontology (or concept hierarchy)…

  13. WE-G-BRA-02: SafetyNet: Automating Radiotherapy QA with An Event Driven Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, S; Kessler, M [The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Litzenberg, D [Univ Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lee, C; Irrer, J; Chen, X; Acosta, E; Weyburne, G; Lam, K; Younge, K; Matuszak, M [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Keranen, W [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Covington, E [University of Michigan Hospital and Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Moran, J [Univ Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quality assurance is an essential task in radiotherapy that often requires many manual tasks. We investigate the use of an event driven framework in conjunction with software agents to automate QA and eliminate wait times. Methods: An in house developed subscription-publication service, EventNet, was added to the Aria OIS to be a message broker for critical events occurring in the OIS and software agents. Software agents operate without user intervention and perform critical QA steps. The results of the QA are documented and the resulting event is generated and passed back to EventNet. Users can subscribe to those events and receive messages based on custom filters designed to send passing or failing results to physicists or dosimetrists. Agents were developed to expedite the following QA tasks: Plan Revision, Plan 2nd Check, SRS Winston-Lutz isocenter, Treatment History Audit, Treatment Machine Configuration. Results: Plan approval in the Aria OIS was used as the event trigger for plan revision QA and Plan 2nd check agents. The agents pulled the plan data, executed the prescribed QA, stored the results and updated EventNet for publication. The Winston Lutz agent reduced QA time from 20 minutes to 4 minutes and provided a more accurate quantitative estimate of radiation isocenter. The Treatment Machine Configuration agent automatically reports any changes to the Treatment machine or HDR unit configuration. The agents are reliable, act immediately, and execute each task identically every time. Conclusion: An event driven framework has inverted the data chase in our radiotherapy QA process. Rather than have dosimetrists and physicists push data to QA software and pull results back into the OIS, the software agents perform these steps immediately upon receiving the sentinel events from EventNet. Mr Keranen is an employee of Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Moran’s institution receives research support for her effort for a linear accelerator QA project from

  14. WE-G-BRA-02: SafetyNet: Automating Radiotherapy QA with An Event Driven Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, S; Kessler, M; Litzenberg, D; Lee, C; Irrer, J; Chen, X; Acosta, E; Weyburne, G; Lam, K; Younge, K; Matuszak, M; Keranen, W; Covington, E; Moran, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quality assurance is an essential task in radiotherapy that often requires many manual tasks. We investigate the use of an event driven framework in conjunction with software agents to automate QA and eliminate wait times. Methods: An in house developed subscription-publication service, EventNet, was added to the Aria OIS to be a message broker for critical events occurring in the OIS and software agents. Software agents operate without user intervention and perform critical QA steps. The results of the QA are documented and the resulting event is generated and passed back to EventNet. Users can subscribe to those events and receive messages based on custom filters designed to send passing or failing results to physicists or dosimetrists. Agents were developed to expedite the following QA tasks: Plan Revision, Plan 2nd Check, SRS Winston-Lutz isocenter, Treatment History Audit, Treatment Machine Configuration. Results: Plan approval in the Aria OIS was used as the event trigger for plan revision QA and Plan 2nd check agents. The agents pulled the plan data, executed the prescribed QA, stored the results and updated EventNet for publication. The Winston Lutz agent reduced QA time from 20 minutes to 4 minutes and provided a more accurate quantitative estimate of radiation isocenter. The Treatment Machine Configuration agent automatically reports any changes to the Treatment machine or HDR unit configuration. The agents are reliable, act immediately, and execute each task identically every time. Conclusion: An event driven framework has inverted the data chase in our radiotherapy QA process. Rather than have dosimetrists and physicists push data to QA software and pull results back into the OIS, the software agents perform these steps immediately upon receiving the sentinel events from EventNet. Mr Keranen is an employee of Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Moran’s institution receives research support for her effort for a linear accelerator QA project from

  15. Investigations of low qa discharges in the SINP tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low edge safety factor discharges including very low qa (1 qa ... From fluctuation analysis of the external magnetic probe data it has been found that MHD ... To investigate the internal details of these discharges, an internal magnetic probe ...

  16. IMRT QA: Selecting gamma criteria based on error detection sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steers, Jennifer M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 and Physics and Biology in Medicine IDP, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Fraass, Benedick A., E-mail: benedick.fraass@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    threshold was consistent across all studied combinations of %Diff/DTA. Criteria such as 2%/3 mm and 3%/2 mm with a 50% threshold at 90% pixels passing are shown to be more appropriately sensitive without being overly strict. However, a broadening of the penumbra by as much as 5 mm in the beam configuration was difficult to detect with commonly used criteria, as well as with the previously mentioned criteria utilizing a threshold of 50%. Conclusions: We have introduced the error curve method, an analysis technique which allows the quantitative determination of gamma criteria sensitivity to induced errors. The application of the error curve method using DMLC IMRT plans measured on the ArcCHECK® device demonstrated that large errors can potentially be missed in IMRT QA with commonly used gamma criteria (e.g., 3%/3 mm, threshold = 10%, 90% pixels passing). Additionally, increasing the dose threshold value can offer dramatic increases in error sensitivity. This approach may allow the selection of more meaningful gamma criteria for IMRT QA and is straightforward to apply to other combinations of devices and treatment techniques.

  17. Basic concept of QA for advanced technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijnheer, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The lecture was structured as follows: (1) Rationale for accurate dose determination; (2) Existing recommendations and guidance; (3) Challenges within the current QA paradigm; (4) New paradigm adopted by AAPM TG 100; and (5) Application of new paradigm to IMRT. Attention was paid, i.a., to major accidents in radiotherapy such as Epinal-1. (P.A.)

  18. Radiotherapy QA of the DAHANCA 19 protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samsøe, E.; Andersen, E.; Hansen, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: It has been demonstrated that nonadherence to protocol-specified radiotherapy (RT) requirements is associated with reduced survival, local control and potentially increased toxicity [1]. Thus, quality assurance (QA) of RT is important when evaluating the results of clinical...

  19. WE-B-BRD-03: MR QA/QC for MRgRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layman, R. [Ohio State Univ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of MRI in radiation therapy is rapidly increasing. Applications vary from the MRI simulator, to the MRI fused with CT, and to the integrated MRI+RT system. Compared with the standard MRI QA, a broader scope of QA features has to be defined in order to maximize the benefits of using MRI in radiation therapy. These QA features include geometric fidelity, image registration, motion management, cross-system alignment, and hardware interference. Advanced MRI techniques require a specific type of QA, as they are being widely used in radiation therapy planning, dose calculations, post-implant dosimetry, and prognoses. A vigorous and adaptive QA program is crucial to defining the responsibility of the entire radiation therapy group and detecting deviations from the performance of high-quality treatment. As a drastic departure from CT simulation, MRI simulation requires changes in the work flow of treatment planning and image guidance. MRI guided radiotherapy platforms are being developed and commercialized to take the advantage of the advance in knowledge, technology and clinical experience. This symposium will from an educational perspective discuss the scope and specific issues related to MRI guided radiotherapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the difference between a standard and a radiotherapy-specific MRI QA program. Understand the effects of MRI artifacts (geometric distortion and motion) on radiotherapy. Understand advanced MRI techniques (ultrashort echo, fast MRI including dynamic MRI and 4DMRI, diffusion, perfusion, and MRS) and related QA. Understand the methods to prepare MRI for treatment planning (electron density assignment, multimodality image registration, segmentation and motion management). Current status of MRI guided treatment platforms. Dr. Jihong Wang has a research grant with Elekta-MRL project. Dr. Ke Sheng receives research grants from Varian Medical systems.

  20. A Chatbot as a Natural Web Interface to Arabic Web QA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan Abu Shawar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a way to access Arabic Web Question Answering (QA corpus using a chatbot, without the need for sophisticated natural language processing or logical inference. Any Natural Language (NL interface to Question Answer (QA system is constrained to reply with the given answers, so there is no need for NL generation to recreate well-formed answers, or for deep analysis or logical inference to map user input questions onto this logical ontology; simple (but large set of pattern-template matching rules will suffice. In previous research, this approach works properly with English and other European languages. In this paper, we try to see how the same chatbot will react in terms of Arabic Web QA corpus. Initial results shows that 93% of answers were correct, but because of a lot of characteristics related to Arabic language, changing Arabic questions into other forms may lead to no answers.

  1. Minimum requirements on a QA program in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    In April, 1994, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine published a ''Comprehensive QA for radiation oncology:'' a report of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee. This is a comprehensive QA program which is likely to become the standard for such programs in the United States. The program stresses the interdisciplinary nature of QA in radiation oncology involving the radiation oncologists, the radiotherapy technologies (radiographers), dosimetrists, and accelerator engineers, as well as the medical physicists. This paper describes a comprehensive quality assurance program with the main emphasis on the quality assurance in radiation therapy using a linear accelerator. The paper deals with QA for a linear accelerator and simulator and QA for treatment planning computers. Next the treatment planning process and QA for individual patients is described. The main features of this report, which should apply to QA programs in any country, emphasizes the responsibilities of the medical physicist. (author). 7 refs, 9 tabs

  2. Minimum requirements on a QA program in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P R [Louisville Univ., Louisville, KY (United States). J.G. Brown Cancer Center

    1996-08-01

    In April, 1994, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine published a ``Comprehensive QA for radiation oncology:`` a report of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee. This is a comprehensive QA program which is likely to become the standard for such programs in the United States. The program stresses the interdisciplinary nature of QA in radiation oncology involving the radiation oncologists, the radiotherapy technologies (radiographers), dosimetrists, and accelerator engineers, as well as the medical physicists. This paper describes a comprehensive quality assurance program with the main emphasis on the quality assurance in radiation therapy using a linear accelerator. The paper deals with QA for a linear accelerator and simulator and QA for treatment planning computers. Next the treatment planning process and QA for individual patients is described. The main features of this report, which should apply to QA programs in any country, emphasizes the responsibilities of the medical physicist. (author). 7 refs, 9 tabs.

  3. Building Watson: An Overview of the DeepQA Project

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrucci, David; Brown, Eric; Chu-Carroll, Jennifer; Fan, James; Gondek, David; Kalyanpur, Aditya A.; Lally, Adam; Murdock, J. William; Nyberg, Eric; Prager, John; Schlaefer, Nico; Welty, Chris

    2010-01-01

    IBM Research undertook a challenge to build a computer system that could compete at the human champion level in real time on the American TV Quiz show, Jeopardy! The extent of the challenge includes fielding a real-time automatic contestant on the show, not merely a laboratory exercise. The Jeopardy! Challenge helped us address requirements that led to the design of the DeepQA architecture and the implementation of Watson. After 3 years of intense research and development by a core team of ab...

  4. Common QA/QM Criteria for Multinational Vendor Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This VICWG document provides the 'Common QA/QM Criteria' which will be used in Multinational Vendor Inspection. The 'Common QA/QM Criteria' provides the basic consideration when performing the Vendor Inspection. These criteria has been developed in conformity with International Codes and Standards such as IAEA, ISO and so on that MDEP member countries adopted. The purpose of the VICWG is to establish areas of co-operation in the Vendor Inspection practices among MDEP member countries as described in the MDEP issue-specific Terms of Reference (ToR). As part of this, from the beginning, a survey was performed to understand and to identify areas of commonality and differences between regulatory practices of member countries in the area of vendor inspection. The VICWG also collaborated by performing Witnessed Inspections and Joint Inspections. Through these activities, it was recognized that member countries commonly apply the IAEA safety standard (GS-R-3) to the vendor inspection criteria, and almost ail European member countries apply the ISO standard (ISO9001). In the US, the NRC regulatory requirement in 10 CFR, Part 50, Appendix B is used. South Korea uses the same criteria as in the US. As a result of the information obtained, a comparison table between codes and standards (IAEAGS-R-3, ISO 9001:2008.10CFR50 Appendix Band ASME NQA-1) has been developed in order to inform the development of 'Common QA/QM Criteria'. The result is documented in Table 1, 'MDEP CORE QA/QM Requirement and Comparison between Codes and Standards'. In addition, each country's criteria were compared with the US 10CFR50 Appendix B as a template. Table 2 shows VICWG Survey on Quality Assurance Program Requirements. Through these activities above, we considered that the core requirements should be consistent with both IAEA safety standard and ISO standard, and considered that the common requirements in the US 10CFR50 Appendix B used to the survey

  5. Characterization of a prototype MR-compatible Delta4 QA-system in a 1.5 tesla MR-linac

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Wilfred J H; Seravalli, Enrica; Houweling, Anette; Woodings, Simon J; van Rooij, Rob; Wolthaus, Jochem W H; Lagendijk, JJW; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2018-01-01

    To perform patient plan-quality assurance (QA) on the newly installed MR-Linac (MRL) there was a need for having an MR-compatible QA-device. An MR compatible device (MR-Delta4) was developed together with Scandidos AB (Uppsala, Sweden). The basic characteristics of the detector response

  6. Application of QA to R ampersand D support of HLW programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryder, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Quality has always been of primary importance in the research and development (R ampersand D) environment. An organization's ability to attract funds for new or continued research is largely dependent on the quality of past performance. However, with the possible exceptions of peer reviews for fund allocation and the referee process prior to publication, past quality assurance (QA) activities were primarily informal good practices. This resulted in standards of acceptable practice that varied from organization to organization. The increasing complexity of R ampersand D projects and the increasing need for project results to be upheld outside the scientific community (i.e., lawsuits and licensing hearings) are encouraging R ampersand D organizations and their clients to adopt more formalized methods for the scientific process and to increase control over support organizations (i.e., suppliers and subcontractors). This has become especially true for R ampersand D organizations involved in the high-level (HLW) projects for a number of years. The PNL began to implement QA program requirements within a few HLW repository preliminary studies in 1978. In 1985, PNL developed a comprehensive QA program for R ampersand D activities in support of two of the proposed repository projects. This QA program was developed by the PNL QA department with a significant amount of support assistance and guidance from PNL upper management, the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), and the Salt Repository Program Office (SPRO). The QA program has been revised to add a three-level feature and is currently being implemented on projects sponsored by the Office of Geologic Repositories (DOE/OGR), Repository Technology Program (DOE-CH), Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project, and other HLW projects

  7. Quality assurance records system for research and development activities in support of geologic repository programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.W.; Ryder, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Department of Energy, is conducting site-specific research for all three candidate sites for the first geologic high-level waste repository, as well as generic research for the second repository. In conjunction with this effort, PNL has developed a quality assurance (QA) program that is applicable to all organizations that are performing research and development (R and D) activities in support of the repository programs. This QA program meets the basic and supplemental requirements of ANSI/ASME NQA-1-1983 and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Review Plan for QA Programs for Site Characterization of High Level Nuclear Waste Repositories. A key part of this program is the handling of QA records that may ultimately support the licensing process for the repository. This paper describes a QA records system that is flexible enough to accommodate several types of research, such as paper studies, test method development, site characterization studies, software development, and hardware design. In addition, the QA records system is acceptable to a variety of sponsors who have licensing concerns. The QA procedures and their relation to the requirements are described. Most important is the discussion on the approaches used to assure that the records are organized such that the user can readily recreate or defend data, conclusions, and recommendations resulting from the research

  8. Conventional patient specific IMRT QA and 3DVH verification of dose distribution for helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prabhat Krishna; Joshi, Kishore; Epili, D.; Gavake, Umesh; Paul, Siji; Reena, Ph.; Jamema, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, patient-specific IMRT QA has transitioned from point dose measurements by ion chambers to films to 2D array measurements. 3DVH software has taken this transition a step further by estimating the 3D dose delivered to the patient volume from 2D diode measurements using a planned dose perturbation (PDP) algorithm. This algorithm was developed to determine, if the conventional IMRT QA though sensitive at detecting errors, has any predictive power in detecting dose errors of clinical significance related to dose to the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). The aim of this study is to compare the conventional IMRT patient specific QA and 3DVH dose distribution for patients treated with helical tomotherapy (HT)

  9. The assessment report of QA program through the analysis of quality trend in 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yung Se; Hong, Kyung Sik; Park, Sang Pil; Park, Kun Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-04-01

    Effectiveness and adequacy of KAERI Qualify Assurance Program is assessed through the analysis of quality trend. As a result of assessment, Quality Assurance System for each project has reached the stage of stabilization, and especially, significant improvement of the conformance to QA procedure, the control of QA Records and documents and the inspiration of quality mind for the job has been made. However, some problems discovered in this trend analysis, ie, improvement of efficiency of quality training and economies of design verification system, are required to take preventive actions and consider appropriate measures. In the future, QA is expected to be a support to assurance of nuclear safety and development of advanced technology by making it possible to establish the best quality system suitable for our situation, based on the assessment method for quality assurance program presented in this study. 5 figs., 30 tabs. (Author).

  10. The assessment report of QA program through the analysis of quality trend in 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yung Se; Hong, Kyung Sik; Park, Sang Pil; Park, Kun Woo

    1995-04-01

    Effectiveness and adequacy of KAERI Qualify Assurance Program is assessed through the analysis of quality trend. As a result of assessment, Quality Assurance System for each project has reached the stage of stabilization, and especially, significant improvement of the conformance to QA procedure, the control of QA Records and documents and the inspiration of quality mind for the job has been made. However, some problems discovered in this trend analysis, ie, improvement of efficiency of quality training and economies of design verification system, are required to take preventive actions and consider appropriate measures. In the future, QA is expected to be a support to assurance of nuclear safety and development of advanced technology by making it possible to establish the best quality system suitable for our situation, based on the assessment method for quality assurance program presented in this study. 5 figs., 30 tabs. (Author)

  11. SU-F-E-18: Training Monthly QA of Medical Accelerators: Illustrated Instructions for Self-Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Court, L; Wang, H; Aten, D; Chi, P; Gao, S; Aristophanous, M; Balter, P [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brown, D; Yock, A [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Maddox, B [Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); MacGregor, H [University of Cape Town (South Africa)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and test clear illustrated instructions for training of monthly mechanical QA of medical linear accelerators. Methods: Illustrated instructions were created for monthly mechanical QA with tolerance tabulated, and underwent several steps of review and refinement. Testers with zero QA experience were then recruited from our radiotherapy department (1 student, 2 computational scientists and 8 dosimetrists). The following parameters were progressively de-calibrated on a Varian C-series linac: Group A = gantry angle, ceiling laser position, X1 jaw position, couch longitudinal position, physical graticule position (5 testers); Group B = Group A + wall laser position, couch lateral and vertical position, collimator angle (3 testers); Group C = Group B + couch angle, wall laser angle, and optical distance indicator (3 testers). Testers were taught how to use the linac, and then used the instructions to try to identify these errors. A physicist observed each session, giving support on machine operation, as necessary. The instructions were further tested with groups of therapists, graduate students and physics residents at multiple institutions. We have also changed the language of the instructions to simulate using the instructions with non-English speakers. Results: Testers were able to follow the instructions. They determined gantry, collimator and couch angle errors within 0.4, 0.3, and 0.9degrees of the actual changed values, respectively. Laser positions were determined within 1mm, and jaw positions within 2mm. Couch position errors were determined within 2 and 3mm for lateral/longitudinal and vertical errors, respectively. Accessory positioning errors were determined within 1mm. ODI errors were determined within 2mm when comparing with distance sticks, and 6mm when using blocks, indicating that distance sticks should be the preferred approach for inexperienced staff. Conclusion: Inexperienced users were able to follow these instructions, and catch

  12. SU-F-E-18: Training Monthly QA of Medical Accelerators: Illustrated Instructions for Self-Learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, L; Wang, H; Aten, D; Chi, P; Gao, S; Aristophanous, M; Balter, P; Brown, D; Yock, A; Maddox, B; MacGregor, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test clear illustrated instructions for training of monthly mechanical QA of medical linear accelerators. Methods: Illustrated instructions were created for monthly mechanical QA with tolerance tabulated, and underwent several steps of review and refinement. Testers with zero QA experience were then recruited from our radiotherapy department (1 student, 2 computational scientists and 8 dosimetrists). The following parameters were progressively de-calibrated on a Varian C-series linac: Group A = gantry angle, ceiling laser position, X1 jaw position, couch longitudinal position, physical graticule position (5 testers); Group B = Group A + wall laser position, couch lateral and vertical position, collimator angle (3 testers); Group C = Group B + couch angle, wall laser angle, and optical distance indicator (3 testers). Testers were taught how to use the linac, and then used the instructions to try to identify these errors. A physicist observed each session, giving support on machine operation, as necessary. The instructions were further tested with groups of therapists, graduate students and physics residents at multiple institutions. We have also changed the language of the instructions to simulate using the instructions with non-English speakers. Results: Testers were able to follow the instructions. They determined gantry, collimator and couch angle errors within 0.4, 0.3, and 0.9degrees of the actual changed values, respectively. Laser positions were determined within 1mm, and jaw positions within 2mm. Couch position errors were determined within 2 and 3mm for lateral/longitudinal and vertical errors, respectively. Accessory positioning errors were determined within 1mm. ODI errors were determined within 2mm when comparing with distance sticks, and 6mm when using blocks, indicating that distance sticks should be the preferred approach for inexperienced staff. Conclusion: Inexperienced users were able to follow these instructions, and catch

  13. MO-FG-202-09: Virtual IMRT QA Using Machine Learning: A Multi-Institutional Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, G; Scheuermann, R; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chan, M; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a machine learning approach to Virtual IMRT QA for accurately predicting gamma passing rates using different QA devices at different institutions. Methods: A Virtual IMRT QA was constructed using a machine learning algorithm based on 416 IMRT plans, in which QA measurements were performed using diode-array detectors and a 3%local/3mm with 10% threshold. An independent set of 139 IMRT measurements from a different institution, with QA data based on portal dosimetry using the same gamma index and 10% threshold, was used to further test the algorithm. Plans were characterized by 90 different complexity metrics. A weighted poison regression with Lasso regularization was trained to predict passing rates using the complexity metrics as input. Results: In addition to predicting passing rates with 3% accuracy for all composite plans using diode-array detectors, passing rates for portal dosimetry on per-beam basis were predicted with an error <3.5% for 120 IMRT measurements. The remaining measurements (19) had large areas of low CU, where portal dosimetry has larger disagreement with the calculated dose and, as such, large errors were expected. These beams need to be further modeled to correct the under-response in low dose regions. Important features selected by Lasso to predict gamma passing rates were: complete irradiated area outline (CIAO) area, jaw position, fraction of MLC leafs with gaps smaller than 20 mm or 5mm, fraction of area receiving less than 50% of the total CU, fraction of the area receiving dose from penumbra, weighted Average Irregularity Factor, duty cycle among others. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the Virtual IMRT QA can predict passing rates using different QA devices and across multiple institutions. Prediction of QA passing rates could have profound implications on the current IMRT process.

  14. MO-FG-202-09: Virtual IMRT QA Using Machine Learning: A Multi-Institutional Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes, G; Scheuermann, R; Solberg, T; Chan, M; Deasy, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a machine learning approach to Virtual IMRT QA for accurately predicting gamma passing rates using different QA devices at different institutions. Methods: A Virtual IMRT QA was constructed using a machine learning algorithm based on 416 IMRT plans, in which QA measurements were performed using diode-array detectors and a 3%local/3mm with 10% threshold. An independent set of 139 IMRT measurements from a different institution, with QA data based on portal dosimetry using the same gamma index and 10% threshold, was used to further test the algorithm. Plans were characterized by 90 different complexity metrics. A weighted poison regression with Lasso regularization was trained to predict passing rates using the complexity metrics as input. Results: In addition to predicting passing rates with 3% accuracy for all composite plans using diode-array detectors, passing rates for portal dosimetry on per-beam basis were predicted with an error <3.5% for 120 IMRT measurements. The remaining measurements (19) had large areas of low CU, where portal dosimetry has larger disagreement with the calculated dose and, as such, large errors were expected. These beams need to be further modeled to correct the under-response in low dose regions. Important features selected by Lasso to predict gamma passing rates were: complete irradiated area outline (CIAO) area, jaw position, fraction of MLC leafs with gaps smaller than 20 mm or 5mm, fraction of area receiving less than 50% of the total CU, fraction of the area receiving dose from penumbra, weighted Average Irregularity Factor, duty cycle among others. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the Virtual IMRT QA can predict passing rates using different QA devices and across multiple institutions. Prediction of QA passing rates could have profound implications on the current IMRT process.

  15. Proteoglycans as Target for an Innovative Therapeutic Approach in Chondrosarcoma: Preclinical Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrode, Caroline; Weber, Valérie; Voissière, Aurélien; Maisonial-Besset, Aurélie; Vidal, Aurélien; Auzeloux, Philippe; Gaumet, Vincent; Borel, Michèle; Dauplat, Marie-Mélanie; Quintana, Mercedes; Degoul, Françoise; Rédini, Françoise; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    To date, surgery remains the only option for the treatment of chondrosarcoma, which is radio- and chemoresistant due in part to its large extracellular matrix (ECM) and poor vascularity. In case of unresectable locally advanced or metastatic diseases with a poor prognosis, improving the management of chondrosarcoma still remains a challenge. Our team developed an attractive approach of improvement of the therapeutic index of chemotherapy by targeting proteoglycan (PG)-rich tissues using a quaternary ammonium (QA) function conjugated to melphalan (Mel). First of all, we demonstrated the crucial role of the QA carrier for binding to aggrecan by surface plasmon resonance. In the orthotopic model of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma, an in vivo biodistribution study of Mel and its QA derivative (Mel-QA), radiolabeled with tritium, showed rapid radioactivity accumulation in healthy cartilaginous tissues and tumor after [ 3 H]-Mel-QA injection. The higher T/M ratio of the QA derivative suggests some advantage of QA-active targeting of chondrosarcoma. The antitumoral effects were characterized by tumor volume assessment, in vivo 99m Tc-NTP 15-5 scintigraphic imaging of PGs, 1 H-HRMAS NMR spectroscopy, and histology. The conjugation of a QA function to Mel did not hamper its in vivo efficiency and strongly improved the tolerability of Mel leading to a significant decrease of side effects (hematologic analyses and body weight monitoring). Thus, QA conjugation leads to a significant improvement of the therapeutic index, which is essential in oncology and enable repeated cycles of chemotherapy in patients with chondrosarcoma. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2575-85. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. SU-F-T-287: A Preliminary Study On Patient Specific VMAT Verification Using a Phosphor-Screen Based Geometric QA System (Raven QA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M; Yi, B; Wong, J; Ding, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The RavenQA system (LAP Laser, Germany) is a QA device with a phosphor screen detector for performing the QA tasks of TG-142. This study tested if it is feasible to use the system for the patient specific QA of the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). Methods: Water equivalent material (5cm) is attached to the front of the detector plate of the RavenQA for dosimetry purpose. Then the plate is attached to the gantry to synchronize the movement between the detector and the gantry. Since the detector moves together with gantry, The ’Reset gantry to 0’ function of the Eclipse planning system (Varian, CA) is used to simulate the measurement situation when calculating dose of the detector plate. The same gantry setup is used when delivering the treatment beam for feasibility test purposes. Cumulative dose is acquired for each arc. The optical scatter component of each captured image from the CCD camera is corrected by deconvolving the 2D spatial invariant optical scatter kernel (OSK). We assume that the OSK is a 2D isotropic point spread function with inverse-squared decrease as a function of radius from the center. Results: Three cases of VMAT plans including head & neck, whole pelvis and abdomen-pelvis are tested. Setup time for measurements was less than 5 minutes. Passing rates of absolute gamma were 99.3, 98.2, 95.9 respectively for 3%/3mm criteria and 96.2, 97.1, 86.4 for 2%/2mm criteria. The abdomen-pelvis field has long treatment fields, 37cm, which are longer than the detector plate (25cm). This plan showed relatively lower passing rate than other plans. Conclusion: An algorithm for IMRT/VMAT verification using the RavenQA has been developed and tested. The model of spatially invariant OSK works well for deconvolution purpose. It is proved that the RavenQA can be used for the patient specific verification of VMAT. This work is funded in part by a Maryland Industrial Partnership Program grant to University of Maryland and to JPLC who owns the

  17. Analysis of QA audit checklist for equipment suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xuehang

    2012-01-01

    Eleven aspects during the equipment manufacturing by the suppliers, including the guidelines and objectives of quality assurance, management department review, document and record control, staffing and training, design control, procurement control, control of items, process control, inspection and testing control, non-conformance control, and internal and external QA audit, are analyzed in this article. The detailed QA audit checklist on these above mentioned aspects are described and the problems found in real QA audit are listed in this article. (authors)

  18. A comparative study and analysis of QA requirements for the establishment of a nuclear R and D QA system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwan Hyun

    2000-06-01

    This technical report provides recommendations on how to fulfill the requirements of the code in relation to QA activities for nuclear R and D field. This guide applies to the quality assurance (QA) programmes of the responsible organization, i.e. the organization having overall responsibility for the nuclear power plant, as well as to any other separate QA programmes in each stage of a nuclear R and D project. This guide covers QA work on items, services and processes impacting nuclear safety during siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The impact on safety may occur during the performance of the QA work, or owing to the application of the results of the QA. This guide may, with appropriate modification, also be usefully applied at nuclear installations other than nuclear R and D field

  19. 40 CFR 98.394 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and QA/QC requirements. 98... by a consensus-based standards organization exists, such a method shall be used. Consensus-based... (NAESB). (ii) Where no appropriate standard method developed by a consensus-based standards organization...

  20. 40 CFR 98.424 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and QA/QC requirements. 98... published by a consensus-based standards organization if such a method exists. Consensus-based standards...). (ii) Where no appropriate standard method developed by a consensus-based standards organization exists...

  1. 40 CFR 98.404 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and QA/QC requirements. 98... published by a consensus-based standards organization exists, such a method shall be used. Consensus-based... (NAESB). (ii) Where no appropriate standard method developed by a consensus-based standards organization...

  2. How social Q&A sites are changing knowledge sharing in open source software communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasilescu, B.N.; Serebrenik, A.; Devanbu, P.; Filkov, V.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, mailing lists have been the preferred means for coordinating development and user support activities. With the emergence and popularity growth of social Q&A sites such as the StackExchange network (e.g., StackOverflow), this is beginning to change. Such sites offer different

  3. The Long and Winding Road: Duties of an NHEERL QA Manager from 1999 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    My career as a US EPA Quality Assurance Manager (QAM) started on September 26, 1999 when I was appointed the QA and Records Manager for the Experimental Toxicology Division (ETD) in NHEERL, in the Office of Research and Development (ORD), on the Research Triangle Campus in RTP, N...

  4. Expansion of polyalanine tracts in the QA domain may play a critical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-03

    Sep 3, 2015 ... role in the clavicular development of cleidocranial dysplasia. LI-ZHENG ... RUNX2 mutation have been identified in nearly 500 families with CCD ... tracts in the QA domain of RUNX2 influences the transcrip- tional activity of ...

  5. Experience in the application of the IAEA QA code and guides to the manufacture of nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, N.G.; Mankame, M.A.; Kulkarni, P.G.; Vijayaraghavan, R.; Balaramamoorthy, K.

    1985-01-01

    India has made considerable progress in the indigenous manufacture of 'Quality' nuclear reactor components. All activities associated with the development of atomic energy from mining of strategic minerals to the design, construction, and operation of nuclear power plants including supporting research and development efforts are mainly carried out by the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). Through the sustained efforts of DAE, the major industries, both in public and private sectors supplying nuclear components have now adopted the practice of systematic quality assurance (QA). The stringent QA steps are mandatory for achieving the desired quality in the manufactured nuclear components. Control blades for BWRs are now indigenously manufactured by the Atomic Fuels Division (AFD) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), a constituent unit of DAE. For the Project Dhruva, a 100 MW(th) nuclear reactor, constructed at BARC, Trombay, Bombay, an independent cell was formed to carry out quality audit on the manufactured components. The components were designed, fabricated, inspected and tested to the desired quality level. The QA activities were enforced from the procurement of raw materials to the audit of the completed component for monitoring the manufacturer's continued compliance with the design. The major components of Dhruva, viz. calandria, end-shield, coolant channels, heat exchangers, etc., were covered under these quality audit activities. The paper highlights the QA programme implemented in the manufacture of control blades for BWRs, illustrated with a typical example, the end-shield for Dhruva. The authors consider that the recommendations and guidelines provided in the documents 50-SG-QA3, 50-SG-QA8, 50-SG-QA10, etc., were useful in providing a formal and systematic framework, under which various quality assurance functions have been carried out

  6. Refinement of MLC modeling improves commercial QA dosimetry system for SRS and SBRT patient-specific QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Yair; Kim, Josh; Chetty, Indrin; Wen, Ning

    2018-04-01

    Mobius 3D (M3D) provides a volumetric dose verification of the treatment planning system's calculated dose using an independent beam model and a collapsed cone convolution superposition algorithm. However, there is a lack of investigation into M3D's accuracy and effectiveness for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) quality assurance (QA). Here, we collaborated with the vendor to develop a revised M3D beam model for SRS/SBRT cases treated with a 6X flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and high-definition multiple leaf collimator (HDMLC) on an Edge linear accelerator. Eighty SRS/SBRT cases, planned with AAA dose algorithm and validated with Gafchromic film, were compared to M3D dose calculations using 3D gamma analysis with 2%/2 mm gamma criteria and a 10% threshold. A revised beam model was developed by refining the HD-MLC model in M3D to improve small field dose calculation accuracy and beam profile agreement. All cases were reanalyzed using the revised beam model. The impact of heterogeneity corrections for lung cases was investigated by applying lung density overrides to five cases. For the standard and revised beam models, respectively, the mean gamma passing rates were 94.6% [standard deviation (SD): 6.1%] and 98.0% [SD: 1.7%] (for the overall patient), 88.2% [SD: 17.3%] and 93.8% [SD: 6.8%] (for the brain PTV), 71.4% [SD: 18.4%] and 81.5% [SD: 14.3%] (for the lung PTV), 83.3% [SD: 16.7%] and 67.9% [SD: 23.0%] (for the spine PTV), and 78.6% [SD: 14.0%] and 86.8% [SD: 12.5%] (for the PTV of all other sites). The lung PTV mean gamma passing rates improved from 74.1% [SD: 7.5%] to 89.3% [SD: 7.2%] with the lung density overridden. The revised beam model achieved an output factor within 3% of plastic scintillator measurements for 2 × 2 cm 2 MLC field size, but larger discrepancies are still seen for smaller field sizes which necessitate further improvement of the beam model. Special attention needs to be paid to small field

  7. Reflections on Narrative Approaches to Moral Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Orlando

    1996-01-01

    Compares narrative approaches to Kohlberg's theory of moral development along five dimensions: values relevance, legitimacy, universality, rationality, and commensurability. Argues that, contrary to Kohlberg's theory, narrative approaches may lead to contradiction in epistemology, nihilism in moral choices, and opportunism in relationships.…

  8. eHealth development: a holistic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentferink, Aniek

    2016-01-01

    This presentation was held during the course 'eHealth development a holistic approach' at the University of Twente. The presentation included information about the project Quantified Self at Work and specifically the approach of co-creation during eHealth design with important stakeholders.

  9. Dynamical Systems Approaches to Emotional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camras, Linda A.; Witherington, David C.

    2005-01-01

    Within the last 20 years, transitions in the conceptualization of emotion and its development have given rise to calls for an explanatory framework that captures emotional development in all its organizational complexity and variability. Recent attempts have been made to couch emotional development in terms of a dynamical systems approach through…

  10. SU-C-BRD-03: Closing the Loop On Virtual IMRT QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes, G; Scheuermann, R; Y, H C.; Olszanski, A; Bellerive, M; Solberg, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an algorithm that predicts a priori IMRT QA passing rates. Methods: 416 IMRT plans from all treatment sites were planned in Eclipse version 11 and delivered using a dynamic sliding window technique on Clinac iX or TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm local distance to agreement (DTA) were recorded during clinical operations using a commercial 2D diode array (MapCHECK 2, Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL). Each plan was characterized by 37 metrics that describe different failure modes between the calculated and measured dose. Machine-learning algorithms (MLAs) were trained to learn the relation between the plan characteristics and each passing rate. Minimization of the cross validated error, together with maximum a posteriori estimation (MAP), were used to choose the model parameters. Results: 3%/3mm local DTA can be predicted with an error smaller than 3% for 98% of the plans. For the remaining 2% of plans, the residual error was within 5%. For 2%/2mm local DTA passing rates, 96% percent of the plans were successfully predicted with an error smaller than 5%. All high-risk plans that failed the 2%/2mm local criteria were correctly identified by the algorithm. The most important metric to describe the passing rates was determined to be the MU per Gray (modulation factor). Conclusions: Logs files and independent dose calculations have been suggested as possible substitutes for measurement based IMRT QA. However, none of these methods answer the fundamental question of whether a plan can be delivered with a clinically acceptable error given the limitations of the linacs and the treatment planning system. Predicting the IMRT QA passing rates a priori closes that loop. For additional robustness, virtual IMRT QA can be combined with Linac QA and log file analysis to confirm appropriate delivery

  11. SU-E-T-432: A Rapid and Comprehensive Procedure for Daily Proton QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, T; Sun, B; Grantham, K; Knutson, N; Santanam, L; Goddu, S; Klein, E [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The objective is to develop a rapid and comprehensive daily QA procedure implemented at the S. Lee Kling Proton Therapy Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Methods: A scribed phantom with imbedded fiducials is used for checking lasers accuracy followed by couch isocentricity and for X-ray imaging congruence with isocenter. A Daily QA3 device (Sun Nuclear, FL) was used to check output, range and profiles. Five chambers in the central region possess various build-ups. After converting the thickness of the inherent build-ups into water equivalent thickness (WET) for proton, range of any beam can be checked with additional build-up on the Daily QA3 device. In our procedure, 3 beams from 3 bands (large, small and deep) with nominal range of 20 cm are checked daily. 17cm plastic water with WET of 16.92cm are used as additional build-up so that four chambers sit on the SOBP plateau at various depths and one sit on the distal fall off. Reading from the five chambers are fitted to an error function that has been parameterized to match the SOBP with the same nominal range. Shifting of the error function to maximize the correlation between measurements and the error function is deemed as the range shift from the nominal value. Results: We have found couch isocentricity maintained over 180 degrees. Imaging system exhibits accuracy in regard to imaging and mechanical isocenters. Ranges are within 1mm accuracy from measurements in water tank, and sensitive to change of sub-millimeter. Data acquired since the start of operation show outputs, profiles and range stay within 1% or 1mm from baselines. The whole procedure takes about 40 minutes. Conclusion: Taking advantage of the design of Daily QA3 device turns the device originally designed for photon and electron into a comprehensive and rapid tool for proton daily QA.

  12. SU-E-T-432: A Rapid and Comprehensive Procedure for Daily Proton QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, T; Sun, B; Grantham, K; Knutson, N; Santanam, L; Goddu, S; Klein, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objective is to develop a rapid and comprehensive daily QA procedure implemented at the S. Lee Kling Proton Therapy Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Methods: A scribed phantom with imbedded fiducials is used for checking lasers accuracy followed by couch isocentricity and for X-ray imaging congruence with isocenter. A Daily QA3 device (Sun Nuclear, FL) was used to check output, range and profiles. Five chambers in the central region possess various build-ups. After converting the thickness of the inherent build-ups into water equivalent thickness (WET) for proton, range of any beam can be checked with additional build-up on the Daily QA3 device. In our procedure, 3 beams from 3 bands (large, small and deep) with nominal range of 20 cm are checked daily. 17cm plastic water with WET of 16.92cm are used as additional build-up so that four chambers sit on the SOBP plateau at various depths and one sit on the distal fall off. Reading from the five chambers are fitted to an error function that has been parameterized to match the SOBP with the same nominal range. Shifting of the error function to maximize the correlation between measurements and the error function is deemed as the range shift from the nominal value. Results: We have found couch isocentricity maintained over 180 degrees. Imaging system exhibits accuracy in regard to imaging and mechanical isocenters. Ranges are within 1mm accuracy from measurements in water tank, and sensitive to change of sub-millimeter. Data acquired since the start of operation show outputs, profiles and range stay within 1% or 1mm from baselines. The whole procedure takes about 40 minutes. Conclusion: Taking advantage of the design of Daily QA3 device turns the device originally designed for photon and electron into a comprehensive and rapid tool for proton daily QA

  13. SU-C-BRD-03: Closing the Loop On Virtual IMRT QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, G; Scheuermann, R; Y, H C.; Olszanski, A; Bellerive, M; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an algorithm that predicts a priori IMRT QA passing rates. Methods: 416 IMRT plans from all treatment sites were planned in Eclipse version 11 and delivered using a dynamic sliding window technique on Clinac iX or TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm local distance to agreement (DTA) were recorded during clinical operations using a commercial 2D diode array (MapCHECK 2, Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL). Each plan was characterized by 37 metrics that describe different failure modes between the calculated and measured dose. Machine-learning algorithms (MLAs) were trained to learn the relation between the plan characteristics and each passing rate. Minimization of the cross validated error, together with maximum a posteriori estimation (MAP), were used to choose the model parameters. Results: 3%/3mm local DTA can be predicted with an error smaller than 3% for 98% of the plans. For the remaining 2% of plans, the residual error was within 5%. For 2%/2mm local DTA passing rates, 96% percent of the plans were successfully predicted with an error smaller than 5%. All high-risk plans that failed the 2%/2mm local criteria were correctly identified by the algorithm. The most important metric to describe the passing rates was determined to be the MU per Gray (modulation factor). Conclusions: Logs files and independent dose calculations have been suggested as possible substitutes for measurement based IMRT QA. However, none of these methods answer the fundamental question of whether a plan can be delivered with a clinically acceptable error given the limitations of the linacs and the treatment planning system. Predicting the IMRT QA passing rates a priori closes that loop. For additional robustness, virtual IMRT QA can be combined with Linac QA and log file analysis to confirm appropriate delivery.

  14. A mathematical framework for virtual IMRT QA using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, G; Scheuermann, R; Hung, C Y; Olszanski, A; Bellerive, M; Solberg, T D

    2016-07-01

    It is common practice to perform patient-specific pretreatment verifications to the clinical delivery of IMRT. This process can be time-consuming and not altogether instructive due to the myriad sources that may produce a failing result. The purpose of this study was to develop an algorithm capable of predicting IMRT QA passing rates a priori. From all treatment, 498 IMRT plans sites were planned in eclipse version 11 and delivered using a dynamic sliding window technique on Clinac iX or TrueBeam Linacs. 3%/3 mm local dose/distance-to-agreement (DTA) was recorded using a commercial 2D diode array. Each plan was characterized by 78 metrics that describe different aspects of their complexity that could lead to disagreements between the calculated and measured dose. A Poisson regression with Lasso regularization was trained to learn the relation between the plan characteristics and each passing rate. Passing rates 3%/3 mm local dose/DTA can be predicted with an error smaller than 3% for all plans analyzed. The most important metrics to describe the passing rates were determined to be the MU factor (MU per Gy), small aperture score, irregularity factor, and fraction of the plan delivered at the corners of a 40 × 40 cm field. The higher the value of these metrics, the worse the passing rates. The Virtual QA process predicts IMRT passing rates with a high likelihood, allows the detection of failures due to setup errors, and it is sensitive enough to detect small differences between matched Linacs.

  15. Retrospective analysis of 'gamma distribution' based IMRT QA criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, C.; Chappell, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: IMRT has been implemented into clinical practice at Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH) since mid 2006 for treating patients with Head and Neck (H and N) or prostate tumours. A local quality assurance (QA) acceptance criteria based on 'gamma distribution' for approving IMRT plan was developed and implemented in early 2007. A retrospective analysis of such criteria over 194 clinical cases will be presented. The RHH IMRT criteria was established with assumption that gamma distribution obtained through inter-comparison of 2 D dose maps between planned and delivered was governed by a positive-hail' normal distribution. A commercial system-MapCheck was used for 2 D dose map comparison with a built-in gamma analysis tool. Gamma distribution histogram was generated and recorded for all cases. By retrospectively analysing those distributions using curve fitting technique, a statistical gamma distribution can be obtained and evaluated. This analytical result can be used for future IMRT planing and treatment delivery. The analyses indicate that gamma distribution obtained through MapCheckTM is well under the normal distribution, particularly for prostate cases. The applied pass/fail criteria is not overly sensitive to identify 'false fails' but can be further tighten-up for smaller field while for larger field found in both H and N and prostate cases, the criteria was correctly applied. Non-uniform distribution of detectors in MapCheck and experience level of planners are two major factors to variation in gamma distribution among clinical cases. This criteria derived from clinical statistics is superior and more accurate than single-valued criteria for lMRT QA acceptance procedure. (author)

  16. MO-B-BRB-04: 3D Dosimetry in End-To-End Dosimetry QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibbott, G. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Full three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry using volumetric chemical dosimeters probed by 3D imaging systems has long been a promising technique for the radiation therapy clinic, since it provides a unique methodology for dose measurements in the volume irradiated using complex conformal delivery techniques such as IMRT and VMAT. To date true 3D dosimetry is still not widely practiced in the community; it has been confined to centres of specialized expertise especially for quality assurance or commissioning roles where other dosimetry techniques are difficult to implement. The potential for improved clinical applicability has been advanced considerably in the last decade by the development of improved 3D dosimeters (e.g., radiochromic plastics, radiochromic gel dosimeters and normoxic polymer gel systems) and by improved readout protocols using optical computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. In this session, established users of some current 3D chemical dosimeters will briefly review the current status of 3D dosimetry, describe several dosimeters and their appropriate imaging for dose readout, present workflow procedures required for good dosimetry, and analyze some limitations for applications in select settings. We will review the application of 3D dosimetry to various clinical situations describing how 3D approaches can complement other dose delivery validation approaches already available in the clinic. The applications presented will be selected to inform attendees of the unique features provided by full 3D techniques. Learning Objectives: L. John Schreiner: Background and Motivation Understand recent developments enabling clinically practical 3D dosimetry, Appreciate 3D dosimetry workflow and dosimetry procedures, and Observe select examples from the clinic. Sofie Ceberg: Application to dynamic radiotherapy Observe full dosimetry under dynamic radiotherapy during respiratory motion, and Understand how the measurement of high resolution dose data in an

  17. Ada developers' supplement to the recommended approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Rush; Landis, Linda

    1993-01-01

    This document is a collection of guidelines for programmers and managers who are responsible for the development of flight dynamics applications in Ada. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the Recommended Approach to Software Development (SEL-81-305), which describes the software development life cycle, its products, reviews, methods, tools, and measures. The Ada Developers' Supplement provides additional detail on such topics as reuse, object-oriented analysis, and object-oriented design.

  18. Developing educational hypermedia applications: a methodological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Nunes

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an hypermedia development methodology with the aim of integrating the work of both educators, who will be primarily responsible for the instructional design, with that of software experts, responsible for the software design and development. Hence, it is proposed that the educators and programmers should interact in an integrated and systematic manner following a methodological approach.

  19. Toward a Cooperative Experimental System Development Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Kyng, Morten; Mogensen, Preben Holst

    1997-01-01

    This chapter represents a step towards the establishment of a new system development approach, called Cooperative Experimental System Development (CESD). CESD seeks to overcome a number of limitations in existing approaches: specification oriented methods usually assume that system design can...... be based solely on observation and detached reflection; prototyping methods often have a narrow focus on the technical construction of various kinds of prototypes; Participatory Design techniques—including the Scandinavian Cooperative Design (CD) approaches—seldom go beyond the early analysis....../design activities of development projects. In contrast, the CESD approach is characterized by its focus on: active user involvement throughout the entire development process; prototyping experiments closely coupled to work-situations and use-scenarios; transforming results from early cooperative analysis...

  20. Holistic and Ecological Approaches in Talent Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Kristoffer

    the somewhat opposing talent discovery and development approaches by focusing on how an environment manages the balance between these two, and how this balance becomes a part of the environment’s identity. Ecological perspectives on talent development hold rich insights for developing theories, research......Research on athletic talent has evolved from talent detection to talent development with both perspectives focusing on an individual athlete. This individual focus has been mirrored in the applied work of the sport psychology practitioner in youth competitive sport who has primarily focused...... on equipping individual athletes with the psychosocial skills required in a sport career. In contrast, the holistic ecological approach (HEA) to talent development in sport (Henriksen, Stambulova & Roessler, 2010) acknowledges the role of the overall environment in athletes’ development. The HEA integrates...

  1. Role of QA in total quality management environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.B.; Ayres, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    A successful company in today's highly competitive business environment must emphasize quality in all activities at all times. For most companies, this requires a major cultural change to establish appropriate operating attitudes and priorities. A total quality environment is required where quality becomes a way of life, and this process must be carefully managed. It will not be accomplished in a few short months with a simple management pronouncement. Instead, it evolves over a period of years through continuous incremental improvement. This evolution towards total quality requires a dramatic change in the quality assurance (QA) function of most companies. Traditionally, quality was automatically equated to QA and its attendant procedures and personnel. Now, quality is becoming a global concept, and QA can play a significant role in the process. The QA profession must, however, recognize and accept a new role as consultant, coach, and partner in today's total quality game. The days of the hard-line enforcer of procedural requirements are gone

  2. Moving from gamma passing rates to patient DVH-based QA metrics in pretreatment dose QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, Heming; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to explore the usefulness of the gamma passing rate metric for per-patient, pretreatment dose QA and to validate a novel patient-dose/DVH-based method and its accuracy and correlation. Specifically, correlations between: (1) gamma passing rates for three 3D dosimeter detector geometries vs clinically relevant patient DVH-based metrics; (2) Gamma passing rates of whole patient dose grids vs DVH-based metrics, (3) gamma passing rates filtered by region of interest (ROI) vs DVH-based metrics, and (4) the capability of a novel software algorithm that estimates corrected patient Dose-DVH based on conventional phan-tom QA data are analyzed. Methods: Ninety six unique ''imperfect'' step-and-shoot IMRT plans were generated by applying four different types of errors on 24 clinical Head/Neck patients. The 3D patient doses as well as the dose to a cylindrical QA phantom were then recalculated using an error-free beam model to serve as a simulated measurement for comparison. Resulting deviations to the planned vs simulated measured DVH-based metrics were generated, as were gamma passing rates for a variety of difference/distance criteria covering: dose-in-phantom comparisons and dose-in-patient comparisons, with the in-patient results calculated both over the whole grid and per-ROI volume. Finally, patient dose and DVH were predicted using the conventional per-beam planar data as input into a commercial ''planned dose perturbation'' (PDP) algorithm, and the results of these predicted DVH-based metrics were compared to the known values. Results: A range of weak to moderate correlations were found between clinically relevant patient DVH metrics (CTV-D95, parotid D{sub mean}, spinal cord D1cc, and larynx D{sub mean}) and both 3D detector and 3D patient gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm) for dose-in-phantom along with dose-in-patient for both whole patient volume and filtered per-ROI. There was

  3. APPROACHES TO EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT IN CZECH ORGANISATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNOUČKOVÁ, Lucie

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Education, development, knowledge management, career development and talent management are currently often discussed themes regarding strategic management of organisations. Those concepts are strategically important. Therefore the aim of the article is to evaluate possibilities of employee education and development and identify main approaches to employee development in Czech organizations. The results are based on a quantitative survey by questionnaire data collection. The results shows that 70% of respondents have possibility of development; 86% uses their skills and abilities and 63% stated that their employer support their development. On the contrary, 27% do not feel any possibility to grow and that may lead to disaffection, loss of production or even to employee turnover. Based on the results of the analysis, employees, who miss adequate level of development are usually key and knowledge employees; it is necessary to support their career plans and development to retain them in organisation.

  4. QA role in advanced energy activities: Reductionism, emergence, and functionalism; presuppositions in designing internal QA audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1988-06-01

    After a brief overview of the mission of Fermilab, this paper explores some of the problems associated with designing internal QA audits. The paper begins with several examples of how audits should not be designed, then goes on to analyze two types of presuppositions about organizational structure (reductionism and emergence) that can be misleading and skew the data sample if folded too heavily into the checklist. A third type of presupposition (functionalism), is proposed as a viable way of achieving a more well-rounded measure of the performance of an organization, i.e. its effectiveness, not just compliance.

  5. Systematic Approach for Development of Innovative Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarema Muhamedova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The necessity for development of innovative infrastructure is proved. Its nature, reasonability of systematic approach use and purpose has been identified. The author suggests considering the regime of infrastructural provision aimed at offering horizontal and vertical integration of institutions. This model is designed to create and integral complex for innovative support. The grounds of establishment the state politics are identified. The conceptual recommendations on its development and formation of relevant model, strategy and regulatory mechanism are outlined.

  6. Biotechnology approaches to developing herbicide tolerance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of herbicides has revolutionized weed control in many crop production systems. However, with the increasing development of weed resistances to many popular selective herbicides, the need has arisen to rethink the application of chemical weed control. Approaches to maintain the efficiency of chemical weed ...

  7. An approach towards sustainable groundwater development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To address water availability problems in a semi-arid country like South Africa, the National Water Act (RSA, 1998) proposes that specialists adopt an approach that is strategic, deliberate and dictated by socio-political reforms and socioeconomic development needs on a programmatic basis for long-term sustainability.

  8. Development of energy-efficient comfortable ventilation systems with air quality guided volume flow control and continuous monitoring of the window opening status. Part 1. Use of the LuQaS triple sensor for air quality guided volume flow control of mechanical ventilation systems in domestic buildings. Research project; Entwicklung energieeffizienter Komfortlueftungsanlagen mit luftqualitaetsgefuehrter Volumenstromregelung und kontinuierlicher Erfassung des Fensteroeffnungszustandes. Teilbericht 1. Einsatz des LuQaS-Triple-Sensors zur luftqualitaetsgefuehrten Volumenstromregelung von mechanischen Lueftungsanlagen in Wohngebaeuden. Forschungsprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossklos, Marc; Ebel, Witta; Knissel, Jens

    2011-05-15

    The report presents the preparatory work on the research project of the above title. The first chapter presents a status report on air quality monitoring inside rooms and evaluates the projects so far in which the LuQaS air quality sensor was used. The second chapter is a documentation of preliminary measurements using the LuQaS sensor in two passive residential buildings and several individual measurements for sensor calibration. It was found that in apartments with mechanical ventilation, the sensor reflects the user activities; further, the measured values indicate signal changes also in the off-air of the building, so that control via central sensors in the ventilation and off-air systems appears feasible. The third chapter discusses control strategies for air quality control. Apart from a discussion of control unit types, operating regimes, methods to determine rated values, and additional control functions, the effects of threshold value control with different threshold limit values and volume flow changes on the air quality of a model building was simulated. The results prove the expectation that the air quality inside a building will be influenced positively by air quality control. Theoretical investigations of the DrD method will be presented in another part-report of the project.

  9. Approach to performance based regulation development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spogen, L.R.; Cleland, L.L.

    1977-06-01

    An approach to the development of performance based regulations (PBR's) is described. Initially, a framework is constructed that consists of a function hierarchy and associated measures. The function at the top of the hierarchy is described in terms of societal objectives. Decomposition of this function into subordinate functions and their subsequent decompositions yield the function hierarchy. ''Bottom'' functions describe the roles of system components. When measures are identified for the performance of each function and means of aggregating performances to higher levels are established, the framework may be employed for developing PBR's. Consideration of system flexibility and performance uncertainty guide in determining the hierarchical level at which regulations are formulated. Ease of testing compliance is also a factor. To show the viability of the approach, the framework developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for evaluation of material control systems at fixed facilities is presented

  10. Education positive approach: contributions to human development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara ROMERO PÉREZ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article analizes the current theoretical perspectives underlying educational proposals aimed at promoting the positive development of the people. Firstly we show the most important characteristics of the positive approach. Then, we focus on the positive concept of the inner and its relation to eudaimonia, self-care and emotional selfgovernance. Thirdly, with reference to the contributions of Positive Psychology and Prevention Science we examine the two points of view –hedonic and eudaemonic– from which different pedagogical approaches are based and focus towards education for the welfare, social-emotional development and educational character. We conclude that, despite the lack of practical knowledge about happiness and the art of living, a positive education oriented to the human construction processes must promote both emotional and social skills such as feelings and moral responsibilities for the optimal development of human being.

  11. Towards a Provotyping Approach in Systems Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst

    1992-01-01

    This paper explores the notion of ‘provocation through concrete experience’ towards a provotyping approach. It addresses the question: How do we on the one hand, devise qualitatively new systems, and on the other hand, ensure their usability in a given practice? The notion of provocation through...... practice and a lack of mutual understanding, usually conceived of as hindrances to successful systems development, are used constructively. These ideas are compared to four related approaches: Future Workshops, Metaphorical Design, Cooperative Prototyping, and Organizational Games. The comparison serves...

  12. Stepwise Approach to Accessible MOOC Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draffan, E A; Wald, Mike; Dickens, Kate; Zimmermann, Gottfried; Kelle, Sebastian; Miesenberger, Klaus; Petz, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Developing resources for online learning in its many guises and more recently for MOOCs has been discussed across the educational sector, usually by individuals working for one institution or organisation. Rarely are there discussions that highlight the issues of collaborative working on content that is delivered over a period of weeks for a wide range of abilities and skills. In particular there is a reluctance to face the issues presented by barriers to access for those with disabilities and even the issues that could arise should an academic be unable to access the development platform to present content. This paper aims to approach these issues by providing guidance in a series of practical steps that highlight an inclusive design approach.

  13. Study on the application of quality assurance in research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyuk Il; Lim, Kap Soon; Lee, Young Keun; Lim, Nam Jin; Cho, Moon Seong; Choi, Se Jin; Won, Byung Chool; Kwon, Woo Ju; Lee, Jae Hyung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Application status of R and D QA system in advanced research organizations abroad was studied and related information were reviewed. On these bases, KAERI R and D QA system and detailed instructions for R and D projects were trained with the system. Especially for three of the five demo projects, project specific QA programs were developed in accordance with project types. Besides, the 1st Nuclear QA seminar and other events such as `Seminar on Adopting Quality Management in an R and D Environment` were held for the purpose of assisting QA implementation in demo projects as well as enhancing researchers` perceptions on QA. Based on these activities, measures for QA application in R and D were suggested, which include R and D QA document hierarchy, determination of the scope of QA application, and QA activities in project performance stage and appraisal stage. 4 tabs., 12 figs., 13 refs. (Author).

  14. Complexions of Iterative Information Systems Development Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus Rotvit Perlt

    There is an abundance of methodologies and approaches of information Systems Development (ISD) Processes. We use the concept of complexions of development processes and Technology Use Mediation (TUM) from a client perspective to show how an instance of a planned project in the prehospital sector...... changes dynamically. We identify how the events in the ISD process unfold according to which actions are taken and responded to by users and management respectively. The study finds that depending on the types of actions that users take, managers will react and this can greatly change the complexion...

  15. A development approach for nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1992-01-01

    The cost and time to develop nuclear thermal propulsion systems are very approach dependent. The objectives addressed are the development of an ''acceptable'' nuclear thermal propulsion system that can be used as part of the transportation system for people to explore Mars and the enhancement performance of other missions, within highly constrained budgets and schedules. To accomplish this, it was necessary to identify the cost drivers considering mission parameters, safety of the crew, mission success, facility availability and time and cost to construct new facilities, qualification criteria, status of technologies, management structure, and use of such system engineering techniques as concurrent engineering

  16. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  17. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma

  18. [A Quality Assurance (QA) System with a Web Camera for High-dose-rate Brachytherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Asako; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Oohira, Shingo; Isono, Masaru; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Inui, Shouki; Masaoka, Akira; Taniguchi, Makoto; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-03-01

    The quality assurance (QA) system that simultaneously quantifies the position and duration of an (192)Ir source (dwell position and time) was developed and the performance of this system was evaluated in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This QA system has two functions to verify and quantify dwell position and time by using a web camera. The web camera records 30 images per second in a range from 1,425 mm to 1,505 mm. A user verifies the source position from the web camera at real time. The source position and duration were quantified with the movie using in-house software which was applied with a template-matching technique. This QA system allowed verification of the absolute position in real time and quantification of dwell position and time simultaneously. It was evident from the verification of the system that the mean of step size errors was 0.31±0.1 mm and that of dwell time errors 0.1±0.0 s. Absolute position errors can be determined with an accuracy of 1.0 mm at all dwell points in three step sizes and dwell time errors with an accuracy of 0.1% in more than 10.0 s of the planned time. This system is to provide quick verification and quantification of the dwell position and time with high accuracy at various dwell positions without depending on the step size.

  19. A quality assurance (QA) system with a web camera for high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Asako; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ohira, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The quality assurance (QA) system that simultaneously quantifies the position and duration of an 192 Ir source (dwell position and time) was developed and the performance of this system was evaluated in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This QA system has two functions to verify and quantify dwell position and time by using a web camera. The web camera records 30 images per second in a range from 1,425 mm to 1,505 mm. A user verifies the source position from the web camera at real time. The source position and duration were quantified with the movie using in-house software which was applied with a template-matching technique. This QA system allowed verification of the absolute position in real time and quantification of dwell position and time simultaneously. It was evident from the verification of the system that the mean of step size errors was 0.3±0.1 mm and that of dwell time errors 0.1 ± 0.0 s. Absolute position errors can be determined with an accuracy of 1.0 mm at all dwell points in three step sizes and dwell time errors with an accuracy of 0.1% in more than 10.0 s of the planned time. This system is to provide quick verification and quantification of the dwell position and time with high accuracy at various dwell positions without depending on the step size. (author)

  20. Developing a holistic approach to obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jenny; Wimpenny, Peter

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the theoretical background and relevance of a holistic approach to obesity management by nurses. There is a global rise in the number of people with obesity, such that it now represents one of the major health challenges. However, nurses are often influenced by physical and dietetic focused approaches and could fail to acknowledge a range of other factors that can impact on weight management. As part of the development of a holistic approach to obesity a literature search was undertaken to establish relevant theoretical perspectives that underpin practice in physical, psychological and social aspects of care (focused on the period 1995-2005). In addition, experiences of working in a secondary care weight management clinic were also drawn upon. Psychobiological, attribution and social support theories were identified that could contribute to a better understanding of obesity. If these theoretical perspectives and supporting evidence can be integrated in a holistic approach to care and management it might be possible to promote better health and well-being in those with obesity. Creating a greater understanding of the range of theoretical perspectives and supporting evidence related to obesity could, it is argued, provide enhanced care and management. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. The performance regulatory approach in quality assurance: Its application to safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajaroff, Pedro M.

    2000-01-01

    In early 1991, the IAEA assembled an Advisory Group on the Comprehensive Revision of the Code and the Safety on Quality Assurance of the NUSS Programme. The Group was made up by specialists from a number of countries and from ISO, FORATOM, the EC and the IAEA itself, and its objective was completed in June 1995. This paper is aimed at describing the conceptual contents of the final draft of the revision 2 of the 50-C-QA Code 'Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants and other Nuclear Facilities' (hereinafter, the Code) which is essentially based on performance. Although the performance regulatory approach is not new in Argentina and in other countries, what is indeed novel is applying performance based QA. In such a way the Code will contribute to preventing both QA misinterpretations (i.e., a formalistic regulatory requirement) and the execution of non-effective work without attaining the needed quality level (what may be seen as a pathological deviation of QA). The Code contains ten basic requirements to be adopted when QA programmes are established and implemented in nuclear power plants. The goal is improving safety through an improvement in the methods applied for attaining quality. In line with the current developments in quality management techniques, priority is given to effectiveness of the QA programme. All the involved individuals (that is those in the managerial level, those performing the work and those assessing the work performed) must contribute to quality in a co-ordinated manner. The revised Safety Guides are being introduced, standing out those non existing before. Interrelation between quality assurance, safety culture and quality culture is to be noted. Besides QA for safety-related software mentioned as an issue to be considered by the IAEA. (author)

  2. NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL-DEVELOPMENT APPROACH IN AUTISTIC CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoslav KOPACHEV

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper on the children’s autism gives an overview of neuropsychological aspect and in context of the development dynamic approach.The author expresses some characteristics and dilemmas which refer to the Kanner’s autism and Asperger`s syndrome. He presents his own opinion and dilemmas about the every day practice in relation to children’s autism as a pathological disorder which is an expression of pervasive disorder, children’s psychosis or just one development phase in which children are fixated forever.The author thinks children’s autism should be seen in context of the inter-game of biological factors, development and the stress.

  3. A Systematic Approach for Soft Sensor Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Bao; Recke, Bodil; Renaudat, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach based on robust statistical techniques for development of a data-driven soft sensor, which is an important component of the process analytical technology (PAT) and is essential for effective quality control. The data quality is obviously of essential...... significance for a data-driven soft sensor. Therefore, preprocessing procedures for process measurements are described in detail. First, a template is defined based on one or more key process variables to handle missing data related to severe operation interruptions. Second, a univariate, followed...... reveal the effectiveness of the systematic framework in deriving data-driven soft sensors that provide reasonably reliable one-step-ahead predictions....

  4. The GSPC: Newest Franchise in al-Qa'ida's Global Jihad

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boudali, Lianne K

    2007-01-01

    ... of support in Europe. The alignment of the GSPC with al Qa ida represents a significant change in the group's strategy, however, its decision to join al Qa ida's global jihad should be understood as an act of desperation...

  5. Innovation in Developing Countries - a New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Bubel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently the enterprises’ development and competitive positions are determined by innovation. The importance of innovation in corporate management is a result of changes in corporate environment, as well as of preferences and changing needs of customers. These changes are accompanied by a new approach to innovation: they are no longer limited to developed countries, but also emerge in developing countries. Moreover, a reverse in the direction of innovations occurs, which means that developing countries are often not only the recipients of innovative products, but also creators and „exporters”. Given the current trends, the paper begins with the concept of innovation and deals with the subject of innovation in developing countries. The conclusion of the paper presents examples of innovative solutions originated from Poland. Although Poland ranks rather „tail end” in innovation rankings, but also deliver products that have a good chance to conquer the global market. By highlighting the importance of this reverse innovative trend, this article provides the conceptual grounds for further systematic research.

  6. A new approach for developing adjoint models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, P. E.; Funke, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    Many data assimilation algorithms rely on the availability of gradients of misfit functionals, which can be efficiently computed with adjoint models. However, the development of an adjoint model for a complex geophysical code is generally very difficult. Algorithmic differentiation (AD, also called automatic differentiation) offers one strategy for simplifying this task: it takes the abstraction that a model is a sequence of primitive instructions, each of which may be differentiated in turn. While extremely successful, this low-level abstraction runs into time-consuming difficulties when applied to the whole codebase of a model, such as differentiating through linear solves, model I/O, calls to external libraries, language features that are unsupported by the AD tool, and the use of multiple programming languages. While these difficulties can be overcome, it requires a large amount of technical expertise and an intimate familiarity with both the AD tool and the model. An alternative to applying the AD tool to the whole codebase is to assemble the discrete adjoint equations and use these to compute the necessary gradients. With this approach, the AD tool must be applied to the nonlinear assembly operators, which are typically small, self-contained units of the codebase. The disadvantage of this approach is that the assembly of the discrete adjoint equations is still very difficult to perform correctly, especially for complex multiphysics models that perform temporal integration; as it stands, this approach is as difficult and time-consuming as applying AD to the whole model. In this work, we have developed a library which greatly simplifies and automates the alternate approach of assembling the discrete adjoint equations. We propose a complementary, higher-level abstraction to that of AD: that a model is a sequence of linear solves. The developer annotates model source code with library calls that build a 'tape' of the operators involved and their dependencies, and

  7. Marketing Approach to Management of Spatial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil Petrovich Frolov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Marketing of territories is a modern mechanism of management of spatial entities› development (cities, regions, etc., which is based on the principles of regulated self-organization and cultivation of self-generating trends. In this paper territories are considered as socially responsible multistakeholder quasi-corporations that produce specific goods and promote their own brands. But it is not clear yet what marketing of territories is – the function or ideology of regional administration? How do regional marketing and branding correlate? What is «the product of the territory» and who are its› consumers? Why are instituting territorial goods so important? How do the traditional socio- economic development strategy and marketing strategy of the region relate? What is the action mechanism of the regional marketing? The article presents the author›s answers to these and other issues of theory and practice of regional marketing in the context of new methodological approaches

  8. SU-E-T-760: Tolerance Design for Site-Specific Range in Proton Patient QA Process Using the Six Sigma Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lah, J; Shin, D; Kim, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To show how tolerance design and tolerancing approaches can be used to predict and improve the site-specific range in patient QA process in implementing the Six Sigma. Methods: In this study, patient QA plans were selected according to 6 site-treatment groups: head &neck (94 cases), spine (76 cases), lung (89 cases), liver (53 cases), pancreas (55 cases), and prostate (121 cases), treated between 2007 and 2013. We evaluated a model of the Six Sigma that determines allowable deviations in design parameters and process variables in patient-specific QA, where possible, tolerance may be loosened, then customized if it necessary to meet the functional requirements. A Six Sigma problem-solving methodology is known as DMAIC phases, which are used stand for: Define a problem or improvement opportunity, Measure process performance, Analyze the process to determine the root causes of poor performance, Improve the process by fixing root causes, Control the improved process to hold the gains. Results: The process capability for patient-specific range QA is 0.65 with only ±1 mm of tolerance criteria. Our results suggested the tolerance level of ±2–3 mm for prostate and liver cases and ±5 mm for lung cases. We found that customized tolerance between calculated and measured range reduce that patient QA plan failure and almost all sites had failure rates less than 1%. The average QA time also improved from 2 hr to less than 1 hr for all including planning and converting process, depth-dose measurement and evaluation. Conclusion: The objective of tolerance design is to achieve optimization beyond that obtained through QA process improvement and statistical analysis function detailing to implement a Six Sigma capable design

  9. SU-E-T-760: Tolerance Design for Site-Specific Range in Proton Patient QA Process Using the Six Sigma Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lah, J [Myongji Hospital, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To show how tolerance design and tolerancing approaches can be used to predict and improve the site-specific range in patient QA process in implementing the Six Sigma. Methods: In this study, patient QA plans were selected according to 6 site-treatment groups: head &neck (94 cases), spine (76 cases), lung (89 cases), liver (53 cases), pancreas (55 cases), and prostate (121 cases), treated between 2007 and 2013. We evaluated a model of the Six Sigma that determines allowable deviations in design parameters and process variables in patient-specific QA, where possible, tolerance may be loosened, then customized if it necessary to meet the functional requirements. A Six Sigma problem-solving methodology is known as DMAIC phases, which are used stand for: Define a problem or improvement opportunity, Measure process performance, Analyze the process to determine the root causes of poor performance, Improve the process by fixing root causes, Control the improved process to hold the gains. Results: The process capability for patient-specific range QA is 0.65 with only ±1 mm of tolerance criteria. Our results suggested the tolerance level of ±2–3 mm for prostate and liver cases and ±5 mm for lung cases. We found that customized tolerance between calculated and measured range reduce that patient QA plan failure and almost all sites had failure rates less than 1%. The average QA time also improved from 2 hr to less than 1 hr for all including planning and converting process, depth-dose measurement and evaluation. Conclusion: The objective of tolerance design is to achieve optimization beyond that obtained through QA process improvement and statistical analysis function detailing to implement a Six Sigma capable design.

  10. Statistical process control analysis for patient-specific IMRT and VMAT QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Srisatit, Somyot; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-05-01

    This work applied statistical process control to establish the control limits of the % gamma pass of patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA), and to evaluate the efficiency of the QA process by using the process capability index (Cpml). A total of 278 IMRT QA plans in nasopharyngeal carcinoma were measured with MapCHECK, while 159 VMAT QA plans were undertaken with ArcCHECK. Six megavolts with nine fields were used for the IMRT plan and 2.5 arcs were used to generate the VMAT plans. The gamma (3%/3 mm) criteria were used to evaluate the QA plans. The % gamma passes were plotted on a control chart. The first 50 data points were employed to calculate the control limits. The Cpml was calculated to evaluate the capability of the IMRT/VMAT QA process. The results showed higher systematic errors in IMRT QA than VMAT QA due to the more complicated setup used in IMRT QA. The variation of random errors was also larger in IMRT QA than VMAT QA because the VMAT plan has more continuity of dose distribution. The average % gamma pass was 93.7% ± 3.7% for IMRT and 96.7% ± 2.2% for VMAT. The Cpml value of IMRT QA was 1.60 and VMAT QA was 1.99, which implied that the VMAT QA process was more accurate than the IMRT QA process. Our lower control limit for % gamma pass of IMRT is 85.0%, while the limit for VMAT is 90%. Both the IMRT and VMAT QA processes are good quality because Cpml values are higher than 1.0.

  11. TMT approach to observatory software development process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buur, Hanne; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Gillies, Kim; Dumas, Christophe; Bhatia, Ravinder

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the Observatory Software System (OSW) is to integrate all software and hardware components of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) to enable observations and data capture; thus it is a complex software system that is defined by four principal software subsystems: Common Software (CSW), Executive Software (ESW), Data Management System (DMS) and Science Operations Support System (SOSS), all of which have interdependencies with the observatory control systems and data acquisition systems. Therefore, the software development process and plan must consider dependencies to other subsystems, manage architecture, interfaces and design, manage software scope and complexity, and standardize and optimize use of resources and tools. Additionally, the TMT Observatory Software will largely be developed in India through TMT's workshare relationship with the India TMT Coordination Centre (ITCC) and use of Indian software industry vendors, which adds complexity and challenges to the software development process, communication and coordination of activities and priorities as well as measuring performance and managing quality and risk. The software project management challenge for the TMT OSW is thus a multi-faceted technical, managerial, communications and interpersonal relations challenge. The approach TMT is using to manage this multifaceted challenge is a combination of establishing an effective geographically distributed software team (Integrated Product Team) with strong project management and technical leadership provided by the TMT Project Office (PO) and the ITCC partner to manage plans, process, performance, risk and quality, and to facilitate effective communications; establishing an effective cross-functional software management team composed of stakeholders, OSW leadership and ITCC leadership to manage dependencies and software release plans, technical complexities and change to approved interfaces, architecture, design and tool set, and to facilitate

  12. Schistosomiasis vaccine development: approaches and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Bergquist

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence for acquired immunity to schistosomiasis in humans supports the case for immunological intervention. On the other hand, rapid reinfection poses a threat to younger age groups due to the slow maturation of natural resistance. However, rational approaches, based on advances in immunology and molecular biology, have substantially increased the odds of producing an effective vaccine. Since the parasite cannot replicate in the human host and serious morbidity generally occurs only after a relatively long period of heavy worm burden, complete protection against infection is not essential. The chances of success would increase if more than one of the various host/parasite interphases were targeted, for example reducing morbidity through decreased worm loads as well as through suppression of egg production. Several promising schistosome antigens have now reached an advanced phase of development and are currently undergoing independent confirmatory testing according to a standardized protocol. A few molecules are being contemplated for scaled-up production but, so far, only one has reached the stage of industrial manufacture and safety testing. Since schistosomiasis cannot realistically be controlled by a single approach, vaccination is envisaged to be implemented in conjunction with other means of control, notably chemotherapy.

  13. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan

  14. Discussion of QA grading for AP1000 NP plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Shuiyun; Zhang Qingchuan

    2012-01-01

    The grading method of quality assurance for the following AP1000 project is presented based on the Westinghouse classification principle, referring to the classification method of the AP1000 self-reliance supporting project and considering the factors of classification, which can meet the requirements of domestic nuclear safety regulation and standard of the QA classification. (authors)

  15. Q&A: Grace Anne Koppel, Living Well with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their own lives back is the most rewarding thing we have ever done. Read More "The Challenge of COPD" Articles Q&A: Grace Anne Koppel, Living Well with COPD / What is COPD? / What Causes COPD? / Getting Tested / Am I at Risk? / COPD Quiz Fall ...

  16. Q&A: The Basics of California's School Finance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    EdSource, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In a state as large and complex as California, education financing can become as complicated as rocket science. This two-page Q&A provides a brief, easy-to-understand explanation of California's school finance system and introduces the issues of its adequacy and equity. A list of resources providing additional information is provided.

  17. A community Q&A for HEP Software and Computing ?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    How often do you use StackOverflow or ServerFault to find information in your daily work? Would you be interested in a community Q&A site for HEP Software and Computing, for instance a dedicated StackExchange site? I looked into this question...

  18. Gating treatment delivery QA based on a surrogate motion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chojnowski, J.; Simpson, E.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: To develop a methodology to estimate intrafractional target position error during a phase-based gated treatment. Westmead Cancer Care Centre is using respiratory correlated phase-based gated beam delivery in the treatment of lung cancer. The gating technique is managed by the Varian Real-time Position Management (RPM) system, version 1.7.5. A 6-dot block is placed on the abdomen of the patient and acts as a surrogate for the target motion. During a treatment session, the motion of the surrogate can be recorded by RPM application. Analysis of the surrogate motion file by in-house developed software allows the intrafractional error of the treatment session to be computed. To validate the computed error, a simple test that involves the introduction of deliberate errors is performed. Errors of up to 1.1 cm are introduced to a metal marker placed on a surrogate using the Varian Breathing Phantom. The moving marker was scanned in prospective mode using a GE Lightspeed 16 CT scanner. Using the CT images, a difference of the marker position with and without introduced errors is compared to the calculated errors based on the surrogate motion. The average and standard deviation of a difference between calculated target position errors and measured introduced artificial errors of the marker position is 0.02 cm and 0.07 cm respectively. Conclusion The calculated target positional error based on surrogate motion analysis provides a quantitative measure of intrafractional target positional errors during treatment. Routine QA for gated treatment using surrogate motion analysis is relatively quick and simple.

  19. Process control analysis of IMRT QA: implications for clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlicki, Todd; Rice, Roger K; Yoo, Sua; Court, Laurence E; McMillan, Sharon K; Russell, J Donald; Pacyniak, John M; Woo, Milton K; Basran, Parminder S; Boyer, Arthur L; Bonilla, Claribel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: first is to investigate the process of IMRT QA using control charts and second is to compare control chart limits to limits calculated using the standard deviation (σ). Head and neck and prostate IMRT QA cases from seven institutions in both academic and community settings are considered. The percent difference between the point dose measurement in phantom and the corresponding result from the treatment planning system (TPS) is used for analysis. The average of the percent difference calculations defines the accuracy of the process and is called the process target. This represents the degree to which the process meets the clinical goal of 0% difference between the measurements and TPS. IMRT QA process ability defines the ability of the process to meet clinical specifications (e.g. 5% difference between the measurement and TPS). The process ability is defined in two ways: (1) the half-width of the control chart limits, and (2) the half-width of ±3σ limits. Process performance is characterized as being in one of four possible states that describes the stability of the process and its ability to meet clinical specifications. For the head and neck cases, the average process target across institutions was 0.3% (range: -1.5% to 2.9%). The average process ability using control chart limits was 7.2% (range: 5.3% to 9.8%) compared to 6.7% (range: 5.3% to 8.2%) using standard deviation limits. For the prostate cases, the average process target across the institutions was 0.2% (range: -1.8% to 1.4%). The average process ability using control chart limits was 4.4% (range: 1.3% to 9.4%) compared to 5.3% (range: 2.3% to 9.8%) using standard deviation limits. Using the standard deviation to characterize IMRT QA process performance resulted in processes being preferentially placed in one of the four states. This is in contrast to using control charts for process characterization where the IMRT QA processes were spread over three of the

  20. From Field Notes to Data Portal - A Scalable Data QA/QC Framework for Tower Networks: Progress and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, C.; Hackley, S.; Lee, R.; Holling, G.; Bonarrigo, S.

    2017-12-01

    Quality assurance and control (QA/QC) is one of the most important yet challenging aspects of producing research-quality data. Data quality issues are multi-faceted, including sensor malfunctions, unmet theoretical assumptions, and measurement interference from humans or the natural environment. Tower networks such as Ameriflux, ICOS, and NEON continue to grow in size and sophistication, yet tools for robust, efficient, scalable QA/QC have lagged. Quality control remains a largely manual process heavily relying on visual inspection of data. In addition, notes of measurement interference are often recorded on paper without an explicit pathway to data flagging. As such, an increase in network size requires a near-proportional increase in personnel devoted to QA/QC, quickly stressing the human resources available. We present a scalable QA/QC framework in development for NEON that combines the efficiency and standardization of automated checks with the power and flexibility of human review. This framework includes fast-response monitoring of sensor health, a mobile application for electronically recording maintenance activities, traditional point-based automated quality flagging, and continuous monitoring of quality outcomes and longer-term holistic evaluations. This framework maintains the traceability of quality information along the entirety of the data generation pipeline, and explicitly links field reports of measurement interference to quality flagging. Preliminary results show that data quality can be effectively monitored and managed for a multitude of sites with a small group of QA/QC staff. Several components of this framework are open-source, including a R-Shiny application for efficiently monitoring, synthesizing, and investigating data quality issues.

  1. Environmental analytical laboratory setup operation and QA/QC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, J.P.; Boyd, J.A.; DeViney, S.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental analysis requires precise and timely measurements. The required precise measurement is ensured with quality control and timeliness through an efficient operation. The efficiency of the operation also ensures cost-competitiveness. Environmental analysis plays a very important role in the environmental protection program. Due to the possible litigation involvement, most environmental analyses follow stringent criteria, such as the U.S. EPA Contract Laboratory Program procedures with analytical results documented in an orderly manner. The documentation demonstrates that all quality control steps are followed and facilitates data evaluation to determine the quality and usefulness of the data. Furthermore, the tedious documents concerning sample checking, chain-of-custody, standard or surrogate preparation, daily refrigerator and oven temperature monitoring, analytical and extraction logbooks, standard operation procedures, etc., also are an important part of the laboratory documentation. Quality control for environmental analysis is becoming more stringent, required documentation is becoming more detailed and turnaround time is shorter. However, the business is becoming more cost-competitive and it appears that this trend will continue. In this paper, we discuss what should be done to deal this high quality, fast-paced and tedious environmental analysis process at a competitive cost. The success of environmental analysis is people. The knowledge and experience of the staff are the key to a successful environmental analysis program. In order to be successful in this new area, the ability to develop new methods is crucial. In addition, the laboratory information system, laboratory automation and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) are major factors for laboratory success. This paper concentrates on these areas

  2. Genetic Approaches to Develop Salt Tolerant Germplasm

    KAUST Repository

    Tester, Mark A.

    2015-08-19

    Forty percent of the world\\'s food is produced under irrigation, and this is directly threatened by over-exploitation and changes in the global environment. One way to address this threat is to develop systems for increasing our ability to use lower quality water, in particular saline water. Low cost partial desalination of brackish water, use of saline water for cooling and increases in the salinity tolerance of crops can all contribute to the development of this new agricultural system. In this talk, the focus will be on the use of forward genetic approaches for discovery of genes related to salinity tolerance in barley and tomatoes. Rather than studying salinity tolerance as a trait in itself, we dissect salinity tolerance into a series of components that are hypothesised to contribute to overall salinity tolerance (following the paradigm of Munns & Tester, 2008). For example, one significant component of tolerance of most crop plants to moderate soil salinity is due to the ability to maintain low concentrations of Na+ in the leaves, and much analysis of this aspect has been done (e.g. Roy et al., 2013, 2014). A major site for the control of shoot Na+ accumulation is at the plasma membrane of the mature stele of the root. Alleles of HKT, a major gene underlying this transport process have been characterized and, in work led by Dr Rana Munns (CSIRO), have now been introgressed into commercial durum wheat and led to significantly increased yields in saline field conditions (Munns et al., 2012). The genotyping of mapping populations is now highly efficient. However, the ability to quantitatively phenotype these populations is now commonly limiting forward progress in plant science. The increasing power of digital imaging and computational technologies offers the opportunity to relieve this phenotyping bottleneck. The Plant Accelerator is a 4500m2 growth facility that provides non-destructive phenotyping of large populations of plants (http

  3. Multi Sensor Approach to Address Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid

    2007-01-01

    The main objectives of Earth Science research are many folds: to understand how does this planet operates, can we model her operation and eventually develop the capability to predict such changes. However, the underlying goals of this work are to eventually serve the humanity in providing societal benefits. This requires continuous, and detailed observations from many sources in situ, airborne and space. By and large, the space observations are the way to comprehend the global phenomena across continental boundaries and provide credible boundary conditions for the mesoscale studies. This requires a multiple sensors, look angles and measurements over the same spot in accurately solving many problems that may be related to air quality, multi hazard disasters, public health, hydrology and more. Therefore, there are many ways to address these issues and develop joint implementation, data sharing and operating strategies for the benefit of the world community. This is because for large geographical areas or regions and a diverse population, some sound observations, scientific facts and analytical models must support the decision making. This is crucial for the sustainability of vital resources of the world and at the same time to protect the inhabitants, endangered species and the ecology. Needless to say, there is no single sensor, which can answer all such questions effectively. Due to multi sensor approach, it puts a tremendous burden on any single implementing entity in terms of information, knowledge, budget, technology readiness and computational power. And, more importantly, the health of planet Earth and its ability to sustain life is not governed by a single country, but in reality, is everyone's business on this planet. Therefore, with this notion, it is becoming an impractical problem by any single organization/country to bear this colossal responsibility. So far, each developed country within their means has proceeded along satisfactorily in implementing

  4. Developing disaster management modules: a collaborative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Valerie

    Disasters, whether natural or human induced, can strike when least expected. The events of 9/11 in the US, the 7/7 bombings in the UK, and the anthrax incident in the US on 10th October 2001 indicate that there is a need to have a nursing workforce who is able to respond effectively to mass casualty events and incidents involving chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear substances. Multi-agency collaboration is one of the fundamental principles of disaster preparedness and response. It was therefore necessary to take a similar multi-agency collaborative approach to develop modules on the management of mass casualty events and incidents involving hazardous substances. The modules are offered to registered nurses and registered paramedics. They can be taken independently or as part of a BSc in nursing or health pathway, on a part-time basis. Since the commencement of the modules in September 2004, registered paramedics and registered nurses who work in a wide range of specialties have accessed them.

  5. Using Student Surveys to Monitor Teacher Effectiveness: Q&A with Dr. Ronald Ferguson. REL Mid-Atlantic Teacher Effectiveness Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this webinar, Dr. Ronald Ferguson, creator of the Tripod Project and Senior Lecturer at Harvard University Graduate School of Education, discussed the use of student surveys as an approach to measuring teacher effectiveness. This Q&A addressed the questions participants had for Dr. Ferguson following the webinar. The webinar recording and…

  6. Approaches to Sustainable Development in Contemporary Museology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Campolmi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development has become a leading value of the 21st century society. Throsby’s and Hutter’s recent studies on inter and intra-generational equity, diversity maintenance and interdependence have demonstrated that sustainability values promote a different perspective on cultural institutions. Particularly, they incite to reorganize the production and consumption patterns, and rethink about the construction of meanings in permanent displays. The paper wants to explore how sustainability principles are an approach to develop a “sustainable museology”, which cares about making visitors more critic and aware of the political, sociological, epistemological and cultural implications that lay behind the making of exhibitions. Museums undertaking a sustainable development of their narrative making processes overpass the Foucauldian idea of art museums as heterotopy, (space of otherness, and approach that of archétopy. This model offers rooms to rethink about narratives as stakeholders’ collective processes capable to “meet the needs of the present without compromising those of the future generations”, as stated in the “Brundtland Commision” Report of 1987. The last display done by the Berlin Neue Nationalgalerie is analysed as a case-study for archétopy. Il paper analizza il concetto di sostenibilità nelle politiche governative dei musei d’arte. Lo studio osserva tale valore da un punto di vista sia teorico che pratico e cita l’esempio dei grandi musei europei, facendo più volte riferimento al caso della Tate Modern di Londra. Se da un lato l’argomento è esplicitamente collegato ai musei d’arte in quanto essi operano per la sostenibilità del bene comune, dall’altro i musei europei hanno basato le proprie politiche culturali adottando il così detto approccio “three bottom” già intrapreso dalle grandi aziende e dalle business companies. Tale approccio si basa sull’elaborazione di politiche attente alla

  7. Deep nets vs expert designed features in medical physics: An IMRT QA case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interian, Yannet; Rideout, Vincent; Kearney, Vasant P; Gennatas, Efstathios; Morin, Olivier; Cheung, Joey; Solberg, Timothy; Valdes, Gilmer

    2018-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of Deep Neural Networks against a technique designed by domain experts in the prediction of gamma passing rates for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance (IMRT QA). A total of 498 IMRT plans across all treatment sites were planned in Eclipse version 11 and delivered using a dynamic sliding window technique on Clinac iX or TrueBeam Linacs. Measurements were performed using a commercial 2D diode array, and passing rates for 3%/3 mm local dose/distance-to-agreement (DTA) were recorded. Separately, fluence maps calculated for each plan were used as inputs to a convolution neural network (CNN). The CNNs were trained to predict IMRT QA gamma passing rates using TensorFlow and Keras. A set of model architectures, inspired by the convolutional blocks of the VGG-16 ImageNet model, were constructed and implemented. Synthetic data, created by rotating and translating the fluence maps during training, was created to boost the performance of the CNNs. Dropout, batch normalization, and data augmentation were utilized to help train the model. The performance of the CNNs was compared to a generalized Poisson regression model, previously developed for this application, which used 78 expert designed features. Deep Neural Networks without domain knowledge achieved comparable performance to a baseline system designed by domain experts in the prediction of 3%/3 mm Local gamma passing rates. An ensemble of neural nets resulted in a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.70 ± 0.05 and the domain expert model resulted in a 0.74 ± 0.06. Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) with transfer learning can predict IMRT QA passing rates by automatically designing features from the fluence maps without human expert supervision. Predictions from CNNs are comparable to a system carefully designed by physicist experts. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. TH-A-BRC-01: AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieterich, S.

    2016-01-01

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  9. TH-A-BRC-00: New Task Groups for External Beam QA: An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  10. TH-A-BRC-00: New Task Groups for External Beam QA: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  11. TH-A-BRC-01: AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieterich, S. [UC Davis Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  12. Agile Service Development: A Rule-Based Method Engineering Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Martijn Zoet; Stijn Hoppenbrouwers; Inge van de Weerd; Johan Versendaal

    2011-01-01

    Agile software development has evolved into an increasingly mature software development approach and has been applied successfully in many software vendors’ development departments. In this position paper, we address the broader agile service development. Based on method engineering principles we

  13. Policy development: a more formal systems approach process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greeff, AP

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Policy developers in corporate and governance roles are often developing policies by means of policy development cycles that typically resemble a system life cycle approach. Although policy development cycles often vary, depending on the applicable...

  14. USGS QA Plan: Certification of digital airborne mapping products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopherson, J.

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate acceptance of new digital technologies in aerial imaging and mapping, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners have launched a Quality Assurance (QA) Plan for Digital Aerial Imagery. This should provide a foundation for the quality of digital aerial imagery and products. It introduces broader considerations regarding processes employed by aerial flyers in collecting, processing and delivering data, and provides training and information for US producers and users alike.

  15. QA/QC - Practices and procedures in WWER fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keselica, M.

    1999-01-01

    Construction time schedule and commissioning (unit by unit) of the NPP Dukovany as well as structure of electricity generation in the CEZ in 1998 are reviewed. History of QA/QC system establishment and rules (system standards) as well as organization chart of the NPP Dukovany and quality manual of reactor physics department are presented. Standards of worker's qualification and nuclear fuel inspections are discussed. Fuel reliability indicators are presented

  16. Institutional Patient-specific IMRT QA Does Not Predict Unacceptable Plan Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Molineu, Andrea [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kerns, James R.; Faught, Austin M.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Pulliam, Kiley B.; Tonigan, Jackie [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Paola [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Stingo, Francesco [The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether in-house patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) results predict Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC)-Houston phantom results. Methods and Materials: IROC Houston's IMRT head and neck phantoms have been irradiated by numerous institutions as part of clinical trial credentialing. We retrospectively compared these phantom results with those of in-house IMRT QA (following the institution's clinical process) for 855 irradiations performed between 2003 and 2013. The sensitivity and specificity of IMRT QA to detect unacceptable or acceptable plans were determined relative to the IROC Houston phantom results. Additional analyses evaluated specific IMRT QA dosimeters and analysis methods. Results: IMRT QA universally showed poor sensitivity relative to the head and neck phantom, that is, poor ability to predict a failing IROC Houston phantom result. Depending on how the IMRT QA results were interpreted, overall sensitivity ranged from 2% to 18%. For different IMRT QA methods, sensitivity ranged from 3% to 54%. Although the observed sensitivity was particularly poor at clinical thresholds (eg 3% dose difference or 90% of pixels passing gamma), receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that no threshold showed good sensitivity and specificity for the devices evaluated. Conclusions: IMRT QA is not a reasonable replacement for a credentialing phantom. Moreover, the particularly poor agreement between IMRT QA and the IROC Houston phantoms highlights surprising inconsistency in the QA process.

  17. Institutional Patient-specific IMRT QA Does Not Predict Unacceptable Plan Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Molineu, Andrea; Kerns, James R.; Faught, Austin M.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Pulliam, Kiley B.; Tonigan, Jackie; Alvarez, Paola; Stingo, Francesco; Followill, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether in-house patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) results predict Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC)-Houston phantom results. Methods and Materials: IROC Houston's IMRT head and neck phantoms have been irradiated by numerous institutions as part of clinical trial credentialing. We retrospectively compared these phantom results with those of in-house IMRT QA (following the institution's clinical process) for 855 irradiations performed between 2003 and 2013. The sensitivity and specificity of IMRT QA to detect unacceptable or acceptable plans were determined relative to the IROC Houston phantom results. Additional analyses evaluated specific IMRT QA dosimeters and analysis methods. Results: IMRT QA universally showed poor sensitivity relative to the head and neck phantom, that is, poor ability to predict a failing IROC Houston phantom result. Depending on how the IMRT QA results were interpreted, overall sensitivity ranged from 2% to 18%. For different IMRT QA methods, sensitivity ranged from 3% to 54%. Although the observed sensitivity was particularly poor at clinical thresholds (eg 3% dose difference or 90% of pixels passing gamma), receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that no threshold showed good sensitivity and specificity for the devices evaluated. Conclusions: IMRT QA is not a reasonable replacement for a credentialing phantom. Moreover, the particularly poor agreement between IMRT QA and the IROC Houston phantoms highlights surprising inconsistency in the QA process

  18. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bentzen, Soren M.; Bruner, Deborah; Curran, Walter J.; Dignam, James; Efstathiou, Jason A.; FitzGerald, T. J.; Hurkmans, Coen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack; Merchant, Timothy E.; Michalski, Jeff; Palta, Jatinder R.; Simon, Richard; Ten Haken, Randal K.; Timmerman, Robert; Tunis, Sean; Coleman, C. Norman; Purdy, James

    2012-01-01

    Background In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a two day workshop to examine the challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. Lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities like proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results Four recommendations were made: 1) Develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor intensity of QA to clinical trial objectives. Tiers include (i) general credentialing, (ii) trial specific credentialing, and (iii) individual case review; 2) Establish a case QA repository; 3) Develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and 4) Explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion Radiotherapy QA may impact clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based. PMID:22425219

  19. MDEP Common Position CP-VICWG-01. Common Position: Establishment of Common QA/QM Criteria for the Multinational Vendor Inspection CP-VICWG-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a set of common positions for harmonizing inspection criteria called 'Common QA/QM Criteria' which will be used in Multinational Vendor Inspections. This document was prepared by the Vendor Inspection Co-operation Working Group (VICWG) of the Multinational Design Evaluation Program (MDEP). The 'Common QA/QM Criteria' provides the basic areas for consideration when performing Vendor Inspections. The criteria have been developed in conformity with International Codes and Standards such as IAEA, ISO, etc. that MDEP member countries have adopted

  20. Comparing Two Approaches for Engineering Education Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade there have been two dominating models for reforming engineering education: Problem/Project Based Learning (PBL) and the CDIO Initiative. The aim of this paper is to compare the PBL and CDIO approaches to engineering education reform, to identify and explain similarities...... and differences. CDIO and PBL will each be defined and compared in terms of the original need analysis, underlying educational philosophy and the essentials of the respective approaches to engineering education. In these respects we see many similarities. Circumstances that explain differences in history...... approaches have much in common and can be combined, and especially that the practitioners have much to learn from each other’s experiences through a dialogue between the communities. This structured comparison will potentially indicate specifically what an institution experienced in one of the communities...

  1. SU-E-T-354: Efficient and Enhanced QA Testing of Linear Accelerators Using a Real-Time Beam Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J; Farrokhkish, M; Norrlinger, B; Wang, Y [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heaton, R; Jaffray, D; Islam, M [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of performing routine QA tests of linear accelerators (Linac) using the Integral Quality Monitoring (IQM) system. The system, consisting of a 1-D sensitivity gradient large area ion-chamber mounted at the collimator, allows automatic collection and analysis of beam data. Methods: The IQM was investigated to perform several QA constancy tests, similar to those recommended by AAPM TG142, of a Linac including: beam output, MLC calibration, beam symmetry, relative dose factor (RDF), dose linearity, output as a function of gantry angle and dose rate. All measurements by the IQM system accompanied a reference measurement using a conventional dosimetry system and were performed on an Elekta Infinity Linac with Agility MLC. The MLC calibration check is done using a Picket-Fence type 2×10cm{sup 2} field positioned at different off-axis locations along the chamber gradient. Beam symmetry constancy values are established by signals from an 4×4cm{sup 2} aperture located at various off-axis positions; the sensitivity of the test was determined by the changes in the signals in response to a tilt in the beam. The data for various square field sizes were used to develop a functional relationship with RDF. Results: The IQM tracked the beam output well within 1% of the reference ion-chamber readings. The Picket-Fence type field test detected a 1mm shift error of one MLC bank. The system was able to detect 2.5% or greater beam asymmetry. The IQM results for all other QA tests were found to agree with the reference values to within 0.5%. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the IQM system can effectively monitor the Linac performance parameters for the purpose of routine QA constancy tests. With minimum user interactions a comprehensive set of tests can be performed efficiently, allowing frequent monitoring of the Linac. The presenting author’s salary is funded by the manufacturer of the QA device. All the other authors have financial

  2. SU-E-T-354: Efficient and Enhanced QA Testing of Linear Accelerators Using a Real-Time Beam Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J; Farrokhkish, M; Norrlinger, B; Wang, Y; Heaton, R; Jaffray, D; Islam, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of performing routine QA tests of linear accelerators (Linac) using the Integral Quality Monitoring (IQM) system. The system, consisting of a 1-D sensitivity gradient large area ion-chamber mounted at the collimator, allows automatic collection and analysis of beam data. Methods: The IQM was investigated to perform several QA constancy tests, similar to those recommended by AAPM TG142, of a Linac including: beam output, MLC calibration, beam symmetry, relative dose factor (RDF), dose linearity, output as a function of gantry angle and dose rate. All measurements by the IQM system accompanied a reference measurement using a conventional dosimetry system and were performed on an Elekta Infinity Linac with Agility MLC. The MLC calibration check is done using a Picket-Fence type 2×10cm 2 field positioned at different off-axis locations along the chamber gradient. Beam symmetry constancy values are established by signals from an 4×4cm 2 aperture located at various off-axis positions; the sensitivity of the test was determined by the changes in the signals in response to a tilt in the beam. The data for various square field sizes were used to develop a functional relationship with RDF. Results: The IQM tracked the beam output well within 1% of the reference ion-chamber readings. The Picket-Fence type field test detected a 1mm shift error of one MLC bank. The system was able to detect 2.5% or greater beam asymmetry. The IQM results for all other QA tests were found to agree with the reference values to within 0.5%. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the IQM system can effectively monitor the Linac performance parameters for the purpose of routine QA constancy tests. With minimum user interactions a comprehensive set of tests can be performed efficiently, allowing frequent monitoring of the Linac. The presenting author’s salary is funded by the manufacturer of the QA device. All the other authors have financial interests with

  3. A novel DTI-QA tool: Automated metric extraction exploiting the sphericity of an agar filled phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Sofia; Viviano, Joseph; Zamyadi, Mojdeh; Kingsley, Peter B; Kochunov, Peter; Strother, Stephen; Voineskos, Aristotle

    2018-02-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) tool (acquisition guidelines and automated processing) for diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data using a common agar-based phantom used for fMRI QA. The goal is to produce a comprehensive set of automated, sensitive and robust QA metrics. A readily available agar phantom was scanned with and without parallel imaging reconstruction. Other scanning parameters were matched to the human scans. A central slab made up of either a thick slice or an average of a few slices, was extracted and all processing was performed on that image. The proposed QA relies on the creation of two ROIs for processing: (i) a preset central circular region of interest (ccROI) and (ii) a signal mask for all images in the dataset. The ccROI enables computation of average signal for SNR calculations as well as average FA values. The production of the signal masks enables automated measurements of eddy current and B0 inhomogeneity induced distortions by exploiting the sphericity of the phantom. Also, the signal masks allow automated background localization to assess levels of Nyquist ghosting. The proposed DTI-QA was shown to produce eleven metrics which are robust yet sensitive to image quality changes within site and differences across sites. It can be performed in a reasonable amount of scan time (~15min) and the code for automated processing has been made publicly available. A novel DTI-QA tool has been proposed. It has been applied successfully on data from several scanners/platforms. The novelty lies in the exploitation of the sphericity of the phantom for distortion measurements. Other novel contributions are: the computation of an SNR value per gradient direction for the diffusion weighted images (DWIs) and an SNR value per non-DWI, an automated background detection for the Nyquist ghosting measurement and an error metric reflecting the contribution of EPI instability to the eddy current induced shape changes observed for DWIs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  4. The Microsociological Approach on Local Development Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lic. Domingos António-Lópes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, societies, economies and cultures of the countries developed and developing have lived deep structural changes of marked breadth and impact processes in everyday lives.  Today we are witnessing a new era of technological and organizational restructuring that affects the ways to produce and manage local development. Sociology as a social science has begun to rethink development from the voices of a variety of actors, to strike with them rhythms and intensities of the social and cultural dynamics. This article is a sociological study on local development from the perspective of culture, placing the concepts of social space and socialization practices. An analysis of documentary sources which favoured the systematization of the concepts of development and local development.Keywords:  development, local development, socialization, cultural practices, social space, social capital.

  5. Baltimore: A Multifaceted Approach to Developing Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Rachel E.; Shiller, Jessica; Connolly, Faith

    2018-01-01

    As community schools spread across the country, community school staff need effective approaches to engaging families and community-based partners. Such principles must be broadly applicable, given community schools' mandate to adapt to different local contexts. Based on recent research on Baltimore City's community schools, the authors highlight…

  6. Applying the Cultural Approach to Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvain, Mary; Beebe, Heidi; Zhao, Shuheng

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive development is a cultural process. More experienced cultural members and the practices, institutions, and artifacts of the culture provide support and guidance for children as they develop knowledge and thinking skills. In this article, the authors describe the value that is added to our understanding of cognitive development when…

  7. Characterization of a prototype MR-compatible Delta4 QA system in a 1.5 tesla MR-linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, J. H. W.; Seravalli, E.; Houweling, A. C.; Woodings, S. J.; van Rooij, R.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2018-01-01

    To perform patient plan quality assurance (QA) on a newly installed MR-linac (MRL) it is necessary to have an MR-compatible QA device. An MR compatible device (MR-Delta4) has been developed together with Scandidos AB (Uppsala, Sweden). The basic characteristics of the detector response, such as short-term reproducibility, dose linearity, field size dependency, dose rate dependency, dose-per-pulse dependency and angular dependency, were investigated for the clinical Delta4-PT as well as for the MR compatible version. All tests were performed with both devices on a conventional linac and the MR compatible device was tested on the MRL as well. No statistically significant differences were found in the short-term reproducibility (tesla magnetic field of the Elekta MR-linac

  8. Agricultural Development in Rural Nigeria: A Review of Approaches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural Development in Rural Nigeria: A Review of Approaches. ... African Journal of Sustainable Development ... the country's very low human development indicators, particularly in the rural areas, is a serious cause of concern.

  9. Developing an Evaluation Tool for Assessing Clinical Ethics Consultation Skills in Simulation Based Education: The ACES Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Katherine; Parsi, Kayhan; McCarthy, Michael; Siddall, Viva Jo; Kuczewski, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities has created a quality attestation (QA) process for clinical ethics consultants; the pilot phase of reviewing portfolios has begun. One aspect of the QA process which is particularly challenging is assessing the interpersonal skills of individual clinical ethics consultants. We propose that using case simulation to evaluate clinical ethics consultants is an approach that can meet this need provided clear standards for assessment are identified. To this end, we developed the Assessing Clinical Ethics Skills (ACES) tool, which identifies and specifies specific behaviors that a clinical ethics consultant should demonstrate in an ethics case simulation. The aim is for the clinical ethics consultant or student to use a videotaped case simulation, along with the ACES tool scored by a trained rater, to demonstrate their competence as part of their QA portfolio. The development and piloting of the tool is described.

  10. System theoretic approach to sustainable development problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batanović Vladan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that the concepts and methodology contained in the system theory and operations research are suitable for application in the planning and control of the sustainable development. The sustainable development problems can be represented using the state space concepts, such as the transition of system, from the given initial state to the final state. It is shown that sustainable development represents a specific control problem. The peculiarity of the sustainable development is that the target is to keep the system in the prescribed feasible region of the state space. The analysis of planning and control problems of sustainable development has also shown that methods developed in the operations research area, such as multicriteria optimization, dynamic processes simulation, non-conventional treatment of uncertainty etc. are adequate, exact base, suitable for resolution of these problems.

  11. Approaches to Sustainable Development in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostrzewa, Karina; ); Piasecki, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    The sustainable development principle was introduced into the legal system of Poland when the Constitution of the Polish Republic was adopted in 1997. Paradoxically, in Poland - one of the few countries in the world which have introduced the concept of sustainable development at the level of the Constitution, it is difficult to find a reference to it in the political debate. The national sustainable development strategy Poland 2025 has met no response among society and today it seems to be hardly remembered by anybody. An average citizen does not know the concept of sustainable development, or has a vague notion of it, often identifying it exclusively with environmental protection. Solving social problems (the labour market, education, health protection, equality of the sexes, etc.) is not associated with sustainable development whatsoever, and neither is engagement into achieving these development targets on the global scale

  12. The Typology of Methodological Approaches to Development of Innovative Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farat Olexandra V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to study the existing methodological approaches to assessing the development of enterprises for further substantiation of possibilities of their using by cluster associations. As a result of research, based on the analysis of scientific literature, the most applicable methodological approaches to assessing the development of enterprises are characterized. 8 methodical approaches to assessing the level of development of enterprises and 4 methodological approaches to assessing the level of development of clusters are singled out. Each of the approaches is characterized by the presence of certain advantages and disadvantages, but none of them allows to obtain a systematic assessment of all areas of cluster functioning, identify possible reserves for cluster competitiveness growth and characterize possible strategies for their future development. Taking into account peculiarities of the functioning and development of cluster associations of enterprises, we propose our own methodological approach for assessing the development of innovative cluster structures.

  13. Lessons on rural development, challenges and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Absalón Machado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For 25 years, Colombia implemented a rural development policy according to models adopted in Latin America since the 1960s. That policy advanced progressively toward decentralized and participatory development and it also moved forward to new concept of rural territorial development. Nevertheless, the Integrated Rural Development Program - IRD, turned into a Co-financing Fund, due to several reasons, ended during the second half of the 1990s. The change of protectionist policies towards deregulation, political cooptation of the program and the weak State capacities to replacing the IRD with other alternatives to stabilize rural societies contributed to the disappearance of the policy.

  14. Approach to developing reliable space reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondt, J.F.; Shinbrot, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Reactor Power System Project is in the engineering development phase of a three-phase program. During Phase II, the Engineering Development Phase, the SP-100 Project has defined and is pursuing a new approach to developing reliable power systems. The approach to developing such a system during the early technology phase is described in this paper along with some preliminary examples to help explain the approach. Developing reliable components to meet space reactor power system requirements is based on a top down systems approach which includes a point design based on a detailed technical specification of a 100 kW power system

  15. Summary Report for the Evaluation of Current QA Processes Within the FRMAC FAL and EPA MERL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanks, Sonoya T.; Ted Redding; Lynn Jaussi; Allen, Mark B.; Fournier, Sean Donovan; Leonard, Elliott J.

    2017-04-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) relies on accurate and defensible analytical laboratory data to support its mission. Therefore, FRMAC must ensure that the environmental analytical laboratories providing analytical services maintain an ongoing capability to provide accurate analytical results to DOE. It is undeniable that the more Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) measures required of the laboratory, the less resources that are available for analysis of response samples. Being that QA and QC measures in general are understood to comprise a major effort related to a laboratory’s operations, requirements should only be considered if they are deemed “value-added” for the FRMAC mission. This report provides observations of areas for improvement and potential interoperability opportunities in the areas of Batch Quality Control Requirements, Written Communications, Data Review Processes, Data Reporting Processes, along with the lessons learned as they apply to items in the early phase of a response that will be critical for developing a more efficient, integrated response for future interactions between the FRMAC and EPA assets.

  16. Dynamic wedge, electron energy and beam profile Q.A. using an ionization chamber linear array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, M.B.; Todd, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of multi-modal linacs the quality assurance workload of a Physical Sciences department has increased dramatically. The advent of dynamic wedges has further complicated matters because of the need to invent accurate methods to perform Q.A. in a reasonable time. We have been using an ionization chamber linear array, the Thebes 7000 TM by Victoreen, Inc., for some years to measure X-ray and electron beam profiles. Two years ago we developed software to perform Q.A. on our dynamic wedges using the array and more recently included a routine to check electron beam energies using the method described by Rosenow, U.F. et al., Med. Phys. 18(1) 19-25. The integrated beam and profile management system has enabled us to maintain a comprehensive quality assurance programme on all our linaccs. Both our efficiency and accuracy have increased to the point where we are able to keep up with the greater number of tests required without an increase in staff or hours spent in quality assurance. In changing the processor from the Z80 of the Thebes console to the 486 of the PC we have also noticed a marked increase in the calibration stability of the array. (author)

  17. NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] perspective of software QA [quality assurance] in the nuclear history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Computer technology has been a part of the nuclear industry since its inception. However, it is only recently that computers have been integrated into reactor operations. During the early history of commercial nuclear power in the United States, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) discouraged the use of digital computers for real-time control and monitoring of nuclear power plant operation. At the time, this position was justified since software engineering was in its infancy, and horror stories on computer crashes were plentiful. Since the advent of microprocessors and inexpensive computer memories, significant advances have been made in fault-tolerant computer architecture that have resulted in highly reliable, durable computer systems. The NRC's requirement for safety parameter display system (SPDS) stemmed form the results of studies and investigations conducted on the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. An NRC contractor has prepared a handbook of software QA techniques applicable to the nuclear industry, published as NUREG/CR-4640 in August 1987. Currently, the NRC is considering development of an inspection program covering software QA. Future efforts may address verification and validation as applied to expert systems and artificial intelligence programs

  18. M073: Monte Carlo generated spectra for QA/QC of automated NAA routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackman, K.R.; Biegalski, S.R.

    2004-01-01

    A quality check for an automated system of analyzing large sets of neutron activated samples has been developed. Activated samples are counted with an HPGe detector, in conjunction with an automated sample changer and spectral analysis tools, controlled by the Canberra GENIE 2K and REXX software. After each sample is acquired and analyzed, a Microsoft Visual Basic program imports the results into a template Microsoft Excel file where the final concentrations, uncertainties, and detection limits are determined. Standard reference materials are included in each set of 40 samples as a standard quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) test. A select group of sample spectra are also visually reviewed to check the peak fitting routines. A reference spectrum was generated in MCNP 4c2 using an F8, pulse height, tally with a detector model of the actual detector used in counting. The detector model matches the detector resolution, energy calibration, and counting geometry. The generated spectrum also contained a radioisotope matrix that was similar to what was expected in the samples. This spectrum can then be put through the automated system and analyzed along with the other samples. The automated results are then compared to expected results for QA/QC assurance.

  19. Monte Carlo generated spectra for QA/QC of automated NAA routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackman, K.R.; Biegalski, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    A quality check for an automated system of analyzing large sets of neutron activated samples has been developed. Activated samples are counted with an HPGe detector, in conjunction with an automated sample changer and spectral analysis tools, controlled by the Canberra GENIE 2K and REXX software. After each sample is acquired and analyzed, a Microsoft Visual Basic program imports the results into a template Microsoft Excel file where the final concentrations, uncertainties, and detection limits are determined. Standard reference materials are included in each set of 40 samples as a standard quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) test. A select group of sample spectra are also visually reviewed to check the peak fitting routines. A reference spectrum was generated in MCNP 4c2 using an F8, pulse-height, tally with a detector model of the actual detector used in counting. The detector model matches the detector resolution, energy calibration, and counting geometry. The generated spectrum also contained a radioisotope matrix that was similar to what was expected in the samples. This spectrum can then be put through the automated system and analyzed along with the other samples. The automated results are then compared to expected results for QA/QC assurance. (author)

  20. Approaching development – An opinionated review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Christian

    2010-01-01

    and as a craft and argues for the necessity of recognizing their difference. Moreover, as a social science, development studies also navigate between theoretical generalization and descriptive particularism. By making a distinction between explanatory and heuristic frameworks, development studies can...... be normalized as a science and thus able to study a contextual moving target while drawing on a general or ‘grand theory'....

  1. Unified Approach in the DSS Development Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of today's decision support environment become very complex due to new generation of Business Intelligence applications and technologies like Data Warehouse, OLAP (On Line Analytical Processing and Data Mining. In this respect DSS development process are not simple and needs an adequate methodology or framework able to manage different tools and platforms to achieve manager's requirements. The DSS development process must be view like a unified and iterative set of activities and operations. The new techniques based on Unified Process (UP methodology and UML (Unified Modeling Language it seems to be appropriate for DSS development using prototyping and RAD (Rapid Application Development techniques. In this paper we present a conceptual framework for development and integrate Decision Support Systems using Unified Process Methodology and UML.

  2. Analyzing Information Systems Development: A Comparison and Analysis of Eight IS Development Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iivari, Juhani; Hirschheim, Rudy

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes and compares eight information systems (IS) development approaches: Information Modelling, Decision Support Systems, the Socio-Technical approach, the Infological approach, the Interactionist approach, the Speech Act-based approach, Soft Systems Methodology, and the Scandinavian Trade Unionist approach. Discusses the organizational roles…

  3. Improvement of QA/QC activities in the construction of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinji Tomita; Shigetaka Tomaru

    1987-01-01

    Construction of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan started at around 1965. In this presentation are described quality assurance (QA) activities of a plant supplier who is a manufacturer of the key components as well. The QA activities until now are divided into several periods of the construction history in Japan. First term is 1960's when the QA activities are featured as the study and implementation through the construction of imported plants. Since then technologies and procedures of our own have been established and improved for the construction of high reliability plants. Our present QA activities are based on the active reflection of those lessons learned of past experiences. (author)

  4. A dynamical systems approach to motor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, K; Thelen, E; Jensen, J L

    1990-12-01

    The study of motor development has long influenced the clinical practice of physical therapy. We first review the contributions and deficiencies of two traditional maturational and reflex-based models of motor development. Second, we describe basic principles of kinematic and kinetic analyses of movement and show how we have applied these techniques to understand infant stepping and kicking. Third, we propose a theory of motor development based on a dynamical systems perspective that is consistent with our infant studies. Finally, we explore the implications of the model for physical therapists.

  5. Toward a More Holistic Evaluation Approach for Rural Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The discussion on and development of a holistic evaluation approach for rural development will be indispensable to improving and enriching the lives of rural people. This approach can be developed by considering the conceptualization of community policy structure in rural areas, the localization of policy structure in the rural community, and the…

  6. Philosophy and possible approach to SAMG development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartmadjiev, A.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture are discussed: Safety functional relationship; Basic principles for development and implementation of SAMG; and Determination of the plant damage condition. Phases of the SA management are presented

  7. An approach towards sustainable groundwater development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    role-players are used to develop a social-character map. • Site surveys and ... intervention programmes. ..... tional benefit and demonstrate improved psychosocial function- ... CAMPBEll C (1997) Migration, masculine identities and AIdS: The.

  8. Teaching Web Evaluation: A Cognitive Development Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice Benjes-Small

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Web evaluation has been a standard information literacy offering for years and has always been a challenging topic for instruction librarians. Over time, the authors had tried a myriad of strategies to teach freshmen how to assess the credibility of Web sites but felt the efforts were insufficient. By familiarizing themselves with the cognitive development research, they were able to effectively revamp Web evaluation instruction to improve student learning. This article discusses the problems of traditional methods, such as checklists; summarizes the cognitive development research, particularly in regards to its relationship to the ACRL Information Literacy Standards; and details the instructional lesson plan developed by the authors that incorporates cognitive development theories.

  9. Energy and Development. A Modelling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ruijven, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid economic growth of developing countries like India and China implies that these countries become important actors in the global energy system. Examples of this impact are the present day oil shortages and rapidly increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. Global energy models are used to explore possible future developments of the global energy system and identify policies to prevent potential problems. Such estimations of future energy use in developing countries are very uncertain. Crucial factors in the future energy use of these regions are electrification, urbanisation and income distribution, issues that are generally not included in present day global energy models. Model simulations in this thesis show that current insight in developments in low-income regions lead to a wide range of expected energy use in 2030 of the residential and transport sectors. This is mainly caused by many different model calibration options that result from the limited data availability for model development and calibration. We developed a method to identify the impact of model calibration uncertainty on future projections. We developed a new model for residential energy use in India, in collaboration with the Indian Institute of Science. Experiments with this model show that the impact of electrification and income distribution is less univocal than often assumed. The use of fuelwood, with related health risks, can decrease rapidly if the income of poor groups increases. However, there is a trade off in terms of CO2 emissions because these groups gain access to electricity and the ownership of appliances increases. Another issue is the potential role of new technologies in developing countries: will they use the opportunities of leapfrogging? We explored the potential role of hydrogen, an energy carrier that might play a central role in a sustainable energy system. We found that hydrogen only plays a role before 2050 under very optimistic assumptions. Regional energy

  10. Need for multiple approaches in collaborative software development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LePoire, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    The need to share software and reintegrate it into new applications presents a difficult but important challenge. Component-based development as an approach to this problem is receiving much attention in professional journals and academic curricula. However, there are many other approaches to collaborative software development that might be more appropriate. This paper reviews a few of these approaches and discusses criteria for the conditions and contexts in which these alternative approaches might be more appropriate. This paper complements the discussion of context-based development team organizations and processes. Examples from a small development team that interacts with a larger professional community are analyzed

  11. A Systems Engineering Approach to Architecture Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Architecture development is often conducted prior to system concept design when there is a need to determine the best-value mix of systems that works collectively in specific scenarios and time frames to accomplish a set of mission area objectives. While multiple architecture frameworks exist, they often require use of unique taxonomies and data structures. In contrast, this paper characterizes architecture development using terminology widely understood within the systems engineering community. Using a notional civil space architecture example, it employs a multi-tier framework to describe the enterprise level architecture and illustrates how results of lower tier, mission area architectures integrate into the enterprise architecture. It also presents practices for conducting effective mission area architecture studies, including establishing the trade space, developing functions and metrics, evaluating the ability of potential design solutions to meet the required functions, and expediting study execution through the use of iterative design cycles

  12. Child Development: An Active Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Laura E.; Munsch, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Within each chapter of this innovative topical text, the authors engage students by demonstrating the wide range of real-world applications of psychological research connected to child development. In particular, the distinctive Active Learning features incorporated throughout the book foster a dynamic and personal learning process for students.…

  13. Entrepreneurship development in China : a multilevel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of entrepreneurship focus on one of three areas: entrepreneurship as an engine to drive national economic growth, CE as an instrument to facilitate corporate performance, and individual EI as the source of entrepreneurial behavior. There has been rapid development and corporate catching-up

  14. Energy and development : A modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruijven, B.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834521

    2008-01-01

    Rapid economic growth of developing countries like India and China implies that these countries become important actors in the global energy system. Examples of this impact are the present day oil shortages and rapidly increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. Global energy models are used explore

  15. Classical and Contemporary Approaches for Moral Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Zekeriya; Seydoogullari, Sedef; Cavdar, Duygu; Cok, Figen

    2012-01-01

    Most of the information in the moral development literature depends on Theories of Piaget and Kohlberg. The theoretical contribution by Gilligan and Turiel are not widely known and not much resource is available in Turkish. For this reason introducing and discussing the theories of Gilligan and Turiel and more comprehensive perspective for moral…

  16. Genetic Approaches to Develop Salt Tolerant Germplasm

    KAUST Repository

    Tester, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Forty percent of the world's food is produced under irrigation, and this is directly threatened by over-exploitation and changes in the global environment. One way to address this threat is to develop systems for increasing our ability to use lower

  17. Agribusiness model approach to territorial food development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murcia Hector Horacio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Several research efforts have coordinated the academic program of Agricultural Business Management from the University De La Salle (Bogota D.C., to the design and implementation of a sustainable agribusiness model applied to food development, with territorial projection. Rural development is considered as a process that aims to improve the current capacity and potential of the inhabitant of the sector, which refers not only to production levels and productivity of agricultural items. It takes into account the guidelines of the Organization of the United Nations “Millennium Development Goals” and considered the concept of sustainable food and agriculture development, including food security and nutrition in an integrated interdisciplinary context, with holistic and systemic dimension. Analysis is specified by a model with an emphasis on sustainable agribusiness production chains related to agricultural food items in a specific region. This model was correlated with farm (technical objectives, family (social purposes and community (collective orientations projects. Within this dimension are considered food development concepts and methodologies of Participatory Action Research (PAR. Finally, it addresses the need to link the results to low-income communities, within the concepts of the “new rurality”.

  18. Revising Amartya Sen's Capability Approach to Education for Ethical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Kwangsu; Jeong, Wongyu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine whether Amartya Sen's capability approach can suggest an appropriate theory of education for ethical development. Many advocates of Sen's capability approach insist that his approach is superior to rival theories of education, including the human capital theory. This is because Sen emphasizes the purpose and…

  19. PUMA Development through a Multi physics Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Jinsik; Kim, Junehyung; Lee, Byoungoon; Lee, Chanbock

    2013-01-01

    Meanwhile advances of numerical methods make it possible for the multi physics problem to be solved in a fully coupled way. In addition to a multidimensional, multi physical approach, a nuclear fuel performance analysis code, which is 1D code, should be improved by accommodating the state-of-the-art in the numerical analysis to support current fuel design and performance analysis. In particular, the coupling between the mechanical equilibrium equation and a set of numerically stiff kinetics equations for fission gas release is of great importance for a multi physics simulation of nuclear fuel. Instead, coupling between temperature and fuel constituent was found to be made with a relative ease by employing an ordinary differential equations solver. As an effort for a new SFR metal fuel performance analysis code, called PUMA (Performance of Uranium Metal fuel rod Analysis code), the deformation of U-Zr fuel for SFR in connection with a fission gas release model is analyzed. A finite element analyses for purely mechanical problems are performed using a backward differentiation formula, and are subjected to scrupulous verification with Abaqus. Then mechanical equilibrium equation and the equations for fission gas release are coupled with the same differential-algebraic equations (DAE) solver

  20. Understanding and developing creativity: A practical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Donald J. Treffinger; Edwin C. Selby

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking and creative thinking are proposed as determinants to cope with the constant change society, and basically children are experiencing nowadays. Moreover, tools for the development of critical and creative thinking are discussed, and the creative problem solving toolbox is presented, involving tools for generating options, as well as tools for focusing options. The importance of the tools as significant basis for the learning process, as well as for the management of changes i...

  1. ATLAS IBL Stave QA - In and Around SR1

    CERN Document Server

    Carney, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    During the Phase-I upgrade the ATLAS Inner tracker will have a whole new layer of pixels inserted between the existing B-layer and a new, smaller, beam pipe. Briefly, there are 14 assemblies of 32 single and double-chip hybrid silicon pixel chips arranged side-by-side on light-weight, thermally conductive carbon-fibre coated carbon foam supports called staves. When the staves arrive at CERN, fully assembled, they undergo a QA procedure, which checks the power characteristics of sensors and read-out chips, and assess the quality of individual pixels.

  2. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    We plan to extend our success in treating B cell malignancies with 131 I labeled Lym-1 by a major effort in therapy with 67 Cu Lym-1. Yttrium-90 labeled by a macrocycle, DOTA will be studied in patients as a continuation of the 111 In-BAD (DOTA) Lym-1 studies. Excellent images and pharmacokinetics of the 111 In-BAD(DOTA)-Lym-1 studies. Lymphomas and related diseases represent a special case for radioimmunotherapy because of their documented radiosensitivity and immunodeficiency, and thus offer a unique opportunity to conduct therapeutic feasibility studies in a responsive human model. Using marine and chimeric L6 and other MoAb to breast cancer, we have applied the strategies that were developed in taking Lym-1 antibody from the bench to the patient. We have examined a number of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of breast cancer and chose chimeric L6 for prototype studies because of certain characteristics. The chemistry of attachment of conjugates to antibodies and their impact on immunological targeting biological activities (cytotoxicity), metabolic fate, and therapeutic index will continue to be a major strength and function of this program. This grant has supported the conception, synthesis, and development of the first macrocylic, bifunctional chelating agent TETA (6-p-nitrobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazatetradecane-N,N',N double-prime, N'double-prime-tetraacetic acid and its derivatives, including Lym-1-2IT-BAT), for use in Cu-67-based radioimmunodiagnosis and therapy. This work has led to the further development of several new macrocylic bifunctional chelating agents for copper, indium, yttrium and other metals. In addition, successful Cu-67 labelings of Lym-1-2IT-BAT for human radiopharmaceutical have shown patient pharmacokinetics of 67 Cu-BAT(TETA)-Lym-1 with promising therapeutic dosimetry

  3. Software development an open source approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, Allen; de Silva, Chamindra

    2011-01-01

    Overview and Motivation Software Free and Open Source Software (FOSS)Two Case Studies Working with a Project Team Key FOSS Activities Client-Oriented vs. Community-Oriented Projects Working on a Client-Oriented Project Joining a Community-Oriented Project Using Project Tools Collaboration Tools Code Management Tools Run-Time System ConstraintsSoftware Architecture Architectural Patterns Layers, Cohesion, and Coupling Security Concurrency, Race Conditions, and DeadlocksWorking with Code Bad Smells and Metrics Refactoring Testing Debugging Extending the Software for a New ProjectDeveloping the D

  4. A systematic approach for component-based software development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guareis de farias, Cléver; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    2000-01-01

    Component-based software development enables the construction of software artefacts by assembling prefabricated, configurable and independently evolving building blocks, called software components. This paper presents an approach for the development of component-based software artefacts. This

  5. An Introduction to the Human Development and Capability Approach

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-08-29

    Aug 29, 2009 ... ... Reports at the global, regional, national and local level. ... Book cover An Introduction to the Human Development and Capability Approach: ... inequality; the role of markets and economic growth in promoting development; ...

  6. An Introduction to the Human Development and Capability Approach

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    29 août 2009 ... Book cover An Introduction to the Human Development and Capability Approach: ... Reports at the global, regional, national and local level. ... inequality; the role of markets and economic growth in promoting development; the ...

  7. Feminist Development Economics : An Institutional Approach to Household Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene); O. Odebode (Olasunbo)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In this chapter, we argue that an institutional approach to feminist development economics provides deeper understandings to how gender inequalities function in economic processes in developing countries. We do this in three ways. First, we distinguish between

  8. Radioactive waste management approaches for developed countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Anthony Hechanova; Catherine Riddle

    2013-07-01

    , ALSEP, EXAM, or LUCA are pursued worldwide and their approaches will be highlighted.

  9. Understanding and developing creativity: A practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J. Treffinger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking and creative thinking are proposed as determinants to cope with the constant change society, and basically children are experiencing nowadays. Moreover, tools for the development of critical and creative thinking are discussed, and the creative problem solving toolbox is presented, involving tools for generating options, as well as tools for focusing options. The importance of the tools as significant basis for the learning process, as well as for the management of changes in the creative problem solving solution, as well as its application from infancy to adulthood is discussed. Finally, recommendations about teaching and application of thinking tools are considered.

  10. A risk management approach to CAIS development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Hal; Kerner, Judy; Alden, Tony; Belz, Frank; Tadman, Frank

    1986-01-01

    The proposed DoD standard Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS) was developed as a framework set of interfaces that will support the transportability and interoperability of tools in the support environments of the future. While the current CAIS version is a promising start toward fulfilling those goals and current prototypes provide adequate testbeds for investigations in support of completing specifications for a full CAIS, there are many reasons why the proposed CAIS might fail to become a usable product and the foundation of next-generation (1990'S) project support environments such as NASA's Space Station software support environment. The most critical threats to the viability and acceptance of the CAIS include performance issues (especially in piggybacked implementations), transportability, and security requirements. To make the situation worse, the solution to some of these threats appears to be at conflict with the solutions to others.

  11. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials—Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bentzen, Soren M.; Bruner, Deborah; Curran, Walter J.; Dignam, James; Efstathiou, Jason A.; FitzGerald, T.J.; Hurkmans, Coen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack; Merchant, Thomas E.; Michalski, Jeff; Palta, Jatinder R.; Simon, Richard; Ten Haken, Randal K.; Timmerman, Robert; Tunis, Sean; Coleman, C. Norman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  12. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials-Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bruner, Deborah [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Dignam, James [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); FitzGerald, T.J. [University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Brussels (Belgium); Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Michalski, Jeff [University of Washington, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Simon, Richard [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ten Haken, Randal K. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Tunis, Sean [Center for Medical Technology Policy, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  13. Poster - Thur Eve - 29: Detecting changes in IMRT QA using statistical process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drever, L; Salomons, G

    2012-07-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) methods were used to analyze 239 measurement based individual IMRT QA events. The selected IMRT QA events were all head and neck (H&N) cases with 70Gy in 35 fractions, and all prostate cases with 76Gy in 38 fractions planned between March 2009 and 2012. The results were used to determine if the tolerance limits currently being used for IMRT QA were able to indicate if the process was under control. The SPC calculations were repeated for IMRT QA of the same type of cases that were planned after the treatment planning system was upgraded from Eclipse version 8.1.18 to version 10.0.39. The initial tolerance limits were found to be acceptable for two of the three metrics tested prior to the upgrade. After the upgrade to the treatment planning system the SPC analysis found that the a priori limits were no longer capable of indicating control for 2 of the 3 metrics analyzed. The changes in the IMRT QA results were clearly identified using SPC, indicating that it is a useful tool for finding changes in the IMRT QA process. Routine application of SPC to IMRT QA results would help to distinguish unintentional trends and changes from the random variation in the IMRT QA results for individual plans. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Technical report on comparative analysis of ASME QA requirements and ISO series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwan Hyun

    2000-06-01

    This technical report provides the differences on the QA requirement ASME and ISO in nuclear fields. This report applies to the quality assurance(QA) programmes of the design of two requirement. The organization having overall responsibility for the nuclear design, preservation, fabrication shall be described in this report in each stage of design project

  15. QA practice for online analyzers in water steam cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staub, L.

    2010-01-01

    The liberalization of power markets throughout the world has resulted in more and more power stations being operated in cycling mode, with frequent load changes and multiple daily start-up and shut-down cycles. This more flexible operation also calls for better automation and poses new challenges to water chemistry in water steam cycles, to avoid subsequent damage to vital plant components such as turbines, boilers or condensers. But automation for the most important chemistry control tool, the sampling and online analyzer system, is only possible if chemists can rely on their online analysis equipment. Proof of plausibility as well as reliability and availability of online analysis results becomes a major focus. While SOP and standard QA procedures for laboratory equipment are well established and daily practice, such measures are widely neglected for online process analyzers. This paper is aiming to establish a roadmap for the implementation of SOP and QA/QC procedures for online instruments in water steam cycles, leading to reliable chemical information that is trustworthy for process automation and chemistry control in water steam cycles. (author)

  16. QA practice for online analyzers in water steam cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staub Lukas

    2009-01-01

    The liberalization of power markets throughout the world has resulted in more and more power stations being operated in cycling mode, with frequent load changes and multiple daily start-up and shut-down cycles. This more flexible operation also calls for better automation and poses new challenges to water chemistry in water steam cycles, to avoid subsequent damage to vital plant components such as turbines, boilers or condensers. But automation for the most important chemistry control tool, the sampling and online analyzer system, is only possible if chemists can rely on their online analysis equipment. Proof of plausibility as well as reliability and availability of online analysis results becomes a major focus. While SOP and standard QA procedures for laboratory equipment are well established and daily practice, such measures are widely neglected for online process analyzers. This paper is aiming to establish a roadmap for the implementation of SOP and QA/QC procedures for online instruments in water steam cycles, leading to reliable chemical information that is trustworthy for process automation and chemistry control in water steam cycles. (author)

  17. Poster - 10: QA of Ultrasound Images for Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpala, Stanislaw; Kohli, Kirpal S. [BCCA-Fraser Valley Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The current QA protocol of ultrasound systems used in prostate brachytherapy (TG128) addresses geometrical verifications, but the scope of evaluation of image quality is limited. We recognized importance of the latter in routine practice, and designed a protocol for QA of the images. Methods: Images of an ultrasound prostate phantom (CIRS053) were collected with BK Flex Focus 400. The images were saved as bmp after adjusting the gain to 50% for consistent results. Mean pixel values and signal to noise ratio were inspected in the representative sections of the phantom, including the mock prostate and the unechoic medium. Constancy of these numbers over a one year period was looked at. Results: The typical intensity in the mock prostate region in the transverse images ranged between 95 and 118 (out of 256), and the signal to noise was about 10. The intensity in the urethra region was about 170±40, and the unechoic medium was 2±2. The mean and the signal to noise ratio remained almost unchanged after a year, while the signal in the unechoic medium increased to about 7±4. Similar values were obtained in the sagittal images. Conclusions: The image analysis discussed above allows quick evaluation of constancy of the image quality. This may be also useful in troubleshooting image-quality problems during routine exams, which might not be due to deterioration of the US system, but other reasons, e.g. variations in tissue properties or air being trapped between the probe and the anatomy.

  18. Sustainability in product development: a proposal for classification of approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Flores Magnago

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The product development is a process that addresses sustainability issues inside companies. Many approaches have been discussed in academy concerning sustainability, as Natural Capitalism, Design for Environment (DfE and Life Cycle Analysis (LCA, but a question arises: which is indicated for what circumstance? This article aim is the proposition of a classification, based on a literature review, for 15 of these approaches. The criteria were: (i approach nature, (ii organization level, (iii integration level in Product Development Process (PDP, and (iv approach relevance for sustainability dimensions. Common terms allowed the establishment of connections among the approaches. As a result the researchers concluded that, despite they come from distinct knowledge areas they are not mutually excludent, on the contrary, the approaches may be used in a complementary way by managers. The combined use of complementary approaches is finally suggested in the paper.

  19. Concept of a QA-programme for the recipient country, goals and measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, F.W.

    1986-04-01

    Ordering, design and erection of a NPP is a complex business even in a country with experience. Therefore a QA-Programme can be helpful to do the work in a planned and organized manner. In the case of a recipient country the use of administrative QA-measures seems to be a necessary support, especially for the ordering company. It is not the intention of the QA-Programme to say what to do, and so it cannot solve ''political'' questions of the business, but the QA-Programme can say how the work has to be done to bring it to a good end. This lecture points out the most important and interesting questions in the phase of establishing a QA-Programme. Examples of solutions are given. (author). 13 figs

  20. MO-FG-202-04: Gantry-Resolved Linac QA for VMAT: A Comprehensive and Efficient System Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwan, B J [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Barnes, M; Greer, P B [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Calvary Mater Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Hindmarsh, J; Seymour, E [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); O’Connor, D J [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Keall, P J [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To automate gantry-resolved linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: A QA system for VMAT was developed that uses an EPID, frame-grabber assembly and in-house developed image processing software. The system relies solely on the analysis of EPID image frames acquired without the presence of a phantom. Images were acquired at 8.41 frames per second using a frame grabber and ancillary acquisition computer. Each image frame was tagged with a gantry angle from the linac’s on-board gantry angle encoder. Arc-dynamic QA plans were designed to assess the performance of each individual linac component during VMAT. By analysing each image frame acquired during the QA deliveries the following eight machine performance characteristics were measured as a function of gantry angle: MLC positional accuracy, MLC speed constancy, MLC acceleration constancy, MLC-gantry synchronisation, beam profile constancy, dose rate constancy, gantry speed constancy, dose-gantry angle synchronisation and mechanical sag. All tests were performed on a Varian iX linear accelerator equipped with a 120 leaf Millennium MLC and an aS1000 EPID (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA). Results: Machine performance parameters were measured as a function of gantry angle using EPID imaging and compared to machine log files and the treatment plan. Data acquisition is currently underway at 3 centres, incorporating 7 treatment units, at 2 weekly measurement intervals. Conclusion: The proposed system can be applied for streamlined linac QA and commissioning for VMAT. The set of test plans developed can be used to assess the performance of each individual components of the treatment machine during VMAT deliveries as a function of gantry angle. The methodology does not require the setup of any additional phantom or measurement equipment and the analysis is fully automated to allow for

  1. MO-FG-202-04: Gantry-Resolved Linac QA for VMAT: A Comprehensive and Efficient System Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwan, B J; Barnes, M; Greer, P B; Hindmarsh, J; Seymour, E; O’Connor, D J; Keall, P J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To automate gantry-resolved linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: A QA system for VMAT was developed that uses an EPID, frame-grabber assembly and in-house developed image processing software. The system relies solely on the analysis of EPID image frames acquired without the presence of a phantom. Images were acquired at 8.41 frames per second using a frame grabber and ancillary acquisition computer. Each image frame was tagged with a gantry angle from the linac’s on-board gantry angle encoder. Arc-dynamic QA plans were designed to assess the performance of each individual linac component during VMAT. By analysing each image frame acquired during the QA deliveries the following eight machine performance characteristics were measured as a function of gantry angle: MLC positional accuracy, MLC speed constancy, MLC acceleration constancy, MLC-gantry synchronisation, beam profile constancy, dose rate constancy, gantry speed constancy, dose-gantry angle synchronisation and mechanical sag. All tests were performed on a Varian iX linear accelerator equipped with a 120 leaf Millennium MLC and an aS1000 EPID (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA). Results: Machine performance parameters were measured as a function of gantry angle using EPID imaging and compared to machine log files and the treatment plan. Data acquisition is currently underway at 3 centres, incorporating 7 treatment units, at 2 weekly measurement intervals. Conclusion: The proposed system can be applied for streamlined linac QA and commissioning for VMAT. The set of test plans developed can be used to assess the performance of each individual components of the treatment machine during VMAT deliveries as a function of gantry angle. The methodology does not require the setup of any additional phantom or measurement equipment and the analysis is fully automated to allow for

  2. A META-COMPOSITE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT APPROACH FOR TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivam, Rajani S.; Tanik, Murat M.

    2013-01-01

    Translational researchers conduct research in a highly data-intensive and continuously changing environment and need to use multiple, disparate tools to achieve their goals. These researchers would greatly benefit from meta-composite software development or the ability to continuously compose and recompose tools together in response to their ever-changing needs. However, the available tools are largely disconnected, and current software approaches are inefficient and ineffective in their support for meta-composite software development. Building on the composite services development approach, the de facto standard for developing integrated software systems, we propose a concept-map and agent-based meta-composite software development approach. A crucial step in composite services development is the modeling of users’ needs as processes, which can then be specified in an executable format for system composition. We have two key innovations. First, our approach allows researchers (who understand their needs best) instead of technicians to take a leadership role in the development of process models, reducing inefficiencies and errors. A second innovation is that our approach also allows for modeling of complex user interactions as part of the process, overcoming the technical limitations of current tools. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach using a real-world translational research use case. We also present results of usability studies evaluating our approach for future refinements. PMID:23504436

  3. A meta-composite software development approach for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivam, Rajani S; Tanik, Murat M

    2013-06-01

    Translational researchers conduct research in a highly data-intensive and continuously changing environment and need to use multiple, disparate tools to achieve their goals. These researchers would greatly benefit from meta-composite software development or the ability to continuously compose and recompose tools together in response to their ever-changing needs. However, the available tools are largely disconnected, and current software approaches are inefficient and ineffective in their support for meta-composite software development. Building on the composite services development approach, the de facto standard for developing integrated software systems, we propose a concept-map and agent-based meta-composite software development approach. A crucial step in composite services development is the modeling of users' needs as processes, which can then be specified in an executable format for system composition. We have two key innovations. First, our approach allows researchers (who understand their needs best) instead of technicians to take a leadership role in the development of process models, reducing inefficiencies and errors. A second innovation is that our approach also allows for modeling of complex user interactions as part of the process, overcoming the technical limitations of current tools. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach using a real-world translational research use case. We also present results of usability studies evaluating our approach for future refinements.

  4. Systems approach to waste management in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E. R.

    1991-01-01

    A systems engineering approach to the development of waste management facilities is described which may prove to be useful for developing countries. Basically the approach involves a determination of performance objectives, the functions necessary to achieve the objectives, the constraints involved, and the basic facility requirements necessary to accomplish the functions. The foregoing provides the basis for developing a set of descriptions and associated requirements for the overall system as well as for elements of the system at different hierarchical levels. These in turn provide the basis for initiation of design and subsequently construction of the facilities involved. The operation of the approach is illustrated for a hypothetical low level waste processing system

  5. Managing Cybersecurity Research and Experimental Development: The REVO Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Craigen; Drew Vandeth; D’Arcy Walsh

    2013-01-01

    We present a systematic approach for managing a research and experimental development cybersecurity program that must be responsive to continuously evolving cybersecurity, and other, operational concerns. The approach will be of interest to research-program managers, academe, corporate leads, government leads, chief information officers, chief technology officers, and social and technology policy analysts. The approach is compatible with international standards and procedures published by the...

  6. An approach for the development of visual configuration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Lars; Ladeby, Klaes Rohde

    2007-01-01

    How can a visual configuration system be developed to support the specification process' in companies that manufacture customer tailored products? This article focuses on how visual configuration systems can be developed. The approach for developing visual configuration systems has been developed...... by Centre for Product Modelling (CPM) at The Technical University of Denmark. The approach is based on experiences from a visualization project in co-operation between CPM and the global provider of power protection American Power Conversion (APC). The visual configuration system was developed in 2001...... of the product in the visual configuration system....

  7. Developing, Approving and Maintaining Qualifications: Selected International Approaches. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misko, Josie

    2015-01-01

    There are lessons for Australia in the key approaches to the development, approval, maintenance and quality assurance of qualifications adopted in countries overseas. This research takes into account a range of approaches used in selected European Union (EU) member states (Germany, Finland and Sweden), the United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland…

  8. Bridging Knowledge: A Collective Undergraduate Thesis Development Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Jason K.; Arun, Özgür

    2017-01-01

    While there are various approaches to gerontological and geriatrics (and social sciences) education globally, a component commonly included in undergraduate education is a final thesis project. In Turkey, the Department of Gerontology at Akdeniz University has undertaken a unique approach to thesis development that values and draws on accessing…

  9. A Task-Based Approach to Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to present a task-based approach to materials development. In the first part of the chapter, I sketch out the evolution of task based language teaching, drawing on a distinction between synthetic and analytical approaches to syllabus design first articulated by Wilkins (1976).

  10. A Constructive Neural-Network Approach to Modeling Psychological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews a particular computational modeling approach to the study of psychological development--that of constructive neural networks. This approach is applied to a variety of developmental domains and issues, including Piagetian tasks, shift learning, language acquisition, number comparison, habituation of visual attention, concept…

  11. A Comparison of MOOC Development and Delivery Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Caldwell, Helen; Richards, Mike; Bandara, Arosha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a comparison of two ways of developing and delivering massive open online courses (MOOCs). One was developed by The Open University in collaboration with FutureLearn; the other was developed independently by a small team at the Northampton University. Design/methodology/approach: The different…

  12. Quality Assurance in Post-Secondary Education: Some Common Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Dennis Chung Sea

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The common approaches to quality assurance (QA), as practiced by most post-secondary education institutions for internal quality monitoring and most QA authorities for external quality monitoring (EQM), have been considered by many researchers as having largely failed to address the essence of educational quality. The purpose of this…

  13. Top-Down Approach for the Social Capital Development

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Syed Akhter Hussain; Shah, Tari shah; Ahmed, Eatzaz

    2011-01-01

    This study provides the compatibility of top-down approach of the collectivist society with the algebraic representation of social capital matrix [22], which establishes algebraic based model having capability of interpreting the state intervention in building social capital. The study also suggests a policy framework for the developing economic strategies and effective planing at government level regarding social capital development in perspective of top-down approach.

  14. China's Approach to International Development: A Study of Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Renwick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available China is establishing itself as a new international aid donor. This study explains China's emerging approach to international development assistance. The paper addresses the question of how far China's understanding of "development" is an appropriate basis for genuinely "win-win" relationships? The paper explores this question by examining China's relationship with Southeast Asia. China is re-emphasising its commitment and partnership credentials with neighbouring states, some of whom have many people living in poverty and as countries are in need of development assistance. The paper identifies key facets of China's approach to international development, examines economic, political and strategic factors underpinning China's approach in Southeast Asia. Adopting a Human Security perspective, it assesses China's development contribution with reference to Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar and highlights popular opposition. The study finds that Chinese trade and investment are making a significant contribution to the region's economic growth. However, the analysis identifies two problems in China's approach, an over-reliance on the level of state-to-state relations and too narrow a domain of engagement centred upon economic cooperation. China needs to incorporate a societal engagement strategy highlighting transparency and accountability of Chinese corporate behaviour. It also needs to re-balance its approach by emphasising human capital capability and capacity-building across the non-economic social and cultural domains. China's approach to international development is a rapid learning process and is emerging, but still has further to go.

  15. QA lessons learned for parameter control from the WIPP Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of lessons learned from experiences on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WJPP) Project in implementation of quality assurance controls surrounding inputs for performance assessment analysis. Since the performance assessment (PA) process is inherent in compliance determination for any waste repository, these lessons-learned are intended to be useful to investigators, analysts, and Quality Assurance (QA) practitioners working on high level waste disposal projects. On the WIPP Project, PA analyses for regulatory-compliance determination utilized several inter-related computer programs (codes) that mathematically modeled phenomena such as radionuclide release, retardation, and transport. The input information for those codes are the parameters that are the subject of this paper. Parameters were maintained in a computer database, which was then queried electronically by the PA codes whenever input was needed as the analyses were run

  16. A relational developmental systems approach to moral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpendale, Jeremy I M; Hammond, Stuart I; Atwood, Sherrie

    2013-01-01

    Morality and cooperation are central to human life. Psychological explanations for moral development and cooperative behavior will have biological and evolutionary dimensions, but they can differ radically in their approach to biology. In particular, many recent proposals have pursued the view that aspects of morality are innate. We briefly review and critique two of these claims. In contrast to these nativist assumptions about the role of biology in morality, we present an alternative approach based on a relational developmental systems view of moral development. The role for biology in this approach is in setting up the conditions--the developmental system--in which forms of interaction and later forms of thinking emerge.

  17. SU-F-T-226: QA Management for a Large Institution with Multiple Campuses for FMEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, G; Chan, M; Lovelock, D; Lim, S; Febo, R; DeLauter, J; Both, S; Li, X; Ma, R; Saleh, Z; Song, Y; Tang, X; Xiong, W; Hunt, M; LoSasso, T [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To redesign our radiation therapy QA program with the goal to improve quality, efficiency, and consistency among a growing number of campuses at a large institution. Methods: A QA committee was established with at least one physicist representing each of our six campuses (22 linacs). Weekly meetings were scheduled to advise on and update current procedures, to review end-to-end and other test results, and to prepare composite reports for internal and external audits. QA procedures for treatment and imaging equipment were derived from TG Reports 142 and 66, practice guidelines, and feedback from ACR evaluations. The committee focused on reaching a consensus on a single QA program among all campuses using the same type of equipment and reference data. Since the recommendations for tolerances referenced to baseline data were subject to interpretation in some instances, the committee reviewed the characteristics of all machines and quantified any variations before choosing between treatment planning system (i.e. treatment planning system commissioning data that is representative for all machines) or machine-specific values (i.e. commissioning data of the individual machines) as baseline data. Results: The configured QA program will be followed strictly by all campuses. Inventory of available equipment has been compiled, and additional equipment acquisitions for the QA program are made as needed. Dosimetric characteristics are evaluated for all machines using the same methods to ensure consistency of beam data where possible. In most cases, baseline data refer to treatment planning system commissioning data but machine-specific values are used as reference where it is deemed appropriate. Conclusion: With a uniform QA scheme, variations in QA procedures are kept to a minimum. With a centralized database, data collection and analysis are simplified. This program will facilitate uniformity in patient treatments and analysis of large amounts of QA data campus

  18. Land ECVs from QA4ECV using an optimal estimation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jan-Peter; Kharbouche, Said; Lewis, Philip; Danne, Olaf; Blessing, Simon; Giering, Ralf; Gobron, Nadine; Lanconelli, Christian; Govaerts, Yves; Schulz, Joerg; Doutriaux-Boucher, Marie; Lattanzio, Alessio; Aoun, Youva

    2017-04-01

    In the ESA-DUE GlobAlbedo project (http://www.GlobAlbedo.org), a 15 year record of land surface albedo was generated from the European VEGETATION & MERIS sensors using optimal estimation. This was based on 3 broadbands (0.4-0.7, 0.7-3, 0.4-3µm) and fused data at level-2 after converting from spectral narrowband to these 3 broadbands with surface BRFs. A 10 year long record of land surface albedo climatology was generated from Collection 5 of the MODIS BRDF product for these same broadbands. This was employed as an a priori estimate for an optimal estimation based retrieval of land surface albedo when there were insufficient samples from the European sensors. This so-called MODIS prior was derived at 1km from the 500m MOD43A1,2 BRDF inputs every 8 days using the QA bits and the method described in the GlobAlbedo ATBD which is available from the website (http://www.globalbedo.org/docs/GlobAlbedo_Albedo_ATBD_V4.12.pdf). In the ESA-STSE WACMOS-ET project, FastOpt generated fapar & LAI based on this GlobAlbedo BRDF with associated per pixel uncertainty using the TIP framework. In the successor EU-FP7-QA4ECV* project, we have developed a 33 year record (1981-2014) of Earth surface spectral and broadband albedo (i.e. including the ocean and sea-ice) using optimal estimation for the land and where available, relevant sensors for "instantaneous" retrievals over the poles (Kharbouche & Muller, this conference). This requires the longest possible land surface spectral and broadband BRDF record that can only be supplied by a 16 year of MODIS Collection 6 BRDFs at 500m but produced on a daily basis. The CEMS Big Data computer at RAL was used to generate 7 spectral bands and 3 broadband BRDF with and without snow and snow_only. We will discuss the progress made since the start of the QA4ECV project on the production of a new fused land surface BRDF/albedo spectral and broadband CDR product based on four European sensors: MERIS, (A)ATSR(2), VEGETATION, PROBA-V and two US sensors

  19. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Canis Lupus LLC and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Departments of Human Oncology, Medical Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa

  20. Quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Osaka Rosai Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Kazuki; Yagi, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Kanta

    2013-01-01

    The linear accelerator with image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was introduced in May 2010. We performed the verification of the IGRT system, id est (i.e.), acceptance test and our original performance test and confirmed the acceptability for clinical use. We also performed daily QA/QC program before the start of treatment. One-year experience of QA/QC program showed excellent stability of IGRT function compared with our old machine. We further hope to establish the more useful management system and QA/QC program. (author)

  1. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa. Conclusions: There is a lack of correlation between

  2. The development of quality assurance program for cyberknife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Sun; Lee, Dong Han; Kang, Young Nam

    2006-01-01

    Standardization quality assurance (QA)program of Cyberknife for suitable circumstances in Korea has not been established. In this research, we investigated the development of QA program for Cyberknife and evaluation of the feasibility under applications. Considering the feature of constitution for systems and the therapeutic methodology of Cyberknife, the list of quality control (QC) was established and divided dependent on the each period of operations. And then all these developed QC lists were categorized into three groups such as basic QC, delivery specific QC, and patient specific QC based on the each purpose of QA. In order to verify the validity of the established QA program, this QC lists was applied to two Cyberknife centers. The acceptable tolerance was based on the undertaking inspection list from the Cyberknife manufacturer and the QC results during last three years of two Cyberknife centers in Korea. The acquired measurement results were evaluated for the analysis of the current QA status and the verification of the propriety for the developed QA program. The current QA status of two Cyberknife centers was evaluated from the accuracy of all measurements in relation with application of the established QA program. Each measurement result was verified having a good agreement within the acceptable tolerance limit of the developed QA program. It is considered that the developed QA program in this research could be established the standardization of QC methods for Cyberknife and confirmed the accuracy and stability for the image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy

  3. SU-F-T-275: A Correlation Study On 3D Fluence-Based QA and 2D Dose Measurement-Based QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S; Mazur, T; Li, H; Green, O; Sun, B; Mutic, S; Yang, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper was to demonstrate the feasibility and creditability of computing and verifying 3D fluencies to assure IMRT and VMAT treatment deliveries, by correlating the passing rates of the 3D fluence-based QA (P(ά)) to the passing rates of 2D dose measurementbased QA (P(Dm)). Methods: 3D volumetric primary fluencies are calculated by forward-projecting the beam apertures and modulated by beam MU values at all gantry angles. We first introduce simulated machine parameter errors (MU, MLC positions, jaw, gantry and collimator) to the plan. Using passing rates of voxel intensity differences (P(Ir)) and 3D gamma analysis (P(γ)), calculated 3D fluencies, calculated 3D delivered dose, and measured 2D planar dose in phantom from the original plan are then compared with those from corresponding plans with errors, respectively. The correlations of these three groups of resultant passing rates, i.e. 3D fluence-based QA (P(ά,Ir) and P(ά,γ)), calculated 3D dose (P(Dc,Ir) and P(Dc,γ)), and 2D dose measurement-based QA (P(Dm,Ir) and P(Dm,γ)), will be investigated. Results: 20 treatment plans with 5 different types of errors were tested. Spearman’s correlations were found between P(ά,Ir) and P(Dc,Ir), and also between P(ά,γ) and P(Dc,γ), with averaged p-value 0.037, 0.065, and averaged correlation coefficient ρ-value 0.942, 0.871 respectively. Using Matrixx QA for IMRT plans, Spearman’s correlations were also obtained between P(ά,Ir) and P(Dm,Ir) and also between P(ά,γ) and P(Dm,γ), with p-value being 0.048, 0.071 and ρ-value being 0.897, 0.779 respectively. Conclusion: The demonstrated correlations improve the creditability of using 3D fluence-based QA for assuring treatment deliveries for IMRT/VMAT plans. Together with advantages of high detection sensitivity and better visualization of machine parameter errors, this study further demonstrates the accuracy and feasibility of 3D fluence based-QA in pre-treatment QA and daily QA. Research

  4. Component-Based Approach in Learning Management System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Larisa; Bule, Jekaterina; Makarov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes component-based approach (CBA) for learning management system development. Learning object as components of e-learning courses and their metadata is considered. The architecture of learning management system based on CBA being developed in Riga Technical University, namely its architecture, elements and possibilities are…

  5. Rights-Based Approach: The Hub of Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choondassery, Yesudas

    2017-01-01

    A rights-based approach to the environmental issues has been gaining momentum since the United Nations' Environmental Agency proposed a new rights-based agenda for sustainable development in the document, "Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development" (UN, 2015). Our moral responsibility toward the environment is…

  6. "Design for Somebody" - Approach Enabling Mobile Technology Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkka, Andrew; Merilampi, Sari; Koivisto, Antti; Tommiska, Janika; Saarinen, Tatu-Pekka

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents case examples of Design for Somebody (DfS) philosophy used both in developing novel technologies and modifying existing main stream technologies applicable for users with special needs. DfS embodies variety of mobile technology approaches to generate personalised means to enable and motivate physical, cognitive and social skills development.

  7. An Introduction to the Human Development and Capability Approach

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    For still others, development is a holistic project of personal social and spiritual progress. ..... One set relates to how the policy decision will affect economic output. ...... This brings up one further misunderstanding of Sen's capability approach and ...... Human development focuses on the institutional factors that violate human ...

  8. Learning Conservation and Sustainable Development: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Schelhas; James P. Lassoie

    2001-01-01

    Conservation aud sustainable development (CSD) represent one of the most important new ways of thinking in natural resource management and policy. Cornell University has developed an iuterdisciplinary graduate minor to include this approach in its curriculum. The concept of CSD involves working toward environmental, social, and economic goals simultaneously. Although...

  9. Local energy developments based on spatial and systemic approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manickam, Anu

    Local energy developments from a spatial and systemic approach are highlighted using examples from a Dutch case study. Developments in energy systems included interconnectedness of contextual factors and systems responses. The need to explore both the contextual factors and systemic aspects are

  10. A Comparison of Five Alternative Approaches to Information Systems Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Hirschheim

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The field of information systems (IS has grown dramatically over the past three decades. Recent trends have transformed the IS landscape. These trends include: the evolution of implementation technology from centralized mainframe environments towards distributed client-server architectures, embracing the internet and intranets; changes in user interface technology from character-based to graphical user interfaces, multimedia, and the World Wide Web; changes in applications from transaction processing systems towards systems supporting collaborative work; and the use of information technology as an enabler of business process reengineering and redesign. These technology changes coupled with changes in organizations and their operating environment, such as the growth of the network and virtual organization, internationalization and globalization of many organizations, intensified global competition, changes in values such as customer orientation (service quality and Quality of Working Life, have imposed new demands on the development of information systems. These changes have led to an increasing discussion about information systems development (ISO, and in particular, the various methods, tools, methodologies, and approaches for ISD. We believe such discussion has opened the door for new, alternative IS development approaches and methodologies. Our paper takes up this theme by describing five alternative ISD approaches, namely the Interactionist approach, the Speech Act-based approach, Soft Systems Methodology, the Trade Unionist approach, and the Professional Work Practices approach. Despite the fact that most of these approaches have a history of over 15 years, their relevance to IS development is not well recognized in the mainstream of IS practice and research, nor is their institutional status comparable to traditional approaches such as structured analysis and design methods. Therefore we characterize the five approaches as 'alternative' in

  11. Strategic approach to outsourcing the research and development function

    OpenAIRE

    Firend, A.R

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for outsourcing the R&D function. This model is to serve as a strategic approach to outsourcing that considers number of elements with strategic competitive advantage as an ultimate objective. This paper suggest that outsourcing research and development should be planed and conducted from a strategic standpoint and have positive impact on organizational competitive position by incorporating it into the overall\\ud strategy of the organization to reduce the numbe...

  12. Development of a Conservative Model Validation Approach for Reliable Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    CIE 2015 August 2-5, 2015, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [DRAFT] DETC2015-46982 DEVELOPMENT OF A CONSERVATIVE MODEL VALIDATION APPROACH FOR RELIABLE...obtain a conservative simulation model for reliable design even with limited experimental data. Very little research has taken into account the...3, the proposed conservative model validation is briefly compared to the conventional model validation approach. Section 4 describes how to account

  13. Developing a New Approach for Arabic Morphological Analysis and Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Gridach, Mourad; Chenfour, Noureddine

    2011-01-01

    Arabic morphological analysis is one of the essential stages in Arabic Natural Language Processing. In this paper we present an approach for Arabic morphological analysis. This approach is based on Arabic morphological automaton (AMAUT). The proposed technique uses a morphological database realized using XMODEL language. Arabic morphology represents a special type of morphological systems because it is based on the concept of scheme to represent Arabic words. We use this concept to develop th...

  14. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES FOR MODELING THE RURAL SETTLEMENT DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbenkova Elena Vladimirovna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Subject: the paper describes the research results on validation of a rural settlement developmental model. The basic methods and approaches for solving the problem of assessment of the urban and rural settlement development efficiency are considered. Research objectives: determination of methodological approaches to modeling and creating a model for the development of rural settlements. Materials and methods: domestic and foreign experience in modeling the territorial development of urban and rural settlements and settlement structures was generalized. The motivation for using the Pentagon-model for solving similar problems was demonstrated. Based on a systematic analysis of existing development models of urban and rural settlements as well as the authors-developed method for assessing the level of agro-towns development, the systems/factors that are necessary for a rural settlement sustainable development are identified. Results: we created the rural development model which consists of five major systems that include critical factors essential for achieving a sustainable development of a settlement system: ecological system, economic system, administrative system, anthropogenic (physical system and social system (supra-structure. The methodological approaches for creating an evaluation model of rural settlements development were revealed; the basic motivating factors that provide interrelations of systems were determined; the critical factors for each subsystem were identified and substantiated. Such an approach was justified by the composition of tasks for territorial planning of the local and state administration levels. The feasibility of applying the basic Pentagon-model, which was successfully used for solving the analogous problems of sustainable development, was shown. Conclusions: the resulting model can be used for identifying and substantiating the critical factors for rural sustainable development and also become the basis of

  15. Recent developments in the path integral approach to anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo.

    1986-08-01

    After a brief summary of the path integral approach to anomalous identities, some of the recent developments in this approach are discussed. The topics discussed include (i) Construction of the effective action by means of the covariant current, (ii) Gauss law constraint in anomalous gauge theories, (iii) Path integral approach to anomalies in superconformal transformations, (iv) Conformal and ghost number anomalies in string theory in analogy with the instanton calculation, (v) Covariant local Lorentz anomaly and its connection with the mathematical construction of the consistent anomaly. (author)

  16. Investigating ion recombination effects in a liquid-filled ionization chamber array used for IMRT QA measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knill, Cory, E-mail: knillcor@gmail.com; Snyder, Michael; Rakowski, Joseph T.; Burmeister, Jay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan 48201 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Zhuang, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Matuszak, Martha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: PTW’s Octavius 1000 SRS array performs IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements with liquid-filled ionization chambers (LICs) to allow closer detector spacing and higher resolution, compared to air-filled QA devices. However, reduced ion mobility in LICs relative to air leads to increased ion recombination effects and reduced collection efficiencies that are dependent on Linac pulse frequency and pulse dose. These pulse parameters are variable during an IMRT delivery, which affects QA results. In this study, (1) 1000 SRS collection efficiencies were measured as a function of pulse frequency and pulse dose, (2) two methods were developed to correct changes in collection efficiencies during IMRT QA measurements, and the effects of these corrections on QA pass rates were compared. Methods: To obtain collection efficiencies, the OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS was used to measure open fields of varying pulse frequency, pulse dose, and beam energy with results normalized to air-filled chamber measurements. Changes in ratios of 1000 SRS to chamber measured dose were attributed to changing collection efficiencies, which were then correlated to pulse parameters using regression analysis. The usefulness of the derived corrections was then evaluated using 6 MV and 10FFF SBRT RapidArc plans delivered to the OCTAVIUS 4D system using a TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems) linear accelerator equipped with a high definition multileaf collimator. For the first correction, MATLAB software was developed that calculates pulse frequency and pulse dose for each detector, using measurement and DICOM RT Plan files. Pulse information is converted to collection efficiency, and measurements are corrected by multiplying detector dose by ratios of calibration to measured collection efficiencies. For the second correction the MU/min in the daily 1000 SRS calibration was chosen to match the average MU/min of the volumetric modulated arc therapy plan. Effects of the two corrections on QA results were

  17. Student Development in Higher Education: A Constructivist Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Rania; Sarirete, Akila

    Sustainable education requires a new approach to knowledge acquisition and learning. This approach is manifested in merging student experience inside and outside the classroom, which eventually results in shaping the 21 st century lifelong learner. This paper presents an innovative student development model based on the constructivist approach; showing the collaboration between student affairs and academics. Furthermore, it illustrates a unique experience implemented at Effat University for developing the student as a whole person. This is done to complement the student's academic experience with the necessary skills and abilities derived from Effat University mission that focuses on creating women leaders. The student finds herself in a journey of self development and growth throughout the course of her study until graduation. At the time of graduation, she is equipped with all what it takes to be a successful career woman and a leader of change in her society.

  18. Web Implementation of Quality Assurance (QA) for X-ray Units in Balkanic Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urošević, Vlade; Ristić, Olga; Milošević, Danijela; Košutić, Duško

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic radiology is the major contributor to the total dose of the population from all artificial sources. In order to reduce radiation exposure and optimize diagnostic x-ray image quality, it is necessary to increase the quality and efficiency of quality assurance (QA) and audit programs. This work presents a web application providing completely new QA solutions for x-ray modalities and facilities. The software gives complete online information (using European standards) with which the corresponding institutions and individuals can evaluate and control a facility's Radiation Safety and QA program. The software enables storage of all data in one place and sharing the same information (data), regardless of whether the measured data is used by an individual user or by an authorized institution. The software overcomes the distance and time separation of institutions and individuals who take part in QA. Upgrading the software will enable assessment of the medical exposure level to ionizing radiation.

  19. The GSPC: Newest Franchise in al-Qa'ida's Global Jihad

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boudali, Lianne K

    2007-01-01

    .... Some observers have speculated that North Africa may be the next safe haven for al Qa ida, and that European countries may face a greater risk of attack if Algerian terrorist groups expand their base...

  20. Portland cement concrete pavement review of QC/QA data 2000 through 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This report analyzes the Quality Control/Quality Assurance (QC/QA) data for Portland cement concrete pavement : (PCCP) awarded in the years 2000 through 2009. Analysis of the overall performance of the projects is accomplished by : reviewing the Calc...

  1. A Stigmergy Approach for Open Source Software Developer Community Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Beaver, Justin M [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Treadwell, Jim N [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The stigmergy collaboration approach provides a hypothesized explanation about how online groups work together. In this research, we presented a stigmergy approach for building an agent based open source software (OSS) developer community collaboration simulation. We used group of actors who collaborate on OSS projects as our frame of reference and investigated how the choices actors make in contribution their work on the projects determinate the global status of the whole OSS projects. In our simulation, the forum posts and project codes served as the digital pheromone and the modified Pierre-Paul Grasse pheromone model is used for computing developer agent behaviors selection probability.

  2. Systems approaches to integrated solid waste management in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Rachael E.; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Five drivers led developed countries to current solid waste management paradigm. ► Many unique factors challenge developing country solid waste management. ► Limited transferability of developed country approaches to developing countries. ► High uncertainties and decision stakes call for post-normal approaches. ► Systems thinking needed for multi-scale, self-organizing eco-social waste systems. - Abstract: Solid waste management (SWM) has become an issue of increasing global concern as urban populations continue to rise and consumption patterns change. The health and environmental implications associated with SWM are mounting in urgency, particularly in the context of developing countries. While systems analyses largely targeting well-defined, engineered systems have been used to help SWM agencies in industrialized countries since the 1960s, collection and removal dominate the SWM sector in developing countries. This review contrasts the history and current paradigms of SWM practices and policies in industrialized countries with the current challenges and complexities faced in developing country SWM. In industrialized countries, public health, environment, resource scarcity, climate change, and public awareness and participation have acted as SWM drivers towards the current paradigm of integrated SWM. However, urbanization, inequality, and economic growth; cultural and socio-economic aspects; policy, governance, and institutional issues; and international influences have complicated SWM in developing countries. This has limited the applicability of approaches that were successful along the SWM development trajectories of industrialized countries. This review demonstrates the importance of founding new SWM approaches for developing country contexts in post-normal science and complex, adaptive systems thinking

  3. Systems approaches to integrated solid waste management in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Rachael E., E-mail: rmarsh01@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Albert A. Thornbrough Building, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Farahbakhsh, Khosrow, E-mail: khosrowf@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Albert A. Thornbrough Building, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Five drivers led developed countries to current solid waste management paradigm. ► Many unique factors challenge developing country solid waste management. ► Limited transferability of developed country approaches to developing countries. ► High uncertainties and decision stakes call for post-normal approaches. ► Systems thinking needed for multi-scale, self-organizing eco-social waste systems. - Abstract: Solid waste management (SWM) has become an issue of increasing global concern as urban populations continue to rise and consumption patterns change. The health and environmental implications associated with SWM are mounting in urgency, particularly in the context of developing countries. While systems analyses largely targeting well-defined, engineered systems have been used to help SWM agencies in industrialized countries since the 1960s, collection and removal dominate the SWM sector in developing countries. This review contrasts the history and current paradigms of SWM practices and policies in industrialized countries with the current challenges and complexities faced in developing country SWM. In industrialized countries, public health, environment, resource scarcity, climate change, and public awareness and participation have acted as SWM drivers towards the current paradigm of integrated SWM. However, urbanization, inequality, and economic growth; cultural and socio-economic aspects; policy, governance, and institutional issues; and international influences have complicated SWM in developing countries. This has limited the applicability of approaches that were successful along the SWM development trajectories of industrialized countries. This review demonstrates the importance of founding new SWM approaches for developing country contexts in post-normal science and complex, adaptive systems thinking.

  4. TH-A-BRC-03: AAPM TG218: Measurement Methods and Tolerance Levels for Patient-Specific IMRT Verification QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miften, M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  5. TH-A-BRC-03: AAPM TG218: Measurement Methods and Tolerance Levels for Patient-Specific IMRT Verification QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miften, M.

    2016-01-01

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  6. DeepQA: Improving the estimation of single protein model quality with deep belief networks

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Renzhi; Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Hou, Jie; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Background Protein quality assessment (QA) useful for ranking and selecting protein models has long been viewed as one of the major challenges for protein tertiary structure prediction. Especially, estimating the quality of a single protein model, which is important for selecting a few good models out of a large model pool consisting of mostly low-quality models, is still a largely unsolved problem. Results We introduce a novel single-model quality assessment method DeepQA based on deep belie...

  7. Technical Note: Response time evolution of XR-QA2 GafChromic™ film models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldelaijan, Saad; Tomic, Nada; Papaconstadopoulos, Pavlos; Schneider, James; Seuntjens, Jan; Shih, Shelley; Lewis, David; Devic, Slobodan

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the response of the newest XR-QA2 GafChromic™ film model in terms of postexposure signal growth and energy response in comparison with the older XR-QA (Version 2) model. Pieces of film were irradiated to air kerma in air values up to 12 cGy with several beam qualities (5.3-8.25 mm Al) commonly used for CT scanning. Film response was scored in terms of net reflectance from scanned film images at various points in time postirradiation ranging from 1 to 7 days and 5 months postexposure. To reconstruct the measurement signal changes with postirradiation delay, we irradiated one film piece and then scanned it at different point times starting from 2" min and up to 3 days postexposure. For all beam qualities and dose range investigated, it appears that the XR-QA2 film signal completely saturated after 15 h. Compared to 15 h postirradiation scanning time, the observed variation in net reflectance were 3%, 2%, and 1% for film scanned 2" min, 20 min, and 3 h after exposure, respectively, which is well within the measurement uncertainty of the XR-QA2 based reference radiochromic film dosimetry system. A comparison between the XR-QA (Version 2) and the XR-QA2 film response after several months (relative to their responses after 24 h) show differences in up to 8% and 1% for each film model respectively. The replacement of cesium bromide in the older XR-QA (Version 2) film model with bismuth oxide in the newer XR-QA2 film, while keeping the same single sensitive layer structure, lead to a significantly more stable postexposure response. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Tolerance design of patient-specific range QA using the DMAIC framework in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Dongho; Manger, Ryan P; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Do Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Gwe-Ya

    2018-02-01

    To implement the DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) can be used for customizing the patient-specific QA by designing site-specific range tolerances. The DMAIC framework (process flow diagram, cause and effect, Pareto chart, control chart, and capability analysis) were utilized to determine the steps that need focus for improving the patient-specific QA. The patient-specific range QA plans were selected according to seven treatment site groups, a total of 1437 cases. The process capability index, C pm was used to guide the tolerance design of patient site-specific range. For prostate field, our results suggested that the patient range measurements were capable at the current tolerance level of ±1 mm in clinical proton plans. For other site-specific ranges, we analyzed that the tolerance tends to be overdesigned to insufficient process capability calculated by the patient-specific QA data. The customized tolerances were calculated for treatment sites. Control charts were constructed to simulate the patient QA time before and after the new tolerances were implemented. It is found that the total simulation QA time was decreased on average of approximately 20% after establishing new site-specific range tolerances. We simulated the financial impact of this project. The QA failure for whole process in proton therapy would lead up to approximately 30% increase in total cost. DMAIC framework can be used to provide an effective QA by setting customized tolerances. When tolerance design is customized, the quality is reasonably balanced with time and cost demands. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. The implementing of the training, examination and qualification for QA auditor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaozheng; Han Peicong; Zhang Zhongyuan; Zhu Guoliang

    2007-01-01

    China Power Investment Corporation has implemented the training, examination and qualification for QA auditor based on the related requirements of the nuclear safety documents. The bases, planning of the procedure, implementing procedure and suggestions for implementing the training, examination and qualification are described in this article. That can be used as the reference for implementing the training, examination and qualification for QA auditor, as well as for establishment of the related guide. (authors)

  10. On the Use of Hybrid Development Approaches in Software and Systems Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Münch, Jürgen; Diebold, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A software process is the game plan to organize project teams and run projects. Yet, it still is a challenge to select the appropriate development approach for the respective context. A multitude of development approaches compete for the users’ favor, but there is no silver bullet serving all...... possible setups. Moreover, recent research as well as experience from practice shows companies utilizing different development approaches to assemble the best-fitting approach for the respective company: a more traditional process provides the basic framework to serve the organization, while project teams...

  11. Managing Cybersecurity Research and Experimental Development: The REVO Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Craigen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a systematic approach for managing a research and experimental development cybersecurity program that must be responsive to continuously evolving cybersecurity, and other, operational concerns. The approach will be of interest to research-program managers, academe, corporate leads, government leads, chief information officers, chief technology officers, and social and technology policy analysts. The approach is compatible with international standards and procedures published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS. The key benefits of the approach are the following: i the breadth of the overall (cybersecurity space is described; ii depth statements about specific (cybersecurity challenges are articulated and mapped to the breadth of the problem; iii specific (cybersecurity initiatives that have been resourced through funding or personnel are tracked and linked to specific challenges; and iv progress is assessed through key performance indicators. Although we present examples from cybersecurity, the method may be transferred to other domains. We have found the approach to be rigorous yet adaptive to change; it challenges an organization to be explicit about the nature of its research and experimental development in a manner that fosters alignment with evolving business priorities, knowledge transfer, and partner engagement.

  12. QA experience at the University of Wisconsin accredited dosimetry calibration laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWard, L.A.; Micka, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UW ADCL) employs procedure manuals as part of its Quality Assurance (QA) program. One of these manuals covers the QA procedures and results for all of the UW ADCL measurement equipment. The QA procedures are divided into two main areas: QA for laboratory equipment and QA for external chambers sent for calibration. All internal laboratory equipment is checked and recalibrated on an annual basis, after establishing its consistency on a 6-month basis. QA for external instruments involves checking past calibration history as well as comparing to a range of calibration values for specific instrument models. Generally, the authors find that a chamber will have a variation of less than 0.5 % from previous Co-60 calibration factors, and falls within two standard deviations of previous calibrations. If x-ray calibrations are also performed, the energy response of the chamber is plotted and compared to previous instruments of the same model. These procedures give the authors confidence in the transfer of calibration values from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  13. QA experience at the University of Wisconsin accredited dosimetry calibration laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWard, L.A.; Micka, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UW ADCL) employs procedure manuals as part of its Quality Assurance (QA) program. One of these manuals covers the QA procedures and results for all of the UW ADCL measurement equipment. The QA procedures are divided into two main areas: QA for laboratory equipment and QA for external chambers sent for calibration. All internal laboratory equipment is checked and recalibrated on an annual basis, after establishing its consistency on a 6-month basis. QA for external instruments involves checking past calibration history as well as comparing to a range of calibration values for specific instrument models. Generally, the authors find that a chamber will have a variation of less than 0.5 % from previous Co-60 calibration factors, and falls within two standard deviations of previous calibrations. If x-ray calibrations are also performed, the energy response of the chamber is plotted and compared to previous instruments of the same model. These procedures give the authors confidence in the transfer of calibration values from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  14. Conducting Research with young people and developing the MTW Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frostholm, Peter Hornbæk; Mikkelsen, Sidse Hølvig; Gravesen, David Thore

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this article we present our qualitative mixed-methods methodology that we name the Map-Talk-Walk Approach (MTW Approach). We developed the approach to better grasp young people’s understandings of youth, normality and belonging, which make up the thematic framework of our current youth...... research. The MTW Approach is based on three phases, 1) Researcher-initiated workshops, 2) Focus group interviews, and 3) Walk-and-talks in the young people’s local environments. In the article, we discuss the ethical complications related to doing research with young people and positioning them as experts...... in their life worlds. Our ambition is to create a democratized research process that allows the participants ownership, and we find this to be a challenging task. In the closing section, after a thorough presentation of the three phases, we discuss some of the pitfalls we experienced during the process...

  15. Study on Risk Approaches in Software Development Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu BRANDAS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk approaches in project development led to the integration in the IT project management methodologies and software development of activities and processes of risk management. The diversity and the advanced level of the used technologies in IT projects with increasing com-plexity leads to an exponential diversification of risk factors.The purpose of this research is to identify the level of the risk approach in IT projects both at the IT project management and software development methodologies level and the level of the perception of IT project man-agers, IT managers and IT analysts in Romanian IT companies. Thus, we want to determine the correlation between the use of a project management or software development methodology and the overall level of risk perceived by the project managers using these methodologies.

  16. Developing an Approach for Analyzing and Verifying System Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, William C.; Lindvall, Mikael; Ackermann, Chris; Sibol, Deane E.; Godfrey, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a project for developing an approach for analyzing and verifying the inter system communications. The motivation for the study was that software systems in the aerospace domain are inherently complex, and operate under tight constraints for resources, so that systems of systems must communicate with each other to fulfill the tasks. The systems of systems requires reliable communications. The technical approach was to develop a system, DynSAVE, that detects communication problems among the systems. The project enhanced the proven Software Architecture Visualization and Evaluation (SAVE) tool to create Dynamic SAVE (DynSAVE). The approach monitors and records low level network traffic, converting low level traffic into meaningful messages, and displays the messages in a way the issues can be detected.

  17. Adapting the innovation systems approach to agricultural development in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friederichsen, Rupert; Thai, Thi Minh; Neef, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    into the still-dominant transfer of technology model. We show how extensionists draw selectively on these diverse discourses to foster interaction with outsiders and clients, and bolster their livelihood strategies. We conclude that the conceptual framework suggested by the innovation systems (IS) approach......Competing models of innovation informing agricultural extension, such as transfer of technology, participatory extension and technology development, and innovation systems have been proposed over the last decades. These approaches are often presented as antagonistic or even mutually exclusive....... This article shows how practitioners in a rural innovation system draw on different aspects of all three models, while creating a distinct local practice and discourse. We revisit and deepen the critique of Vietnam’s “model” approach to upland rural development, voiced a decade ago in this journal. Our...

  18. Territorial development. A new approach to development processes for the economies of the developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Pecqueur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to show how the elements of a (flexible and adaptable model of territorial development, whose roots are anchored in the analysis of coordination among pre-capitalist actors, can take on a more concrete form in developing economies. Our hypothesis is that the application of this model functions as a resurgence of pre-capitalist production relations, revalidated by local practices and renewed by territorial dynamics. Is such a return to pre-capitalist ways possible and realistic despite the obstacles and, if so, under what conditions? These are the questions this paper seeks to address, by the way of a specifically economic analysis focused on the dynamics of productive systems. On the first part, we review the fundamental principles of a model of territorial development based on a local system of actors, which assumes that the territory is “constructed” and is founded, according to our approach, on the principle of specification. On the second part, we assess the feasibility of this model in developing economies, remembering that we are starting from practices that are already old; practices involving risks and that assume certain conditions of implementation.

  19. Life Span Approach to Growth and Human Development: A Broad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The traditional approach to the study of development emphasizes extensive change in childhood. ... the paper draws the reader's attention to the fact that by adopting the life-span perspective, we gain insights into what our lives will be like as we grow into middle age or old age, who we are, how we came to be this way and ...

  20. Pedagogical Approaches to Develop Critical Thinking and Crisis Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powley, Edward H.; Taylor, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    Management schools must be prepared to aid leaders and managers to succeed in uncertain environments. We offer two approaches, each designed for critical thinking skill development, to teach graduate management students about leading in and through potential disruption to organizational life. First, we present a personalized case method that…

  1. Object Oriented Software Development Using A Use-Cases Approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a systematic approach to the analysis and design of an online banking system using the Use-Cases method of Jacobson. This analysis and design method will support the development of highly effective reuseable code, thus bringing the benefits of object orientation into important software projects.

  2. Reasoning about Development: Essays on Amartya Sen's Capability Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.R. Wells (Thomas)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOver the last 30 years the Indian philosopher-economist Amartya Sen has developed an original normative approach to the evaluation of individual and social well-being. The foundational concern of this ‘capability approach’ is the real freedom of individuals to achieve the kind of lives

  3. Object Oriented Software Development Using A Use-Cases Approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Object Oriented Software Development Using A Use-Cases Approach. ... to the analysis and design of an online banking system using the Use-Cases method of Jacobson. ... thus bringing the benefits of object orientation into important software projects. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol.

  4. Personality and Development in Childhood: A Person-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Daniel; Atkins, Robert; Fegley, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    Applied a person-centered approach to childhood personality development in 28 diverse samples of 3- to 6-year-olds studied over 6 years. Identified resilient, overcontrolled, and undercontrolled personality types. Found that the undercontrolled personality type related to intellectual decline over 6 years. The number of family risks predicted…

  5. Combinatorial chemistry approach to development of molecular plastic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godovsky, Dmitri; Inganäs, Olle; Brabec, Christoph J.; Sariciftci, N. Serdar; Hummelen, Jan C.; Janssen, Rene A.J.; Prato, M.; Maggini, M.; Segura, Jose; Martin, Nazario

    1999-01-01

    We used a combinatorial chemistry approach to develop the molecular plastic solar cells based on soluble fullerene derivatives or solubilized TCNQ molecules in combination with conjugated polymers. Profiles, formed by the diffusion of low molecular weight component in the spin-cast polymer host were

  6. Literature: Developing Critical Awareness; Some Classroom-Tested Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Dorothy, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the "Illinois English Bulletin" is devoted to developing critical awareness, through poetry, values, the elements of fiction, and literary study. The first section considers approaching narrative through the use of popular materials and includes two essays: "Grim Tales in the English Classroom" by Larry Danielson and "From the Comics…

  7. An Iterative Approach To Development Of A PACS Display Workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Kathleen G.

    1989-05-01

    An iterative prototyping approach has been used in the development of requirements for a new user interface for the display workstation in the CommView system product line. This approach involves many steps, including development of the preliminary concept, validation and ranking of ideas within that concept, prototyping, evaluating, and revising. We describe in this paper the process undertaken to design and evaluate the new user interface. Staff at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Bowman Gray/Baptist Hospital Medical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Georgetown University Medical Center and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital participated in various aspects of the study. The subject population included radiologists, residents, technologists and staff physicians from several areas in the hospitals. Subjects participated in in-depth interviews, answered questionnaires, and performed specific tasks, to aid our development process. We feel this method has resulted in a product that will achieve a high level of customer satisfaction, developed in less time than a traditional approach. Some of the reasons we believe in the value of this approach are: • Users may not be able to describe their needs in terms that designers are expecting, leading to misinterpretation; • Users may not be able to choose between options without seeing them; • Users needs and choices evolve with experience; • Users true choices and needs may not seem logical to one not performing those tasks (i.e., the designers).

  8. A Dooyeweerd-based approach to regional economic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aay, H; Van Langevelde, A

    2005-01-01

    Within regional science there is a need for a general theory of regional economic development, one that evaluates and integrates existing approaches. In this paper, the philosophy of Herman Dooyeweerd is used as a basis for conceptualising the contours of such a theory. Contributions of this

  9. Nature and dementia: development of a person-centered approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, I.H.; Vliet, D. van; Gerritsen, D.L.; Droes, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to develop and try out an approach for personalized nature activities for people with dementia. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study using focus group interviews with people with dementia was conducted. Based on the results of the focus groups and the

  10. Sustainable development through biomass utilization: A practical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Malhotra

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an abstract only) This paper is for folks involved in community development efforts targeted towards biomass utilization. Our approach to evaluate the potential for establishing enterprises that utilize locally available forest resources is tailored specifically to the needs of the local community. We evaluate the: 1. Technical feasibility and...

  11. An Approach to Quality Estimation in Model-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegaard, Jens Peter; Koch, Peter; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2004-01-01

    We present an approach to estimation of parameters for design space exploration in Model-Based Development, where synthesis of a system is done in two stages. Component qualities like space, execution time or power consumption are defined in a repository by platform dependent values. Connectors...

  12. Systematic Approach to Modernization of the Russian Federal Spatial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Tatarkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper estimates the regional and municipal opportunities of spa- tial development modernization in the Russian Federation. In the post-crisis period, it is necessary to facilitate the innovative processes and society oriented state develop- ment to give way to the steady transition from the regional policy to the federal state structure, which requires scientifically based decision making in all the directions of social development. The author considers the ideology of such transition and recom- mends using the systematic approach to choosing priorities and development institu- tions. Several perspective factors such as education and science are analyzed in the context of systematic regional and territorial development along with the necessity for program-project modernization of the federal state structure. The following new insti- tutions for regional development are proposed: regional and municipal self-deve- lopment, business territories, program-project planning of spatial development

  13. Systematic Approach to Modernization of the Russian Federal Spatial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Tatarkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper estimates the regional and municipal opportunities of spa- tial development modernization in the Russian Federation. In the post-crisis period, it is necessary to facilitate the innovative processes and society oriented state develop- ment to give way to the steady transition from the regional policy to the federal state structure, which requires scientifically based decision making in all the directions of social development. The author considers the ideology of such transition and recom- mends using the systematic approach to choosing priorities and development institu- tions. Several perspective factors such as education and science are analyzed in the context of systematic regional and territorial development along with the necessity for program-project modernization of the federal state structure. The following new insti- tutions for regional development are proposed: regional and municipal self-deve- lopment, business territories, program-project planning of spatial development

  14. Developing green supply chain management strategies: A taxonomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mutingi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this research is to explore the empirical green supply chain activities found in literature, and to develop a taxonomic framework that can be used for formulating appropriate strategies for green supply chains, based on characteristic dimensions for the green supply chain. Design/methodology/approach: The taxonomic framework is developed through (i analysis of green supply chain activities found in existing empirical work or case studies recorded in literature, (ii identification of key dimensions that influence green supply chain management strategies, and (iii development of a taxonomic scheme for selecting or developing green strategies. Findings: The paper finds that this study yielded: a set of three characteristic dimensions that influence strategic green supply chain management, and a guided structured approach selecting appropriate green strategies, providing managerial insights. Research limitations/implications: This paper shows that future work includes development of specific performance management indices according to the taxonomy of green strategies developed in this study. Practical implications: This research provided a practical guided approach that enhances appropriate formulation of green strategies for green supply chain management, while providing sound managerial insights for the supply chain decision maker. The choice of supply chain strategy directly impacts the overall environmental, economic and operations performance of the supply chain. Originality/value: This study presents to supply chain decision makers a new taxonomic framework that simplifies and enhances the formulation of green strategies, and to researchers a comparative understanding of various strategies applicable to green supply chains.

  15. QA programme in external radiotherapy in Romania - status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, A.; Milu, C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Recognizing the importance of quality assurance in radiotherapy and the need to make access to radiation standards traceable to the international measurement system for every radiotherapy center, the Romanian national secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) has started in 1999 - together with IAEA - a national quality audit programme in all the centers for external radiotherapy from Romania. At present, there are 17 radiotherapy centers in Romania, and a total of 19 teletherapy units and 4 LINCs. The programme has 3 phases: the first phase was to organize a survey in all radiotherapy centers, to collect general information on their radio therapists, medical physicists, type of equipment, dosimeters, etc. Following the survey, a quality assurance network was set up, and on-site dosimetry reviews were arranged according to a suitable timetable. The second phase consisted in performing the reference dosimetry and the calibration of the equipment. Then, a quality audit system based on mailed TLDs has been applied to all radiation beams produced by cobalt-60 therapy units and medical accelerators, in order to identify discrepancies in dosimetry larger than ± 3%. At the same time, the beam calibration performed by the SSDLs was verified. The results of the first survey were analyzed, and corrective actions were taken. A second survey was then organized, based on the mailed TLDs. This paper presents in detail the entire QA programme, its results, and the actions that are to be taken in order to improve the accuracy and consistency of the dosimetry in clinical radiotherapy in Romania. (author)

  16. QA/QC For Radon Concentration Measurement With Charcoal Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelic, G.; Zivanovic, M.; Rajacic, M.; Krneta Nikolic, J.; Todorovic, D.

    2015-01-01

    The primary concern of any measuring of radon or radon progeny must be the quality of the results. A good quality assurance program, when properly designed and diligently followed, ensures that laboratory staff will be able to produce the type and quality of measurement results which is needed and expected. Active charcoal detectors are used for testing the concentration of radon in dwellings. The method of measurement is based on radon adsorption on coal and measurement of gamma radiation of radon daughters. Upon closing the detectors, the measurement was carried out after achieving the equilibrium between radon and its daughters (at least 3 hours) using NaI or HPGe detector. Radon concentrations as well as measurement uncertainties were calculated according to US EPA protocol 520/5-87-005. Detectors used for the measurements were calibrated by 226Ra standard of known activity in the same geometry. Standard and background canisters are used for QA and QC, as well as for the calibration of the measurement equipment. Standard canister is a sealed canister with the same matrix and geometry as the canisters used for measurements, but with the known activity of radon. Background canister is a regular radon measurement canister, which has never been exposed. The detector background and detector efficiency are measured to ascertain whether they are within the warning and acceptance limits. (author).

  17. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been prepared for waste characterization activities to be conducted by the Transuranic (TRU) Project at the Hanford Site to meet requirements set forth in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, 4890139088-TSDF, Attachment B, including Attachments B1 through B6 (WAP) (DOE, 1999a). The QAPjP describes the waste characterization requirements and includes test methods, details of planned waste sampling and analysis, and a description of the waste characterization and verification process. In addition, the QAPjP includes a description of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) requirements for the waste characterization program. Before TRU waste is shipped to the WIPP site by the TRU Project, all applicable requirements of the QAPjP shall be implemented. Additional requirements necessary for transportation to waste disposal at WIPP can be found in the ''Quality Assurance Program Document'' (DOE 1999b) and HNF-2600, ''Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan.'' TRU mixed waste contains both TRU radioactive and hazardous components, as defined in the WLPP-WAP. The waste is designated and separately packaged as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH), based on the radiological dose rate at the surface of the waste container. RH TRU wastes are not currently shipped to the WIPP facility

  18. Perception approaches and practices of local farming and development: an anthropological approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, S.A.; Chaudhry, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The study focused on recognizing the local approaches of farming in designing and implementation of development projects. These approaches are representative of a particular ecological, social, economical, and political system, shaped by the constraints and opportunities associated to the area. Effective and successful development projects must include the local perceptions, their approaches and practices, as the locals are the ones most representative of their issues and have the most workable solution to them. The traditional agriculture has completely been clutched into the nexus of modern farming methods, due to which they are being abandoned by the farmers. Modern farming which is representative of development has increased the competition, transitioning, breaking the community into people experimenting on modern technology and those who are still finding means to adapt their traditional agriculture to the fast changing needs of the societies. The research was carried out in the villages of Ghora Gali and Aruka through qualitative and quantitative methods. Sustainable development in Pakistan thus needs to be reinvented in the local perspective considering approaches and practices and, eradicating the alien chains of development completely. (author)

  19. An OOP Approach to Simplify MDI Application Development An OOP Approach to Simplify MDI Application Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Hernández Fusilier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Multiple Document Interface (MDI is a Microsoft Windows specification that allows managing multiple documents using a single graphic interface application. An MDI application allows opening several documents simultaneously. Only one document is active at a particular time. MDI applications can be deployed using Win32 or Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC. Programs developed using Win32 are faster than those using MFC. However, Win32applications are difficult to implement and prone to errors. It should be mentioned that, learning how to properly use MFC to deploy MDI applications is not simple, and performance is typically worse than that of Win32 applications. A method to simplify the development of MDI applications using Object-Oriented Programming (OOP is proposed. Subsequently, it is shown that this method generates compact code that is easier to read and maintain than other methods (i.e., MFC. Finally, it is demonstrated that the proposed method allowsthe rapid development of MDI applications without sacrificing application performance.La Interfase para Múltiples Documentos (MDI es una especificación del sistema operativo Microsoft Windows que permite manipular varios documentos usando un sólo programa. Un programa del tipo MDI permite abrir varios documentos simultáneamente. En un instante dado, sólo un documento es activo. Los programas del tipo MDI pueden desarrollarseu sando Win32 o las clases fundamentales de Microsoft (MFC. Los programas desarrollados usando Win32 son más rápidos que los programas que usan MFC. Sin embargo, éstos son difíciles de implementar promoviendo la existencia de errores. Cabe mencionar que el desarrollo de programas del tipo MDI usando MFC no es sencillo, y que su desempeño estípicamente peor que el de un programa del tipo Win32. Se propone un método que drásticamente simplifica el desarrollo de programas del tipo MDI por medio de la Programación Orientada a Objetos (POO. Se demuestra que el m

  20. Systematic approach to scenario development using FEP analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, L.E.E.; Lever, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    UK regulatory requirements require that the 'assessed radiological risk ... to a representative member of the potentially exposed group at greatest risk should be consistent with a risk target of 10 -6 per year' and that risks should be 'summed over all situations that could give rise to exposure to the group'. It is a further requirement that a repository performance assessment provides a 'comprehensive record of the judgements and assumptions on which the risk assessments are based'. In order to meet these requirements, Nirex, working with AEA Technology, has developed an approach to performance assessment based on the identification and analysis of features, events and processes (FEPs). The objectives of the approach are to provide a comprehensive, traceable and clear presentation of a performance assessment for a deep geological radioactive waste repository. The approach to scenario development is fundamental to the overall Nirex strategy for performance assessment, eventually leading to a repository safety case for regulatory submission. This paper outlines the main concepts of the approach, illustrated with examples of work undertaken by Nirex to demonstrate its practicality. Due to the current status of the Nirex repository programme, the approach has not yet been used to conduct a full performance assessment of a repository located at a specific site. (authors)

  1. Sustainable intensification: a multifaceted, systemic approach to international development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, Jennifer; Ares, Adrian; van Houweling, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Sustainable intensification (SI) is a term increasingly used to describe a type of approach applied to international agricultural projects. Despite its widespread use, there is still little understanding or knowledge of the various facets of this composite paradigm. A review of the literature has led to the formalization of three principles that convey the current characterization of SI, comprising a whole system, participatory, agroecological approach. Specific examples of potential bottlenecks to the SI approach are cited, in addition to various technologies and techniques that can be applied to overcome these obstacles. Models of similar, succcessful approaches to agricultural development are examined, along with higher level processes. Additionally, this review explores the desired end points of SI and argues for the inclusion of gender and nutrition throughout the process. To properly apply the SI approach, its various aspects need to be understood and adapted to different cultural and geographic situations. New modeling systems and examples of the effective execution of SI strategies can assist with the successful application of the SI paradigm within complex developing communities. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. A plant control system development approach for IRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.T.; Brittain, C.R.; March-Leuba, J.A.; Conway, L.E.; Oriani, L.

    2003-01-01

    The plant control system concept for the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) will make use of integrated control, diagnostic, and decision modules to provide a highly automated intelligent control capability. The plant control system development approach established for IRIS involves determination and verification of control strategies based on whole-plant simulation; identification of measurement, control, and diagnostic needs; development of an architectural framework in which to integrate an intelligent plant control system; and design of the necessary control and diagnostic elements for implementation and validation. This paper describes key elements of the plant control system development approach established for IRIS and presents some of the strategies and methods investigated to support the desired control capabilities. (author)

  3. Transgenic approaches for development of disease resistance in banana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhawat, Upendra K.S.; Ghag, Siddhesh B.; Ganapathi, Thumballi R.

    2014-01-01

    Banana (Musa spp.) is an important food and cash crop worldwide. Diseases and pests pose the most serious constraint to banana cultivation. Among the diseases, Fusarium wilt and Banana Bunchy Top Virus (BBTV) are the most important economically. We have explored different transgenic approaches for development of efficient resistance in banana against these two diseases. For countering Fusarium wilt, we have over expressed Petunia floral defensins using a strong constitutive promoter in transgenic banana plants. We have also tested a host induced gene silencing strategy targeting two vital fungal genes to obtain Fusarium resistant banana plants. For development of BBTV resistant banana plants also, we have used a host-induced gene silencing approach utilizing the full and partial coding sequence of the viral replication initiation protein. Successful bioassays performed in controlled greenhouse conditions have shown the efficacy of using these strategies to develop disease resistant banana plants. (author)

  4. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  5. A Participatory Systemic Approach To Rural Community Development In Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan M. Ha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Various failures of the traditional approach in community development in developing countries have led to the development of a more appropriate and holistic approach to address complex development issues. Systems approaches and cutting-edge tools have recently been embraced to deal with such complexities under contexts of interwoven relationships amongst social economic political cultural and environmental factors. This paper provides reflections on practical value of the Evolutionary Learning Laboratory ELLab through a case study on improving the quality of life for women farmers in northern Vietnam where gender-bias labour hardship and poor living-standard are evident. The first five steps of the participatory systems-based ELLab were implemented during 2013-2014 providing valuable results that have made both practical and theoretical contributions with substantial implications to community development. Our study finds that the context-based results reshaped the original project goal. The approach and framework helped to identify and engage right stakeholders in problem analyses and decision making activities. Fuzzy problems within the complex web of life of the women and rural households were uncovered using relevant systems tools to develop a big picture systems model of the current situation defining levers for systemic interventions. The ELLab helps to build capacity of local people for taking ownership of the process and outcomes to guarantee sustainability and long-term impacts. It also facilitates true participation and co-learning amongst stakeholders triggering transformative learning. Contributions to action research and an innovative mechanism for sharing reflections and lessons at both local and global levels via the online Think2ImpactTM are discussed.

  6. Object Oriented Approach to Software Development for LHC Experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    Tummers, B J; Day, C; Innocente, V; Mount, R; Visser, E; Burnett, T H; Balke, C

    2002-01-01

    % RD41 \\\\ \\\\ We propose to study the viability of the Object Oriented~(OO) approach for developing the code for LHC experiments. The authors of this proposal will learn the key issues of this approach:~~OO analysis and design. Several methodologies will be studied to select the most appropriate for the High Energy Physics case. Some Computer Aided Software Engineering tools and implementation languages will be evaluated. These studies will be carried out with various well-defined prototypes, some of which have been defined in a preceding study and some of which will be defined in the course of this R\\&D project. We propose to also study in this project how the OO approach enhances a different, and hopefully better, project management. Management tools will be tried and professional training will be organized.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF THE STRUCTURAL MATRIX APPROACH IN ORGANIZATIONAL DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishlanova Marina Yur'evna

    2012-07-01

    The proposed approach discloses private constituents of elements, communications, organizational layers, generalized characteristics of layers, and partial effects. This approach may be used to simulate a system of forces, items of pressure, and organizational problems. The most advanced state of stability and sustainable development is now provided with the structure within which the elements remain in certain natural interdependence (symmetry, or balance. Formation of this model is based on thorough diagnostics of an organization through the employment of the structural matrix approach and the audit of the following characteristics: labour efficiency, reliability and flexibility of communications, uniformity of distribution of communications and their coordination, connectivity of elements and layers with account for their impact, degree of freedom of elements, layers and the system as a whole, reliability, rigidity, adaptability, stability of the organizational structure.

  8. A MOOC approach for training researchers in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Murugesan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on an online course in research writing offered in a massive open online course (MOOC format for developing country researchers. The concepts of cognitive presence, teacher presence, and social presence informed the design of the course, with a philosophy of strong social interaction supported by guest facilitators. The course was developed with low-bandwidth elements and hosted on a Moodle site. It was offered twice as a MOOC and 2830 learners from more than 90 countries, mainly in the developing world, took part. The average completion rate was 53%. Female learners and learners who were active in the forums were more likely to complete the course. Our MOOC approach may be a useful model for continuing professional development training in the developing world.

  9. Impact and payback of a QA/QC program for steam-water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, S.I.; Wilson, D.

    1992-01-01

    QA/QC programs for analytical laboratories and in-line instrumentation are essential if we are to have any faith in the data they produce. When the analytes are at trace levels, as they frequently are in a steam-water cycle, the importance of QA/QC increases by an order of magnitude. The cost and resources of such a program, although worth it, are frequently underestimated. QA/QC is much more than running a standard several times a week. This paper will discuss some of the essential elements of such a program, compare them to the cost, and point out the impact of not having such a program. RP-2712-3 showed how essential QA/QC is to understand the limitations of instruments doing trace analysis of water. What it did not do, nor was it intended to, is discuss how good reliability can be in your own plant. QA programs that include training of personnel, written procedures, and comprehensive maintenance and inventory programs ensure optimum performance of chemical monitors. QC samples run regularly allow plant personnel to respond to poor performance in a timely manner, appropriate to plant demands. Proper data management establishes precision information necessary to determine how good our measurements are. Generally, the plant has the advantage of a central laboratory to perform corroborative analysis, and a comprehensive QA/QC program will integrate the plant monitoring operations with the central lab. Where trace analysis is concerned, attention to detail becomes paramount. Instrument performance may be below expected levels, and instruments are probably being run at the bottom end of their optimum range. Without QA/QC the plant manager can have no confidence in analytical results. Poor steam-water chemistry can go unnoticed, causing system deterioration. We can't afford to wait for another RP-2712-3 to tell us how good our data is

  10. A Multicultural Competencies Approach to Developing Human Capital Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolliscroft, Paul; Cagáňová, Dagmar; Čambál, Miloš; Šefčíková, Miriam; Kamenova, Joana Valery

    2012-12-01

    The globalisation phenomenon has been prevalent since the last decade of 20th century and remains a significant factor influencing both organisations and individuals today. Within a globalised business environment the effective management of multicultural aspects and differences has become imperative to ensure success. It is increasingly evident there is a need to develop a clear understanding of multicultural competencies in order to fully develop a strategic approach to human capital management (HCM). The adoption of a strategic approach is necessary to ensure a focus on the issues critical to success and competitive advantage including multicultural management, professional skills and knowledge management. This paper aims to identify the importance of intercultural management and the impact of globalisation upon international business.

  11. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  12. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Cetin; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal; Carmack, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R and D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  13. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Frasch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level.

  14. The applying stakeholder approach to strategic management of territories development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilshat Azamatovich Tazhitdinov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the aspects of the strategic management of socioeconomic development of territories in terms of stakeholder approach are discussed. The author's interpretation of the concept of stakeholder sub-region is proposed, and their classification into internal and external to the territorial socioeconomic system of sub-regional level is offered. The types of interests and types of resources stakeholders in the sub-region are identified, and at the same time the correlation of interests and resources allows to determine the groups (alliances stakeholders, which ensure the balance of interests depending on the certain objectives of the association. The conceptual stakeholder agent model of management of strategic territorial development within the hierarchical system of «region — sub-region — municipal formation,» is proposed. All stakeholders there are considered as the influence agents directing its own resources to provide a comprehensive approach to management territorial development. The interaction between all the influence agents of the «Region — Sub-region — municipal formation» is provided vertically and horizontally through the initialization of the development and implementation of strategic documents of the sub-region. Vertical interaction occurs between stakeholders such as government and municipal authorities being as a guideline, and the horizontal — between the rests of them being as a partnership. Within the proposed model, the concurrent engineering is implemented, which is a form of inter-municipal strategic cooperation of local government municipalities for the formation and analyzing a set of alternatives of the project activities in the sub-region in order to choose the best options. The proposed approach was tested in the development of medium-term comprehensive program of socioeconomic development of the Zauralye and sub-regions of the North-East of the Republic of Bashkortostan (2011–2015.

  15. Malaria Vaccine Development: The Need for Novel Approach-es: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima MAHMOUDI

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although rigorous efforts have substantially decreased the malaria burden through decades, it still threatens the lives of millions of children. Development of an effective vaccine can provide important approach in malaria control strategies. Unfortunately, development of an effective vaccine for falciparum malaria has been hindered by the extreme complexity of malaria parasite biology, complex and diverse parasite genomes, and immune evasion by the parasites as well as the intricate nature of the parasites infection cycle. The aim of this review was to discuss the different approaches to malaria vaccine development until now.Methods: Scientific databases, including MEDLINE (via PubMed and SCOPUS were searched up to 30 Jan 2017 and the articles regarding malaria vaccine development were taken into examination.Results: Several strategies for malaria vaccine development including pre-erythrocytic vaccines, antibody-based subunit vaccines, vectored vaccines, whole sporozoite vaccines, genetically Attenuated parasites and sporozoite subunit vaccine, erythrocytic vaccines, sexual stage vaccine, transmission-blocking vaccine as well as synthetic peptides and conjugate vaccine has been introduced. However, the success has been limited thus far.Conclusion: Although development of malaria vaccine over the past 70 year has been continued, the discovery, development, and licensing of a malaria vaccine formulation, which meets safety, affordability, accessibility, applicability, and efficacy has not yet been achieved.

  16. Project Report on Development of a Safeguards Approach for Pyroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Bean

    2010-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has undertaken an effort to develop a standard safeguards approach for international commercial pyroprocessing facilities. This report details progress for the fiscal year 2010 effort. A component by component diversion pathway analysis has been performed, and has led to insight on the mitigation needs and equipment development needed for a valid safeguards approach. The effort to develop an in-hot cell detection capability led to the digital cloud chamber, and more importantly, the significant potential scientific breakthrough of the inverse spectroscopy algorithm, including the ability to identify energy and spatial location of gamma ray emitting sources with a single, non-complex, stationary radiation detector system. Curium measurements were performed on historical and current samples at the FCF to attempt to determine the utility of using gross neutron counting for accountancy measurements. A solid cost estimate of equipment installation at FCF has been developed to guide proposals and cost allocations to use FCF as a test bed for safeguards measurement demonstrations. A combined MATLAB and MCNPX model has been developed to perform detector placement calculations around the electrorefiner. Early harvesting has occurred wherein the project team has been requested to provide pyroprocessing technology and safeguards short courses.

  17. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach. Progress report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  18. The Development of the Standard Lithuanian Language: Ecolinguistic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaida Buivydienė

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The theory of standard languages is closely linked with the standardization policy and prevailing ideology. The language ideology comprises its value, experience and convictions related to language usage and its dis - course being influenced at institutional, local and global levels. Recently, in the last decades, foreign linguists have linked the theories of the development of standard lan- guages and their ideologies with an ecolinguistic approach towards language standardization phenomena. The article is based on Einar Haugen ’s theory about the development of standard languages and ecolinguistic statements and presents the stages of developing the standard language as well as the factors having an influ - ence on them. In conclusion, a strong political and social impact has been made on the development of the standard Lithuanian language. The stages of the progress of the standard Lithuanian language have rapidly changed each other, some have been held very close to one another and some still have been taken part.

  19. Standardized approach for developing probabilistic exposure factor distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2003-03-01

    The effectiveness of a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) depends critically on the quality of input information that is available to the risk assessor and specifically on the probabilistic exposure factor distributions that are developed and used in the exposure and risk models. Deriving probabilistic distributions for model inputs can be time consuming and subjective. The absence of a standard approach for developing these distributions can result in PRAs that are inconsistent and difficult to review by regulatory agencies. We present an approach that reduces subjectivity in the distribution development process without limiting the flexibility needed to prepare relevant PRAs. The approach requires two steps. First, we analyze data pooled at a population scale to (1) identify the most robust demographic variables within the population for a given exposure factor, (2) partition the population data into subsets based on these variables, and (3) construct archetypal distributions for each subpopulation. Second, we sample from these archetypal distributions according to site- or scenario-specific conditions to simulate exposure factor values and use these values to construct the scenario-specific input distribution. It is envisaged that the archetypal distributions from step 1 will be generally applicable so risk assessors will not have to repeatedly collect and analyze raw data for each new assessment. We demonstrate the approach for two commonly used exposure factors--body weight (BW) and exposure duration (ED)--using data for the U.S. population. For these factors we provide a first set of subpopulation based archetypal distributions along with methodology for using these distributions to construct relevant scenario-specific probabilistic exposure factor distributions.

  20. Beam dynamics of mixed high intensity highly charged ion Beams in the Q/A selector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.H., E-mail: zhangxiaohu@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yuan, Y.J.; Yin, X.J.; Qian, C.; Sun, L.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Du, H.; Li, Z.S.; Qiao, J.; Wang, K.D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H.W.; Xia, J.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-06-11

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators for their advantages in producing high quality intense beams of highly charged ions. However, it exists challenges in the design of the Q/A selection systems for mixed high intensity ion beams to reach sufficient Q/A resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, as the emittance of beam from ECR ion sources is coupled, the matching of phase space to post accelerator, for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities, should be carefully studied. In this paper, the simulation and experimental results of the Q/A selection system at the LECR4 platform are shown. The formation of hollow cross section heavy ion beam at the end of the Q/A selector is revealed. A reasonable interpretation has been proposed, a modified design of the Q/A selection system has been committed for HIRFL-SSC linac injector. The features of the new design including beam simulations and experiment results are also presented.

  1. Lymphocytes Negatively Regulate NK Cell Activity via Qa-1b following Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng C. Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available NK cells can reduce anti-viral T cell immunity during chronic viral infections, including infection with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. However, regulating factors that maintain the equilibrium between productive T cell and NK cell immunity are poorly understood. Here, we show that a large viral load resulted in inhibition of NK cell activation, which correlated with increased expression of Qa-1b, a ligand for inhibitory NK cell receptors. Qa-1b was predominantly upregulated on B cells following LCMV infection, and this upregulation was dependent on type I interferons. Absence of Qa-1b resulted in increased NK cell-mediated regulation of anti-viral T cells following viral infection. Consequently, anti-viral T cell immunity was reduced in Qa-1b- and NKG2A-deficient mice, resulting in increased viral replication and immunopathology. NK cell depletion restored anti-viral immunity and virus control in the absence of Qa-1b. Taken together, our findings indicate that lymphocytes limit NK cell activity during viral infection in order to promote anti-viral T cell immunity.

  2. QA in the design and fabrication of the TMI-2 rail cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    EGandG Idaho, Inc., acting on behalf of the US Department of Energy, is responsible for transporting core debris from Three Mile Island-Unit 2 to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Transportation of the debris is being accomplished using an NRC licensed container, called the NuPac 125-B. This paper describes the NuPac 125-B Rail Cask and the quality assurance (QA) requirements for that system. Also discussed are the QA roles of the various organizations involved in designing, building, inspecting and testing the NuPac 125-B. The paper presents QA/QC systems implemented during the design, procurement, and fabrication of the cask to assure compliance with all applicable technical codes, standards and regulations. It also goes beyond the requirements aspect and describes unique QA/QC measures employed to assure that the cask was built with minimum QA problems. Finally, the lessons learned from the NuPac 125-B project is discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs

  3. Development of Scientific Approach Based on Discovery Learning Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellizar, E.; Hardeli, H.; Beltris, S.; Suharni, R.

    2018-04-01

    Scientific Approach is a learning process, designed to make the students actively construct their own knowledge through stages of scientific method. The scientific approach in learning process can be done by using learning modules. One of the learning model is discovery based learning. Discovery learning is a learning model for the valuable things in learning through various activities, such as observation, experience, and reasoning. In fact, the students’ activity to construct their own knowledge were not optimal. It’s because the available learning modules were not in line with the scientific approach. The purpose of this study was to develop a scientific approach discovery based learning module on Acid Based, also on electrolyte and non-electrolyte solution. The developing process of this chemistry modules use the Plomp Model with three main stages. The stages are preliminary research, prototyping stage, and the assessment stage. The subject of this research was the 10th and 11th Grade of Senior High School students (SMAN 2 Padang). Validation were tested by the experts of Chemistry lecturers and teachers. Practicality of these modules had been tested through questionnaire. The effectiveness had been tested through experimental procedure by comparing student achievement between experiment and control groups. Based on the findings, it can be concluded that the developed scientific approach discovery based learning module significantly improve the students’ learning in Acid-based and Electrolyte solution. The result of the data analysis indicated that the chemistry module was valid in content, construct, and presentation. Chemistry module also has a good practicality level and also accordance with the available time. This chemistry module was also effective, because it can help the students to understand the content of the learning material. That’s proved by the result of learning student. Based on the result can conclude that chemistry module based on

  4. Comprehensive change management concepts. Development of a participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Klaus J; Steimle, Ulrich; Schröder, Delia

    2008-07-01

    During the last years, many change projects in organizations did not have the planned success. Therefore at first, the causes for these failures and the success factors contributing to organizational change have to be discussed. To get better results, a comprehensive change management concept has been developed and tested in an ongoing research project. By using concepts for an integrated assessment and design of organizations, an approach for analyzing the current situation has been elaborated to identify "lack of integration" in the change initiatives of a company. To realize an integrated overall approach of modernization by harmonizing different methods and concepts, first, one has to prove their relationship to policy and strategy (vertical harmonization). The second step is to take into account the fact that there has to be a logical fit between the single concepts (horizontal harmonization). But even if all elements are logically coherent, that does not mean that the people working in the company also see this coherence. Therefore, in addition to the "logical fit", one has to examine the "psychological fit". In the end, a concept for analyzing the status quo in an organization as a result of "objective data" and "subjective data" originated. Subsequently, instruments for harmonizing different modernizing concepts have been applied. As part of the comprehensive change management concept participatory ergonomic approaches have been used during the project. The present study shows this approach in the case of one company.

  5. Application of graded QA in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    All current schemes for grading of quality assurance are developments or variations on three themes; defining and grouping the planning and systematic actions which constitute the quality assurance approach, defining and classifying the safety, economic and other factors which influence the extent of quality assurance necessary, and using classification or grading schedules to relate grades of quality assurance to classes of factors. The codes and standards which define the actions needed for good management are listed and discussed. A typical equipment classification schedule or a light water reactor is shown. Contract interface documentation and surveillance requirements are discussed. (UK)

  6. Trend Analysis to Measure The Effectiveness of the QA Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mell, Martin A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper represents an approach to the development and use of a system for the evaluation of available information to recognize and deal with quality trends in the design, engineering, procurement and construction process. Selection, collection, analysis and reporting of data and information will be described. The Trend Analysis System is intended to identify, for line and management personnel, areas where improved compliance, revision of practices or procedures, or other appropriate systematic corrective action is warranted, and provides management with a measure of the overall effectiveness of the quality program

  7. A psychology based approach for longitudinal development in cognitive robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eLaw

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in robotics is the ability to learn, from novel experiences, new behaviour that is useful for achieving new goals and skills. Autonomous systems must be able to learn solely through the environment, thus ruling out a priori task knowledge, tuning, extensive training, or other forms of pre-programming. Learning must also be cumulative and incremental, as complex skills are built on top of primitive skills. Additionally, it must be driven by intrinsic motivation because formative experience is gained through autonomous activity, even in the absence of extrinsic goals or tasks. This paper presents an approach to these issues through robotic implementations inspired by the learning behaviour of human infants. We describe an approach to developmental learning and present results from a demonstration of longitudinal development on an iCub humanoid robot. The results cover the rapid emergence of staged behaviour, the role of constraints in development, the effect of bootstrapping between stages, and the use of a schema memory of experiential fragments in learning new skills. The context is a longitudinalexperiment in which the robot advanced from uncontrolled motor babbling to skilled hand/eyeintegrated reaching and basic manipulation of objects. This approach offers promise for furtherfast and effective sensory-motor learning techniques for robotic learning.

  8. Quality assurance of 3-D conformal radiation therapy for a cooperative group trial - RTOG 3D QA center initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Purdy, James A.; Harms, William B.; Bosch, Walter R.; Oehmke, Frederick; Cox, James D.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: 3-D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) holds promise in allowing safe escalation of radiation dose to increase the local control of prostate cancer. Prospective evaluation of this new modality requires strict quality assurance (QA). We report the results of QA review on patients receiving 3DCRT for prostate cancer on a cooperative group trial. MATERIALS and METHODS: In 1993 the NCI awarded the ACR/RTOG and nine institutions an RFA grant to study the use of 3DCRT in the treatment of prostate cancer. A phase I/II trial was developed to: a) test the feasibility of conducting 3DCRT radiation dose escalation in a cooperative group setting; b) establish the maximum tolerated radiation dose that can be delivered to the prostate; and c) quantify the normal tissue toxicity rate when using 3DCRT. In order to assure protocol compliance each participating institution was required to implement data exchange capabilities with the RTOG 3D QA center. The QA center reviews at a minimum the first five case from each participating center and spot checks subsequent submissions. For each case review the following parameters are evaluated: 1) target volume delineation, 2) normal structure delineation, 3) CT data quality, 4) field placement, 5) field shaping, and 6) dose distribution. RESULTS: Since the first patient was registered on August 23, 1994, an additional 170 patients have been accrued. Each of the nine original approved institutions has participated and three other centers have recently passed quality assurance bench marks for study participation. Eighty patients have been treated at the first dose level (68.4 Gy minimum PTV dose) and accrual is currently ongoing at the second dose level (73.8 Gy minimum PTV dose). Of the 124 cases that have undergone complete or partial QA review, 30 cases (24%) have had some problems with data exchange. Five of 67 CT scans were not acquired by protocol standards. Target volume delineation required the submitting institution

  9. Innovative Approaches to Increase Access to Medicines in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde Stevens

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Access to essential medicines is problematic for one third of all persons worldwide. The price of many medicines (i.e., drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics is unaffordable to the majority of the population in need, especially in least-developed countries, but also increasingly in middle-income countries. Several innovative approaches, based on partnerships, intellectual property, and pricing, are used to stimulate innovation, promote healthcare delivery, and reduce global health disparities. No single approach suffices, and therefore stakeholders need to further engage in partnerships promoting knowledge and technology transfer in assuring essential medicines to be manufactured, authorized, and distributed in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs in an effort of making them available at affordable and acceptable conditions.

  10. Laboratory QA/QC improvements for small drinking water systems at Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), a 310 square mile facility located near Aiken, S.C., is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the US Department of Energy. SRS has 28 separate drinking water systems with average daily demands ranging from 0.0002 to 0.5 MGD. All systems utilize treated groundwater. Until recently, the water laboratories for each system operated independently. As a result, equipment, reagents, chemicals, procedures, personnel, and quality control practices differed from location to location. Due to this inconsistency, and a lack of extensive laboratory OA/QC practices at some locations, SRS auditors were not confident in the accuracy of daily water quality analyses results. The Site`s Water Services Department addressed these concerns by developing and implementing a practical laboratory QA/QC program. Basic changes were made which can be readily adopted by most small drinking water systems. Key features of the program include: Standardized and upgraded laboratory instrumentation and equipment; standardized analytical procedures based on vendor manuals and site requirements; periodic accuracy checks for all instrumentation; creation of a centralized laboratory to perform metals digestions and chlorine colorimeter accuracy checks; off-site and on-site operator training; proper storage, inventory and shelf life monitoring for reagents and chemicals. This program has enhanced the credibility and accuracy of SRS drinking water system analyses results.

  11. Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Approach to Enterprise Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Division has implemented an innovative approach to Enterprise Risk Management under a unique governance structure and streamlined integration model. ESD's mission is to design and build the capability to extend human existence to deep space. The Enterprise consists of three Programs: Space Launch System (SLS), Orion, and Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO). The SLS is a rocket and launch system that will be capable of powering humans, habitats, and support systems to deep space. Orion will be the first spacecraft in history capable of taking humans to multiple destinations within deep space. GSDO is modernizing Kennedy's spaceport to launch spacecraft built and designed by both NASA and private industry. ESD's approach to Enterprise Risk Management is commensurate with affordability and a streamlined management philosophy. ESD Enterprise Risk Management leverages off of the primary mechanisms for integration within the Enterprise. The Enterprise integration approach emphasizes delegation of authority to manage and execute the majority of cross-program activities and products to the individual Programs, while maintaining the overall responsibility for all cross-program activities at the Division. The intent of the ESD Enterprise Risk Management approach is to improve risk communication, to avoid replication and/or contradictory strategies, and to minimize overhead process burden. This is accomplished by the facilitation and integration of risk information within ESD. The ESD Division risks, Orion risks, SLS risks, and GSDO risks are owned and managed by the applicable Program. When the Programs have shared risks with multiple consequences, they are jointly owned and managed. When a risk is associated with the integrated system that involves more than one Program in condition, consequence, or mitigation plan, it is considered an Exploration Systems Integration

  12. TALENT MANAGEMENT: A NOVEL APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TOWARDS HERITAGE COMMUNITIES DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hesham Madbouly Hussein Khalil

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Heritage communities in Egypt have continuously developed to sustain a history of millenniums. Developments have been focused on sustaining the physical heritage such as buildings and cities, yet ignoring the intangible heritage such as stories, memories and traditions of people. The results are deterioration of the developed physical heritage as a natural response of ignorance. Architectural Design Firms (ADFs are responsible for developing innovative solutions that translate intangible heritage into sustainable projects. Such solutions require talented architects who are in need of being treated in a talented manner. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the role of Talent Management (TM as a novel approach for developing innovative solutions for Egyptian heritage communities’ development. In order to achieve this aim, a qualitative approach based on (1 literature review is used to investigate heritage development, creative industries, ADFs, motivation and TM and (2 a case study is collected and analysed to study the relationship between TM and intangible heritage preservation.

  13. Quality Assurance of Cancer Study Common Data Elements Using A Post-Coordination Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Solbrig, Harold R; Prud'hommeaux, Eric; Tao, Cui; Weng, Chunhua; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Domain-specific common data elements (CDEs) are emerging as an effective approach to standards-based clinical research data storage and retrieval. A limiting factor, however, is the lack of robust automated quality assurance (QA) tools for the CDEs in clinical study domains. The objectives of the present study are to prototype and evaluate a QA tool for the study of cancer CDEs using a post-coordination approach. The study starts by integrating the NCI caDSR CDEs and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data dictionaries in a single Resource Description Framework (RDF) data store. We designed a compositional expression pattern based on the Data Element Concept model structure informed by ISO/IEC 11179, and developed a transformation tool that converts the pattern-based compositional expressions into the Web Ontology Language (OWL) syntax. Invoking reasoning and explanation services, we tested the system utilizing the CDEs extracted from two TCGA clinical cancer study domains. The system could automatically identify duplicate CDEs, and detect CDE modeling errors. In conclusion, compositional expressions not only enable reuse of existing ontology codes to define new domain concepts, but also provide an automated mechanism for QA of terminological annotations for CDEs.

  14. Designing a strategic plan development approach for integrated area development projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kort, Inge

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly, it has become evident that spatial problems can no longer be resolved in isolation, but should be solved in conjunction with other development-related issues. Interest in integrated area development is growing, and a more integrated planning approach is desired. In this design-based

  15. Developing the digital literacies of academic staff: an institutional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Newland

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Institutional engagement with digital literacies at the University of Brighton has been promoted through the creation of a Digital Literacies Framework (DLF aimed at academic staff. The DLF consists of 38 literacies divided into four categories that align to the following key areas of academic work:• Learning and teaching• Research• Communication and collaboration• AdministrationFor each literacy, there is an explanation of what the literacy is, why it is important and how to gain it, with links to resources and training opportunities. After an initial pilot, the DLF website was launched in the summer of 2014. This paper discusses the strategic context and policy development of the DLF, its initial conception and subsequent development based on a pilot phase, feedback and evaluation. It critically analyses two of the ways that engagement with the DLF have been promoted: (1 formal professional development schemes and (2 the use of a ‘School-based’ approach. It examines the successes and challenges of the University of Brighton's scheme and makes some suggestions for subsequent steps including taking a course-level approach.

  16. GB 388 -- An independent's approach to deepwater development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blincow, R.M.; Whittenburg, L.A.; Pickard, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    As the oil industry moves toward greater water depths in search of viable investment opportunities, cost effective, fast track development schemes must be cultivated to overcome the economic obstacles inherent to deepwater field development. While every deepwater development is different and each presents its own unique problems, the dilemma of justifying the costs, minimizing the lead time to first revenue and minimizing the associated risk are common to all projects. The Garden Banks 388 project has successfully utilized the project management concepts, and methodologies presented in this paper to develop a relatively low cost, low risk, fast track approach to deepwater development in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper describes the production system concept, management style and philosophy which have been employed to develop Garden Banks 388. The paper also discusses why the Floating Production System is considered the best alternative for this particular application. Many of the ideas and strategies used in this project can be applied to any project, whether it be deepwater or more conventional types of projects

  17. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  18. WE-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Tools for TG-142 Linac Imaging QA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, N; Murray, B

    2014-01-01

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The therapy topic this year is solutions for TG-142 recommendations for linear accelerator imaging QA. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Using DoseLab to Perform TG-142 Imaging QA The goals of this session will be to present a clinical overview of acquiring images for TG-142 Imaging QA, as well as analyzing and evaluating results using DoseLab software. DoseLab supports planar imaging QA analysis using almost any QA phantom provided by numerous vendors. General advantages and disadvantages of selecting each of these phantoms will be briefly summarized. Best practices for selecting image acquisition parameters will be presented. A demonstration of using DoseLab software to perform a series of TG-142 tests will be performed. We will disuss why DoseLab uses its own set of imaging QA formulas, and why imaging QA measurement values of the same nominal properties will vary between TG- 142 software packages. Because TG-142 does not specify baseline and tolerance values for imaging QA, the presentation will recommend performing the manufacturer's acceptance test procedure to validate the equipment is functioning correctly. Afterwards, results can be obtained using the clinic's selected set of phantoms, image acquisition parameters, and TG-142 software to set proper baseline values. This presentation will highlight the reasons why comparing imaging QA results can be trickier than comparing linear accelerator treatment results and what physicists should keep in mind when comparing imaging QA results for different machines. Physicists are often unsure of the next step when there is an issue discovered during Imaging QA. Therefore, a few common examples

  19. WE-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Tools for TG-142 Linac Imaging QA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childress, N [Mobius Medical Management, LLC,, Houston, TX (United States); Murray, B [ZapIT Medical, Dublin, OH (Ireland)

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The therapy topic this year is solutions for TG-142 recommendations for linear accelerator imaging QA. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Using DoseLab to Perform TG-142 Imaging QA The goals of this session will be to present a clinical overview of acquiring images for TG-142 Imaging QA, as well as analyzing and evaluating results using DoseLab software. DoseLab supports planar imaging QA analysis using almost any QA phantom provided by numerous vendors. General advantages and disadvantages of selecting each of these phantoms will be briefly summarized. Best practices for selecting image acquisition parameters will be presented. A demonstration of using DoseLab software to perform a series of TG-142 tests will be performed. We will disuss why DoseLab uses its own set of imaging QA formulas, and why imaging QA measurement values of the same nominal properties will vary between TG- 142 software packages. Because TG-142 does not specify baseline and tolerance values for imaging QA, the presentation will recommend performing the manufacturer's acceptance test procedure to validate the equipment is functioning correctly. Afterwards, results can be obtained using the clinic's selected set of phantoms, image acquisition parameters, and TG-142 software to set proper baseline values. This presentation will highlight the reasons why comparing imaging QA results can be trickier than comparing linear accelerator treatment results and what physicists should keep in mind when comparing imaging QA results for different machines. Physicists are often unsure of the next step when there is an issue discovered during Imaging QA. Therefore, a few common examples

  20. Improvement in QA protocol for TLD based personnel monitoring laboratory in last five year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakesh, R.B.

    2018-01-01

    The Quality Assurance (QA) in Personnel monitoring (PM) is a tool to assess the performance of PM laboratories and reliability of dose estimation with respect to standards laid down by international agencies such as IAEA (ISO trumpet curve), IEC, ANSI etc. Reliable personal dose estimation is a basic requirement for radiation protection planning as well as decision making continuous improvement in radiation protection is inherent in radiation protection practices which is highly dependent on accuracy and reliability of the monitoring data. Experience based evolution of Quality control (QC) measures as well as Quality assurance (QA) protocol are two important aspects towards continuous improvement in accuracy and reliability of personnel monitoring results. The paper describes improvement in QC measures and QA protocols initiated during the last five years which led to improvement in the quality of PM services

  1. Innovative development of universities: organizational and economic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belokrylova Olga, S.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the innovative activity of universities in Russia is always accompanied by the organizational changes carried out in the framework of the concept of stage-by-stage approach – a combination of natural and subjectively rational principle and based on intra-organizational integration of all subjects of University ethos for joint decisions in the field of organizational change. The authors analyze the mission transformation of universities determined by formation of information society which now is including not only development of the human capital, but also creation of knowledge as the competitive product possessing the essential production and social importance.

  2. PDF approach for turbulent scalar field: Some recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng

    1993-01-01

    The probability density function (PDF) method has been proven a very useful approach in turbulence research. It has been particularly effective in simulating turbulent reacting flows and in studying some detailed statistical properties generated by a turbulent field There are, however, some important questions that have yet to be answered in PDF studies. Our efforts in the past year have been focused on two areas. First, a simple mixing model suitable for Monte Carlo simulations has been developed based on the mapping closure. Secondly, the mechanism of turbulent transport has been analyzed in order to understand the recently observed abnormal PDF's of turbulent temperature fields generated by linear heat sources.

  3. Developing a Dual-Level Capabilities Approach: Using Constructivist Grounded Theory and Feminist Ethnography to Enhance the Capabilities Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kia M. Q.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a dual-level capabilities approach to development is introduced. This approach intends to improve upon individual-focused capabilities approaches developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. Based upon seven months of ethnographic research in the Afro-descendant, autochthonous Garifuna community of Honduras, constructivist grounded…

  4. The unusually strong hydrogen bond between the carbonyl of Q(A) and His M219 in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center is not essential for efficient electron transfer from Q(A)(-) to Q(B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Jacques; Lavergne, Jérôme; Wakeham, Marion C; Nabedryk, Eliane; Jones, Michael R

    2007-06-05

    In native reaction centers (RCs) from photosynthetic purple bacteria the primary quinone (QA) and the secondary quinone (QB) are interconnected via a specific His-Fe-His bridge. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs the C4=O carbonyl of QA forms a very strong hydrogen bond with the protonated Npi of His M219, and the Ntau of this residue is in turn coordinated to the non-heme iron atom. The second carbonyl of QA is engaged in a much weaker hydrogen bond with the backbone N-H of Ala M260. In previous work, a Trp side chain was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at the M260 position in the RC of Rb. sphaeroides, resulting in a complex that is completely devoid of QA and therefore nonfunctional. A photochemically competent derivative of the AM260W mutant was isolated that contains a Cys side chain at the M260 position (denoted AM260(W-->C)). In the present work, the interactions between the carbonyl groups of QA and the protein in the AM260(W-->C) suppressor mutant have been characterized by light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy of the photoreduction of QA. The QA-/QA difference spectrum demonstrates that the strong interaction between the C4=O carbonyl of QA and His M219 is lost in the mutant, and the coupled CO and CC modes of the QA- semiquinone are also strongly perturbed. In parallel, a band assigned to the perturbation of the C5-Ntau mode of His M219 upon QA- formation in the native RC is lacking in the spectrum of the mutant. Furthermore, a positive band between 2900 and 2400 cm-1 that is related to protons fluctuating within a network of highly polarizable hydrogen bonds in the native RC is reduced in amplitude in the mutant. On the other hand, the QB-/QB FTIR difference spectrum is essentially the same as for the native RC. The kinetics of electron transfer from QA- to QB were measured by the flash-induced absorption changes at 780 nm. Compared to native RCs the absorption transients are slowed by a factor of about 2 for both the slow phase (in the

  5. Development of Compact Quasi-Axisymmetric Stellarator Reactor Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, L.P.; Zarnstorff, M.; White, R.B.; Cooper, W.A.; Sanchez, R.; Neilson, H.; Schmidt, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We have started to examine the reactor potential of quasi-axisymmetric (QA) stellarators with an integrated approach that includes systems evaluation, engineering considerations, and plasma and coil optimizations. In this paper, we summarize the progress made so far in developing QA configurations with reduced alpha losses while retaining good MHD stability properties. The minimization of alpha losses is achieved by directly targeting the collisionless orbits to prolong the average resident times. Configurations with an overall energy loss rate of ∼10% or less, including collisional contributions, have been found. To allow remotely maintaining coils and machine components in a reactor environment, there is a desire to simplify to the extent possible the coil design. To this end, finding a configuration that is optimized not only for the alpha confinement and MHD stability but also for the good coil and reactor performance, remains to be a challenging task

  6. DeepQA: improving the estimation of single protein model quality with deep belief networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Renzhi; Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Hou, Jie; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-12-05

    Protein quality assessment (QA) useful for ranking and selecting protein models has long been viewed as one of the major challenges for protein tertiary structure prediction. Especially, estimating the quality of a single protein model, which is important for selecting a few good models out of a large model pool consisting of mostly low-quality models, is still a largely unsolved problem. We introduce a novel single-model quality assessment method DeepQA based on deep belief network that utilizes a number of selected features describing the quality of a model from different perspectives, such as energy, physio-chemical characteristics, and structural information. The deep belief network is trained on several large datasets consisting of models from the Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) experiments, several publicly available datasets, and models generated by our in-house ab initio method. Our experiments demonstrate that deep belief network has better performance compared to Support Vector Machines and Neural Networks on the protein model quality assessment problem, and our method DeepQA achieves the state-of-the-art performance on CASP11 dataset. It also outperformed two well-established methods in selecting good outlier models from a large set of models of mostly low quality generated by ab initio modeling methods. DeepQA is a useful deep learning tool for protein single model quality assessment and protein structure prediction. The source code, executable, document and training/test datasets of DeepQA for Linux is freely available to non-commercial users at http://cactus.rnet.missouri.edu/DeepQA/ .

  7. THE FAIRSHARES MODEL: AN ETHICAL APPROACH TO SOCIAL ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory James Ridley-Duff

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the keynote address to the 14th International Association of Public and Non-Profit Marketing (IAPNM conference. It explore the question "What impact do ethical values in the FairShares Model have on social entrepreneurial behaviour?" In the first part, three broad approaches to social enterprise are set out: co-operative and mutual enterprises (CMEs, social and responsible businesses (SRBs and charitable trading activities (CTAs. The ethics that guide each approach are examined to provide a conceptual framework for examining FairShares as a case study. In the second part, findings are scrutinised in terms of the ethical values and principles that are activated when FairShares is applied to practice. The paper contributes to knowledge by giving an example of the way OpenSource technology (Loomio has been used to translate 'espoused theories' into 'theories in use' to advance social enterprise development. The review of FairShares using the conceptual framework suggests there is a fourth approach based on multi-stakeholder co-operation to create 'associative democracy' in the workplace.

  8. Developing a Clinical Approach to Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Michael B; Baumgartner, Jill; Vedanthan, Rajesh

    2018-02-13

    Nearly 3 billion people are exposed to household air pollution emitted from inefficient cooking and heating stoves, and almost the entire global population is exposed to detectable levels of outdoor air pollution from traffic, industry, and other sources. Over 3 million people die annually of ischemic heart disease or stroke attributed to air pollution, more than from traditional cardiac risk factors such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, or smoking. Clinicians have a role to play in reducing the burden of pollution-attributable cardiovascular disease. However, there currently exists no clear clinical approach to this problem. Here, we provide a blueprint for an evidence-based clinical approach to assessing and mitigating cardiovascular risk from exposure to air pollution. We begin with a discussion of the global burden of pollution-attributable cardiovascular disease, including a review of the mechanisms by which particulate matter air pollution leads to cardiovascular outcomes. Next, we offer a simple patient-screening tool using known risk factors for pollution exposure. We then discuss approaches to quantifying air pollution exposures and cardiovascular risk, including the development of risk maps for clinical catchment areas. We review a collection of interventions for household and outdoor air pollution, which clinicians can tailor to patients and populations at risk. Finally, we identify future research needed to quantify pollution exposures and validate clinical interventions. Overall, we demonstrate that clinicians can be empowered to mitigate the global burden of cardiovascular disease attributable to air pollution. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Quality assurance for the research and development of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Kim, Young Sea; Lee, In Koo; Lim, Nam Jin; Ha, Jung Goo; Kim, Yoong Yoon; Koh, Han Joon; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Kim, Chang Deog; Park, Sang Pill

    1987-12-01

    To establish the KAERI-wide quality system, the KAERI QA program was developed. Internal evaluation was performed to determine the current status of quality activities. Study of the advanced quality technology such as QA in R and D , design QA, reliability, software QA was performed for the future application. The KAERI-wide quality system should be implemented as proposed in this report and will be improved through evaluation of the quality and application of the advanced quality technology to have the optimum quality system. (Author)

  10. A strategic approach to workforce development for local public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Beverley; Ward, Megan

    2017-11-09

    In 2009, Peel Public Health set a vision to transform the work of public health from efficient delivery of public health services as defined by provincial mandate to the robust analysis of the health status of the local population and selection and implementation of programming to achieve best health outcomes. A strategic approach to the workforce was a key enabler. PPH is a public health unit in Ontario that serves 1.4 million people. An organization-wide strategic workforce development program was instituted. It is theory-based, evidence-informed and data-driven. A first step was a conceptual framework, followed by interventions in workforce planning, human resources management, and capacity development. The program was built on evidence reviews, theory, and public health core competencies. Interventions spread across the employee work-life span. Capacity development based on the public health core competencies is a main focus, particularly analytical capacity to support decision-making. Employees gain skill and knowledge in comprehensive population health. Leadership evolves as work shifts to the analysis of health status and development of interventions. Effective human resource processes ensure appropriate job design, recruitment and orientation. Analysis of the workforce leads to vigorous employee development to ensure a strong pool of potential leadership successors. Theory, research evidence, and data provide a robust foundation for workforce development. Competencies are important inputs to job descriptions, recruitment, training, and human resource processes. A comprehensive workforce development strategy enables the development of a skilled workforce capable of responding to the needs of the population it serves.

  11. Innovative approaches to clinical development and trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Orloff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical innovation is increasingly risky, costly and at times inefficient, which has led to a decline in industry productivity. Despite the increased investment in R&D by the industry, the number of new molecular entities achieving marketing authorization is not increasing. Novel approaches to clinical development and trial design could have a key role in overcoming some of these challenges by improving efficiency and reducing attrition rates. The effectiveness of clinical development can be improved by adopting a more integrated model that increases flexibility and maximizes the use of accumulated knowledge. Central to this model of drug development are novel tools, including modelling and simulation, Bayesian methodologies, and adaptive designs, such as seamless adaptive designs and sample-size re-estimation methods. Applications of these methodologies to early- and late-stage drug development are described with some specific examples, along with advantages, challenges, and barriers to implementation. Because they are so flexible, these new trial designs require significant statistical analyses, simulations and logistical considerations to verify their operating characteristics, and therefore tend to require more time for the planning and protocol development phase. Greater awareness of the distinct advantages of innovative designs by regulators and sponsors are crucial to increasing the adoption of these modern tools.

  12. Pharmaceutical product development: A quality by design approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, Kannissery; Tahir, M. Abu; Charoo, Naseem A.; Ansari, Shahid H.; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    The application of quality by design (QbD) in pharmaceutical product development is now a thrust area for the regulatory authorities and the pharmaceutical industry. International Conference on Harmonization and United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) emphasized the principles and applications of QbD in pharmaceutical development in their guidance for the industry. QbD attributes are addressed in question-based review, developed by USFDA for chemistry, manufacturing, and controls section of abbreviated new drug applications. QbD principles, when implemented, lead to a successful product development, subsequent prompt regulatory approval, reduce exhaustive validation burden, and significantly reduce post-approval changes. The key elements of QbD viz., target product quality profile, critical quality attributes, risk assessments, design space, control strategy, product lifecycle management, and continual improvement are discussed to understand the performance of dosage forms within design space. Design of experiments, risk assessment tools, and process analytical technology are also discussed for their role in QbD. This review underlines the importance of QbD in inculcating science-based approach in pharmaceutical product development. PMID:27606256

  13. Pharmaceutical product development: A quality by design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, Kannissery; Tahir, M Abu; Charoo, Naseem A; Ansari, Shahid H; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    The application of quality by design (QbD) in pharmaceutical product development is now a thrust area for the regulatory authorities and the pharmaceutical industry. International Conference on Harmonization and United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) emphasized the principles and applications of QbD in pharmaceutical development in their guidance for the industry. QbD attributes are addressed in question-based review, developed by USFDA for chemistry, manufacturing, and controls section of abbreviated new drug applications. QbD principles, when implemented, lead to a successful product development, subsequent prompt regulatory approval, reduce exhaustive validation burden, and significantly reduce post-approval changes. The key elements of QbD viz., target product quality profile, critical quality attributes, risk assessments, design space, control strategy, product lifecycle management, and continual improvement are discussed to understand the performance of dosage forms within design space. Design of experiments, risk assessment tools, and process analytical technology are also discussed for their role in QbD. This review underlines the importance of QbD in inculcating science-based approach in pharmaceutical product development.

  14. Size Effect of the 2-D Bodies on the Geothermal Gradient and Q-A Plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, M.; Blackwell, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Using numerical models we have investigated some of the criticisms on the Q-A plot of related to the effect of size of the body on the slope and reduced heat flow. The effects of horizontal conduction depend on the relative difference of radioactivity between the body and the country rock (assuming constant thermal conductivity). Horizontal heat transfer due to different 2-D bodies was numerically studied in order to quantify resulting temperature differences at the Moho and errors on the predication of Qr (reduced heat flow). Using the two end member distributions of radioactivity, the step model (thickness 10km) and exponential model, different 2-D models of horizontal scale (width) ranging from 10 -500 km were investigated. Increasing the horizontal size of the body tends to move observations closer towards the 1-D solution. A temperature difference of 50 oC is produced (for the step model) at Moho between models of width 10 km versus 500 km. In other words the 1-D solution effectively provides large scale averaging in terms of heat flow and temperature field in the lithosphere. For bodies’ ≤ 100 km wide the geotherms at shallower levels are affected, but at depth they converge and are 50 oC lower than that of the infinite plate model temperature. In case of 2-D bodies surface heat flow is decreased due to horizontal transfer of heat, which will shift the Q-A point vertically downward on the Q-A plot. The smaller the size of the body, the more will be the deviation from the 1-D solution and the more will be the movement of Q-A point downwards on a Q-A plot. On the Q-A plot, a limited points of bodies of different sizes with different radioactivity contrast (for the step and exponential model), exactly reproduce the reduced heat flow Qr. Thus the size of the body can affect the slope on a Q-A plot but Qr is not changed. Therefore, Qr ~ 32 mWm-2 obtained from the global terrain average Q-A plot represents the best estimate of stable continental mantle heat

  15. SU-F-T-285: Evaluation of a Patient DVH-Based IMRT QA System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, H; Redler, G; Chu, J; Turian, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical performance of a patient DVH-based QA system for prostate VMAT QA. Methods: Mobius3D(M3D) is a QA software with an independent beam model and dose engine. The MobiusFX(MFX) add-on predicts patient dose using treatment machine log files. We commissioned the Mobius beam model in two steps. First, the stock beam model was customized using machine commissioning data, then verified against the TPS with 12 simple phantom plans and 7 clinical 3D plans. Secondly, the Dosimetric Leaf Gap(DLG) in the Mobius model was fine-tuned for VMAT treatment based on ion chamber measurements for 6 clinical VMAT plans. Upon successful commissioning, we retrospectively performed IMRT QA for 12 VMAT plans with the Mobius system as well as the ArcCHECK-3DVH system. Selected patient DVH values (PTV D95, D50; Bladder D2cc, Dmean; Rectum D2cc) were compared between TPS, M3D, MFX, and 3DVH. Results: During the first commissioning step, TPS and M3D calculated target Dmean for 3D plans agree within 0.7%±0.7%, with 3D gamma passing rates of 98%±2%. In the second commissioning step, the Mobius DLG was adjusted by 1.2mm from the stock value, reducing the average difference between MFX calculation and ion chamber measurement from 3.2% to 0.1%. In retrospective prostate VMAT QA, 5 of 60 MFX calculated DVH values have a deviation greater than 5% compared to TPS. One large deviation at high dose level was identified as a potential QA failure. This echoes the 3DVH QA result, which identified 2 instances of large DVH deviation on the same structure. For all DVH’s evaluated, M3D and MFX show high level of agreement (0.1%±0.2%), indicating that the observed deviation is likely from beam modelling differences rather than delivery errors. Conclusion: Mobius system provides a viable solution for DVH based VMAT QA, with the capability of separating TPS and delivery errors.

  16. SU-F-T-285: Evaluation of a Patient DVH-Based IMRT QA System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, H; Redler, G; Chu, J; Turian, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical performance of a patient DVH-based QA system for prostate VMAT QA. Methods: Mobius3D(M3D) is a QA software with an independent beam model and dose engine. The MobiusFX(MFX) add-on predicts patient dose using treatment machine log files. We commissioned the Mobius beam model in two steps. First, the stock beam model was customized using machine commissioning data, then verified against the TPS with 12 simple phantom plans and 7 clinical 3D plans. Secondly, the Dosimetric Leaf Gap(DLG) in the Mobius model was fine-tuned for VMAT treatment based on ion chamber measurements for 6 clinical VMAT plans. Upon successful commissioning, we retrospectively performed IMRT QA for 12 VMAT plans with the Mobius system as well as the ArcCHECK-3DVH system. Selected patient DVH values (PTV D95, D50; Bladder D2cc, Dmean; Rectum D2cc) were compared between TPS, M3D, MFX, and 3DVH. Results: During the first commissioning step, TPS and M3D calculated target Dmean for 3D plans agree within 0.7%±0.7%, with 3D gamma passing rates of 98%±2%. In the second commissioning step, the Mobius DLG was adjusted by 1.2mm from the stock value, reducing the average difference between MFX calculation and ion chamber measurement from 3.2% to 0.1%. In retrospective prostate VMAT QA, 5 of 60 MFX calculated DVH values have a deviation greater than 5% compared to TPS. One large deviation at high dose level was identified as a potential QA failure. This echoes the 3DVH QA result, which identified 2 instances of large DVH deviation on the same structure. For all DVH’s evaluated, M3D and MFX show high level of agreement (0.1%±0.2%), indicating that the observed deviation is likely from beam modelling differences rather than delivery errors. Conclusion: Mobius system provides a viable solution for DVH based VMAT QA, with the capability of separating TPS and delivery errors.

  17. Control approach development for variable recruitment artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Tyler E.; Chapman, Edward M.; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This study characterizes hybrid control approaches for the variable recruitment of fluidic artificial muscles with double acting (antagonistic) actuation. Fluidic artificial muscle actuators have been explored by researchers due to their natural compliance, high force-to-weight ratio, and low cost of fabrication. Previous studies have attempted to improve system efficiency of the actuators through variable recruitment, i.e. using discrete changes in the number of active actuators. While current variable recruitment research utilizes manual valve switching, this paper details the current development of an online variable recruitment control scheme. By continuously controlling applied pressure and discretely controlling the number of active actuators, operation in the lowest possible recruitment state is ensured and working fluid consumption is minimized. Results provide insight into switching control scheme effects on working fluids, fabrication material choices, actuator modeling, and controller development decisions.

  18. Structured interview approach to the development of plant maintenance unavailabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragola, J.R.; Jacobs, M.

    1986-01-01

    In a nuclear generating facility, the overall plant economics and safety suffer when a component is not available when needed. Maintenance unavailabilities provide a mechanism to predict the probability that a specific component is not available to function on demand due to maintenance. The development of these maintenance unavailabilities required a visit to an operational pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear facility to conduct an interview process with the plant operators who provided their insights into availability histories of the components of interest. A structured approach was developed for the extraction of downtime information from the plant operators, which was essential to ensure that the data gathered were relevant to the study and, most important, consistent within a specific component type. This process provided traceability so that it could be understood where the data originated from some years hence. In addition, it had to be reproducible providing the same steps were followed by another interviewer where the results would be consistent

  19. Nuclear engineering education: A competence based approach to curricula development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry is a one of the most critical challenges in the near future. With the development of a number of nuclear engineering educational programmes in several States, this publication provides guidance to decision makers in Member States on a competence based approach to curricula development, presenting the established practices and associated requirements for educational programmes in this field. It is a consolidation of best practices that will ensure sustainable, effective nuclear engineering programmes, contributing to the safe, efficient and economic operation of nuclear power plants. The information presented is drawn from a variety of recognized nuclear engineering programmes around the world and contributes to the main areas that are needed to ensure a viable and robust nuclear industry

  20. Chemometrics approach to substrate development, case: semisyntetic cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Hansen, Birgitte Vedel

    1998-01-01

    from food production facilities.The Chemometrics approach to substrate development is illustrated by the development of a semisyntetic cheese substrate. Growth, colour formation and mycotoxin production of 6 cheese related fungi were studied on 9 types of natural cheeses and 24 synthetic cheese......, the most frequently occurring contaminant on semi-hard cheese. Growth experiments on the substrate were repeatable and reproducible. The substrate was also suitable for the starter P. camemberti. Mineral elements in cheese were shown to have strong effect on growth, mycotoxin production and colour...... formation of fungi. For P. roqueforti, P. discolor, P. verrucosum and Aspergillus versicolor the substrate was less suitable as a model cheese substrate, which indicates great variation in nutritional demands of the fungi. Substrates suitable for studies of specific cheese types was found for P. roqueforti...

  1. Development of Digital MMIS for Research Reactors: Graded Approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil ur, Rahman; Shin, Jin Soo; Heo, Gyun Young; Son, Han Seong; Kim, Young Ki; Park, Jae Kwan; Seo, Sang Mun; Kim, Yong Jun

    2012-01-01

    Though research reactors are small in size yet they are important in terms of industrial applications and R and D, educational purposes. Keeping the eye on its importance, Korean government has intention to upgrade and extend this industry. Presently, Korea is operating only HANARO at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and AGN-201K at Kyung Hee University (KHU), which are not sufficient to meet the current requirements of research and education. In addition, we need self-sufficiency in design and selfreliance in design and operation, as we are installing research reactors in domestic as well as foreign territories for instance Jordan. Based on these demands, KAERI and universities initiated a 5 year research project since December 2011 collaboratly, for the deep study of reactor core, thermal hydraulics, materials and instrumentation and control (I and C). This particular study is being carried out to develop highly reliable advanced digital I and C systems using a grading approach. It is worth mentioning that next generation research reactor should be equipped with advance state of the art digital I and C for safe and reliable operation and impermeable cyber security system that is needed to be devised. Moreover, human error is one of important area which should be linked with I and C in terms of Man Machine Interface System (MMIS) and development of I and C should cover human factor engineering. Presently, the digital I and C and MMIS are well developed for commercial power stations whereas such level of development does not exist for research reactors in Korea. Since the functional and safety requirements of research reactors are not so strict as commercial power plants, the design of digital I and C systems for research reactors seems to be graded based on the stringency of regulatory requirements. This paper was motivated for the introduction of those missions, so it is going to describe the general overview of digital I and C systems, the graded

  2. Development of Digital MMIS for Research Reactors: Graded Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil ur, Rahman; Shin, Jin Soo; Heo, Gyun Young [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Son, Han Seong [Joongbu University, Geumsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ki; Park, Jae Kwan; Seo, Sang Mun; Kim, Yong Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Though research reactors are small in size yet they are important in terms of industrial applications and R and D, educational purposes. Keeping the eye on its importance, Korean government has intention to upgrade and extend this industry. Presently, Korea is operating only HANARO at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and AGN-201K at Kyung Hee University (KHU), which are not sufficient to meet the current requirements of research and education. In addition, we need self-sufficiency in design and selfreliance in design and operation, as we are installing research reactors in domestic as well as foreign territories for instance Jordan. Based on these demands, KAERI and universities initiated a 5 year research project since December 2011 collaboratly, for the deep study of reactor core, thermal hydraulics, materials and instrumentation and control (I and C). This particular study is being carried out to develop highly reliable advanced digital I and C systems using a grading approach. It is worth mentioning that next generation research reactor should be equipped with advance state of the art digital I and C for safe and reliable operation and impermeable cyber security system that is needed to be devised. Moreover, human error is one of important area which should be linked with I and C in terms of Man Machine Interface System (MMIS) and development of I and C should cover human factor engineering. Presently, the digital I and C and MMIS are well developed for commercial power stations whereas such level of development does not exist for research reactors in Korea. Since the functional and safety requirements of research reactors are not so strict as commercial power plants, the design of digital I and C systems for research reactors seems to be graded based on the stringency of regulatory requirements. This paper was motivated for the introduction of those missions, so it is going to describe the general overview of digital I and C systems, the graded

  3. Development of safeguards approach for the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.J.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Pearsall, C.; Chesnay, B.; Creusot, C.; Ehinger, M.; Kuhn, E.; Robson, N.; Higuchi, H.; Takeda, S.; Fujimaki, K.; Ai, H.; Uehara, S.; Amano, H.; Hoshi, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), which is currently undergoing construction and commissioning by the Japan Nuclear Fuels Limited (JNFL), is scheduled to begin active operations in 2005. The planned operating capacity is 800 tonnes of spent fuel per year containing approximately 8 tonnes of plutonium. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Japan safeguards authorities are working with JNFL to develop a Safeguards Approach that is both effective and efficient. In order to accomplish this goal, a number of advanced concepts are being introduced and many currently applied safeguards measures are being enhanced. These new and improved techniques and procedures will provide for more sensitive and reliable verification of nuclear material and facility operations while reducing the required inspection effort. The Safeguards Approach incorporates systematic Design Information Examination and Verification (DIE/DIV) during all phases of construction, commissioning and operation. It incorporates installed, unattended radiation and solution measurement and monitoring systems along with a number of inspector attended measurement systems. While many of the measurement systems will be independent-inspector controlled, others will require authentication of a split signal from operator controlled systems. The independent and/or authenticated data from these systems will be transmitted over a network to a central inspector center for evaluation. Near-Real-Time-Accountancy (NRTA) will be used for short period sequential analysis of the operator and inspector data which, when combined with Solution Monitoring data, will provide higher assurance in the verification of nuclear material for timeliness and of the operational status of the facility. Samples will be taken using a facility installed, but IAEA authenticated, automatic sampling system and will then be transferred to a jointly used IAEA-JSGO On-Site Laboratory (OSL). This paper provides an

  4. Developing State Level Approaches under the State Level Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budlong Sylvester, K.; Murphy, C.L.; Boyer, B.; Pilat, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    With the pursuit of the State-Level Concept (SLC), the IAEA has sought to further evolve the international safeguards system in a manner which maintains (or improves) the effectiveness of the system in an environment of expanding demands and limited resources. The IAEA must not remain static and should continuously examine its practices to ensure it can capture opportunities for cost reductions while adapting to, and staying ahead of, emerging proliferation challenges. Contemporary safeguards have been focused on assessing the nuclear programme of the State as a whole, rather than on the basis of individual facilities. Since the IAEA's integrated safeguards program, State-level Approaches (SLAs) have been developed that seek to optimally combine the measures provided for by the Additional Protocol with those of traditional safeguards. This process resulted in facility specific approaches that, while making use of a State's broader conclusion, were nonetheless prescriptive. Designing SLAs on a State-by-State basis would avoid the shortcomings of a one-size-fits-all system. It would also enable the effective use of the Agency's information analysis and State evaluation efforts by linking this analysis to safeguards planning efforts. Acquisition Path Analysis (APA), along with the State Evaluation process, can be used to prioritize paths in a State in terms of their attractiveness for proliferation. While taking advantage of all safeguards relevant information, and tailoring safeguards to individual characteristics of the State, paths of the highest priority in all States will necessarily meet the same standard of coverage. Similarly, lower priority paths will have lower performance targets, thereby promoting nondiscrimination. Such an approach would improve understanding of safeguards implementation under the SLC and the rational for safeguards resource allocation. The potential roles for APA and performance targets in SLA development will be reviewed

  5. Workplace mental health: developing an integrated intervention approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental health problems are prevalent and costly in working populations. Workplace interventions to address common mental health problems have evolved relatively independently along three main threads or disciplinary traditions: medicine, public health, and psychology. In this Debate piece, we argue that these three threads need to be integrated to optimise the prevention of mental health problems in working populations. Discussion To realise the greatest population mental health benefits, workplace mental health intervention needs to comprehensively 1) protect mental health by reducing work–related risk factors for mental health problems; 2) promote mental health by developing the positive aspects of work as well as worker strengths and positive capacities; and 3) address mental health problems among working people regardless of cause. We outline the evidence supporting such an integrated intervention approach and consider the research agenda and policy developments needed to move towards this goal, and propose the notion of integrated workplace mental health literacy. Summary An integrated approach to workplace mental health combines the strengths of medicine, public health, and psychology, and has the potential to optimise both the prevention and management of mental health problems in the workplace. PMID:24884425

  6. Overview of the FEP analysis approach to model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, L.

    1998-01-01

    This report heads a suite of documents describing the Nirex model development programme. The programme is designed to provide a clear audit trail from the identification of significant features, events and processes (FEPs) to the models and modelling processes employed within a detailed safety assessment. A five stage approach has been adopted, which provides a systematic framework for addressing uncertainty and for the documentation of all modelling decisions and assumptions. The five stages are as follows: Stage 1: EP Analysis - compilation and structuring of a FEP database; Stage 2: Scenario and Conceptual Model Development; Stage 3: Mathematical Model Development; Stage 4: Software Development; Stage 5: confidence Building. This report describes the development and structuring of a FEP database as a Master Directed Diagram (MDD) and explains how this may be used to identify different modelling scenarios, based upon the identification of scenario -defining FEPs. The methodology describes how the possible evolution of a repository system can be addressed in terms of a base scenario, a broad and reasonable representation of the 'natural' evolution of the system, and a number of variant scenarios, representing the effects of probabilistic events and processes. The MDD has been used to identify conceptual models to represent the base scenario and the interactions between these conceptual models have been systematically reviewed using a matrix diagram technique. This has led to the identification of modelling requirements for the base scenario, against which existing assessment software capabilities have been reviewed. A mechanism for combining probabilistic scenario-defining FEPs to construct multi-FEP variant scenarios has been proposed and trialled using the concept of a 'timeline', a defined sequence of events, from which consequences can be assessed. An iterative approach, based on conservative modelling principles, has been proposed for the evaluation of

  7. Making a case for a development-driven approach to law as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driven approach to law as a linchpin for the post-2015 development agenda. KEYWORDS: Law, development, development-driven law, development law, development goals, development strategy, Millennium Development Goals, Millennium ...

  8. A fully electronic intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) process implemented in a network comprised of independent treatment planning, record and verify, and delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Daniel W; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to implement an electronic method to perform and analyze intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) using an aSi megavoltage electronic portal imaging device in a network comprised of independent treatment planning, record and verify (R&V), and delivery systems. A verification plan was generated in the treatment planning system using the actual treatment plan of a patient. After exporting the treatment fields to the R&V system, the fields were delivered in QA mode with the aSi imager deployed. The resulting dosimetric images are automatically stored in a DICOM-RT format in the delivery system treatment console computer. The relative dose density images are subsequently pushed to the R&V system. The absolute dose images are then transferred electronically from the treatment console computer to the treatment planning system and imported into the verification plan in the dosimetry work space for further analysis. Screen shots of the gamma evaluation and isodose comparison are imported into the R&V system as an electronic file (e.g. PDF) to be reviewed prior to initiation of patient treatment. A relative dose image predicted by the treatment planning system can also be sent to the R&V system to be compared with the relative dose density image measured with the aSi imager. Our department does not have integrated planning, R&V, and delivery systems. In spite of this, we are able to fully implement a paperless and filmless IMRT QA process, allowing subsequent analysis and approval to be more efficient, while the QA document is directly attached to its specific patient chart in the R&V system in electronic form. The calculated and measured relative dose images can be compared electronically within the R&V system to analyze the density differences and ensure proper dose delivery to patients. In the absence of an integrated planning, verifying, and delivery system, we have shown that it is nevertheless possible to develop a

  9. Trends in scenario development methodologies and integration in NUMO's approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebashi, Takeshi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Wakasugi, Keiichiro; Kawamura, Hideki; Gaus, Irina; Vomvoris, Stratis; Martin, Andrew J.; Smith, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The development of scenarios for quantitative or qualitative analysis is a key element of the assessment of the safety of geological disposal systems. As an outcome of an international workshop attended by European and the Japanese implementers, a number of features common to current methodologies could be identified, as well as trends in their evolution over time. In the late nineties, scenario development was often described as a bottom-up process, whereby scenarios were said to be developed in essence from FEP databases. Nowadays, it is recognised that, in practice, the approaches actually adopted are better described as top-down or 'hybrid', taking as their starting point an integrated (top-down) understanding of the system under consideration including uncertainties in initial state, sometimes assisted by the development of 'storyboards'. A bottom-up element remains (hence the term 'hybrid') to the extent that FEP databases or FEP catalogues (including interactions) are still used, but the focus is generally on completeness checking, which occurs parallel to the main assessment process. Recent advances focus on the consistent treatment of uncertainties throughout the safety assessment and on the integration of operational safety and long term safety. (author)

  10. Bantam: A Systematic Approach to Reusable Launch Vehicle Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griner, Carolyn; Lyles, Garry

    1999-01-01

    The Bantam technology project is focused on providing a low cost launch capability for very small (100 kilogram) NASA and University science payloads. The cost goal has been set at one million dollars per launch. The Bantam project, however, represents much more than a small payload launch capability. Bantam represents a unique, systematic approach to reusable launch vehicle technology development. This technology maturation approach will enable future highly reusable launch concepts in any payload class. These launch vehicle concepts of the future could deliver payloads for hundreds of dollars per pound, enabling dramatic growth in civil and commercial space enterprise. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has demonstrated a better, faster, and cheaper approach to science discovery in recent years. This approach is exemplified by the successful Mars Exploration Program lead by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the NASA Space Science Enterprise. The Bantam project represents an approach to space transportation technology maturation that is very similar to the Mars Exploration Program. The NASA Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) and Future X Pathfinder Program will combine to systematically mature reusable space transportation technology from low technology readiness to system level flight demonstration. New reusable space transportation capability will be demonstrated at a small (Bantam) scale approximately every two years. Each flight demonstration will build on the knowledge derived from the previous flight tests. The Bantam scale flight demonstrations will begin with the flights of the X-34. The X-34 will demonstrate reusable launch vehicle technologies including; flight regimes up to Mach 8 and 250,000 feet, autonomous flight operations, all weather operations, twenty-five flights in one year with a surge capability of two flights in less than twenty-four hours and safe abort. The Bantam project will build on this initial

  11. Program Management Approach to the Territorial Development of Small Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Aleksandrovna Knysh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the research of the application on a state level of the program management approach to the territorial development of small business. Studying the main mechanism of the state policy implementation in the sphere of small business on a regional level, the authors have revealed the necessity to take into account the territorial specificity while the government programs of small business development are being formed. The analysis of the national practice of utilizing the program management mechanism in the regional system of the government support of small entrepreneurship was conducted on the example of Omsk region. The results of the analysis have shown the inefficiency of the current support system for small business and have determined the need to create an integrated model of territorial programming, which would not only contribute to the qualitative development of small business, but also provide the functioning efficiency of program management mechanism. As a result, the authors have created the two-level model of the programming of the territorial development of small business, which allows to satisfy purposefully the needs of entrepreneurship taking into account the specificity of the internal and external environment of the region. The first level of the model is methodological one and it is based on the marketing approach (the concepts of place marketing and relationship marketing to the operation of the program management mechanism. The second level of the model is methodical one. It offers the combination of the flexible methods of management of programming procedure (benchmarking, foresight, crowdsourcing and outsourcing. The given model raises the efficiency of the management decisions of the state structures in the sphere of small business. Therefore, it is interesting for the government authorities, which are responsible for the regional and municipal support programs of small business, as well

  12. Initial application of a geometric QA tool for integrated MV and kV imaging systems on three image guided radiotherapy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Speiser, Michael; Medin, Paul; Papiez, Lech; Solberg, Timothy; Xing, Lei

    2011-05-01

    Several linacs with integrated kilovoltage (kV) imaging have been developed for delivery of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). High geometric accuracy and coincidence of kV imaging systems and megavoltage (MV) beam delivery are essential for successful image guidance. A geometric QA tool has been adapted for routine QA for evaluating and characterizing the geometric accuracy of kV and MV cone-beam imaging systems. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the application of methodology to routine QA across three IGRT-dedicated linac platforms. It has been applied to a Varian Trilogy (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), an Elekta SynergyS (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden), and a Brainlab Vero (Brainlab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Both the Trilogy and SynergyS linacs are equipped with a retractable kV x-ray tube and a flat panel detector. The Vero utilizes a rotating, rigid ring structure integrating a MV x-ray head mounted on orthogonal gimbals, an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), two kV x-ray tubes, and two fixed flat panel detectors. This dual kV imaging system provides orthogonal radiographs, CBCT images, and real-time fluoroscopic monitoring. Two QA phantoms were built to suit different field sizes. Projection images of a QA phantom were acquired using MV and kV imaging systems at a series of gantry angles. Software developed for this study was used to analyze the projection images and calculate nine geometric parameters for each projection. The Trilogy was characterized five times over one year, while the SynergyS was characterized four times and the Vero once. Over 6500 individual projections were acquired and analyzed. Quantitative geometric parameters of both MV and kV imaging systems, as well as the isocenter consistency of the imaging systems, were successfully evaluated. A geometric tool has been successfully implemented for calibration and QA of integrated kV and MV across a variety of radiotherapy platforms. X-ray source angle deviations up to

  13. Professional teachers development through a constructivist approach: didactic contexts,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Maria Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the partial results obtained from a research that aimed professional development courses for primary and secondary school teachers, under a constructivist and hands-on approach. The intention was to analyze how teachers grasp knowledge under such context, what difficulties emerge and what situations favour their learning process, as well as to study the consequences of professional development courses on their classroom practices. Thirteen teachers participated on workshops during which the investigation of electrostatic phenomena was proposed and low cost experimental apparatus were built, and simultaneously teachers had the opportunity to reflect and analyze their pedagogic practices. The methodological approach of this investigation was qualitative, data were collected with records of oral and written outcomes from researched subjects, as well as records of researchers observations. The learning context generated in those workshops enabled the identification of both conceptual and linguistic difficulties, along with other learning forms, such as action learning and group action learning. Metacognition processes fostered a critical view upon the mechanisms of scientific knowledge acquisition. It is assumed that the experience and the analysis of situations that are similar to those proposed to students might favour an isomorphism with future classroom actions. This professional development proposal seems promising as to consolidate methodological changes arisen from teachers new models and conceptions, different from those regarded as traditional. The analysis of the data regarding the reflections on teachers practices and how the transposition of methods and contents to classrooms happened indicate to this sense and will be covered in a future paper.

  14. Evaluating a physician leadership development program - a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throgmorton, Cheryl; Mitchell, Trey; Morley, Tom; Snyder, Marijo

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - With the extent of change in healthcare today, organizations need strong physician leaders. To compensate for the lack of physician leadership education, many organizations are sending physicians to external leadership programs or developing in-house leadership programs targeted specifically to physicians. The purpose of this paper is to outline the evaluation strategy and outcomes of the inaugural year of a Physician Leadership Academy (PLA) developed and implemented at a Michigan-based regional healthcare system. Design/methodology/approach - The authors applied the theoretical framework of Kirkpatrick's four levels of evaluation and used surveys, observations, activity tracking, and interviews to evaluate the program outcomes. The authors applied grounded theory techniques to the interview data. Findings - The program met targeted outcomes across all four levels of evaluation. Interview themes focused on the significance of increasing self-awareness, building relationships, applying new skills, and building confidence. Research limitations/implications - While only one example, this study illustrates the importance of developing the evaluation strategy as part of the program design. Qualitative research methods, often lacking from learning evaluation design, uncover rich themes of impact. The study supports how a PLA program can enhance physician learning, engagement, and relationship building throughout and after the program. Physician leaders' partnership with organization development and learning professionals yield results with impact to individuals, groups, and the organization. Originality/value - Few studies provide an in-depth review of evaluation methods and outcomes of physician leadership development programs. Healthcare organizations seeking to develop similar in-house programs may benefit applying the evaluation strategy outlined in this study.

  15. How users adopt healthcare information: An empirical study of an online Q&A community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiahua; Yan, Xiangbin; Li, Yijun; Li, Yumei

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of social media technology has led to the creation of many online healthcare communities, where patients can easily share and look for healthcare-related information from peers who have experienced a similar problem. However, with increased user-generated content, there is a need to constantly analyse which content should be trusted as one sifts through enormous amounts of healthcare information. This study aims to explore patients' healthcare information seeking behavior in online communities. Based on dual-process theory and the knowledge adoption model, we proposed a healthcare information adoption model for online communities. This model highlights that information quality, emotional support, and source credibility are antecedent variables of adoption likelihood of healthcare information, and competition among repliers and involvement of recipients moderate the relationship between the antecedent variables and adoption likelihood. Empirical data were collected from the healthcare module of China's biggest Q&A community-Baidu Knows. Text mining techniques were adopted to calculate the information quality and emotional support contained in each reply text. A binary logistics regression model and hierarchical regression approach were employed to test the proposed conceptual model. Information quality, emotional support, and source credibility have significant and positive impact on healthcare information adoption likelihood, and among these factors, information quality has the biggest impact on a patient's adoption decision. In addition, competition among repliers and involvement of recipients were tested as moderating effects between these antecedent factors and the adoption likelihood. Results indicate competition among repliers positively moderates the relationship between source credibility and adoption likelihood, and recipients' involvement positively moderates the relationship between information quality, source credibility, and adoption

  16. Nuclear and sustainable development - A trans-disciplinary approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, Gaston

    2001-01-01

    Never before in history has society been so thoroughly permeated by Science and Technology in all aspects of human life, ranging from economic progress to warfare, often resulting in huge environmental problems. Nuclear science can easily be seen as an exponent of this evolution. Numerous beneficial technologies for medicine and energy were developed, but mostly against the background of the Cold War culture of military secrecy - thus contaminating the public perception of nuclear technology as a whole from the early beginning. Moreover, these developments were accompanied by the threat of cancer risks. Gradually, the contours of a new societal paradigm seem to materialise, driven by the often cited dynamics of social change: globalisation, the pace of technological change (notably biotechnology and information technology), changing social identities, mistrust in 'big science' and expert systems and often, an alienation from politics. In 'the age of risk', people feel insecure about the future. In this social context of uncertainty, a new concept for policy making at the global and local level has emerged : Sustainable Development. At present, the nuclear expert is struggling with society, and he paradoxically lacks a scientific approach and insight in complex human behaviour and societal interaction. The restoration of trust will require the integration of humanities and social sciences in a transdisciplinary problem solving approach, far beyond the technical dimension. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN already built up experience with multidisciplinary projects (e.g. extending the research on nuclear complexity to economics and liability), but in 1998 the board of directors decided to integrate social sciences in a more co-ordinated way. The four existing projects are: Legal Aspects and Liability, Sustainability and Nuclear Development, Transgenerational Ethics related to the Disposal of long-lived Rad waste, and Emergency Communication and Risk

  17. Developing an instrument to identify MBChB students' approaches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The constructs of deep, surface and achieving approaches to learning are well defined in the literature and amply supported by research. Quality learning results from a deep approach to learning, and a deep-achieving approach to learning is regarded as the most adaptive approach institutionally. It is therefore felt that ...

  18. A more rational approach to new-product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonabeau, Eric; Bodick, Neil; Armstrong, Robert W

    2008-03-01

    Companies often treat new-product development as a monolithic process, but it can be more rationally divided into two parts: an early stage that focuses on evaluating prospects and eliminating bad bets, and a late stage that maximizes the remaining candidates' market potential. Recognizing the value of this approach, Eli Lilly designed and piloted Chorus, an autonomous unit dedicated solely to the early stage. This article demonstrates how segmenting development in this way can speed it up and make it more cost-effective. Two classes of decision-making errors can impede NPD, the authors say. First, managers often ignore evidence challenging their assumptions that projects will succeed. As a result, many projects go forward despite multiple red flags; some even reach the market, only to fail dramatically after their introduction. Second, companies sometimes terminate projects prematurely because people fail to conduct the right experiments to reveal products' potential. Most companies promote both kinds of errors by focusing disproportionately on late-stage development; they lack the early, truth-seeking functions that would head such errors off. In segmented NPD, however, the early-stage organization maintains loyalty to the experiment rather than the product, whereas the late-stage organization pursues commercial success. Chorus has significantly improved NPD efficiency and productivity at Lilly. Although the unit absorbs just one-tenth of Lilly's investment in early-stage development, it delivers a substantially greater fraction of the molecules slated for late Phase II trials--at almost twice the speed and less than a third of the cost of the standard process, sometimes shaving as much as two years off the usual development time.

  19. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Aitor; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influenza virus allows for the reassortment between two or more viruses within a co-infected cell, and this characteristic has also been harnessed in the laboratory to generate reassortant viruses for their use as either inactivated or live-attenuated influenza vaccines. With the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques, it is now possible to engineer recombinant influenza viruses entirely from full-length complementary DNA copies of the viral genome by transfection of susceptible cells. These reverse genetics systems have provided investigators with novel and powerful approaches to answer important questions about the biology of influenza viruses, including the function of viral proteins, their interaction with cellular host factors and the mechanisms of influenza virus transmission and pathogenesis. In addition, reverse genetics techniques have allowed the generation of recombinant influenza viruses, providing a powerful technology to develop both inactivated and live-attenuated influenza vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of state-of-the-art, plasmid-based, influenza reverse genetics approaches and their implementation to provide rapid, convenient, safe and more effective influenza inactivated or live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:28025504

  20. Development of erosion risk map using fuzzy logic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi Manyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erosion-hazard assessment is an important aspect in the management of a river basin such as Siak River Basin, Riau Province, Indonesia. This study presents an application of fuzzy logic approach to develop erosion risk map based on geographic information system. Fuzzy logic is a computing approach based on “degrees of truth” rather than the usual “true or false” (1 or 0 Boolean logic on which the modern computer is based. The results of the erosion risk map were verified by using field measurements. The verification result shows that the parameter of soil-erodibility (K indicates a good agreement with field measurement data. The classification of soil-erodibility (K as the result of validation were: very low (0.0–0.1, medium (0.21-0.32, high (0.44-0.55 and very high (0.56-0.64. The results obtained from this study show that the erosion risk map of Siak River Basin were dominantly classified as medium level which cover about 68.54%. The other classifications were high and very low erosion level which cover about 28.84% and 2.61% respectively.

  1. Developing a multicriteria approach for the measurement of sustainable performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, G.

    2005-02-01

    In Australia, cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is one of the conventional tools used widely by the public and the private sectors in the appraisal of projects. It measures and compares the total costs and benefits of projects that are competing for scarce resources in monetary terms. Growing concerns that the values of environmental goods and services are often ignored or underestimated in the CBA approach have led to the overuse and depletion of environmental assets. A model of a sustainability index as an evaluation tool that combines economic, social and environmental criteria into an indexing algorithm is presented and described. The sustainability index uses monetary and non-monetary approaches to rank projects and facilities on their contribution to sustainability. This process enables the principle of trade-off to occur in the decision-making process and thereby allows environmental values to be considered when selecting a development option. This makes it possible to optimize financial return, maximize resource consumption and minimize detrimental effects to the natural and man-made world. A case study is used to demonstrate the model. (author)

  2. Approaches to modernize the combination drug development paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Day

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in genomic sequencing and omics-based capabilities are uncovering tremendous therapeutic opportunities and rapidly transforming the field of cancer medicine. Molecularly targeted agents aim to exploit key tumor-specific vulnerabilities such as oncogenic or non-oncogenic addiction and synthetic lethality. Additionally, immunotherapies targeting the host immune system are proving to be another promising and complementary approach. Owing to substantial tumor genomic and immunologic complexities, combination strategies are likely to be required to adequately disrupt intricate molecular interactions and provide meaningful long-term benefit to patients. To optimize the therapeutic success and application of combination therapies, systematic scientific discovery will need to be coupled with novel and efficient clinical trial approaches. Indeed, a paradigm shift is required to drive precision medicine forward, from the traditional “drug-centric” model of clinical development in pursuit of small incremental benefits in large heterogeneous groups of patients, to a “strategy-centric” model to provide customized transformative treatments in molecularly stratified subsets of patients or even in individual patients. Crucially, to combat the numerous challenges facing combination drug development—including our growing but incomplete understanding of tumor biology, technical and informatics limitations, and escalating financial costs—aligned goals and multidisciplinary collaboration are imperative to collectively harness knowledge and fuel continual innovation.

  3. [Approach to the Development of Mind and Persona].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaguchi, Toshiko

    2018-01-01

    To access medical specialists by health specialists working in the regional health field, the possibility of utilizing the voice approach for dissociative identity disorder (DID) patients as a health assessment for medical access (HAMA) was investigated. The first step is to investigate whether the plural personae in a single DID patient can be discriminated by voice analysis. Voices of DID patients including these with different personae were extracted from YouTube and were analysed using the software PRAAT with basic frequency, oral factors, chin factors and tongue factors. In addition, RAKUGO story teller voices made artificially and dramatically were analysed in the same manner. Quantitive and qualitative analysis method were carried out and nested logistic regression and a nested generalized linear model was developed. The voice from different personae in one DID patient could be visually and easily distinquished using basic frequency curve, cluster analysis and factor analysis. In the canonical analysis, only Roy's maximum root was personae could guide to the risky situation such as suicide. So if the voice approach can show the time threshold of changes between the different personae, it would be useful as an Access Assessment in the form of a simple HAMA.

  4. Novel approaches in anti-arenaviral drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Andrew M.; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fevers caused by arenaviruses are among the most devastating emerging human diseases. Considering the number of individuals affected, the current lack of a licensed vaccine, and the limited therapeutic options, arenaviruses are arguably among the most neglected tropical pathogens and the development of efficacious anti-arenaviral drugs is of high priority. Over the past years significant efforts have been undertaken to identify novel potent inhibitors of arenavirus infection. High throughput screening of small molecule libraries employing pseudotype platforms led to the discovery of several potent and broadly active inhibitors of arenavirus cell entry that are effective against the major hemorrhagic arenaviruses. Mechanistic studies revealed that these novel entry inhibitors block arenavirus membrane fusion and provided novel insights into the unusual mechanism of this process. The success of these approaches highlights the power of small molecule screens in antiviral drug discovery and establishes arenavirus membrane fusion as a robust drug target. These broad screenings have been complemented by strategies targeting cellular factors involved in productive arenavirus infection. Approaches targeting the cellular protease implicated in maturation of the fusion-active viral envelope glycoprotein identified the proteolytic processing of the arenavirus glycoprotein precursor as a novel and promising target for anti-arenaviral strategies.

  5. Nanoparticle exposure biomonitoring: exposure/effect indicator development approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie-Desvergne, C.; Dubosson, M.; Lacombe, M.; Brun, V.; Mossuz, V.

    2015-05-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles (NP) is more and more widespread in various industrial sectors. The inhalation route of exposure is a matter of concern (adverse effects of air pollution by ultrafine particles and asbestos). No NP biomonitoring recommendations or standards are available so far. The LBM laboratory is currently studying several approaches to develop bioindicators for occupational health applications. As regards exposure indicators, new tools are being implemented to assess potentially inhaled NP in non-invasive respiratory sampling (nasal sampling and exhaled breath condensates (EBC)). Diverse NP analytical characterization methods are used (ICP-MS, dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy coupled to energy-dispersive X-ray analysis). As regards effect indicators, a methodology has been developed to assess a range of 29 cytokines in EBCs (potential respiratory inflammation due to NP exposure). Secondly, collaboration between the LBM laboratory and the EDyp team has allowed the EBC proteome to be characterized by means of an LC-MS/MS process. These projects are expected to facilitate the development of individual NP exposure biomonitoring tools and the analysis of early potential impacts on health. Innovative techniques such as field-flow fractionation combined with ICP-MS and single particle-ICPMS are currently being explored. These tools are directly intended to assist occupational physicians in the identification of exposure situations.

  6. Nanoparticle exposure biomonitoring: exposure/effect indicator development approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie-Desvergne, C; Dubosson, M; Mossuz, V; Lacombe, M; Brun, V

    2015-01-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles (NP) is more and more widespread in various industrial sectors. The inhalation route of exposure is a matter of concern (adverse effects of air pollution by ultrafine particles and asbestos). No NP biomonitoring recommendations or standards are available so far. The LBM laboratory is currently studying several approaches to develop bioindicators for occupational health applications. As regards exposure indicators, new tools are being implemented to assess potentially inhaled NP in non-invasive respiratory sampling (nasal sampling and exhaled breath condensates (EBC)). Diverse NP analytical characterization methods are used (ICP-MS, dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy coupled to energy-dispersive X-ray analysis). As regards effect indicators, a methodology has been developed to assess a range of 29 cytokines in EBCs (potential respiratory inflammation due to NP exposure). Secondly, collaboration between the LBM laboratory and the EDyp team has allowed the EBC proteome to be characterized by means of an LC-MS/MS process. These projects are expected to facilitate the development of individual NP exposure biomonitoring tools and the analysis of early potential impacts on health. Innovative techniques such as field-flow fractionation combined with ICP-MS and single particle-ICPMS are currently being explored. These tools are directly intended to assist occupational physicians in the identification of exposure situations. (paper)

  7. Development of framework for sustainable Lean implementation: an ISM approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Jagdish Rajaram; Mantha, S. S.; Rane, Santosh B.

    2014-07-01

    The survival of any organization depends upon its competitive edge. Even though Lean is one of the most powerful quality improvement methodologies, nearly two-thirds of the Lean implementations results in failures and less than one-fifth of those implemented have sustained results. One of the most significant tasks of top management is to identify, understand and deploy the significant Lean practices like quality circle, Kanban, Just-in-time purchasing, etc. The term `bundle' is used to make groups of inter-related and internally consistent Lean practices. Eight significant Lean practice bundles have been identified based on literature reviewed and opinion of the experts. The order of execution of Lean practice bundles is very important. Lean practitioners must be able to understand the interrelationship between these practice bundles. The objective of this paper is to develop framework for sustainable Lean implementation using interpretive structural modelling approach.

  8. Development of passive design zones in China using bioclimatic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Joseph C.; Yang Liu; Liu Jiaping

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the work on development of passive design zones for different climates in China. A total of 18 cities representing the five major climatic types, namely severe cold, cold, hot summer and cold winter, mild and hot summer and warm winter were selected for climatic analysis. Measured weather data were gathered and analysed. A bioclimatic approach was adopted in which the comfort zone and 12 monthly climatic lines were determined and plotted on the psychrometric chart for each city. From these bioclimatic charts, the potential use of passive design strategies such as solar heating, natural ventilation, thermal mass with/without night ventilation and evaporative cooling was assessed. A total of nine passive design strategy zones were identified, and appropriate design strategies suggested for both summer and winter consideration

  9. An Institutional Approach to Developing Research Data Management Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. J. Wilson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the work that the University of Oxford is undertaking to implement a coordinated data management infrastructure. The rationale for the approach being taken by Oxford is presented, with particular attention paid to the role of each service division. This is followed by a consideration of the relative advantages and disadvantages of institutional data repositories, as opposed to national or international data centres. The article then focuses on two ongoing JISC-funded projects, ‘Embedding Institutional Data Curation Services in Research’ (Eidcsr and ‘Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities’ (Sudamih. Both projects are intra-institutional collaborations and involve working with researchers to develop particular aspects of infrastructure, including: University policy, systems for the preservation and documentation of research data, training and support, software tools for the visualisation of large images, and creating and sharing databases via the Web (Database as a Service.

  10. A User Centered Approach to Developing Emergent Technology Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo; McAloone, Timothy Charles; Schlegel, Tanja

    2008-01-01

    be used too early in the design process, given that users respond best to issues they know or can relate to. This paper presents a case study where a user-centred approach was used to determine when and how to involve users in the design of a TV-enabled mobile telephone. The aim of the study......Current participatory design methods do not allow designers to gain the insight required to develop products with emerging technologies, that is, products that do not have any precedents in the users’ knowledge base and experience. This poses challenges to the designers, as input from users cannot...... methodological issues related to user involvement in the implementation of emerging technologies in the consumer electronics industry....

  11. Anaerobic digestion for sustainable development: a natural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gljzen, H J

    2002-01-01

    After the discovery of methane gas by Alessandro Volta in 1776, it took about 100 years before anaerobic processes for the treatment of wastewater and sludges were introduced. The development of high rate anaerobic digesters for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastewater took until the nineteen-seventies and for solid waste even till the nineteen-eighties. All digesters have in common that they apply natural anaerobic consortia of microorganisms for degradation and transformation processes. In view of this, it could be rewarding to evaluate the efficiency of natural ecosystems for their possible application. Examples of high rate anaerobic natural systems include the forestomach of ruminants and the hindgut of certain insects, such as termites and cockroaches. These 'natural reactors' exhibit volumetric methane production rates as high as 35 l/l.d. The development of anaerobic reactors based on such natural anaerobic systems could produce eco-technologies for the effective management of a wide variety of solid wastes and industrial wastewater. Important limitations of anaerobic treatment of domestic sewage relate to the absence of nutrient and pathogen removal. A combination of anaerobic pre-treatment followed by photosynthetic posttreatment is proposed for the effective recovery of energy and nutrients from sewage. This eco-technology approach is based on the recognition that the main nutrient assimilating capacity is housed in photosynthetic plants. The proposed anaerobic-photosynthetic process is energy efficient, cost effective and applicable under a wide variety of rural and urban conditions. a natural systems approach towards waste management could generate affordable eco-technologies for effective treatment and resource recovery.

  12. Anaerobic digestion for sustainable development: a natural approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gijzen, H.J.

    2002-07-01

    After the discovery of methane gas by Alessandro Volta in 1776, it took about 100 years before anaerobic processes for the treatment of wastewater and sludges were introduced. The development of high rate anaerobic digesters for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastewater took until the nineteen-seventies and for solid waste even till the nineteen-eighties. All digesters have in common that they apply natural anaerobic consortia of microorganisms for degradation and transformation processes. In view of this, it could be rewarding to evaluate the efficiency of natural ecosystems for their possible application. Examples of high rate anaerobic natural systems include the forestomach of ruminants and the hindgut of certain insects, such as termites and cockroaches. These ''natural reactors'' exhibit volumetric methane production rates as high as 35 l/l.d. The development of anaerobic reactors based on such natural anaerobic systems could produce eco-technologies for the effective management of a wide variety of solid wastes and industrial wastewater. Important limitations of anaerobic treatment of domestic sewage relate to the absence of nutrient and pathogen removal. A combination of anaerobic pre-treatment followed by photosynthetic post-treatment is proposed for the effective recovery of energy and nutrients from sewage. This eco-technology approach is based on the recognition that the main nutrient assimilating capacity is housed in photosynthetic plants. The proposed anaerobic-photosynthetic process is energy efficient, cost effective and applicable under a wide variety of rural and urban conditions. In conclusion: a natural systems approach towards waste management could generate affordable eco-technologies for effective treatment and resource recovery. (author)

  13. Possible approaches to community development for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, D.E.; Herrington, B.E.

    1982-10-01

    Community development is a process whereby communities assess their needs, determine their priorities, make plans, carry out these plans, and evaluate the results. This approach is applied in evaluating four possible decision-making scenarios that DOE could use in the site selection process and in the development of compensation/mitigation mechanisms. In the first scenario, DOE would select the repository site purely on geologic and technological grounds. In the second scenario, DOE would select the repository site using geologic and technological information, detailed socioeconomic information, and an understanding of potential socioeconomic impacts of a nuclear repository upon the community. In the third scenario DOE would select a repository site using the same information available in the second scenario; however, in this case, DOE would provide the local community with professionals who would act as advocates for the local community and argue their position within DOE's decision-making process. In the final scenario, DOE would invite potential repository site communities to engage in an auctioning process, whereby each community would bid on an acceptable compensation package (in their eyes) to be paid by DOE. Based on an evaluation of these scenarios, the report makes the following recommendations: (1) DOE should consider the auctioning process; (2) in the event that no communities are willing to present bids, DOE should provide communities with advocates; (3) compensation should be a collective package rather than in the form of individual cash payments; (4) a third party (other than DOE), with a heavy reliance on local organizations, should be specifically created for implementing the compensation/mitigation package; and (5) in order to approach the siting of additional repositories with greater understanding, longitudinal research at the first repository should be undertaken as a part of the monitoring phase

  14. Development of the ECAT Preprocessor with the Trust Communication Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevser Ovaz Akpinar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past several years, attacks over industrial control systems (ICS have become increasingly frequent and sophisticated. The most common objectives of these types of attacks are controlling/monitoring the physical process, manipulating programmable controllers, or affecting the integrity of software and networking equipment. As one of the widely applied protocols in the ICS world, EtherCAT is an Ethernet-based protocol; thus, it is exposed to both TCP/IP and ICS-specific attacks. In this paper, we analyze EtherCAT field-level communication principles from the security viewpoint focusing on the protocol vulnerabilities, which have been rarely analyzed previously. Our research showed that it lacks the most common security parameters, such as authentication, encryption, and authorization, and is open to Media Access Control (MAC spoofing, data injection, and other advanced attacks, which require superior skills. To prevent, detect, and reduce attacks over the EtherCAT-based critical systems, first, we improved the open-source Snort intrusion detection/prevention system (IDS/IPS to support packets that are not processed over transport and network layers. Second, by incorporating a vulnerability analysis, we proposed the EtherCAT (ECAT preprocessor. Third, we introduced a novel approach called trust-node identification and applied the approach as three rules into the preprocessor. In this sense, the ECAT preprocessor differs from other supported ICS preprocessors in the literature, such as DNP3 and Modbus/TCP. Besides supporting traditional rule expansion, it is also able to handle layer 2 packets and to apply deep packet inspection on EtherCAT packets using the trust-node approach. This method first identifies engineering-station approved nodes based on EtherCAT network information (ENI configuration files and then deeply inspects incoming packets, considering protocol specifications. The improvements and approach have been tested on the

  15. Risk and dose assessment methods in gamma knife QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, W.W.; Jones, E.D.; Rathbun, P.

    1992-10-01

    Traditional methods used in assessing risk in nuclear power plants may be inappropriate to use in assessing medical radiation risks. The typical philosophy used in assessing nuclear reactor risks is machine dominated with only secondary attention paid to the human component, and only after critical machine failure events have been identified. In assessing the risk of a misadministrative radiation dose to patients, the primary source of failures seems to stem overwhelmingly, from the actions of people and only secondarily from machine mode failures. In essence, certain medical misadministrations are dominated by human events not machine failures. Radiological medical devices such as the Leksell Gamma Knife are very simple in design, have few moving parts, and are relatively free from the risks of wear when compared with a nuclear power plant. Since there are major technical differences between a gamma knife and a nuclear power plant, one must select a particular risk assessment method which is sensitive to these system differences and tailored to the unique medical aspects of the phenomena under study. These differences also generate major shifts in the philosophy and assumptions which drive the risk assessment (Machine-centered vs Person-centered) method. We were prompted by these basic differences to develop a person-centered approach to risk assessment which would reflect these basic philosophical and technological differences, have the necessary resolution in its metrics, and be highly reliable (repeatable). The risk approach chosen by the Livermore investigative team has been called the ''Relative Risk Profile Method'' and has been described in detail by Banks and Paramore, (1983)

  16. 40 CFR 98.214 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and QA/QC requirements. 98.214 Section 98.214 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... standard method or other enhanced industry consensus standard method published by an industry consensus...

  17. 40 CFR 98.144 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and QA/QC requirements. 98... fraction for each carbonate consumed based on sampling and chemical analysis using an industry consensus... testing method published by an industry consensus standards organization (e.g., ASTM, ASME, API, etc.). ...

  18. 40 CFR 98.164 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Methods for Instrumental Determination of Carbon, Hydrogen, and Nitrogen in Petroleum Products and... Determination of Carbon, Hydrogen, and Nitrogen in Laboratory Samples of Coal (incorporated by reference, see... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.164 Monitoring and QA/QC requirements...

  19. 40 CFR 98.414 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and QA/QC requirements. 98.414 Section 98.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.414 Monitoring...

  20. A virtual dosimetry audit - Towards transferability of gamma index analysis between clinical trial QA groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohammad; Clementel, Enrico; Eaton, David J; Greer, Peter B; Haworth, Annette; Ishikura, Satoshi; Kry, Stephen F; Lehmann, Joerg; Lye, Jessica; Monti, Angelo F; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Hurkmans, Coen; Clark, Catharine H

    2017-12-01

    Quality assurance (QA) for clinical trials is important. Lack of compliance can affect trial outcome. Clinical trial QA groups have different methods of dose distribution verification and analysis, all with the ultimate aim of ensuring trial compliance. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of different processes to inform future dosimetry audit reciprocity. Six clinical trial QA groups participated. Intensity modulated treatment plans were generated for three different cases. A range of 17 virtual 'measurements' were generated by introducing a variety of simulated perturbations (such as MLC position deviations, dose differences, gantry rotation errors, Gaussian noise) to three different treatment plan cases. Participants were blinded to the 'measured' data details. Each group analysed the datasets using their own gamma index (γ) technique and using standardised parameters for passing criteria, lower dose threshold, γ normalisation and global γ. For the same virtual 'measured' datasets, different results were observed using local techniques. For the standardised γ, differences in the percentage of points passing with γ audit has been an informative step in understanding differences in the verification of measured dose distributions between different clinical trial QA groups. This work lays the foundations for audit reciprocity between groups, particularly with more clinical trials being open to international recruitment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 76 FR 5832 - International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business Unit, Optim Data Studio Tools QA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,554] International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business Unit, Optim Data Studio Tools QA, San Jose, CA; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated November 29, 2010, a worker and a state workforce official...

  2. 40 CFR 98.174 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.174 Monitoring and QA/QC... moisture content of the stack gas. (5) Determine the mass rate of process feed or process production (as... Fusion Techniques (incorporated by reference, see § 98.7) for iron and ferrous scrap. (v) ASM CS-104 UNS...

  3. Confocal Microscopy and Flow Cytometry System Performance: Assessment of QA Parameters that affect data Quanitification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flow and image cytometers can provide useful quantitative fluorescence data. We have devised QA tests to be used on both a flow cytometer and a confocal microscope to assure that the data is accurate, reproducible and precise. Flow Cytometry: We have provided two simple perform...

  4. A Modular Approach To Developing A Large Deployable Reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, R.; Leidich, C.; Mascy, F.; Swenson, B.

    1984-01-01

    NASA is currently studying the feasibility of developing a Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) astronomical facility to perform astrophysical studies of the infrared and submillimeter portion of the spectrum in the mid 1990's. The LDR concept was recommended by the Astronomy Survey Committee of the National Academy of Sciences as one of two space based projects to be started this decade. The current baseline calls for a 20 m (65.6 ft) aperture telescope diffraction limited at 30 μm and automatically deployed from a single Shuttle launch. The volume, performance, and single launch constraints place great demands on the technology and place LDR beyond the state-of-the-art in certain areas such as lightweight reflector segments. The advent of the Shuttle is opening up many new options and capabilities for producing large space systems. Until now, LDR has always been conceived as an integrated system, deployed autonomously in a single launch. This paper will look at a combination of automatic deployment and on-orbit assembly that may reduce the technological complexity and cost of the LDR system. Many technological tools are now in use or under study that will greatly enhance our capabilities to do assembly in space. Two Shuttle volume budget scenarios will be examined to assess the potential of these tools to reduce the LDR system complexity. Further study will be required to reach the full optimal combination of deployment and assembly, since in most cases the capabilities of these new tools have not been demonstrated. In order to take maximum advantage of these concepts, the design of LDR must be flexible and allow one subsystem to be modified without adversely affecting the entire system. One method of achieving this flexibility is to use a modular design approach in which the major subsystems are physically separated during launch and assembled on orbit. A modular design approach facilitates this flexibility but requires that the subsystems be interfaced in a simple

  5. Radiochromic film for individual patient QA in extracranial stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, T.; Clements, N.; Aarons, Y.; Dunn, L.; Chesson, B.; Miller, J.; Roozen, K.; Ball, D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Modern radiotherapy is characterised by increasingly complex radiation delivery such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (ESR). It has become common practice to verify the delivery for each patient in IMRT, however, no such methods have been defined to date for ESR. It was the aim of the present work to develop a method to verify the dose distribution for ESR in a moving phantom using radiochromic film. Methods: Radiochromic film (ISP EBT2) was used in a cylindrical film cassette fitted into a QUASAR phantom (Modus Medical). The cassette can be moved forwards and backwards with motion patterns that can mimic the breathing of individual patients. The radiotherapy treatment plans of four patients were re-planned for the phantom. Between 8 and 10 radiation fields of 6 MV photons from a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator were used to deliver target doses between 18 and 26 Gy per fraction. In order to allow for measurements with EBT2 film all monitor units were divided by 3 or 4 resulting in maximum doses not exceeding 10 Gy. The film was evaluated using a transmission scan on an Epson Perfection V700 scanner with 50 dpi spatial resolution (3 colors, 48bit). A calibration curve was used to convert either the red or green component of the scan to dose. Results: Qualitative film analysis found no discernible discrepancies from planned isodose distributions in the stationary images. The dose distribution in the moving phantom was used successfully to confirm the appropriateness of the ITV construction in the planning process. Conclusions: We have developed a QA procedure that accounts for breathing patterns of individual patients in ESR for lung cancer. Radiochromic film was found to be easy to adapt to this process.

  6. Novel approaches for an enhanced geothermal development of residential sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelenz, Sophie; Firmbach, Linda; Shao, Haibing; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    An ongoing technological enhancement drives an increasing use of shallow geothermal systems for heating and cooling applications. However, even in areas with intensive shallow geothermal use, planning of geothermal systems is in many cases solely based on geological maps, drilling databases, and literature references. Thus, relevant heat transport parameters are rather approximated than measured for the specific site. To increase the planning safety and promote the use of renewable energies in the domestic sector, this study investigates a novel concept for an enhanced geothermal development of residential neighbourhoods. This concept is based on a site-specific characterization of subsurface conditions and the implementation of demand-oriented geothermal usage options. Therefore, an investigation approach has been tested that combines non-invasive with minimum-invasive exploration methods. While electrical resistivity tomography has been applied to characterize the geological subsurface structure, Direct Push soundings enable a detailed, vertical high-resolution characterization of the subsurface surrounding the borehole heat exchangers. The benefit of this site-specific subsurface investigation is highlighted for 1) a more precise design of shallow geothermal systems and 2) a reliable prediction of induced long-term changes in groundwater temperatures. To guarantee the financial feasibility and practicability of the novel geothermal development, three different options for its implementation in residential neighbourhoods were consequently deduced.

  7. An End User Development Approach for Mobile Web Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bosetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The trend towards mobile devices usage has made it possible for the Web to be conceived not only as an information space but also as a ubiquitous platform where users perform all kinds of tasks. In some cases, users access the Web with native mobile applications developed for well-known sites, such as, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. These native applications might offer further (e.g., location-based functionalities to their users in comparison with their corresponding Web sites because they were developed with mobile features in mind. However, many Web applications have no native counterpart and users access them using a mobile Web browser. Although the access to context information is not a complex issue nowadays, not all Web applications adapt themselves according to it or diversely improve the user experience by listening to a wide range of sensors. At some point, users might want to add mobile features to these Web sites, even if those features were not originally supported. In this paper, we present a novel approach to allow end users to augment their preferred Web sites with mobile features. We support our claims by presenting a framework for mobile Web augmentation, an authoring tool, and an evaluation with 21 end users.

  8. A systematic approach to developing a global surgery elective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Richard S; Davis, Bradley R; Huber, Nathan L; Edwards, Michael J; Lungu, Douglas; Logan, Jocelyn M

    2015-01-01

    Interest in global health has been increasing for years among American residents and medical students. Many residency programs have developed global health tracks or electives in response to this need. Our goal was to create a global surgery elective based on a synergistic partnership between our institution and a hospital in the developing world. We created a business plan and 1-year schedule for researching potential sites and completing a pilot rotation at our selected hospital. We administered a survey to general surgery residents at the University of Cincinnati and visited medical facilities in Sierra Leone, Cameroon, and Malawi. The survey was given to all general surgery residents. A resident and a faculty member executed the fact-finding trip as well as the pilot rotation. Our general surgery residents view an international elective as integral to residency training and would participate in such an elective. After investigating 6 hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa, we conducted a pilot rotation at our selected hospital and gained the necessary information to organize a curriculum. We will begin sending senior residents for 8-week rotations in the coming academic year. By systematically approaching the process of creating a global surgery elective, we were able to gain considerable insight into choosing a location and organizing the elective. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and initial validation of a cessation fatigue scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Amanda R; Heckman, Bryan W; Meier, Ellen; Carpenter, Matthew J

    2017-07-01

    Smoking cessation fatigue, or tiredness of attempting to quit smoking, has been posited as a latent construct encompassing loss of motivation, loss of hope in cessation success, decreased self-efficacy, and exhaustion of self-control resources. Despite the potential clinical impact of characterizing cessation fatigue, there is currently no validated measure to assess it. Using a rational scale development approach, we developed a cessation fatigue measure and examined its reliability and construct validity in relation to a) smokers' experience of a recently failed quit attempt (QA) and b) readiness to engage in a subsequent QA. Data were drawn from an online cross-sectional survey of 484 smokers who relapsed from a QA within the past 30days. Exploratory factor analysis identified three factors within the 17-item Cessation Fatigue Scale (CFS), which we labeled: emotional exhaustion, pessimism, and devaluation. High internal consistency was observed for each factor and across the full scale. As expected, CFS overall was positively associated with withdrawal severity and difficulty quitting. CFS was negatively associated with previously validated measures of intention to quit, self-efficacy, and abstinence-related motivational engagement, even after adjusting for nicotine dependence. Findings provide initial validation for a new tool to assess cessation fatigue and contribute needed information on a theory-driven component of cessation-related motivation and relapse risk. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. On the use of biomathematical models in patient-specific IMRT dose QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen Heming [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Montefiore Medical Center and Institute of Onco-Physics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of biomathematical models such as tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) as new quality assurance (QA) metrics.Methods: Five different types of error (MLC transmission, MLC penumbra, MLC tongue and groove, machine output, and MLC position) were intentionally induced to 40 clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient plans (20 H and N cases and 20 prostate cases) to simulate both treatment planning system errors and machine delivery errors in the IMRT QA process. The changes in TCP and NTCP for eight different anatomic structures (H and N: CTV, GTV, both parotids, spinal cord, larynx; prostate: CTV, rectal wall) were calculated as the new QA metrics to quantify the clinical impact on patients. The correlation between the change in TCP/NTCP and the change in selected DVH values was also evaluated. The relation between TCP/NTCP change and the characteristics of the TCP/NTCP curves is discussed.Results:{Delta}TCP and {Delta}NTCP were summarized for each type of induced error and each structure. The changes/degradations in TCP and NTCP caused by the errors vary widely depending on dose patterns unique to each plan, and are good indicators of each plan's 'robustness' to that type of error.Conclusions: In this in silico QA study the authors have demonstrated the possibility of using biomathematical models not only as patient-specific QA metrics but also as objective indicators that quantify, pretreatment, a plan's robustness with respect to possible error types.

  11. SU-F-P-07: Applying Failure Modes and Effects Analysis to Treatment Planning System QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, D; Alaei, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A small-scale implementation of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for treatment planning system QA by utilizing methodology of AAPM TG-100 report. Methods: FMEA requires numerical values for severity (S), occurrence (O) and detectability (D) of each mode of failure. The product of these three values gives a risk priority number (RPN). We have implemented FMEA for the treatment planning system (TPS) QA for two clinics which use Pinnacle and Eclipse TPS. Quantitative monthly QA data dating back to 4 years for Pinnacle and 1 year for Eclipse have been used to determine values for severity (deviations from predetermined doses at points or volumes), and occurrence of such deviations. The TPS QA protocol includes a phantom containing solid water and lung- and bone-equivalent heterogeneities. Photon and electron plans have been evaluated in both systems. The dose values at multiple distinct points of interest (POI) within the solid water, lung, and bone-equivalent slabs, as well as mean doses to several volumes of interest (VOI), have been re-calculated monthly using the available algorithms. Results: The computed doses vary slightly month-over-month. There have been more significant deviations following software upgrades, especially if the upgrade involved re-modeling of the beams. TG-100 guidance and the data presented here suggest an occurrence (O) of 2 depending on the frequency of re-commissioning the beams, severity (S) of 3, and detectability (D) of 2, giving an RPN of 12. Conclusion: Computerized treatment planning systems could pose a risk due to dosimetric errors and suboptimal treatment plans. The FMEA analysis presented here suggests that TPS QA should immediately follow software upgrades, but does not need to be performed every month.

  12. SU-F-P-07: Applying Failure Modes and Effects Analysis to Treatment Planning System QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, D; Alaei, P [University Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A small-scale implementation of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for treatment planning system QA by utilizing methodology of AAPM TG-100 report. Methods: FMEA requires numerical values for severity (S), occurrence (O) and detectability (D) of each mode of failure. The product of these three values gives a risk priority number (RPN). We have implemented FMEA for the treatment planning system (TPS) QA for two clinics which use Pinnacle and Eclipse TPS. Quantitative monthly QA data dating back to 4 years for Pinnacle and 1 year for Eclipse have been used to determine values for severity (deviations from predetermined doses at points or volumes), and occurrence of such deviations. The TPS QA protocol includes a phantom containing solid water and lung- and bone-equivalent heterogeneities. Photon and electron plans have been evaluated in both systems. The dose values at multiple distinct points of interest (POI) within the solid water, lung, and bone-equivalent slabs, as well as mean doses to several volumes of interest (VOI), have been re-calculated monthly using the available algorithms. Results: The computed doses vary slightly month-over-month. There have been more significant deviations following software upgrades, especially if the upgrade involved re-modeling of the beams. TG-100 guidance and the data presented here suggest an occurrence (O) of 2 depending on the frequency of re-commissioning the beams, severity (S) of 3, and detectability (D) of 2, giving an RPN of 12. Conclusion: Computerized treatment planning systems could pose a risk due to dosimetric errors and suboptimal treatment plans. The FMEA analysis presented here suggests that TPS QA should immediately follow software upgrades, but does not need to be performed every month.

  13. On the use of biomathematical models in patient-specific IMRT dose QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen Heming; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of biomathematical models such as tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) as new quality assurance (QA) metrics.Methods: Five different types of error (MLC transmission, MLC penumbra, MLC tongue and groove, machine output, and MLC position) were intentionally induced to 40 clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient plans (20 H and N cases and 20 prostate cases) to simulate both treatment planning system errors and machine delivery errors in the IMRT QA process. The changes in TCP and NTCP for eight different anatomic structures (H and N: CTV, GTV, both parotids, spinal cord, larynx; prostate: CTV, rectal wall) were calculated as the new QA metrics to quantify the clinical impact on patients. The correlation between the change in TCP/NTCP and the change in selected DVH values was also evaluated. The relation between TCP/NTCP change and the characteristics of the TCP/NTCP curves is discussed.Results:ΔTCP and ΔNTCP were summarized for each type of induced error and each structure. The changes/degradations in TCP and NTCP caused by the errors vary widely depending on dose patterns unique to each plan, and are good indicators of each plan's “robustness” to that type of error.Conclusions: In this in silico QA study the authors have demonstrated the possibility of using biomathematical models not only as patient-specific QA metrics but also as objective indicators that quantify, pretreatment, a plan's robustness with respect to possible error types

  14. Developing a Materialist Anti-Racist Approach to Language Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a materialist anti-racist approach to language activism. This approach combines Joshua Fishman's pioneering work on language activism with critical race theory and the recent materialist turn in applied linguistics. A materialist anti-racist approach to language activism, positions language policy within broader…

  15. VMAT QA: Measurement-guided 4D dose reconstruction on a patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Opp, Daniel; Robinson, Joshua; Wolf, Theresa K.; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Live Oak Technologies LLC, Kirkwood, Missouri 63122 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) tool that takes as input a time-resolved, low-density ({approx}10 mm) cylindrical surface dose map from a commercial helical diode array, and outputs a high density, volumetric, time-resolved dose matrix on an arbitrary patient dataset. This first validation study is limited to a homogeneous 'patient.'Methods: A VMAT treatment is delivered to a diode array phantom (ARCCHECK, Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL). 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear) derives the high-density volumetric dose using measurement-guided dose reconstruction (MGDR). MGDR cylindrical phantom results are then used to perturb the three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning dose on the patient dataset, producing a semiempirical volumetric dose grid. Four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction on the patient is also possible by morphing individual sub-beam doses instead of the composite. For conventional (3D) dose comparison two methods were developed, using the four plans (Multi-Target, C-shape, Mock Prostate, and Head and Neck), including their structures and objectives, from the AAPM TG-119 report. First, 3DVH and treatment planning system (TPS) cumulative point doses were compared to ion chamber in a cube water-equivalent phantom ('patient'). The shape of the phantom is different from the ARCCHECK and furthermore the targets were placed asymmetrically. Second, coronal and sagittal absolute film dose distributions in the cube were compared with 3DVH and TPS. For time-resolved (4D) comparisons, three tests were performed. First, volumetric dose differences were calculated between the 3D MGDR and cumulative time-resolved patient (4D MGDR) dose at the end of delivery, where they ideally should be identical. Second, time-resolved (10 Hz sampling rate) ion chamber doses were compared to cumulative point dose vs time curves from 4D MGDR. Finally, accelerator output was varied to assess the linearity of

  16. SU-F-T-295: MLCs Performance and Patient-Specific IMRT QA Using Log File Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, A [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); American University of Biuret Medical Center, Biuret (Lebanon); Maalej, N [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Jayesh, K; Abdel-Rahman, W [King Fahad Specialist Hospital-Dammam, Eastern Province (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the performance of the multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) from the log files recorded during the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment and to construct the relative fluence maps and do the gamma analysis to compare the planned and executed MLCs movement. Methods: We developed a program to extract and analyze the data from dynamic log files (dynalog files) generated from sliding window IMRT delivery treatments. The program extracts the planned and executed (actual or delivered) MLCs movement, calculates and compares the relative planned and executed fluences. The fluence maps were used to perform the gamma analysis (with 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement) for 3 IMR patients. We compared our gamma analysis results with those obtained from portal dose image prediction (PDIP) algorithm performed using the EPID. Results: For 3 different IMRT patient treatments, the maximum difference between the planned and the executed MCLs positions was 1.2 mm. The gamma analysis results of the planned and delivered fluences were in good agreement with the gamma analysis from portal dosimetry. The maximum difference for number of pixels passing the gamma criteria (3%/3mm) was 0.19% with respect to portal dosimetry results. Conclusion: MLC log files can be used to verify the performance of the MLCs. Patientspecific IMRT QA based on MLC movement log files gives similar results to EPID dosimetry results. This promising method for patient-specific IMRT QA is fast, does not require dose measurements in a phantom, can be done before the treatment and for every fraction, and significantly reduces the IMRT workload. The author would like to thank King Fahd University of petroleum and Minerals for the support.

  17. Comparison of calculated and experimental isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for purple bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers with different quinones incorporated into the QA binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eZhao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that ONIOM type (QM/MM calculations can be used to simulate isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for neutral ubiquinone in the QA binding site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centers. Here we considerably extend upon this previous work by calculating isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for reaction centers with a variety of unlabeled and 18O labeled foreign quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. Isotope edited spectra were calculated for reaction centers with 2,3-dimethoxy-5,6-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MQ0, 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (duroquinone, DQ, and 2,3-dimethyl-l,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ incorporated, and compared to corresponding experimental spectra. The calculated and experimental spectra agree well, further demonstrating the utility and applicability of our ONIOM approach for calculating the vibrational properties of pigments in protein binding sites.The normal modes that contribute to the bands in the calculated spectra, their composition, frequency and intensity, and how these quantities are modified upon 18O labeling, are presented. This computed information leads to a new and more detailed understanding/interpretation of the experimental FTIR difference spectra. Hydrogen bonding to the carbonyl groups of the incorporated quinones is shown to be relatively weak. It is also shown that there is some asymmetry in hydrogen bonding, accounting for 10-13 cm-1 separation in the frequencies of the carbonyl vibrational modes of the incorporated quinones. The extent of asymmetry H-bonding could only be established by considering the spectra for various types of quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. The quinones listed above are tail-less. Spectra were also calculated for reaction centers with corresponding tail containing quinones incorporated, and it is found that replacement of the quinone methyl group by a phytyl or prenyl chain does not alter ONIOM calculated s

  18. TU-FG-201-01: 18-Month Clinical Experience of a Linac Daily Quality Assurance (QA) Solution Using Only EPID and OBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, B; Sun, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Goddu, S; Li, H; Caruthers, D; Kavanaugh, J; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the clinical use of a Linear Accelerator (Linac) DailyQA system with only EPID and OBI. To assess the reliability over an 18-month period and improve the robustness of this system based on QA failure analysis. Methods: A DailyQA solution utilizing an in-house designed phantom, combined EPID and OBI image acquisitions, and a web-based data analysis and reporting system was commissioned and used in our clinic to measure geometric, dosimetry and imaging components of a Varian Truebeam Linac. During an 18-month period (335 working days), the Daily QA results, including the output constancy, beam flatness and symmetry, uniformity, TPR20/10, MV and KV imaging quality, were collected and analyzed. For output constancy measurement, an independent monthly QA system with an ionization chamber (IC) and annual/incidental TG51 measurements with ADCL IC were performed and cross-compared to Daily QA system. Thorough analyses were performed on the recorded QA failures to evaluate the machine performance, optimize the data analysis algorithm, adjust the tolerance setting and improve the training procedure to prevent future failures. Results: A clinical workflow including beam delivery, data analysis, QA report generation and physics approval was established and optimized to suit daily clinical operation. The output tests over the 335 working day period cross-correlated with the monthly QA system within 1.3% and TG51 results within 1%. QA passed with one attempt on 236 days out of 335 days. Based on the QA failures analysis, the Gamma criteria is revised from (1%, 1mm) to (2%, 1mm) considering both QA accuracy and efficiency. Data analysis algorithm is improved to handle multiple entries for a repeating test. Conclusion: We described our 18-month clinical experience on a novel DailyQA system using only EPID and OBI. The long term data presented demonstrated the system is suitable and reliable for Linac daily QA.

  19. Deconstructive Misalignment: Archives, Events, and Humanities Approaches in Academic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor M. Holmes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Using poetry, role play, readers’ theatre, and creative manipulations of space through yarn and paper weaving, a workshop in 2008 challenged one of educational development’s more pervasive and least questioned notions (“constructive alignment” associated most often with the work of John Biggs. This paper describes the reasoning behind using humanities approaches specifically in this case and more generally in the Challenging Academic Development Collective’s work, as well as problematising the notions of “experiment” and “results” by unarchiving and re-archiving such a nonce-event. The critical stakes in using an anti-empirical method are broached, and readers are encouraged to experience their own version of the emergent truths of such approaches by drawing their own conclusions. En 2008, par le biais de la poésie, du jeu de rôles, du théâtre lu et de manipulations créatrices de l’espace avec de la laine et des tissages en papier, un atelier a mis au défi une des notions les plus généralisées et les moins remises en question du développement éducatif, l’alignement constructif, le plus souvent associé aux travaux de John Biggs. Cet article décrit le raisonnement qui se cache sous l’utilisation des approches des humanités tout spécialement dans ce cas et de manière plus générale dans les travaux du Collectif sur le développement académique stimulant. L’article traite également de la problématique sur les notions d’« expérience » et de « résultats » en désarchivant et en réarchivant une telle circonstance. Les enjeux principaux de l’utilisation de cette méthode anti-empirique sont abordés et les lecteurs sont encouragés à faire l’expérience de leur propre version des vérités qui émergent de telles approches en tirant leurs propres conclusions.

  20. Development of EarthCube Governance: An Agile Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearthree, G.; Allison, M. L.; Patten, K.

    2013-12-01

    Governance of geosciences cyberinfrastructure is a complex and essential undertaking, critical in enabling distributed knowledge communities to collaborate and communicate across disciplines, distances, and cultures. Advancing science with respect to 'grand challenges," such as global climate change, weather prediction, and core fundamental science, depends not just on technical cyber systems, but also on social systems for strategic planning, decision-making, project management, learning, teaching, and building a community of practice. Simply put, a robust, agile technical system depends on an equally robust and agile social system. Cyberinfrastructure development is wrapped in social, organizational and governance challenges, which may significantly impede progress. An agile development process is underway for governance of transformative investments in geosciences cyberinfrastructure through the NSF EarthCube initiative. Agile development is iterative and incremental, and promotes adaptive planning and rapid and flexible response. Such iterative deployment across a variety of EarthCube stakeholders encourages transparency, consensus, accountability, and inclusiveness. A project Secretariat acts as the coordinating body, carrying out duties for planning, organizing, communicating, and reporting. A broad coalition of stakeholder groups comprises an Assembly (Mainstream Scientists, Cyberinfrastructure Institutions, Information Technology/Computer Sciences, NSF EarthCube Investigators, Science Communities, EarthCube End-User Workshop Organizers, Professional Societies) to serve as a preliminary venue for identifying, evaluating, and testing potential governance models. To offer opportunity for broader end-user input, a crowd-source approach will engage stakeholders not involved otherwise. An Advisory Committee from the Earth, ocean, atmosphere, social, computer and library sciences is guiding the process from a high-level policy point of view. Developmental

  1. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Tools for TG-142 Linac Imaging QA I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, M [RAD Image, Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Wiesmeyer, M [Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The therapy topic this year is solutions for TG-142 recommendations for linear accelerator imaging QA. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Automated Imaging QA for TG-142 with RIT Presentation Time: 2:45 – 3:15 PM This presentation will discuss software tools for automated imaging QA and phantom analysis for TG-142. All modalities used in radiation oncology will be discussed, including CBCT, planar kV imaging, planar MV imaging, and imaging and treatment coordinate coincidence. Vendor supplied phantoms as well as a variety of third-party phantoms will be shown, along with appropriate analyses, proper phantom setup procedures and scanning settings, and a discussion of image quality metrics. Tools for process automation will be discussed which include: RIT Cognition (machine learning for phantom image identification), RIT Cerberus (automated file system monitoring and searching), and RunQueueC (batch processing of multiple images). In addition to phantom analysis, tools for statistical tracking, trending, and reporting will be discussed. This discussion will include an introduction to statistical process control, a valuable tool in analyzing data and determining appropriate tolerances. An Introduction to TG-142 Imaging QA Using Standard Imaging Products Presentation Time: 3:15 – 3:45 PM Medical Physicists want to understand the logic behind TG-142 Imaging QA. What is often missing is a firm understanding of the connections between the EPID and OBI phantom imaging, the software “algorithms” that calculate the QA metrics, the establishment of baselines, and the analysis and interpretation of the results. The goal of our brief presentation will be to

  2. SU-F-T-558: ArcCheck for Patient Specific QA in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, P; Tajaldeen, A; Esen, N; Geso, M; Taylor, D; Wanigaratne, D; Roozen, K; Kron, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) is one of the most preferred treatment techniques for early stage lung cancer. This technique has been extended to other treatment sites like Spine, Liver, Scapula, Sternum etc., This has resulted in increased physics QA time on machine. In this study, we’ve tested the feasibility of using ArcCheck as an alternative method to replace film dosimetry. Methods: Twelve patients with varied diagnosis of Lung, Liver, scapula, sternum and Spine undergoing SABR were selected for this study. Pre-treatment QA was performed for all the patients which include ionization chamber and film dosimetry. The required gamma criteria for each SABR plan to pass QA and proceed to treatment is 95% (3%,1mm). In addition to this routine process, the treatment plans were exported on to an ArcCheck phantom. The planned and measured dose from the ArcCheck device were compared using four different gamma criteria: 2%,2 mm, 3%,2 mm, 3%,1 mm and 3%, 3 mm. In addition to this, we’ve also introduced errors to gantry, collimator and couch angle to assess sensitivity of the ArcCheck with potential delivery errors. Results: The ArcCheck mean passing rates for all twelve cases were 76.1%±9.7% for gamma criteria 3%,1 mm, 89.5%±5.3% for 2%,2 mm, 92.6%±4.2% for 3%,2 mm, and 97.6%±2.4% for 3%,3 mm gamma criteria. When SABR spine cases are excluded, we observe ArcCheck passing rates higher than 95% for all the studied cases with 3%, 3mm, and ArcCheck results in acceptable agreement with the film gamma results. Conclusion: Our ArcCheck results at 3%, 3 mm were found to correlate well with our non-SABR spine routine patient specific QA results (3%,1 mm). We observed significant reduction in QA time on using ArcCheck for SABR QA. This study shows that ArcCheck could replace film dosimetry for all sites except SABR spine.

  3. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Tools for TG-142 Linac Imaging QA I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, M; Wiesmeyer, M

    2014-01-01

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The therapy topic this year is solutions for TG-142 recommendations for linear accelerator imaging QA. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Automated Imaging QA for TG-142 with RIT Presentation Time: 2:45 – 3:15 PM This presentation will discuss software tools for automated imaging QA and phantom analysis for TG-142. All modalities used in radiation oncology will be discussed, including CBCT, planar kV imaging, planar MV imaging, and imaging and treatment coordinate coincidence. Vendor supplied phantoms as well as a variety of third-party phantoms will be shown, along with appropriate analyses, proper phantom setup procedures and scanning settings, and a discussion of image quality metrics. Tools for process automation will be discussed which include: RIT Cognition (machine learning for phantom image identification), RIT Cerberus (automated file system monitoring and searching), and RunQueueC (batch processing of multiple images). In addition to phantom analysis, tools for statistical tracking, trending, and reporting will be discussed. This discussion will include an introduction to statistical process control, a valuable tool in analyzing data and determining appropriate tolerances. An Introduction to TG-142 Imaging QA Using Standard Imaging Products Presentation Time: 3:15 – 3:45 PM Medical Physicists want to understand the logic behind TG-142 Imaging QA. What is often missing is a firm understanding of the connections between the EPID and OBI phantom imaging, the software “algorithms” that calculate the QA metrics, the establishment of baselines, and the analysis and interpretation of the results. The goal of our brief presentation will be to

  4. SU-F-T-558: ArcCheck for Patient Specific QA in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandran, P [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); RMIT University, Bundoora (Australia); Tajaldeen, A; Esen, N; Geso, M [RMIT University, Bundoora (Australia); Taylor, D; Wanigaratne, D; Roozen, K; Kron, T [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) is one of the most preferred treatment techniques for early stage lung cancer. This technique has been extended to other treatment sites like Spine, Liver, Scapula, Sternum etc., This has resulted in increased physics QA time on machine. In this study, we’ve tested the feasibility of using ArcCheck as an alternative method to replace film dosimetry. Methods: Twelve patients with varied diagnosis of Lung, Liver, scapula, sternum and Spine undergoing SABR were selected for this study. Pre-treatment QA was performed for all the patients which include ionization chamber and film dosimetry. The required gamma criteria for each SABR plan to pass QA and proceed to treatment is 95% (3%,1mm). In addition to this routine process, the treatment plans were exported on to an ArcCheck phantom. The planned and measured dose from the ArcCheck device were compared using four different gamma criteria: 2%,2 mm, 3%,2 mm, 3%,1 mm and 3%, 3 mm. In addition to this, we’ve also introduced errors to gantry, collimator and couch angle to assess sensitivity of the ArcCheck with potential delivery errors. Results: The ArcCheck mean passing rates for all twelve cases were 76.1%±9.7% for gamma criteria 3%,1 mm, 89.5%±5.3% for 2%,2 mm, 92.6%±4.2% for 3%,2 mm, and 97.6%±2.4% for 3%,3 mm gamma criteria. When SABR spine cases are excluded, we observe ArcCheck passing rates higher than 95% for all the studied cases with 3%, 3mm, and ArcCheck results in acceptable agreement with the film gamma results. Conclusion: Our ArcCheck results at 3%, 3 mm were found to correlate well with our non-SABR spine routine patient specific QA results (3%,1 mm). We observed significant reduction in QA time on using ArcCheck for SABR QA. This study shows that ArcCheck could replace film dosimetry for all sites except SABR spine.

  5. Fusion material development program in the broader approach activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitani, T. [Directorates of Fusion Energy Research: Naka, Ibaraki, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Tanigawa, H.; Jitsukawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hayashi, K.; Takatsu, H. [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Momie Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Yamanishi, T. [Tritium Process Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Tsuchiya, K. [Directorates of Fusion Energy Research, JAEA, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); MoIslang, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baluc, N. [EPFL-Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, UHD - CRPP, PPB, Lausanne (Switzerland); Pizzuto, A. [ENEA CR Frascat, Frascati (Italy); Hodgson, E.R. [CIEMAT-Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Association Euratom-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Lasser, R.; Gasparotto, M. [EFDA CSU Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The world fusion community is now launching construction of ITER, the first nuclear-grade fusion machine in the world. In parallel to the ITER program, Broader Approach (BA) activities are initiated by EU and Japan, mainly at Rokkasho BA site in Japan. The BA activities include the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility-Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (IFMIF-EVEDA), the International Fusion Energy Research Center (IFERC), and the Satellite Tokamak. IFERC consists of three sub project; a DEMO Design and R and D coordination Center, a Computational Simulation Center, and an ITER Remote Experimentation Center. Technical R and Ds mainly on fusion materials will be implemented as a part of the DEMO Design and R and D coordination Center. Based on the common interest of each party toward DEMO, R and Ds on a) reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels as a DEMO blanket structural material, SiCf/SiC composites, advanced tritium breeders and neutron multiplier for DEMO blankets, and Tritium Technology were selected and assessed by European and Japanese experts. In the R and D on the RAFM steels, the fabrication technology, techniques to incorporate the fracture/rupture properties of the irradiated materials, and methods to predict the deformation and fracture behaviors of structures under irradiation will be investigated. For SiCf/SiC composites, standard methods to evaluate high-temperature and life-time properties will be developed. Not only for SiCf/SiC but also related ceramics, physical and chemical properties such as He and H permeability and absorption will be investigated under irradiation. As the advanced tritium breeder R and D, Japan and EU plan to establish the production technique for advanced breeder pebbles of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, respectively. Also physical, chemical, and mechanical properties will be investigated for produced breeder pebbles. For the

  6. SU-E-I-83: Error Analysis of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using a Preclinical Multi-Modality QA Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fullerton, G; Goins, B [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous study a preclinical multi-modality quality assurance (QA) phantom that contains five tumor-simulating test objects with 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 mm diameters was developed for accurate tumor size measurement by researchers during cancer drug development and testing. This study analyzed the errors during tumor volume measurement from preclinical magnetic resonance (MR), micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) and ultrasound (US) images acquired in a rodent tumor model using the preclinical multi-modality QA phantom. Methods: Using preclinical 7-Tesla MR, US and micro-CT scanners, images were acquired of subcutaneous SCC4 tumor xenografts in nude rats (3–4 rats per group; 5 groups) along with the QA phantom using the same imaging protocols. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging was performed to determine reference tumor volume. Volumes measured for the rat tumors and phantom test objects were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three imaging modalities. Then linear regression analysis was performed to compare image-based tumor volumes with the reference tumor volume and known test object volume for the rats and the phantom respectively. Results: The slopes of regression lines for in-vivo tumor volumes measured by three imaging modalities were 1.021, 1.101 and 0.862 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. For phantom, the slopes were 0.9485, 0.9971 and 0.9734 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. Conclusion: For both animal and phantom studies, random and systematic errors were observed. Random errors were observer-dependent and systematic errors were mainly due to selected imaging protocols and/or measurement method. In the animal study, there were additional systematic errors attributed to ellipsoidal assumption for tumor shape. The systematic errors measured using the QA phantom need to be taken into account to reduce measurement

  7. Development of an Electrochemistry Teaching Sequence using a Phenomenographic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Velazquez, Sorangel

    the core concepts from discipline-specific models and theories serve as visual tools to describe reversible redox half-reactions at equilibrium, predict the spontaneity of the electrochemical process and explain interfacial equilibrium between redox species and electrodes in solution. The integration of physics concepts into electrochemistry instruction facilitated describing the interactions between the chemical system (e.g., redox species) and the external circuit (e.g., voltmeter). The "Two worlds" theoretical framework was chosen to anchor a robust educational design where the world of objects and events is deliberately connected to the world of theories and models. The core concepts in Marcus theory and density of states (DOS) provided the scientific foundations to connect both worlds. The design of this teaching sequence involved three phases; the selection of the content to be taught, the determination of a coherent and explicit connection among concepts and the development of educational activities to engage students in the learning process. The reduction-oxidation and electrochemistry chapters of three of the most popular general chemistry textbooks were revised in order to identify potential gaps during instruction, taking into consideration learning and teaching difficulties. The electrochemistry curriculum was decomposed into manageable sections contained in modules. Thirteen modules were developed and each module addresses specific conceptions with regard to terminology, redox reactions in electrochemical cells, and the function of the external circuit in electrochemical process. The electrochemistry teaching sequence was evaluated using a phenomenographic approach. This approach allows describing the qualitative variation in instructors' consciousness about the teaching of electrochemistry. A phenomenographic analysis revealed that the most relevant aspect of variation came from instructors' expertise. Participant A expertise (electrochemist) promoted in

  8. Use of reliability data for QA program evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarro, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Possible analytical approaches for evaluation of the effectiveness in the operation of US commercial nuclear power plants are discussed. These approaches may be based on key plant component performance comparisons, correlation models, or comprehensive cost-benefit evaluation frameworks. As plant availability and reliability data must be used to quantify the models, the quality of these data conditions the amount of information that can ultimately be extracted. The potential impact of uncertainties in the data must be considered carefully, especially before application of the more complex models. 10 refs., 4 tabs

  9. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PROCESS-BASED APPROACH TO MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urij V. Lyandau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the timeline of the approaches to management of the industrial processes and organizations in general.The Adam Smith’s idea of specialization, the Henry Ford’s conveyor and Frederick Taylor’s scientific approach created functional corporations, in which specialized departments consisted of specialized workers. Such organizational chart was optimized for every department’s tasks, which are necessary to perform.During the life cycle evolution of industrial and then informational ages external conditions of production has changed. In consequence, there was born the necessity to change key factors of the management paradigm. These changes are the transfer from the functional management to the process-based approach. The functional management was the basic type of management in many organizations during the 20th century. Only in the end of 1990 companies started to integrate the process-based approach. This conversion was born cause of special conditions that the informational age created.

  10. A self-efficacy approach to holistic student development | Wood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Education ... It is argued that student acquisition of the necessary social and academic skills will be more successful if ... can approach their tasks with confidence, a positive attitude, and the belief that they can succeed.

  11. Macroeconomic Vulnerability in Developing Countries: Approaches and Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Anuradha Seth; Amr Ragab

    2012-01-01

    Economic vulnerability is approached from micro- and macroeconomic perspectives. While the microeconomic perspective is concerned with the impact of shocks on the well-being of individual households, the macroeconomic perspective focuses on the impact of these shocks on economic growth. This paper reviews the literature on macroeconomic vulnerability and finds that there is no single approach to understanding macroeconomic vulnerability in the context of financial and economic crises in devel...

  12. Sustaining Families: Why the Life Course Development Approach Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sharon J.; McKenry, Patrick C.

    2003-01-01

    A life-course development perspective depicts stages of family development with tasks for each stage. It addresses the diversity of family relationships and illustrates how human development includes individual, generational, and historical time. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  13. Monte Carlo-based QA for IMRT of head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, F.; Sham, J.; Ma, C.-M.; Li, J.-S.

    2007-06-01

    It is well-known that the presence of large air cavity in a dense medium (or patient) introduces significant electronic disequilibrium when irradiated with megavoltage X-ray field. This condition may worsen by the possible use of tiny beamlets in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs), in particular those based on the pencil-beam method, do not provide accurate dose computation for the lungs and other cavity-laden body sites such as the head and neck. In this paper we present the use of Monte Carlo (MC) technique for dose re-calculation of IMRT of head and neck cancers. In our clinic, a turn-key software system is set up for MC calculation and comparison with TPS-calculated treatment plans as part of the quality assurance (QA) programme for IMRT delivery. A set of 10 off-the-self PCs is employed as the MC calculation engine with treatment plan parameters imported from the TPS via a graphical user interface (GUI) which also provides a platform for launching remote MC simulation and subsequent dose comparison with the TPS. The TPS-segmented intensity maps are used as input for the simulation hence skipping the time-consuming simulation of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). The primary objective of this approach is to assess the accuracy of the TPS calculations in the presence of air cavities in the head and neck whereas the accuracy of leaf segmentation is verified by fluence measurement using a fluoroscopic camera-based imaging device. This measurement can also validate the correct transfer of intensity maps to the record and verify system. Comparisons between TPS and MC calculations of 6 MV IMRT for typical head and neck treatments review regional consistency in dose distribution except at and around the sinuses where our pencil-beam-based TPS sometimes over-predicts the dose by up to 10%, depending on the size of the cavities. In addition, dose re-buildup of up to 4% is observed at the posterior nasopharyngeal

  14. The Game is aFoot, Watson: DeepQA systems and the future of HCI

    OpenAIRE

    Keates, Simeon; Varker, Philip

    2012-01-01

    In February 2011, the IBM Watson DeepQA (deep question and answer) system took part in a special challenge, pitting its question and answer capability against former Jeopardy!TM grand champions in a televised match. Watson emerged victorious from the challenge, demonstrating that current question answering technology has advanced to the point where it can arguably be more dependable than human experts. This new system represents a significant breakthrough in humanity’s decades-long endeavour ...

  15. SU-F-T-271: Comparing IMRT QA Pass Rates Before and After MLC Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazza, A; Perrin, D; Fontenot, J [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare IMRT QA pass rates before and after an in-house MLC leaf calibration procedure. Methods: The MLC leaves and backup jaws on four Elekta linear accelerators with MLCi2 heads were calibrated using the EPID-based RIT Hancock Test as the means for evaluation. The MLCs were considered to be successfully calibrated when they could pass the Hancock Test with criteria of 1 mm jaw position tolerance, and 1 mm leaf position tolerance. IMRT QA results were collected pre- and postcalibration and analyzed using gamma analysis with 3%/3mm DTA criteria. AAPM TG-119 test plans were also compared pre- and post-calibration, at both 2%/2mm DTA and 3%/3mm DTA. Results: A weighted average was performed on the results for all four linear accelerators. The pre-calibration IMRT QA pass rate was 98.3 ± 0.1%, compared with the post-calibration pass rate of 98.5 ± 0.1%. The TG-119 test plan results showed more of an improvement, particularly at the 2%/2mm criteria. The averaged results were 89.1% pre and 96.1% post for the C-shape plan, 94.8% pre and 97.1% post for the multi-target plan, 98.6% pre and 99.7% post for the prostate plan, 94.7% pre and 94.8% post for the head/neck plan. Conclusion: The patient QA results did not show statistically significant improvement at the 3%/3mm DTA criteria after the MLC calibration procedure. However, the TG-119 test cases did show significant improvement at the 2%/2mm level.

  16. Establishing QC/QA system in the fabrication of nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, K.S.; Choi, S.K.; Park, H.G.; Park, T.G.; Chung, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Quality control instruction manuals and inspection methods for UO 2 powder and zircaloy materials as the material control, and for UO 2 pellets and nuclear fuel rods as the process control were established. And for the establishment of Q.A programme, the technical specifications of the purchased materials, the control regulation of the measuring and testing equipments, and traceability chart as a part of document control have also been provided and practically applied to the fuel fabrication process

  17. Peer review, basic research, and engineering: Defining a role for QA professionals in basic research environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1989-02-01

    Within the context of doing basic research, this paper seeks to answer four major questions: (1) What is the authority structure of science. (2) What is peer review. (3) Where is the interface between basic physics research and standard engineering. and (4) Given the conclusions to the first three questions, what is the role of the QA professional in a basic research environment like Fermilab. 23 refs.

  18. Sustainable Development in Engineering Education: A Pedagogical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, A.; Zascerinska, J.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering education is facing a challenge of the development of student engineers' social responsibility in the context of sustainable development. The aim of the research is to analyze efficiency of engineering curriculum in the context of sustainable development underpinning elaboration of pedagogical guidelines on the development of students'…

  19. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-05: Validation of High-Resolution 3D Patient QA for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning and IMPT by Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardin, A; Avery, S; Ding, X; Kassaee, A; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maryanski, M [MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Validation of high-resolution 3D patient QA for proton pencil beam scanning and IMPT by polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: Four BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeters (manufactured by MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) were used for patient QA at the Robert's Proton Therapy Center (RPTC, Philadelphia, PA). All dosimeters were sealed in identical thin-wall Pyrex glass spheres. Each dosimeter contained a set of markers for 3D registration purposes. The dosimeters were mounted in a consistent and reproducible manner using a custom build holder. Two proton pencil beam scanning plans were designed using Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system: 1) A two-field intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan and 2) one single field uniform dose (SFUD) plan. The IMPT fields were evaluated as a composite plan and individual fields, the SFUD plan was delivered as a single field plan.Laser CT scanning was performed using the manufacturer's OCTOPUS-IQ axial transmission laser CT scanner using a 1 mm slice thickness. 3D registration, analysis, and OD/cm to absorbed dose calibrations were perfomed using DICOM RT-Dose and CT files, and software developed by the manufacturer. 3D delta index, a metric equivalent to the gamma tool, was used for dose comparison. Results: Very good agreement with single IMPT fields and with SFUD was obtained. Composite IMPT fields had a less satisfactory agreement. The single fields had 3D delta index passing rates (3% dose difference, 3 mm DTA) of 98.98% and 94.91%. The composite 3D delta index passing rate was 80.80%. The SFUD passing rate was 93.77%. Required shifts of the dose distributions were less than 4 mm. Conclusion: A formulation of the BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeter, suitable for 3D QA of proton patient plans is established and validated. Likewise, the mailed QA analysis service provided by the manufacturer is a practical option when required resources are unavailable. We fully disclose that the subject of this research regards a

  20. Manufacture of Daily Check Device and Efficiency Evaluation for Daily Q.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Yong; Jae, Young Wan; Park, Heung Deuk; Lee, Jae Hee

    2005-01-01

    Daily Q.A is the important step which must be preceded in a radiation treatment. Specially, radiation output measurement and laser alignment, SSD indicator related to a patient set-up recurrence must be confirmed for a reasonable radiation treatment. Daily Q.A proceeds correctness and a prompt way, and needs an objective measurement basis. Manufacture of the device which can facilitate confirmation of output measurement and appliances check at one time was requested. Produced the phantom formal daily check device which can confirm a lot of appliances check (output measurement and laser alignment. field size, SSD indicator) with one time of set up at a time, and measurement observed a linear accelerator (4 machine) for four months and evaluated efficiency. We were able to confirm an laser alignment, field size, SSD indicator check at the same time, and out put measurement was possible with the same set up, so daily Q.A time was reduced, and we were able to confirm an objective basis about each item measurement. As a result of having measured for four months, output measurement within ±2%, and measured laser alignment, field size, SSD indicator in range within ±1 mm. We can enforce output measurement and appliances check conveniently, and time was reduced and was able to raise efficiency of business. We were able to bring a cost reduction by substitution expensive commercialized equipment. Further It is necessary to makes a product as strong and slight materials, and improve convenience of use.

  1. The Second Round of the PHAR-QA Survey of Competences for Pharmacy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the second European Delphi round on the ranking of competences for pharmacy practice and compares these data to those of the first round already published. A comparison of the numbers of respondents, distribution by age group, country of residence, etc., shows that whilst the student population of respondents changed from Round 1 to 2, the populations of the professional groups (community, hospital and industrial pharmacists, pharmacists in other occupations and academics were more stable. Results are given for the consensus of ranking and the scores of ranking of 50 competences for pharmacy practice. This two-stage, large-scale Delphi process harmonized and validated the Quality Assurance in European Pharmacy Education and Training (PHAR-QA framework and ensured the adoption by the pharmacy profession of a framework proposed by the academic pharmacy community. The process of evaluation and validation of ranking of competences by the pharmacy profession is now complete, and the PHAR-QA consortium will now put forward a definitive PHAR-QA framework of competences for pharmacy practice.

  2. The Second Round of the PHAR-QA Survey of Competences for Pharmacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey; De Paepe, Kristien; Pozo, Antonio Sánchez; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Volmer, Daisy; Hirvonen, Jouni; Bozic, Borut; Skowron, Agnieska; Mircioiu, Constantin; Marcincal, Annie; Koster, Andries; Wilson, Keith; van Schravendijk, Chris

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the second European Delphi round on the ranking of competences for pharmacy practice and compares these data to those of the first round already published. A comparison of the numbers of respondents, distribution by age group, country of residence, etc., shows that whilst the student population of respondents changed from Round 1 to 2, the populations of the professional groups (community, hospital and industrial pharmacists, pharmacists in other occupations and academics) were more stable. Results are given for the consensus of ranking and the scores of ranking of 50 competences for pharmacy practice. This two-stage, large-scale Delphi process harmonized and validated the Quality Assurance in European Pharmacy Education and Training (PHAR-QA) framework and ensured the adoption by the pharmacy profession of a framework proposed by the academic pharmacy community. The process of evaluation and validation of ranking of competences by the pharmacy profession is now complete, and the PHAR-QA consortium will now put forward a definitive PHAR-QA framework of competences for pharmacy practice. PMID:28970400

  3. The use of a commercial QA device for daily output check of a helical tomotherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaei, Parham; Hui, Susanta K.; Higgins, Patrick D.; Gerbi, Bruce J.

    2006-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy radiation therapy units, due to their particular design and differences from a traditional linear accelerator, require different procedures by which to perform routine quality assurance (QA). One of the principal QA tasks that should be performed daily on any radiation therapy equipment is the output constancy check. The daily output check on a Hi-Art TomoTherapy unit is commonly performed utilizing ionization chambers placed inside a solid water phantom. This provides a good check of output at one point, but does not give any information on either energy or symmetry of the beam, unless more than one point is measured. This also has the added disadvantage that it has to be done by the physics staff. To address these issues, and to simplify the process, such that it can be performed by radiation therapists, we investigated the use of a commercially available daily QA device to perform this task. The use of this device simplifies the task of daily output constancy checks and eliminates the need for continued physics involvement. This device can also be used to monitor the constancy of beam energy and cone profile and can potentially be used to detect gross errors in the couch movement or laser alignment

  4. Proposal for a Similar Question Search System on a Q&A Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsutoshi Kanamori

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a service to help Internet users obtain answers to specific questions when they visit a Q&A site. A Q&A site is very useful for the Internet user, but posted questions are often not answered immediately. This delay in answering occurs because in most cases another site user is answering the question manually. In this study, we propose a system that can present a question that is similar to a question posted by a user. An advantage of this system is that a user can refer to an answer to a similar question. This research measures the similarity of a candidate question based on word and dependency parsing. In an experiment, we examined the effectiveness of the proposed system for questions actually posted on the Q&A site. The result indicates that the system can show the questioner the answer to a similar question. However, the system still has a number of aspects that should be improved.

  5. TLD Quality Assurance (QA) network in radiotherapy and radiology in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroutilikova, D.; Novak, N.; Novotny, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Czech TLD QA network was established in 1997, as a part of the External Auditing Group (EAG) originated in 1995, in order to perform an independent quality audit in external beam therapy for two purposes: a) to unify the dose within radiotherapy departments, b) to impact state supervision. On basis of a good experience with this network in radiotherapy, new methods were developed to expand the network also to radiology in order to simplify the operation of state supervision. The TLD QA network in dental radiology has been brought into practice in 2001. Both the TLD audits performed in radiotherapy and radiology are realized via mailed dosimetry. In radiotherapy, two modes of the audit are used. Basic mode of TLD audit covers measurements under reference conditions, specifically beam calibration checks for all clinically used photon and electron beams. According to Czech regulations every beam must be checked in this way at least once during two years' period. Advanced mode consists of measurements under both reference and non- reference conditions using Leuven multi-purpose phantom for photon beams. It enables to check a substantial part of the treatment planning process inclusive of final dose realization of the planned radiotherapy. The radiotherapy centers are instructed to deliver absorbed dose of 2 Gy to the TLDs on central beam axis based on calculated treatment time or monitor units by their treatment planning system for a particular treatment set-up. In this way the TLD measured doses are compared with the calculated ones. Deviations of ±3% are considered acceptable for both basic and advanced modes of the audit, deviations up to ±6% are still tolerable, but new audit is repeated as soon as possible to solve the dosimetry problem. Deviations above ±6% leads immediately to investigation by EAG. There are 34 centers in the Czech Republic, which provide external beam radiotherapy. Since they must undergo the basic TLD audit regularly every

  6. Intergovernmental approach of the new liberalism in the development of integration processes

    OpenAIRE

    O. P. Stadnyk; R. Y. Romaniuk

    2013-01-01

    Investigated intergovernmental theory approach to understanding the new liberalism integration processes. Determined the nature of the liberal intergovernmental approach that Andrew Moravchik developed within the new liberalism. Emphasized that the intergovernmental approach of the new liberalism theory considers national preferences in international relations as being primarily determined by domestic political processes. Liberal intergovernmental approach rejects the rhetoric of so­called na...

  7. Development of an approach to facilitate optimal equipment replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    The principle objective of this study was to develop a procedure using available departmental data on operation, maintenance and replacement costs to provide the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development with guidelines for the identific...

  8. Fusing Language Learning and Leadership Development: Initial Approaches and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sheri Spaine; LeLoup, Jean W.; Derby, LeAnn; Reyes, Ramsamooj J.

    2014-01-01

    During a recent visiting professorship at the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA), it became clear that language faculty--both military and civilians--stated that they included leadership while teaching foreign languages and cultures. However, many of the same educators could not explicitly spell out their approach to doing so. This gap…

  9. Grass-roots approach: developing qualified nuclear personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power plants experiencing personnel recruitment problems are trying a grass-roots approach to increase the manpower pool. The Philadelphia Electric Co. and the Toledo Edison Co. are working with local educational institutions to offer nuclear-technology training specific to the needs of nuclear plants. The utilities' investment covers much of the cost of instruction as well as continued training for employees

  10. Development of a high-throughput microsatellite typing approach for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB. ISSN 1684–5315 © 2008 ... and A.D.S. Bastos1. 1Mammal ... obtained for each. These results confirm the usefulness of this rapid, cost-effective typing approach for.

  11. Developing a Critical Literacy Approach with "To Kill a Mockingbird."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Marian

    2000-01-01

    Ponders why the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" has held a place in the secondary school canon for 40 years. Describes a 10-week unit for year 10 English students that takes a critical literacy approach to the novel. Outlines a set of pre-reading activities, during reading activities and post-reading activities. (SR)

  12. Tobacco Cessation for Adolescents: Developing a Group Therapy Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolchan, Eric T.; Ruckel, Susan J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a cognitive-behavioral therapeutic approach to help teenagers better manage life stressors by using effective and adaptive coping skills, while identifying and addressing specific factors that lead either to smoking or maintaining abstinence from smoking behavior. Discusses specific group exercises that empower teens to take control of…

  13. Developing a Competency-Based Assessment Approach for Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Pamela T.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education accrediting bodies are increasing the emphasis on assessing student learning outcomes as opposed to teaching methodology. The purpose of this article is to describe the process used by Troy University's Master of Public Administration program to change their assessment approach from a course learning objective perspective to a…

  14. Assessment of Teacher Motivation Approaches in the Less Developed Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliya, Amos; Ifeoma, Loko Grace

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is an internal process that makes a person move toward a goal. Therefore, this paper examines both traditional and new approaches to teacher motivation, threats to teacher motivation and measures for shaping teacher motivation. The paper concludes that intrinsic rewards such as self-respect, responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment…

  15. Mind Map Marketing: A Creative Approach in Developing Marketing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Lars Torsten; Hauer, Amie M.

    2004-01-01

    In this conceptual article, the authors describe an alternative course structure that joins learning key marketing concepts to creative problem solving. The authors describe an approach using a convergent-divergent-convergent (CDC) process: key concepts are first derived from case material to be organized in a marketing matrix, which is then used…

  16. A new approach in development of data flow control and investigation system for computer networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, I.; Vaguine, A.; Silin, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach in development of data flow control and investigation system for computer networks. This approach was developed and applied in the Moscow Radiotechnical Institute for control and investigations of Institute computer network. It allowed us to solve our network current problems successfully. Description of our approach is represented below along with the most interesting results of our work. (author)

  17. Towards a systems approach to sustainable developments | Kutua ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Sustainable development” as a concept was popularised by a 1987 report of the United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development. The report defined sustainable development as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own ...

  18. Operational approach to the environmental problems in the developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsyari, F

    1980-01-01

    Environmental programs associated with socioeconomic development are examined. In most developing countries, environmental problems affecting human health are connected with poverty, over-population, and biological pollutants. An analysis of the environmental problems associated with socioeconomic development in Surabaya City, Indonesia, is presented. An analytical methodology and a mathematical model for an integrated environmental program are described. (1 diagram, 5 references, 5 tables)

  19. An approach to developing user interfaces for space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Keith; McKinney, Karen

    1993-08-01

    Inherent weakness in the traditional waterfall model of software development has led to the definition of the spiral model. The spiral model software development lifecycle model, however, has not been applied to NASA projects. This paper describes its use in developing real time user interface software for an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Process Control Prototype at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center.

  20. Approaches of Extension Specialists to Teaching Community and Economic Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leones, Julie

    1995-01-01

    Responses from 64 of 80 extension agents specializing in community resources and economic development identified the "Journal of the Community Development Society" as the primary source of ideas and information. Frequently cited program topics were entrepreneurship, fiscal policy, budgeting, strategic planning, and leadership development. Among…