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Sample records for q344ter-induced retinal degeneration

  1. Chemical Exacerbation of Light-induced Retinal Degeneration in F344/N Rats in National Toxicology Program Rodent Bioassays

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    Yamashita, Haruhiro; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Peddada, Shyamal D.; Sills, Robert C.; Pandiri, Arun R.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degeneration due to chronic ambient light exposure is a common spontaneous age-related finding in albino rats, but it can also be related to exposures associated with environmental chemicals and drugs. Typically, light induced retinal degeneration has a central/hemispherical localization where as chemical induced retinal degeneration has a diffuse localization. This study was conducted to identify National Toxicology Program (NTP) rodent bioassays with treatment-related retinal degene...

  2. Preventive and therapeutic effects of SkQ1-containing Visomitin eye drops against light-induced retinal degeneration.

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    Novikova, Yu P; Gancharova, O S; Eichler, O V; Philippov, P P; Grigoryan, E N

    2014-10-01

    The human retina is constantly affected by light of varying intensity, this being especially true for photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium. Traditionally, photoinduced damages of the retina are induced by visible light of high intensity in albino rats using the LIRD (light-induced retinal degeneration) model. This model allows study of pathological processes in the retina and the search for retinoprotectors preventing retinal photodamage. In addition, the etiology and mechanisms of retina damage in the LIRD model have much in common with the mechanisms of the development of age-related retinal disorders, in particular, with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have studied preventive and therapeutic effects of Visomitin eye drops (based on the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1) on albino rat retinas damaged by bright light. In the first series of experiments, rats receiving Visomitin for two weeks prior to illumination demonstrated significantly less expressed atrophic and degenerative changes in the retina compared to animals receiving similar drops with no SkQ1. In the second series, the illuminated rats were treated for two weeks with Visomitin or similar drops without SkQ1. The damaged retinas of the experimental animals were repaired much more effectively than those of the control animals. Therefore, we conclude that Visomitin SkQ1-containing eye drops have pronounced preventive and therapeutic effects on the photodamaged retina and might be recommended as a photoprotector and a pharmaceutical preparation for the treatment of AMD in combination with conventional medicines.

  3. Oxygen-induced retinopathy in mice with retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration.

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    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Zuo-Ming

    2014-04-25

    It is reported that retinal neovascularization seems to rarely co-exist with retinitis pigmentosa in patients and in some mouse models; however, it is not widely acknowledged as a universal phenomenon in all strains of all animal species. We aimed to further explore this phenomenon with an oxygen-induced retinopathy model in mice with retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration. Oxygen-induced retinopathy of colored and albino mice with rapid retinal degeneration were compared to homologous wild-type mice. The retinas were analyzed using high-molecular-weight FITC-dextran stained flat-mount preparation, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained cross-sections, an immunohistochemical test for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) distribution and Western blotting for VEGF expression after exposure to hyperoxia between postnatal days 17 (P17) and 21. Leakage and areas of non-perfusion of the retinal blood vessels were alleviated in the retinal degeneration mice. The number of preretinal vascular endothelial cell nuclei in the retinal degeneration mice was smaller than that in the homologous wild-type mice after exposure to hyperoxia (Poxygen-induced retinopathy was positively correlated with the VEGF expression level. However, the VEGF expression level was lower in the retinal degeneration mice. Proliferative retinopathy occurred in mice with rapid retinal degeneration, but retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration could partially restrain the retinal neovascularization in this rapid retinal degeneration mouse model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of pharmacologically induced retinal degeneration on retinal autofluorescence lifetimes in mice.

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    Dysli, Chantal; Dysli, Muriel; Zinkernagel, Martin S; Enzmann, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) was used to investigate retinal autofluorescence lifetimes in mouse models of pharmacologically induced retinal degeneration over time. Sodium iodate (NaIO 3 , 35 mg/kg intravenously) was used to induce retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration with subsequent loss of photoreceptors (PR) whereas N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU, 45 mg/kg intraperitoneally) was employed for degeneration of the photoreceptor cell layer alone. All mice were measured at day 3, 7, 14, and 28 after the respective injection of NaIO 3 , MNU or NaCl (control). Fluorescence lifetime imaging was performed using a fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). Fluorescence was excited at 473 nm and fluorescence lifetimes were measured in a short and a long spectral channel (498-560 nm and 560-720 nm). Corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT) images were consecutively acquired and histology was performed at the end of the experiments. Segmentation of OCT images and histology verified the cell type-specific degeneration process over time. Retinal autofluorescence lifetimes increased from day 3 to day 28 in mice after NaIO 3 treatment. Finally, at day 28, fluorescence lifetimes were prolonged by 8% in the short and 61% in the long spectral channel compared to control animals (p = 0.21 and p = 0.004, respectively). In mice after MNU treatment, the mean retinal autofluorescence lifetimes were already decreased at day 3 and retinal lifetimes were finally shortened by 27% in the short and 51% in the long spectral channel at day 28 (p = 0.0028). In conclusion, degeneration of the RPE with subsequent photoreceptor degeneration by NaIO 3 lead to longer mean fluorescence lifetimes of the retina compared to control mice, whereas during specific degeneration of the photoreceptor layer induced by MNU shorter lifetimes were measured. Therefore, short retinal fluorescence lifetimes may originate

  5. Aag-initiated base excision repair drives alkylation-induced retinal degeneration in mice.

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    Meira, Lisiane B; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A; Green, Stephanie L; Calvo, Jennifer A; Bronson, Roderick T; Shah, Dharini; Samson, Leona D

    2009-01-20

    Vision loss affects >3 million Americans and many more people worldwide. Although predisposing genes have been identified their link to known environmental factors is unclear. In wild-type animals DNA alkylating agents induce photoreceptor apoptosis and severe retinal degeneration. Alkylation-induced retinal degeneration is totally suppressed in the absence of the DNA repair protein alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag) in both differentiating and postmitotic retinas. Moreover, transgenic expression of Aag activity restores the alkylation sensitivity of photoreceptors in Aag null animals. Aag heterozygotes display an intermediate level of retinal degeneration, demonstrating haploinsufficiency and underscoring that Aag expression confers a dominant retinal degeneration phenotype.

  6. Digoxin-induced retinal degeneration depends on rhodopsin.

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    Landfried, Britta; Samardzija, Marijana; Barben, Maya; Schori, Christian; Klee, Katrin; Storti, Federica; Grimm, Christian

    2017-03-16

    Na,K-ATPases are energy consuming ion pumps that are required for maintaining ion homeostasis in most cells. In the retina, Na,K-ATPases are especially important to sustain the dark current in photoreceptor cells needed for rapid hyperpolarization of rods and cones in light. Cardiac glycosides like digoxin inhibit the activity of Na,K-ATPases by targeting their catalytic alpha subunits. This leads to a disturbed ion balance, which can affect cellular function and survival. Here we show that the treatment of wild-type mice with digoxin leads to severe retinal degeneration and loss of vision. Digoxin induced cell death specifically in photoreceptor cells with no or only minor effects in other retinal cell types. Photoreceptor-specific cytotoxicity depended on the presence of bleachable rhodopsin. Photoreceptors of Rpe65 knockouts, which have no measurable rhodopsin and photoreceptors of Rpe65 R91W mice that have treatment. Similarly, cones in the all-cone retina of Nrl knockout mice were also not affected. Digoxin induced expression of several genes involved in stress signaling and inflammation. It also activated proteins such as ERK1/2, AKT, STAT1, STAT3 and CASP1 during a period of up to 10 days after treatment. Activation of signaling genes and proteins, as well as the dependency on bleachable rhodopsin resembles mechanisms of light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. Digoxin-mediated photoreceptor cell death may thus be used as an inducible model system to study molecular mechanisms of retinal degeneration.

  7. ER stress in retinal degeneration in S334ter Rho rats.

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    Vishal M Shinde

    Full Text Available The S334ter rhodopsin (Rho rat (line 4 bears the rhodopsin gene with an early termination codon at residue 334 that is a model for several such mutations found in human patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP. The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR is implicated in the pathophysiology of several retinal disorders including ADRP in P23H Rho rats. The aim of this study was to examine the onset of UPR gene expression in S334ter Rho retinas to determine if UPR is activated in ADRP animal models and to investigate how the activation of UPR molecules leads to the final demise of S334ter Rho photoreceptors. RT-PCR was performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles for the P10, P12, P15, and P21 stages of the development and progression of ADRP in S334ter Rho photoreceptors. We determined that during the P12-P15 period, ER stress-related genes are strongly upregulated in transgenic retinas, resulting in the activation of the UPR that was confirmed using western blot analysis and RT-PCR. The activation of UPR was associated with the increased expression of JNK, Bik, Bim, Bid, Noxa, and Puma genes and cleavage of caspase-12 that together with activated calpains presumably compromise the integrity of the mitochondrial MPTP, leading to the release of pro-apoptotic AIF1 into the cytosol of S334ter Rho photoreceptor cells. Therefore, two major cross-talking pathways, the UPR and mitochondrial MPTP occur in S334ter-4 Rho retina concomitantly and eventually promote the death of the photoreceptor cells.

  8. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

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    Masayuki Niwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced, autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced. The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease, and will facilitate the development of novel effective therapeutic drugs to treat retinal cell damage.

  9. An activated unfolded protein response promotes retinal degeneration and triggers an inflammatory response in the mouse retina.

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    Rana, T; Shinde, V M; Starr, C R; Kruglov, A A; Boitet, E R; Kotla, P; Zolotukhin, S; Gross, A K; Gorbatyuk, M S

    2014-12-18

    Recent studies on the endoplasmic reticulum stress have shown that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is involved in the pathogenesis of inherited retinal degeneration caused by mutant rhodopsin. However, the main question of whether UPR activation actually triggers retinal degeneration remains to be addressed. Thus, in this study, we created a mouse model for retinal degeneration caused by a persistently activated UPR to assess the physiological and morphological parameters associated with this disease state and to highlight a potential mechanism by which the UPR can promote retinal degeneration. We performed an intraocular injection in C57BL6 mice with a known unfolded protein response (UPR) inducer, tunicamycin (Tn) and examined animals by electroretinography (ERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and histological analyses. We detected a significant loss of photoreceptor function (over 60%) and retinal structure (35%) 30 days post treatment. Analysis of retinal protein extracts demonstrated a significant upregulation of inflammatory markers including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IBA1. Similarly, we detected a strong inflammatory response in mice expressing either Ter349Glu or T17M rhodopsin (RHO). These mutant rhodopsin species induce severe retinal degeneration and T17M rhodopsin elicits UPR activation when expressed in mice. RNA and protein analysis revealed a significant upregulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers such as IL-1β, IL-6, p65 nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and MCP-1, as well as activation of F4/80 and IBA1 microglial markers in both the retinas expressing mutant rhodopsins. We then assessed if the Tn-induced inflammatory marker IL-1β was capable of inducing retinal degeneration by injecting C57BL6 mice with a recombinant IL-1β. We observed ~19% reduction in ERG a-wave amplitudes and a 29% loss of photoreceptor cells compared with

  10. Activity of coenzyme Q 10 (Q-Ter multicomposite) on recovery time in noise-induced hearing loss.

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    Staffa, Paola; Cambi, Jacopo; Mezzedimi, Chiara; Passali, Desiderio; Bellussi, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    A potential consequence of exposure to noise is a temporary reduction in auditory sensitivity known as temporary threshold shift (TTS), which mainly depends on the intensity and duration of exposure to the noise. Recovery time is related to the amount of initial hearing loss, and the most recovery takes place during the first 15 min following exposure. This study evaluated the efficacy in otoprotection against noise-induced hearing loss of an orally administrated food supplement containing coenzyme Q 10 -Ter. This water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q 10 shows better bioavailability than the native form and has been found to have a protective effect on outer hair cells after exposure to noise in animal models. Thirty volunteers were enrolled, and the right ear of each subject was exposed to a narrow-band noise centered at 3 kHz for 10 min at the intensity of 90 dB HL. In the 30 subjects enrolled, TTS was evaluated after 2, 15, and 30 min and the recovery time was recorded in each subject. The longest recovery time was 45 min. Among the 18 subjects who underwent a second test after treatment with Q-Ter, the mean recovery time was 31.43 min. The results of the present study show that 30 days' treatment with Q-Ter can aid faster recovery after exposure to noise (P < 0.0001). The reduction in the recovery time following treatment can be explained by Q-Ter-mediated improvement of the outer hair cells' response to oxidative stress.

  11. Lattice degeneration of the retina and retinal detachment.

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    Semes, L P

    1992-01-01

    Lattice retinal degeneration is considered the most significant peripheral retinal disorder potentially predisposing to retinal breaks and retinal detachment. Lattice degeneration affects the vitreous and inner retinal layers with secondary changes as deep as the retinal pigment epithelium and perhaps the choriocapillaris. Variations in clinical appearance are the rule; geographically, lattice lesions favor the vertical meridians between the equator and the ora serrata. Lattice degeneration begins early in life and has been reported in sequential generations of the same family. Along with its customary bilateral occurrence, lattice shares other characteristics of a dystrophy. The association between the vitreous and retina in lattice lesions may be responsible for the majority of lattice-induced retinal detachments. The tumultuous event of posterior vitreous separation in the presence of abnormally strong vitreoretinal adherence is the trigger for a retinal tear that, in turn, may lead to retinal detachment. Although retinal holes in young patients with lattice degeneration may play a role in the evolution of retinal detachment, the clinical course of lattice degeneration seems to be one of dormancy rather than of progressive change. This discussion outlines the pathophysiology of lattice retinal degeneration and the relationship of pathophysiology to clinical presentation. The epidemiology of lattice degeneration is summarized, as are the possible precursors to retinal detachment. A clinical characterization of the natural history of lattice degeneration is offered, and interventions for complications are described. To conclude, management strategies from a primary-care standpoint are reviewed.

  12. Rapid glutamate receptor 2 trafficking during retinal degeneration

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    Lin Yanhua

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal degenerations, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, are characterized by photoreceptor loss and anomalous remodeling of the surviving retina that corrupts visual processing and poses a barrier to late-stage therapeutic interventions in particular. However, the molecular events associated with retinal remodeling remain largely unknown. Given our prior evidence of ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR reprogramming in retinal degenerations, we hypothesized that the edited glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2 subunit and its trafficking may be modulated in retinal degenerations. Results Adult albino Balb/C mice were exposed to intense light for 24 h to induce light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD. We found that prior to the onset of photoreceptor loss, protein levels of GluR2 and related trafficking proteins, including glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1 and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95, were rapidly increased. LIRD triggered neuritogenesis in photoreceptor survival regions, where GluR2 and its trafficking proteins were expressed in the anomalous dendrites. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed interaction between KIF3A and GRIP1 as well as PSD-95, suggesting that KIF3A may mediate transport of GluR2 and its trafficking proteins to the novel dendrites. However, in areas of photoreceptor loss, GluR2 along with its trafficking proteins nearly vanished in retracted retinal neurites. Conclusions All together, LIRD rapidly triggers GluR2 plasticity, which is a potential mechanism behind functionally phenotypic revisions of retinal neurons and neuritogenesis during retinal degenerations.

  13. Urocortin 2 treatment is protective in excitotoxic retinal degeneration.

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    Szabadfi, K; Kiss, P; Reglodi, D; Fekete, E M; Tamas, A; Danyadi, B; Atlasz, T; Gabriel, R

    2014-03-01

    Urocortin 2 (Ucn 2) is a corticotrop releasing factor paralog peptide with many physiological functions and it has widespread distribution. There are some data on the cytoprotective effects of Ucn 2, but less is known about its neuro- and retinoprotective actions. We have previously shown that Ucn 2 is protective in ischemia-induced retinal degeneration. The aim of the present study was to examine the protective potential of Ucn 2 in monosodium-glutamate (MSG)-induced retinal degeneration by routine histology and to investigate cell-type specific effects by immunohistochemistry. Rat pups received MSG applied on postnatal days 1, 5 and 9 and Ucn 2 was injected intravitreally into one eye. Retinas were processed for histology and immunocytochemistry after 3 weeks. Immunolabeling was determined for glial fibrillary acidic protein, vesicular glutamate transporter 1, protein kinase Cα, calbindin, parvalbumin and calretinin. Retinal tissue from animals treated with MSG showed severe degeneration compared to normal retinas, but intravitreal Ucn 2 treatment resulted in a retained retinal structure both at histological and neurochemical levels: distinct inner retinal layers and rescued inner retinal cells (different types of amacrine and rod bipolar cells) could be observed. These findings support the neuroprotective function of Ucn 2 in MSG-induced retinal degeneration.

  14. Chemically-induced photoreceptor degeneration and protection in mouse iPSC-derived three-dimensional retinal organoids

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    Shin-ichiro Ito

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which can be differentiated into various tissues and cell types, have been used for clinical research and disease modeling. Self-organizing three-dimensional (3D tissue engineering has been established within the past decade and enables researchers to obtain tissues and cells that almost mimic in vivo development. However, there are no reports of practical experimental procedures that reproduce photoreceptor degeneration. In this study, we induced photoreceptor cell death in mouse iPSC-derived 3D retinal organoids (3D-retinas by 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT, which induces photoreceptor degeneration in mouse retinal explants, and then established a live-cell imaging system to measure degeneration-related properties. Furthermore, we quantified the protective effects of representative ophthalmic supplements for treating the photoreceptor degeneration. This drug evaluation system enables us to monitor drug effects in photoreceptor cells and could be useful for drug screening.

  15. Wagner vitreoretinal degeneration with genetic linkage refinement on chromosome 5q13-q14.

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    Zech, J C; Morlé, L; Vincent, P; Alloisio, N; Bozon, M; Gonnet, C; Milazzo, S; Grange, J D; Trepsat, C; Godet, J; Plauchu, H

    1999-05-01

    It has been previously described that Wagner disease is linked to chromosome 5q13-q14. This study was carried out to describe the ophthalmological aspects and report the results of genetic linkage analysis in a large pedigree affected by Wagner disease. Fourty members of one same family agreed to be examined. Twenty patients presented vitreoretinal degeneration in both eyes without any extra-ocular abnormalities. In young patients, visual acuity was usually normal after correction of frequent mild myopia. Presenile cataracts progressed by the third decade and required removal for visual rehabilitation. The primary disorder involved an abnormal vitreous. A few avascular vitreous bands were usually the only optical feature in the mostly empty vitreous cavity. A circumferential vitreous condensation formed in contact with the retina on many spots. Less common retinal findings included retinal detachment, abnormal retinal pigmentation, progressive atrophy of the RPE simulating choroideremia and lattice degeneration. Genetic analysis revealed a highly significant linkage (lod score >5.0) between the disease and 10 markers of the chromosome 5q13-q14 region. Two recombination events allowed us to refine the linked interval to 20 cM between the D5S650 and D5S618 markers. Ophthalmological aspects of Wagner's disease appear to progress with age. Regular ophthalmological examination is important for detecting retinal abnormalities. The gene involved in Wagner's disease lies in a 20 cM interval on chromosome 5q13-q14.

  16. Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid1 receptor antagonist, protects against light-induced retinal degeneration in vitro and in vivo.

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    Imamura, Tomoyo; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yuki; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Ohno, Yuta; Ogami, Shiho; Yamane, Shinsaku; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-05-15

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous constellation of proteins related to cannabinoid 1 receptor signaling, including free fatty acids, diacylglycerol lipase, and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase, are localized in the murine retina. Moreover, the expression levels of endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors are changed in the vitreous fluid. However, the role of the endocannabinoid system in the retina, particularly in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration, remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated involvement of the cannabinoid 1 receptor in light-induced retinal degeneration using in vitro and in vivo models. To evaluate the effect of cannabinoid 1 receptors in light irradiation-induced cell death, the mouse retinal cone-cell line (661W) was treated with a cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant. Time-dependent changes of expression and localization of retinal cannabinoid 1 receptors were measured using Western blot and immunostaining. Retinal damage was induced in mice by exposure to light, followed by intravitreal injection of rimonabant. Electroretinograms and histologic analyses were performed. Rimonabant suppressed light-induced photoreceptor cell death. Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression was upregulated by light exposure. Treatment with rimonabant improved both a- and b-wave amplitudes and the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. These results suggest that the cannabinoid 1 receptor is involved in light-induced retinal degeneration and it may represent a therapeutic target in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of substance P on recovery from laser-induced retinal degeneration.

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    Hong, Hyun Sook; Kim, Suna; Nam, Seungwoo; Um, Jihyun; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Son, Youngsook

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration is caused by neovascularization and persistent inflammation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid, and causes serious eye disease including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Thus, inhibiting inflammation and neovascularization may be a primary approach to protect the retina from degeneration. The purpose of this study was to determine whether substance P (SP), which can suppress inflammation and mobilize stem cells, can protect the RPE from degeneration. The effect of SP was evaluated by analyzing systemic inflammation, cell survival, and neovascularization within the argon laser-injured retina of mice. At 1 week postinjury, the SP-treated group had lower tumor necrosis factor-alpha and higher interleukin-10 serum concentrations, and a more intact retinal structure compared to the vehicle-treated group. In mice administered SP repeatedly for 4 weeks, the retinal structure appeared normal and showed sparse neovascularization, whereas the vehicle-treated group showed severe retinal destruction and dense neovascularization. Moreover, the efficacy of SP was identical to that of mesenchymal stem cells that were transplanted into the vitreous after retinal injury. This study highlights the potential for the endogenous neuropeptide SP as a treatment for retinal damage to prevent conditions such as AMD. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  18. Morphological and physiological retinal degeneration induced by intravenous delivery of vitamin A dimers in rabbits

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    Jackie Penn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The eye uses vitamin A as a cofactor to sense light and, during this process, some vitamin A molecules dimerize, forming vitamin A dimers. A striking chemical signature of retinas undergoing degeneration in major eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD and Stargardt disease is the accumulation of these dimers in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and Bruch’s membrane (BM. However, it is not known whether dimers of vitamin A are secondary symptoms or primary insults that drive degeneration. Here, we present a chromatography-free method to prepare gram quantities of the vitamin A dimer, A2E, and show that intravenous administration of A2E to the rabbit results in retinal degeneration. A2E-damaged photoreceptors and RPE cells triggered inflammation, induced remolding of the choroidal vasculature and triggered a decline in the retina’s response to light. Data suggest that vitamin A dimers are not bystanders, but can be primary drivers of retinal degeneration. Thus, preventing dimer formation could be a preemptive strategy to address serious forms of blindness.

  19. Acquired retinal pigmentary degeneration in a child with 13q deletion syndrome.

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    Aguilera, Zenia P; Belin, Peter J; Cavuoto, Kara M; Jayakar, Parul; McKeown, Craig A

    2015-10-01

    Orbeli syndrome, or 13q deletion syndrome, is a rare condition caused by a distal deletion in the long arm of chromosome 13. The syndrome is characterized by severe physical malformations and developmental delays and has been associated with numerous ocular manifestations. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with 13q deletion syndrome, who was evaluated for impaired vision and found to have bilateral retinal pigmentary changes resembling those seen in retinitis pigmentosa. There has only been one other case of retinal pigment variation in association with 13q deletion syndrome; however, this represents the first case of bilateral symmetric retinal pigmentary changes with corresponding rod and cone dysfunction on electroretinography. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Course of Sodium Iodate-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Albino and Pigmented Mice.

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    Chowers, Guy; Cohen, Matan; Marks-Ohana, Devora; Stika, Shelly; Eijzenberg, Ayala; Banin, Eyal; Obolensky, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    To characterize the course of sodium iodate (SI)-induced retinal degeneration in young adult albino and pigmented mice. Single intraperitoneal (IP) injections of SI (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) were performed in 7- to 8-week-old BALB/c and C57Bl/6J mice. Retinal function and structure was assessed at baseline, 24 hours, 3 days, 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks postinjection by optokinetic tracking response, ERG, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and histologic and immunohistochemical techniques. The 50 mg/kg SI dosage was selected after dose ranging due to consistent retinal effects and lack of systemic toxicity. Time-dependent deterioration in retinal function and morphology was consistently observed between 1 and 4 weeks in all measured parameters. These include reduction of ERG responses, thinning of retinal layers as observed by OCT and histology, and loss of RPE nuclei. Immunohistochemistry revealed rapid RPE disorganization with loss of tight junctions and markedly reduced expression of RPE65 and rod opsin, accompanied by mislocalization of cone opsins. Earlier time points displayed variable results, including partial recovery of visual acuity at 1 week and supranormal ERG cone responses at 24 hours, suggesting possible limitations of early intervention and assessment in the SI model. A single IP injection of 50 mg/kg SI leads to severe RPE injury followed by vision impairment, dysfunction, and loss of photoreceptors in both BALB/c and C57Bl/6J mice. This easily induced and reproducible noninherited model may serve as a useful tool for seeking and evaluating novel therapeutic modalities for the treatment of retinal degenerations caused by primary failure of the RPE.

  1. [Peripheral retinal degenerations--treatment recommendations].

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    Joussen, A M; Kirchhof, B

    2004-10-01

    This report reviews the clinical appearance of degenerative diseases of the peripheral retina in relationship to the risk of developing a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. We present recommendations for preventive treatment in eyes at increased risk of developing retinal detachment. Retinal degenerations are common lesions involving the peripheral retina but most of them are clinically insignificant. Lattice degeneration, degenerative retinoschisis, cystic retinal tufts, and very rarely zonular traction tufts can result in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Therefore, these lesions have been considered for prophylactic treatment; however, adequate studies have not been performed to date. Most of the peripheral retinal degenerations may not require treatment except in rare, high-risk situations. According to current knowledge there is no higher incidence of secondary pucker or other side effects after laser coagulation. Therefore, generous laser indication is recommended if risk factors apply.

  2. Dietary supplement enriched in antioxidants and omega-3 protects from progressive light-induced retinal degeneration.

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    Ramchani-Ben Othman, Khaoula; Cercy, Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Doly, Michel; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG) followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD). For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration.

  3. Dietary supplement enriched in antioxidants and omega-3 protects from progressive light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaoula Ramchani-Ben Othman

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD. For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration.

  4. Peripheral retinal degenerations and the risk of retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Hilel

    2003-07-01

    To review the degenerative diseases of the peripheral retina in relationship with the risk to develop a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and to present recommendations for use in eyes at increased risk of developing a retinal detachment. Focused literature review and author's clinical experience. Retinal degenerations are common lesions involving the peripheral retina, and most of them are clinically insignificant. Lattice degeneration, degenerative retinoschisis, cystic retinal tufts, and, rarely, zonular traction tufts, can result in a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Therefore, these lesions have been considered for prophylactic therapy; however, adequate studies have not been performed to date. Well-designed, prospective, randomized clinical studies are necessary to determine the benefit-risk ratio of prophylactic treatment. In the meantime, the evidence available suggests that most of the peripheral retinal degenerations should not be treated except in rare, high-risk situations.

  5. Coenzyme Q10 protects retinal cells from apoptosis induced by radiation in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulli, M.; Witort, E.; Papucci, L.; Torre, E.; Schiavone, N.; Capaccioli, S.; Dal Monte, M.

    2012-01-01

    The key pathogenetic event of many retinopathies is apoptosis of retinal cells. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) prevents apoptosis of corneal keratocytes both in vitro and in vivo, by virtue of its ability to inhibit mitochondrial depolarization, independently of its free radical scavenger role. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether CoQ10 can protect cultured retinal cells and the retinas of rats from radiation-induced apoptosis, if instilled as eye drops in the cornea. In vitro experiments were carried out on cultured ARPE-19 or retinal ganglion cells (RGC)-5 cells pretreated with CoQ10 before eliciting apoptosis by ultraviolet (UV)- and γ-radiation, chemical hypoxia (Antimycin A) and serum starvation. Cell viability was evaluated by light microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis. Apoptotic events were scored by time-lapse videomicroscopy. Mitochondrial permeability transition was evaluated by JC-1. The anti-apoptotic effectiveness of CoQ10 in retina was also evaluated by an in situ end-labeling assay in Wistar albino rats treated with CoQ10 eye drops prior to UV irradiation of the eye. CoQ10 substantially increased cell viability and lowered retinal cell apoptosis in response both to UV- and γ-radiation and to chemical hypoxia or serum starvation by inhibiting mitochondrion depolarization. In the rat, CoQ10, even when applied as eye drops on the cornea, protected all retina layers from ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced apoptosis. The ability of CoQ10 to protect retinal cells from radiation-induced apoptosis following its instillation on the cornea suggests the possibility for CoQ10 eye drops to become a future therapeutic countermeasure for radiation-induced retinal lesions. (author)

  6. [Coenzyme Q10 (Q-ter) in treatment of functional voice disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensini, M; Corvino, A; Passeri, L; Gallone, G O; Landolfo, V; Raimondo, L; Giordano, C

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the effectivness of Coenzyme Q-Ter and Vitamin A in functional voice disorders. Twenty two patients were treated with CoQ10-ter and vitamin A twice a day for ten days. A general otolaryngological/foniatric and logopedic examination were performed. Videolaringostroboscopy, GIRBAS, Voice Handicap Index questionnaire and Multi-Dimensional Voice analysis were carried out before and after treatment. In all patients an improvement was observed in almost all parameters considered after treatment. CoQ10-ter and Vitamin A risulted effective in treatment of patients with functional voice disorders (caused by vocal "malmenage" or "surmenage").

  7. Effects of combined ketamine/xylazine anesthesia on light induced retinal degeneration in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Arango-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To explore the effect of ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on light-induced retinal degeneration in rats. METHODS: Rats were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine (100 and 5 mg, respectively for 1 h, followed by a recovery phase of 2 h before exposure to 16,000 lux of environmental illumination for 2 h. Functional assessment by electroretinography (ERG and morphological assessment by in vivo imaging (optical coherence tomography, histology (hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry (GFAP and rhodopsin staining were performed at baseline (ERG, 36 h, 7 d and 14 d post-treatment. Non-anesthetized animals treated with light damage served as controls. RESULTS: Ketamine-xylazine pre-treatment preserved retinal function and protected against light-induced retinal degeneration. In vivo retinal imaging demonstrated a significant increase of outer nuclear layer (ONL thickness in the non-anesthetized group at 36 h (p0.05, indicating a stabilizing and/or protective effect with regard to phototoxicity. Histology confirmed light-induced photoreceptor cell death and Müller cells gliosis in non-anesthetized rats, especially in the superior hemiretina, while ketamine-xylazine treated rats showed reduced photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL staining: p<0.001 after 7 d, thicker ONL and longer IS/OS. Fourteen days after light damage, a reduction of standard flash induced a-wave amplitudes and a-wave slopes (p = 0.01 and significant alterations in parameters of the scotopic sensitivity function (e.g. Vmax of the Naka Rushton fit p = 0.03 were observed in non-treated vs. ketamine-xylazine treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that pre-treatment with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia protects retinas against light damage, reducing photoreceptor cell death. These data support the notion that anesthesia with ketamine-xylazine provides neuroprotective effects in light-induced cell damage.

  8. Primary amines protect against retinal degeneration in mouse models of retinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Akiko; Golczak, Marcin; Chen, Yu; Okano, Kiichiro; Kohno, Hideo; Shiose, Satomi; Ishikawa, Kaede; Harte, William; Palczewska, Grazyna; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-12-25

    Vertebrate vision is initiated by photoisomerization of the visual pigment chromophore 11-cis-retinal and is maintained by continuous regeneration of this retinoid through a series of reactions termed the retinoid cycle. However, toxic side reaction products, especially those involving reactive aldehyde groups of the photoisomerized product, all-trans-retinal, can cause severe retinal pathology. Here we lowered peak concentrations of free all-trans-retinal with primary amine-containing Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs that did not inhibit chromophore regeneration in mouse models of retinal degeneration. Schiff base adducts between all-trans-retinal and these amines were identified by MS. Adducts were observed in mouse eyes only when an experimental drug protected the retina from degeneration in both short-term and long-term treatment experiments. This study demonstrates a molecular basis of all-trans-retinal-induced retinal pathology and identifies an assemblage of FDA-approved compounds with protective effects against this pathology in a mouse model that shows features of Stargardt's disease and age-related retinal degeneration.

  9. Water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 formulation (Q-ter) promotes outer hair cell survival in a guinea pig model of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetoni, Anna Rita; Piacentini, Roberto; Fiorita, Antonella; Paludetti, Gaetano; Troiani, Diana

    2009-02-27

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a powerful source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) also in noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) and anti-oxidants and free-radicals scavengers have been shown to attenuate the damage. Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) or ubiquinone has a bioenergetic role as a component of the mithocondrial respiratory chain, it inhibits mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, inducing ATP production and it is involved in ROS removal and prevention of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. However the therapeutic application of CoQ(10) is limited by the lack of solubility and poor bio- availability, therefore it is a challenge to improve its water solubility in order to ameliorate the efficacy in tissues and fluids. This study was conducted in a model of acoustic trauma in the guinea pig where the effectiveness of CoQ(10) was compared with a soluble formulation of CoQ(10) (multicomposite CoQ(10) Terclatrate, Q-ter) given intraperitoneally 1 h before and once daily for 3 days after pure tone noise exposure (6 kHz for 1 h at 120 dB SPL). Functional and morphological studies were carried out by measuring auditory brainstem responses, scanning electron microscopy for hair cell loss count, active caspase 3 staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP labelling assay in order to identify initial signs of apoptosis. Treatments decreased active caspase 3 expression and the number of apoptotic cells, but animals injected with Q-ter showed a greater degree of activity in preventing apoptosis and thus in improving hearing. These data confirm that solubility of Coenzyme Q(10) improves the ability of CoQ(10) in preventing oxidative injuries that result from mitochondrial dysfunction.

  10. Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidins from Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides L. Seed against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary proanthocyanidins (PACs as health-protective agents have become an important area of human nutrition research because of their potent bioactivities. We investigated the retinoprotective effects of PACs from sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. seed against visible light-induced retinal degeneration in vivo. Pigmented rabbits were orally administered sea buckthorn seed PACs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day for 14 consecutive days of pre-illumination and seven consecutive days of post-illumination. Retinal function was quantified via electroretinography 7 days after light exposure. Retinal damage was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the full-thickness retina and outer nuclear layer 7 days after light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms and maintained the retinal structure. Increased retinal photooxidative damage was expressed by the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, the decrease of total antioxidant capacity level and the increase of malondialdehyde level. Light exposure induced a significant increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 and angiogenesis (VEGF levels in retina. Light exposure upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, sea buckthorn seed PACs ameliorated these changes induced by light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs mediated the protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  11. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper Protects the Retina From Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration by Inducing Bcl-xL in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruiping; Tang, Wenyi; Lei, Boya; Ding, Xinyi; Jiang, Cheng; Xu, Gezhi

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in a light-induced retinal degeneration model and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Intravitreal injection of recombinant GILZ-overexpressing lentivirus (OE-GILZ-rLV) and short hairpin RNA targeting GILZ recombinant lentivirus (shRNA-GILZ-rLV) was performed to up- and downregulate retinal GILZ, respectively. Three days after stable transduction, rats were exposed to continuous bright light (5000 lux) for 2 days. Retinal function was assessed by full-field electroretinography (ERG), and the retinal structure was examined for photoreceptor survival and death in rats kept under a 12-hour light:2-hour dark cycle following light exposure. The expression levels of retinal Bcl-xL, caspase-9, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blotting or real-time PCR at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after light exposure. Exposure to bright light downregulated retinal GILZ in parallel with the downregulation of Bcl-xL and the upregulation of active caspase-3. Overexpression of retinal GILZ attenuated the decrease of Bcl-xL and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after bright light exposure, respectively. GILZ silencing aggravated the downregulation of Bcl-xL induced by bright light exposure. Bright light exposure reduced the amplitude of ERG, increased the number of apoptotic photoreceptor cells, and decreased retinal thickness; and GILZ overexpression could attenuate all these effects. Overexpression of GILZ by OE-GILZ-rLV transduction protected the retina from light-induced cellular damage by activating antiapoptotic pathways.

  12. Coenzyme Q10 instilled as eye drops on the cornea reaches the retina and protects retinal layers from apoptosis in a mouse model of kainate-induced retinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulli, Matteo; Witort, Ewa; Papucci, Laura; Torre, Eugenio; Schipani, Christian; Bergamini, Christian; Dal Monte, Massimo; Capaccioli, Sergio

    2012-12-17

    To evaluate if coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) can protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from apoptosis and, when instilled as eye drops on the cornea, if it can reach the retina and exert its antiapoptotic activity in this area in a mouse model of kainate (KA)-induced retinal damage. Rat primary or cultured RGCs were subjected to glutamate (50 μM) or chemical hypoxia (Antimycin A, 200 μM) or serum withdrawal (FBS, 0.5%) in the presence or absence of CoQ10 (10 μM). Cell viability was evaluated by light microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses. Apoptosis was evaluated by caspase 3/7 activity and mitochondrion depolarization tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester analysis. CoQ10 transfer to the retina following its instillation as eye drops on the cornea was quantified by HPLC. Retinal protection by CoQ10 (10 μM) eye drops instilled on the cornea was then evaluated in a mouse model of KA-induced excitotoxic retinal cell apoptosis by cleaved caspase 3 immunohistofluorescence, caspase 3/7 activity assays, and quantification of inhibition of RGC loss. CoQ10 significantly increased viable cells by preventing RGC apoptosis. Furthermore, when topically applied as eye drops to the cornea, it reached the retina, thus substantially increasing local CoQ10 concentration and protecting retinal layers from apoptosis. The ability of CoQ10 eye drops to protect retinal cells from apoptosis in the mouse model of KA-induced retinal damage suggests that topical CoQ10 may be evaluated in designing therapies for treating apoptosis-driven retinopathies.

  13. Progress toward the maintenance and repair of degenerating retinal circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugler, Anthony A

    2010-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa remain major causes of severe vision loss in humans. Clinical trials for treatment of retinal degenerations are underway and advancements in our understanding of retinal biology in health/disease have implications for novel therapies. A review of retinal biology is used to inform a discussion of current strategies to maintain/repair neural circuitry in age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and Type 2 Leber congenital amaurosis. In age-related macular degeneration/retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive loss of rods/cones results in corruption of bipolar cell circuitry, although retinal output neurons/photoreceptive melanopsin cells survive. Visual function can be stabilized/enhanced after treatment in age-related macular degeneration, but in advanced degenerations, reorganization of retinal circuitry may preclude attempts to restore cone function. In Type 2 Leber congenital amaurosis, useful vision can be restored by gene therapy where central cones survive. Remarkable progress has been made in restoring vision to rodents using light-responsive ion channels inserted into bipolar cells/retinal ganglion cells. Advances in genetic, cellular, and prosthetic therapies show varying degrees of promise for treating retinal degenerations. While functional benefits can be obtained after early therapeutic interventions, efforts should be made to minimize circuitry changes as soon as possible after rod/cone loss. Advances in retinal anatomy/physiology and genetic technologies should allow refinement of future reparative strategies.

  14. Relationship between full-thickness macular hole and retinal break/lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinglin; Li, Yonghao; Zhao, Xiujuan; Cai, Yu; Yu, Xiling; Lu, Lin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose is to investigate the relationship between full-thickness macular hole (MH) and retinal break (RB) and/or lattice degeneration. Patients diagnosed as full-thickness MH and referred to Dr. Lin Lu from January 2009 to December 2013 were evaluated. All patients underwent general ophthalmologic examinations, fundus examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The RB and/or lattice degeneration were recorded. Totally 183 eyes of 167 patients were included. The sex ratio of men to women was 1:2.88. A total of 17 eyes were pseudophakic and 166 eyes were phakic. RB and/or lattice degeneration were found in 62 eyes (33.88%). The prevalence of RB and/or lattice degeneration was similar between men and women (P = 0.344 > 0.05). There was no statistical difference between the pseudophakic eyes and phakic eyes (P = 0.138 > 0.05). All of the RB and/or lattice degeneration were located near or anterior to the equator. The inferior quadrants and the vertical meridian were affected more often than the superior quadrants and the horizontal meridian. We identified a high incidence of RB/lattice degeneration in cases of full-thickness MH. Carefully examination of the peripheral retina and prophylactic treatment of RB and/or lattice degeneration are critical.

  15. Risk of retinal detachment in patients with lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, K; Ideta, H; Yonemoto, J; Tanaka, S; Hirose, A; Oka, C

    1998-01-01

    To determine the risk of retinal detachment in patients with lattice degeneration of the retina, we statistically analyzed the incidence of retinal detachment in these patients. The data of hospital patients with retinal detachment associated with lattice degeneration in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan, in 1990 were collected. The prevalence of lattice degeneration in Kumamoto was reported to be 9.5% in 1980. Based on population data from the 1990 census, the cumulative incidence of retinal detachment associated with lattice degeneration was calculated in this study. Among 1,840,000 residents in Kumamoto, there were 110 patients with retinal detachment associated with lattice degeneration; 72 with detachment resulting from tractional tears (tears), and 38 with detachment from atrophic holes. The cumulative incidence of retinal detachment from atrophic holes was 1.5% at the age of 40 years; from tears it was 3.6% at the age of 80 years. The cumulative incidence of detachment from both atrophic holes and tears was 5.3% at the age of 80 years. The results of this study are useful for clarifying the natural course of lattice degeneration.

  16. Frequency of lattice degeneration and retinal breaks in the fellow eye in retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, S E

    1988-04-01

    The fellow eye of 100 consecutively admitted cases of retinal detachment was studied with three-mirror examination for the presence of lattice degeneration and retinal breaks. Lattice degeneration was found in 18% and retinal breaks in 20% of fellow eyes.

  17. Interventions for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for preventing retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Charles P

    2014-09-05

    Asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration are visible lesions that are risk factors for later retinal detachment. Retinal detachments occur when fluid in the vitreous cavity passes through tears or holes in the retina and separates the retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. Creation of an adhesion surrounding retinal breaks and lattice degeneration, with laser photocoagulation or cryotherapy, has been recommended as an effective means of preventing retinal detachment. This therapy is of value in the management of retinal tears associated with the symptoms of flashes and floaters and persistent vitreous traction upon the retina in the region of the retinal break, because such symptomatic retinal tears are associated with a high rate of progression to retinal detachment. Retinal tears and holes unassociated with acute symptoms and lattice degeneration are significantly less likely to be the sites of retinal breaks that are responsible for later retinal detachment. Nevertheless, treatment of these lesions frequently is recommended, in spite of the fact that the effectiveness of this therapy is unproven. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of techniques used to treat asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for the prevention of retinal detachment. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 2), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to February 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2014), PubMed (January 1948 to February 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials

  18. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  19. LONGITUDINAL STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN LATE-ONSET RETINAL DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine; Flamendorf, Jason; Wong, Wai T; Ayyagari, Radha; Cunningham, Denise; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    To characterize longitudinal structural changes in early stages of late-onset retinal degeneration to investigate pathogenic mechanisms. Two affected siblings, both with a S163R missense mutation in the causative gene C1QTNF5, were followed for 8+ years. Color fundus photos, fundus autofluorescence images, near-infrared reflectance fundus images, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography scans were acquired during follow-up. Both patients, aged 45 and 50 years, had good visual acuities (>20/20) in the context of prolonged dark adaptation. Baseline color fundus photography demonstrated yellow-white, punctate lesions in the temporal macula that correlated with a reticular pattern on fundus autofluorescence and near-infrared reflectance imaging. Baseline spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging revealed subretinal deposits that resemble reticular pseudodrusen described in age-related macular degeneration. During follow-up, these affected areas developed confluent thickening of the retinal pigment epithelial layer and disruption of the ellipsoid zone of photoreceptors before progressing to overt retinal pigment epithelium and outer retinal atrophy. Structural changes in early stages of late-onset retinal degeneration, revealed by multimodal imaging, resemble those of reticular pseudodrusen observed in age-related macular degeneration and other retinal diseases. Longitudinal follow-up of these lesions helps elucidate their progression to frank atrophy and may lend insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying diverse retinal degenerations.

  20. Enhancing the efficacy of AREDS antioxidants in light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Paul; Markey, M; Rapp, C M; Darrow, R M; Ziesel, A; Organisciak, D T

    2017-01-01

    Light-induced photoreceptor cell degeneration and disease progression in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involve oxidative stress and visual cell loss, which can be prevented, or slowed, by antioxidants. Our goal was to test the protective efficacy of a traditional Age-related Eye Disease Study antioxidant formulation (AREDS) and AREDS combined with non-traditional antioxidants in a preclinical animal model of photooxidative retinal damage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in a low-intensity (20 lux) or high-intensity (200 lux) cyclic light environment for 6 weeks. Some animals received a daily dietary supplement consisting of a small cracker infused with an AREDS antioxidant mineral mixture, AREDS antioxidants minus zinc, or zinc oxide alone. Other rats received AREDS combined with a detergent extract of the common herb rosemary, AREDS plus carnosic acid, zinc oxide plus rosemary, or rosemary alone. Antioxidant efficacy was determined by measuring retinal DNA levels 2 weeks after 6 h of intense exposure to white light (9,000 lux). Western blotting was used to determine visual cell opsin and arrestin levels following intense light treatment. Rhodopsin regeneration was determined after 1 h of exposure to light. Gene array analysis was used to determine changes in the expression of retinal genes resulting from light rearing environment or from antioxidant supplementation. Chronic high-intensity cyclic light rearing resulted in lower levels of rod and cone opsins, retinal S-antigen (S-ag), and medium wavelength cone arrestin (mCAR) than found for rats maintained in low cyclic light. However, as determined by retinal DNA, and by residual opsin and arrestin levels, 2 weeks after acute photooxidative damage, visual cell loss was greater in rats reared in low cyclic light. Retinal damage decreased with AREDS plus rosemary, or with zinc oxide plus rosemary whereas AREDS alone and zinc oxide alone (at their daily recommended levels) were both ineffective. One

  1. An Unusual Case of Extensive Lattice Degeneration and Retinal Detachment

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, David J.; Sarma, Saurabh Kumar; Basaiawmoit, Jennifer V.

    2016-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is not infrequently encountered on a dilated retinal examination and many of them do not need any intervention. We report a case of atypical lattice degeneration variant with peripheral retinal detachment. An asymptomatic 35-year-old lady with minimal refractive error was found to have extensive lattice degeneration, peripheral retinal detachment and fibrotic changes peripherally with elevation of retinal vessels on dilated retinal examination. There were al...

  2. Apigenin-7-diglucuronide protects retinas against bright light-induced photoreceptor degeneration through the inhibition of retinal oxidative stress and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Minjuan; Zhang, Yong; Du, Xiaoye; Xu, Jing; Cui, Jingang; Gu, Jiangping; Zhu, Weiliang; Zhang, Teng; Chen, Yu

    2017-05-15

    Vision impairment in retinal degenerative diseases such as age-related macular degeneration is primarily associated with photoreceptor degeneration, in which oxidative stress and inflammatory responses are mechanistically involved as central players. Therapies with photoreceptor protective properties remain to be developed. Apigenin-7-diglucuronide (A7DG), a flavonoid glycoside, is present in an assortment of medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory or ant-oxidant activities. However, the pharmacological significance of A7DG remains unknown in vivo. The current study isolated A7DG from Glechoma longituba (Nakai) Kuprian and investigated the retinal protective effect A7DG in mice characterized by bright light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. The results showed that A7DG treatment led to remarkable photoreceptor protection in bright light-exposed BALB/c mice. Moreover, A7DG treatment alleviated photoreceptor apoptosis, mitigated oxidative stress, suppressed reactive gliosis and microglial activation and attenuated the expression of proinflammatory genes in bright light-exposed retinas. The results demonstrated for the first time remarkable photoreceptor protective activities of A7DG in vivo. Inhibition of bright light-induced retinal oxidative stress and retinal inflammatory responses was associated with the retinal protection conferred by A7DG. The work here warrants further evaluation of A7DG as a pharmacological candidate for the treatment of vision-threatening retinal degenerative disorders. Moreover, given the general implication of oxidative stress and inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration, A7DG could be further tested for the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcium channel blockers inhibit retinal degeneration in the retinal-degeneration-B mutant of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahly, I; Bar Nachum, S; Suss-Toby, E; Rom, A; Peretz, A; Kleiman, J; Byk, T; Selinger, Z; Minke, B

    1992-01-01

    Light accelerates degeneration of photoreceptor cells of the retinal degeneration B (rdgB) mutant of Drosophila. During early stages of degeneration, light stimuli evoke spikes from photoreceptors of the mutant fly; no spikes can be recorded from photoreceptors of the wild-type fly. Production of spike potentials from mutant photoreceptors was blocked by diltiazem, verapamil hydrochloride, and cadmium. Little, if any, effect of the (-)-cis isomer or (+)-cis isomer of diltiazem on the light response was seen. Further, the (+)-cis isomer was approximately 50 times more effective than the (-)-cis isomer in blocking the Ca2+ spikes, indicating that diltiazem action on the rdgB eye is mediated by means of blocking voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, rather than by blocking the light-sensitive channels. Application of the Ca(2+)-channel blockers (+)-cis-diltiazem and verapamil hydrochloride to the eyes of rdgB flies over a 7-day period largely inhibited light-dependent degeneration of the photoreceptor cells. Pulse labeling with [32P]phosphate showed much greater incorporation into eye proteins of [32P]phosphate in rdgB flies than in wild-type flies. Retarding the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in the mutant by Ca(2+)-channel blockers, thus, suggests that toxic increase in intracellular Ca2+ by means of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, possibly secondary to excessive phosphorylation, leads to photoreceptor degeneration in the rdgB mutant. Images PMID:1309615

  4. An Unusual Case of Extensive Lattice Degeneration and Retinal Detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, David J; Sarma, Saurabh Kumar; Basaiawmoit, Jennifer V

    2016-07-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is not infrequently encountered on a dilated retinal examination and many of them do not need any intervention. We report a case of atypical lattice degeneration variant with peripheral retinal detachment. An asymptomatic 35-year-old lady with minimal refractive error was found to have extensive lattice degeneration, peripheral retinal detachment and fibrotic changes peripherally with elevation of retinal vessels on dilated retinal examination. There were also areas of white without pressure, chorioretinal scarring and retinal breaks. All the changes were limited to beyond the equator but were found to span 360 degrees. She was treated with barrage laser all around to prevent extension of the retinal detachment posteriorly. She remained stable till her latest follow-up two years after the barrage laser. This case is reported for its rarity with a discussion of the probable differential diagnoses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in lattice degeneration.

  5. Progranulin, a major secreted protein of mouse adipose-derived stem cells, inhibits light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Yamauchi, Mika; Sugitani, Sou; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Ohno, Yuta; Nagahara, Yuki; Ikegame, Yuka; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Iwama, Toru; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction contains mesenchymal stem cells, which show protective effects when administered to damaged tissues, mainly through secreted trophic factors. We examined the protective effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and ASC-conditioned medium (ASC-CM) against retinal damage and identified the neuroprotective factors in ASC-CM. ASCs and mature adipocytes were isolated from mouse subcutaneous tissue. ASCs were injected intravitreally in a mouse model of light-induced retinal damage, and ASC injection recovered retinal function as measured by electroretinogram and inhibited outer nuclear layer, thinning, without engraftment of ASCs. ASC-CM and mature adipocyte-conditioned medium were collected after 72 hours of culture. In vitro, H2O2- and light-induced cell death was reduced in a photoreceptor cell line with ASC-CM but not with mature adipocyte-conditioned medium. In vivo, light-induced photoreceptor damage was evaluated by measurement of outer nuclear layer thickness at 5 days after light exposure and by electroretinogram recording. ASC-CM significantly inhibited photoreceptor degeneration and retinal dysfunction after light exposure. Progranulin was identified as a major secreted protein of ASCs that showed protective effects against retinal damage in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, progranulin phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element binding protein, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor, and protein kinase C signaling pathways were involved in the protective effects of progranulin. These findings suggest that ASC-CM and progranulin have neuroprotective effects in the light-induced retinal-damage model. Progranulin may be a potential target for the treatment of the degenerative diseases of the retina.

  6. PAR-Complex and Crumbs Function During Photoreceptor Morphogenesis and Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichaud, Franck

    2018-01-01

    The fly photoreceptor has long been used as a model to study sensory neuron morphogenesis and retinal degeneration. In particular, elucidating how these cells are built continues to help further our understanding of the mechanisms of polarized cell morphogenesis, intracellular trafficking and the causes of human retinal pathologies. The conserved PAR complex, which in flies consists of Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka, and the transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) are key players during photoreceptor morphogenesis. While the PAR complex regulates polarity in many cell types, Crb function in polarity is relatively specific to epithelial cells. Together Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka and Crb orchestrate the differentiation of the photoreceptor apical membrane (AM) and zonula adherens (ZA) , thus allowing these cells to assemble into a neuro-epithelial lattice. In addition to its function in epithelial polarity, Crb has also been shown to protect fly photoreceptors from light-induced degeneration, a process linked to Rhodopsin expression and trafficking. Remarkably, mutations in the human Crumbs1 (CRB1) gene lead to retinal degeneration, making the fly photoreceptor a powerful disease model system.

  7. [Clinical features and prognosis of retinal lattice degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X R

    1990-07-01

    110 cases (110 eyes) of retinal lattice degeneration were clinically observed and followed up for 3-8 years. Most lesions were located in the superotemporal quadrant, band-shaped, and parallel to the ora serrata. 80.9% of the lesions presented various degrees of pigmentation, 67.1% yellowish white spots, and 83.6% white lines. 32.9% of the eyes developed retinal holes. Most lattice degenerations were accompanied by vitreous degeneration and vitreoretinal traction. The disease progressed only slowly, though in a few cases it tended to expand.

  8. Effect of eye NGF administration on two animal models of retinal ganglion cells degeneration

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    Valeria Colafrancesco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF administration on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in experimentally induced glaucoma (GL and diabetic retinopathy (DR. GL was induced in adult rats by injection of hypertonic saline into the episcleral vein of the eye and diabetes (DT was induced by administration of streptozoticin. Control and experimental rats were treated daily with either ocular application of NGF or vehicle solution. We found that both animal models present a progressive degeneration of RGCs and changing NGF and VEGF levels in the retina and optic nerve. We then proved that NGF eye drop administration exerts a protective effect on these models of retinal degeneration. In brief, our findings indicate that NGF can play a protective role against RGC degeneration occurring in GL and DR and suggest that ocular NGF administration might be an effective pharmacological approach.

  9. The hormone prolactin is a novel, endogenous trophic factor able to regulate reactive glia and to limit retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edith; Thebault, Stéphanie; Baeza-Cruz, German; Arredondo Zamarripa, David; Adán, Norma; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Clapp, Carmen

    2014-01-29

    Retinal degeneration is characterized by the progressive destruction of retinal cells, causing the deterioration and eventual loss of vision. We explored whether the hormone prolactin provides trophic support to retinal cells, thus protecting the retina from degenerative pressure. Inducing hyperprolactinemia limited photoreceptor apoptosis, gliosis, and changes in neurotrophin expression, and it preserved the photoresponse in the phototoxicity model of retinal degeneration, in which continuous exposure of rats to bright light leads to retinal cell death and retinal dysfunction. In this model, the expression levels of prolactin receptors in the retina were upregulated. Moreover, retinas from prolactin receptor-deficient mice exhibited photoresponsive dysfunction and gliosis that correlated with decreased levels of retinal bFGF, GDNF, and BDNF. Collectively, these data unveiled prolactin as a retinal trophic factor that may regulate glial-neuronal cell interactions and is a potential therapeutic molecule against retinal degeneration.

  10. Prescreening whole exome sequencing results from patients with retinal degeneration for variants in genes associated with retinal degeneration

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    Bryant L

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura Bryant,1 Olga Lozynska,1 Albert M Maguire,1–3 Tomas S Aleman,1–3 Jean Bennett1–3 1Center for Advanced Retinal and Ocular Therapeutics (CAROT, FM Kirby Center for Molecular Ophthalmology, Scheie Eye Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Scheie Eye Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Background: Accurate clinical diagnosis and prognosis of retinal degeneration can be aided by the identification of the disease-causing genetic variant. It can confirm the clinical diagnosis as well as inform the clinician of the risk for potential involvement of other organs such as kidneys. It also aids in genetic counseling for affected individuals who want to have a child. Finally, knowledge of disease-causing variants informs laboratory investigators involved in translational research. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, identifying pathogenic mutations is becoming easier, especially the identification of novel pathogenic variants.Methods: We used whole exome sequencing on a cohort of 69 patients with various forms of retinal degeneration and in whom screens for previously identified disease-causing variants had been inconclusive. All potential pathogenic variants were verified by Sanger sequencing and, when possible, segregation analysis of immediate relatives. Potential variants were identified by using a semi-masked approach in which rare variants in candidate genes were identified without knowledge of the clinical diagnosis (beyond “retinal degeneration” or inheritance pattern. After the initial list of genes was prioritized, genetic diagnosis and inheritance pattern were taken into account.Results: We identified the likely pathogenic variants in 64% of the subjects. Seven percent had a single

  11. Light and inherited retinal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Paskowitz, D M; LaVail, M M; Duncan, J L

    2006-01-01

    Light deprivation has long been considered a potential treatment for patients with inherited retinal degenerative diseases, but no therapeutic benefit has been demonstrated to date. In the few clinical studies that have addressed this issue, the underlying mutations were unknown. Our rapidly expanding knowledge of the genes and mechanisms involved in retinal degeneration have made it possible to reconsider the potential value of light restriction in specific genetic contexts. This review summ...

  12. PAR-Complex and Crumbs Function During Photoreceptor Morphogenesis and Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Pichaud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The fly photoreceptor has long been used as a model to study sensory neuron morphogenesis and retinal degeneration. In particular, elucidating how these cells are built continues to help further our understanding of the mechanisms of polarized cell morphogenesis, intracellular trafficking and the causes of human retinal pathologies. The conserved PAR complex, which in flies consists of Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka, and the transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb are key players during photoreceptor morphogenesis. While the PAR complex regulates polarity in many cell types, Crb function in polarity is relatively specific to epithelial cells. Together Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka and Crb orchestrate the differentiation of the photoreceptor apical membrane (AM and zonula adherens (ZA, thus allowing these cells to assemble into a neuro-epithelial lattice. In addition to its function in epithelial polarity, Crb has also been shown to protect fly photoreceptors from light-induced degeneration, a process linked to Rhodopsin expression and trafficking. Remarkably, mutations in the human Crumbs1 (CRB1 gene lead to retinal degeneration, making the fly photoreceptor a powerful disease model system.

  13. The prognosis of retinal detachment due to lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, W E; Morse, P H

    1978-09-01

    In a series of 553 consecutive retinal detachments, 29% (120) were due to lattice degeneration. Forty-five percent of these were due to atrophic holes in the lattice degeneration and 55% were due to tears caused by traction posterior to or at the end of a patch of lattice. In phakic patients, retinal detachments due to atrophic holes were most common in young myopes. Detachments due to traction tears were seen in older, less myopic patients. The incidence of massive periretinal proliferation was less (5%) in detachments due to lattice degeneration than in detachments not due to lattice degeneration (6.5%).

  14. Therapeutic Approaches to Histone Reprogramming in Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Andre K; Kleinman, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Recent data have revealed epigenetic derangements and subsequent chromatin remodeling as a potent biologic switch for chronic inflammation and cell survival which are important therapeutic targets in the pathogenesis of several retinal degenerations. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a major component of this system and serve as a unique control of the chromatin remodeling process. With a multitude of targeted HDAC inhibitors now available, their use in both basic science and clinical studies has widened substantially. In the field of ocular biology, there are data to suggest that HDAC inhibition may suppress neovascularization and may be a possible treatment for retinitis pigmentosa and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the effects of these inhibitors on cell survival and chemokine expression in the chorioretinal tissues remain very unclear. Here, we review the multifaceted biology of HDAC activity and pharmacologic inhibition while offering further insight into the importance of this epigenetic pathway in retinal degenerations. Our laboratory investigations aim to open translational avenues to advance dry AMD therapeutics while exploring the role of acetylation on inflammatory gene expression in the aging and degenerating retina.

  15. Relationship between retinal lattice degeneration and open angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mansour

    2005-01-01

    Patients with retinal disorders may develop glaucoma of both a primary and secondary type. Pigment may contribute to trabecular obstruction in some patients with open-angle glaucoma. Lattice degeneration of the retina in its typical form is a sharply demarcated, circumferentially oriented, degenerative process with significant alterations of retinal pigmentation. The association between myopia, open angle glaucoma and pigment dispersion is striking. Therefore, it could be postulated that there is significant prevalence of open angle glaucoma in patients with retinal lattice degeneration, especially in combination with myopia.

  16. Water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation (Q-TER(®)) in the treatment of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, Angelo; Mora, Renzo; Dellepiane, Massimo; Manini, Giorgio; Santomauro, Valentina; Barettini, Luciano; Guastini, Luca

    2010-10-01

    These preliminary data are encouraging for a larger clinical trial to collect additional evidence on the effect of Q-TER(®) in preventing the development of hearing loss in subjects with presbycusis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and applicability of a water-soluble formulation of CoQ10 (Q-TER(®)) in subjects with presbycusis. A total of 60 patients with presbycusis were included and divided into three numerically equal groups. Group A underwent therapy with Q-TER(®), 160 mg, once a day for 30 days; group B underwent therapy with vitamin E (50 mg), once a day for 30 days; group C received placebo, once a day for 30 days. Before and at the end of the treatment, all patients underwent pure tone audiometry, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions, otoacoustic products of distortion, auditory brainstem response, and speech audiometry. Compared with group B, at the end of the treatment in group A the liminar tonal audiometry showed a significant improvement of the air and bone thresholds at the 1000 (14/20 vs 9/20), 2000 (14/20 vs 7/20), 4000 (15/20 vs 6/20), and 8000 Hz (13/20 vs 5/20). We found no significant differences in the other parameters and in group C.

  17. The surface morphology of retinal breaks and lattice retinal degeneration. A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M R; Streeten, B W

    1986-02-01

    In 14 of 110 eye bank eyes, lesions characteristic of peripheral retinal surface pathology were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These included operculated and flap tears, trophic round holes, lattice degeneration with holes, and paravascular retinal "pitting" degeneration. By SEM, the edges of the retinal breaks were covered by smooth cellular membranes, merging peripherally with a meshwork of vitreous fibrils. The membrane cells had poorly defined borders, a pitted surface, and variable numbers of microvilli consistent with glia. Lattice surfaces and foci of paravascular retinal degeneration were covered by similar membrane, but showed characteristic differences. It appears that breaks in the internal limiting membrane always stimulate proliferation of preretinal glial membranes. Similar cellular morphology of the membranes associated with breaks is consistent with a common cell of origin. Limited proliferation of these membranes suggests that surface gliosis is normally inhibited when the cells contact either intact basement membrane or vitreous.

  18. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in TULP1 Induced Retinal Degeneration.

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    Glenn P Lobo

    Full Text Available Inherited retinal disorders (IRDs result in severe visual impairments in children and adults. A challenge in the field of retinal degenerations is identifying mechanisms of photoreceptor cell death related to specific genetic mutations. Mutations in the gene TULP1 have been associated with two forms of IRDs, early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA. TULP1 is a cytoplasmic, membrane-associated protein shown to be involved in transportation of newly synthesized proteins destined for the outer segment compartment of photoreceptor cells; however, how mutant TULP1 causes cell death is not understood. In this study, we provide evidence that common missense mutations in TULP1 express as misfolded protein products that accumulate within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causing prolonged ER stress. In an effort to maintain protein homeostasis, photoreceptor cells then activate the unfolded protein response (UPR complex. Our results indicate that the two major apoptotic arms of the UPR pathway, PERK and IRE1, are activated. Additionally, we show that retinas expressing mutant TULP1 significantly upregulate the expression of CHOP, a UPR signaling protein promoting apoptosis, and undergo photoreceptor cell death. Our study demonstrates that the ER-UPR, a known mechanism of apoptosis secondary to an overwhelming accumulation of misfolded protein, is involved in photoreceptor degeneration caused by missense mutations in TULP1. These observations suggest that modulating the UPR pathways might be a strategy for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Suppressing thyroid hormone signaling preserves cone photoreceptors in mouse models of retinal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie; Redmond, T. Michael; Baehr, Wolfgang; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Photoreceptors degenerate in a wide array of hereditary retinal diseases and age-related macular degeneration. There is currently no treatment available for retinal degenerations. While outnumbered roughly 20:1 by rods in the human retina, it is the cones that mediate color vision and visual acuity, and their survival is critical for vision. In this communication, we investigate whether thyroid hormone (TH) signaling affects cone viability in retinal degeneration mouse models. TH signaling is...

  20. The Rate of Vitamin A Dimerization in Lipofuscinogenesis, Fundus Autofluorescence, Retinal Senescence and Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Ilyas; Saad, Leonide

    2016-01-01

    One of the earliest events preceding several forms of retinal degeneration is the formation and accumulation of vitamin A dimers in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and underlying Bruch's membrane (BM). Such degenerations include Stargardt disease, Best disease, forms of retinitis pigmentosa, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since their discovery in the 1990's, dimers of vitamin A, have been postulated as chemical triggers driving retinal senescence and degeneration. There is evidence to suggest that the rate at which vitamin A dimerizes and the eye's response to the dimerization products may dictate the retina's lifespan. Here, we present outstanding questions, finding the answers to which may help to elucidate the role of vitamin A dimerization in retinal degeneration.

  1. Progress of stem/progenitor cell-based therapy for retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhimin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yuyao; Zhang, Dandan; Shen, Bingqiao; Luo, Min; Gu, Ping

    2017-05-10

    Retinal degeneration (RD), such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa, is one of the leading causes of blindness. Presently, no satisfactory therapeutic options are available for these diseases principally because the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) do not regenerate, although wet AMD can be prevented from further progression by anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Nevertheless, stem/progenitor cell approaches exhibit enormous potential for RD treatment using strategies mainly aimed at the rescue and replacement of photoreceptors and RPE. The sources of stem/progenitor cells are classified into two broad categories in this review, which are (1) ocular-derived progenitor cells, such as retinal progenitor cells, and (2) non-ocular-derived stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells. Here, we discuss in detail the progress in the study of four predominant stem/progenitor cell types used in animal models of RD. A short overview of clinical trials involving the stem/progenitor cells is also presented. Currently, stem/progenitor cell therapies for RD still have some drawbacks such as inhibited proliferation and/or differentiation in vitro (with the exception of the RPE) and limited long-term survival and function of grafts in vivo. Despite these challenges, stem/progenitor cells represent the most promising strategy for RD treatment in the near future.

  2. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-C inhibits neuroretinal apoptosis in a murine model of focal retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujuan; Abu-Asab, Mones S; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Tang, Zhongshu; Shen, Defen; Tuo, Jingsheng; Li, Xuri; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2014-06-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-C is a member of the PDGF family and is critical for neuronal survival in the central nervous system. We studied the possible survival and antiapoptotic effects of PDGF-C on focal retinal lesions in Ccl2(-/-)/Cx3cr1(-/-) on C57BL/6N [Crb1(rd8)] (DKO rd8) background mice, a model for progressive and focal retinal degeneration. We found no difference in transcript and protein expression of PDGF-C in the retina between DKO rd8 mice and wild type (WT, C57BL/6N). Recombinant PDGF-CC protein (500 ng/eye) was injected intravitreally into the right eye of DKO rd8 mice with phosphate-buffered saline as controls into the left eye. The retinal effects of PDGF-C were assessed by fundoscopy, ocular histopathology, A2E levels, apoptotic molecule analysis, and direct flat mount retinal vascular labeling. We found that the PDGF-CC-treated eyes showed slower progression or attenuation of the focal retinal lesions, lesser photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial degeneration resulting in better-preserved photoreceptor structure. Lower expression of apoptotic molecules was detected in the PDGF-CC-treated eyes than in controls. In addition, no retinal neovascularization was observed after PDGF-CC treatment. Our results demonstrate that PDGF-C potently ameliorates photoreceptor degeneration via the suppression of apoptotic pathways without inducing retinal angiogenesis. The protective effects of PDGF-C suggest a novel alternative approach for potential age-related retinal degeneration treatment.

  3. Prolonged Prevention of Retinal Degeneration with Retinylamine Loaded Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Puntel, Anthony; Maeda, Akiko; Golczak, Marcin; Gao, Song-Qi; Yu, Guanping; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration impairs the vision of millions in all age groups worldwide. Increasing evidence suggests that the etiology of many retinal degenerative diseases is associated with impairment in biochemical reactions involved in the visual cycle, a metabolic pathway responsible for regeneration of the visual chromophore (11-cis-retinal). Inefficient clearance of toxic retinoid metabolites, especially all-trans-retinal, is considered responsible for photoreceptor cytotoxicity. Primary amin...

  4. Transgenic Mice Over-Expressing RBP4 Have RBP4-Dependent and Light-Independent Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mei; Phelps, Eric; Balangue, Michael J; Dockins, Aaron; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Shin, Younghwa; Kane, Shelley; Otalora, Laura; Ma, Jian-Xing; Farjo, Rafal; Farjo, Krysten M

    2017-08-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing serum retinol-binding protein (RBP4-Tg) develop progressive retinal degeneration, characterized by microglia activation, yet the precise mechanisms underlying retinal degeneration are unclear. Previous studies showed RBP4-Tg mice have normal ocular retinoid levels, suggesting that degeneration is independent of the retinoid visual cycle or light exposure. The present study addresses whether retinal degeneration is light-dependent and RBP4-dependent by testing the effects of dark-rearing and pharmacological lowering of serum RBP4 levels, respectively. RBP4-Tg mice reared on normal mouse chow in normal cyclic light conditions were directly compared to RBP4-Tg mice exposed to chow supplemented with the RBP4-lowering compound A1120 or dark-rearing conditions. Quantitative retinal histological analysis was conducted to assess retinal degeneration, and electroretinography (ERG) and optokinetic tracking (OKT) tests were performed to assess retinal and visual function. Ocular retinoids and bis-retinoid A2E were quantified. Dark-rearing RBP4-Tg mice effectively reduced ocular bis-retinoid A2E levels, but had no significant effect on retinal degeneration or dysfunction in RBP4-Tg mice, demonstrating that retinal degeneration is light-independent. A1120 treatment lowered serum RBP4 levels similar to wild-type mice, and prevented structural retinal degeneration. However, A1120 treatment did not prevent retinal dysfunction in RBP4-Tg mice. Moreover, RBP4-Tg mice on A1120 diet had significant worsening of OKT response and loss of cone photoreceptors compared to RBP4-Tg mice on normal chow. This may be related to the very significant reduction in retinyl ester levels in the retina of mice on A1120-supplemented diet. Retinal degeneration in RBP4-Tg mice is RBP4-dependent and light-independent.

  5. Nerve fiber layer (NFL) degeneration associated with acute q-switched laser exposure in the nonhuman primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Harry; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Lund, David J.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    1995-01-01

    We have evaluated acute laser retinal exposure in non-human primates using a Rodenstock scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) equipped with spectral imaging laser sources at 488, 514, 633, and 780 nm. Confocal spectral imaging at each laser wavelength allowed evaluation of the image plane from deep within the retinal vascular layer to the more superficial nerve fiber layer in the presence and absence of the short wavelength absorption of the macular pigment. SLO angiography included both fluorescein and indocyanine green procedures to assess the extent of damage to the sensory retina, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and the choroidal vasculature. All laser exposures in this experiment were from a Q-switched Neodymium laser source at an exposure level sufficient to produce vitreous hemorrhage. Confocal imaging of the nerve fiber layer revealed discrete optic nerve sector defects between the lesion site and the macula (retrograde degeneration) as well as between the lesion site and the optic disk (Wallerian degeneration). In multiple hemorrhagic exposures, lesions placed progressively distant from the macula or overlapping the macula formed bridging scars visible at deep retinal levels. Angiography revealed blood flow disturbance at the retina as well as at the choroidal vascular level. These data suggest that acute parafoveal laser retinal injury can involve both direct full thickness damage to the sensory and non-sensory retina and remote nerve fiber degeneration. Such injury has serious functional implications for both central and peripheral visual function.

  6. cGMP-Phosphodiesterase Inhibition Prevents Hypoxia-Induced Cell Death Activation in Porcine Retinal Explants.

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    Lorena Olivares-González

    Full Text Available Retinal hypoxia and oxidative stress are involved in several retinal degenerations including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, central retinal artery occlusion, or retinopathy of prematurity. The second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP has been reported to be protective for neuronal cells under several pathological conditions including ischemia/hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the accumulation of cGMP through the pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE with Zaprinast prevented retinal degeneration induced by mild hypoxia in cultures of porcine retina. Exposure to mild hypoxia (5% O2 for 24h reduced cGMP content and induced retinal degeneration by caspase dependent and independent (PARP activation mechanisms. Hypoxia also produced a redox imbalance reducing antioxidant response (superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and increasing superoxide free radical release. Zaprinast reduced mild hypoxia-induced cell death through inhibition of caspase-3 or PARP activation depending on the cell layer. PDE inhibition also ameliorated the effects of mild hypoxia on antioxidant response and the release of superoxide radical in the photoreceptor layer. The use of a PKG inhibitor, KT5823, suggested that cGMP-PKG pathway is involved in cell survival and antioxidant response. The inhibition of PDE, therefore, could be useful for reducing retinal degeneration under hypoxic/ischemic conditions.

  7. The Protective Role of PAC1-Receptor Agonist Maxadilan in BCCAO-Induced Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaczy, A; Reglodi, D; Somoskeoy, T; Kovacs, K; Lokos, E; Szabo, E; Tamas, A; Atlasz, T

    2016-10-01

    A number of studies have proven that pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is protective in neurodegenerative diseases. Permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) causes severe degeneration in the rat retina. In our previous studies, protective effects were observed with PACAP1-38, PACAP1-27, and VIP but not with their related peptides, glucagon, or secretin in BCCAO. All three PACAP receptors (PAC1, VPAC1, VPAC2) appear in the retina. Molecular and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the retinoprotective effects are most probably mainly mediated by the PAC1 receptor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the retinoprotective effects of a selective PAC1-receptor agonist maxadilan in BCCAO-induced retinopathy. Wistar rats were used in the experiment. After performing BCCAO, the right eye was treated with intravitreal maxadilan (0.1 or 1 μM), while the left eye was injected with vehicle. Sham-operated rats received the same treatment. Two weeks after the operation, retinas were processed for standard morphometric and molecular analysis. Intravitreal injection of 0.1 or 1 μM maxadilan caused significant protection in the thickness of most retinal layers and the number of cells in the GCL compared to the BCCAO-operated eyes. In addition, 1 μM maxadilan application was more effective than 0.1 μM maxadilan treatment in the ONL, INL, IPL, and the entire retina (OLM-ILM). Maxadilan treatment significantly decreased cytokine expression (CINC-1, IL-1α, and L-selectin) in ischemia. In summary, our histological and molecular analysis showed that maxadilan, a selective PAC1 receptor agonist, has a protective role in BCCAO-induced retinal degeneration, further supporting the role of PAC1 receptor conveying the retinoprotective effects of PACAP.

  8. Role of fractalkine/CX3CR1 interaction in light-induced photoreceptor degeneration through regulating retinal microglial activation and migration.

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    Meng Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive exposure to light enhances the progression and severity of some human retinal degenerative diseases. While retinal microglia are likely to be important in neuron damage associated with these diseases, the relationship between photoreceptor damage and microglial activation remains poorly understood. Some recent studies have indicated that the chemokine fractalkine is involved in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was performed to investigate the cross-talk between injured photoreceptors and activated retinal microglia, focusing on the role of fractalkine and its receptor CX3CR1 in light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both in vivo and in vitro experiments were involved in the research. In vivo, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to blue light for 24 hours. In vitro, the co-culture of primary retinal microglia and a photoreceptor cell line (661W cell was exposed to blue light for five hours. Some cultures were pretreated by the addition of anti-CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody or recombinant fractalkine. Expression of fractalkine/CX3CR1 and inflammatory cytokines was detected by immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, Western immunoblot analysis, and ELISA assay. TUNEL method was used to detect cell apoptosis. In addition, chemotaxis assay was performed to evaluate the impact of soluble fractalkine on microglial migration. Our results showed that the expression of fractalkine that was significantly upregulated after exposure to light, located mainly at the photoreceptors. The extent of photoreceptor degeneration and microglial migration paralleled the increased level of fractalkine/CX3CR1. Compared with the control, the expression of inflammatory cytokines was significantly downregulated in the anti-CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody-treated group, and the number of photoreceptors was also well preserved. The addition of recombinant full-length fractalkine or soluble

  9. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells

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    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC, even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75NTR, TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  10. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A; De Nicolò, Sara; Rosso, Pamela; De Vitis, Luigi A; Castoldi, Valerio; Leocani, Letizia; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F; Tirassa, Paola; Rama, Paolo; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-05

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC) degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC), even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75 NTR , TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac) by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75 NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75 NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  11. Automated imaging dark adaptometer for investigating hereditary retinal degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Dario F. G.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Regunath, Gopalakrishnan; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    1995-05-01

    We designed and built an automated imaging dark adaptometer (AIDA) to increase accuracy, reliability, versatility and speed of dark adaptation testing in patients with hereditary retinal degenerations. AIDA increases test accuracy by imaging the ocular fundus for precise positioning of bleaching and stimulus lights. It improves test reliability by permitting continuous monitoring of patient fixation. Software control of stimulus presentation provides broad testing versatility without sacrificing speed. AIDA promises to facilitate the measurement of dark adaptation in studies of the pathophysiology of retinal degenerations and in future treatment trials of these diseases.

  12. Superior cervical gangliectomy induces non-exudative age-related macular degeneration in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán H. Dieguez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, a prevalent cause of blindness, is a progressive and degenerative disease characterized by alterations in Bruch's membrane, retinal pigment epithelium, and photoreceptors exclusively localized in the macula. Although experimental murine models exist, the vast majority take a long time to develop retinal alterations and, in general, these alterations are ubiquitous, with many resulting from non-eye-specific genetic manipulations; additionally, most do not always reproduce the hallmarks of human age-related macular degeneration. Choroid vessels receive sympathetic innervation from the superior cervical ganglion, which, together with the parasympathetic system, regulates blood flow into the choroid. Choroid blood flow changes have been involved in age-related macular degeneration development and progression. At present, no experimental models take this factor into account. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of superior cervical gangliectomy (also known as ganglionectomy on the choroid, Bruch's membrane, retinal pigment epithelium and retina. Adult male C57BL/6J mice underwent unilateral superior cervical gangliectomy and a contralateral sham procedure. Although superior cervical gangliectomy induced ubiquitous choroid and choriocapillaris changes, it induced Bruch's membrane thickening, loss of retinal pigment epithelium melanin content and retinoid isomerohydrolase, the appearance of drusen-like deposits, and retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor atrophy, exclusively localized in the temporal side. Moreover, superior cervical gangliectomy provoked a localized increase in retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor apoptosis, and a decline in photoreceptor electroretinographic function. Therefore, superior cervical gangliectomy recapitulated the main features of human non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, and could become a new experimental model of dry age

  13. Human retinal gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis shows advancing retinal degeneration despite enduring visual improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Beltran, William A.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Swider, Malgorzata; Iwabe, Simone; Roman, Alejandro J.; Olivares, Melani B.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Komáromy, András M.; Hauswirth, William W.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2013-01-01

    The first retinal gene therapy in human blindness from RPE65 mutations has focused on safety and efficacy, as defined by improved vision. The disease component not studied, however, has been the fate of photoreceptors in this progressive retinal degeneration. We show that gene therapy improves vision for at least 3 y, but photoreceptor degeneration progresses unabated in humans. In the canine model, the same result occurs when treatment is at the disease stage equivalent to humans. The study ...

  14. Safranal, a saffron constituent, attenuates retinal degeneration in P23H rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fernández-Sánchez

    Full Text Available Saffron, an extract from Crocus sativus, has been largely used in traditional medicine for its antiapoptotic and anticarcinogenic properties. In this work, we investigate the effects of safranal, a component of saffron stigmas, in attenuating retinal degeneration in the P23H rat model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We demonstrate that administration of safranal to homozygous P23H line-3 rats preserves both photoreceptor morphology and number. Electroretinographic recordings showed higher a- and b-wave amplitudes under both photopic and scotopic conditions in safranal-treated versus non-treated animals. Furthermore, the capillary network in safranal-treated animals was preserved, unlike that found in untreated animals. Our findings indicate that dietary supplementation with safranal slows photoreceptor cell degeneration and ameliorates the loss of retinal function and vascular network disruption in P23H rats. This work also suggests that safranal could be potentially useful to retard retinal degeneration in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

  15. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  16. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  17. Stem cells in clinical trials for treatment of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Henry

    2016-01-01

    After decades of basic science research involving the testing of regenerative strategies in animal models of retinal degenerative diseases, a number of clinical trials are now underway, with additional trials set to begin shortly. These efforts will evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of cell-based products in the eyes of patients with a number of retinal conditions, notably including age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt's disease. This review considers the scientific work and early trials with fetal cells and tissues that set the stage for the current clinical investigatory work, as well the trials themselves, specifically those either now completed, underway or close to initiation. The cells of interest include retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from embryonic stem or induced pluripotent stem cells, undifferentiated neural or retinal progenitors or cells from the vascular/bone marrow compartment or umbilical cord tissue. Degenerative diseases of the retina represent a popular target for emerging cell-based therapeutics and initial data from early stage clinical trials suggest that short-term safety objectives can be met in at least some cases. The question of efficacy will require additional time and testing to be adequately resolved.

  18. Superior cervical gangliectomy induces non-exudative age-related macular degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Hernán H; Romeo, Horacio E; González Fleitas, María F; Aranda, Marcos L; Milne, Georgia A; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Dorfman, Damián

    2018-02-07

    Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, a prevalent cause of blindness, is a progressive and degenerative disease characterized by alterations in Bruch's membrane, retinal pigment epithelium, and photoreceptors exclusively localized in the macula. Although experimental murine models exist, the vast majority take a long time to develop retinal alterations and, in general, these alterations are ubiquitous, with many resulting from non-eye-specific genetic manipulations; additionally, most do not always reproduce the hallmarks of human age-related macular degeneration. Choroid vessels receive sympathetic innervation from the superior cervical ganglion, which, together with the parasympathetic system, regulates blood flow into the choroid. Choroid blood flow changes have been involved in age-related macular degeneration development and progression. At present, no experimental models take this factor into account. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of superior cervical gangliectomy (also known as ganglionectomy) on the choroid, Bruch's membrane, retinal pigment epithelium and retina. Adult male C57BL/6J mice underwent unilateral superior cervical gangliectomy and a contralateral sham procedure. Although superior cervical gangliectomy induced ubiquitous choroid and choriocapillaris changes, it induced Bruch's membrane thickening, loss of retinal pigment epithelium melanin content and retinoid isomerohydrolase, the appearance of drusen-like deposits, and retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor atrophy, exclusively localized in the temporal side. Moreover, superior cervical gangliectomy provoked a localized increase in retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor apoptosis, and a decline in photoreceptor electroretinographic function. Therefore, superior cervical gangliectomy recapitulated the main features of human non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, and could become a new experimental model of dry age-related macular degeneration, and

  19. PARP inhibitors protect against sex- and AAG-dependent alkylation-induced neural degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocca, Mariacarmela; Corrigan, Joshua J; Fake, Kimberly R; Calvo, Jennifer A; Samson, Leona D

    2017-09-15

    Alkylating agents are commonly used to treat cancer. Although base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway for repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, the initiation of BER produces toxic repair intermediates that damage healthy tissues. The initiation of BER by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG, a.k.a. MPG) can mediate alkylation-induced cytotoxicity in specific cells in the retina and cerebellum of male mice. Cytotoxicity in both wild-type and Aag -transgenic ( AagTg ) mice is abrogated in the absence of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1). Here, we tested whether PARP inhibitors can also prevent alkylation-induced retinal and cerebellar degeneration in male and female WT and AagTg mice. Importantly, we found that WT mice display sex-dependent alkylation-induced retinal damage (but not cerebellar damage), with WT males being more sensitive than females. Accordingly, estradiol treatment protects males against alkylation-induced retinal degeneration. In AagTg male and female mice, the alkylation-induced tissue damage in both the retina and cerebellum is exacerbated and the sex difference in the retina is abolished. PARP inhibitors, much like Parp1 gene deletion, protect against alkylation-induced AAG-dependent neuronal degeneration in WT and AagTg mice, regardless of the gender, but their efficacy in preventing alkylation-induced neuronal degeneration depends on PARP inhibitor characteristics and doses. The recent surge in the use of PARP inhibitors in combination with cancer chemotherapeutic alkylating agents might represent a powerful tool for obtaining increased therapeutic efficacy while avoiding the collateral effects of alkylating agents in healthy tissues.

  20. Iron in hereditary retinal degeneration: PIXE microanalysis Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, C.; Gouget, B.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.; Yefimova, M.; Courtois, Y.; Jeanny, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Several types of hereditary retinal degeneration with progressive alteration of photoreceptors exist in men and animals. Recent immunohistochemical results have shown strong degradation of transferrin, the protein responsible for iron transport, in retinas of rats with hereditary retinal degeneration. Freeze-dried thin sections of rat retinas from different stages of the disease, and respective coeval control sections, have been analyzed using nuclear microprobe. In this first part of the study, the rat retinas at post-natal stages of 35 and 45 days have been analyzed. The sample preparation and the post-irradiation staining to determine precisely the retinal layers involved are described. Preliminary results of element distributions (K, Ca, Fe) in the rat retina layers are discussed. A very high content of calcium in the choriocapillaris of dystrophic rat retinas was observed. Preliminary results on iron distribution in the rat retina layers are presented

  1. Quantitative genetic analysis of retinal degeneration in the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E O'Quin

    Full Text Available The retina is the light-sensitive tissue of the eye that facilitates vision. Mutations within genes affecting eye development and retinal function cause a host of degenerative visual diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa and anophthalmia/microphthalmia. The characin fish Astyanax mexicanus includes both eyed (surface fish and eyeless (cavefish morphs that initially develop eyes with normal retina; however, early in development, the eyes of cavefish degenerate. Since both surface and cave morphs are members of the same species, they serve as excellent evolutionary mutant models with which to identify genes causing retinal degeneration. In this study, we crossed the eyed and eyeless forms of A. mexicanus and quantified the thickness of individual retinal layers among 115 F(2 hybrid progeny. We used next generation sequencing (RAD-seq and microsatellite mapping to construct a dense genetic map of the Astyanax genome, scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting retinal thickness, and identify candidate genes within these QTL regions. The map we constructed for Astyanax includes nearly 700 markers assembled into 25 linkage groups. Based on our scans with this map, we identified four QTL, one each associated with the thickness of the ganglion, inner nuclear, outer plexiform, and outer nuclear layers of the retina. For all but one QTL, cavefish alleles resulted in a clear reduction in the thickness of the affected layer. Comparative mapping of genetic markers within each QTL revealed that each QTL corresponds to an approximately 35 Mb region of the zebrafish genome. Within each region, we identified several candidate genes associated with the function of each affected retinal layer. Our study is the first to examine Astyanax retinal degeneration in the context of QTL mapping. The regions we identify serve as a starting point for future studies on the genetics of retinal degeneration and eye disease using the evolutionary mutant model Astyanax.

  2. Three novel and the common Arg677Ter RP1 protein truncating mutations causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in a Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antiñolo Guillermo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of retinal degeneration disorders affecting the photoreceptor cells, is one of the leading causes of genetic blindness. Mutations in the photoreceptor-specific gene RP1 account for 3–10% of cases of autosomal dominant RP (adRP. Most of these mutations are clustered in a 500 bp region of exon 4 of RP1. Methods Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis and direct genomic sequencing were used to evaluate the 5' coding region of exon 4 of the RP1 gene for mutations in 150 unrelated index adRP patients. Ophthalmic and electrophysiological examination of RP patients and relatives according to pre-existing protocols were carried out. Results Three novel disease-causing mutations in RP1 were detected: Q686X, K705fsX712 and K722fsX737, predicting truncated proteins. One novel missense mutation, Thr752Met, was detected in one family but the mutation does not co-segregate in the family, thereby excluding this amino acid variation in the protein as a cause of the disease. We found the Arg677Ter mutation, previously reported in other populations, in two independent families, confirming that this mutation is also present in a Spanish population. Conclusion Most of the mutations reported in the RP1 gene associated with adRP are expected to encode mutant truncated proteins that are approximately one third or half of the size of wild type protein. Patients with mutations in RP1 showed mild RP with variability in phenotype severity. We also observed several cases of non-penetrant mutations.

  3. Beneficial effects of a Q-ter based nutritional mixture on functional performance, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinze Xu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are central mechanisms underlying the aging process and the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. Selected antioxidants and specific combinations of nutritional compounds could target many biochemical pathways that affect both oxidative stress and mitochondrial function and, thereby, preserve or enhance physical performance.In this study, we evaluated the potential anti-aging benefits of a Q-ter based nutritional mixture (commercially known as Eufortyn mainly containing the following compounds: terclatrated coenzyme Q(10 (Q-ter, creatine and a standardized ginseng extract. We found that Eufortyn supplementation significantly ameliorated the age-associated decreases in grip strength and gastrocnemius subsarcolemmal mitochondria Ca(2+ retention capacity when initiated in male Fischer344 x Brown Norway rats at 21 months, but not 29 months, of age. Moreover, the increases in muscle RNA oxidation and subsarcolemmal mitochondrial protein carbonyl levels, as well as the decline of total urine antioxidant power, which develop late in life, were mitigated by Eufortyn supplementation in rats at 29 months of age.These data imply that Eufortyn is efficacious in reducing oxidative damage, improving the age-related mitochondrial functional decline, and preserving physical performance when initiated in animals at early midlife (21 months. The efficacy varied, however, according to the age at which the supplementation was provided, as initiation in late middle age (29 months was incapable of restoring grip strength and mitochondrial function. Therefore, the Eufortyn supplementation may be particularly beneficial when initiated prior to major biological and functional declines that appear to occur with advancing age.

  4. Beneficial effects of a Q-ter based nutritional mixture on functional performance, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinze; Seo, Arnold Y; Vorobyeva, Darya A; Carter, Christy S; Anton, Stephen D; Lezza, Angela M S; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2010-05-11

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are central mechanisms underlying the aging process and the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. Selected antioxidants and specific combinations of nutritional compounds could target many biochemical pathways that affect both oxidative stress and mitochondrial function and, thereby, preserve or enhance physical performance. In this study, we evaluated the potential anti-aging benefits of a Q-ter based nutritional mixture (commercially known as Eufortyn) mainly containing the following compounds: terclatrated coenzyme Q(10) (Q-ter), creatine and a standardized ginseng extract. We found that Eufortyn supplementation significantly ameliorated the age-associated decreases in grip strength and gastrocnemius subsarcolemmal mitochondria Ca(2+) retention capacity when initiated in male Fischer344 x Brown Norway rats at 21 months, but not 29 months, of age. Moreover, the increases in muscle RNA oxidation and subsarcolemmal mitochondrial protein carbonyl levels, as well as the decline of total urine antioxidant power, which develop late in life, were mitigated by Eufortyn supplementation in rats at 29 months of age. These data imply that Eufortyn is efficacious in reducing oxidative damage, improving the age-related mitochondrial functional decline, and preserving physical performance when initiated in animals at early midlife (21 months). The efficacy varied, however, according to the age at which the supplementation was provided, as initiation in late middle age (29 months) was incapable of restoring grip strength and mitochondrial function. Therefore, the Eufortyn supplementation may be particularly beneficial when initiated prior to major biological and functional declines that appear to occur with advancing age.

  5. Development and degeneration of cone bipolar cells are independent of cone photoreceptors in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Chen

    Full Text Available Retinal photoreceptors die during retinal synaptogenesis in a portion of retinal degeneration. Whether cone bipolar cells establish regular retinal mosaics and mature morphologies, and resist degeneration are not completely understood. To explore these issues, we backcrossed a transgenic mouse expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP in one subset of cone bipolar cells (type 7 into rd1 mice, a classic mouse model of retinal degeneration, to examine the development and survival of cone bipolar cells in a background of retinal degeneration. Our data revealed that both the development and degeneration of cone bipolar cells are independent of the normal activity of cone photoreceptors. We found that type 7 cone bipolar cells achieved a uniform tiling of the retinal surface and developed normal dendritic and axonal arbors without the influence of cone photoreceptor innervation. On the other hand, degeneration of type 7 cone bipolar cells, contrary to our belief of central-to-peripheral progression, was spatially uniform across the retina independent of the spatiotemporal pattern of cone degeneration. The results have important implications for the design of more effective therapies to restore vision in retinal degeneration.

  6. Outcomes of macular hole surgery in patients treated intraoperatively for retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, John; Escariao, Paulo; Iranmanesh, Reza; Tosi, Gian Marco; Chang, Stanley

    2007-01-01

    To assess the outcome of macular hole surgery in patients treated intraoperatively for retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration. Retrospective review of patients who underwent macular hole surgery from September 1998 to August 2005. Outcomes in eyes that received intraoperative endolaser photocoagulation for retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration were compared to outcomes in a case-matched control group without retinal breaks or lattice degeneration. A total of 235 consecutive macular hole surgery cases were reviewed. Twenty-four eyes from 24 patients received intraoperative endolaser photocoagulation for retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration. Macular hole closure occurred in all case and control eyes without any incidence of postoperative retinal detachment. Best-corrected visual acuity improvement of at least three Snellen lines occurred in 100% of case eyes and 92% of control eyes. Outcomes of macular hole surgery in patients with retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration are similar to outcomes in the overall population when these conditions are treated with intraoperative endolaser photocoagulation. Postoperative retinal detachment does not appear to be correlated with treated retinal tears and greater attention should focus on detecting and managing intraoperative breaks. In our hands, routine use panoramic viewing has replaced indirect ophthalmoscopy, by saving time, and reducing the risk of contamination.

  7. Modeling retinal degeneration using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Bing Jin

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is the most common inherited human eye disease resulting in night blindness and visual defects. It is well known that the disease is caused by rod photoreceptor degeneration; however, it remains incurable, due to the unavailability of disease-specific human photoreceptor cells for use in mechanistic studies and drug screening. We obtained fibroblast cells from five RP patients with distinct mutations in the RP1, RP9, PRPH2 or RHO gene, and generated patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells by ectopic expression of four key reprogramming factors. We differentiated the iPS cells into rod photoreceptor cells, which had been lost in the patients, and found that they exhibited suitable immunocytochemical features and electrophysiological properties. Interestingly, the number of the patient-derived rod cells with distinct mutations decreased in vitro; cells derived from patients with a specific mutation expressed markers for oxidation or endoplasmic reticulum stress, and exhibited different responses to vitamin E than had been observed in clinical trials. Overall, patient-derived rod cells recapitulated the disease phenotype and expressed markers of cellular stresses. Our results demonstrate that the use of patient-derived iPS cells will help to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms caused by genetic mutations in RP.

  8. Targeting iodothyronine deiodinases locally in the retina is a therapeutic strategy for retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Ma, Hongwei; Belcher, Joshua; Butler, Michael R; Redmond, T Michael; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have implicated thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in cone photoreceptor viability. Using mouse models of retinal degeneration, we found that antithyroid treatment preserves cones. This work investigates the significance of targeting intracellular TH components locally in the retina. The cellular TH level is mainly regulated by deiodinase iodothyronine (DIO)-2 and -3. DIO2 converts thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3), which binds to the TH receptor, whereas DIO3 degrades T3 and T4. We examined cone survival after overexpression of DIO3 and inhibition of DIO2 and demonstrated the benefits of these manipulations. Subretinal delivery of AAV5-IRBP/GNAT2-DIO3, which directs expression of human DIO3 specifically in cones, increased cone density by 30-40% in a Rpe65 -/- mouse model of Lebers congenital amaurosis (LCA) and in a Cpfl1 mouse with Pde6c defect model of achromatopsia, compared with their respective untreated controls. Intravitreal and topical delivery of the DIO2 inhibitor iopanoic acid also significantly improved cone survival in the LCA model mice. Moreover, the expression levels of DIO2 and Slc16a2 were significantly higher in the diseased retinas, suggesting locally elevated TH signaling. We show that targeting DIOs protects cones, and intracellular inhibition of TH components locally in the retina may represent a novel strategy for retinal degeneration management.-Yang, F., Ma, H., Belcher, J., Butler, M. R., Redmond, T. M., Boye, S. L., Hauswirth, W. W., Ding, X.-Q. Targeting iodothyronine deiodinases locally in the retina is a therapeutic strategy for retinal degeneration. © FASEB.

  9. Prevalence and characteristics of peripheral retinal degeneration in Chinese adults with high myopia: a cross-sectional prevalence survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Dennis S C; Fan, Dorothy S P; Chan, Wai-Man; Tam, Barbara S M; Kwok, Alvin K H; Leung, Alfred T S; Parsons, Hugh

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the prevalence of peripheral retinal findings in adult Chinese patients with high myopia (refraction degeneration (51.2%), followed by lattice degeneration in 12.2% and retinal holes in 7.5% of eyes. A positive correlation was noted between axial length and the lesions of pigmentary degeneration and pavingstone degeneration. The prevalence of retinal holes was 6.4% and 30.0% in eyes with axial length of or = 30 mm, respectively (chi-squared test, p = 0.006). A high prevalence of peripheral retinal degenerations was found in adult Chinese high myopes. The presence of retinal holes was positively correlated with very high myopia of an axial length of > or = 30 mm.

  10. Expression of wild-type Rp1 protein in Rp1 knock-in mice rescues the retinal degeneration phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Liu

    Full Text Available Mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1 gene are a common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP, and have also been found to cause autosomal recessive RP (arRP in a few families. The 33 dominant mutations and 6 recessive RP1 mutations identified to date are all nonsense or frameshift mutations, and almost exclusively (38 out of 39 are located in the 4(th and final exon of RP1. To better understand the underlying disease mechanisms of and help develop therapeutic strategies for RP1 disease, we performed a series of human genetic and animal studies using gene targeted and transgenic mice. Here we report that a frameshift mutation in the 3(rd exon of RP1 (c.686delC; p.P229QfsX35 found in a patient with recessive RP1 disease causes RP in the homozygous state, whereas the heterozygous carriers are unaffected, confirming that haploinsufficiency is not the causative mechanism for RP1 disease. We then generated Rp1 knock-in mice with a nonsense Q662X mutation in exon 4, as well as Rp1 transgenic mice carrying a wild-type BAC Rp1 transgene. The Rp1-Q662X allele produces a truncated Rp1 protein, and homozygous Rp1-Q662X mice experience a progressive photoreceptor degeneration characterized disorganization of photoreceptor outer segments. This phenotype could be prevented by expression of a normal amount of Rp1 protein from the BAC transgene without removal of the mutant Rp1-Q662X protein. Over-expression of Rp1 protein in additional BAC Rp1 transgenic lines resulted in retinal degeneration. These findings suggest that the truncated Rp1-Q662X protein does not exert a toxic gain-of-function effect. These results also imply that in principle gene augmentation therapy could be beneficial for both recessive and dominant RP1 patients, but the levels of RP1 protein delivered for therapy will have to be carefully controlled.

  11. Progressive Retinal Degeneration and Accumulation of Autofluorescent Lipopigments in Progranulin Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafler, Brian P.; Klein, Zoe A.; Zhou, Z. Jimmy; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior investigations have shown that patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) develop neurodegeneration characterized by vision loss, motor dysfunction, seizures, and often early death. Neuropathological analysis of patients with NCL shows accumulation of intracellular autofluorescent storage material, lipopigment, throughout neurons in the central nervous system including in the retina. A recent study of a sibling pair with adult onset NCL and retinal degeneration showed linkage to the region of the progranulin (GRN) locus and a homozygous mutation was demonstrated in GRN. In particular, the sibling pair with a mutation in GRN developed retinal degeneration and optic atrophy. This locus for this form of adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis was designated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-11 (CLN11). Based on these clinical observations, we wished to determine whether Grn-null mice develop accumulation of autofluorescent particles and retinal degeneration. Retinas of both wild-type and Progranulin deficient mice were examined by immunostaining and autofluorescence. Accumulation of autofluorescent material was present in Progranulin deficient mice at 12 months. Degeneration of multiple classes of neurons including photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells was noted in mice at 12 and 18 months. Our data shows that Grn−/− mice develop degenerative pathology similar to features of human CLN11. PMID:25234724

  12. Molecular pharmacodynamics of emixustat in protection against retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianye; Kiser, Philip D; Badiee, Mohsen; Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Tochtrop, Gregory P; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    Emixustat is a visual cycle modulator that has entered clinical trials as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This molecule has been proposed to inhibit the visual cycle isomerase RPE65, thereby slowing regeneration of 11-cis-retinal and reducing production of retinaldehyde condensation byproducts that may be involved in AMD pathology. Previously, we reported that all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is directly cytotoxic and that certain primary amine compounds that transiently sequester atRAL via Schiff base formation ameliorate retinal degeneration. Here, we have shown that emixustat stereoselectively inhibits RPE65 by direct active site binding. However, we detected the presence of emixustat-atRAL Schiff base conjugates, indicating that emixustat also acts as a retinal scavenger, which may contribute to its therapeutic effects. Using agents that lack either RPE65 inhibitory activity or the capacity to sequester atRAL, we assessed the relative importance of these 2 modes of action in protection against retinal phototoxicity in mice. The atRAL sequestrant QEA-B-001-NH2 conferred protection against phototoxicity without inhibiting RPE65, whereas an emixustat derivative incapable of atRAL sequestration was minimally protective, despite direct inhibition of RPE65. These data indicate that atRAL sequestration is an essential mechanism underlying the protective effects of emixustat and related compounds against retinal phototoxicity. Moreover, atRAL sequestration should be considered in the design of next-generation visual cycle modulators.

  13. Retinal Structure Measurements as Inclusion Criteria for Stem Cell-Based Therapies of Retinal Degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Matsui, Rodrigo; Sumaroka, Alexander; Cideciyan, Artur V

    2016-04-01

    We reviewed and illustrated the most optimal retinal structural measurements to make in stem cell clinical trials. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and autofluorescence (AF) imaging were used to evaluate patients with severe visual loss from nonsyndromic and syndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP), ABCA4-Stargardt disease, and nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Outer nuclear layer (ONL), rod outer segment (ROS) layer, inner retina, ganglion cell layer (GCL), and nerve fiber layer (NFL) thicknesses were quantified. All patients had severely reduced visual acuities. Retinitis pigmentosa patients had limited visual fields; maculopathy patients had central scotomas with retained peripheral function. For the forms of RP illustrated, there was detectable albeit severely reduced ONL across the scanned retina, and normal or hyperthick GCL and NFL. Maculopathy patients had no measurable ONL centrally; it became detectable with eccentricity. Some maculopathy patients showed unexpected GCL losses. Autofluorescence imaging illustrated central losses of RPE integrity. A hypothetical scheme to relate patient data with different phases of retinal remodeling in animal models of retinal degeneration was presented. Stem cell science is advancing, but it is not too early to open the discussion of criteria for patient selection and monitoring. Available clinical tools, such as OCT and AF imaging, can provide inclusion/exclusion criteria and robust objective outcomes. Accepting that early trials may not lead to miraculous cures, we should be prepared to know why-scientifically and clinically-so we can improve subsequent trials. We also must determine if retinal remodeling is an impediment to efficacy.

  14. Edaravone Prevents Retinal Degeneration in Adult Mice Following Optic Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Goichi; Azuchi, Yuriko; Guo, Xiaoli; Noro, Takahiko; Kimura, Atsuko; Harada, Chikako; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Harada, Takayuki

    2017-09-01

    To assess the therapeutic potential of edaravone, a free radical scavenger that is used for the treatment of acute brain infarction and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in a mouse model of optic nerve injury (ONI). Two microliters of edaravone (7.2 mM) or vehicle were injected intraocularly 3 minutes after ONI. Optical coherence tomography, retrograde labeling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), histopathology, and immunohistochemical analyses of phosphorylated apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the retina were performed after ONI. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were assessed with a CellROX Green Reagent. Edaravone ameliorated ONI-induced ROS production, RGC death, and inner retinal degeneration. Also, activation of the ASK1-p38 MAPK pathway that induces RGC death following ONI was suppressed with edaravone treatment. The results of this study suggest that intraocular administration of edaravone may be a useful treatment for posttraumatic complications.

  15. Inhibition of thyroid hormone receptor locally in the retina is a therapeutic strategy for retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongwei; Yang, Fan; Butler, Michael R; Belcher, Joshua; Redmond, T Michael; Placzek, Andrew T; Scanlan, Thomas S; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2017-08-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. Recent studies have implicated TH signaling in cone photoreceptor viability. Using mouse models of retinal degeneration, we demonstrated that antithyroid drug treatment and targeting iodothyronine deiodinases (DIOs) to suppress cellular tri-iodothyronine (T3) production or increase T3 degradation preserves cones. In this work, we investigated the effectiveness of inhibition of the TH receptor (TR). Two genes, THRA and THRB , encode TRs; THRB 2 has been associated with cone viability. Using TR antagonists and Thrb2 deletion, we examined the effects of TR inhibition. Systemic and ocular treatment with the TR antagonists NH-3 and 1-850 increased cone density by 30-40% in the Rpe65 -/- mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis and reduced the number of TUNEL + cells. Cone survival was significantly improved in Rpe65 -/- and Cpfl1 (a model of achromatopsia with Pde6c defect) mice with Thrb2 deletion. Ventral cone density in Cpfl1/Thrb2 -/- and Rpe65 -/- / Thrb2 -/- mice was increased by 1- to 4-fold, compared with age-matched controls. Moreover, the expression levels of TR were significantly higher in the cone-degeneration retinas, suggesting locally elevated TR signaling. This work shows that the effects of antithyroid treatment or targeting DIOs were likely mediated by TRs and that suppressing TR protects cones. Our findings support the view that inhibition of TR locally in the retina is a therapeutic strategy for retinal degeneration management.-Ma, H., Yang, F., Butler, M. R., Belcher, J., Redmond, T. M., Placzek, A. T., Scanlan, T. S., Ding, X.-Q. Inhibition of thyroid hormone receptor locally in the retina is a therapeutic strategy for retinal degeneration. © FASEB.

  16. Spontaneous oscillatory rhythms in the degenerating mouse retina modulate retinal ganglion cell responses to electrical stimulation

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    Yong Sook eGoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice, where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs. Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties.

  17. An Unconventional Approach To Reducing Retinal Degeneration After Traumatic Ocular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    regulating drugs – currently not purposed to treat retinal damage – may serve to ameliorate retinal degeneration in mice who have experienced blast...to buy a set for for our experiments going forward). A parallel experiments of SNR experiments with red vs green dye (data not shown), moreover

  18. Hif1a inactivation rescues photoreceptor degeneration induced by a chronic hypoxia-like stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barben, Maya; Ail, Divya; Storti, Federica; Klee, Katrin; Schori, Christian; Samardzija, Marijana; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Meneau, Isabelle; Blaser, Frank; Barthelmes, Daniel; Grimm, Christian

    2018-04-17

    Reduced choroidal blood flow and tissue changes in the ageing human eye impair oxygen delivery to photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium. As a consequence, mild but chronic hypoxia may develop and disturb cell metabolism, function and ultimately survival, potentially contributing to retinal pathologies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we show that several hypoxia-inducible genes were expressed at higher levels in the aged human retina suggesting increased activity of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) during the physiological ageing process. To model chronically elevated HIF activity and investigate ensuing consequences for photoreceptors, we generated mice lacking von Hippel Lindau (VHL) protein in rods. This activated HIF transcription factors and led to a slowly progressing retinal degeneration in the ageing mouse retina. Importantly, this process depended mainly on HIF1 with only a minor contribution of HIF2. A gene therapy approach using AAV-mediated RNA interference through an anti-Hif1a shRNA significantly mitigated the degeneration suggesting a potential intervention strategy that may be applicable to human patients.

  19. Phakic retinal detachment associated with atrophic hole of lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Nagasako, F; Ohba, N

    1983-01-01

    Forty patients with phakic nontraumatic retinal detachment caused by atrophic retinal hole of lattice degeneration were reviewed. The condition was characterized by insidious, slowly developing shallow detachment, with frequent formation of demarcation lines. Often, the patients did not recognize their visual problems until the detachment had extended to the macular region. Young patients under 40 years of age were more common than older patients. Myopic refractive errors were frequently associated. The results of surgical repair were favorable. The risk of retinal detachment in lattice degeneration with atrophic holes was estimated to be about 1 in 90 patients, and prophylactic treatment for this common anomaly is not readily recommended.

  20. Screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Bin

    2009-02-01

    Transplant technologies have been studied for the recovery of vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In several rodent retinal degeneration models and in patients, retinal progenitor cells transplanted as layers to the subretinal space have been shown to restore or preserve vision. The methods for evaluation of transplants are expensive considering the large amount of animals. Alternatively, time-domain Stratus OCT was previously shown to be able to image the morphological structure of transplants to some extent, but could not clearly identify laminated transplants. The efficacy of screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT was studied on 37 S334ter line 3 rats with retinal degeneration 6-67 days after transplant surgery. The transplants were morphologically categorized as no transplant, detachment, rosettes, small laminated area and larger laminated area with both Fourier-domain OCT and histology. The efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants was evaluated by comparing the categorization results with OCT and histology. Additionally, 4 rats were randomly selected for multiple OCT examinations (1, 5, 9, 14 and 21days post surgery) in order to determine the earliest image time of OCT examination since the transplanted tissue may need some time to show its tendency of growing. Finally, we demonstrated the efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants in early stages and determined the earliest imaging time for OCT. Fourier-domain OCT makes itself valuable in saving resource spent on animals with unsuccessful transplants.

  1. Using Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Wild-Type Mice to Develop a Gene Augmentation-Based Strategy to Treat CLN3-Associated Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; Drack, Arlene V; Banach, Bailey B; Ochoa, Dalyz; Cranston, Cathryn M; Madumba, Robert A; East, Jade S; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-10-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) is a childhood neurodegenerative disease with early-onset, severe central vision loss. Affected children develop seizures and CNS degeneration accompanied by severe motor and cognitive deficits. There is no cure for JNCL, and patients usually die during the second or third decade of life. In this study, independent lines of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from two patients with molecularly confirmed mutations in CLN3, the gene mutated in JNCL. Clinical-grade adeno-associated adenovirus serotype 2 (AAV2) carrying the full-length coding sequence of human CLN3 was generated in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-registered cGMP facility. AAV2-CLN3 was efficacious in restoring full-length CLN3 transcript and protein in patient-specific fibroblasts and iPSC-derived retinal neurons. When injected into the subretinal space of wild-type mice, purified AAV2-CLN3 did not show any evidence of retinal toxicity. This study provides proof-of-principle for initiation of a clinical trial using AAV-mediated gene augmentation for the treatment of children with CLN3-associated retinal degeneration.

  2. Negative electroretinograms in pericentral pigmentary retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuki; Kondo, Mineo; Nakamura, Makoto; Hotta, Junko; Terasaki, Hiroko; Miyake, Yozo; Hida, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The clinical presentation and electrophysiological findings are described of three consecutive cases with pericentral pigmentary retinal degeneration. The responses to bright flashes after dark adaptation showed negative waveform shape in all cases. Rod responses were strongly reduced compared with cone responses. Cone electroretinograms elicited by long-duration stimuli showed greater loss of the on-response than the off-response. The ratio of the on-response amplitude to off-response amplitude of these patients (0.52 +/- 0.12; mean +/- SD, n = 6) was significantly smaller than that of normal subject (0.83 +/- 0.21; mean +/- SD, n = 8) (Mann-Whitney U-test, P retinal function, especially in transmission between photoreceptors and depolarizing bipolar cells.

  3. Evidence-based analysis of prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, C P

    2000-01-01

    To assess the quality of information in the literature regarding the benefits of prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic retinal tears and lattice degeneration. Asymptomatic retinal breaks occur in approximately 7% of patients over age 40, and lattice degeneration is present in approximately 8% of the general population. Because retinal breaks cause retinal detachment and lattice degeneration is associated with approximately 30% of retinal detachments, prophylactic treatment of these lesions has sometimes been recommended. A panel of vitreoretinal experts performed a literature review of all publications regarding prevention of retinal detachment that have been published in English. These articles were then used to prepare recommendations for patient care in an American Academy of Ophthalmology Preferred Practice Pattern (PPP). Each recommendation was rated according to: (1) its importance in the care process and (2) the strength of evidence supporting the given recommendation. Most recommendations were rated as A (most important to patient care). Only a single publication was graded as I (providing strong evidence in support of a recommendation), and this was not a prospective trial. Of the few publications rated as II (substantial evidence), most were studies documenting a lack of treatment benefit. Because of an absence of level I and level II studies in the literature, level III (consensus of expert opinion) was the basis for most recommendations in the PPP. The current literature regarding prevention of retinal detachment does not provide sufficient information to support strongly prophylactic treatment of lesions other than symptomatic flap tears. Prospective randomized trials of prophylactic therapy are indicated. Eyes highly predisposed to retinal detachment should be considered for such studies.

  4. Progression of transsynaptic retinal degeneration with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

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    Stephen G. Schwartz

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions and importance: Retrograde transsynaptic retinal degeneration may occur in patients with homonymous visual field loss caused by post-geniculate neurologic disease. This is best detected as homonymous thinning of the retina, corresponding to the pattern of visual field loss, using SD-OCT of the GCC and macula. The retinal changes occur at a variable time following the onset of neurologic disease.

  5. Transplantation of rat embryonic stem cell-derived retinal progenitor cells preserves the retinal structure and function in rat retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zepeng; Guan, Yuan; Cui, Lu; Song, Jian; Gu, Junjie; Zhao, Hanzhi; Xu, Lei; Lu, Lixia; Jin, Ying; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2015-11-09

    Degenerative retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading cause of blindness. Cell transplantation showed promising therapeutic effect for such diseases, and embryonic stem cell (ESC) is one of the sources of such donor cells. Here, we aimed to generate retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) from rat ESCs (rESCs) and to test their therapeutic effects in rat model. The rESCs (DA8-16) were cultured in N2B27 medium with 2i, and differentiated to two types of RPCs following the SFEBq method with modifications. For rESC-RPC1, the cells were switched to adherent culture at D10, while for rESC-RPC2, the suspension culture was maintained to D14. Both RPCs were harvested at D16. Primary RPCs were obtained from P1 SD rats, and some of them were labeled with EGFP by infection with lentivirus. To generate Rax::EGFP knock-in rESC lines, TALENs were engineered to facilitate homologous recombination in rESCs, which were cotransfected with the targeting vector and TALEN vectors. The differentiated cells were analyzed with live image, immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometric analysis, gene expression microarray, etc. RCS rats were used to mimic the degeneration of retina and test the therapeutic effects of subretinally transplanted donor cells. The structure and function of retina were examined. We established two protocols through which two types of rESC-derived RPCs were obtained and both contained committed retina lineage cells and some neural progenitor cells (NPCs). These rESC-derived RPCs survived in the host retinas of RCS rats and protected the retinal structure and function in early stage following the transplantation. However, the glia enriched rESC-RPC1 obtained through early and longer adherent culture only increased the b-wave amplitude at 4 weeks, while the longer suspension culture gave rise to evidently neuronal differentiation in rESC-RPC2 which significantly improved the visual function of RCS rats. We have successfully differentiated

  6. Local signaling from a retinal prosthetic in a rodent retinitis pigmentosa model in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach. PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main results. When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (⩽7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells. The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance. Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent processing within

  7. CERKL knockdown causes retinal degeneration in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Riera

    Full Text Available The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration.

  8. Moderate Light-Induced Degeneration of Rod Photoreceptors with Delayed Transducin Translocation in shaker1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Wang, Wei-Min; Delimont, Duane; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Usher syndrome is characterized by congenital deafness associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Mutations in the myosin VIIa gene (MYO7A) cause a common and severe subtype of Usher syndrome (USH1B). Shaker1 mice have mutant MYO7A. They are deaf and have vestibular dysfunction but do not develop photoreceptor degeneration. The goal of this study was to investigate abnormalities of photoreceptors in shaker1 mice. Methods. Immunocytochemistry and hydroethidine-based detection of intracellular superoxide production were used. Photoreceptor cell densities under various conditions of light/dark exposures were evaluated. Results. In shaker1 mice, the rod transducin translocation is delayed because of a shift of its light activation threshold to a higher level. Even moderate light exposure can induce oxidative damage and significant rod degeneration in shaker1 mice. Shaker1 mice reared under a moderate light/dark cycle develop severe retinal degeneration in less than 6 months. Conclusions. These findings show that, contrary to earlier studies, shaker1 mice possess a robust retinal phenotype that may link to defective rod protein translocation. Importantly, USH1B animal models are likely vulnerable to light-induced photoreceptor damage, even under moderate light. PMID:21447681

  9. Astrocytes and Müller Cell Alterations During Retinal Degeneration in a Transgenic Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Campello, Laura; Pinilla, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes, and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of P23H vs. SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina. PMID:26733810

  10. Astrocytes and Müller cells changes during retinal degeneration in a transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eFernández-Sánchez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer of P23H versus SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina.

  11. Epiretinal transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells rescues retinal and vision function in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzameret, Adi; Sher, Ifat; Belkin, Michael; Treves, Avraham J; Meir, Amilia; Nagler, Arnon; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hani; Rotenstreich, Ygal; Solomon, Arieh S

    2015-09-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with incurable retinal degeneration affect millions of people worldwide. In this study, 0.25×10(6) human bone marrow stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were transplanted epiretinally in the right eye of Royal College Surgeons (RCS) rats at the age of 28 days. Epiretinally transplanted cells were identified as a thin layer of cells along vitreous cavity, in close proximity to the retina or attached to the lens capsule, up to 6 weeks following transplantation. Epiretinal transplantation delayed photoreceptor degeneration and rescued retinal function up to 20 weeks following cell transplantation. Visual functions remained close to normal levels in epiretinal transplantation rats. No inflammation or any other adverse effects were observed in transplanted eyes. Our findings suggest that transplantation of hBM-MSCs as a thin epiretinal layer is effective for treatment of retinal degeneration in RCS rats, and that transplanting the cells in close proximity to the retina enhances hBM-MSC therapeutic effect compared with intravitreal injection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome in western Canada: 93 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, Marina L; Lucyshyn, Danica; Bauer, Bianca S; Grahn, Bruce H; Sandmeyer, Lynne S

    2017-11-01

    This study reviewed clinical data from dogs diagnosed with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) in western Canada. Medical records from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine from 2002 to 2016 showed that 93 cases of SARDS were diagnosed based on presentation for sudden blindness and a bilaterally extinguished electroretinogram. The most common pure breeds were the miniature schnauzer, dachshund, and pug. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.1 years and males and females were equally affected. Most of the dogs were presented with normal non-chromatic, but abnormal chromatic pupillary light reflexes. The incidence of retinal degeneration as detected via ophthalmoscopy increased over time after SARDS diagnosis. Polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, weight gain, elevated liver enzyme values, isosthenuria, and proteinuria were common clinical and laboratory findings. Chromatic pupillary light reflex testing may be more valuable than non-chromatic pupillary light testing in detecting pupil response abnormalities in dogs with SARDS, although electroretinography remains the definitive diagnostic test.

  13. Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome in western Canada: 93 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, Marina L.; Lucyshyn, Danica; Bauer, Bianca S.; Grahn, Bruce H.; Sandmeyer, Lynne S.

    2017-01-01

    This study reviewed clinical data from dogs diagnosed with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) in western Canada. Medical records from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine from 2002 to 2016 showed that 93 cases of SARDS were diagnosed based on presentation for sudden blindness and a bilaterally extinguished electroretinogram. The most common pure breeds were the miniature schnauzer, dachshund, and pug. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.1 years and males and females were equally affected. Most of the dogs were presented with normal non-chromatic, but abnormal chromatic pupillary light reflexes. The incidence of retinal degeneration as detected via ophthalmoscopy increased over time after SARDS diagnosis. Polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, weight gain, elevated liver enzyme values, isosthenuria, and proteinuria were common clinical and laboratory findings. Chromatic pupillary light reflex testing may be more valuable than non-chromatic pupillary light testing in detecting pupil response abnormalities in dogs with SARDS, although electroretinography remains the definitive diagnostic test. PMID:29089658

  14. Protective effect of sulforaphane against retinal degeneration in the Pde6rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kai; Yu, Minzhong

    2017-12-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited diseases characterized by the death of rod photoreceptors, followed by the death of cone photoreceptors, progressively leading to partial or complete blindness. Currently no specific treatment is available for RP patients. Sulforaphane (SFN) has been confirmed to be an effective antioxidant in the treatment of many diseases. In this study, we tested the therapeutic effects of SFN against photoreceptor degeneration in Pde6b rd10 mice. rd10 mice and C57/BL6 wild-type (WT) mice were treated with SFN and saline, respectively, from P6 to P20. Electroretinography (ERG), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and western blot were tested, respectively, at P21 for the analysis of retinal function, retinal cell apoptosis or death and the protein express of GRP78/BiP (TUNEL) as a marker of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Compared with the saline group, the SFN-treated group showed significantly higher ERG a-wave and b-wave amplitudes, less photoreceptor death, and the downregulation of GRP78/BiP. Our data showed that SFN ameliorated the retinal degeneration of rd10 mice, which is possibly related to the downregulation of GRP78 expression.

  15. Corneal and Retinal Neuronal Degeneration in Early Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Dehghani, Cirous; Pritchard, Nicola; Edwards, Katie; Russell, Anthony W; Malik, Rayaz A; Efron, Nathan

    2017-12-01

    To examine the neuronal structural integrity of cornea and retina as markers for neuronal degeneration in nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). Participants were recruited from the broader Brisbane community, Queensland, Australia. Two hundred forty-one participants (187 with diabetes and 54 nondiabetic controls) were examined. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was graded according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) scale. Corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL), corneal nerve branch density (CNBD), corneal nerve fiber tortuosity (CNFT), full retinal thickness, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), ganglion cell complex (GCC), focal (FLV) and global loss volumes (GLV), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), nephropathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular measures were examined. The central zone (P = 0.174), parafoveal thickness (P = 0.090), perifovea (P = 0.592), RNFL (P = 0.866), GCC (P = 0.798), and GCC GLV (P = 0.338) did not differ significantly between the groups. In comparison to the control group, those with very mild NPDR and those with mild NPDR had significantly higher focal loss in GCC volume (P = 0.036). CNFL was significantly lower in those with mild NPDR (P = 0.004) in comparison to the control group and those with no DR. The CNBD (P = 0.094) and CNFT (P = 0.458) did not differ between the groups. Both corneal and retinal neuronal degeneration may occur in early stages of diabetic retinopathy. Further studies are required to examine these potential markers for neuronal degeneration in the absence of clinical signs of DR.

  16. Curcumin Delays Retinal Degeneration by Regulating Microglia Activation in the Retina of rd1 Mice

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    Yanhe Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is characterized by degeneration of photoreceptors, and there are currently no effective treatments for this disease. However, curcumin has shown neuroprotectant efficacy in a RP rat and swine model, and thus, may have neuroprotective effects in this disease. Methods: Immunofluorescence staining, electroretinogram recordings, and behavioral tests were used to analyze the effects of curcumin and the underlying mechanism in retinal degeneration 1 (rd1 mice. Results: The number of apoptotic cells in the retina of rd1 mice at postnatal day 14 significantly decreased with curcumin treatment and visual function was improved. The activation of microglia and secretion of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases in the retina were inhibited by curcumin. These effects were also observed in a co-culture of BV2 microglial cells and retina-derived 661W cells. Conclusions: Curcumin delayed retinal degeneration by suppressing microglia activation in the retina of rd1 mice. Thus, it may be an effective treatment for neurodegenerative disorders such as RP.

  17. Alterations of sodium and potassium channels of RGCs in RCS rat with the development of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongshan; Song, Yanping; Yao, Junping; Weng, Chuanhuang; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2013-11-01

    All know that retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of hereditary retinal degenerative diseases characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptors and associated with progressive cells loss; nevertheless, little is known about how rods and cones loss affects the surviving inner retinal neurons and networks. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) process and convey visual information from retina to visual centers in the brain. The healthy various ion channels determine the normal reception and projection of visual signals from RGCs. Previous work on the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat, as a kind of classical RP animal model, indicated that, at late stages of retinal degeneration in RCS rat, RGCs were also morphologically and functionally affected. Here, retrograde labeling for RGCs with Fluorogold was performed to investigate the distribution, density, and morphological changes of RGCs during retinal degeneration. Then, patch clamp recording, western blot, and immunofluorescence staining were performed to study the channels of sodium and potassium properties of RGCs, so as to explore the molecular and proteinic basis for understanding the alterations of RGCs membrane properties and firing functions. We found that the resting membrane potential, input resistance, and capacitance of RGCs changed significantly at the late stage of retinal degeneration. Action potential could not be evoked in a part of RGCs. Inward sodium current and outward potassium current recording showed that sodium current was impaired severely but only slightly in potassium current. Expressions of sodium channel protein were impaired dramatically at the late stage of retinal degeneration. The results suggested that the density of RGCs decreased, process ramification impaired, and sodium ion channel proteins destructed, which led to the impairment of electrophysiological functions of RGCs and eventually resulted in the loss of visual function.

  18. All-optical recording and stimulation of retinal neurons in vivo in retinal degeneration mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazzeri, Jennifer M.; Williams, David R.; Merigan, William H.

    2018-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the application of a method that could accelerate the development of novel therapies by allowing direct and repeatable visualization of cellular function in the living eye, to study loss of vision in animal models of retinal disease, as well as evaluate the time course of retinal function following therapeutic intervention. We use high-resolution adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy to image fluorescence from the calcium sensor GCaMP6s. In mice with photoreceptor degeneration (rd10), we measured restored visual responses in ganglion cell layer neurons expressing the red-shifted channelrhodopsin ChrimsonR over a six-week period following significant loss of visual responses. Combining a fluorescent calcium sensor, a channelrhodopsin, and adaptive optics enables all-optical stimulation and recording of retinal neurons in the living eye. Because the retina is an accessible portal to the central nervous system, our method also provides a novel non-invasive method of dissecting neuronal processing in the brain. PMID:29596518

  19. Macular Pigment and Lutein Supplementation in ABCA4-associated Retinal Degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Windsor, Elizabeth A. M.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Swider, Malgorzata; Chico, John D.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Pantelyat, Alexander Y.; Duncan, Keith G.; Gardner, Leigh M.; Emmons, Jessica M.; Steinberg, Janet D.; Stone, Edwin M.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine macular pigment (MP) optical density (OD) in patients with ABCA4-associated retinal degenerations (ABCA4-RD) and the response of MP and vision to supplementation with lutein. METHODS Stargardt disease or cone-rod dystrophy patients with foveal fixation and with known or suspected disease-causing mutations in the ABCA4 gene were included. MPOD profiles were measured with heterochromatic flicker photometry. Serum carotenoids, visual acuity, foveal sensitivity and retinal thickness were quantified. Changes in MPOD and central vision were determined in a subset of patients receiving oral supplementation with lutein for 6 months. RESULTS MPOD in patients ranged from normal to markedly abnormal. As a group, ABCA4-RD patients had reduced foveal MPOD and there was strong correlation with retinal thickness. Average foveal tissue concentration of MP, estimated by dividing MPOD by retinal thickness, was normal in patients whereas serum concentration of lutein and zeaxanthin was significantly lower than normal. After oral lutein supplementation for 6 months, 91% of the patients showed significant increases in serum lutein and 63% of the patient eyes showed a significant augmentation in MPOD. The retinal responders tended to be female, and have lower serum lutein and zeaxanthin, lower MPOD and greater retinal thickness at baseline. Responding eyes had significantly lower baseline MP concentration compared to non-responding eyes. Central vision was unchanged after the period of supplementation. CONCLUSIONS MP is strongly affected by the stage of ABCA4 disease leading to abnormal foveal architecture. MP could be augmented by supplemental lutein in some patients. There was no change in central vision after 6 months of lutein supplementation. Long-term influences on the natural history of this supplement on macular degenerations require further study. PMID:17325179

  20. Activation of muscarinic receptors protects against retinal neurons damage and optic nerve degeneration in vitro and in vivo models.

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    Tan, Pan-Pan; Yuan, Hai-Hong; Zhu, Xu; Cui, Yong-Yao; Li, Hui; Feng, Xue-Mei; Qiu, Yu; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhou, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist pilocarpine reduces intraocular pressure (IOP) of glaucoma mainly by stimulating ciliary muscle contraction and then increasing aqueous outflow. It is of our great interest to know whether pilocarpine has the additional properties of retinal neuroprotection independent of IOP lowering in vitro and in vivo models. In rat primary retinal cultures, cell viability was measured using an MTT assay and the trypan blue exclusion method, respectively. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified by immunofluorescence and quantified by flow cytometry. For the in vivo study, the retinal damage after retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats was evaluated by histopathological study using hematoxylin and eosin staining, transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical study on cleaved caspase-3, caspase-3, and ChAT. Pretreatment of pilocarpine attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity of primary retinal neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Protection of pilocarpine in both retinal neurons and RGCs was largely abolished by the nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and the M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine. After ischemia/reperfusion injury in retina, the inner retinal degeneration occurred including ganglion cell layer thinning and neuron lost, and the optic nerve underwent vacuolar changes. These degenerative changes were significantly lessened by topical application of 2% pilocarpine. In addition, the protective effect of pilocarpine on the ischemic rat retina was favorably reflected by downregulating the expression of activated apoptosis marker cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-3 and upregulating the expression of cholinergic cell marker ChAT. Taken together, this highlights pilocarpine through the activation of muscarinic receptors appear to afford significant protection against retinal neurons damage and optic nerve degeneration at clinically relevant concentrations. These data also

  1. A CTRP5 gene S163R mutation knock-in mouse model for late-onset retinal degeneration.

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    Chavali, Venkata R M; Khan, Naheed W; Cukras, Catherine A; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-05-15

    Late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORD) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by a single missense mutation (S163R) in the CTRP5/C1QTNF5 protein. Early phenotypic features of L-ORD include: dark adaptation abnormalities, nyctalopia, and drusen deposits in the peripheral macular region. Apart from posterior segment abnormalities, these patients also develop abnormally long anterior lens zonules. In the sixth decade of life the rod and cone function declines, accompanied by electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Some patients also develop choroidal neovascularization and glaucoma. In order to understand the disease pathology and mechanisms involved in retinal dystrophy, we generated a knock-in (Ctrp5(+/-)) mouse model carrying the disease-associated mutation in the mouse Ctrp5/C1QTNF5 gene. These mice develop slower rod-b wave recovery consistent with early dark adaptation abnormalities, accumulation of hyperautofluorescence spots, retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities, drusen, Bruch's membrane abnormalities, loss of photoreceptors, and retinal vascular leakage. The Ctrp5(+/-) mice, which have most of the pathological features of age-related macular degeneration, are unique and may serve as a valuable model both to understand the molecular pathology of late-onset retinal degeneration and to evaluate therapies.

  2. Round atrophic holes in lattice degeneration--an important cause of phakic retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, W V; Lucier, A C

    1976-01-01

    Round atrophic holes in lattice degeneration are an important cause of phakic retinal detachment. Detachments due solely to round holes in lattice accounted for almost 2.8% of all retinal detachments treated at Wills Eye Hospital from January 1970 to August 1973. These detachments had the following important characteristics: 1. One of the patients were under the age of 30 years. 2. Over 75% of the patients had refractive errors more myopic than -3 D spherical equivalent. 3. Inferior detachments were slightly more common than superior detachments. When located inferiorly, there was a tendency for slow progression as indicated by the frequent presence of pigmented demarcation lines. 4. Surgical repair with standard scleral buckling techniques was successful in 98% of these detachments. Young, moderate to highly myopic patients with round holes in areas of lattice degeneration seem to have a greater risk of developing this type of detachment. Patients with the triad of youth, myopia, and round holes in lattice degeneration deserve close observation.

  3. Clinical Characteristics and Current Therapies for Inherited Retinal Degenerations

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    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) encompass a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect approximately 1 in 3000 people (>2 million people worldwide) (Bessant DA, Ali RR, Bhattacharya SS. 2001. Molecular genetics and prospects for therapy of the inherited retinal dystrophies. Curr Opin Genet Dev 11: 307–316.). IRDs may be inherited as Mendelian traits or through mitochondrial DNA, and may affect the entire retina (e.g., rod–cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa, cone dystrophy, cone–rod dystrophy, choroideremia, Usher syndrome, and Bardet-Bidel syndrome) or be restricted to the macula (e.g., Stargardt disease, Best disease, and Sorsby fundus dystrophy), ultimately leading to blindness. IRDs are a major cause of severe vision loss, with profound impact on patients and society. Although IRDs remain untreatable today, significant progress toward therapeutic strategies for IRDs has marked the past two decades. This progress has been based on better understanding of the pathophysiological pathways of these diseases and on technological advances. PMID:25324231

  4. Curcumin Delays Retinal Degeneration by Regulating Microglia Activation in the Retina of rd1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhe; Yin, Zhiyuan; Gao, Lixiong; Sun, Dayu; Hu, Xisu; Xue, Langyue; Dai, Jiaman; Zeng, YuXiao; Chen, Siyu; Pan, Boju; Chen, Min; Xie, Jing; Xu, Haiwei

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is characterized by degeneration of photoreceptors, and there are currently no effective treatments for this disease. However, curcumin has shown neuroprotectant efficacy in a RP rat and swine model, and thus, may have neuroprotective effects in this disease. Immunofluorescence staining, electroretinogram recordings, and behavioral tests were used to analyze the effects of curcumin and the underlying mechanism in retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) mice. The number of apoptotic cells in the retina of rd1 mice at postnatal day 14 significantly decreased with curcumin treatment and visual function was improved. The activation of microglia and secretion of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases in the retina were inhibited by curcumin. These effects were also observed in a co-culture of BV2 microglial cells and retina-derived 661W cells. Curcumin delayed retinal degeneration by suppressing microglia activation in the retina of rd1 mice. Thus, it may be an effective treatment for neurodegenerative disorders such as RP. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Sirtuin1 Over-Expression Does Not Impact Retinal Vascular and Neuronal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michan, Shaday; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Cui, Zhenghao; Evans, Lucy P.; Hatton, Colman J.; Pei, Dorothy T.; Ju, Meihua; Sinclair, David A.; Smith, Lois E. H.; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness, including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children and diabetic retinopathy in adults. Retinopathy is characterized by an initial phase of vessel loss, leading to tissue ischemia and hypoxia, followed by sight threatening pathologic neovascularization in the second phase. Previously we found that Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a metabolically dependent protein deacetylase, regulates vascular regeneration in a mouse model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy (OIR), as neuronal depletion of Sirt1 in retina worsens retinopathy. In this study we assessed whether over-expression of Sirtuin1 in retinal neurons and vessels achieved by crossing Sirt1 over-expressing flox mice with Nestin-Cre mice or Tie2-Cre mice, respectively, may protect against retinopathy. We found that over-expression of Sirt1 in Nestin expressing retinal neurons does not impact vaso-obliteration or pathologic neovascularization in OIR, nor does it influence neuronal degeneration in OIR. Similarly, increased expression of Sirt1 in Tie2 expressing vascular endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages does not protect retinal vessels in OIR. In addition to the genetic approaches, dietary supplement with Sirt1 activators, resveratrol or SRT1720, were fed to wild type mice with OIR. Neither treatment showed significant vaso-protective effects in retinopathy. Together these results indicate that although endogenous Sirt1 is important as a stress-induced protector in retinopathy, over-expression of Sirt1 or treatment with small molecule activators at the examined doses do not provide additional protection against retinopathy in mice. Further studies are needed to examine in depth whether increasing levels of Sirt1 may serve as a potential therapeutic approach to treat or prevent retinopathy. PMID:24416337

  6. Sirtuin1 over-expression does not impact retinal vascular and neuronal degeneration in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michan, Shaday; Juan, Aimee M; Hurst, Christian G; Cui, Zhenghao; Evans, Lucy P; Hatton, Colman J; Pei, Dorothy T; Ju, Meihua; Sinclair, David A; Smith, Lois E H; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness, including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children and diabetic retinopathy in adults. Retinopathy is characterized by an initial phase of vessel loss, leading to tissue ischemia and hypoxia, followed by sight threatening pathologic neovascularization in the second phase. Previously we found that Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a metabolically dependent protein deacetylase, regulates vascular regeneration in a mouse model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy (OIR), as neuronal depletion of Sirt1 in retina worsens retinopathy. In this study we assessed whether over-expression of Sirtuin1 in retinal neurons and vessels achieved by crossing Sirt1 over-expressing flox mice with Nestin-Cre mice or Tie2-Cre mice, respectively, may protect against retinopathy. We found that over-expression of Sirt1 in Nestin expressing retinal neurons does not impact vaso-obliteration or pathologic neovascularization in OIR, nor does it influence neuronal degeneration in OIR. Similarly, increased expression of Sirt1 in Tie2 expressing vascular endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages does not protect retinal vessels in OIR. In addition to the genetic approaches, dietary supplement with Sirt1 activators, resveratrol or SRT1720, were fed to wild type mice with OIR. Neither treatment showed significant vaso-protective effects in retinopathy. Together these results indicate that although endogenous Sirt1 is important as a stress-induced protector in retinopathy, over-expression of Sirt1 or treatment with small molecule activators at the examined doses do not provide additional protection against retinopathy in mice. Further studies are needed to examine in depth whether increasing levels of Sirt1 may serve as a potential therapeutic approach to treat or prevent retinopathy.

  7. Early Events in Retinal Degeneration Caused by Rhodopsin Mutation or Pigment Epithelium Malfunction: Differences and Similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierdomenico, Johnny; García-Ayuso, Diego; Pinilla, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolás; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Villegas-Pérez, María P.

    2017-01-01

    To study the course of photoreceptor cell death and macro and microglial reactivity in two rat models of retinal degeneration with different etiologies. Retinas from P23H-1 (rhodopsin mutation) and Royal College of Surgeon (RCS, pigment epithelium malfunction) rats and age-matched control animals (Sprague-Dawley and Pievald Viro Glaxo, respectively) were cross-sectioned at different postnatal ages (from P10 to P60) and rhodopsin, L/M- and S-opsin, ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1), glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins were immunodetected. Photoreceptor nuclei rows and microglial cells in the different retinal layers were quantified. Photoreceptor degeneration starts earlier and progresses quicker in P23H-1 than in RCS rats. In both models, microglial cell activation occurs simultaneously with the initiation of photoreceptor death while GFAP over-expression starts later. As degeneration progresses, the numbers of microglial cells increase in the retina, but decreasing in the inner retina and increasing in the outer retina, more markedly in RCS rats. Interestingly, and in contrast with healthy animals, microglial cells reach the outer nuclei and outer segment layers. The higher number of microglial cells in dystrophic retinas cannot be fully accounted by intraretinal migration and PCNA immunodetection revealed microglial proliferation in both models but more importantly in RCS rats. The etiology of retinal degeneration determines the initiation and pattern of photoreceptor cell death and simultaneously there is microglial activation and migration, while the macroglial response is delayed. The actions of microglial cells in the degeneration cannot be explained only in the basis of photoreceptor death because they participate more actively in the RCS model. Thus, the retinal degeneration caused by pigment epithelium malfunction is more inflammatory and would probably respond better to interventions

  8. Cell Fate of Müller Cells During Photoreceptor Regeneration in an N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea-Induced Retinal Degeneration Model of Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogai, Kazuhiro; Hisano, Suguru; Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Kato, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish can regenerate several organs such as the tail fin, heart, central nervous system, and photoreceptors. Very recently, a study has demonstrated the photoreceptor regeneration in the alkylating agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced retinal degeneration (RD) zebrafish model, in which whole photoreceptors are lost within a week after MNU treatment and then regenerated within a month. The research has also shown massive proliferation of Müller cells within a week. To address the question of whether proliferating Müller cells are the source of regenerating photoreceptors, which remains unknown in the MNU-induced zebrafish RD model, we employed a BrdU pulse-chase technique to label the proliferating cells within a week after MNU treatment. As a result of the BrdU pulse-chase technique, a number of BrdU(+) cells were observed in the outer nuclear layer as well as the inner nuclear layer. This implies that regenerating photoreceptors are derived from proliferating Müller cells in the zebrafish MNU-induced RD model.

  9. Integrating Topographic Measures to Explore the Protective Effects of Peonidin Against the N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration

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    Ye Tao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The pathphysiological properties of N-Methyl -N -nitrosourea (MNU induced photoreceptor degeneration are similar to the hereditary retinitis pigmentosa (RP. The present study sought to explore the beneficial effects of the peonidin, a common aglycone form of anthocyanin, on the MNU induced photoreceptor degeneration via topographic measurements. Methods: The MNU administrated mouse received peonidin or vehicle injections, and then they were examined by electroretinography (ERG, multi electrode array (MEA, histological and immunohistochemistry studies. Results: The protective effects of peonidin on the MNU administrated retinas were systematically verified and quantified by topographic measures. The peonidin treatment could protect the photoreceptor against the MNU toxicity both functionally and morphologicaly. The most sensitive zone to peonidin therapy was sorted out, indicating that different rescuing kinetics existed between the retinal hemispheres and retinal quadrants. Moreover, the hyperactive spontaneous firing response and the debilitated light induced response in MNU administrated retinas could be partially reversed by peonidin treatment. To our knowledge, this was the first study to explore the pharmacological effects of peonidin on the electrophysiological properties of inner visual signal pathways. Conclusion: The peonidin could ameliorate the MNU induced photoreceptors degeneration and rectify the abnormities in the inner visual signal pathways. Future refinements of the knowledge cast insights into the discovery of a novel treatment for human RP.

  10. Valproic acid prevents retinal degeneration in a murine model of normal tension glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsuko; Guo, Xiaoli; Noro, Takahiko; Harada, Chikako; Tanaka, Kohichi; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Harada, Takayuki

    2015-02-19

    Valproic acid (VPA) is widely used for treatment of epilepsy, mood disorders, migraines and neuropathic pain. It exerts its therapeutic benefits through modulation of multiple mechanisms including regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate neurotransmissions, activation of pro-survival protein kinases and inhibition of histone deacetylase. The evidence for neuroprotective properties associated with VPA is emerging. Herein, we investigated the therapeutic potential of VPA in a mouse model of normal tension glaucoma (NTG). Mice with glutamate/aspartate transporter gene deletion (GLAST KO mice) demonstrate progressive retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and optic nerve degeneration without elevated intraocular pressure, and exhibit glaucomatous pathology including glutamate neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in the retina. VPA (300mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) was administered via intraperitoneal injection in GLAST KO mice daily for 2 weeks from the age of 3 weeks, which coincides with the onset of glaucomatous retinal degeneration. Following completion of the treatment period, the vehicle-treated GLAST KO mouse retina showed significant RGC death. Meanwhile, VPA treatment prevented RGC death and thinning of the inner retinal layer in GLAST KO mice. In addition, in vivo electrophysiological analyses demonstrated that visual impairment observed in vehicle-treated GLAST KO mice was ameliorated with VPA treatment, clearly establishing that VPA beneficially affects both histological and functional aspects of the glaucomatous retina. We found that VPA reduces oxidative stress induced in the GLAST KO retina and stimulates the cell survival signalling pathway associated with extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK). This is the first study to report the neuroprotective effects of VPA in an animal model of NTG. Our findings raise intriguing possibilities that the widely prescribed drug VPA may be a novel candidate for treatment of glaucoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  11. Loss of Ikbkap Causes Slow, Progressive Retinal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Familial Dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Yumi; Ramirez, Grisela; Salcedo, Ernesto; Stabio, Maureen E; Lefcort, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is an autosomal recessive congenital neuropathy that is caused by a mutation in the gene for inhibitor of kappa B kinase complex-associated protein ( IKBKAP ). Although FD patients suffer from multiple neuropathies, a major debilitation that affects their quality of life is progressive blindness. To determine the requirement for Ikbkap in the developing and adult retina, we generated Ikbkap conditional knockout (CKO) mice using a TUBA1a promoter-Cre ( Tα1-Cre ). In the retina, Tα1-Cre expression is detected predominantly in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). At 6 months, significant loss of RGCs had occurred in the CKO retinas, with the greatest loss in the temporal retina, which is the same spatial phenotype observed in FD, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, and dominant optic atrophy. Interestingly, the melanopsin-positive RGCs were resistant to degeneration. By 9 months, signs of photoreceptor degeneration were observed, which later progressed to panretinal degeneration, including RGC and photoreceptor loss, optic nerve thinning, Müller glial activation, and disruption of layers. Taking these results together, we conclude that although Ikbkap is not required for normal development of RGCs, its loss causes a slow, progressive RGC degeneration most severely in the temporal retina, which is later followed by indirect photoreceptor loss and complete retinal disorganization. This mouse model of FD is not only useful for identifying the mechanisms mediating retinal degeneration, but also provides a model system in which to attempt to test therapeutics that may mitigate the loss of vision in FD patients.

  12. Decreased Expression of DREAM Promotes the Degeneration of Retinal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintala, Shravan; Cheng, Mei; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic mechanisms that promote the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following the activation of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) are unclear. In this study, we have investigated the role of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) in NMDA-mediated degeneration of the retina. NMDA, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and MK801 were injected into the vitreous humor of C57BL/6 mice. At 12, 24, and 48 hours after injection, expression of DREAM in the retina was determined by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis, and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA). Apoptotic death of cells in the retina was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferace dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. Degeneration of RGCs in cross sections and in whole mount retinas was determined by using antibodies against Tuj1 and Brn3a respectively. Degeneration of amacrine cells and bipolar cells was determined by using antibodies against calretinin and protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha respectively. DREAM was expressed constitutively in RGCs, amacrine cells, bipolar cells, as well as in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). NMDA promoted a progressive decrease in DREAM levels in all three cell types over time, and at 48 h after NMDA-treatment very low DREAM levels were evident in the IPL only. DREAM expression in retinal nuclear proteins was decreased progressively after NMDA-treatment, and correlated with its decreased binding to the c-fos-DRE oligonucleotides. A decrease in DREAM expression correlated significantly with apoptotic death of RGCs, amacrine cells and bipolar cells. Treatment of eyes with NMDA antagonist MK801, restored DREAM expression to almost normal levels in the retina, and significantly decreased NMDA-mediated apoptotic death of RGCs, amacrine cells, and bipolar cells. Results presented in this study show for the first time that down-regulation of DREAM promotes the degeneration of RGCs, amacrine cells, and

  13. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells for macular degeneration as a drug screening platform: identification of curcumin as a protective agent for retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative stress

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    Yun-Ching eChang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one retinal aging process that may lead to irreversible vision loss in the elderly. Its pathogenesis remains unclear, but oxidative stress inducing retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells damage is perhaps responsible for the aging sequence of retina and may play an important role in macular degeneration. In this study, we have reprogrammed T cells from patients with dry type AMD into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs via integration-free episomal vectors and differentiated them into RPE cells that were used as an expandable platform for investigating pathogenesis of the AMD and in-vitro drug screening. These patient-derived RPEs with the AMD-associated background (AMD-RPEs exhibited reduced antioxidant ability, compared with normal RPE cells. Among several screened candidate drugs, curcumin caused most significant reduction of ROS in AMD-RPEs. Pre-treatment of curcumin protected these AMD-RPEs from H2O2-induced cell death and also increased the cytoprotective effect against the oxidative stress of H2O2 through the reduction of ROS levels. In addition, curcumin with its versatile activities modulated the expression of many oxidative stress-regulating genes such as PDGF, VEGF, IGFBP-2, HO1, SOD2 and GPX1. Our findings indicated that the RPE cells derived from AMD patients have decreased antioxidative defense, making RPE cells more susceptible to oxidative damage and thereby leading to AMD formation. Curcumin represented an ideal drug that can effectively restore the neuronal functions in AMD patient-derived RPE cells, rendering this drug an effective option for macular degeneration therapy and an agent against aging-associated oxidative stress.

  14. Expression and regulation of enzymes in the ceramide metabolic pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells and their relevance to retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, DanHong; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G; Hinton, David R; Kannan, Ram

    2010-03-31

    Ceramide and its metabolic derivatives are important modulators of cellular apoptosis and proliferation. Dysregulation or imbalance of their metabolic pathways may promote the development of retinal degeneration. The aim of this study was to identify the expression and regulation of key enzymes of the ceramide pathway in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. RT-PCR was used to screen the enzymes involved in ceramide metabolism that are expressed in RPE. Over-expression of neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (SMPD3) or sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) in ARPE-19 cells was achieved by transient transfection of SMPD3 or Sphk1 cDNA subcloned into an expression vector. The number of apoptotic or proliferating cells was determined using TUNEL and BrdU assays, respectively. Neutral sphingomyelinase-1, neutral sphingomyelinase-2, acidic ceramidase, ceramide kinase, SphK1 and Sphk2 were expressed in both ARPE-19 and early passage human fetal RPE (fRPE) cells, while alkaline ceramidase 2 was only expressed in fRPE cells. Over-expression of SMPD3 decreased RPE cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased proportionally with the amount of transfected SMPD3 DNA. Over-expression of SphK1 promoted cell proliferation and protected ARPE-19 cells from ceramide-induced apoptosis. The effect of C(2) ceramide on induction of apoptosis was evaluated in polarized vs. non-polarized RPE cultures; polarization of RPE was associated with much reduced apoptosis in response to ceramide. In conclusion, RPE cells possess the synthetic machinery for the production of ceramide, sphingosine, ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Over-expression of SMPD3 may increase cellular ceramide levels, leading to enhanced cell death and arrested cell proliferation. The selective induction of apoptosis in non-polarized RPE cultures by C(2) ceramide suggests that increased ceramide levels will preferentially affect non-polarized RPE, as are found in

  15. Combining neuroprotectants in a model of retinal degeneration: no additive benefit.

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    Fabiana Di Marco

    Full Text Available The central nervous system undergoing degeneration can be stabilized, and in some models can be restored to function, by neuroprotective treatments. Photobiomodulation (PBM and dietary saffron are distinctive as neuroprotectants in that they upregulate protective mechanisms, without causing measurable tissue damage. This study reports a first attempt to combine the actions of PBM and saffron. Our working hypothesis was that the actions of PBM and saffron in protecting retinal photoreceptors, in a rat light damage model, would be additive. Results confirmed the neuroprotective potential of each used separately, but gave no evidence that their effects are additive. Detailed analysis suggests that there is actually a negative interaction between PBM and saffron when given simultaneously, with a consequent reduction of the neuroprotection. Specific testing will be required to understand the mechanisms involved and to establish whether there is clinical potential in combining neuroprotectants, to improve the quality of life of people affected by retinal pathology, such as age-related macular degeneration, the major cause of blindness and visual impairment in older adults.

  16. A novel platform for minimally invasive delivery of cellular therapy as a thin layer across the subretina for treatment of retinal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Kalish, Sapir E.; Belkin, Michael; Meir, Amilia; Treves, Avraham J.; Nagler, Arnon; Sher, Ifat

    2015-03-01

    Incurable retinal degenerations affect millions worldwide. Stem cell transplantation rescued visual functions in animal models of retinal degeneration. In those studies cells were transplanted in subretinal "blebs", limited number of cells could be injected and photoreceptor rescue was restricted to areas in proximity to the injection sites. We developed a minimally-invasive surgical platform for drug and cell delivery in a thin layer across the subretina and extravascular spaces of the choroid. The novel system is comprised of a syringe with a blunt-tipped needle and an adjustable separator. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were transplanted in eyes of RCS rats and NZW rabbits through a longitudinal triangular scleral incision. No immunosuppressants were used. Retinal function was determined by electroretinogram analysis and retinal structure was determined by histological analysis and OCT. Transplanted cells were identified as a thin layer across the subretina and extravascular spaces of the choroid. In RCS rats, cell transplantation delayed photoreceptor degeneration across the entire retina and significantly enhanced retinal functions. No retinal detachment or choroidal hemorrhages were observed in rabbits following transplantation. This novel platform opens a new avenue for drug and cell delivery, placing the transplanted cells in close proximity to the damaged RPE and retina as a thin layer, across the subretina and thereby slowing down cell death and photoreceptor degeneration, without retinal detachment or choroidal hemorrhage. This new transplantation system may increase the therapeutic effect of other cell-based therapies and therapeutic agents. This study is expected to directly lead to phase I/II clinical trials for autologous hBM-MSCs transplantation in retinal degeneration patients.

  17. A Proinflammatory Function of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium as a Novel Target for Reducing Choroidal Neovascularization in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lili; Ju, Meihua; Lee, Kei Ying V; Mackey, Ashley; Evangelista, Mariasilvia; Iwata, Daiju; Adamson, Peter; Lashkari, Kameran; Foxton, Richard; Shima, David; Ng, Yin Shan

    2017-10-01

    Current treatments for choroidal neovascularization, a major cause of blindness for patients with age-related macular degeneration, treat symptoms but not the underlying causes of the disease. Inflammation has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization. We examined the inflammatory role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in age-related macular degeneration. TLR2 was robustly expressed by the retinal pigment epithelium in mouse and human eyes, both normal and with macular degeneration/choroidal neovascularization. Nuclear localization of NF-κB, a major downstream target of TLR2 signaling, was detected in the retinal pigment epithelium of human eyes, particularly in eyes with advanced stages of age-related macular degeneration. TLR2 antagonism effectively suppressed initiation and growth of spontaneous choroidal neovascularization in a mouse model, and the combination of anti-TLR2 and antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 yielded an additive therapeutic effect on both area and number of spontaneous choroidal neovascularization lesions. Finally, in primary human fetal retinal pigment epithelium cells, ligand binding to TLR2 induced robust expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and end products of lipid oxidation had a synergistic effect on TLR2 activation. Our data illustrate a functional role for TLR2 in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization, likely by promoting inflammation of the retinal pigment epithelium, and validate TLR2 as a novel therapeutic target for reducing choroidal neovascularization. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor-Induced Generation of Splenic Erythroblast-like Ter-Cells Promotes Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanmei; Liu, Qiuyan; Hou, Jin; Gu, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Zhubo; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Weiping; Qiu, Shuangjian; Zhang, Yonghong; Dong, Tao; Li, Ning; Jiang, Zhengping; Zhu, Ha; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wang, Qingqing; Yu, Yizhi; Li, Nan; Cao, Xuetao

    2018-04-19

    Identifying tumor-induced leukocyte subsets and their derived circulating factors has been instrumental in understanding cancer as a systemic disease. Nevertheless, how primary tumor-induced non-leukocyte populations in distal organs contribute to systemic spread remains poorly defined. Here, we report one population of tumor-inducible, erythroblast-like cells (Ter-cells) deriving from megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor cells with a unique Ter-119 + CD45 - CD71 + phenotype. Ter-cells are enriched in the enlarged spleen of hosts bearing advanced tumors and facilitate tumor progression by secreting neurotrophic factor artemin into the blood. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and Smad3 activation are important in Ter-cell generation. In vivo blockade of Ter-cell-derived artemin inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth, and artemin deficiency abolishes Ter-cells' tumor-promoting ability. We confirm the presence of splenic artemin-positive Ter-cells in human HCC patients and show that significantly elevated serum artemin correlates with poor prognosis. We propose that Ter-cells and the secreted artemin play important roles in cancer progression with prognostic and therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Subretinal Gene Transfer at Different Time Points in a Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xufeng; Zhang, Hua; Han, Juanjuan; He, Ying; Zhang, Yangyang; Qi, Yan; Pang, Ji-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) is necessary for photoreceptors to generate an important lipid component of their membranes. The absence of LPCAT1 results in early and rapid rod and cone degeneration. Retinal degeneration 11 (rd11) mice carry a mutation in the Lpcat1 gene, and are an excellent model of early-onset rapid retinal degeneration (RD). To date, no reports have documented gene therapy administration in the rd11 mouse model at different ages. In this study, the AAV8 (Y733F)-smCBA-Lpcat1 vector was subretinally injected at postnatal day (P) 10, 14, 18, or 22. Four months after injection, immunohistochemistry and analysis of retinal morphology showed that treatment at P10 rescued about 82% of the wild-type retinal thickness. However, the diffusion of the vector and the resulting rescue were limited to an area around the injection site that was only 31% of the total retinal area. Injection at P14 resulted in vector diffusion that covered approximately 84% of the retina, and we found that gene therapy was more effective against RD when exposure to light was limited before and after treatment. We observed long-term preservation of electroretinogram (ERG) responses, and preservation of retinal structure, indicating that early treatment followed by limited light exposure can improve gene therapy effectiveness for the eyes of rd11 mice. Importantly, delayed treatment still partially preserved M-cones, but not S-cones, and M-cones in the rd11 retina appeared to have a longer window of opportunity for effective preservation with gene therapy. These results provide important information regarding the effects of subretinal gene therapy in the mouse model of LPCAT1-deficiency.

  20. Pattern of retinal morphological and functional decay in a light-inducible, rhodopsin mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargini, Claudia; Novelli, Elena; Piano, Ilaria; Biagioni, Martina; Strettoi, Enrica

    2017-07-18

    Hallmarks of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), a family of genetic diseases, are a typical rod-cone-degeneration with initial night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, followed by decreased daylight sight and progressive visual acuity loss up to legal blindness. Great heterogeneity in nature and function of mutated genes, variety of mutations for each of them, variability in phenotypic appearance and transmission modality contribute to make RP a still incurable disease. Translational research relies on appropriate animal models mimicking the genetic and phenotypic diversity of the human pathology. Here, we provide a systematic, morphological and functional analysis of Rho Tvrm4 /Rho + rhodopsin mutant mice, originally described in 2010 and portraying several features of common forms of autosomal dominant RP caused by gain-of-function mutations. These mice undergo photoreceptor degeneration only when exposed briefly to strong, white light and allow controlled timing of induction of rod and cone death, which therefore can be elicited in adult animals, as observed in human RP. The option to control severity and retinal extent of the phenotype by regulating intensity and duration of the inducing light opens possibilities to exploit this model for multiple experimental purposes. Altogether, the unique features of this mutant make it an excellent resource for retinal degeneration research.

  1. Novel Animal Model of Crumbs-Dependent Progressive Retinal Degeneration That Targets Specific Cone Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jinling; Nagashima, Mikiko; Guo, Chuanyu; Raymond, Pamela A; Wei, Xiangyun

    2018-01-01

    Human Crb1 is implicated in some forms of retinal degeneration, suggesting a role in photoreceptor maintenance. Multiple Crumbs (Crb) polarity genes are expressed in vertebrate retina, although their functional roles are not well understood. To gain further insight into Crb and photoreceptor maintenance, we compared retinal cell densities between wild-type and Tg(RH2-2:Crb2b-sfEX/RH2-2:GFP)pt108b transgenic zebrafish, in which the extracellular domain of Crb2b-short form (Crb2b-sfEX) is expressed in the retina as a secreted protein, which disrupts the planar organization of RGB cones (red, green, and blue) by interfering with Crb2a/2b-based cone-cone adhesion. We used standard morphometric techniques to assess age-related changes in retinal cell densities in adult zebrafish (3 to 27 months old), and to assess effects of the Crb2b-sfEX transgene on retinal structure and photoreceptor densities. Linear cell densities were measured in all retinal layers in radial sections with JB4-Feulgen histology. Planar (surface) densities of cones were determined in retinal flat-mounts. Cell counts from wild-type and pt108b transgenic fish were compared with both a "photoreceptor maintenance index" and statistical analysis of cell counts. Age-related changes in retinal cell linear densities and cone photoreceptor planar densities in wild-type adult zebrafish provided a baseline for analysis. Expression of Crb2b-sfEX caused progressive and selective degeneration of RGB cones, but had no effect on ultraviolet-sensitive (UV) cones, and increased numbers of rod photoreceptors. These differential responses of RGB cones, UV cones, and rods to sustained exposure to Crb2b-sfEX suggest that Crb-based photoreceptor maintenance mechanisms are highly selective.

  2. [Tapeto-retinal degeneration combined with incomplete general albinism (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivandić, T

    1975-05-01

    Report on a family, which presented the rare autosomal dominant transmitted, incomplete general albinism associated with autosomal recessive inherited, diffuse tapeto-retinal degeneration "sine pigmento". hypopigmentation of skin, eyebrows and hair, blue iris and fundus albinoticus with hypoplasia of the macula. In 3 cases additionally appeared: waxy pallor of optic disc, vascular narrowing, reflexless hypoplastic macula, pigmentless periphery, acquired blue-yellow blindness, concentric limitation of the visual field, reduced darkadaptation, abolished electroretinogram and myopic astigmatism.

  3. Chitosan oligosaccharides attenuates oxidative-stress related retinal degeneration in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Mo Fang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the therapeutic potential and mechanisms of chitosan oligosaccharides (COS for oxidative stress-induced retinal diseases. Retinal oxidative damage was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intravitreal injection of paraquat (PQ. Low-dose (5 mg/kg or high-dose (10 mg/kg COS or PBS was intragastrically given for 14 days after PQ injection. Electroretinograms were performed to determine the functionality of the retinas. The surviving neurons in the retinal ganglion cell layer and retinal apoptosis were determined by counting Neu N-positive cells in whole-mounted retinas and TUNEL staining, respectively. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was determined by lucigenin- and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. Retinal oxidative damages were assessed by staining with nitrotyrosine, acrolein, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Immunohistochemical studies were used to demonstrate the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65 in retinas. An in vitro study using RGC-5 cells was performed to verify the results. We demonstrated COS significantly enhanced the recovery of retinal function, preserved inner retinal thickness, and decreased retinal neurons loss in a dose-dependent manner. COS administration demonstrated anti-oxidative effects by reducing luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminenscense levels and activating superoxide dismutase and catalase, leading to decreased retinal apoptosis. COS markedly reduced retinal NF-κB p65. An in vitro study demonstrated COS increased IκB expression, attenuated the increase of p65 and thus decreased NF-κB/DNA binding activity in PQ-stimulated RGC-5 cells. In conclusion, COS attenuates oxidative stress-induced retinal damages, probably by decreasing free radicals, maintaining the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes, and inhibiting the activation of NF-κB.

  4. Encephalopathy with intracerebral calcification, white matter lesions, growth hormone deficiency, microcephaly, and retinal degeneration: two sibs confirming a probably distinct entity.

    OpenAIRE

    Bönnemann, C G; Meinecke, P; Reich, H

    1991-01-01

    Two sibs with an encephalopathy, including intracerebral calcification and white matter lesions, dwarfism owing to growth hormone deficiency, and retinal degeneration are reported. The onset of the disease in both patients occurred with retardation of motor development during the first year of life. Later, dwarfism, mental retardation, spasticity, ataxia, and retinal degeneration became apparent. These cases probably represent some form of connatal leucodystrophy. The differential diagnosis i...

  5. Hsp104 suppresses polyglutamine-induced degeneration post onset in a drosophila MJD/SCA3 model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Cushman-Nick

    Full Text Available There are no effective therapeutics that antagonize or reverse the protein-misfolding events underpinning polyglutamine (PolyQ disorders, including Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type-3 (SCA3. Here, we augment the proteostasis network of Drosophila SCA3 models with Hsp104, a powerful protein disaggregase from yeast, which is bafflingly absent from metazoa. Hsp104 suppressed eye degeneration caused by a C-terminal ataxin-3 (MJD fragment containing the pathogenic expanded PolyQ tract, but unexpectedly enhanced aggregation and toxicity of full-length pathogenic MJD. Hsp104 suppressed toxicity of MJD variants lacking a portion of the N-terminal deubiquitylase domain and full-length MJD variants unable to engage polyubiquitin, indicating that MJD-ubiquitin interactions hinder protective Hsp104 modalities. Importantly, in staging experiments, Hsp104 suppressed toxicity of a C-terminal MJD fragment when expressed after the onset of PolyQ-induced degeneration, whereas Hsp70 was ineffective. Thus, we establish the first disaggregase or chaperone treatment administered after the onset of pathogenic protein-induced degeneration that mitigates disease progression.

  6. X-linked dominant cone-rod degeneration: linkage mapping of a new locus for retinitis pigmentosa (RP 15) to Xp22.13-p22.11.

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, R E; Sullivan, L S; Blanton, S H; Church, M W; Heckenlively, J R; Daiger, S P

    1995-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the name given to a heterogeneous group of hereditary retinal degenerations characterized by progressive visual field loss, pigmentary changes of the retina, abnormal electroretinograms, and, frequently, night blindness. In this study, we investigated a family with dominant cone-rod degeneration, a variant form of retinitis pigmentosa. We used microsatellite markers to test for linkage to the disease locus and excluded all mapped autosomal loci. However, a marker from ...

  7. Streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in F344----Lewis and in Lewis----F344 bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Bruggen, M.C.; van den Broek, M.F.; van den Berg, W.B.

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis (AA) are rat models for chronic, erosive polyarthritis. Both models can be induced in susceptible Lewis rats, whereas F344 rats are resistant. In AA as well as in SCW arthritis, antigen-specific T lymphocytes have been demonstrated to be crucial for chronic disease. In this communication the authors describe their studies to probe the cellular mechanism responsible for the difference in susceptibility of Lewis and F344, using bone marrow chimeras. By transplanting bone marrow cells from F344 into lethally irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to SCW arthritis induction. F344 rats reconstituted with Lewis bone marrow, i.e., Lewis----F344 chimeras, develop an arthritis upon SCW injection. For AA comparable results were obtained. These data suggest that both resistance and susceptibility to bacterium-induced chronic arthritis are mediated by hemopoietic/immune cells and that the recipiental environment does not influence the susceptibility to chronic joint inflammation

  8. The severity of retinal degeneration in Rp1h gene-targeted mice is dependent on genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Saveliev, Alexei; Pierce, Eric A

    2009-04-01

    The severity of disease in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can vary significantly, even among patients with the same primary mutations. It is hypothesized that modifier genes play important roles in determining the severity of RP, including the retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1) form of disease. To investigate the basis of variation in disease expression for RP1 disease, the authors generated congenic mice with a gene-targeted retinitis pigmentosa 1 homolog (Rp1h) allele (Rp1h(tm1Eap)) on several different genetic backgrounds and analyzed their retinal phenotypes. The Rp1h(tm1Eap) allele was placed onto the C57BL/6J, DBA1/J, and A/J backgrounds. Retinal function of the resultant congenic mice was evaluated using electroretinographic analyses. Retinal structure and ultrastructure were evaluated using light and electron microscopy. Rp1h protein location was determined with immunofluorescence microscopy. Analysis of the retinal phenotype of incipient congenic (N6) B6.129S-Rp1h(+/tm1Eap), DBA.129S(B6)-Rp1h(+/tm1Eap), and A.129S(B6)-Rp1h(+/tm1Eap) mice at 1 year of age showed retinal degeneration only in the A.129S(B6)-Rp1h(+/tm1Eap) mice. Further analyses revealed that the photoreceptors of the fully congenic A.129S(B6)-Rp1h(+/tm1Eap) mice show evidence of degeneration at 6 months of age and are almost completely lost by 18 months of age. In contrast, the photoreceptor cells in the fully congenic B6.129S-Rp1h(+/tm1Eap) mice remain healthy up to 18 months. The severity of the retinal degeneration caused by the Rp1h(tm1Eap) allele is notably dependent on genetic background. The development and characterization of the B6.129S-Rp1h(+/tm1Eap) and A.129S(B6)-Rp1h(+/tm1Eap) congenic mouse lines will facilitate identification of sequence alterations in genes that modify the severity of RP1 disease.

  9. Orally active multi-functional antioxidants are neuroprotective in a rat model of light-induced retinal damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Randazzo

    Full Text Available Progression of age-related macular degeneration has been linked to iron dysregulation and oxidative stress that induce apoptosis of neural retinal cells. Since both antioxidants and chelating agents have been reported to reduce the progression of retinal lesions associated with AMD in experimental animals, the present study evaluates the ability of multi-functional antioxidants containing functional groups that can independently chelate redox metals and quench free radicals to protect the retina against light-induced retinal degeneration, a rat model of dry atrophic AMD.Proof of concept studies were conducted to evaluate the ability of 4-(5-hydroxypyrimidin-2-yl-N,N-dimethyl-3,5-dioxopiperazine-1-sulfonamide (compound 4 and 4-(5-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yl-N,N-dimethyl-3,5-dioxopiperazine-1-sulfonamide (compound 8 to reduce retinal damage in 2-week dark adapted Wistar rats exposed to 1000 lx of light for 3 hours. Assessment of the oxidative stress markers 4- hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine modified proteins and Thioredoxin by ELISA and Western blots indicated that these compounds reduced the oxidative insult caused by light exposure. The beneficial antioxidant effects of these compounds in providing significant functional and structural protection were confirmed by electroretinography and quantitative histology of the retina.The present study suggests that multi-functional compounds may be effective candidates for preventive therapy of AMD.

  10. Characterization of cytochrome c as marker for retinal cell degeneration by uv/vis spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmach, Julia; Schweizer, Julia; Steiner, Gerald; Knels, Lilla; Funk, Richard H. W.; Thalheim, Silko; Koch, Edmund

    2011-07-01

    Retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration have become an important cause of visual loss depending on increasing life expectancy and lifestyle habits. Due to the fact that no satisfying treatment exists, early diagnosis and prevention are the only possibilities to stop the degeneration. The protein cytochrome c (cyt c) is a suitable marker for degeneration processes and apoptosis because it is a part of the respiratory chain and involved in the apoptotic pathway. The determination of the local distribution and oxidative state of cyt c in living cells allows the characterization of cell degeneration processes. Since cyt c exhibits characteristic absorption bands between 400 and 650 nm wavelength, uv/vis in situ spectroscopic imaging was used for its characterization in retinal ganglion cells. The large amount of data, consisting of spatial and spectral information, was processed by multivariate data analysis. The challenge consists in the identification of the molecular information of cyt c. Baseline correction, principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were performed in order to identify cyt c within the spectral dataset. The combination of PCA and CA reveals cyt c and its oxidative state. The results demonstrate that uv/vis spectroscopic imaging in conjunction with sophisticated multivariate methods is a suitable tool to characterize cyt c under in situ conditions.

  11. Repair mechanism of retinal pigment epithelial tears in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Ryo; Sato, Taku; Kishi, Shoji

    2015-03-01

    To investigate repair mechanisms of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tears in age-related macular degeneration. The authors retrospectively studied 10 eyes with age-related macular degeneration that developed RPE tears during follow-up or after treatment with an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor drug or photodynamic therapy combined with ranibizumab. After development of the RPE tears, all follow-ups exceeded 13 months. Spectral domain or swept-source optical coherence tomography have been used to examine consecutive retinal changes where the RPE tears developed and attempted to determine the repair mechanisms. Retinal pigment epithelial tears developed during the natural course (n = 4) after ranibizumab treatment (n = 2) and after photodynamic therapy and ranibizumab (n = 4). Subretinal fluid persisted for more than 6 months after the RPE tears developed (n = 4), with the area where the RPE was lost found to be covered with thickened proliferative tissue. In 6 eyes where the subretinal fluid was absorbed within 2 months, optical coherence tomography showed the outer retina appeared to be directly attached to Bruch membrane, and there was attenuation of the normal hyperreflective band attributable to normal RPE during follow-up. Results suggest that two repair processes may be present in the area where RPE tears developed. Persistent subretinal fluid may lead to repair with thick proliferative tissue, while the outer retina appears to attach to Bruch membrane when there is early subretinal fluid resolution after RPE tear development.

  12. Protective effects of the compounds isolated from the seed of Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced retinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-A [Functional Food Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Sang Hee [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hong Ryul [Functional Food Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sang Hoon, E-mail: shjung507@gmail.com [Functional Food Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism underlying glaucoma remains controversial, but apoptosis caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of compounds isolated from Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo. Transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) were treated with L-buthione-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) and glutamate in the presence or with pre-treatment with compound 6, bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia. We observed reduced cell death in cells pre-treated with bakuchiol. Moreover, bakuchiol inhibited the oxidative stress-induced decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm). Furthermore, while intracellular Ca{sup 2+} was high in RGC-5 cells after exposure to oxidative stress, bakuchiol reduced these levels. In an in vivo study, in which rat retinal damage was induced by intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), bakuchiol markedly reduced translocation of AIF and release of cytochrome c, and inhibited up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved PARP. The survival rate of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) 7 days after optic nerve crush (ONC) in mice was significantly decreased; however, bakuchiol attenuated the loss of RGCs. Moreover, bakuchiol attenuated ONC-induced up-regulation of apoptotic proteins, including cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-9. Bakuchiol also significantly inhibited translocation of mitochondrial AIF into the nuclear fraction and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol. These results demonstrate that bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia has protective effects against oxidative stress-induced retinal damage, and may be considered as an agent for treating or preventing retinal degeneration. - Highlights: • Psoralea corylifolia have neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. • Bakuchiol attenuated the increase of apoptotic proteins induced by oxidative

  13. Protective effects of the compounds isolated from the seed of Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced retinal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-A; Shim, Sang Hee; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism underlying glaucoma remains controversial, but apoptosis caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of compounds isolated from Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo. Transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) were treated with L-buthione-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) and glutamate in the presence or with pre-treatment with compound 6, bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia. We observed reduced cell death in cells pre-treated with bakuchiol. Moreover, bakuchiol inhibited the oxidative stress-induced decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm). Furthermore, while intracellular Ca 2+ was high in RGC-5 cells after exposure to oxidative stress, bakuchiol reduced these levels. In an in vivo study, in which rat retinal damage was induced by intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), bakuchiol markedly reduced translocation of AIF and release of cytochrome c, and inhibited up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved PARP. The survival rate of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) 7 days after optic nerve crush (ONC) in mice was significantly decreased; however, bakuchiol attenuated the loss of RGCs. Moreover, bakuchiol attenuated ONC-induced up-regulation of apoptotic proteins, including cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-9. Bakuchiol also significantly inhibited translocation of mitochondrial AIF into the nuclear fraction and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol. These results demonstrate that bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia has protective effects against oxidative stress-induced retinal damage, and may be considered as an agent for treating or preventing retinal degeneration. - Highlights: • Psoralea corylifolia have neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. • Bakuchiol attenuated the increase of apoptotic proteins induced by oxidative

  14. The neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on laser-induced retinal damage in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnevskia-Dai, Victoria; Belokopytov, Mark; Dubinsky, Galina; Nachum, Gal; Avni, Isaac; Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai

    2005-04-01

    Retinal damage induced by mechanical trauma, ischemia or laser photocoagulation increases considerably by secondary degeneration processes. The spread of damage may be ameliorated by neuroprotection that is aimed at reducing the extent of the secondary degeneration and promote healing processes. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment consists of inspiration of oxygen at higher than one absolute atmospheric pressure. Improved neural function was observed in patients with acute brain trauma or ischemia treated with HBO. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on laser induced retinal damage in a rat model. Standard argon laser lesions were created in 25 pigmented rats divided into three groups: Ten rats were treated immediately after the irradiation with HBO three times during the first 24 hr followed by 12 consecutive daily treatments. Five rats received a shorter treatment regimen of 10 consecutive HBO treatments. The control group (10 rats) underwent the laser damage with no additional treatment. The retinal lesions were evaluated 20 days after the injury. All outcome measures were improved by the longer HBO treatment (Ptreatment was less effective, showing an increase only in nuclei density at the central area of lesion (Pretinal damage in a rat model. In the range of HBO exposures studied, longer exposure provides more neuroprotection. These results encourage further evaluation of the potential therapeutic use of hyperbaric oxygen in diseases and injuries of the retina.

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal Degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons Rats and Its Correlation with Morphology and Electroretinography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Kodai; Mounai, Natsuki; Tanabu, Reiko; Nakazawa, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the correlation between optical coherence tomography (OCT) and the histological, ultrastructural and electroretinography (ERG) findings of retinal degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS-/-) rats. Materials and Methods Using OCT, we qualitatively and quantitatively observed the continual retinal degeneration in RCS-/- rats, from postnatal (PN) day 17 until PN day 111. These findings were compared with the corresponding histological, electron microscopic, and ERG findings. We also compared them to OCT findings in wild type RCS+/+ rats, which were used as controls. Results After PN day 17, the hyperreflective band at the apical side of the photoreceptor layer became blurred. The inner segment (IS) ellipsoid zone then became obscured, and the photoreceptor IS and outer segment (OS) layers became diffusely hyperreflective after PN day 21. These changes correlated with histological and electron microscopic findings showing extracellular lamellar material that accumulated in the photoreceptor OS layer. After PN day 26, the outer nuclear layer became significantly thinner (P RCS-/- and RCS+/+ rats. Conclusion Our results suggest that OCT demonstrates histologically validated photoreceptor degeneration in RCS rats, and that OCT findings partly correlate with ERG findings. We propose that OCT is a less invasive and useful method for evaluating photoreceptor degeneration in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:27644042

  16. Choice of Cell Source in Cell-Based Therapies for Retinal Damage due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar John

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex disorder that affects primarily the macula involving the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE but also to a certain extent the photoreceptor layer and the retinal neurons. Cell transplantation is a promising option for AMD and clinical trials are underway using different cell types. Methods. We hypothesize that instead of focusing on a particular cell source for concurrent regeneration of all the retinal layers and also to prevent exhaustive research on an array of cell sources for regeneration of each layer, the choice should depend on, precisely, which layer is damaged. Results. Thus, for a damage limited to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE layer, the choice we suggest would be RPE cells. When the damage extends to rods and cones, the choice would be bone marrow stem cells and when retinal neurons are involved, relatively immature stem cell populations with an inherent capacity to yield neuronal lineage such as hematopoietic stem cells, embryonic stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells can be tried. Conclusion. This short review will prove to be a valuable guideline for those working on cell therapy for AMD to plan their future directions of research and therapy for this condition.

  17. Manganese-Enhanced MRI for Preclinical Evaluation of Retinal Degeneration Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Rebecca M; Sheng, Li; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Yu, Guanping; Gao, Songqi; Yu, Xin; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-07-01

    Apply manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) to assess ion channel activity and structure of retinas from mice subject to light-induced retinal degeneration treated with prophylactic agents. Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) double knockout mice with and without prophylactic retinylamine (Ret-NH2) treatment were illuminated with strong light. Manganese-enhanced MRI was used to image the retina 2 hours after intravitreous injection of MnCl2 into one eye. Contrast-enhanced MRIs of the retina and vitreous humor in each experimental group were assessed and correlated with the treatment. Findings were compared with standard structural and functional assessments of the retina by optical coherence tomography (OCT), histology, and electroretinography (ERG). Manganese-enhanced MRI contrast in the retina was high in nonilluminated and illuminated Ret-NH2-treated mice, whereas no enhancement was evident in the retina of the light-illuminated mice without Ret-NH2 treatment (P treatment based on the measurement of ion channel activity. This approach could be used as a complementary tool in preclinical development of new prophylactic therapies for retinopathies.

  18. [Lattice degeneration of the retina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, E V; Suetov, A A; Mal'tsev, D S

    2014-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is a clinically important type of peripheral retinal dystrophies due to its participation in the pathogenesis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. In spite of extensive epidemiological, morphological, and clinical data, the question on causes of this particular type of retinal dystrophies currently remains debatable. Existing hypotheses on pathogenesis of retinal structural changes in lattice degeneration explain it to a certain extent. In clinical ophthalmology it is necessary to pay close attention to this kind of degenerations and distinguish between cases requiring preventive treatment and those requiring monitoring.

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal Degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons Rats and Its Correlation with Morphology and Electroretinography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobu Adachi

    Full Text Available To evaluate the correlation between optical coherence tomography (OCT and the histological, ultrastructural and electroretinography (ERG findings of retinal degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS-/- rats.Using OCT, we qualitatively and quantitatively observed the continual retinal degeneration in RCS-/- rats, from postnatal (PN day 17 until PN day 111. These findings were compared with the corresponding histological, electron microscopic, and ERG findings. We also compared them to OCT findings in wild type RCS+/+ rats, which were used as controls.After PN day 17, the hyperreflective band at the apical side of the photoreceptor layer became blurred. The inner segment (IS ellipsoid zone then became obscured, and the photoreceptor IS and outer segment (OS layers became diffusely hyperreflective after PN day 21. These changes correlated with histological and electron microscopic findings showing extracellular lamellar material that accumulated in the photoreceptor OS layer. After PN day 26, the outer nuclear layer became significantly thinner (P < 0.01 and hyperreflective compared with that in the controls; conversely, the photoreceptor IS and OS layers, as well as the inner retinal layers, became significantly thicker (P < 0.001 and P = 0.05, respectively. The apical hyperreflective band, as well as the IS ellipsoid zone, gradually disappeared between PN day 20 and PN day 30; concurrently, the ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes deteriorated. In contrast, the thicknesses of the combined retinal pigment epithelium and choroid did not differ significantly between RCS-/- and RCS+/+ rats.Our results suggest that OCT demonstrates histologically validated photoreceptor degeneration in RCS rats, and that OCT findings partly correlate with ERG findings. We propose that OCT is a less invasive and useful method for evaluating photoreceptor degeneration in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa.

  20. Pigment epithelial detachment followed by retinal cystoid degeneration leads to vision loss in treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Waldstein, Sebastian M; Deak, Gabor-Gyoergy; Kundi, Michael; Simader, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Intravitreal antiangiogenic therapy is the major therapeutic breakthrough in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the leading diagnostic tool, but solid criteria for optimal therapeutic outcomes are lacking. A comprehensive analysis of structure/function correlations using Food and Drug Administration- and European Medicines Agency-approved substances and fixed and flexible regimens was performed. Post hoc analysis of a prospective, randomized multicenter clinical trial including 189 study sites. A total of 1240 patients with active neovascular AMD. Participants received intravitreal ranibizumab or aflibercept. A fixed regimen was used for 48 weeks followed by a flexible regimen until week 96. At monthly intervals, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured and retinal morphology was assessed by standardized OCT, including intraretinal cysts (IRCs), subretinal fluid (SRF), and pigment epithelial detachment (PED), presenting with a width ≥400 μm or a height of ≥200 μm. Results were correlated for each regimen, feature, and time. The BCVA outcomes in relation to retinal pathomorphology based on noninferiority for all treatment arms. In neovascular AMD, only IRC at baseline and persistent through week 12 had a negative impact on BCVA. With therapeutic intervention, exudative features such as IRC and SRF resolved rapidly in 74% of eyes, whereas PED responded only slowly with 38%. Independent of the type of regimen, fixed or flexible, retinal morphology correlated tightly with visual function. Intraretinal cysts consistently showed the lowest BCVA gains with either regimen or substance. With the switch from a fixed to a flexible pro re nata (PRN) regimen, progressive visual loss occurred exclusively in the group with primary PED presenting as the hallmark of neovascular activity and was induced by secondary formation of IRC in the neurosensory retina. The efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy in neovascular

  1. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Orban, Tivadar; Johnson, William M.; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mieyal, John J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes adult-onset blindness. There are 2 forms of this progressive disease: wet and dry. Currently there is no cure for AMD, but several treatment options have started to emerge making early detection critical for therapeutic success. Analysis of the eyes of Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− mice that display light-induced retinal degeneration indicates that 11-cis-retinal and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were significantly decrea...

  2. Suppressed retinal degeneration in aged wild type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice by bone marrow transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yang

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-related condition characterized by accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid β peptides (Aβ in brain and retina. Because bone marrow transplantation (BMT results in decreased cerebral Aβ in experimental AD, we hypothesized that BMT would mitigate retinal neurotoxicity through decreased retinal Aβ. To test this, we performed BMT in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mice using green fluorescent protein expressing wild type (wt mice as marrow donors. We first examined retinas from control, non-transplanted, aged AD mice and found a two-fold increase in microglia compared with wt mice, prominent inner retinal Aβ and paired helical filament-tau, and decreased retinal ganglion cell layer neurons. BMT resulted in near complete replacement of host retinal microglia with BMT-derived cells and normalized total AD retinal microglia to non-transplanted wt levels. Aβ and paired helical filament-tau were reduced (61.0% and 44.1% respectively in BMT-recipient AD mice, which had 20.8% more retinal ganglion cell layer neurons than non-transplanted AD controls. Interestingly, aged wt BMT recipients also had significantly more neurons (25.4% compared with non-transplanted aged wt controls. Quantitation of retinal ganglion cell layer neurons in young mice confirmed age-related retinal degeneration was mitigated by BMT. We found increased MHC class II expression in BMT-derived microglia and decreased oxidative damage in retinal ganglion cell layer neurons. Thus, BMT is neuroprotective in age-related as well as AD-related retinal degeneration, and may be a result of alterations in innate immune function and oxidative stress in BMT recipient mice.

  3. Potential of Gene Editing and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) in Treatment of Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Katherine; Fields, Mark A; Del Priore, Lucian V

    2017-12-01

    The advent of gene editing has introduced the ability to make changes to the genome of cells, thus allowing for correction of genetic mutations in patients with monogenic diseases. Retinal diseases are particularly suitable for the application of this new technology because many retinal diseases, such as Stargardt disease, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), are monogenic. Moreover, gene delivery techniques such as the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been optimized for intraocular use, and phase III trials are well underway to treat LCA, a severe form of inherited retinal degeneration, with gene therapy. This review focuses on the use of gene editing techniques and another relatively recent advent, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and their potential for the study and treatment of retinal disease. Investment in these technologies, including overcoming challenges such as off-target mutations and low transplanted cell integration, may allow for future treatment of many debilitating inherited retinal diseases.

  4. Air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Sato, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Air puff-induced ultrasonic vocalizations in adult rats, termed "22-kHz calls," have been applied as a useful animal model to develop psychoneurological and psychopharmacological studies focusing on human aversive affective disorders. To date, all previous studies on air puff-induced 22-kHz calls have used outbred rats. Furthermore, newly developed gene targeting technologies, which are essential for further advancement of biomedical experiments using air puff-induced 22-kHz calls, have enabled the production of genetically modified rats using inbred rat strains. Therefore, we considered it necessary to assess air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred rats. In this study, we assessed differences in air puff-induced 22-kHz calls between inbred F344 rats and outbred Wistar rats. Male F344 rats displayed similar total (summed) duration of air puff-induced 22 kHz vocalizations to that of male Wistar rats, however, Wistar rats emitted fewer calls of longer duration, while F344 rats emitted higher number of vocalizations of shorter duration. Additionally, female F344 rats emitted fewer air puff-induced 22-kHz calls than did males, thus confirming the existence of a sex difference that was previously reported for outbred Wistar rats. The results of this study could confirm the reliability of air puff stimulus for induction of a similar amount of emissions of 22-kHz calls in different rat strains, enabling the use of air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred F344 rats and derived genetically modified animals in future studies concerning human aversive affective disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation implicated in retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Matthew; Duignan, Emma; Humphries, Pete; Palfi, Arpad; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2016-04-01

    The GNAT1 gene encodes the α subunit of the rod transducin protein, a key element in the rod phototransduction cascade. Variants in GNAT1 have been implicated in stationary night-blindness in the past, but unlike other proteins in the same pathway, it has not previously been implicated in retinitis pigmentosa. A panel of 182 retinopathy-associated genes was sequenced to locate disease-causing mutations in patients with inherited retinopathies. Sequencing revealed a novel homozygous truncating mutation in the GNAT1 gene in a patient with significant pigmentary disturbance and constriction of visual fields, a presentation consistent with retinitis pigmentosa. This is the first report of a patient homozygous for a complete loss-of-function GNAT1 mutation. The clinical data from this patient provide definitive evidence of retinitis pigmentosa with late onset in addition to the lifelong night-blindness that would be expected from a lack of transducin function. These data suggest that some truncating GNAT1 variants can indeed cause a recessive, mild, late-onset retinal degeneration in human beings rather than just stationary night-blindness as reported previously, with notable similarities to the phenotype of the Gnat1 knockout mouse. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Fields

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD, Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  7. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Mark; Cai, Hui; Gong, Jie; Del Priore, Lucian

    2016-12-08

    The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  8. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for the study and treatment of retinal degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; Songstad, Allison E; Drack, Arlene V; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2015-01-01

    Vision is the sense that we use to navigate the world around us. Thus it is not surprising that blindness is one of people's most feared maladies. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, collectively affecting as many as one-third of all people over the age of 75, to some degree. For decades, scientists have dreamed of preventing vision loss or of restoring the vision of patients affected with retinal degeneration through drug therapy, gene augmentation or a cell-based transplantation approach. In this review we will discuss the use of the induced pluripotent stem cell technology to model and develop various treatment modalities for the treatment of inherited retinal degenerative disease. We will focus on the use of iPSCs for interrogation of disease pathophysiology, analysis of drug and gene therapeutics and as a source of autologous cells for cell transplantation and replacement. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Gene therapy for inherited retinal and optic nerve degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nicholas A; Morral, Nuria; Ciulla, Thomas A; Bracha, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The eye is a target for investigational gene therapy due to the monogenic nature of many inherited retinal and optic nerve degenerations (IRD), its accessibility, tight blood-ocular barrier, the ability to non-invasively monitor for functional and anatomic outcomes, as well as its relative immune privileged state.Vectors currently used in IRD clinical trials include adeno-associated virus (AAV), small single-stranded DNA viruses, and lentivirus, RNA viruses of the retrovirus family. Both can transduce non-dividing cells, but AAV are non-integrating, while lentivirus integrate into the host cell genome, and have a larger transgene capacity. Areas covered: This review covers Leber's congenital amaurosis, choroideremia, retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, Stargardt disease, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, Achromatopsia, and X-linked retinoschisis. Expert opinion: Despite great potential, gene therapy for IRD raises many questions, including the potential for less invasive intravitreal versus subretinal delivery, efficacy, safety, and longevity of response, as well as acceptance of novel study endpoints by regulatory bodies, patients, clinicians, and payers. Also, ultimate adoption of gene therapy for IRD will require widespread genetic screening to identify and diagnose patients based on genotype instead of phenotype.

  10. Correlation between SD-OCT, immunocytochemistry and functional findings in a pigmented animal model of retinal degeneration

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    Nicolás eCuenca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The P23H rhodopsin mutation is an autosomal dominant cause of retinitis pigmentosa. The degeneration can be tracked using different anatomical and functional methods. In our case, we evaluated the anatomical changes using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT and correlated the findings with retinal thickness values determined by immunocytochemistry.Methods: Pigmented rats heterozygous for the P23H mutation, with ages between P18 and P180 were studied. Function was assessed by means of optomotor testing and ERGs. Retinal thicknesses measurements, autofluorescence and fluorescein angiography were performed using Spectralis OCT. Retinas were studied by means of immunohistochemistry. Results: Between P30 and P180, visual acuity decreased from 0.500 to 0.182 cycles per degree (cyc/deg and contrast sensitivity decreased from 54.56 to 2.98 for a spatial frequency of 0.089 cyc/deg. Only cone-driven b-wave responses reached developmental maturity. Flicker fusions were also comparable at P29 (42 Hz. Double flash-isolated rod-driven responses were already affected at P29. Photopic responses revealed deterioration after P29.A reduction in retinal thicknesses and morphological modifications were seen in OCT sections. Statistically significant differences were found in all evaluated thicknesses. Autofluorescence was seen in P23H rats as sparse dots. Immunocytochemistry showed a progressive decrease in the outer nuclear layer, and morphological changes. Although anatomical thickness measures were significantly lower than OCT values, there was a very strong correlation between the values measured by both techniques.Conclusions: In pigmented P23H rats, a progressive deterioration occurs in both retinal function and anatomy. Anatomical changes can be effectively evaluated using SD-OCT and immunocytochemistry, with a good correlation between their values, thus making SD-OCT an important tool for research in retinal degeneration.

  11. 17β-Estradiol up-regulates Nrf2 via PI3K/AKT and estrogen receptor signaling pathways to suppress light-induced degeneration in rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C; Wang, S; Wang, B; Du, F; Hu, C; Li, H; Feng, Y; Zhu, R; Mo, M; Cao, Y; Li, A; Yu, X

    2015-09-24

    Human age-related retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), are intimately associated with decreased tissue oxygenation and hypoxia. Different antioxidants have been investigated to reverse AMD. In the present study, we describe the antioxidant 17β-estradiol (βE2) and investigate its protective effects on retinal neurons. Fourteen days after ovariectomy, adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 8000-lux light for 12h to induce retinal degeneration. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were assessed by confocal fluorescence microscopy using 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression were detected by real-time PCR. Western blotting was used to evaluate NRF2 activation. NRF2 translocation was determined by immunohistochemistry, with morphological changes monitored by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Following light exposure, βE2 significantly reduced ROS production. βE2 also up-regulated NRF2 mRNA and protein levels, with maximal expression at 4 and 12h post-exposure, respectively. Interestingly, following βE2 administration, NRF2 was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, primarily in the outer nuclear layer. βE2 also up-regulated NRF2, which triggered phase-2 antioxidant enzyme expression (superoxide dismutases 1 and 2, catalase, glutaredoxins 1 and 2, and thioredoxins 1 and 2), reduced ROS production, and ameliorated retinal damage. However, the beneficial effects of βE2 were markedly suppressed by pretreatment with LY294002 or ICI182780, specific inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt (PI3K/AKT), and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling pathways, respectively. Taken together, these observations suggest that βE2 exerts antioxidative effects following light-induced retinal degeneration potentially via NRF2 activation. This protective mechanism may depend on two pathways: a rapid, non-genomic-type PI3K/AKT response, and a genomic-type ER

  12. Curcumin inhibits neuronal and vascular degeneration in retina after ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Wang

    Full Text Available Neuron loss, glial activation and vascular degeneration are common sequelae of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury in ocular diseases. The present study was conducted to explore the ability of curcumin to inhibit retinal I/R injury, and to investigate underlying mechanisms of the drug effects.Different dosages of curcumin were administered. I/R injury was induced by elevating the intraocular pressure for 60 min followed by reperfusion. Cell bodies, brn3a stained cells and TUNEL positive apoptotic cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL were quantitated, and the number of degenerate capillaries was assessed. The activation of glial cells was measured by the expression level of GFAP. Signaling pathways including IKK-IκBα, JAK-STAT1/3, ERK/MAPK and the expression levels of β-tubulin III and MCP-1 were measured by western blot analysis. Pre-treatment using 0.01%-0.25% curcumin in diets significantly inhibited I/R-induced cell loss in GCL. 0.05% curcumin pre-treatment inhibited I/R-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries, TUNEL-positive apoptotic cell death in the GCL, brn3a stained cell loss, the I/R-induced up-regulation of MCP-1, IKKα, p-IκBα and p-STAT3 (Tyr, and down-regulation of β-tubulin III. This dose showed no effect on injury-induced GFAP overexpression. Moreover, 0.05% curcumin administered 2 days after the injury also showed a vaso-protective effect.Curcumin protects retinal neurons and microvessels against I/R injury. The beneficial effects of curcumin on neurovascular degeneration may occur through its inhibitory effects on injury-induced activation of NF-κB and STAT3, and on over-expression of MCP-1. Curcumin may therefore serve as a promising candidate for retinal ischemic diseases.

  13. Stem Cell-Based Therapeutic Applications in Retinal Degenerative Diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Yiming; Enzmann Volker; Ildstad Suzanne T

    2011-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases that target photoreceptors or the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration (RD) is found in many different forms of retinal diseases including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, and glaucoma. Effective treatment for retinal degeneration has been widely investigated. Gene-replacement therapy has been shown to improve visual function in inheri...

  14. Loss of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium Leads to RPE65 Decrease and Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakurel, Aswin; Balmer, Delphine; Saba-El-Leil, Marc K; Kizilyaprak, Caroline; Daraspe, Jean; Humbel, Bruno M; Voisin, Laure; Le, Yun Z; von Lintig, Johannes; Meloche, Sylvain; Roduit, Raphaël

    2017-12-15

    Recent work suggested that the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is increased in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) patients and therefore could be an attractive therapeutic target. Notably, ERK1/2 pathway inhibitors are used in cancer therapy, with severe and noncharacterized ocular side effects. To decipher the role of ERK1/2 in RPE cells, we conditionally disrupted the Erk1 and Erk2 genes in mouse RPE. The loss of ERK1/2 activity resulted in a significant decrease in the level of RPE65 expression, a decrease in ocular retinoid levels concomitant with low visual function, and a rapid disorganization of RPE cells, ultimately leading to retinal degeneration. Our results identify the ERK1/2 pathway as a direct regulator of the visual cycle and a critical component of the viability of RPE and photoreceptor cells. Moreover, our results caution about the need for a very fine adjustment of kinase inhibition in cancer or ARMD treatment in order to avoid ocular side effects. Copyright © 2017 Pyakurel et al.

  15. [Preventive treatment of retinal detachment in aphakic eyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnault, F; Bregeat, P

    1977-01-01

    We have examined 243 cases with retinal detachment occurring within 6 months following cataract surgery. In 92 of them retinal tear was due to lattice degeneration, in 66 to snail track degeneration and in 17 to equatorial degeneration. 290 other patients had preventive treatments. In this group, there were only 10 cases of retinal detachment. 9 out of 22 patients who had no preventive treatment suffered retinal detachments. There are two reasons for the occurrence of this retinal detachment in the 6 months following cataract surgery in eyes where retinal degenerations are found: (1) surgical trauma even with cryoextraction is responsible for traction of the vitreous base, (2) rapid disappearance of the hyaluronic acid in the aphakic vitreous is responsible for the degradation of the vitreous with formation of large zones of liquid vitreous. When adhesion between the vitreous and the retinal degeneration area remains, the traction is responsible for retinal tear or retinal detachment. The importance of the preventive treatment of retinal lesions prior to cataract surgery should be stressed.

  16. Histological Characterization of the Dicer1 Mutant Zebrafish Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DICER1, a multidomain RNase III endoribonuclease, plays a critical role in microRNA (miRNA and RNA-interference (RNAi functional pathways. Loss of Dicer1 affects different developmental processes. Dicer1 is essential for retinal development and maintenance. DICER1 was recently shown to have another function of silencing the toxicity of Alu RNAs in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration. In this study, we characterized a Dicer1 mutant fish line, which carries a nonsense mutation (W1457Ter induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis. Zebrafish DICER1 protein is highly conserved in the evolution. Zebrafish Dicer1 is expressed at the earliest stages of zebrafish development and persists into late developmental stages; it is widely expressed in adult tissues. Homozygous Dicer1 mutant fish (DICER1W1457Ter/W1457Ter have an arrest in early growth with significantly smaller eyes and are dead at 14–18 dpf. Heterozygous Dicer1 mutant fish have similar retinal structure to that of control fish; the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells are normal with no sign of degeneration at the age of 20 months.

  17. Metabolic bone disease and central retinal degeneration in a kitten due to nutritional inadequacy of an all-meat raw diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lenox

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 5-month-old castrated male Sphynx kitten presented with left hindlimb lameness shortly after adoption. Prior to adoption, the breeder had fed the kitten an exclusively raw chicken diet. Radiographs revealed generalized osteopenia and a left tibia–fibula fracture. Ophthalmic examination revealed corneal vascularization and opacity in the right eye, and lesions suggestive of feline central retinal degeneration in the left eye. The patient’s diagnoses included metabolic bone disease and feline central retinal degeneration, which can result from taurine deficiency. The kitten’s nutritional diseases were managed with a complete and balanced canned diet designed for kitten growth and with taurine supplementation.

  18. Recessive NRL mutations in patients with clumped pigmentary retinal degeneration and relative preservation of blue cone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Koji M; Friedman, James S; Sandberg, Michael A; Swaroop, Anand; Berson, Eliot L; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2004-12-21

    Mice lacking the transcription factor Nrl have no rod photoreceptors and an increased number of short-wavelength-sensitive cones. Missense mutations in NRL are associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa; however, the phenotype associated with the loss of NRL function in humans has not been reported. We identified two siblings who carried two allelic mutations: a predicted null allele (L75fs) and a missense mutation (L160P) altering a highly conserved residue in the domain involved in DNA-binding-site recognition. In vitro luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the NRL-L160P mutant had severely reduced transcriptional activity compared with the WT NRL protein, consistent with a severe loss of function. The affected patients had night blindness since early childhood, consistent with a severe reduction in rod function. Color vision was normal, suggesting the presence of all cone color types; nevertheless, a comparison of central visual fields evaluated with white-on-white and blue-on-yellow light stimuli was consistent with a relatively enhanced function of short-wavelength-sensitive cones in the macula. The fundi had signs of retinal degeneration (such as vascular attenuation) and clusters of large, clumped, pigment deposits in the peripheral fundus at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium (clumped pigmentary retinal degeneration). Our report presents an unusual clinical phenotype in humans with loss-of-function mutations in NRL.

  19. Alterations in NMDA receptor expression during retinal degeneration in the RCS rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründer, T; Kohler, K; Guenther, E

    2001-01-01

    To determine how a progressive loss of photoreceptor cells and the concomitant loss of glutamatergic input to second-order neurons can affect inner-retinal signaling, glutamate receptor expression was analyzed in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat, an animal model of retinitis pigmentosa. Immunohistochemistry was performed on retinal sections of RCS rats and congenic controls between postnatal (P) day 3 and the aged adult (up to P350) using specific antibodies against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subunits. All NMDA subunits (NR1, NR2A-2D) were expressed in control and dystrophic retinas at all ages, and distinct patterns of labeling were found in horizontal cells, subpopulations of amacrine cells and ganglion cells, as well as in the outer and inner plexiform layer (IPL). NRI immunoreactivity in the inner plexiform layer of adult control retinas was concentrated in two distinct bands, indicating a synaptic localization of NMDA receptors in the OFF and ON signal pathways. In the RCS retina, these bands of NRI immunoreactivity in the IPL were much weaker in animals older than P40. In parallel, NR2B immunoreactivity in the outer plexiform layer (OPL) of RCS rats was always reduced compared to controls and vanished between P40 and P120. The most striking alteration observed in the degenerating retina, however, was a strong expression of NRI immunoreactivity in Müller cell processes in the inner retina which was not observed in control animals and which was present prior to any visible sign of photoreceptor degeneration. The results suggest functional changes in glutamatergic receptor signaling in the dystrophic retina and a possible involvement of Müller cells in early processes of this disease.

  20. Electrophysiological assessment of retinal function during 6 months of bevacizumab treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karen Bjerg; Møller, Flemming; Sjølie, Anne Katrin

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the alteration of retinal function by multifocal electroretinography and full-field electroretinography in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with bevacizumab. METHODS: We performed a prospective pilot study of 26 eyes of 26...... previously treatment-naïve patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration receiving intravitreal injections with 1.25 mg bevacizumab. Patients were examined with multifocal electroretinography, full-field electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity. Follow...

  1. Understanding the Function of Genes Involved in Inherited Retinal Degeneration-Insights into the Pathogenesis and Function of C8ORF37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Ali Sakawa

    Inherited retinal degenerative diseases (IRD) are a group of disorders that lead to progressive deterioration of mainly the photoreceptors. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) are two forms of IRDs. RP is the most common form of IRD and is due to rod photoreceptor degeneration followed by cone photoreceptor loss. CRD, on the other hand, is characterized by the loss of cones or the concurrent degeneration of both cones and rods. Both RP and CRD are presently incurable. More than 200 genes have been identified to cause IRDs and the functions of many of these genes remain unclear. Mutations in a novel gene, C8ORF37, were identified to cause recessive, severe, and early-onset RP and CRD. I, therefore, pioneered in characterizing the role of C8ORF37 in the retina. This dissertation is comprised of four chapters that is organized as follows: (1) summary of an ocular disorder (2) a genetic model of a retinal disorder (3) biochemical/proteomic analysis of C8ORF37 (4) potential clinical applications. A summary of ocular disorders is discussed in Chapter 1, with an emphasis on CRD. Chapter 2 focuses on the generation and characterization of C8orf37 mutant mouse models that recapitulate the retinal pathologies observed in human patients. In C8orf37 knockout retinas, the outer segment (OS) was nonuniform, swollen, and wider in width when compared to the controls. Moreover, many OS membrane proteins were reduced in the retina of C8orf37 knockout, including CNGB1 and RDS, proteins essential for OS disc morphogenesis and alignment. Our findings shed new light on the pathogenesis underlying retinal dysfunction and degeneration in C8ORF37-deficient patients. To determine the function of a novel protein, a powerful approach is by identifying its binding partners. In Chapter 3, I discuss GST pull-down using bovine retinal lysates, yeast-two-hybrid, and immunoprecipitation with mouse retinal lysate in order to identify C8ORF37-interacting proteins. Our pull

  2. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor Reduces Apoptosis and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Gene Expression in a Murine Model of Focal Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujuan Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AMD (age-related macular degeneration is a neurodegenerative disease causing irreversible central blindness in the elderly. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in AMD pathogenesis. PEDF (pigment epithelium-derived factor is a potent neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory glycoprotein that protects the retinal neurons and photoreceptors against cell death caused by pathological insults. We studied the effects of PEDF on focal retinal lesions in DKO rd8 (Ccl2 −/− /Cx3cr1 −/− on C57BL/6N [Crb1rd8 ] mice, a model for progressive, focal rd (retinal degeneration. First, we found a significant decrease in PEDF transcript expression in DKO rd8 mouse retina and RPE (retinal pigment epithelium than WT (wild-type, C57BL/6N. Next, cultured DKO rd8 RPE cells secreted lower levels of PEDF protein in the media than WT. Then the right eyes of DKO rd8 mice were injected intravitreously with recombinant human PEDF protein (1 μg, followed by a subconjunctival injection of PEDF (3 μg 4 weeks later. The untreated left eyes served as controls. The effect of PEDF was assessed by fundoscopy, ocular histopathology and A2E {[2,6-dimethyl-8-(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl-1E,3E,5E,7E-octatetra-enyl]-1-(2-hydroxyethyl-4-[4-methyl-6(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl 1E,3E,5E,7E-hexatrienyl]-pyridinium} levels, as well as apoptotic and inflammatory molecules. The PEDF-treated eyes showed slower progression or attenuation of the focal retinal lesions, fewer and/or smaller photoreceptor and RPE degeneration, and significantly lower A2E, relative to the untreated eyes. In addition, lower expression of apoptotic and inflammatory molecules were detected in the PEDF-treated than untreated eyes. Our results establish that PEDF potently stabilizes photoreceptor degeneration via suppression of both apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. The multiple beneficial effects of PEDF represent a novel approach for potential AMD treatment.

  3. Pigment epithelium-derived factor reduces apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in a murine model of focal retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujuan; Subramanian, Preeti; Shen, Defen; Tuo, Jingsheng; Becerra, S Patricia; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-11-26

    AMD (age-related macular degeneration) is a neurodegenerative disease causing irreversible central blindness in the elderly. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in AMD pathogenesis. PEDF (pigment epithelium-derived factor) is a potent neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory glycoprotein that protects the retinal neurons and photoreceptors against cell death caused by pathological insults. We studied the effects of PEDF on focal retinal lesions in DKO rd8 (Ccl2(-/-)/Cx3cr1(-/-) on C57BL/6N [Crb1(rd8)]) mice, a model for progressive, focal rd (retinal degeneration). First, we found a significant decrease in PEDF transcript expression in DKO rd8 mouse retina and RPE (retinal pigment epithelium) than WT (wild-type, C57BL/6N). Next, cultured DKO rd8 RPE cells secreted lower levels of PEDF protein in the media than WT. Then the right eyes of DKO rd8 mice were injected intravitreously with recombinant human PEDF protein (1 μg), followed by a subconjunctival injection of PEDF (3 μg) 4 weeks later. The untreated left eyes served as controls. The effect of PEDF was assessed by fundoscopy, ocular histopathology and A2E {[2,6-dimethyl-8-(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E,7E-octatetra-enyl]-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-[4-methyl-6(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl) 1E,3E,5E,7E-hexatrienyl]-pyridinium} levels, as well as apoptotic and inflammatory molecules. The PEDF-treated eyes showed slower progression or attenuation of the focal retinal lesions, fewer and/or smaller photoreceptor and RPE degeneration, and significantly lower A2E, relative to the untreated eyes. In addition, lower expression of apoptotic and inflammatory molecules were detected in the PEDF-treated than untreated eyes. Our results establish that PEDF potently stabilizes photoreceptor degeneration via suppression of both apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. The multiple beneficial effects of PEDF represent a novel approach for potential AMD treatment.

  4. Segmentation and quantification of retinal lesions in age-related macular degeneration using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Gotzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Sattmann, Harald; Schuutze, Christopher; Schlanitz, Ferdinand; Ahlers, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2010-01-01

    We present polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for quantitative assessment of retinal pathologies in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). On the basis of the polarization scrambling characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium, novel segmentation algorithms were developed that allow one to segment pathologic features such as drusen and atrophic zones in dry AMD as well as to determine their dimensions. Results from measurements in the eyes of AMD patients prove the ability of PS-OCT for quantitative imaging based on the retinal features polarizing properties. Repeatability measurements were performed in retinas diagnosed with drusen and geographic atrophy in order to evaluate the performance of the described methods. PS-OCT appears as a promising imaging modality for three-dimensional retinal imaging and ranging with additional contrast based on the structures' tissue-inherent polarization properties.

  5. A novel NR2E3 gene mutation in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with cystic maculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, D.; Votruba, Marcela

    2017-01-01

    NR2E3 is a gene that encodes for photoreceptor cell specific nuclear receptor, which is involved in cone proliferation. The splice site mutation 119-2A>C in NR2E3 (15q23) has been previously reported to underlie recessive enhanced cone S sensitivity syndrome, clumped pigmentary retinal degeneration, Goldman-Favre syndrome and also autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). However, the mutation c 571 + 2 T > C in NR2E3 has not been previously reported with retinal d...

  6. Measurement of Retinal Sensitivity on Tablet Devices in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhichao; Guymer, Robyn H; Jung, Chang J; Goh, Jonathan K; Ayton, Lauren N; Luu, Chi D; Lawson, David J; Turpin, Andrew; McKendrick, Allison M

    2015-06-01

    We compared measurements of central retinal sensitivity on a portable, low-cost tablet device to the established method of microperimetry in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A customized test designed to measure central retinal sensitivity (within the central 1° radius) on a tablet device was developed using an open-source platform called PsyPad. A total of 30 participants with AMD were included in this study, and all participants performed a practice test on PsyPad, followed by four tests of one eye and one test of the other eye. Participants then underwent standardized microperimetry examinations in both eyes. The average test duration on PsyPad was 53.9 ± 7.5 seconds, and no significant learning effect was observed over the examinations performed ( P = 1.000). The coefficient of repeatability of central retinal sensitivity between the first two examinations on PsyPad was ±1.76 dB. The mean central retinal sensitivity was not significantly different between PsyPad (25.7 ± 0.4 dB) and microperimetry (26.1 ± 0.4 dB, P = 0.094), and the 95% limits of agreement between the two measures were between -4.12 and 4.92 dB. The measurements of central retinal sensitivity can be performed effectively using a tablet device, displaying reasonably good agreement with those obtained using the established method of microperimetry. These findings highlight the potential of tablet devices as low-cost and portable tools for developing and performing visual function measures that can be easily and widely implemented.

  7. Correlations between specific patterns of spontaneous activity and stimulation efficiency in degenerated retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Haselier

    Full Text Available Retinal prostheses that are currently used to restore vision in patients suffering from retinal degeneration are not adjusted to the changes occurring during the remodeling process of the retina. Recent studies revealed abnormal rhythmic activity in the retina of genetic mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa. Here we describe this abnormal activity also in a pharmacologically-induced (MNU mouse model of retinal degeneration. To investigate how this abnormal activity affects the excitability of retinal ganglion cells, we recorded the electrical activity from whole mounted retinas of rd10 mice and MNU-treated mice using a microelectrode array system and applied biphasic current pulses of different amplitude and duration to stimulate ganglion cells electrically. We show that the electrical stimulation efficiency is strongly reduced in degenerated retinas, in particular when abnormal activity such as oscillations and rhythmic firing of bursts of action potentials can be observed. Using a prestimulus pulse sequence, we could abolish rhythmic retinal activity. Under these conditions, the stimulation efficiency was enhanced in a few cases but not in the majority of tested cells. Nevertheless, this approach supports the idea that modified stimulation protocols could help to improve the efficiency of retinal prostheses in the future.

  8. Gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations: initial successes and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priya R.; Huckfeldt, Rachel M.

    2017-10-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of conditions that have historically shared an untreatable course. In recent years, however, a wide range of therapeutic strategies have demonstrated efficacy in preclinical studies and entered clinical trials with a common goal of improving visual function for patients affected with these conditions. Gene therapy offers a particularly elegant and precise opportunity to target the causative genetic mutations underlying these monogenic diseases. The present review will provide an overview of gene therapy with particular emphasis on key clinical results to date and challenges for the future.

  9. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  10. Outcomes in Eyes with Retinal Angiomatous Proliferation in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Ebenezer; Shaffer, James; Ying, Gui-shuang; Grunwald, Juan E; Martin, Daniel F; Jaffe, Glenn J; Maguire, Maureen G

    2016-03-01

    To compare baseline characteristics, visual acuity (VA), and morphologic outcomes between eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) and all other eyes among patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD) treated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs. Prospective cohort study within the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT). Patients with NVAMD. Reading center staff evaluated digital color fundus photographs, fluorescein angiography (FA) images, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans of eyes with NVAMD treated with either ranibizumab or bevacizumab over a 2-year period. Retinal angiomatous proliferation was identified by the intense intra-retinal leakage of fluorescein in combination with other associated features. Visual acuity; fluorescein leakage; scar; geographic atrophy (GA) on FA; retinal thickness, fluid, and subretinal hyperreflective material (SHRM) on OCT; and the number of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections at 1 and 2 years. Retinal angiomatous proliferation was present in 126 of 1183 (10.7%) study eyes at baseline. Mean VA improvement from baseline was greater (10.6 vs. 6.9 letters; P = 0.01) at 1 year, but similar at 2 years (7.8 vs. 6.2 letters; P = 0.34). At 1 year, eyes with RAP were more likely to have no fluid (46% vs. 26%; P treatment in CATT, eyes with RAP were less likely to have fluid, FA leakage, scar, and SHRM and more likely to have GA than eyes without RAP. Mean improvement in VA was similar at 2 years. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Retinopathy of prematurity: inflammation, choroidal degeneration, and novel promising therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, José Carlos; Holm, Mari; Austeng, Dordi; Morken, Tora Sund; Zhou, Tianwei Ellen; Beaudry-Richard, Alexandra; Sierra, Estefania Marin; Dammann, Olaf; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2017-08-22

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is an important cause of childhood blindness globally, and the incidence is rising. The disease is characterized by initial arrested retinal vascularization followed by neovascularization and ensuing retinal detachment causing permanent visual loss. Although neovascularization can be effectively treated via retinal laser ablation, it is unknown which children are at risk of entering this vision-threatening phase of the disease. Laser ablation may itself induce visual field deficits, and there is therefore a need to identify targets for novel and less destructive treatments of ROP. Inflammation is considered a key contributor to the pathogenesis of ROP. A large proportion of preterm infants with ROP will have residual visual loss linked to loss of photoreceptor (PR) and the integrity of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the macular region. Recent studies using animal models of ROP suggest that choroidal degeneration may be associated with a loss of integrity of the outer retina, a phenomenon so far largely undescribed in ROP pathogenesis. In this review, we highlight inflammatory and neuron-derived factors related to ROP progression, as well, potential targets for new treatment strategies. We also introduce choroidal degeneration as a significant cause of residual visual loss following ROP. We propose that ROP should no longer be considered an inner retinal vasculopathy only, but also a disease of choroidal degeneration affecting both retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor integrity.

  12. Retinal pigment epithelial detachments and tears, and progressive retinal degeneration in light chain deposition disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Leigh H; Heckenlively, John R; Leys, Anita M

    2013-05-01

    Light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) is a rare condition characterised by deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (LCs) in tissues, resulting in varying degrees of organ dysfunction. This study reports the characteristic clinical ocular findings seen in advanced LCDD upon development of ocular fundus changes. This is the first report to describe this entity in vivo in a series of patients. A case series of ocular fundus changes in three patients with kidney biopsy-proven LCDD. All patients underwent best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) exam, perimetry, colour fundus photography and fluorescein angiography; two patients underwent indocyanine green angiography, optical coherence tomography, ultrasound and electroretinography; and one patient underwent fundus autofluorescence. Three patients, 53-60 years old at initial presentation, were studied. All three presented with night blindness, poor dark adaptation, metamorphopsia and visual loss. Examination revealed serous and serohaemorrhagic detachments, multiple retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tears, diffuse RPE degeneration and progressive fibrotic changes. Neither choroidal neovascularisation nor other vascular abnormalities were present. Final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/40 to 20/300. Progressive LC deposition in the fundus seems to damage RPE pump function with flow disturbance between choroid and retina. This pathogenesis can explain the evolution to RPE detachments and subsequent rips and progressive retinal malfunction.

  13. Biochemical Measurements of Free Opsin in Macular Degeneration Eyes: Examining the 11-CIS Retinal Deficiency Hypothesis of Delayed Dark Adaptation (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanneken, Anne; Neikirk, Thomas; Johnson, Jennifer; Kono, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that delayed dark adaptation in patients with macular degeneration is due to an excess of free unliganded opsin (apo-opsin) and a deficiency of the visual chromophore, 11 -cis retinal, in rod outer segments. A total of 50 human autopsy eyes were harvested from donors with and without macular degeneration within 2-24 hrs. postmortem. Protocols were developed which permitted dark adaptation of normal human eyes after death and enucleation. Biochemical methods of purifying rod outer segments were optimized and the concentration of rhodopsin and apo-opsin was measured with UV-visible scanning spectroscopy. The presence of apo-opsin was calculated by measuring the difference in the rhodopsin absorption spectra before and after the addition of 11 -cis retinal. A total of 20 normal eyes and 16 eyes from donors with early, intermediate and advanced stages of macular degeneration were included in the final analysis. Dark adaptation was achieved by harvesting whole globes in low light, transferring into dark (light-proof) canisters and dissecting the globes using infrared light and image converters for visualization. Apo-opsin was readily detected in positive controls after the addition of 11 -cis retinal. Normal autopsy eyes showed no evidence of apo-opsin. Eyes with macular degeneration also showed no evidence of apo-opsin, regardless of the severity of disease. Methods have been developed to study dark adaptation in human autopsy eyes. Eyes with age-related macular degeneration do not show a deficiency of 11 -cis retinal or an excess of apo-opsin within rod outer segments.

  14. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Delay Retinal Degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons Rats Through Anti-Apoptotic and VEGF-Mediated Neuroprotective Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Wang, J; Gao, F; Zhang, J; Tian, H; Shi, X; Lian, C; Sun, Y; Li, W; Xu, J-Y; Li, P; Zhang, J; Gao, Z; Xu, J; Wang, F; Lu, L; Xu, G-T

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic approach for retinal degeneration (RD). Our study investigated the effects of human adipose derived stem cell (hADSCs) on Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled hADSCs were transplanted subretinally into RCS rats at postnatal (PN) 21 days to explore potential therapeutic effects, while adeno-associated viral vector (AAV2)-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and siVEGF-hADSCs were used to aid the mechanistic dissections. Visual function was evaluated by Electroretinogram (ERG) recording. Potential transdifferentiations were examined by Immunofluorescence (IF) and gene expressions were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Apoptotic retinal cells were detected by Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) assay and the cytokines secreted by hADSCs were measured by Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The visual function of RCS rats began to decrease one week after their eyes opened at PN week 3 and almost lost in PN 5 weeks, accompanied by the loss of retinal outer nuclear layer (ONL). Subretinal transplantation of hADSCs significantly improved the visual function 2 weeks after the transplantation and such therapeutic effect persisted up to 8 weeks after the treatment (PN 11 weeks), with 3-4 rows of photoreceptors remained in the ONL and reduced apoptosis. Consistent with these phenotypic changes, the gene expression of rod photoreceptor markers Rhodopsin (Rho), Crx and Opsin (Opn1) in RCS rats showed obvious decreasing trends over time after PN 3 weeks, but were elevated with hADSC treatment. hADSC transplantation also repressed the expressions of Bax, Bak and Caspase 3, but not the expression of anti-apoptotic genes, including Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Finally, substantial VEGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) secretions from hADSCs were detected, while endogenous

  15. Gene expression changes in the retina following subretinal injection of human neural progenitor cells into a rodent model for retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Melissa K; Lu, Bin; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases (RDDs) affect millions of people and are the leading cause of vision loss. Although treatment options for RDDs are limited, stem and progenitor cell-based therapies have great potential to halt or slow the progression of vision loss. Our previous studies have shown that a single subretinal injection of human forebrain derived neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) into the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) retinal degenerate rat offers long-term preservation of photoreceptors and visual function. Furthermore, neural progenitor cells are currently in clinical trials for treating age-related macular degeneration; however, the molecular mechanisms of stem cell-based therapies are largely unknown. This is the first study to analyze gene expression changes in the retina of RCS rats following subretinal injection of hNPCs using high-throughput sequencing. RNA-seq data of retinas from RCS rats injected with hNPCs (RCS(hNPCs)) were compared to sham surgery in RCS (RCS(sham)) and wild-type Long Evans (LE(sham)) rats. Differential gene expression patterns were determined with in silico analysis and confirmed with qRT-PCR. Function, biologic, cellular component, and pathway analyses were performed on differentially expressed genes and investigated with immunofluorescent staining experiments. Analysis of the gene expression data sets identified 1,215 genes that were differentially expressed between RCS(sham) and LE(sham) samples. Additionally, 283 genes were differentially expressed between the RCS(hNPCs) and RCS(sham) samples. Comparison of these two gene sets identified 68 genes with inverse expression (termed rescue genes), including Pdc, Rp1, and Cdc42ep5. Functional, biologic, and cellular component analyses indicate that the immune response is enhanced in RCS(sham). Pathway analysis of the differential expression gene sets identified three affected pathways in RCS(hNPCs), which all play roles in phagocytosis signaling. Immunofluorescent staining

  16. Loss of Arf4 causes severe degeneration of the exocrine pancreas but not cystic kidney disease or retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian N Pearring

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Arf4 is proposed to be a critical regulator of membrane protein trafficking in early secretory pathway. More recently, Arf4 was also implicated in regulating ciliary trafficking, however, this has not been comprehensively tested in vivo. To directly address Arf4's role in ciliary transport, we deleted Arf4 specifically in either rod photoreceptor cells, kidney, or globally during the early postnatal period. Arf4 deletion in photoreceptors did not cause protein mislocalization or retinal degeneration, as expected if Arf4 played a role in protein transport to the ciliary outer segment. Likewise, Arf4 deletion in kidney did not cause cystic disease, as expected if Arf4 were involved in general ciliary trafficking. In contrast, global Arf4 deletion in the early postnatal period resulted in growth restriction, severe pancreatic degeneration and early death. These findings are consistent with Arf4 playing a critical role in endomembrane trafficking, particularly in the pancreas, but not in ciliary function.

  17. Optical coherent tomography in diagnoses of peripheral retinal degenarations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Pozdeyeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Studying the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (RTVue-100, OPTOVUE, USA in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions, adjacent vitreous body as well as measurement of morphometric data.Methods: The study included 189 patients (239 eyes with peripheral retinal degeneration. 77 men and 112 women aged 18 to 84 underwent an ophthalmologic examination since November 2012 until October 2013. The peripheral retina was visualized with the help of optical coherence tomography («RTVue-100,» USA. The fundography was carried out using a Nikon NF505‑AF (Japan fundus camera. All patients were examined with a Goldmann lens.Results: Optical coherence tomography was used to evaluate different kinds of peripheral retinal degenerations, such as lattice and snail track degeneration, isolated retinal tears, cystoid retinal degeneration, pathological hyperpigmentation, retinoschisis and cobblestone degeneration. The following morphometric data were studied: dimensions of the lesion (average length, retinal thickness along the edge of the lesion, retinal thickness at the base of the lesion and the vitreoretinal interface.Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is a promising in vivo visualization method which is useful in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions and tractions. It also provides a comprehensive protocolling system and monitoring. It will enable ophthalmologists to better define laser and surgical treatment indications and evaluate therapy effectiveness.

  18. Optical coherent tomography in diagnoses of peripheral retinal degenarations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Pozdeyeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Studying the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (RTVue-100, OPTOVUE, USA in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions, adjacent vitreous body as well as measurement of morphometric data.Methods: The study included 189 patients (239 eyes with peripheral retinal degeneration. 77 men and 112 women aged 18 to 84 underwent an ophthalmologic examination since November 2012 until October 2013. The peripheral retina was visualized with the help of optical coherence tomography («RTVue-100,» USA. The fundography was carried out using a Nikon NF505‑AF (Japan fundus camera. All patients were examined with a Goldmann lens.Results: Optical coherence tomography was used to evaluate different kinds of peripheral retinal degenerations, such as lattice and snail track degeneration, isolated retinal tears, cystoid retinal degeneration, pathological hyperpigmentation, retinoschisis and cobblestone degeneration. The following morphometric data were studied: dimensions of the lesion (average length, retinal thickness along the edge of the lesion, retinal thickness at the base of the lesion and the vitreoretinal interface.Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is a promising in vivo visualization method which is useful in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions and tractions. It also provides a comprehensive protocolling system and monitoring. It will enable ophthalmologists to better define laser and surgical treatment indications and evaluate therapy effectiveness.

  19. Posterior lattice degeneration characterized by spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Varsha; Taha, Mohammed; Fujimoto, James G; Duker, Jay S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to use high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography in the characterization of retinal and vitreal morphological changes overlying posterior lattice degeneration. A cross-sectional retrospective analysis was performed on 13 eyes of 13 nonconsecutive subjects with posterior lattice degeneration seen at the New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center between October 2009 and January 2010. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography images taken through the region of lattice degeneration were qualitatively analyzed. Four characteristic changes of the retina and vitreous were seen in the 13 eyes with lattice degeneration: 1) anterior/posterior U-shaped vitreous traction; 2) retinal breaks; 3) focal retinal thinning; and 4) vitreous membrane formation. The morphologic appearance of vitreous traction and retinal breaks were found to be consistent with previous histologic reports. It is possible to image posterior lattice degeneration in many eyes using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and to visualize the spectrum of retinal and vitreous changes throughout the area of lattice degeneration.

  20. Retinal vascular caliber, iris color, and age-related macular degeneration in the Irish Nun Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Amy; Silvestri, Giuliana; Moore, Evelyn; Silvestri, Vittorio; Patterson, Christopher C; Maxwell, Alexander P; McKay, Gareth J

    2014-12-18

    To evaluate the relationship between retinal vascular caliber (RVC), iris color, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in elderly Irish nuns. Data from 1233 participants in the cross-sectional observational Irish Nun Eye Study were assessed from digital photographs with a standardized protocol using computer-assisted software. Macular images were graded according to the modified Wisconsin Age-related Maculopathy Grading System. Regression models were used to assess associations, adjusting for age, mean arterial blood pressure, body mass index, refraction, and fellow RVC. In total, 1122 (91%) participants had gradable retinal images of sufficient quality for vessel assessment (mean age: 76.3 years [range, 56-100 years]). In an unadjusted analysis, we found some support for a previous finding that individuals with blue iris color had narrower retinal venules compared to those with brown iris color (P < 0.05), but this was no longer significant after adjustment. Age-related macular degeneration status was categorized as no AMD, any AMD, and late AMD only. Individuals with any AMD (early or late AMD) had significantly narrower arterioles and venules compared to those with no AMD in an unadjusted analysis, but this was no longer significant after adjustment. A nonsignificant reduced risk of any AMD or late AMD only was observed in association with brown compared to blue iris color, in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Retinal vascular caliber was not significantly associated with iris color or early/late AMD after adjustment for confounders. A lower but nonsignificant AMD risk was observed in those with brown compared to blue iris color. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  1. Retinal genes are differentially expressed in areas of primary versus secondary degeneration following partial optic nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam Chiha

    Full Text Available Partial transection (PT of the optic nerve is an established experimental model of secondary degeneration in the central nervous system. After a dorsal transection, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs with axons in ventral optic nerve are intact but vulnerable to secondary degeneration, whereas RGCs in dorsal retina with dorsal axons are affected by primary and secondary injuries. Using microarray, we quantified gene expression changes in dorsal and ventral retina at 1 and 7 days post PT, to characterize pathogenic pathways linked to primary and secondary degeneration.In comparison to uninjured retina Cryba1, Cryba2 and Crygs, were significantly downregulated in injured dorsal retina at days 1 and 7. While Ecel1, Timp1, Mt2A and CD74, which are associated with reducing excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation, were significantly upregulated. Genes associated with oxygen binding pathways, immune responses, cytokine receptor activity and apoptosis were enriched in dorsal retina at day 1 after PT. Oxygen binding and apoptosis remained enriched at day 7, as were pathways involved in extracellular matrix modification. Fewer changes were observed in ventral retina at day 1 after PT, most associated with the regulation of protein homodimerization activity. By day 7, apoptosis, matrix organization and signal transduction pathways were enriched. Discriminant analysis was also performed for specific functional gene groups to compare expression intensities at each time point. Altered expression of selected genes (ATF3, GFAP, Ecel1, TIMP1, Tp53 and proteins (GFAP, ECEL1 and ATF3 were semi-quantitatively assessed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry respectively.There was an acute and complex primary injury response in dorsal retina indicative of a dynamic interaction between neuroprotective and neurodegenerative events; ventral retina vulnerable to secondary degeneration showed a delayed injury response. Both primary and secondary injury resulted in the

  2. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... degenerate. Forms of RP and related diseases include Usher syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, and Bardet-Biedl syndrome, among ...

  3. Loosely coupled level sets for retinal layers and drusen segmentation in subjects with dry age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novosel, J.; Wang, Ziyuan; De Jong, Henk; Vermeer, K.A.; van Vliet, L.J.; Styner, Martin A.; Angelini, Elsa D.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to produce high-resolution three-dimensional images of the retina, which permit the investigation of retinal irregularities. In dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic eye disease that causes central vision loss, disruptions such as drusen and

  4. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, A.; Gorgels, T.G.M.F.; ten Brink, J.B.; van der Spek, P.J.; Bossers, K.; Heine, V.M.; Bergen, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to

  5. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles : Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Ten Brink, Jacoline B; van der Spek, Peter J; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M; Bergen, Arthur A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to

  6. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new

  7. Imaging retinal degeneration in mice by combining Fourier domain optical coherence tomography and fluorescent scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein-Javaheri, Nima; Molday, Laurie L.; Xu, Jing; Molday, Robert S.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2009-02-01

    Visualization of the internal structures of the retina is critical for clinical diagnosis and monitoring of pathology as well as for medical research investigating the root causes of retinal degeneration. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is emerging as the preferred technique for non-contact sub-surface depth-resolved imaging of the retina. The high resolution cross sectional images acquired in vivo by OCT can be compared to histology to visually delineate the retinal layers. The recent demonstration of the significant sensitivity increase obtained through use of Fourier domain (FD) detection with OCT has been used to facilitate high speed scanning for volumetric reconstruction of the retina in software. The images acquired by OCT are purely structural, relying on refractive index differences in the tissue for contrast, and do not provide information on the molecular content of the sample. We have constructed a FDOCT prototype and combined it with a fluorescent Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (fSLO) to permit real time alignment of the field of view on the retina. The alignment of the FDOCT system to the specimen is crucial for the registration of measurements taken throughout longitudinal studies. In addition, fluorescence detection has been integrated with the SLO to enable the en face localization of a molecular contrast signal, which is important for retinal angiography, and also for detection of autofluorescence associated with some forms of retinal degeneration, for example autofluorescence lipofuscin accumulations are associated with Stargardt's Macular Dystrophy. The integrated FD OCT/fSLO system was investigated for imaging the retina of the mice in vivo.

  8. Degenerate ground states and multiple bifurcations in a two-dimensional q-state quantum Potts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yan-Wei; Cho, Sam Young; Batchelor, Murray T; Zhou, Huan-Qiang

    2014-06-01

    We numerically investigate the two-dimensional q-state quantum Potts model on the infinite square lattice by using the infinite projected entangled-pair state (iPEPS) algorithm. We show that the quantum fidelity, defined as an overlap measurement between an arbitrary reference state and the iPEPS ground state of the system, can detect q-fold degenerate ground states for the Z_{q} broken-symmetry phase. Accordingly, a multiple bifurcation of the quantum ground-state fidelity is shown to occur as the transverse magnetic field varies from the symmetry phase to the broken-symmetry phase, which means that a multiple-bifurcation point corresponds to a critical point. A (dis)continuous behavior of quantum fidelity at phase transition points characterizes a (dis)continuous phase transition. Similar to the characteristic behavior of the quantum fidelity, the magnetizations, as order parameters, obtained from the degenerate ground states exhibit multiple bifurcation at critical points. Each order parameter is also explicitly demonstrated to transform under the Z_{q} subgroup of the symmetry group of the Hamiltonian. We find that the q-state quantum Potts model on the square lattice undergoes a discontinuous (first-order) phase transition for q=3 and q=4 and a continuous phase transition for q=2 (the two-dimensional quantum transverse Ising model).

  9. Strain difference of cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in inbred Wistar-Imamichi and Fischer 344 rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Narumi, Rika [Kumamoto University, Faculty of Education, Kumamoto (Japan); Nagano, Masaaki; Yasutake, Akira [National Institute for Minamata Disease, Biochemistry Section, Kumamoto (Japan); Waalkes, Michael P. [National Cancer Institute at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Inorganic Carcinogenesis Section, Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Imamura, Yorishige [Kumamoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Previously, we reported that Wistar-Imamichi (WI) rats are highly resistant to cadmium (Cd)-induced lethality and hepatotoxicity compared to Fischer 344 (F344) rats. Since the testes are one of the most sensitive organs to acute Cd toxicity, we examined possible strain-related differences in Cd-induced testicular toxicity between inbred WI and F344 rats. Rats were treated with a single dose of 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg Cd/kg, as CdCl{sub 2}, sc and killed 24 h later. Cd at doses of 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg induced severe testicular hemorrhage, as assessed by pathological and testis hemoglobin content, in F344 rats, but not WI rats. After Cd treatment (2.0 mg/kg), the testicular Cd content was significantly lower in WI rats than in the F344 rats, indicating a toxiokinetic mechanism for the observed strain difference. Thus, the remarkable resistance to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in WI rats is associated, at least in part, with lower testicular accumulation of Cd. When zinc (Zn; 10 mg/kg, sc) was administered in combination with Cd (2.0 mg/kg) to F344 rats, the Cd-induced increase in testicular hemoglobin content, indicative of hemorrhage, was significantly reduced. Similarly, the testicular Cd content was significantly decreased with Zn co-treatment compared to Cd treatment alone. Thus, it can be concluded that the testicular Cd accumulation partly competes with Zn transport systems and that these systems may play an important role in the strain-related differences in Cd-induced testicular toxicity between WI and F344 rats. (orig.)

  10. [Factors related to intraoperative retinal breaks in macular hole surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, K; Ogino, N; Demizu, S; Atsumi, K; Kurihara, H; Iwaki, M; Ishigooka, H; Tachi, N

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the factors of intraoperative retinal breaks in macular hole surgery. This study included 558 eyes of 506 patients who underwent idiopathic macular hole surgery by one surgeon. Multiple regression was performed using the variables of gender, age, affected eye, lens status, stage, duration of symptoms, hole size, axial length, and lattice degeneration. The rate of retinal breaks was higher in stage 3 (16.0%) than in stage 4 (8.2%) (p = 0.014). In eyes with lattice degeneration intraoperative retinal breaks occurred in about 40% of the cases. Major factors were as follows: lattice degeneration (r = 0.24, p lattice degeneration, and gender (r = -0.18, p = 0.035) in eyes of stage 4 without lattice degeneration. The factors of intraoperative retinal breaks in macular hole surgery were lattice degeneration in all eyes and stage 3 in eyes without lattice degeneration. The high incidence of intraoperative retinal breaks in stage 3 was mainly due to the occurrence of posterior vitreous detachment. Male gender was a significant factor associated with intraoperative retinal breaks.

  11. Interleukin-17 retinotoxicity is prevented by gene transfer of a soluble interleukin-17 receptor acting as a cytokine blocker: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ardeljan

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common yet complex retinal degeneration that causes irreversible central blindness in the elderly. Pathology is widely believed to follow loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and photoreceptor degeneration. Here we report aberrant expression of interleukin-17A (IL17A and the receptor IL17RC in the macula of AMD patients. In vitro, IL17A induces RPE cell death characterized by the accumulation of cytoplasmic lipids and autophagosomes with subsequent activation of pro-apoptotic Caspase-3 and Caspase-9. This pathology is reduced by siRNA knockdown of IL17RC. IL17-dependent retinal degeneration in a mouse model of focal retinal degeneration can be prevented by gene therapy with adeno-associated virus vector encoding soluble IL17 receptor. This intervention rescues RPE and photoreceptors in a MAPK-dependent process. The IL17 pathway plays a key role in RPE and photoreceptor degeneration and could hold therapeutic potential in AMD.

  12. Recurrent central serous chorioretinopathy after peripheral retinal laser photocoagulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Francesco; Russo, Andrea; Delcassi, Luisa; Costagliola, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    To report a case of recurrent central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) after performing peripheral laser photocoagulation for retinal degenerations. A 44-year-old woman with ocular history of CSC presented to the emergency room of our department complaining of heavy photopsia due to retinal tuft and lattice degenerations, and underwent laser photocoagulation to prevent retinal detachment. Two days after laser treatment, the visual acuity dropped, and optical coherence tomography scan showed the onset of CSC. The serous detachment completely resolved in 20 days with no therapy. A new CSC episode occurred in the same eye after another analogous laser treatment and, similarly, quickly resolved spontaneously. We reviewed the literature and discuss the possibility that laser-induced inflammation could rouse an inflammatory cascade mediated by proinflammatory cytokines and PAI-1, leading to the exacerbation of retinal serous detachment in susceptible patients.

  13. [Outcome of cataract surgery in patients with pigmentary retinal degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grześk, Magdalena; Kałuzny, Józef; Malukiewicz-Wiśniewska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the results of cataract surgery in patients with RP because retinitis pigmentosa is one of the disease entities that belongs to tapeto-retinal degenerations. The occurrence of RP appearance is 1:4000 to 1:3000. Twenty patients with RP (7 women and 13 men, 33 eyes), who underwent cataract surgery were examined retrospectively. Average age in our group was 46.6 years. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, slip lamp examination, fundus examination, cataract morphology, visual field were taken before surgery and on discharge, on the basis of medical documentation. Control examination was taken, on average, eighty one months after cataract surgery. Nine eyes were operated by phacoemulsification, 24 eyes by means of extracapsular cataract extraction. In the same way control group of 18 patients who underwent cataract surgery without RP (33 eyes) was examined. In RP group in 63.6% patients on discharge from the hospital and in 60.6% patients during the control examination, improvement of visual acuity was revealed. Deterioration was noted in 18.2% of patients on discharge from hospital and in 24.2% of patients during the control examination. In the control group improvement of visual acuity was revealed in 90.9% of patients on discharge and in 97% patients during the control examination, whereas deterioration of visual acuity occurred in 6.1% patients on discharge and in 3% patients during the check examination. In patients with retinitis pigmentosa cataract occurs earlier then in the control group. Cataract surgery for relatively minor opacities is beneficial in patients with RP, and causes improvement of visual acuity in most of eyes undergoing surgery.

  14. NR2E3 mutations in enhanced S-cone sensitivity syndrome (ESCS), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (GFS), clumped pigmentary retinal degeneration (CPRD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorderet, Daniel F; Escher, Pascal

    2009-11-01

    NR2E3, also called photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor (PNR), is a transcription factor of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily whose expression is uniquely restricted to photoreceptors. There, its physiological activity is essential for proper rod and cone photoreceptor development and maintenance. Thirty-two different mutations in NR2E3 have been identified in either homozygous or compound heterozygous state in the recessively inherited enhanced S-cone sensitivity syndrome (ESCS), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (GFS), and clumped pigmentary retinal degeneration (CPRD). The clinical phenotype common to all these patients is night blindness, rudimental or absent rod function, and hyperfunction of the "blue" S-cones. A single p.G56R mutation is inherited in a dominant manner and causes retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We have established a new locus-specific database for NR2E3 (www.LOVD.nl/eye), containing all reported mutations, polymorphisms, and unclassified sequence variants, including novel ones. A high proportion of mutations are located in the evolutionarily-conserved DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of NR2E3. Based on homology modeling of these NR2E3 domains, we propose a structural localization of mutated residues. The high variability of clinical phenotypes observed in patients affected by NR2E3-linked retinal degenerations may be caused by different disease mechanisms, including absence of DNA-binding, altered interactions with transcriptional coregulators, and differential activity of modifier genes.

  15. FORMALDEHYDE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN F344 RAT NASAL RESPIRATORY EPITHELIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaldehyde-induced gene expression in F344 rat nasal respiratory epithelium ABSTRACTFormaldehyde, an occupational and environmental toxicant used extensively in the manufacturing of many household and personal use products, is known to induce squamous cell carci...

  16. Repetitive magnetic stimulation improves retinal function in a rat model of retinal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Levi, Nir; Kalish, Sapir; Sher, Ifat; Zangen, Avraham; Belkin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal dystrophies affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration is characterized by photoreceptor cell death and concomitant remodeling of remaining retinal cells. Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (RMS) is a non-invasive technique that creates alternating magnetic fields by brief electric currents transmitted through an insulated coil. These magnetic field generate action potentials in neurons, and modulate the expression of neurotransmitter receptors, growth factors and transcription factors which mediate plasticity. This technology has been proven effective and safe in various psychiatric disorders. Here we determined the effect of RMS on retinal function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model for retinal dystrophy. Four week-old RCS and control Spargue Dawley (SD) rats received sham or RMS treatment over the right eye (12 sessions on 4 weeks). RMS treatment at intensity of at 40% of the maximal output of a Rapid2 stimulator significantly increased the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses by up to 6- or 10-fold in the left and right eye respectively, 3-5 weeks following end of treatment. RMS treatment at intensity of 25% of the maximal output did not significant effect b-wave responses following end of treatment with no adverse effect on ERG response or retinal structure of SD rats. Our findings suggest that RMS treatment induces delayed improvement of retinal functions and may induce plasticity in the retinal tissue. Furthermore, this non-invasive treatment may possibly be used in the future as a primary or adjuvant treatment for retinal dystrophy.

  17. Transplantation of CX3CL1-expressing mesenchymal stem cells provides neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Libin; Xu, Wei; Xu, Guoxing

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) engineered to secrete CX3CL1 on the light-injured retinal structure and function. Normal MSCs and CX3CL1-expressing MSCs (CX3CL1-MSCs) were transplanted into the subretinal space of light-injured rats. By ERG and TUNEL methods, their rescue effect of the host retina was compared with untreated light-injured and vehicle-injected rats. Activated microglia in the retina were stained by ED-1 antibody, and Western blot was performed to quantify cytokines secreted by the retina post-transplantation. ERG analysis showed better function in CX3CL1-MSC-injected group than other groups at 21 days after transplantation (p < 0.05). CX3CL1-MSCs inhibited apoptosis of the retinal cells and microglial activation. Neurotrophic factors expression in host retina that received CX3CL1-MSCs was stronger than in the retina that received normal MSCs. Conversely, the expression of proinflammatory factors was downregulated. CX3CL1-MSCs subretinal transplantation may enhance protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration.

  18. Early Changes of Retinal Morphology in Therapy of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Three Commonly Used Anti-VEGF Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Philip; Sitnilska, Vasilena; Altay, Lebriz; Fauser, Sascha

    2018-01-01

    To compare changes of retinal morphology in the first weeks following injection of anti-VEGF agents for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). In a prospective study 50 patients with active choroidal neovascularization secondary to nAMD were monitored weekly by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography for 3 weeks after treatment. Twenty-two patients received bevacizumab, 15 ranibizumab, and 13 aflibercept. Morphological parameters of retinal compartments were compared. Mean central retinal thickness (391.22 ± 123.41 µm) was reduced by -26.15 µm (p treatment. This information could be clinically helpful to evaluate early non-response. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Abrupt onset of mutations in a developmentally regulated gene during terminal differentiation of post-mitotic photoreceptor neurons in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivette M Sandoval

    Full Text Available For sensitive detection of rare gene repair events in terminally differentiated photoreceptors, we generated a knockin mouse model by replacing one mouse rhodopsin allele with a form of the human rhodopsin gene that causes a severe, early-onset form of retinitis pigmentosa. The human gene contains a premature stop codon at position 344 (Q344X, cDNA encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP at its 3' end, and a modified 5' untranslated region to reduce translation rate so that the mutant protein does not induce retinal degeneration. Mutations that eliminate the stop codon express a human rhodopsin-EGFP fusion protein (hRho-GFP, which can be readily detected by fluorescence microscopy. Spontaneous mutations were observed at a frequency of about one per retina; in every case, they gave rise to single fluorescent rod cells, indicating that each mutation occurred during or after the last mitotic division. Additionally, the number of fluorescent rods did not increase with age, suggesting that the rhodopsin gene in mature rod cells is less sensitive to mutation than it is in developing rods. Thus, there is a brief developmental window, coinciding with the transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin locus, in which somatic mutations of the rhodopsin gene abruptly begin to appear.

  20. Layer-specific blood-flow MRI of retinitis pigmentosa in RCS rats☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Garza, Bryan De La; Shih, Yen-Yu I.; Muir, Eric R.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2013-01-01

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is an established animal model of retinitis pigmentosa, a family of inherited retinal diseases which starts with loss of peripheral vision and progresses to eventual blindness. Blood flow (BF), an important physiological parameter, is intricately coupled to metabolic function under normal physiological conditions and is perturbed in many neurological and retinal diseases. This study reports non-invasive high-resolution MRI (44 × 44 × 600 μm) to image quantitative retinal and choroidal BF and layer-specific retinal thicknesses in RCS rat retinas at different stages of retinal degeneration compared with age-matched controls. The unique ability to separate retinal and choroidal BF was made possible by the depth-resolved MRI technique. RBF decreased with progressive retinal degeneration, but ChBF did not change in RCS rats up to post-natal day 90. We concluded that choroidal and retinal circulations have different susceptibility to progressive retinal degeneration in RCS rats. Layer-specific retinal thickness became progressively thinner and was corroborated by histological analysis in the same animals. MRI can detect progressive anatomical and BF changes during retinal degeneration with laminar resolution. PMID:22721720

  1. Layer-specific blood-flow MRI of retinitis pigmentosa in RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; De La Garza, Bryan; Shih, Yen-Yu I; Muir, Eric R; Duong, Timothy Q

    2012-08-01

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is an established animal model of retinitis pigmentosa, a family of inherited retinal diseases which starts with loss of peripheral vision and progresses to eventual blindness. Blood flow (BF), an important physiological parameter, is intricately coupled to metabolic function under normal physiological conditions and is perturbed in many neurological and retinal diseases. This study reports non-invasive high-resolution MRI (44 × 44 × 600 μm) to image quantitative retinal and choroidal BF and layer-specific retinal thicknesses in RCS rat retinas at different stages of retinal degeneration compared with age-matched controls. The unique ability to separate retinal and choroidal BF was made possible by the depth-resolved MRI technique. RBF decreased with progressive retinal degeneration, but ChBF did not change in RCS rats up to post-natal day 90. We concluded that choroidal and retinal circulations have different susceptibility to progressive retinal degeneration in RCS rats. Layer-specific retinal thickness became progressively thinner and was corroborated by histological analysis in the same animals. MRI can detect progressive anatomical and BF changes during retinal degeneration with laminar resolution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Subpopulations and Their Difference in Cell Biology and Effects on Retinal Degeneration in RCS Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Li, P; Tian, Y; Li, Z; Lian, C; Ou, Q; Jin, C; Gao, F; Xu, J-Y; Wang, J; Wang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Li, W; Tian, H; Lu, L; Xu, G-T

    2017-01-01

    Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are potential candidates for treating retinal degeneration (RD). To further study the biology and therapeutic effects of the hUC-MSCs on retinal degeneration. Two hUC-MSC subpopulations, termed hUC-MSC1 and hUC-MSC2, were isolated by single-cell cloning method and their therapeutic functions were compared in RCS rat, a RD model. Although both subsets satisfied the basic requirements for hUC-MSCs, they were significantly different in morphology, proliferation rate, differentiation capacity, phenotype and gene expression. Furthermore, only the smaller, fibroblast-like, faster growing subset hUC-MSC1 displayed stronger colony forming potential as well as adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacities. When the two subsets were respectively transplanted into the subretinal spaces of RCS rats, both subsets survived, but only hUC-MSC1 expressed RPE cell markers Bestrophin and RPE65. More importantly, hUC-MSC1 showed stronger rescue effect on the retinal function as indicated by the higher b-wave amplitude on ERG examination, thicker retinal nuclear layer, and decreased apoptotic photoreceptors. When both subsets were treated with interleukin-6, mimicking the inflammatory environment when the cells were transplanted into the eyes with degenerated retina, hUC-MSC1 expressed much higher levels of trophic factors in comparison with hUC-MSC2. The data here, in addition to prove the heterogeneity of hUC-MSCs, confirmed that the stronger therapeutic effects of hUC-MSC1 were attributed to its stronger anti-apoptotic effect, paracrine of trophic factors and potential RPE cell differentiation capacity. Thus, the subset hUC-MSC1, not the other subset or the ungrouped hUC-MSCs should be used for effective treatment of RD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Nanosecond laser therapy reverses pathologic and molecular changes in age-related macular degeneration without retinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, A I; Guymer, R H; Vessey, K A; Greferath, U; Mills, S A; Brassington, K H; Luu, C D; Aung, K Z; Trogrlic, L; Plunkett, M; Fletcher, E L

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss, characterized by drusen deposits and thickened Bruch's membrane (BM). This study details the capacity of nanosecond laser treatment to reduce drusen and thin BM while maintaining retinal structure. Fifty patients with AMD had a single nanosecond laser treatment session and after 2 yr, change in drusen area was compared with an untreated cohort of patients. The retinal effect of the laser was determined in human and mouse eyes using immunohistochemistry and compared with untreated eyes. In a mouse with thickened BM (ApoEnull), the effect of laser treatment was quantified using electron microscopy and quantitative PCR. In patients with AMD, nanosecond laser treatment reduced drusen load at 2 yr. Retinal structure was not compromised in human and mouse retina after laser treatment, with only a discrete retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) injury, and limited mononuclear cell response observed. BM was thinned in the ApoEnull mouse 3 mo after treatment (ApoEnull treated 683 ± 38 nm, ApoEnull untreated 890 ± 60 nm, C57Bl6J 606 ± 43 nm), with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -3 increased (>260%). Nanosecond laser resolved drusen independent of retinal damage and improved BM structure, suggesting this treatment has the potential to reduce AMD progression. © FASEB.

  4. Non-invasive stem cell therapy in a rat model for retinal degeneration and vascular pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is characterized by progressive night blindness, visual field loss, altered vascular permeability and loss of central vision. Currently there is no effective treatment available except gene replacement therapy has shown promise in a few patients with specific gene defects. There is an urgent need to develop therapies that offer generic neuro-and vascular-protective effects with non-invasive intervention. Here we explored the potential of systemic administration of pluripotent bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to rescue vision and associated vascular pathology in the Royal College Surgeons (RCS rat, a well-established animal model for RP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Animals received syngeneic MSCs (1x10(6 cells by tail vein at an age before major photoreceptor loss. PRINCIPAL RESULTS: both rod and cone photoreceptors were preserved (5-6 cells thick at the time when control animal has a single layer of photoreceptors remained; Visual function was significantly preserved compared with controls as determined by visual acuity and luminance threshold recording from the superior colliculus; The number of pathological vascular complexes (abnormal vessels associated with migrating pigment epithelium cells and area of vascular leakage that would ordinarily develop were dramatically reduced; Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated there was upregulation of growth factors and immunohistochemistry revealed that there was an increase in neurotrophic factors within eyes of animals that received MSCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results underscore the potential application of MSCs in treating retinal degeneration. The advantages of this non-invasive cell-based therapy are: cells are easily isolated and can be expanded in large quantity for autologous graft; hypoimmunogenic nature as allogeneic donors; less controversial in nature than other stem cells; can be readministered with minor discomfort

  5. In vitro differentiation of adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neural retinal cells through expression of human PAX6 (5a) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanejad, Habib; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Haddad, Farhang; Matin, Maryam M; Samiei, Shahram; Manafi, Ali; Ahmadieh, Hamid

    2014-04-01

    The neural retina is subjected to various degenerative conditions. Regenerative stem-cell-based therapy holds great promise for treating severe retinal degeneration diseases, although many drawbacks remain to be overcome. One important problem is to gain authentically differentiated cells for replacement. Paired box 6 protein (5a) (PAX6 (5a)) is a highly conserved master control gene that has an essential role in the development of the vertebrate visual system. Human adipose-tissue-derived stem cell (hADSC) isolation was performed by using fat tissues and was confirmed by the differentiation potential of the cells into adipocytes and osteocytes and by their surface marker profile. The coding region of the human PAX6 (5a) gene isoform was cloned and lentiviral particles were propagated in HEK293T. The differentiation of hADSCs into retinal cells was characterized by morphological characteristics, quantitative real-time reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) for some retinal cell-specific and retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cell-specific markers. hADSCs were successfully isolated. Flow cytometric analysis of surface markers indicated the high purity (~97 %) of isolated hADSCs. After 30 h of post-transduction, cells gradually showed the characteristic morphology of neuronal cells and small axon-like processes emerged. qPCR and ICC confirmed the differentiation of some neural retinal cells and RPE cells. Thus, PAX6 (5a) transcription factor expression, together with medium supplemented with fibronectin, is able to induce the differentiation of hADSCs into retinal progenitors, RPE cells and photoreceptors.

  6. [Myopia: frequency of lattice degeneration and axial length].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Sánchez, M D; Roldán Pallarés, M

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between lattice retinal degeneration and axial length of the eye in different grades of myopia. A sample of 200 eyes from 124 myopic patients was collected by chance. The average age was 34.8 years (20-50 years) and the myopia was between 0.5 and 20 diopters (D). The eyes were grouped according to the degree of refraction defect, the mean axial length of each group (Scan A) and the frequency of lattice retinal degeneration and the relationship between these variables was studied. The possible influence of age on our results was also considered. For the statistical analysis, the SAS 6.07 program with the variance analysis for quantitative variables, and chi(2) test for qualitative variables with a 5% significance were used. A multivariable linear regression model was also adjusted. The highest frequency of lattice retinal degeneration occurred in those myopia patients having more than 15 D, and also in the group of myopia patients between 3 and 6 D, but this did not show statistical significance when compared with the other myopic groups. If the axial length is assessed, a greater frequency of lattice retinal degeneration is also found when the axial length is 25-27 mm and 29-30 mm, which correspond, respectively, to myopias between 3-10 D and more than 15 D. When the multivariable linear regression model was adjusted, the axial length showed the existence of lattice retinal degeneration (beta 0.41 mm; p=0.08) adjusted by the number of diopters (beta 0.38 mm; plattice retinal degeneration was found for myopias with axial eye length between 29-30 mm (more than 15 D), and 25-27 mm (between 3-10 D).

  7. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao-Peng; Yao, Jin; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Li, Xiu-Miao; Jiang, Qin; Yan, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy

  8. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chao-Peng; Yao, Jin; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Li, Xiu-Miao; Jiang, Qin, E-mail: jqin710@vip.sina.com; Yan, Biao, E-mail: yanbiao1982@hotmail.com

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy.

  9. Analysis of the RPE sheet in the rd10 retinal degeneration model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yi [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-04

    The normal RPE sheet in the C57Bl/6J mouse is subclassified into two major tiling patterns: A regular generally hexagonal array covering most of the surface and a 'soft network' near the ciliary body made of irregularly shaped cells. Physics models predict these two patterns based on contractility and elasticity of the RPE cell, and strength of cellular adhesion between cells. We hypothesized and identified major changes in RPE regular hexagonal tiling pattern in rdl0 compared to C57BL/6J mice. RPE sheet damage was extensive but occurred in rd10 later than expected, after most retinal degeneration. RPE sheet changes occur in zones with a bullseye pattern. In the posterior zone around the optic nerve RPE cells take on larger irregular and varied shapes to form an intact monolayer. In mid periphery, there is a higher than normal density of cells that progress into involuted layers of RPE under the retina. The periphery remains mostly normal until late stages of degeneration. The number of neighboring cells varies widely depending on zone and progression. RPE morphology continues to deteriorate long after the photoreceptors have degenerated. The RPE cells are bystanders to the rd10 degeneration within photo receptors, and the collateral damage to the RPE sheet resembles stimulation of migration or chemotaxis. Quantitative measures of the tiling patterns and histopathology detected here, scripted in a pipeline written in Perl and Cell Profiler (an open source Matlab plugin), are directly applicable to RPE sheet images from noninvasive fundus autofluorescence (FAF), adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-cSLO), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) of patients with early stage AMD or RP.

  10. Cone function studied with flicker electroretinogram during progressive retinal degeneration in RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, I; Lund, R D; Sauvé, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat has a primary defect in retinal pigment epithelial cells that leads to the progressive loss of photoreceptors and central visual responsiveness. While most rods are lost by 90 days of age (P90), cones degenerate more slowly, and can be detected anatomically up to 2 years of age, despite massive neuronal death and retinal remodelling. To examine how this progressive degenerative process impacts on cone function, we recorded the electroretingram to white light flashes (1.37 log cd s m(-2)) presented at frequencies ranging from 3 to 50 Hz, under light adapted conditions (29.8 cd m(-2)). Pigmented dystrophic and congenic non-dystrophic RCS rats aged from 18 to 300 days were studied. In all responsive animals at all ages, maximal amplitudes were obtained at 3 Hz. In both non-dystrophic and dystrophic rats, there was an increase from P18 to P21 in response amplitude and critical fusion frequency. After P21, these two parameters declined progressively with age in dystrophic rats. Other changes included prolongation in latency, which was first detected prior to the initiation of amplitude reduction. While phase shifts were also detected in dystrophic RCS rats, they appeared at later degenerative stages. The latest age at which responses could be elicited in dystrophic rats was at P200, with positive waves being replaced by negative deflections. The effect of increments in the intensity of background illumination was tested at P50 in both groups. This caused a diminution in flicker response amplitude and critical fusion frequencies in non-dystrophics, while in dystrophic animals, response amplitudes were reduced only at low frequencies and critical fusion frequencies were unaltered. In conclusion, although dystrophic RCS rats undergo a progressive decline in cone function with age, the flicker responsiveness at P21 is comparable to that of non-dystrophic congenic rats, suggesting normal developmental maturation of the cone system in

  11. OFD1, as a Ciliary Protein, Exhibits Neuroprotective Function in Photoreceptor Degeneration Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available Ofd1 is a newly identified causative gene for Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, a photoreceptor degenerative disease. This study aimed to examine Ofd1 localization in retina and further to investigate its function in photoreceptor degeneration models. Ofd1 localization in rat retina was examined using immunofluorescence. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU-induced rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats were used as photoreceptor degeneration models. The expression pattern of Ofd1, other ciliary associated genes and Wnt signaling pathway genes were examined in rat models. Furthermore, pEGFP-Ofd1-CDS and pSUPER-Ofd1-shRNA were constructed to overexpress and knockdown the expression level in 661W and R28 cells. MNU was also used to induce cell death. Cilia formation was observed using immunocytochemistry (ICC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS were detected using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA assay. Apoptosis genes expression was examined using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Ofd1 localized to outer segments of rat retina photoreceptors. Ofd1 and other ciliary proteins expression levels increased from the 1st and 4th postnatal weeks and decreased until the 6th week in the RCS rats, while their expression consistently decreased from the 1st and 7th day in the MNU rats. Moreover, Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was significantly up-regulated in both rat models. Knockdown of Ofd1 expression resulted in a smaller population, shorter length of cell cilia, and lower cell viability. Ofd1 overexpression partially attenuated MNU toxic effects by reducing ROS levels and mitigating apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating Ofd1 localization and its function in rat retina and in retinal degeneration rat models. Ofd1 plays a role in controlling photoreceptor cilium length and number. Importantly, it demonstrates a neuroprotective function by protecting the photoreceptor

  12. Translating induced pluripotent stem cells from bench to bedside: application to retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Alona O; MacLaren, Robert E

    2013-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSc) are a scientific and medical frontier. Application of reprogrammed somatic cells for clinical trials is in its dawn period; advances in research with animal and human iPSc are paving the way for retinal therapies with the ongoing development of safe animal cell transplantation studies and characterization of patient- specific and disease-specific human iPSc. The retina is an optimal model for investigation of neural regeneration; amongst other advantageous attributes, it is the most accessible part of the CNS for surgery and outcome monitoring. A recent clinical trial showing a degree of visual restoration via a subretinal electronic prosthesis implies that even a severely degenerate retina may have the capacity for repair after cell replacement through potential plasticity of the visual system. Successful differentiation of neural retina from iPSc and the recent generation of an optic cup from human ESc invitro increase the feasibility of generating an expandable and clinically suitable source of cells for human clinical trials. In this review we shall present recent studies that have propelled the field forward and discuss challenges in utilizing iPS cell derived retinal cells as reliable models for clinical therapies and as a source for clinical cell transplantation treatment for patients suffering from genetic retinal disease.

  13. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa de Hoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB, play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies.

  14. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  15. Retinal pigment epithelium, age-related macular degeneration and neurotrophic keratouveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Enrica; Scarinci, Fabio; Ripandelli, Guido; Feher, Janos; Pacella, Elena; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Gabrieli, Corrado Balacco; Plateroti, Rocco; Plateroti, Pasquale; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Artico, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of impaired vision and blindness in the aging population. The aims of our studies were to identify qualitative and quantitative alterations in mitochondria in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from AMD patients and controls and to test the protective effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a known neurotrophic and antiangiogenic substance, against neurotrophic keratouveitis. Histopathological alterations were studied by means of morphometry, light and electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, morphometric data showed that the RPE alterations noted in AMD may also develop in normal aging, 10-15 years later than appearing in AMD patients. Reduced tear secretion, corneal ulceration and leukocytic infiltration were found in capsaicin (CAP)-treated rats, but this effect was significantly attenuated by PEDF. These findings suggest that PEDF accelerated the recovery of tear secretion and also prevented neurotrophic keratouveitis and vitreoretinal inflammation. PEDF may have a clinical application in inflammatory and neovascular diseases of the eye.

  16. Q-factor improvement of degenerate four-wave-mixing regenerators for ASE degraded signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hang; Wu, Bao-jian; Geng, Yong; Zhou, Xing-yu; Sun, Fan

    2017-11-01

    All-optical regenerators can be used to suppress amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise introduced by cascaded erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) in optical fiber communication systems and lead to the improvement of optical receiver sensitivity. By introducing the Q-factor transfer function (QTF), we evaluate the Q-factor performance of degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) regenerators with clock pump and reveal the differences between the optimal input powers determined from the static and dynamic power tranfer function (PTF) and the QTF curves. Our simulation shows that the clock-pump regnerator is capable of improving the Q-facor and receiver sensitivity for 40 Gbit/s ASE-degraded return-to-zero on-off keying (RZ-OOK) signal by 2.58 dB and 4.2 dB, respectively.

  17. Repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanumunthadu, Daren; Ilginis, Tomas; Restori, Marie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to determine the intrasession repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT)-derived retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). METHODS: A prospective study consisting of patients...... with active nAMD enrolled in the Distance of Choroid Study at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London. Patients underwent three 12×9 mm macular raster scans using the deep range imaging (DRI) OCT-1 SS-OCT (Topcon) device in a single imaging session. Retinal and choroidal thicknesses were calculated for the ETDRS...... macular subfields. Repeatability was calculated according to methods described by Bland and Altman. RESULTS: 39 eyes of 39 patients with nAMD were included with a mean (±SD) age of 73.9 (±7.2) years. The mean (±SD) retinal thickness of the central macular subfield was 225.7 μm (±12.4 μm...

  18. The fellow eye of patients with phakic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment from atrophic holes of lattice degeneration without posterior vitreous detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, C R; Gupta, A; Schwartz, S D; Kreiger, A E

    2004-11-01

    Primary phakic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) without posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) represents a unique clinical entity that behaves differently from RRD associated with PVD. While previous studies have reported the long term findings in the fellow eye of patients with RRD and PVD, the outcome of the fellow eye of patients with RRD without PVD is not known. Consecutive patients with RRD not associated with PVD were studied retrospectively. The authors evaluated the fellow eye for retinal detachment or other vision threatening pathology. 27 patients (mean age 32 years) were studied with follow up of between 9 and 326 months (mean 111 months). 24 (89%) were myopic. Bilateral retinal detachment occurred in eight patients (30%). On initial examination, 17 patients (63%) had retinal findings (including lattice degeneration, atrophic holes, and/or cystic retinal tufts) in the fellow eye that might predispose them to retinal detachment. 14 vision threatening events or diagnoses occurred (nine of which were rhegmatogenous in nature) in the fellow eye including eight retinal detachments, one traumatic PVD without retinal tears, one retinal tear after PVD, one diagnosis of pigmentary glaucoma needing trabeculectomy, two visually significant cataracts, and one diagnosis of chorioretinitis. 23 patients (85%) maintained visual acuity better than 20/50, with most retaining 20/20 vision in the fellow eye. Patients who experience RRD without PVD are at risk of developing vision threatening events in the contralateral eye and, as such, the fellow eye should be followed carefully.

  19. Prevalence of anti-retinal autoantibodies in different stages of Age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, Grazyna; Chew, Emily Y; Ferris, Frederick L; Klein, Michael L

    2014-12-08

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in older adults. Anti-retinal autoantibodies (AAbs) have been found in individuals with AMD. The goal of the study was to determine the AAb specificity in different stages of AMD, and determine whether there is a prevalent AAb signature. Sera of 134 participants in the Age-related Eye Disease Study were analyzed for anti-retinal AAbs by western blotting. The subjects were classified by diagnostic subgroups based upon their clinical classification: No AMD, Intermediate AMD, and Late AMD - geographic atrophy (GA) and Late AMD - neovascular (NV). The presence of anti-retinal AAb was detected in 58% patients with Intermediate and Late AMD, and 54% of those with no AMD. AAbs bound to fifteen different retinal antigens. Most individuals had 1 specific AAbs (67%), with the remainder having 2 to 4 different AAbs. Over 40% of patients with Intermediate AMD, and 46% of those with GA had anti-enolase AAbs, compared with 29% of individuals with NV and 29% with no AMD. Different AAbs signatures related to NV as compared to GA and/or Intermediate AMD were distinguished. Anti-40-kDa (10%) and 42-kDa (16%) autoantibodies were associated with Intermediate AMD, while anti-30-kDa AAbs (23%) were primarily present in GA. Anti-32-kDa (12%), 35-kDa (21%), and 60-kDa (8%) AAbs were more frequent in NV AMD. A unique AAb pattern for each of the disease subgroups was present when AMD progressed from the intermediate to the late forms of severity. Differences in the frequency of specific AAbs between AMD subgroups suggested that they may participate in pathogenicity of AMD. Further studies are necessary to confirm these observations in the larger cohort and individual AMD patients over time.

  20. Lattice degeneration of the retina and the pigment dispersion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weseley, P; Liebmann, J; Walsh, J B; Ritch, R

    1992-11-15

    Retinal detachment occurs more frequently in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. We evaluated the incidence of peripheral retinal abnormalities known to predispose to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in a consecutive series of 60 patients with pigment dispersion syndrome with or without glaucoma. Lattice degeneration was present in at least one eye of 12 patients (20%). Seven patients had bilateral lesions. Full-thickness retinal breaks were found in seven patients (11.7%) and two patients (3.3%) had asymptomatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachments that required scleral buckle procedures. The incidence of lattice degeneration and full-thickness retinal breaks appears to be increased in this group of patients, and may be responsible for the increased risk of rhegmatogenous detachment.

  1. Stem cell therapy for retinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, José Mauricio; Mendonça, Luisa; Brant, Rodrigo; Abud, Murilo; Regatieri, Caio; Diniz, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss about current knowledge about stem cell (SC) therapy in the treatment of retinal degeneration. Both human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell has been growth in culture for a long time, and started to be explored in the treatment of blinding conditions. The Food and Drug Administration, recently, has granted clinical trials using SC retinal therapy to treat complex disorders, as Stargardt’s dystrophy, and patients with geographic atrophy, providing good outcomes. This study’s intent is to overview the critical regeneration of the subretinal anatomy through retinal pigment epithelium transplantation, with the goal of reestablish important pathways from the retina to the occipital cortex of the brain, as well as the differentiation from pluripotent quiescent SC to adult retina, and its relationship with a primary retinal injury, different techniques of transplantation, management of immune rejection and tumorigenicity, its potential application in improving patients’ vision, and, finally, approaching future directions and challenges for the treatment of several conditions. PMID:25621115

  2. Accelerated oxygen-induced retinopathy is a reliable model of ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacampa, Pilar; Menger, Katja E; Abelleira, Laura; Ribeiro, Joana; Duran, Yanai; Smith, Alexander J; Ali, Robin R; Luhmann, Ulrich F; Bainbridge, James W B

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ischemia and pathological angiogenesis cause severe impairment of sight. Oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) in young mice is widely used as a model to investigate the underlying pathological mechanisms and develop therapeutic interventions. We compared directly the conventional OIR model (exposure to 75% O2 from postnatal day (P) 7 to P12) with an alternative, accelerated version (85% O2 from P8 to P11). We found that accelerated OIR induces similar pre-retinal neovascularization but greater retinal vascular regression that recovers more rapidly. The extent of retinal gliosis is similar but neuroretinal function, as measured by electroretinography, is better maintained in the accelerated model. We found no systemic or maternal morbidity in either model. Accelerated OIR offers a safe, reliable and more rapid alternative model in which pre-retinal neovascularization is similar but retinal vascular regression is greater.

  3. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine; Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2014-04-07

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tus, to specific DNA sequences called Ter. Here, we demonstrate that Tus-Ter modules also induce polar RF pausing when engineered into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. This heterologous RF barrier is distinct from a number of previously characterized, protein-mediated, RF pause sites in yeast, as it is neither Tof1-dependent nor counteracted by the Rrm3 helicase. Although the yeast replisome can overcome RF pausing at Tus-Ter modules, this event triggers site-specific homologous recombination that requires the RecQ helicase, Sgs1, for its timely resolution. We propose that Tus-Ter can be utilized as a versatile, site-specific, heterologous DNA replication-perturbing system, with a variety of potential applications.

  4. Photodegradation of retinal bisretinoids in mouse models and implications for macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Keiko; Zhao, Jin; Kim, Hye Jin; Sparrow, Janet R

    2016-06-21

    Adducts of retinaldehyde (bisretinoids) form nonenzymatically in photoreceptor cells and accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells as lipofuscin; these fluorophores are implicated in the pathogenesis of inherited and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here we demonstrate that bisretinoid photodegradation is ongoing in the eye. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of eyes of dark-reared and cyclic light-reared wild-type mice, together with comparisons of pigmented versus albino mice, revealed a relationship between intraocular light and reduced levels of the bisretinoids A2E and A2-glycero-phosphoethanolamine (A2-GPE). Analysis of the bisretinoids A2E, A2-GPE, A2-dihydropyridine-phosphatidylethanolamine (A2-DHP-PE), and all-trans-retinal dimer-phosphatidylethanolamine (all-trans-retinal dimer-PE) also decreases in albino Abca4(-/-) mice reared in cyclic light compared with darkness. In albino Abca4(-/-) mice receiving a diet supplemented with the antioxidant vitamin E, higher levels of RPE bisretinoid were evidenced by HPLC analysis and quantitation of fundus autofluorescence; this effect is consistent with photooxidative processes known to precede bisretinoid degradation. Amelioration of outer nuclear layer thinning indicated that vitamin E treatment protected photoreceptor cells. Conversely, in-cage exposure to short-wavelength light resulted in reduced fundus autofluorescence, decreased HPLC-quantified A2E, outer nuclear layer thinning, and increased methylglyoxal (MG)-adducted protein. MG was also released upon bisretinoid photodegradation in cells. We suggest that the lower levels of these diretinal adducts in cyclic light-reared and albino mice reflect photodegradative loss of bisretinoid. These mechanisms may underlie associations among AMD risk, oxidative mechanisms, and lifetime light exposure.

  5. Retinal peripheral changes after laser in situ keratomileusis in patients with high myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Cássia R; Farah, Michel E

    2004-02-01

    Retinal detachment has been reported after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in myopic eyes. This complication may be related to the risk from myopia before surgery or may be induced by LASIK surgery itself. We performed a study to evaluate retinal peripheral changes after LASIK in patients with high myopia and to correlate symptoms on presentation and vitreoretinal anatomic changes. The study was carried out at a university-affiliated hospital in São Paulo between November 1997 and February 1999. Patients scheduled to undergo LASIK were included if their spherical equivalent was greater than 6.00 dioptres. The exclusion criteria were previous retinal treatment and myopic macular degenerations. We performed binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy with scleral indentation and fundus biomicroscopy with Goldmann lens before LASIK and 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery. We examined 198 eyes preoperatively. Of the 198, 50 did not undergo LASIK surgery owing to refractive criteria, and 79 were lost to follow-up. We thus studied 69 eyes. The mean spherical equivalent preoperatively was -8.00 D (standard deviation 1.95 D). Twenty-four eyes had normal retinal periphery preoperatively; all 24 remained without alterations after LASIK. Forty-five eyes had peripheral alterations: 17 (24.6%) had cystic degeneration, 14 (20.3%) had lattice degeneration, 11 (15.9%) had white-without-pressure, 5 (7.2%) had cystic tufts, 3 (4.3%) had pavingstone degeneration, 2 (2.9%) had pigmentary alteration, 1 (1.4%) had holes with free operculum, and 1 (1.4%) had punctiform holes. The only alteration after surgery was almost punctiform holes around the previous cystic tuft 1 month after surgery in one patient. Retinal detachment did not develop in any of the eyes. In this group of patients it appears that LASIK did not lead to progressive peripheral retinal lesions in asymptomatic patients during the period studied.

  6. Non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, S.K. (Sanne K.); R.A.C. van Huet (Ramon A. C.); C.J.F. Boon (Camiel); A.I. Hollander (Anneke); R.W.J. Collin (Rob); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. Hoyng (Carel); R. Roepman (Ronald); B.J. Klevering (Jeroen)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractRetinitis pigmentosa (RP) encompasses a group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by the primary degeneration of rod and cone photoreceptors. RP is a leading cause of visual disability, with a worldwide prevalence of 1:4000. Although the majority of RP cases are non-syndromic,

  7. RNCR3 knockdown inhibits diabetes mellitus-induced retinal reactive gliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chang; Li, Chao-peng; Wang, Jia-Jian; Shan, Kun; Liu, Xin; Yan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Retinal reactive gliosis is an important pathological feature of diabetic retinopathy. Identifying the underlying mechanisms causing reactive gliosis will be important for developing new therapeutic strategies for treating diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we show that long noncoding RNA-RNCR3 knockdown significantly inhibits retinal reactive gliosis. RNCR3 knockdown leads to a marked reduction in the release of several cytokines. RNCR3 knockdown alleviates diabetes mellitus-induced retinal neurodegeneration, as shown by less apoptotic retinal cells and ameliorative visual function. RNCR3 knockdown could also decrease Müller glial cell viability and proliferation, and reduce the expression of glial reactivity-related genes including GFAP and vimentin in vitro. Collectively, this study shows that RNCR3 knockdown may be a promising strategy for the prevention of diabetes mellitus-induced retinal neurodegeneration. - Highlights: • RNCR3 knockdown inhibits retinal reactive gliosis. • RNCR3 knockdown causes a significant change in cytokine profile. • RNCR3 knockdown alleviates diabetes mellitus-induced retinal neurodegeneration. • RNCR3 knockdown affects Müller glial cell function in vitro.

  8. Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 in retinal degenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying-Qian; Tang, Luo-Sheng; Yoshida, Shigeo; Zhou, Ye-Di

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy is a potentially effective treatment for retinal degenerative diseases. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has been developed as a new genome-editing tool in ophthalmic studies. Recent advances in researches showed that CRISPR/Cas9 has been applied in generating animal models as well as gene therapy in vivo of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). It has also been shown as a potential attempt for clinic by combining with other technologies such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we highlight the main points of further prospect of using CRISPR/Cas9 in targeting retinal degeneration. We also emphasize the potential applications of this technique in treating retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:28503441

  9. Cell Therapy Applications for Retinal Vascular Diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S

    2016-04-01

    Retinal vascular conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, remain leading causes of vision loss. No therapy exists to restore vision loss resulting from retinal ischemia and associated retinal degeneration. Tissue regeneration is possible with cell therapy. The goal would be to restore or replace the damaged retinal vasculature and the retinal neurons that are damaged and/or degenerating from the hypoxic insult. Currently, various adult cell therapies have been explored as potential treatment. They include mesenchymal stem cells, vascular precursor cells (i.e., CD34+ cells, hematopoietic cells or endothelial progenitor cells), and adipose stromal cells. Preclinical studies show that all these cells have a paracrine trophic effect on damaged ischemic tissue, leading to tissue preservation. Endothelial progenitor cells and adipose stromal cells integrate into the damaged retinal vascular wall in preclinical models of diabetic retinopathy and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mesenchymal stem cells do not integrate as readily but appear to have a primary paracrine trophic effect. Early phase clinical trials have been initiated and ongoing using mesenchymal stem cells or autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells injected intravitreally as potential therapy for diabetic retinopathy or retinal vein occlusion. Adipose stromal cells or pluripotent stem cells differentiated into endothelial colony-forming cells have been explored in preclinical studies and show promise as possible therapies for retinal vascular disorders. The relative safety or efficacy of these various cell therapies for treating retinal vascular disorders have yet to be determined.

  10. Long-Term Protection of Genetically Ablated Rabbit Retinal Degeneration by Sustained Transscleral Unoprostone Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Nobuhiro; Koyanagi, Eri; Izumida, Yasuko; Liu, Junjun; Katsuyama, Aya; Kaji, Hirokazu; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Osumi, Noriko; Kondo, Mineo; Terasaki, Hiroko; Mashima, Yukihiko; Nakazawa, Toru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the long-term protective effects of transscleral unoprostone (UNO) against retinal degeneration in transgenic (Tg) rabbits (Pro347Leu rhodopsin mutation). The UNO release devices (URDs) were implanted into the sclerae of Tg rabbits and ERG, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and ophthalmic examinations were conducted for 40 weeks. Unoprostone metabolites in retina, choroid/RPE, aqueous humor, and plasma from wild-type (Wt) rabbits were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry evaluated the retinal distribution of big potassium (BK) channels, and RT-PCR evaluated the expressions of BK channels and m-opsin at 1 week after URD treatment. The URD released UNO at a rate of 10.2 ±1.0 μg/d, and the release rate and amount of UNO decreased during 32 weeks. Higher ERG amplitudes were observed in the URD-treated Tg rabbits compared with the placebo-URD, or nontreated controls. At 24 weeks after implantation into the URD-treated Tg rabbits, OCT images showed preservation of retinal thickness, and histologic examinations (44 weeks) showed greater thickness of outer nuclear layers. Unoprostone was detected in the retina, choroid, and plasma of Wt rabbits. Retina/plasma ratio of UNO levels were 38.0 vs. 0.68 ng UNO*hour/mL in the URD-treated group versus control (topical UNO), respectively. Big potassium channels were observed in cone, cone ON-bipolar, and rod bipolar cells. Reverse-transcriptase PCR demonstrated BK channels and m-opsins increased in URD-treated eyes. In Tg rabbits, URD use slowed the decline of retinal function for more than 32 weeks, and therefore provides a promising tool for long-term treatment of RP.

  11. Retinal detachment in black South Africans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    low incidence of retinal detachment in black patients is not known. ... a retinal break. Predisposing factors include peripheral retinal degenerations, myopia, aphakia and trauma. Delay in presentation increases the difficulty in achieving adequate surgical ... On examination, note was taken of the visual acuity in both eyes, the ...

  12. Expression pattern of Ccr2 and Cx3cr1 in inherited retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Hideo; Koso, Hideto; Okano, Kiichiro; Sundermeier, Thomas R; Saito, Saburo; Watanabe, Sumiko; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Tsutomu

    2015-10-12

    Though accumulating evidence suggests that microglia, resident macrophages in the retina, and bone marrow-derived macrophages can cause retinal inflammation which accelerates photoreceptor cell death, the details of how these cells are activated during retinal degeneration (RD) remain uncertain. Therefore, it is important to clarify which cells play a dominant role in fueling retinal inflammation. However, distinguishing between microglia and macrophages is difficult using conventional techniques such as cell markers (e.g., Iba-1). Recently, two mouse models for visualizing chemokine receptors were established, Cx3cr1 (GFP/GFP) and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) mice. As Cx3cr1 is expressed in microglia and Ccr2 is reportedly expressed in activated macrophages, these mice have the potential to distinguish microglia and macrophages, yielding novel information about the activation of these inflammatory cells and their individual roles in retinal inflammation. In this study, c-mer proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (Mertk) (-/-) mice, which show photoreceptor cell death due to defective retinal pigment epithelium phagocytosis, were employed as an animal model of RD. Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice were established by breeding Mertk (-/-) , Cx3cr1 (GFP/GFP) , and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) mice. The retinal morphology and pattern of inflammatory cell activation and invasion of Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice were evaluated using retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) flat mounts, retinal sections, and flow cytometry. Four-week-old Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice showed Cx3cr1-GFP-positive microglia in the inner retina. Cx3cr1-GFP and Ccr2-RFP dual positive activated microglia were observed in the outer retina and subretinal space of 6- and 8-week-old animals. Ccr2-RFP single positive bone marrow-derived macrophages were observed to migrate into the retina of Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice. These invading cells were still observed in the

  13. Concentric retinitis pigmentosa: clinicopathologic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, A H; De Castro, E B; Smith, J E; Tang, W X; John, S K; Gorin, M B; Stone, E M; Aguirre, G D; Jacobson, S G

    2001-10-01

    Progressive concentric (centripetal) loss of vision is one pattern of visual field loss in retinitis pigmentosa. This study provides the first clinicopathologic correlations for this form of retinitis pigmentosa. A family with autosomal dominant concentric retinitis pigmentosa was examined clinically and with visual function tests. A post-mortem eye of an affected 94 year old family member was processed for histopathology and immunocytochemistry with retinal cell specific antibodies. Unrelated simplex/multiplex patients with concentric retinitis pigmentosa were also examined. Affected family members of the eye donor and patients from the other families had prominent peripheral pigmentary retinopathy with more normal appearing central retina, good visual acuity, concentric field loss, normal or near normal rod and cone sensitivity within the preserved visual field, and reduced rod and cone electroretinograms. The eye donor, at age 90, had good acuity and function in a central island. Grossly, the central region of the donor retina appeared thinned but otherwise normal, while the far periphery contained heavy bone spicule pigment. Microscopically the central retina showed photoreceptor outer segment shortening and some photoreceptor cell loss. The mid periphery had a sharp line of demarcation where more central photoreceptors were near normal except for very short outer segments and peripheral photoreceptors were absent. Rods and cones showed abrupt loss of outer segments and cell death at this interface. It is concluded that concentric retinitis pigmentosa is a rare but recognizable phenotype with slowly progressive photoreceptor death from the far periphery toward the central retina. The disease is retina-wide but shows regional variation in severity of degeneration; photoreceptor death is severe in the peripheral retina with an abrupt edge between viable and degenerate photoreceptors. Peripheral to central gradients of unknown retinal molecule(s) may be defective

  14. Minocycline counter-regulates pro-inflammatory microglia responses in the retina and protects from degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Rebecca; Sobotka, Markus; Caramoy, Albert; Stempfl, Thomas; Moehle, Christoph; Langmann, Thomas

    2015-11-17

    Microglia reactivity is a hallmark of retinal degenerations and overwhelming microglial responses contribute to photoreceptor death. Minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline analog, has potent anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. Here, we investigated how minocycline affects microglia in vitro and studied its immuno-modulatory properties in a mouse model of acute retinal degeneration using bright white light exposure. LPS-treated BV-2 microglia were stimulated with 50 μg/ml minocycline for 6 or 24 h, respectively. Pro-inflammatory gene transcription was determined by real-time RT-PCR and nitric oxide (NO) secretion was assessed using the Griess reagent. Caspase 3/7 levels were determined in 661W photoreceptors cultured with microglia-conditioned medium in the absence or presence of minocycline supplementation. BALB/cJ mice received daily intraperitoneal injections of 45 mg/kg minocycline, starting 1 day before exposure to 15.000 lux white light for 1 hour. The effect of minocycline treatment on microglial reactivity was analyzed by immunohistochemical stainings of retinal sections and flat-mounts, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of microglia markers was determined using real-time RT-PCR and RNA-sequencing. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) stainings were used to measure the extent of retinal degeneration and photoreceptor apoptosis. Stimulation of LPS-activated BV-2 microglia with minocycline significantly diminished the transcription of the pro-inflammatory markers CCL2, IL6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Minocycline also reduced the production of NO and dampened microglial neurotoxicity on 661W photoreceptors. Furthermore, minocycline had direct protective effects on 661W photoreceptors by decreasing caspase 3/7 activity. In mice challenged with white light, injections of minocycline strongly decreased the number of amoeboid alerted microglia in the outer

  15. Subretinally transplanted embryonic stem cells rescue photoreceptor cells from degeneration in the RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraermeyer, U; Thumann, G; Luther, T; Kociok, N; Armhold, S; Kruttwig, K; Andressen, C; Addicks, K; Bartz-Schmidt, K U

    2001-01-01

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is an animal model for retinal degeneration such as the age-related macular degeneration. The RCS rat undergoes a progressive retinal degeneration during the early postnatal period. A potential treatment to prevent this retinal degeneration is the transplantation into the subretinal space of cells that would replace functions of the degenerating retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells or may form neurotrophic factors. In this study we have investigated the potential of subretinally transplanted embryonic stem cells to prevent the genetically determined photoreceptor cell degeneration in the RCS rat. Embryonic stem cells from the inner cell mass of the mouse blastocyst were allowed to differentiate to neural precursor cells in vitro and were then transplanted into the subretinal space of 20-day-old RCS rats. Transplanted and sham-operated rats were sacrificed 2 months following cell transplantation. The eyes were enucleated and photoreceptor degeneration was quantified by analyzing and determining the thickness of the outer nuclear layer by light and electron microscopy. In the eyes transplanted with embryonic cells up to 8 rows of photoreceptor cell nuclei were observed, whereas in nontreated control eyes the outer nuclear layer had degenerated completely. Transplantation of embryonic stem cells appears to delay photoreceptor cell degeneration in RCS rats.

  16. Application of electroretinography (ERG) in early drug development for assessing retinal toxicity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wenhu, E-mail: wenhu.huang@pfizer.com; Collette, Walter; Twamley, Michelle; Aguirre, Shirley A.; Sacaan, Aida

    2015-12-15

    Retinal ocular toxicity is among the leading causes of drug development attrition in the pharmaceutical industry. Electroretinography (ERG) is a non-invasive functional assay used to assess neuro-retinal physiological integrity by measuring the electrical responses. To directly assess the utility of ERG, a series of studies was conducted following intravitreal and/or iv administration of pan-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: AG-012,986 and AG-024,322 in rats. Both compounds have previously shown to induce retinal toxicity. Retinal injury was evaluated by ERG, histopathology and TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-012,986 at ≥ 10 μg/eye resulted in decreases (60%) in ERG b-wave and microscopic changes of mild to moderate retinal degeneration, and at 30 μg/eye led to additional ophthalmic findings. Intravenous administration of AG-012,986 daily at ≥ 5 mg/kg resulted in dose-related decreases (25 to 40%) in b-wave and sporadic to intense positive TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-024,322 at 30 μg/eye also resulted in decreases (50 to 60%) in b-wave, mild to marked retinal degeneration and mild vitreous debris. These experiments demonstrate that ERG can be used as a sensitive and reliable functional tool to evaluate retinal toxicity induced by test compounds in rats complementing other classical ocular safety measurements. - Highlights: • There were strong correlations of ERG readouts to in vivo ophthalmic exams, TUNEL assay, and histopathology. • ERG appears to be more sensitive and can detect retinal functional changes at a very early stage of pathogenesis. • ERG can be incorporated into routine exploratory toxicity study to identify compound ocular safety issues. • In drug discovery, ERG is a quick, non-invasive, sensitive and reliable tool in retinal toxicity de-risking.

  17. Application of electroretinography (ERG) in early drug development for assessing retinal toxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Wenhu; Collette, Walter; Twamley, Michelle; Aguirre, Shirley A.; Sacaan, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ocular toxicity is among the leading causes of drug development attrition in the pharmaceutical industry. Electroretinography (ERG) is a non-invasive functional assay used to assess neuro-retinal physiological integrity by measuring the electrical responses. To directly assess the utility of ERG, a series of studies was conducted following intravitreal and/or iv administration of pan-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: AG-012,986 and AG-024,322 in rats. Both compounds have previously shown to induce retinal toxicity. Retinal injury was evaluated by ERG, histopathology and TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-012,986 at ≥ 10 μg/eye resulted in decreases (60%) in ERG b-wave and microscopic changes of mild to moderate retinal degeneration, and at 30 μg/eye led to additional ophthalmic findings. Intravenous administration of AG-012,986 daily at ≥ 5 mg/kg resulted in dose-related decreases (25 to 40%) in b-wave and sporadic to intense positive TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-024,322 at 30 μg/eye also resulted in decreases (50 to 60%) in b-wave, mild to marked retinal degeneration and mild vitreous debris. These experiments demonstrate that ERG can be used as a sensitive and reliable functional tool to evaluate retinal toxicity induced by test compounds in rats complementing other classical ocular safety measurements. - Highlights: • There were strong correlations of ERG readouts to in vivo ophthalmic exams, TUNEL assay, and histopathology. • ERG appears to be more sensitive and can detect retinal functional changes at a very early stage of pathogenesis. • ERG can be incorporated into routine exploratory toxicity study to identify compound ocular safety issues. • In drug discovery, ERG is a quick, non-invasive, sensitive and reliable tool in retinal toxicity de-risking.

  18. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-13

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  19. Novel Neuroprotective Strategies in Ischemic Retinal Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gabriel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ischemia can be effectively modeled by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, which leads to chronic hypoperfusion-induced degeneration in the entire rat retina. The complex pathways leading to retinal cell death offer a complex approach of neuroprotective strategies. In the present review we summarize recent findings with different neuroprotective candidate molecules. We describe the protective effects of intravitreal treatment with: (i urocortin 2; (ii a mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel opener, diazoxide; (iii a neurotrophic factor, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide; and (iv a novel poly(ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor (HO3089. The retinoprotective effects are demonstrated with morphological description and effects on apoptotic pathways using molecular biological techniques.

  20. The influence of refractive error and lattice degeneration on the incidence of retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, T C

    1989-01-01

    This study indicates the feasibility of stratifying the general population into various risk pools for retinal detachment depending on a person's age, refractive status, and the presence of lattice degeneration. At first impression the risks seem at variance with the fine clinical studies of Byer, who has shown a very low detachment rate in the population with lattice degeneration. In all likelihood the vast majority of his patients were emmetropic or mildly myopic, so that very few would be expected to develop detachments during their entire lifetimes, let along during intervals of only 10 to 20 years. This study shows the futility of following, or treating prophylactically, young emmetropic individuals with lattice degeneration. Assuming that prophylaxis is actually effective, one would have to treat 1000 emmetropic lattice patients in the 30 to 39 year age group to prevent a single detachment over a 10-year period. Lattice patients with low to moderate degrees of myopia tend to develop detachments between 40 and 60 years of age caused by premature posterior vitreous separation and tractional tears. Clearly prophylaxis for this group is not warranted, since only 5% to 10% of these individuals will experience detachments in their lifetimes. On the other hand this study has verified the previous suspicions that persons with myopia exceeding -5.0 D accompanied by lattice degeneration have an extraordinarily high risk of detachment during their lifetimes. Detachments in this group tend to cluster in the second, third, and fourth decades, are typically caused by atrophic holes, are slowly progressive, and are often simultaneously bilateral. Enhanced vigilance is certainly appropriate during this time and perhaps consideration should be given to prophylactically treating this group. This would be no small task, since within a population of 1 million persons there would be about 1150 aged 10 to 39 years with myopia exceeding -5.0 D and lattice degeneration. Only 4

  1. [Lattice degeneration of the peripheral retina: ultrastructural study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, P; Malecaze, F; Arne, J L; Mathis, A

    1985-01-01

    The ultrastructural study of a case of snail track degeneration shows the presence of lipid inclusions in both the glial and the macrophage cells in every layer of the retina, and the existence of intraretinal fibers different from collagen fibers appearing to be glial filaments similar to those found in astrocytic gliomes and to the Rosenthal fibers observed in senile nervous cells. Other features were thinning of the retina and absence of blood vessels in the retina. There are no abnormalities of the vitreo-retinal juncture. All the lesions are in agreement with those observed by Daicker [Ophthalmologica, Basel 165: 360-365, 1972; Klin. Mbl. Augenheilk. 172: 581-583, 1978] with some differences, however. They are different from those found in lattice degeneration. They show that snail track degeneration is a specific form of peripheral retinal degeneration which is quite different from lattice degeneration and must not be considered similar.

  2. Induced Retro-Differentiation of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells on PolyHEMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemroaya, Fatemeh; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Samiei, Shahram; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Davari, Malihe; Heidari, Razeih; Bagheri, Abouzar; Darvishalipour-Astaneh, Shamila

    2017-10-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells represent a great potential to rescue degenerated cells of the damaged retina. Activation of the virtually plastic properties of RPE cells may aid in recovery of retinal degenerative disorders without the need for entire RPE sheet transplantation. Poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)(PolyHEMA) is one of the most important hydrogels in the biomaterials world. This hydrophobic polymer does not normally support attachment of mammalian cells. In the current study we investigated the effect of PolyHEMA as a cell culture substrate on the growth, differentiation, and plasticity of hRPE cells. hRPE cells were isolated from neonatal human globes and cultured on PolyHEMA and polystyrene substrates (as controls) in 24-well culture plates. DMEM/F12 was supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and/or 30% human amniotic fluid (HAF) for cultured cells on polystyrene and PolyHEMA coated vessels. Morphology, rate of cell proliferation and cell death, MTT assay, immunocytochemistry and Real-Time RT-PCR were performed to investigate the effects of PolyHEMA on the growth and differentiation of cultured hRPE cells. Proliferation rate of the cells that had been cultured on PolyHEMA was reduced; PolyHEMA did not induce cell death in the hRPE cultures. hRPE cells cultured on PolyHEMA formed many giant spheroid colonies. The giant colonies were re-cultured and the presence of retinal progenitor markers and markers of hRPE cells were detected in cell cultures on PolyHEMA. PolyHEMA seems to be promising for both maintenance and de-differentiation of hRPE cells and expansion of the retinal progenitor cells from the cultures that are originated from hRPE cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3080-3089, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Application of stem cell-derived retinal pigmented epithelium in retinal degenerative diseases: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Luo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a constituent of blood-retinal barrier and retinal outer segment (ROS scavenger, retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE is fundamental to normal function of retina. Malfunctioning of RPE contributes to the onset and advance of retinal degenerative diseases. Up to date, RPE replacement therapy is the only possible method to completely reverse retinal degeneration. Transplantation of human RPE stem cell-derived RPE (hRPESC-RPE has shown some good results in animal models. With promising results in terms of safety and visual improvement, human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE (hESC-RPE can be expected in clinical settings in the near future. Despite twists and turns, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE (iPSC-RPE is now being intensely investigated to overcome genetic and epigenetic instability. By far, only one patient has received iPSC-RPE transplant, which is a hallmark of iPSC technology development. During follow-up, no major complications such as immunogenicity or tumorigenesis have been observed. Future trials should keep focusing on the safety of stem cell-derived RPE (SC-RPE especially in long period, and better understanding of the nature of stem cell and the molecular events in the process to generate SC-RPE is necessary to the prosperity of SC-RPE clinical application.

  4. Application of stem cell-derived retinal pigmented epithelium in retinal degenerative diseases: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingyue; Chen, Youxin

    2018-01-01

    As a constituent of blood-retinal barrier and retinal outer segment (ROS) scavenger, retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is fundamental to normal function of retina. Malfunctioning of RPE contributes to the onset and advance of retinal degenerative diseases. Up to date, RPE replacement therapy is the only possible method to completely reverse retinal degeneration. Transplantation of human RPE stem cell-derived RPE (hRPESC-RPE) has shown some good results in animal models. With promising results in terms of safety and visual improvement, human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE (hESC-RPE) can be expected in clinical settings in the near future. Despite twists and turns, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE (iPSC-RPE) is now being intensely investigated to overcome genetic and epigenetic instability. By far, only one patient has received iPSC-RPE transplant, which is a hallmark of iPSC technology development. During follow-up, no major complications such as immunogenicity or tumorigenesis have been observed. Future trials should keep focusing on the safety of stem cell-derived RPE (SC-RPE) especially in long period, and better understanding of the nature of stem cell and the molecular events in the process to generate SC-RPE is necessary to the prosperity of SC-RPE clinical application.

  5. Four novel Loci (19q13, 6q24, 12q24, and 5q14 influence the microcirculation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kamran Ikram

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that the microcirculation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Changes in retinal vascular caliber reflect early microvascular disease and predict incident cardiovascular events. We performed a genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with retinal vascular caliber. We analyzed data from four population-based discovery cohorts with 15,358 unrelated Caucasian individuals, who are members of the Cohort for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE consortium, and replicated findings in four independent Caucasian cohorts (n  =  6,652. All participants had retinal photography and retinal arteriolar and venular caliber measured from computer software. In the discovery cohorts, 179 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP spread across five loci were significantly associated (p<5.0×10(-8 with retinal venular caliber, but none showed association with arteriolar caliber. Collectively, these five loci explain 1.0%-3.2% of the variation in retinal venular caliber. Four out of these five loci were confirmed in independent replication samples. In the combined analyses, the top SNPs at each locus were: rs2287921 (19q13; p  =  1.61×10(-25, within the RASIP1 locus, rs225717 (6q24; p = 1.25×10(-16, adjacent to the VTA1 and NMBR loci, rs10774625 (12q24; p  =  2.15×10(-13, in the region of ATXN2,SH2B3 and PTPN11 loci, and rs17421627 (5q14; p = 7.32×10(-16, adjacent to the MEF2C locus. In two independent samples, locus 12q24 was also associated with coronary heart disease and hypertension. Our population-based genome-wide association study demonstrates four novel loci associated with retinal venular caliber, an endophenotype of the microcirculation associated with clinical cardiovascular disease. These data provide further insights into the contribution and biological mechanisms of microcirculatory changes that underlie cardiovascular

  6. Involvement of a gut-retina axis in protection against dietary glycemia induced age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the major cause of blindness in developed nations. AMD is characterized by retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) dysfunction and loss of photoreceptor cells. Epidemiologic studies indicate important contributions of dietary patterns on risk for AMD, but th...

  7. Target 5000: Target Capture Sequencing for Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Dockery

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There are an estimated 5000 people in Ireland who currently have an inherited retinal degeneration (IRD. It is the goal of this study, through genetic diagnosis, to better enable these 5000 individuals to obtain a clearer understanding of their condition and improved access to potentially applicable therapies. Here we show the current findings of a target capture next-generation sequencing study of over 750 patients from over 520 pedigrees currently situated in Ireland. We also demonstrate how processes can be implemented to retrospectively analyse patient datasets for the detection of structural variants in previously obtained sequencing reads. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were detected in 68% of pedigrees tested. We report nearly 30 novel mutations including three large structural variants. The population statistics related to our findings are presented by condition and credited to their respective candidate gene mutations. Rediagnosis rates of clinical phenotypes after genotyping are discussed. Possible causes of failure to detect a candidate mutation are evaluated. Future elements of this project, with a specific emphasis on structural variants and non-coding pathogenic variants, are expected to increase detection rates further and thereby produce an even more comprehensive representation of the genetic landscape of IRDs in Ireland.

  8. Prosthetic vision: devices, patient outcomes and retinal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjinicolaou, Alex E; Meffin, Hamish; Maturana, Matias I; Cloherty, Shaun L; Ibbotson, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Retinal disease and its associated retinal degeneration can lead to the loss of photoreceptors and therefore, profound blindness. While retinal degeneration destroys the photoreceptors, the neural circuits that convey information from the eye to the brain are sufficiently preserved to make it possible to restore sight using prosthetic devices. Typically, these devices consist of a digital camera and an implantable neurostimulator. The image sensor in a digital camera has the same spatiotopic arrangement as the photoreceptors of the retina. Therefore, it is possible to extract meaningful spatial information from an image and deliver it via an array of stimulating electrodes directly to the surviving retinal circuits. Here, we review the structure and function of normal and degenerate retina. The different approaches to prosthetic implant design are described in the context of human and preclinical trials. In the last section, we review studies of electrical properties of the retina and its response to electrical stimulation. These types of investigation are currently assessing a number of key challenges identified in human trials, including stimulation efficacy, spatial localisation, desensitisation to repetitive stimulation and selective activation of retinal cell populations. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  9. VEGF receptor blockade markedly reduces retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration into laser-induced CNV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    Full Text Available Although blocking VEGF has a positive effect in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the effect of blocking its receptors remains unclear. This was an investigation of the effect of VEGF receptor (VEGFR 1 and/or 2 blockade on retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration in laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV, a model of wet AMD. CNV lesions were isolated by laser capture microdissection at 3, 7, and 14 days after laser and analyzed by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining for mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Neutralizing antibodies for VEGFR1 or R2 and the microglia inhibitor minocycline were injected intraperitoneally (IP. Anti-CD11b, CD45 and Iba1 antibodies were used to confirm the cell identity of retinal microglia/macrophage, in the RPE/choroidal flat mounts or retinal cross sections. CD11b(+, CD45(+ or Iba1(+ cells were counted. mRNA of VEGFR1 and its three ligands, PlGF, VEGF-A (VEGF and VEGF-B, were expressed at all stages, but VEGFR2 were detected only in the late stage. PlGF and VEGF proteins were expressed at 3 and 7 days after laser. Anti-VEGFR1 (MF1 delivered IP 3 days after laser inhibited infiltration of leukocyte populations, largely retinal microglia/macrophage to CNV, while anti-VEGFR2 (DC101 had no effect. At 14 days after laser, both MF1 and DC101 antibodies markedly inhibited retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration into CNV. Therefore, VEGFR1 and R2 play differential roles in the pathogenesis of CNV: VEGFR1 plays a dominant role at 3 days after laser; but both receptors play pivotal roles at 14 days after laser. In vivo imaging demonstrated accumulation of GFP-expressing microglia into CNV in both CX3CR1(gfp/gfp and CX3CR1(gfp/+ mice. Minocycline treatment caused a significant increase in lectin(+ cells in the sub-retinal space anterior to CNV and a decrease in dextran-perfused neovessels compared to controls. Targeting the chemoattractant molecules that regulate trafficking of retinal microglia

  10. Progressive retinal degeneration and glial activation in the CLN6 (nclf mouse model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: a beneficial effect of DHA and curcumin supplementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Mirza

    Full Text Available Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL is a group of neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders characterized by vision loss, mental and motor deficits, and spontaneous seizures. Neuropathological analyses of autopsy material from NCL patients and animal models revealed brain atrophy closely associated with glial activity. Earlier reports also noticed loss of retinal cells and reactive gliosis in some forms of NCL. To study this phenomenon in detail, we analyzed the ocular phenotype of CLN6 (nclf mice, an established mouse model for variant-late infantile NCL. Retinal morphometry, immunohistochemistry, optokinetic tracking, electroretinography, and mRNA expression were used to characterize retinal morphology and function as well as the responses of Müller cells and microglia. Our histological data showed a severe and progressive degeneration in the CLN6 (nclf retina co-inciding with reactive Müller glia. Furthermore, a prominent phenotypic transformation of ramified microglia to phagocytic, bloated, and mislocalized microglial cells was identified in CLN6 (nclf retinas. These events overlapped with a rapid loss of visual perception and retinal function. Based on the strong microglia reactivity we hypothesized that dietary supplementation with immuno-regulatory compounds, curcumin and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, could ameliorate microgliosis and reduce retinal degeneration. Our analyses showed that treatment of three-week-old CLN6 (nclf mice with either 5% DHA or 0.6% curcumin for 30 weeks resulted in a reduced number of amoeboid reactive microglia and partially improved retinal function. DHA-treatment also improved the morphology of CLN6 (nclf retinas with a preserved thickness of the photoreceptor layer in most regions of the retina. Our results suggest that microglial reactivity closely accompanies disease progression in the CLN6 (nclf retina and both processes can be attenuated with dietary supplemented immuno-modulating compounds.

  11. In vivo sectional imaging of the retinal periphery using conventional optical coherence tomography systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Kothari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT has transformed macular disease practices. This report describes the use of conventional OCT systems for peripheral retinal imaging. Thirty-six eyes with peripheral retinal pathology underwent imaging with conventional OCT systems. In vivo sectional imaging of lattice degeneration, snail-track degeneration, and paving-stone degeneration was performed. Differences were noted between phenotypes of lattice degeneration. Several findings previously unreported in histopathology studies were encountered. Certain anatomic features were seen that could conceivably explain clinical and intraoperative behavior of peripheral lesions. Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis. Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions. This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

  12. In vivo sectional imaging of the retinal periphery using conventional optical coherence tomography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Abhishek; Narendran, V; Saravanan, V R

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed macular disease practices. This report describes the use of conventional OCT systems for peripheral retinal imaging. Thirty-six eyes with peripheral retinal pathology underwent imaging with conventional OCT systems. In vivo sectional imaging of lattice degeneration, snail-track degeneration, and paving-stone degeneration was performed. Differences were noted between phenotypes of lattice degeneration. Several findings previously unreported in histopathology studies were encountered. Certain anatomic features were seen that could conceivably explain clinical and intraoperative behavior of peripheral lesions. Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis. Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions. This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

  13. A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study of Saffron Supplementation in Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Sustained Benefits to Central Retinal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piccardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In a previous randomized clinical trial (Falsini et al. (2010, it was shown that short-term Saffron supplementation improves retinal flicker sensitivity in early age-related macular degeneration (AMD. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the observed functional benefits from Saffron supplementation may extend over a longer follow-up duration. Design. Longitudinal, interventional open-label study. Setting. Outpatient ophthalmology setting. Participants. Twenty-nine early AMD patients (age range: 55–85 years with a baseline visual acuity >0.3. Intervention. Saffron oral supplementation (20 mg/day over an average period of treatment of 14 (±2 months. Measurements. Clinical examination and focal-electroretinogram-(fERG- derived macular (18° flicker sensitivity estimate (Falsini et al. (2010 every three months over a followup of 14 (±2 months. Retinal sensitivity, the reciprocal value of the estimated fERG amplitude threshold, was the main outcome measure. Results. After three months of supplementation, mean fERG sensitivity improved by 0.3 log units compared to baseline values (P<0.01, and mean visual acuity improved by two Snellen lines compared to baseline values (0.75 to 0.9, P<0.01. These changes remained stable over the follow-up period. Conclusion. These results indicate that in early AMD Saffron supplementation induces macular function improvements from baseline that are extended over a long-term followup.

  14. Induction of oxidative and nitrosative stresses in human retinal pigment epithelial cells by all-trans-retinal

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    Zhu, Xue [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi 214063, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Ke, E-mail: wangke@jsinm.org [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi 214063, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Kai [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi 214063, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhou, Fanfan [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Zhu, Ling [Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2000 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Delayed clearance of free form all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is estimated be the key cause of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells injury during the pathogenesis of retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are far from clear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity effect and underlying molecular mechanism of atRAL on human retinal pigment epithelium ARPE-19 cells. The results indicated that atRAL could cause cell dysfunction by inducing oxidative and nitrosative stresses in ARPE-19 cells. The oxidative stress induced by atRAL was mediated through up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, activating mitochondrial-dependent and MAPKs signaling pathways, and finally resulting in apoptosis of ARPE-19 cells. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin could partly attenuated ROS generation, indicating that NADPH oxidase activity was involved in atRAL-induced oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cells. The nitrosative stress induced by atRAL was mainly reflected in increasing nitric oxide (NO) production, enhancing iNOS, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, and promoting monocyte adhesion. Furthermore, above effects could be dramatically blocked by using a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor SN50, indicated that atRAL-induced oxidative and nitrosative stresses were mediated by NF-κB. The results provide better understanding of atRAL-induced toxicity in human RPE cells. - Highlights: • atRAL induces oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. • atRAL induces oxidative stress-mediated inflammation in ARPE-19 cells. • NF-κB is involved in atRAL-induced oxidative and nitrosative stresses.

  15. Induction of oxidative and nitrosative stresses in human retinal pigment epithelial cells by all-trans-retinal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xue; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Fanfan; Zhu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Delayed clearance of free form all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is estimated be the key cause of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells injury during the pathogenesis of retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are far from clear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity effect and underlying molecular mechanism of atRAL on human retinal pigment epithelium ARPE-19 cells. The results indicated that atRAL could cause cell dysfunction by inducing oxidative and nitrosative stresses in ARPE-19 cells. The oxidative stress induced by atRAL was mediated through up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, activating mitochondrial-dependent and MAPKs signaling pathways, and finally resulting in apoptosis of ARPE-19 cells. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin could partly attenuated ROS generation, indicating that NADPH oxidase activity was involved in atRAL-induced oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cells. The nitrosative stress induced by atRAL was mainly reflected in increasing nitric oxide (NO) production, enhancing iNOS, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, and promoting monocyte adhesion. Furthermore, above effects could be dramatically blocked by using a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor SN50, indicated that atRAL-induced oxidative and nitrosative stresses were mediated by NF-κB. The results provide better understanding of atRAL-induced toxicity in human RPE cells. - Highlights: • atRAL induces oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. • atRAL induces oxidative stress-mediated inflammation in ARPE-19 cells. • NF-κB is involved in atRAL-induced oxidative and nitrosative stresses.

  16. Vision deficits precede structural losses in a mouse model of mitochondrial dysfunction and progressive retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, Alex M; MacPherson, Thomas C; Micks, Taft; Yan, Alex; Hill, Kathleen A

    2011-12-01

    Current animal models of retinal disease often involve the rapid development of a retinal disease phenotype; however, this is at odds with age-related diseases that take many years to manifest clinical symptoms. The present study was performed to examine an apoptosis-inducing factor (Aif)-deficient model, the harlequin carrier mouse (X(hq)X), and determine how mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent accelerated aging affect the function and structure of the mouse retina. Vision and eye structure for cohorts of 6 X(hq)X and 6 wild type mice at 3, 11, and 15 months of age were studied using in vivo electroretinography (ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Retinal superoxide levels were determined in situ using dihydroethidium (DHE) histochemistry. Retinal cell counts were quantified post mortem using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. ERG analysis of X(hq)X retinal function indicated a reduction in b-wave amplitude significant at 3 months of age (p retina (p retina may account for the early and significant reduction in retinal function. This remodeling of retinal neurochemistry in response to stress may be a relevant mechanism in the progression of normal retinal aging and early stages of some retinal degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Missed retinal breaks in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Takkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the causes and associations of missed retinal breaks (MRBs and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD. METHODS: Case sheets of patients undergoing vitreo retinal surgery for RRD at a tertiary eye care centre were evaluated retrospectively. Out of the 378 records screened, 253 were included for analysis of MRBs and 191 patients were included for analysis of PVD, depending on the inclusion criteria. Features of RRD and retinal breaks noted on examination were compared to the status of MRBs and PVD detected during surgery for possible associations. RESULTS: Overall, 27% patients had MRBs. Retinal holes were commonly missed in patients with lattice degeneration while missed retinal tears were associated with presence of complete PVD. Patients operated for cataract surgery were significantly associated with MRBs (P=0.033 with the odds of missing a retinal break being 1.91 as compared to patients with natural lens. Advanced proliferative vitreo retinopathy (PVR and retinal bullae were the most common reasons for missing a retinal break during examination. PVD was present in 52% of the cases and was wrongly assessed in 16%. Retinal bullae, pseudophakia/aphakia, myopia, and horse shoe retinal tears were strongly associated with presence of PVD. Traumatic RRDs were rarely associated with PVD. CONCLUSION: Pseudophakic patients, and patients with retinal bullae or advanced PVR should be carefully screened for MRBs. Though Weiss ring is a good indicator of PVD, it may still be over diagnosed in some cases. PVD is associated with retinal bullae and pseudophakia, and inversely with traumatic RRD.

  18. Performance of photovoltaic arrays in-vivo and characteristics of prosthetic vision in animals with retinal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorach, Henri; Goetz, Georges; Mandel, Yossi; Lei, Xin; Kamins, Theodore I.; Mathieson, Keith; Huie, Philip; Dalal, Roopa; Harris, James S.; Palanker, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loss of photoreceptors during retinal degeneration leads to blindness, but information can be reintroduced into the visual system using electrical stimulation of the remaining retinal neurons. Subretinal photovoltaic arrays convert pulsed illumination into pulsed electric current to stimulate the inner retinal neurons. Since required irradiance exceeds the natural luminance levels, an invisible near-infrared (915nm) light is used to avoid photophobic effects. We characterized the thresholds and dynamic range of cortical responses to prosthetic stimulation with arrays of various pixel sizes and with different number of photodiodes. Stimulation thresholds for devices with 140µm pixels were approximately half those of 70µm pixels, and with both pixel sizes, thresholds were lower with 2 diodes than with 3 diodes per pixel. In all cases these thresholds were more than two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. At high stimulation frequencies (>20Hz), the cortical response exhibited flicker fusion. Over one order of magnitude of dynamic range could be achieved by varying either pulse duration or irradiance. However, contrast sensitivity was very limited. Cortical responses could be detected even with only a few illuminated pixels. Finally, we demonstrate that recording of the corneal electric potential in response to patterned illumination of the subretinal arrays allows monitoring the current produced by each pixel, and thereby assessing the changes in the implant performance over time. PMID:25255990

  19. Ultra-Widefield Steering-Based SD-OCT Imaging of the Retinal Periphery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Netan; Golding, John; Manry, Matthew W.; Rao, Rajesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) features of peripheral retinal findings using an ultra-widefield (UWF) steering technique to image the retinal periphery. Design Observational study. Participants 68 patients (68 eyes) with 19 peripheral retinal features. Main Outcome Measures SD-OCT-based structural features. Methods Nineteen peripheral retinal features including: vortex vein, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), pars plana, ora serrata pearl, typical cystoid degeneration (TCD), cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice and cobblestone degeneration, retinal hole, retinal tear, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD), typical degenerative senile retinoschisis, peripheral laser coagulation scars, ora tooth, cryopexy scars (retinal tear and treated retinoblastoma scar), bone spicules, white without pressure, and peripheral drusen were identified by peripheral clinical examination. Near infrared (NIR) scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) images and SD-OCT of these entities were registered to UWF color photographs. Results SD-OCT resolved structural features of all peripheral findings. Dilated hyporeflective tubular structures within the choroid were observed in the vortex vein. Loss of retinal lamination, neural retinal attenuation, RPE loss or hypertrophy were seen in several entities including CHRPE, ora serrata pearl, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice and cobblestone degenerations. Hyporeflective intraretinal spaces, indicating cystoid or schitic fluid, were seen in ora serrata pearl, ora tooth, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, retinal hole, and typical degenerative senile retinoschisis. The vitreoretinal interface, which often consisted of lamellae-like structures of the condensed cortical vitreous near or adherent to the neural retina, appeared clearly in most peripheral findings, confirming its association with many low-risk and vision-threatening pathologies

  20. Sirtuin 1 participates in the process of age-related retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ying; Yang, Ke

    The process of aging involves retinal cell damage that leads to visual dysfunction. Sirtuin (Sirt) 1 can prevent oxidative stress, DNA damage, and apoptosis. In the present study, we measured the expression of Sirt1 as a functional regulator in the retina during the aging process. The visual function and Sirt1 expression in young (1 month) and old (19 months) Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Electroretinogram (ERG) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or Western blotting were performed. Resveratrol, an activator of Sirt1, was orally administered to SD rats at a dose of 5 mg/kg/day for 19 months. The expression of Sirt1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) was evaluated in the retinas of mice that did and did not receive resveratrol treatment. Apoptosis was detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. With decreasing b-wave amplitude, the expression level of Sirt1 was significantly reduced in aged retinas compared to that in young retinas. After 19 months of treatment with resveratrol, the Sirt1 expression level and b-wave amplitude increased. In old rats treated with resveratrol, the expression levels of BDNF and TrkB were up-regulated. Compared to young retinas, the aged retinas exhibited higher apoptosis, but resveratrol delayed this process. Our data demonstrated a reduction of Sirt1 expression during the aging process of the retina, but enhancing Sirt1 expression reversed the degeneration of the retina. These results suggested that increasing Sirt1 expression may protect retinal neurons and visual function via regulating neurotrophin and its receptor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Late complications following cryotherapy of lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, W E; Morse, P H; Nantawan, P

    1977-10-01

    We observed 341 patients who had received cryotherapy for lattice degeneration in order to identify possible late complications. Sequelae such as retinal tears posterior to an operculum or flap tears within treated areas showed that treatment did not necessarily prevent subsequent vitreous traction. Moreover, the newly created flap tears may extend beyond the treated area and can cause retinal detachment. Even scleral buckling did not necesserily prevent further traction. Therefore, we concluded that when cryotherapy is used to treat lattice degeneration, an adequate margin of surrounding retina should be treated and the treatment should extend to the ora serrata.

  2. Induced pluripotent stem cell-based therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracha, Peter; Moore, Nicholas A; Ciulla, Thomas A

    2017-09-01

    In age-related macular degeneration (AMD), stem cells could possibly replace or regenerate disrupted pathologic retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and produce supportive growth factors and cytokines such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor.  Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived RPE was first subretinally transplanted in a neovascular AMD patient in 2014. Areas covered: Induced PSCs are derived from the introduction of transcription factors to adult cells under specific cell culture conditions, followed by differentiation into RPE cells. Induced PSC-derived RPE cells exhibit ion transport, membrane potential, polarized VEGF secretion and gene expression that is similar to native RPE. Despite having similar in vitro function, morphology, immunostaining and microscopic analysis, it remains to be seen if iPSC-derived RPE can replicate the myriad of in vivo functions, including immunomodulatory effects, of native RPE cells.  Historically, adjuvant RPE transplantation during CNV resections were technically difficult and complicated by immune rejection. Autologous iPSCs are hypothesized to reduce the risk of immune rejection, but their production is time-consuming and expensive.  Alternatively, allogenic transplantation using human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched iPSCs, similar to HLA-matched organ transplantation, is currently being investigated. Expert opinion: Challenges to successful transplantation with iPSCs include surgical technique, a pathologic subretinal microenvironment, possible immune rejection, and complications of immunosuppression.

  3. Tetrahymena telomerase protein p65 induces conformational changes throughout telomerase RNA (TER) and rescues telomerase reverse transcriptase and TER assembly mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Andrea J; Gooding, Anne R; Cech, Thomas R

    2010-10-01

    The biogenesis of the Tetrahymena telomerase ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) is enhanced by p65, a La family protein. Single-molecule and biochemical studies have uncovered a hierarchical assembly of the RNP, wherein the binding of p65 to stems I and IV of telomerase RNA (TER) causes a conformational change that facilitates the subsequent binding of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) to TER. We used purified p65 and variants of TERT and TER to investigate the conformational rearrangements that occur during RNP assembly. Nuclease protection assays and mutational analysis revealed that p65 interacts with and stimulates conformational changes in regions of TER beyond stem IV. Several TER mutants exhibited telomerase activity only in the presence of p65, revealing the importance of p65 in promoting the correct RNP assembly pathway. In addition, p65 rescued TERT assembly mutants but not TERT activity mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that p65 stimulates telomerase assembly and activity in two ways. First, by sequestering stems I and IV, p65 limits the ensemble of structural conformations of TER, thereby presenting TERT with the active conformation of TER. Second, p65 acts as a molecular buttress within the assembled RNP, mutually stabilizing TER and TERT in catalytically active conformations.

  4. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Max Damico

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD and geographi c atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, aim to prevent apoptosis of retinal cells. Oxidative stress and depletion of essential micronutrients are targeted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS formulation. Visual cycle modulators reduce the activity of the photoreceptors and retinal accumulation of toxic fluorophores and lipofuscin. Eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration present chronic inflammation and potential treatments include corticosteroid and complement inhibition. We review the current concepts and rationale of dry age-related macular degeneration treatment that will most likely include a combination of drugs targeting different pathways involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

  5. Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Garg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable.

  6. Quantitative and Topographical Analysis of the Losses of Cone Photoreceptors and Retinal Ganglion Cells Under Taurine Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj-Saïd, Wahiba; Froger, Nicolas; Ivkovic, Ivana; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Dubus, Élisabeth; Dégardin-Chicaud, Julie; Simonutti, Manuel; Quénol, César; Neveux, Nathalie; Villegas-Pérez, María Paz; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Picaud, Serge; García-Ayuso, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Taurine depletion is known to induce photoreceptor degeneration and was recently found to also trigger retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss similar to the retinal toxicity of vigabatrin. Our objective was to study the topographical loss of RGCs and cone photoreceptors, with a distinction between the two cone types (S- and L- cones) in an animal model of induced taurine depletion. We used the taurine transporter (Tau-T) inhibitor, guanidoethane sulfonate (GES), to induce taurine depletion at a concentration of 1% in the drinking water. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and electroretinograms (ERG) were performed on animals after 2 months of GES treatment administered through the drinking water. Retinas were dissected as wholemounts and immunodetection of Brn3a (RGC), S-opsin (S-cones), and L-opsin (L-cones) was performed. The number of Brn3a+ RGCs, and L- and S-opsin+ cones was automatically quantified and their retinal distribution studied using isodensity maps. The treatment resulted in a significant reduction in plasma taurine levels and a profound dysfunction of visual performance as shown by ERG recordings. Optical coherence tomography analysis revealed that the retina was thinner in the taurine-depleted group. S-opsin+cones were more affected (36%) than L-opsin+cones (27%) with greater cone cell loss in the dorsal area whereas RGC loss (12%) was uniformly distributed. This study confirms that taurine depletion causes RGC and cone loss. Electroretinograms results show that taurine depletion induces retinal dysfunction in photoreceptors and in the inner retina. It establishes a gradient of cell loss depending on the cell type from S-opsin+cones, L-opsin+cones, to RGCs. The greater cell loss in the dorsal retina and of the S-cone population may underline different cellular mechanisms of cellular degeneration and suggests that S-cones may be more sensitive to light-induced retinal toxicity enhanced by the taurine depletion.

  7. Autologous transplantation of genetically modified iris pigment epithelial cells: A promising concept for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration and other disorders of the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkova, Irina; Kreppel, Florian; Welsandt, Gerhard; Luther, Thomas; Kozlowski, Jolanta; Janicki, Hanna; Kochanek, Stefan; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2002-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause for visual impairment and blindness in the elder population. Laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy and excision of neovascular membranes have met with limited success. Submacular transplantation of autologous iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells has been proposed to replace the damaged retinal pigment epithelium following surgical removal of the membranes. We tested our hypothesis that the subretinal transplantation of genetically modified autologous IPE cells expressing biological therapeutics might be a promising strategy for the treatment of ARMD and other retinal disorders. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has strong antiangiogenic and neuroprotective activities in the eye. Subretinal transplantation of PEDF expressing IPE cells inhibited pathological choroidal neovascularization in rat models of laser-induced rupture of Bruch's membrane and of oxygen induced ischemic retinopathy. PEDF expressing IPE transplants also increased the survival and preserved rhodopsin expression of photoreceptor cells in the RCS rat, a model of retinal degeneration. These findings suggest a promising concept for the treatment of ARMD and other retinal disorders.

  8. Using CRISPR-Cas9 to Generate Gene-Corrected Autologous iPSCs for the Treatment of Inherited Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnight, Erin R; Gupta, Manav; Wiley, Luke A; Anfinson, Kristin R; Tran, Audrey; Triboulet, Robinson; Hoffmann, Jeremy M; Klaahsen, Darcey L; Andorf, Jeaneen L; Jiao, Chunhua; Sohn, Elliott H; Adur, Malavika K; Ross, Jason W; Mullins, Robert F; Daley, George Q; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2017-09-06

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for autologous cell replacement. However, for many inherited diseases, treatment will likely require genetic repair pre-transplantation. Genome editing technologies are useful for this application. The purpose of this study was to develop CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing strategies to target and correct the three most common types of disease-causing variants in patient-derived iPSCs: (1) exonic, (2) deep intronic, and (3) dominant gain of function. We developed a homology-directed repair strategy targeting a homozygous Alu insertion in exon 9 of male germ cell-associated kinase (MAK) and demonstrated restoration of the retinal transcript and protein in patient cells. We generated a CRISPR-Cas9-mediated non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) approach to excise a major contributor to Leber congenital amaurosis, the IVS26 cryptic-splice mutation in CEP290, and demonstrated correction of the transcript and protein in patient iPSCs. Lastly, we designed allele-specific CRISPR guides that selectively target the mutant Pro23His rhodopsin (RHO) allele, which, following delivery to both patient iPSCs in vitro and pig retina in vivo, created a frameshift and premature stop that would prevent transcription of the disease-causing variant. The strategies developed in this study will prove useful for correcting a wide range of genetic variants in genes that cause inherited retinal degeneration. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human neural progenitor cells decrease photoreceptor degeneration, normalize opsin distribution and support synapse structure in cultured porcine retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollick, Tanzina; Mohlin, Camilla; Johansson, Kjell

    2016-09-01

    Retinal neurodegenerative disorders like retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment decrease retinal functionality leading to visual impairment. The pathological events are characterized by photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic disassembly, remodeling of postsynaptic neurons and activation of glial cells. Despite intense research, no effective treatment has been found for these disorders. The current study explores the potential of human neural progenitor cell (hNPC) derived factors to slow the degenerative processes in adult porcine retinal explants. Retinas were cultured for 3 days with or without hNPCs as a feeder layer and investigated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), immunohistochemical, western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) techniques. TUNEL showed that hNPCs had the capacity to limit photoreceptor cell death. Among cone photoreceptors, hNPC coculture resulted in better maintenance of cone outer segments and reduced opsin mislocalization. Additionally, maintained synaptic structural integrity and preservation of second order calbindin positive horizontal cells was also observed. However, Müller cell gliosis only seemed to be alleviated in terms of reduced Müller cell density. Our observations indicate that at 3 days of coculture, hNPC derived factors had the capacity to protect photoreceptors, maintain synaptic integrity and support horizontal cell survival. Human neural progenitor cell applied treatment modalities may be an effective strategy to help maintain retinal functionality in neurodegenerative pathologies. Whether hNPCs can independently hinder Müller cell gliosis by utilizing higher concentrations or by combination with other pharmacological agents still needs to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fisetin and luteolin protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and regulate inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytti, Maria; Piippo, Niina; Korhonen, Eveliina; Honkakoski, Paavo; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a clinical hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness among aged people in the Western world. Both inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital roles in the development of this disease. Here, we assess the ability of fisetin and luteolin, to protect ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and to decrease intracellular inflammation. We also compare the growth and reactivity of human ARPE-19 cells in serum-free and serum-containing conditions. The absence of serum in the culture medium did not prevent ARPE-19 cells from reaching full confluency but caused an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress-induced cell death. Both fisetin and luteolin protected ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death. They also significantly decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the culture medium. The decrease in inflammation was associated with reduced activation of MAPKs and CREB, but was not linked to NF- κB or SIRT1. The ability of fisetin and luteolin to protect and repair stressed RPE cells even after the oxidative insult make them attractive in the search for treatments for AMD. PMID:26619957

  11. Edaravone Protect against Retinal Damage in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Chen, Xi; Xie, Ping; Yuan, Songtao; Zhang, Weiwei; Lin, Xiaojun; Liu, Qinghuai

    2014-01-01

    Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one), a free radical scavenger, is used for the clinical treatment of retinal injury. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of edaravone against diabetic retinal damage in the mouse. Diabetic retinopathy in the mouse was induced by injection of streptozotocin. Edaravone was given once-daily and was intraperitoneally (i.p.) treated at a dose of 3 mg/kg from streptozotocin injection to 4 weeks after onset of diabetes. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) damage was evaluated by recording the pattern electroretinogram (ERG). RGCs damage was also detected by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined fluorometrically. The expressions of phosporylated-ERK1/2, BDNF, and caspase-3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Retinal levels of ROS, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly increased, whereas the expression of BDNF was significantly decreased in the retinas of diabetic mice, compared to nondiabetic mice. Administration of edaravone significantly attenuated diabetes induced RGCs death, upregulation of ROS, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and cleaved caspase-3 and downregulation of BDNF. These findings suggest that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in diabetic retinal damage and that systemic administration of edaravone may slow the progression of retinal neuropathy induced by diabetes. PMID:24897298

  12. Edaravone protect against retinal damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Yuan

    Full Text Available Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one, a free radical scavenger, is used for the clinical treatment of retinal injury. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of edaravone against diabetic retinal damage in the mouse. Diabetic retinopathy in the mouse was induced by injection of streptozotocin. Edaravone was given once-daily and was intraperitoneally (i.p. treated at a dose of 3 mg/kg from streptozotocin injection to 4 weeks after onset of diabetes. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs damage was evaluated by recording the pattern electroretinogram (ERG. RGCs damage was also detected by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining, and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS were determined fluorometrically. The expressions of phosporylated-ERK1/2, BDNF, and caspase-3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Retinal levels of ROS, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly increased, whereas the expression of BDNF was significantly decreased in the retinas of diabetic mice, compared to nondiabetic mice. Administration of edaravone significantly attenuated diabetes induced RGCs death, upregulation of ROS, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and cleaved caspase-3 and downregulation of BDNF. These findings suggest that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in diabetic retinal damage and that systemic administration of edaravone may slow the progression of retinal neuropathy induced by diabetes.

  13. Melatonin: An Underappreciated Player in Retinal Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Baba, Kenkichi; Hwang, Christopher K.; Iuvone, P. Michael

    2012-01-01

    In the vertebrate retina, melatonin is synthesized by the photoreceptors with high levels of melatonin at night and lower levels during the day. Melatonin exerts its influence by interacting with a family of G-protein-coupled receptors that are negatively coupled with adenylyl cyclase. Melatonin receptors belonging to the subtypes MT1 and MT2 have been identified in the mammalian retina. MT1 and MT2 receptors are found in all layers of the neural retina and in the retinal pigmented epithelium. Melatonin in the eye is believed to be involved in the modulation of many important retinal functions; it can modulate the electroretinogram (ERG), and administration of exogenous melatonin increases light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. Melatonin may also have protective effects on retinal pigment epithelial cells, photoreceptors and ganglion cells. A series of studies have implicated melatonin in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration, and melatonin administration may represent a useful approach to prevent and treat glaucoma. Melatonin is used by millions of people around the world to retard aging, improve sleep performance, mitigate jet lag symptoms, and treat depression. Administration of exogenous melatonin at night may also be beneficial for ocular health, but additional investigation is needed to establish its potential. PMID:22960156

  14. Towards a Completely Implantable, Light-Sensitive Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humayun, M

    2001-01-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis is under development to treat retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, two presently incurable diseases of the outer retina that afflict millions world-wide...

  15. LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OF RETINAL DEGENERATIVE DISORDER TREATMENT WITH PEPTIDE BIOREGULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze long-term outcomes and efficacy of retinal degeneration treatment with Retinalamin.Patients and methods. Group I included 20 patients (40 eyes with pigmentary retinal dystrophy (15 patients, 30 eyes and retinal abiotrophy (5 patients, 10 eyes who received treatment with Retinalamin for 5‑7 years. Group II included 11 patients (22 eyes with pigmentary retinal dystrophy (9 patients, 18 eyes and retinal abiotrophy (2 patients, 4 eyes who received treatment with Retinalamin for 23‑25 years. Group III (controls included 15 patients (30 eyes with pigmentary retinal dystrophy (11 patients, 22 eyes and retinal abiotrophy (4 patients, 8 eyes who received traditional treatment (vasodilators, angioprotectors, antisclerotic agents, vitamins for 25 years. Standard ophthalmological examination, i.e., visual acuity measurement, visual field test, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, was performed.Results. First course of treatment with Retinalamin improved vision in 58.1 % of retinal degeneration patients. Visual fields improved in 64.5 % of cases. Repeated treatment courses (1‑2 times a year for 23‑25 years preserved residual vision in 55.6 % of patients and object vision in 11.1 % of cases. In retinal abiotrophy patients, residual vision preserved in 100 % of cases.Conclusions. In retinal degenerations, Retinalamin improves vision and visual fields and decreases total area of absolute scotomas even after the first treatment course as well as preserves vision in prolonged use. 

  16. Spatially and Temporally Regulated NRF2 Gene Therapy Using Mcp-1 Promoter in Retinal Ganglion Cell Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Fujita

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cell degeneration triggered by axonal injury is believed to underlie many ocular diseases, including glaucoma and optic neuritis. In these diseases, retinal ganglion cells are affected unevenly, both spatially and temporally, such that healthy and unhealthy cells coexist in different patterns at different time points. Herein, we describe a temporally and spatially regulated adeno-associated virus gene therapy aiming to reduce undesired off-target effects on healthy retinal neurons. The Mcp-1 promoter previously shown to be activated in stressed retinal ganglion cells following murine optic nerve injury was combined with the neuroprotective intracellular transcription factor Nrf2. In this model, Mcp-1 promoter-driven NRF2 expression targeting only stressed retinal ganglion cells showed efficacy equivalent to non-selective cytomegalovirus promoter-driven therapy for preventing cell death. However, cytomegalovirus promoter-mediated NRF2 transcription induced cellular stress responses and death of Brn3A-positive uninjured retinal ganglion cells. Such undesired effects were reduced substantially by adopting the Mcp-1 promoter. Combining a stress-responsive promoter and intracellular therapeutic gene is a versatile approach for specifically targeting cells at risk of degeneration. This strategy may be applicable to numerous chronic ocular and non-ocular conditions.

  17. [Prevention of retinal detachment and treatment of retinoschisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, E P

    1990-01-01

    The necessity for prophylactic treatment for degenerative disease in the peripheral retina cannot be evaluated merely on the basis of the ophthalmoscopic findings. Factors such as the patient's history, refraction, the status of the vitreous, and prospective future cataract extraction all have a major impact on the risk of developing retinal detachment. The latter condition can be classified in to three groups: (1) low risk (patients with no history of retinal detachment, intraocular surgery or posterior vitreous detachment, myopia less than three diopters): treatment of atrophic holes and lattice degeneration is not justified, treatment of flap tears according to the circumstances; (2) medium risk (patients with no history of retinal or posterior vitreous detachment; however, myopia of more than three diopters and/or aphakia): the treatment of lattice degeneration is not justified; treatment of breaks according to the circumstances; (3) high risk: (patients with symptoms of posterior vitreous detachment): the treatment of lattice degeneration and atrophic holes is not justified: treatment of tears is necessary; fellow eyes: the treatment of retinal breaks is necessary; treatment of lattice degeneration seems advisable in cases with bilateral symmetric findings or prior to cataract extraction. Treatment of senile retinoschisis is only justified in cases with large and centrally located holes in the outer wall or in the presence of symptomatic schisis detachment.

  18. The Time Course of Deafness and Retinal Degeneration in a Kunming Mouse Model for Usher Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Qi, Lin-Song; Liu, Wei; An, Jing; Wang, Bin; Xue, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Zuo-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by congenital deafness and retinitis pigmentosa. In a mouse model for Usher syndrome, KMush/ush, discovered in our laboratory, we measured the phenotypes, characterized the architecture and morphology of the retina, and quantified the level of expression of pde6b and ush2a between postnatal (P) days 7, and 56. Electroretinograms and auditory brainstem response were used to measure visual and auditory phenotypes. Fundus photography and light microscopy were used to measure the architecture and morphology of the retina. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the expression levels of mRNA. KMush/ush mice had low amplitudes and no obvious waveforms of Electroretinograms after P14 compared with controls. Thresholds of auditory brainstem response in our model were higher than those of controls after P14. By P21, the retinal vessels of KMush/ush mice were attenuated and their optic discs had a waxy pallor. The retinas of KMush/ush mice atrophied and the choroidal vessels were clearly visible. Notably, the architecture of each retinal layer was not different as compared with control mice at P7, while the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and other retinal layers of KMush/ush mice were attenuated significantly between P14 and P21. ONL cells were barely seen in KMush/ush mice at P56. As compared with control mice, the expression of pde6b and ush2a in KMush/ush mice declined significantly after P7. This study is a first step toward characterizing the progression of disease in our mouse model. Future studies using this model may provide insights about the etiology of the disease and the relationships between genotypes and phenotypes providing a valuable resource that could contribute to the foundation of knowledge necessary to develop therapies to prevent the retinal degeneration in patients with Usher Syndrome.

  19. The Time Course of Deafness and Retinal Degeneration in a Kunming Mouse Model for Usher Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yao

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by congenital deafness and retinitis pigmentosa. In a mouse model for Usher syndrome, KMush/ush, discovered in our laboratory, we measured the phenotypes, characterized the architecture and morphology of the retina, and quantified the level of expression of pde6b and ush2a between postnatal (P days 7, and 56. Electroretinograms and auditory brainstem response were used to measure visual and auditory phenotypes. Fundus photography and light microscopy were used to measure the architecture and morphology of the retina. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the expression levels of mRNA. KMush/ush mice had low amplitudes and no obvious waveforms of Electroretinograms after P14 compared with controls. Thresholds of auditory brainstem response in our model were higher than those of controls after P14. By P21, the retinal vessels of KMush/ush mice were attenuated and their optic discs had a waxy pallor. The retinas of KMush/ush mice atrophied and the choroidal vessels were clearly visible. Notably, the architecture of each retinal layer was not different as compared with control mice at P7, while the outer nuclear layer (ONL and other retinal layers of KMush/ush mice were attenuated significantly between P14 and P21. ONL cells were barely seen in KMush/ush mice at P56. As compared with control mice, the expression of pde6b and ush2a in KMush/ush mice declined significantly after P7. This study is a first step toward characterizing the progression of disease in our mouse model. Future studies using this model may provide insights about the etiology of the disease and the relationships between genotypes and phenotypes providing a valuable resource that could contribute to the foundation of knowledge necessary to develop therapies to prevent the retinal degeneration in patients with Usher Syndrome.

  20. INDUCIBLE TRANSIENT CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY VASOSPASM: A CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishulin, Aleksey; Ghandi, Sachin; Apple, Daniel; Lin, Xihui; Hu, Jonathan; Abrams, Gary W

    2017-09-27

    To report a case of inducible transient central retinal artery vasospasm with associated imaging. Observational case report. A 51-year-old man presented for outpatient follow-up for recurrent inducible transient vision loss in his right eye. He experienced an episode during examination and was found to have central retinal artery vasospasm. Fundus photography and fluorescein angiography obtained during his vasospastic attack confirmed retinal arterial vasospasm. Treatment with a calcium-channel blocker (nifedipine) has been effective in preventing recurrent attacks. Idiopathic primary vasospasm is a rare cause of transient vision loss that is difficult to confirm because of the transient nature. We obtained imaging showing the initiation and resolution of the vasospastic event. The patient was then successfully treated with a calcium-channel blocker.

  1. Loosely coupled level sets for retinal layers and drusen segmentation in subjects with dry age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Jelena; Wang, Ziyuan; de Jong, Henk; Vermeer, Koenraad A.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to produce high-resolution three-dimensional images of the retina, which permit the investigation of retinal irregularities. In dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic eye disease that causes central vision loss, disruptions such as drusen and changes in retinal layer thicknesses occur which could be used as biomarkers for disease monitoring and diagnosis. Due to the topology disrupting pathology, existing segmentation methods often fail. Here, we present a solution for the segmentation of retinal layers in dry AMD subjects by extending our previously presented loosely coupled level sets framework which operates on attenuation coefficients. In eyes affected by AMD, Bruch's membrane becomes visible only below the drusen and our segmentation framework is adapted to delineate such a partially discernible interface. Furthermore, the initialization stage, which tentatively segments five interfaces, is modified to accommodate the appearance of drusen. This stage is based on Dijkstra's algorithm and combines prior knowledge on the shape of the interface, gradient and attenuation coefficient in the newly proposed cost function. This prior knowledge is incorporated by varying the weights for horizontal, diagonal and vertical edges. Finally, quantitative evaluation of the accuracy shows a good agreement between manual and automated segmentation.

  2. Optical coherent tomography in diagnoses of peripheral retinal degenarations

    OpenAIRE

    O. G. Pozdeyeva; T. B. Shaimov; A. Yu. Galin; R. B. Shaimov; T. A. Shaimova; A. V. Zolotova; A. V. Fomin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Studying the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (RTVue-100, OPTOVUE, USA) in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions, adjacent vitreous body as well as measurement of morphometric data.Methods: The study included 189 patients (239 eyes) with peripheral retinal degeneration. 77 men and 112 women aged 18 to 84 underwent an ophthalmologic examination since November 2012 until October 2013. The peripheral retina was visualized with the help of op...

  3. Posterior vitreous detachment and retinal detachment after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripandelli, Guido; Coppé, Andrea Maria; Parisi, Vincenzo; Olzi, Diego; Scassa, Cecilia; Chiaravalloti, Adele; Stirpe, Mario

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate possible changes of vitreous status in emmetropic eyes after uneventful phacoemulsification surgery, and possible related complications such as the onset of retinal detachment (RD). Retrospective case series. Four hundred fifty-three emmetropic eyes from 453 patients (mean age, 62.03+/-5.57 years) subjected to uneventful phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in the capsular bag were considered in the study. They had a refractive error within +/-0.5 diopters (mean, -0.21+/-0.08). Eyes with peripheral retinal lattice degeneration were included only if asymptomatic and only if the degeneration involved one retinal quadrant. After cataract surgery, the 453 eyes were evaluated preoperatively at days 1, 15, and 30 and months 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60. The whole period of follow-up was 5 years. Evaluation of vitreous status by biomicroscopic examination, indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy, and B-scan ultrasonography. Postoperative onset of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and RD. After cataract surgery, a PVD occurred in 107 of 141 (75.88%) eyes without preoperative PVD or lattice degeneration. Posterior vitreous detachment occurred in 41 of 47 eyes (87.23%) with preoperative lattice degeneration and no PVD. Eyes with preoperative lattice degeneration and postoperative PVD showed a higher incidence of RD after cataract surgery (21.27%) than eyes without preoperative PVD or lattice degeneration (0.70%). In all patients with lattice degeneration, RD originated from horseshoe retinal tears on lattice areas located on the superior quadrants. No correlation was observed between the development of RD and age. Our results suggest that the onset of postoperative PVD should be considered an important risk factor for the development of RD after cataract surgery, particularly in eyes with lattice areas.

  4. Vitreous in lattice degeneration of retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foos, R Y; Simons, K B

    1984-05-01

    A localized pocket of missing vitreous invariably overlies lattice degeneration of the retina. Subjects with lattice also have a higher rate of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, which is usually a complication of retinal tears. The latter are in turn a result of alterations in the central vitreous--that is, synchysis senilis leading to posterior vitreous detachment. In order to determine if there is either an association or a deleterious interaction between the local and central lesions of the vitreous in eyes with lattice, a comparison was made in autopsy eyes with and without lattice the degree of synchysis and rate of vitreous detachment. Results show no association between the local and central vitreous lesions, indicating that a higher rate of vitreous detachment is not the basis for the higher rate of retinal detachment in eyes with lattice. Also, there was no suggestion of deleterious interaction between the local and central vitreous lesions, either through vitreodonesis as a basis for precocious vitreous detachment, or through a greater degree of synchysis as a basis for interconnection of local and central lacunae (which could extend the localized retinal detachment in eyes with holes in lattice degeneration).

  5. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) through the conduct of clinical trials and other...design and conduct of effective and efficient clinical trials for inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and dry AMD; • Limited number and...linica l trial in the NEER network for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, and the ProgSTAR studies for Stargardt disease ) . As new interventions b

  6. Ocular changes in TgF344-AD rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yuchun; Lu, Bin; Ljubimov, Alexander V; Girman, Sergey; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Sadun, Alfredo A; Svendsen, Clive N; Cohen, Robert M; Wang, Shaomei

    2014-01-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in learning, memory, and executive functions. In addition to cognitive and behavioral deficits, vision disturbances have been reported in early stage of AD, well before the diagnosis is clearly established. To further investigate ocular abnormalities, a novel AD transgenic rat model was analyzed. Transgenic (Tg) rats (TgF344-AD) heterozygous for human mutant APPswe/PS1ΔE9 and age-matched wild type (WT) rats, as well as 20 human postmortem retinal samples from both AD and healthy donors were used. Visual function in the rodent was analyzed using the optokinetic response and luminance threshold recording from the superior colliculus. Immunohistochemistry on retinal and brain sections was used to detect various markers including amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques. As expected, Aβ plaques were detected in the hippocampus, cortex, and retina of Tg rats. Plaque-like structures were also found in two AD human whole-mount retinas. The choroidal thickness was significantly reduced in both Tg rat and in AD human eyes when compared with age-matched controls. Tg rat eyes also showed hypertrophic retinal pigment epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and upregulation of complement factor C3. Although visual acuity was lower in Tg than in WT rats, there was no significant difference in the retinal ganglion cell number and retinal vasculature. In this study, we observed pathological changes in the choroid and in RPE cells in the TgF344-AD rat model; choroidal thinning was observed further in human AD retina. Along with Ab deposition, the inflammatory response was manifested by microglial recruitment and complement activation. Further studies are needed to elucidate the significance and mechanisms of these pathological changes [corrected].

  7. Retinal Biocompatibility of Brilliant Blue G with Deuterated Water for Chromovitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmerson Badaró

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the retinal biocompatibility of Brilliant Blue G with deuterated water (BBG-D2O as a vital dye for chromovitrectomy. Methods: In this animal study, 0.05 mL of 0.25 g/L Brilliant Blue G (BBG associated with 0.13 mL/mL of deuterium oxide (D2O was injected intravitreally in the right eye and the same amount of balanced salt solution (BSS was injected similarly in the left eye of rabbits. Clinical examination and histology with light microscopy were performed after seven days. Retinal cell layers were evaluated for morphologic alterations. Electroretinographic (ERG changes were also assessed at baseline and 7 days after the injections. Results: A total of 6 rabbits were included in the study. The gross histopathologic appearance of the retina, choroid, sclera and optic nerve was within normal limits without any sign of severe retinal necrosis or cystic degeneration. Light microscopy showed that BBG-D2O caused no substantial alterations in retinal layers as compared to control eyes. The injection of BBG-D2O did not induce considerable functional ERG alterations. Conclusion: Intravitreal injection of BBG-D2O 0.25 g/L seems to induce no retinal toxicity as documented by lack of functional and histological changes.

  8. Risk factors for retinal breaks in patients with symptom of floaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singalavanija, Apichart; Amornrattanapan, Chutiwan; Nitiruangjarus, Kanjanee; Tongsai, Sasima

    2010-06-01

    To identify the risk factors of retinal breaks in patients with the symptom of floaters, and to determine the association between those risk factors and retinal breaks. A retrospective analytic study of 184 patients (55 males and 129 females) that included 220 eyes was conducted. Patient information such as age, symptoms (multiple floaters, flashing), duration of symptom, refractive error, history of cataract surgery, family history of retinal detachment, and complete eye examination were recorded. The patients were divided into two groups, the first group (control group) had symptoms of floaters and no retinal breaks, the second group (retinal breaks group) had symptoms of floaters with retinal breaks. Chi-square test, and the multiple logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Two hundred twenty eyes, 175 eyes of the control group and 45 eyes of the retinal breaks group were examined and included in this study. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with multiple floaters, and floaters and flashing increased the risk of retinal breaks to 5.8 and 4.3 times, respectively, when compared to patients with single floater or floaters alone. Lattice degeneration increased the risk of retinal breaks to 5.9 times when compared to eyes that did not have lattice degeneration. Multiple floaters, flashing and lattice degeneration are risk factors of retinal breaks in patients with symptoms of floaters. Therefore, it is important for the ophthalmologists to be aware of these risk factors and the patients at risk should have follow-up examinations.

  9. PATTERNS OF FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE DEFECTS IN NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION SUBTYPES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkok, Ahmet; Sigford, Douglas K; Tezel, Tongalp H

    2016-11-01

    To test define characteristic fundus autofluorescence patterns of different exudative age-related macular degeneration subtypes. Cross-sectional study. Fifty-two patients with choroidal neovascularization because of three different neovascular age-related macular degeneration subtypes were included in the study. Macular and peripheral fundus autofluorescence patterns of study subjects were compared in a masked fashion. Fundus autofluorescence patterns of all three neovascular age-related macular degeneration subtypes revealed similar patterns. However, peripapillary hypo-autofluorescence was more common among patients with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (88.2%) compared with patients with retinal angiomatous proliferation (12.5%) and patients without retinal angiomatous proliferation and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (21.1%) (P autofluorescence defects in neovascular age-related macular degeneration maybe suggestive of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy as a variant of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  10. Single-cell resolution imaging of retinal ganglion cell apoptosis in vivo using a cell-penetrating caspase-activatable peptide probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Qiu

    Full Text Available Peptide probes for imaging retinal ganglion cell (RGC apoptosis consist of a cell-penetrating peptide targeting moiety and a fluorophore-quencher pair flanking an effector caspase consensus sequence. Using ex vivo fluorescence imaging, we previously validated the capacity of these probes to identify apoptotic RGCs in cell culture and in an in vivo rat model of N-methyl- D-aspartate (NMDA-induced neurotoxicity. Herein, using TcapQ488, a new probe designed and synthesized for compatibility with clinically-relevant imaging instruments, and real time imaging of a live rat RGC degeneration model, we fully characterized time- and dose-dependent probe activation, signal-to-noise ratios, and probe safety profiles in vivo. Adult rats received intravitreal injections of four NMDA concentrations followed by varying TcapQ488 doses. Fluorescence fundus imaging was performed sequentially in vivo using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope and individual RGCs displaying activated probe were counted and analyzed. Rats also underwent electroretinography following intravitreal injection of probe. In vivo fluorescence fundus imaging revealed distinct single-cell probe activation as an indicator of RGC apoptosis induced by intravitreal NMDA injection that corresponded to the identical cells observed in retinal flat mounts of the same eye. Peak activation of probe in vivo was detected 12 hours post probe injection. Detectable fluorescent RGCs increased with increasing NMDA concentration; sensitivity of detection generally increased with increasing TcapQ488 dose until saturating at 0.387 nmol. Electroretinography following intravitreal injections of TcapQ488 showed no significant difference compared with control injections. We optimized the signal-to-noise ratio of a caspase-activatable cell penetrating peptide probe for quantitative non-invasive detection of RGC apoptosis in vivo. Full characterization of probe performance in this setting creates an important in

  11. Ultra-Widefield Steering-Based Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Retinal Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Netan; Golding, John; Manry, Matthew W; Rao, Rajesh C

    2016-06-01

    To describe the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) features of peripheral retinal findings using an ultra-widefield (UWF) steering technique to image the retinal periphery. Observational study. A total of 68 patients (68 eyes) with 19 peripheral retinal features. Spectral-domain OCT-based structural features. Nineteen peripheral retinal features, including vortex vein, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, pars plana, ora serrata pearl, typical cystoid degeneration (TCD), cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice and cobblestone degeneration, retinal hole, retinal tear, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, typical degenerative senile retinoschisis, peripheral laser coagulation scars, ora tooth, cryopexy scars (retinal tear and treated retinoblastoma scar), bone spicules, white without pressure, and peripheral drusen, were identified by peripheral clinical examination. Near-infrared scanning laser ophthalmoscopy images and SD OCT of these entities were registered to UWF color photographs. Spectral-domain OCT resolved structural features of all peripheral findings. Dilated hyporeflective tubular structures within the choroid were observed in the vortex vein. Loss of retinal lamination, neural retinal attenuation, retinal pigment epithelium loss, or hypertrophy was seen in several entities, including congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, ora serrata pearl, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice, and cobblestone degenerations. Hyporeflective intraretinal spaces, indicating cystoid or schitic fluid, were seen in ora serrata pearl, ora tooth, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, retinal hole, and typical degenerative senile retinoschisis. The vitreoretinal interface, which often consisted of lamellae-like structures of the condensed cortical vitreous near or adherent to the neural retina, appeared clearly in most peripheral findings, confirming its association with many low-risk and vision

  12. Fully Automated Robust System to Detect Retinal Edema, Central Serous Chorioretinopathy, and Age Related Macular Degeneration from Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Maculopathy is the excessive damage to macula that leads to blindness. It mostly occurs due to retinal edema (RE, central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR, or age related macular degeneration (ARMD. Optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging is the latest eye testing technique that can detect these syndromes in early stages. Many researchers have used OCT images to detect retinal abnormalities. However, to the best of our knowledge, no research that presents a fully automated system to detect all of these macular syndromes is reported. This paper presents the world’s first ever decision support system to automatically detect RE, CSCR, and ARMD retinal pathologies and healthy retina from OCT images. The automated disease diagnosis in our proposed system is based on multilayered support vector machines (SVM classifier trained on 40 labeled OCT scans (10 healthy, 10 RE, 10 CSCR, and 10 ARMD. After training, SVM forms an accurate decision about the type of retinal pathology using 9 extracted features. We have tested our proposed system on 2819 OCT scans (1437 healthy, 640 RE, and 742 CSCR of 502 patients from two different datasets and our proposed system correctly diagnosed 2817/2819 subjects with the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity ratings of 99.92%, 100%, and 99.86%, respectively.

  13. Retinal changes in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Pankaj Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to determine the prevalence of retinal changes in pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH and any association between the retinal changes and age, parity, blood pressure, proteinuria, and severity of the disease. Settings and Design: Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: All the patients admitted with a diagnosis of PIH were included in this study. Age, gravida, gestation period, blood pressure, and proteinuria were noted from the case records. Fundus examination was done with a direct ophthalmoscope. The findings were noted and were analyzed using SPSS program. Results: A total of 150 patients of PIH were examined. The mean age of patients was 25.1 years. The gestation period ranged from 27 weeks to 42 weeks; 76 (50.67% were the primi gravida. 92 (61.33% patients had gestational hypertension, 49 (32.67% patients had preeclampsia, and 9 (6% had eclampsia. Retinal changes (hypertensive retinopathy were noted in 18 (12% patients - Grade 1 in 12 (8% and Grade 2 in 6 (4%. Hemorrhages or exudates or retinal detachment were not seen in any patient. There was statistically significant positive association of retinal changes and blood pressure (P = 0.037, proteinuria (P = 0.0005, and severity of the PIH (P = 0.004. Conclusions: Retinal changes were seen in 12% of patients with PIH. Occurrence of hypertensive retinopathy in PIH cases has been decreased due to better antenatal care and early detection and treatment of PIH cases. There is a greater chance of developing retinopathy with increase in blood pressure, severity of PIH, and proteinuria in cases of PIH.

  14. Progressive retinal degeneration in a girl with Knobloch syndrome who presented with signs of ocular albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradstein, Libe; Hansen, Ronald M; Cox, Gerald F; Altschwager, Pablo; Fulton, Anne B

    2017-04-01

    We report for the first time electroretinographic (ERG) evidence of progressive retinal abnormalities in a girl who presented in infancy with ocular features of albinism and gradually developed choroidal sclerosis and patchy retinal atrophy leading to a diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS, OMIM 267750, COL18A1). At age 2 months, nystagmus and esotropia prompted ophthalmic evaluation. The appearance of choroidal sclerosis and atrophic retinal patches led to further evaluation at age 8 years. Genetics consultation was obtained in infancy and again at age 8 years as retinal findings evolved. Full field ERG responses in both scotopic and photopic conditions were recorded at both ages and compared to those in healthy control subjects. At age 2 months ERG response parameters were within normal limits for age and tyrosinase (TYR) gene sequencing revealed one novel mutation, p.S466F, and the temperature-sensitive polymorphism, p.R402Q, suggesting the diagnosis of oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1). At age 8 years, there was significant attenuation of both scotopic and photopic ERG responses. Genetic re-analysis led to the identification of a homozygous mutation, c.3213dupC, in the COL18A1 gene, thus confirming the diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome. Our patient with Knobloch syndrome developed abnormal ERG responses similar to those found in col18a1 knockout mice. Thus, we have documented progressive attenuation of the scotopic and photopic responses in KS.

  15. [Prophylactic treatment of retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, S; Riss, B

    1981-08-01

    The indications for and results of prophylactic treatment of retinal detachment during a period of five years are reported and compared with the results in the literature. Half of the cases (3 out of 6 eyes) which developed a retinal detachment had been horse-shoe tears combined with a vitreous hemorrhage. For this reason a small buckle operation is recommended in these cases, to prevent further traction. Lattice degeneration should rather be observed than treated, except in special cases: This includes eyes where the fellow eye had a detachment from a lattice degeneration, cases in which one eye is blind from an uncured detachment or has no useful visual acuity, and eyes whose fellow eye has giant tears. In aphakic eyes treatment of lattice degeneration is recommended, because the incidence of detachment from these areas is high, especially in young aphakic cases. In one aphakic eye which had been photocoagulated several times the formation of a preretinal membrane was observed.

  16. Cellular Reparative Mechanisms of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Suet Lee Shirley; Kumar, Suresh; Mok, Pooi Ling

    2017-07-28

    The use of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been reported as promising for the treatment of numerous degenerative disorders including the eye. In retinal degenerative diseases, MSCs exhibit the potential to regenerate into retinal neurons and retinal pigmented epithelial cells in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Delivery of MSCs was found to improve retinal morphology and function and delay retinal degeneration. In this review, we revisit the therapeutic role of MSCs in the diseased eye. Furthermore, we reveal the possible cellular mechanisms and identify the associated signaling pathways of MSCs in reversing the pathological conditions of various ocular disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Current stem cell treatment can be dispensed as an independent cell treatment format or with the combination of other approaches. Hence, the improvement of the treatment strategy is largely subjected by our understanding of MSCs mechanism of action.

  17. [Vitreomacular adhesion in HD-OCT images in the age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latalska, Małgorzata; Swiech-Zubilewicz, Anna; Mackiewicz, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an incidence of the vitreomacular adhesion in patients with age-related macular degeneration. We examined 472 eyes in 241 patients (136 W/ 105 M) in age of 54-92 years (mean 62.6 years +/- 8.5) with dry or wet age-related macular degeneration using Cirrus HD-OCT (Zeiss) macular cube 512x128 program or 5-line pro-gram. Vitreomacular adhesion was observed in 139 eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (29.4%, p=0.000*), in 101 eyes with drusen (21.4%, p=0.000*), in 38 eyes with retinal pigment epithelium alterations (8%, p=0.202), in 278 eyes with wet age-related macular degeneration (58.9%, p=0.001*), in 21 eyes with pigment epithelial detachment (4.4%, p=0.303), in 161 eyes with choroidal neovascularzation (34. 1%, p=0.031*/ and in 96 eyes with scar (20.4%, p=0.040*). Probably, vitreomacular adhesion alone is not able to induce age-related macular degeneration, but it may be associated with choroidal neovascularization development, it can contribute to exudate formation and choroidal neovascularization, it may induces or sustains a chronic low-grade inflammation in the macula region.

  18. A rat retinal damage model predicts for potential clinical visual disturbances induced by Hsp90 inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dan; Liu, Yuan; Ye, Josephine; Ying, Weiwen; Ogawa, Luisa Shin; Inoue, Takayo; Tatsuta, Noriaki; Wada, Yumiko; Koya, Keizo; Huang, Qin; Bates, Richard C.; Sonderfan, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    In human trials certain heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, including 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922, have caused visual disorders indicative of retinal dysfunction; others such as 17-AAG and ganetespib have not. To understand these safety profile differences we evaluated histopathological changes and exposure profiles of four Hsp90 inhibitors, with or without clinical reports of adverse ocular effects, using a rat retinal model. Retinal morphology, Hsp70 expression (a surrogate marker of Hsp90 inhibition), apoptotic induction and pharmacokinetic drug exposure analysis were examined in rats treated with the ansamycins 17-DMAG and 17-AAG, or with the second-generation compounds NVP-AUY922 and ganetespib. Both 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922 induced strong yet restricted retinal Hsp70 up-regulation and promoted marked photoreceptor cell death 24 h after the final dose. In contrast, neither 17-AAG nor ganetespib elicited photoreceptor injury. When the relationship between drug distribution and photoreceptor degeneration was examined, 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922 showed substantial retinal accumulation, with high retina/plasma (R/P) ratios and slow elimination rates, such that 51% of 17-DMAG and 65% of NVP-AUY922 present at 30 min post-injection were retained in the retina 6 h post-dose. For 17-AAG and ganetespib, retinal elimination was rapid (90% and 70% of drugs eliminated from the retina at 6 h, respectively) which correlated with lower R/P ratios. These findings indicate that prolonged inhibition of Hsp90 activity in the eye results in photoreceptor cell death. Moreover, the results suggest that the retina/plasma exposure ratio and retinal elimination rate profiles of Hsp90 inhibitors, irrespective of their chemical class, may predict for ocular toxicity potential. - Highlights: • In human trials some Hsp90 inhibitors cause visual disorders, others do not. • Prolonged inhibition of Hsp90 in the rat eye results in photoreceptor cell death. • Retina/plasma ratio and retinal

  19. Retinitis-pigmentosa-like tapetoretinal degeneration in a rabbit breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, A; Baar, U

    1985-08-15

    By chance, we found a rabbit strain with retinal dystrophy. The eyes of these rabbits were examined by ophthalmoscopy, electroretinography, histology, and cytology--the latter after retina dissociation with papaine. The results suggest this rabbit strain to be a possible animal model for human retinitis pigmentosa.

  20. The P2Y12 Receptor Antagonist Ticagrelor Reduces Lysosomal pH and Autofluorescence in Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells From the ABCA4-/- Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennan Lu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of partially degraded lipid waste in lysosomal-related organelles may contribute to pathology in many aging diseases. The presence of these lipofuscin granules is particularly evident in the autofluorescent lysosome-associated organelles of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE cells, and may be related to early stages of age-related macular degeneration. While lysosomal enzymes degrade material optimally at acidic pH levels, lysosomal pH is elevated in RPE cells from the ABCA4-/- mouse model of Stargardt’s disease, an early onset retinal degeneration. Lowering lysosomal pH through cAMP-dependent pathways decreases accumulation of autofluorescent material in RPE cells in vitro, but identification of an appropriate receptor is crucial for manipulating this pathway in vivo. As the P2Y12 receptor for ADP is coupled to the inhibitory Gi protein, we asked whether blocking the P2Y12 receptor with ticagrelor could restore lysosomal acidity and reduce autofluorescence in compromised RPE cells from ABCA4-/- mice. Oral delivery of ticagrelor giving rise to clinically relevant exposure lowered lysosomal pH in these RPE cells. Ticagrelor also partially reduced autofluorescence in the RPE cells of ABCA4-/- mice. In vitro studies in ARPE-19 cells using more specific antagonists AR-C69931 and AR-C66096 confirmed the importance of the P2Y12 receptor for lowering lysosomal pH and reducing autofluorescence. These observations identify P2Y12 receptor blockade as a potential target to lower lysosomal pH and clear lysosomal waste in RPE cells.

  1. Effect of chronic alcohol ingestion on the progression of periodontitis induced in Fisher-344 rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éder Ricardo Biasoli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Understand the effect of chronic alcohol on the progression of periodontitis induced in Fischer-344 rats.Methods: For the study, 22 Fischer-344 rats, two months old were used, divided into groups: alcohol (n=8, ligature (n=7 and control (n=7. On the first day, the animals in the alcohol group were exposed to ingestion of a water solution containing 20% alcohol (size/size, up to day 90. After thirty days from the beginning of the experiment, the animals in the alcohol group and the ligature group were submitted to the placement of a silk thread around the right maxillary second molar. Nothing was performed on the left side, serving as control. All the groups were submitted to euthanasia 60 days after ligature placement. To assess the destruction of periodontitis, a radiographic exam was used to measure the destruction of bone height. Results: The results of the study showed that on the side in which periodontitis was induced, the group that ingested alcohol suffered an increase in destruction, with statistical differences when compared with the ligature and control groups and increased bone destruction in the ligature group when compared to control. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, it was concluded that chronic alcohol consumption by Fischer-344 rats led to greater progression of induced periodontitis.

  2. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  3. Renal-Retinal Ciliopathy Gene Sdccag8 Regulates DNA Damage Response Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Airik, Rannar; Slaats, Gisela G; Guo, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RCs) are developmental and degenerative kidney diseases that are frequently associated with extrarenal pathologies such as retinal degeneration, obesity, and intellectual disability. We recently identified mutations in a gene encoding the centrosomal...... protein SDCCAG8 as causing NPHP type 10 in humans. To study the role of Sdccag8 in disease pathogenesis, we generated a Sdccag8 gene-trap mouse line. Homozygous Sdccag8(gt/gt) mice lacked the wild-type Sdccag8 transcript and protein, and recapitulated the human phenotypes of NPHP and retinal degeneration....... These mice exhibited early onset retinal degeneration that was associated with rhodopsin mislocalization in the photoreceptors and reduced cone cell numbers, and led to progressive loss of vision. By contrast, renal histologic changes occurred later, and no global ciliary defects were observed in the kidneys...

  4. Honokiol inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavilala, Divya Teja [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States); O’Bryhim, Bliss E. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ponnaluri, V.K. Chaithanya [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States); White, R. Sid; Radel, Jeff [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Symons, R.C. Andrew [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ophthalmology Department, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Surgery, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Mukherji, Mridul, E-mail: mukherjim@umkc.edu [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Aberrant activation of HIF pathway is the underlying cause of ischemic neovascularization. •Honokiol has better therapeutic index as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. •Daily IP injection of honokiol in OIR mouse model reduced retinal neovascularization. •Honokiol also prevents vaso-obliteration, the characteristic feature of the OIR model. •Honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. -- Abstract: Aberrant activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is the underlying cause of retinal neovascularization, one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. The HIF pathway also plays critical roles during tumor angiogenesis and cancer stem cell transformation. We have recently shown that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of the HIF pathway in a number of cancer and retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. Here we evaluate the safety and efficacy of honokiol, digoxin, and doxorubicin, three recently identified HIF inhibitors from natural sources. Our studies show that honokiol has a better safety to efficacy profile as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. Further, we show for the first time that daily intraperitoneal injection of honokiol starting at postnatal day (P) 12 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model significantly reduced retinal neovascularization at P17. Administration of honokiol also prevents the oxygen-induced central retinal vaso-obliteration, characteristic feature of the OIR model. Additionally, honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. Since honokiol suppresses multiple pathways activated by HIF, in addition to the VEGF signaling, it may provide advantages over current treatments utilizing specific VEGF antagonists for ocular neovascular diseases and cancers.

  5. Mutation K42E in dehydrodolichol diphosphate synthase (DHDDS) causes recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Byron L; Züchner, Stephan L; Dallman, Julia; Wen, Rong; Alfonso, Eduardo C; Vance, Jeffery M; Peričak-Vance, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    A single-nucleotide mutation in the gene that encodes DHDDS has been identified by whole exome sequencing as the cause of the non-syndromic recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in a family of Ashkenazi Jewish origin in which three of the four siblings have early onset retinal degeneration. The peripheral retinal degeneration in the affected siblings was evident in the initial examination in 1992 and only one had detectable electroretinogram (ERG) that suggested cone-rod dysfunction. The pigmentary retinal degeneration subsequently progressed rapidly. The identified mutation changes the highly conserved residue Lys42 to Glu, resulting in lower catalytic efficiency. Patterns of plasma transferrin isoelectric focusing gel were normal in all family members, indicating no significant abnormality in protein glycosylation. Dolichols have been shown to influence the fluidity and of the membrane and promote vesicle fusion. Considering that photoreceptor outer segments contain stacks of membrane discs, we believe that the mutation may lead to low dolichol levels in photoreceptor outer segments, resulting in unstable membrane structure that leads to photoreceptor degeneration.

  6. Early and exudative age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Jehs, Tina; Juel, Helene Baek

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have recently identified homeostatic alterations in the circulating T cells of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In cultures of retinal pigment epithelial cells, we have demonstrated that T-cell-derived cytokines induced the upregulation of complement, chemokines...... and other proteins implicated in AMD pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to test whether increased plasma levels of cytokines were present in patients with AMD. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study. Age-related macular degeneration status was assessed using standardized multimodal imaging...

  7. Neuroprotective Treatment of Laser-Induced Retinal Injuries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosner, Mordechai

    2001-01-01

    .... It is not possible to prevent all these injuries and there is no treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dextromethorphan, memantine and brimonidine in our rat model of laser- induced retinal-lesions Methods...

  8. Changes in intrinsic excitability of ganglion cells in degenerated retinas of RCS rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ming Ren

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the intrinsic excitability of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in degenerated retinas. METHODS: The intrinsic excitability of various morphologically defined RGC types using a combination of patch-clamp recording and the Lucifer yellow tracer in retinal whole-mount preparations harvested from Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats, a common retinitis pigmentosa (RP model, in a relatively late stage of retinal degeneration (P90 were investigated. Several parameters of RGC morphologies and action potentials (APs were measured and compared to those of non-dystrophic control rats, including dendritic stratification, dendritic field diameter, peak amplitude, half width, resting membrane potential, AP threshold, depolarization to threshold, and firing rates. RESULTS: Compared with non-dystrophic control RGCs, more depolarizations were required to reach the AP threshold in RCS RGCs with low spontaneous spike rates and in RCS OFF cells (especially A2o cells, and RCS RGCs maintained their dendritic morphologies, resting membrane potentials and capabilities to generate APs. CONCLUSION: RGCs are relatively well preserved morphologically and functionally, and some cells are more susceptible to decreased excitability during retinal degeneration. These findings provide valuable considerations for optimizing RP therapeutic strategies.

  9. [Clinical Characteristics of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment in Highly Myopic and Phakic Eyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihara, Tadashi; Hirota, Kazunari; Yokota, Reiji; Kunita, Daisuke; Itoh, Yuji; Rii, Tosho; Koto, Takashi; Hiraoka, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Makoto; Hirakata, Akito

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate clinical characteristics of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in high myopic and phakic eyes. The subjects were 1174 eyes of phakic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment detected in 1199 eyes that underwent initial vitreoretinal surgery between April 2006 and March 2011. Eyes with macular hole retinal detachment or secondary retinal detachment were excluded. The 486 eyes with high myopia (spherical equivalent ≤ -6.0 D or axial length ≥ 26.5 mm) and the 688 eyes with non-high myopia were compared. The mean age was significantly younger in the high myopia group (42.7 ± 14.2 years old, p lattice degeneration were more frequent (16.7%, 20.4%, respectively). The incidences of the retinal detachment in younger age and those caused by retinal holes were higher in the high myopia group. Higher incidence of retinal detachment and lattice degeneration in the fellow eyes of the high myopia group indicated that careful observation also in the fellow eyes was recommended.

  10. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Tivadar; Johnson, William M; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mieyal, John J; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes adult-onset blindness. There are 2 forms of this progressive disease: wet and dry. Currently there is no cure for AMD, but several treatment options have started to emerge making early detection critical for therapeutic success. Analysis of the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice that display light-induced retinal degeneration indicates that 11-cis-retinal and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were significantly decreased as compared with the eyes of control dark-adapted C57BL/6J mice. In addition, exposure to intense light correlated with higher levels of prostaglandin G2 in the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice. Intense light exposure also lowered DHA levels in the eyes of wild-type C57BL/6J mice without discernible retinal degeneration. Analysis of human serum from patients with AMD recapitulated these dysregulated DHA levels and revealed dysregulation of arachidonic acid (AA) levels as well (∼32% increase in patients with AMD compared with average levels in healthy individuals). From these observations, we then built a statistical model that included levels of DHA and AA from human serum. This model had a 74% probability of correctly identifying patients with AMD from controls. Addition of a genetic analysis for one of the most prevalent amino acid substitutions in the age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 gene linked to AMD, Ala(69)→Ser, did not improve the statistical model. Thus, we have characterized a reliable method with the potential to detect AMD without a genetic component, paving the way for a larger-scale clinical evaluation. Our studies on mouse models along with the analysis of human serum suggest that our small molecule-based model may serve as an effective tool to estimate the risk of developing AMD. © FASEB.

  11. [Retinal pigmentary degeneration--clinical features, diagnostics and possibilities of treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grześk, Magdalena; Malukiewicz-Wiśniewska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical course of retinitis pigmentosa taking into consideration models of inheritance and possible treatment. Retinitis pigmentosa belongs to heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders, which are connected with gradual loss of the photoreceptor function, firstly rod cells subsequently cones, which is accompanied by the retinal pigmentary epithelium disorder. Retinitis pigmentosa connected with X chromosome is one of the most severe form of this disease that in polish population takes place with frequency at average 10-15% which is similar to ADRP--10-20%. Course of RP, despite many similarities may differ from each other and prognosis depends on model of inheritance. Unfortunately, in spite of many efforts, nowadays medicine do not have successful treatment for patients with RP.

  12. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Hypoxia in a Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Imam; Evans, Stephanie M; Craft, Jason R; Capozzi, Megan E; McCollum, Gary W; Yang, Rong; Marnett, Lawrence J; Uddin, Md Jashim; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Penn, John S

    2016-08-05

    Ischemia-induced hypoxia elicits retinal neovascularization and is a major component of several blinding retinopathies such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Currently, noninvasive imaging techniques capable of detecting and monitoring retinal hypoxia in living systems do not exist. Such techniques would greatly clarify the role of hypoxia in experimental and human retinal neovascular pathogenesis. In this study, we developed and characterized HYPOX-4, a fluorescence-imaging probe capable of detecting retinal-hypoxia in living animals. HYPOX-4 dependent in vivo and ex vivo imaging of hypoxia was tested in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Predicted patterns of retinal hypoxia were imaged by HYPOX-4 dependent fluorescence activity in this animal model. In retinal cells and mouse retinal tissue, pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining confirmed the hypoxia selectivity of HYPOX-4. HYPOX-4 had no effect on retinal cell proliferation as indicated by BrdU assay and exhibited no acute toxicity in retinal tissue as indicated by TUNEL assay and electroretinography (ERG) analysis. Therefore, HYPOX-4 could potentially serve as the basis for in vivo fluorescence-based hypoxia-imaging techniques, providing a tool for investigators to understand the pathogenesis of ischemic retinopathies and for physicians to address unmet clinical needs.

  13. The role of whiskers in compensation of visual deficit in a mouse model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voller, Jaroslav; Potužáková, Barbora; Šimeček, Vojtěch; Vožeh, František

    2014-01-13

    Sensory deprivation in one modality can enhance the development of the remaining modalities via mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Mice of the C3H strain suffer from RD1 retinal degeneration that leads to visual impairment at weaning age. We examined a role of whiskers in compensation of the visual deficit. In order to differentiate the contribution of the whiskers from other mechanisms that can take part in the compensation, we investigated the effect of both chronic and acute tactile deprivation. Three-month-old mice were used. We examined motor skills (rotarod, beam walking test), gait control (CatWalk system), spontaneous motor activity (open field) and CNS excitability to an acoustic stimulus for assessment of compensatory changes in auditory system (audiogenic epilepsy). In the sighted mice, the only effect was a decline in their rotarod test performance after acute whisker removal. In the blind animals, chronic tactile deprivation caused changes in their gait and impaired the performance in motor tests. Some other compensatory mechanisms were involved but the whiskers are essential for the compensation as it emerged from more marked change of gait and the worsening of the motor performance after the acute whisker removal. Both chronic and acute tactile deprivation induced anxiety-like behaviour. Only a combination of blindness and chronic tactile deprivation led to an increased sense of hearing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. THICKNESS OF THE MACULA, RETINAL NERVE FIBER LAYER, AND GANGLION CELL-INNER PLEXIFORM LAYER IN THE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION: The Repeatability Study of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Il-Hwan; Lee, Woo-Hyuk; Lee, Jong-Joo; Jo, Young-Joon; Kim, Jung-Yeul

    2018-02-01

    To determine the repeatability of measuring the thickness of the central macula, retinal nerve fiber layer, and ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (Cirrus HD-OCT) in eyes with age-related macular degeneration. One hundred and thirty-four eyes were included. The measurement repeatability was assessed by an experienced examiner who performed two consecutive measurements using a 512 × 128 macular cube scan and a 200 × 200 optic disk cube scan. To assess changes in macular morphology in patients with age-related macular degeneration, the patients were divided into the following three groups according to the central macular thickness (CMT): A group, CMT 300 μm. Measurement repeatability was assessed using test-retest variability, a coefficient of variation, and an intraclass correlation coefficient. The mean measurement repeatability for the central macular, retinal nerve fiber layer, and GC-IPL thickness was high in the B group. The mean measurement repeatability for both the central macula and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was high in the A and C groups, but was lower for the GC-IPL thickness. The measurement repeatability for GC-IPL thickness was high in the B group, but low in the A group and in the C group. The automated measurement repeatability for GC-IPL thickness was significantly lower in patients with age-related macular degeneration with out of normal CMT range. The effect of changes in macular morphology should be considered when analyzing GC-IPL thicknesses in a variety of ocular diseases.

  15. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  16. Treatment of dry age-related macular degeneration with dobesilate

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Angulo, J; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2012-01-01

    The authors present anatomical and functional evidences of dry age-macular degeneration improvement, after intravitreal treatment with dobesilate. Main outcomes measures were normalisation of retinal structure and function, assessed by optical coherence tomography, fundus-monitored microperimetry, electrophysiology and visual acuity. The effect might be related to the normalisation of the outer retinal architecture.

  17. Frank-ter Haar syndrome associated with sagittal craniosynostosis and raised intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendon, Charlotte L; Fenwick, Aimée L; Hurst, Jane A; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Wall, Steven A; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Johnson, David

    2012-11-09

    Frank-ter Haar syndrome is a rare disorder associated with skeletal, cardiac, ocular and craniofacial features including hypertelorism and brachycephaly. The most common underlying genetic defect in Frank-ter Haar syndrome appears to be a mutation in the SH3PXD2B gene on chromosome 5q35.1. Craniosynostosis, or premature fusion of the calvarial sutures, has not previously been described in Frank-ter Haar syndrome. We present a family of three affected siblings born to consanguineous parents with clinical features in keeping with a diagnosis of Frank-ter Haar syndrome. All three siblings have a novel mutation caused by the deletion of exon 13 of the SH3PXD2B gene. Two of the three siblings also have non-scaphocephalic sagittal synostosis associated with raised intracranial pressure. The clinical features of craniosynostosis and raised intracranial pressure in this family with a confirmed diagnosis of Frank-ter Haar syndrome expand the clinical spectrum of the disease. The abnormal cranial proportions in a mouse model of the disease suggests that the association is not coincidental. The possibility of craniosynostosis should be considered in individuals with a suspected diagnosis of Frank-ter Haar syndrome.

  18. Can Vitamin A be Improved to Prevent Blindness due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Stargardt Disease and Other Retinal Dystrophies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Leonide; Washington, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how an imperfect visual cycle results in the formation of vitamin A dimers, thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of various retinal diseases, and summarize how slowing vitamin A dimerization has been a therapeutic target of interest to prevent blindness. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of vitamin A dimerization, an alternative form of vitamin A, one that forms dimers more slowly yet maneuvers effortlessly through the visual cycle, was developed. Such a vitamin A, reinforced with deuterium (C20-D3-vitamin A), can be used as a non-disruptive tool to understand the contribution of vitamin A dimers to vision loss. Eventually, C20-D3-vitamin A could become a disease-modifying therapy to slow or stop vision loss associated with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease and retinal diseases marked by such vitamin A dimers. Human clinical trials of C20-D3-vitamin A (ALK-001) are underway.

  19. Host cell reactivation by fibroblasts from patients with pigmentary degeneration of the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Tarone, R.E.; Barrett, S.F.; Robbins, J.H.; Wirtschafter, J.D.; Dupuy, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by numerous clinical abnormalities including acute sun sensitivity and primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. Cultured fibroblasts from CS patients are hypersensitive to ultraviolet radiation. Host cell reactivation of irradiated virus was studied in CS and in other diseases with retinal degeneration to evaluate repair. The survival of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 was determined in fibroblast lines from four normal donors, two patients with CS, one with both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS, and from several other patients with (Usher syndrome, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, retinitis pigmentosa) and without (XP, ataxia telangiectasia) primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. The viral survival curves in all cell lines showed two components: a very sensitive initial component followed by an exponential, less sensitive component. The exponential component had greater sensitivity than normal in the case of the CS patients, the patient with both XP and CS, and the XP patient. It was proposed that patients with CS have defective repair of DNA which may be the cause of their retinal degeneration. (author)

  20. Host cell reactivation by fibroblasts from patients with pigmentary degeneration of the retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytle, C.D. (Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD (USA)); Tarone, R.E.; Barrett, S.F.; Robbins, J.H. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Wirtschafter, J.D. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis (USA). Hospitals); Dupuy, J.M. (Quebec Univ., Laval-des-Rapides (Canada). Inst. Armand-Frappier)

    1983-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by numerous clinical abnormalities including acute sun sensitivity and primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. Cultured fibroblasts from CS patients are hypersensitive to ultraviolet radiation. Host cell reactivation of irradiated virus was studied in CS and in other diseases with retinal degeneration to evaluate repair. The survival of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 was determined in fibroblast lines from four normal donors, two patients with CS, one with both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS, and from several other patients with (Usher syndrome, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, retinitis pigmentosa) and without (XP, ataxia telangiectasia) primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. The viral survival curves in all cell lines showed two components: a very sensitive initial component followed by an exponential, less sensitive component. The exponential component had greater sensitivity than normal in the case of the CS patients, the patient with both XP and CS, and the XP patient. It was proposed that patients with CS have defective repair of DNA which may be the cause of their retinal degeneration.

  1. Arrestin gene mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, M; Wada, Y; Tamai, M

    1998-04-01

    To assess the clinical and molecular genetic studies of patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa associated with a mutation in the arrestin gene. Results of molecular genetic screening and case reports with DNA analysis and clinical features. University medical center. One hundred twenty anamnestically unrelated patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. DNA analysis was performed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by nucleotide sequencing to search for a mutation in exon 11 of the arrestin gene. Clinical features were characterized by visual acuity slitlamp biomicroscopy, fundus examinations, fluorescein angiography, kinetic visual field testing, and electroretinography. We identified 3 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa associated with a homozygous 1-base-pair deletion mutation in codon 309 of the arrestin gene designated as 1147delA. All 3 patients showed pigmentary retinal degeneration in the midperipheral area with or without macular involvement. Patient 1 had a sibling with Oguchi disease associated with the same mutation. Patient 2 demonstrated pigmentary retinal degeneration associated with a golden-yellow reflex in the peripheral fundus. Patients 1 and 3 showed features of retinitis pigmentosa without the golden-yellow fundus reflex. Although the arrestin 1147delA has been known as a frequent cause of Oguchi disease, this mutation also may be related to the pathogenesis of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. This phenomenon may provide evidence of variable expressivity of the mutation in the arrestin gene.

  2. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Barriers to Setting up a Vitreo‑retinal Unit of Ophthalmology in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vitreo‑retinal equipment is expensive and may be beyond the reach of a ... retinopathy, age‑related macular degeneration, retinal detachment ... requiring treatment. Earlier, we ... the Prevention of Blindness visited our institution and initiated ...

  4. Translational read-through as an alternative approach for ocular gene therapy of retinal dystrophies caused by in-frame nonsense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Möller, Fabian; Penner, Inessa; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    The eye has become an excellent target for gene therapy, and gene augmentation therapy of inherited retinal disorders has made major progress in recent years. Nevertheless, a recent study indicated that gene augmentation intervention might not stop the progression of retinal degeneration in patients. In addition, for many genes, viral-mediated gene augmentation is currently not feasible due to gene size and limited packaging capacity of viral vectors as well as expression of various heterogeneous isoforms of the target gene. Thus, alternative gene-based strategies to stop or delay the retinal degeneration are necessary. This review focuses on an alternative pharmacologic treatment strategy based on the usage of translational read-through inducing drugs (TRIDs) such as PTC124, aminoglycoside antibiotics, and designer aminoglycosides for overreading in-frame nonsense mutations. This strategy has emerged as an option for up to 30-50% of all cases of recessive hereditary retinal dystrophies. In-frame nonsense mutations are single-nucleotide alterations within the gene coding sequence resulting in a premature stop codon. Consequently, translation of such mutated genes leads to the synthesis of truncated proteins, which are unable to fulfill their physiologic functions. In this context, application of TRIDs facilitates the recoding of the premature termination codon into a sense codon, thus restoring syntheses of full-length proteins. So far, clinical trials for non-ocular diseases have been initiated for diverse TRIDs. Although the clinical outcome is not analyzed in detail, an excellent safety profile, namely for PTC124, was clearly demonstrated. Moreover, recent data demonstrated sustained read-through efficacies of nonsense mutations causing retinal degeneration, as manifested in the human Usher syndrome. In addition, a strong retinal biocompatibility for PTC124 and designer aminoglycosides has been demonstrated. In conclusion, recent progress emphasizes the

  5. An Algebraic Construction of Duality Functions for the Stochastic {U_q( A_n^{(1)})} Vertex Model and Its Degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Jeffrey

    2018-03-01

    A recent paper (Kuniba in Nucl Phys B 913:248-277, 2016) introduced the stochastic U}_q(A_n^{(1)})} vertex model. The stochastic S-matrix is related to the R-matrix of the quantum group {U_q(A_n^{(1)})} by a gauge transformation. We will show that a certain function {D^+_{m intertwines with the transfer matrix and its space reversal. When interpreting the transfer matrix as the transition matrix of a discrete-time totally asymmetric particle system on the one-dimensional lattice Z , the function {D^+m} becomes a Markov duality function {Dm} which only depends on q and the vertical spin parameters μ_x. By considering degenerations in the spectral parameter, the duality results also hold on a finite lattice with closed boundary conditions, and for a continuous-time degeneration. This duality function had previously appeared in a multi-species ASEP(q, j) process (Kuan in A multi-species ASEP(q, j) and q-TAZRP with stochastic duality, 2017). The proof here uses that the R-matrix intertwines with the co-product, but does not explicitly use the Yang-Baxter equation. It will also be shown that the stochastic U}_q(A_n^{(1)})} is a multi-species version of a stochastic vertex model studied in Borodin and Petrov (Higher spin six vertex model and symmetric rational functions, 2016) and Corwin and Petrov (Commun Math Phys 343:651-700, 2016). This will be done by generalizing the fusion process of Corwin and Petrov (2016) and showing that it matches the fusion of Kulish and yu (Lett Math Phys 5:393-403, 1981) up to the gauge transformation. We also show, by direct computation, that the multi-species q-Hahn Boson process (which arises at a special value of the spectral parameter) also satisfies duality with respect to D_∞, generalizing the single-species result of Corwin (Int Math Res Not 2015:5577-5603, 2015).

  6. Characterisation of a C1qtnf5 Ser163Arg knock-in mouse model of late-onset retinal macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Shu

    Full Text Available A single founder mutation resulting in a Ser163Arg substitution in the C1QTNF5 gene product causes autosomal dominant late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORMD in humans, which has clinical and pathological features resembling age-related macular degeneration. We generated and characterised a mouse "knock-in" model carrying the Ser163Arg mutation in the orthologous murine C1qtnf5 gene by site-directed mutagenesis and homologous recombination into mouse embryonic stem cells. Biochemical, immunological, electron microscopic, fundus autofluorescence, electroretinography and laser photocoagulation analyses were used to characterise the mouse model. Heterozygous and homozygous knock-in mice showed no significant abnormality in any of the above measures at time points up to 2 years. This result contrasts with another C1qtnf5 Ser163Arg knock-in mouse which showed most of the features of L-ORMD but differed in genetic background and targeting construct.

  7. Crocin prevents retinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury-induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells through the PI3K/AKT signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Wen-Bo; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Xin-Guang

    2013-02-01

    Crocin is a pharmacologically active component of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) and has been reported to be useful in the treatment of neuronal damage. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of crocin on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after retinal ischaemia/reperfusion (IR) injury, and our results show that crocin acts through the PI3K/AKT signalling pathway. Retinal IR injury was induced by raising the intraocular pressure of Sprague-Dawley rats to 110 mmHg for 60 min. The neuroprotective effect of crocin was determined by quantifying the surviving RGCs and apoptotic RGCs following IR injury by means of retrograde labelling and TUNEL staining, respectively. The phosphorylated AKT protein level was determined by western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. To determine the extent to which the PI3K/AKT pathway contributes to the neuroprotective effect of crocin, experiments were also performed using the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Compared with the IR + vehicle group, crocin (50 mg/kg) treatment enhanced RGC survival by approximately 36% and decreased RGC apoptosis by 44% after retinal IR injury. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the PI3K/AKT pathway was activated by crocin in the ganglion cell layer after retinal IR injury. Intravitreal injection of LY294002 blocked the neuroprotective effect of crocin on IR-induced RGC death. In conclusion, crocin prevents retinal IR-induced apoptosis of RGCs by activating the PI3K/AKT signalling pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MR imaging in the evaluation of macular degeneration and intraocular tumorlike conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafee, M.F.; Peyman, G.A.; Cohen, S.B.; Capek, V.

    1987-01-01

    The MR characteristics of malignant uveal melanoma and choroidal hematoma have been described. This paper reports on MR imaging and CT examinations of patients who had macular degeneration, retinal and subretinal masses (hematoma, dense scar), choroidal metastases, choroidal nevus, and choroidal leiomyoma. Several diagnostically helpful MR findings were noted. Posterior hyaloid detachment with associated retinal detachment and subretinal hematoma in patients with macular degeneration demonstrated by MR imaging. Associated liquefaction of the vitreous in our patients with macular degeneration was seen as hyperintensity of the involved vitreous. Hematomas, metastases, and nevi may be confused with uveal melanoma. Choroidal leiomyoma had characteristic high signal intensity in both T1- and T2-weighted images

  9. Retinal Detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Riaz, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 58-year-old female presented to the emergency department reporting six days of progressive, atraumatic left eye vision loss. Her symptoms started with the appearance of dark spots and “spider webs,” and then progressed to darkening of vision in her left eye. She reports mild pain since yesterday. Her review of symptoms was otherwise negative. Ocular physical examination revealed normal external appearance, intact extraocular movements, and visual acuities of 20/25 OD and light/dark sensitivity OS. Fluorescein uptake was negative and slit lamp exam was unremarkable. Significant findings: Bedside ocular ultrasound revealed a serpentine, hyperechoic membrane that appeared tethered to the optic disc posteriorly with hyperechoic material underneath. These findings are consistent with retinal detachment (RD and associated retinal hemorrhage. Discussion: The retina is a layer of organized neurons that line the posterior portion of the posterior chamber of the eye. RD occurs when this layer separates from the underlying epithelium, resulting in ischemia and progressive photoreceptor degeneration, with potentially rapid and permanent vision loss if left untreated.1 Risk factors include advanced age, male sex (60%, race (Asians and Jews, and myopia and lattice degeneration.2 Bedside ultrasound (US performed by emergency physicians provides a valuable tool that has been used by ophthalmologists for decades to evaluate intraocular disease.1,3 Findings on bedside ultrasound consistent with RD include a hyperechoic membrane floating in the posterior chamber. RD usuallyremain tethered to the optic disc posteriorly and do not cross midline, a feature distinguishing them from posterior vitreous detachments. Associated retinal hemorrhage, seen as hyperechoic material under the retinal flap, can often be seen.1,2 US can also distinguish between “mac-on” and “mac-off” detachments. If the retina is still attached to the

  10. STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT OF HYPERAUTOFLUORESCENT RING IN PATIENTS WITH RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIMA, LUIZ H.; CELLA, WENER; GREENSTEIN, VIVIENNE C.; WANG, NAN-KAI; BUSUIOC, MIHAI; THEODORE SMITH, R.; YANNUZZI, LAWRENCE A.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the retinal structure underlying the hyperautofluorescent ring visible on fundus autofluorescence in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Twenty-four eyes of 13 patients with retinitis pigmentosa, aged 13 years to 67 years, were studied. The integrity of the photoreceptor cilia, also known as the inner/outer segment junction of the photoreceptors, the outer nuclear layer, and retinal pigment epithelium, was evaluated outside, across, and inside the ring with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results Inside the foveal area, fundus autofluorescence did not detect abnormalities. Outside the ring, fundus autofluorescence revealed hypoautofluorescence compatible with the photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium degeneration. Spectral-domain OCT inside the ring, in the area of normal foveal fundus autofluorescence, revealed an intact retinal structure in all eyes and total retinal thickness values that were within normal limits. Across the ring, inner/outer segment junction disruption was observed and the outer nuclear layer was decreased in thickness in a centrifugal direction in all eyes. Outside the hyperautofluorescent ring, the inner/outer segment junction and the outer nuclear layer appeared to be absent and there were signs of retinal pigment epithelium degeneration. Conclusion Disruption of the inner/outer segment junction and a decrease in outer retinal thickness were found across the central hyperautofluorescent ring seen in retinitis pigmentosa. Outer segment phagocytosis by retinal pigment epithelium is necessary for the formation of an hyperautofluorescent ring. PMID:19584660

  11. [Effects of pressure induced retinal ischemia on ERG in rabbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G; Yang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhang, D

    2001-12-01

    To observe the effects of pressure induced retinal ischemia on electroretinogram(ERG) in rabbit. Retinal ischemia was induced in rabbits by increasing intraocular pressure at 30 mmHg, 60 mmHg, 90 mmHg, 120 mmHg for 45 minutes, and retinal function was monitored by eletroretinography. There was no difference on ERG before or after the experiment both in 30 mmHg group and control one. In 60 mmHg pressure induced ischemia eyes, the amplitudes of the b-wave and OPs wave reduced significantly. Four hours after reperfusion, they were totally recovered. After an ischemic insult of 90 mmHg or 120 mmHg for 45 minutes, there was no response of ERG. Four hours later, the amplitudes of the b-wave and OPs wave were 66.912 +/- 20.157 and 16.423 +/- 3.965 the former, 38.852 +/- 23.438 and 8.610 +/- 12.090 the latter, respectively. These results suggest that higher intraocular pressure causes more severe retina ischemic damage, and less recovery ability.

  12. EFFECT OF INTRAVITREAL RANIBIZUMAB ON GANGLION CELL COMPLEX AND PERIPAPILLARY RETINAL NERVE FIBER LAYER IN NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION USING SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Cicinelli, Maria V; Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Pierro, Luisa; Gagliardi, Marco; Accardo, Agostino; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    To analyze the changes in ganglion cell complex and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, in central macular thickness and choroidal thickness on spectral domain optical coherence tomography in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab injections. All consecutive patients with untreated neovascular age-related macular degeneration received loading phase of three monthly intravitreal ranibizumab, followed by retreatments on a pro re nata protocol for 12 months. changes in ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer at the end of follow-up. Secondary outcome: changes in best-corrected visual acuity, central macular thickness, and choroidal thickness at the end of follow-up. Choroidal thickness was measured at 500 μm, 1000 μm, and 1,500 μm intervals nasally, temporally, superiorly, and inferiorly to the fovea, respectively, on horizontal and vertical line scans centered on the fovea. Twenty-four eyes were included. Ganglion cell complex and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness did not show statistically significant changes through 12 months (55.6 ± 18.5 and 81.9 ± 9.9 μm at baseline, 52.7 ± 19.3 and 84.6 ± 15.5 μm at month 12, P > 0.05). Central macular thickness showed progressive decrease from baseline to month 12, with maximum reduction at month 3 (P macular thickness was significantly reduced at the end of treatment. Further studies, with larger sample, longer follow-up, and greater number of injections, are warranted.

  13. THE ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS INSECTICIDE FENTHION DOES NOT AFFECT PHAGOCYTOSIS OF ROD OUTER SEGMENTS BY RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM CELLS IN CULTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    :Exposure to the organophosphorous insecticide fenthion has been associated with retinal degeneration in occupational studies. It has also been associated with pigmentary changes of the retina. Because retinal degeneration and pigmentary changes may be due to dysfunction of t...

  14. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab administration in rabbit retinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álcio Coutinho de Paula

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab treatment in an animal experimental model using cytological and molecular techniques. Methods: Eighteen rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: control, adalimumab treatment, and placebo. Cytotoxicity on retinal cells was evaluated using flow cytometry assays to determine the level of apoptosis and necrosis. Genotoxicity was evaluated by comet assays to assess DNA damage, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to evaluate expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases (8 and 3. Results: No cytotoxicity or genotoxicity was observed in any of the two treatment groups (adalimumab and placebo following intravitreal administration compared with the control group. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that more than 90% of the cells were viable, and only a low proportion of retinal cells presented apoptotic (~10% or necrotic (<1% activity across all groups. Molecular damage was also low with a maximum of 6.4% DNA degradation observed in the comet assays. In addition, no increase in gene expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases was observed on retinal cells by qPCR in both the adalimumab and placebo groups compared with the control group. Conclusion: The use of adalimumab resulted in no detectable cytotoxicity or genotoxicity on retinal cells for up to 60 days upon administration. These results therefore indicate that adalimumab may be a safe option for intravitreal application to treat ocular inflammatory diseases in which TNF-α is involved.

  15. Endogenous α-crystallin inhibits expression of caspase-3 induced by hypoxia in retinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xi; Peng, Yanli; Zhang, Jiaping; Wang, Xingli; Wu, Nan; Zeng, Yuxiao; Wang, Yi

    2014-08-28

    To investigate the expression of endogenous, hypoxic stress-induced α-crystallin and caspase-3 in rat retinal neurons in vitro. Retinal neurons were cultured from Long-Evans rats. The expression of endogenous α-crystallin was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Furthermore, hypoxic exposure was performed in cultured cells, and the expression of endogenous α-crystallin and caspase-3 was assayed by Western blotting. Positive α-crystallin staining was observed in cultured retinal neurons, and expression of endogenous α-crystallin mRNA peaked 3-5d after inoculation (Pendogenous, hypoxic stress-induced α-crystallin expression increased gradually, peaking 6h after hypoxia. The expression was more abundant compared to the control (Pendogenous α-crystallin in retinal neurons, especially over-expression induced by hypoxic stress, results in the down regulation of caspase-3. The data suggest that endogenous α-crystallin may act as an endogenous neuroprotective factor in retinal neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Photorefractive keratectomy for visual rehabilitation of anisometropia induced by retinal detachment surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Ozdek, S C; Gürelik, G; Adigüzel, U; Onol, M; Hasanreisoglu, B

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of unilateral photorefractive keratectomy to correct anisometropia induced by retinal detachment surgery. Photorefractive keratectomy was performed in 10 eyes of 10 patients with anisometropia induced by previous retinal detachment surgery. The Aesculap Meditec MEL 60 excimer laser was used. Preoperative mean spherical equivalent refraction was -5.20 D. Mean postoperative spherical equivalent refraction was -0.25 D after a mean follow-up of 12.9 months. Mean preoperative spherical equivalent refraction difference between two eyes of 4.87 D was decreased to a mean 0.60 D postoperatively (t-test, P < .0001). All patients were free of anisometropic symptoms after laser surgery. Unilateral photorefractive keratectomy seems to be an effective method to correct anisometropia induced by conventional retinal detachment surgery, especially for patients with spectacle and contact lens intolerance.

  17. Protective effects of cannabidiol on lesion-induced intervertebral disc degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João W Silveira

    Full Text Available Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  18. [Restoring vision in blind patients following photoreceptor degeneration: clinical results and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendali, Amel; Lorach, Henri; Djilas, Milan; Marre, Olivier; Bensoman, Ryad; Rousseau, Lionel; Lissorgues, Gaëlle; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Bergonzo, Philippe; Garrido, Jose A; Sahel, José Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Retinal prostheses aim at restoring vision in patients blind from photoreceptor degeneration by electrically stimulating the residual retinal tissue. Currently, the most efficient implants are either inserted in the subretinal space or on the vitreal side of the retina (epi-retinal). Although the residual tissue can partly degenerate, it was shown that acute stimulation of residual neurones can induce visual percepts. Recently, a clinical trial with the epiretinal Argus2 device (60 electrodes) from the company 2nd Sight enabled most patients to orient and find light targets, some even reading words. This device has received a CE mark. Surprisingly, when the subretinal implant from the company Retina Implant AG displaying many more electrodes (1500 electrodes) was evaluated in clinical trials, the patient visual performances were fairly similar. The restored visual performances of the patients demonstrate that blind patients can recover some visual function when their residual retina is properly stimulated. However, the resolution is not yet sufficient to perform complex tasks such as autonomous locomotion, face identification or text reading. Several challenges remain to generate an increase in pixel density corresponding to the increase in electrode number and density. These challenges include the stimulation modality, the tissue/implant interface design, the electrode materials, and the visual information encoder. This review will discuss these great challenges after introducing the major clinical results. © Société de Biologie, 2013.

  19. Spatiotemporal characteristics of retinal response to network-mediated photovoltaic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Elton; Smith, Richard; Goetz, Georges; Lei, Xin; Galambos, Ludwig; Kamins, Theodore I; Harris, James; Mathieson, Keith; Palanker, Daniel; Sher, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    Subretinal prostheses aim at restoring sight to patients blinded by photoreceptor degeneration using electrical activation of the surviving inner retinal neurons. Today, such implants deliver visual information with low-frequency stimulation, resulting in discontinuous visual percepts. We measured retinal responses to complex visual stimuli delivered at video rate via a photovoltaic subretinal implant and by visible light. Using a multielectrode array to record from retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the healthy and degenerated rat retina ex vivo, we estimated their spatiotemporal properties from the spike-triggered average responses to photovoltaic binary white noise stimulus with 70-μm pixel size at 20-Hz frame rate. The average photovoltaic receptive field size was 194 ± 3 μm (mean ± SE), similar to that of visual responses (221 ± 4 μm), but response latency was significantly shorter with photovoltaic stimulation. Both visual and photovoltaic receptive fields had an opposing center-surround structure. In the healthy retina, ON RGCs had photovoltaic OFF responses, and vice versa. This reversal is consistent with depolarization of photoreceptors by electrical pulses, as opposed to their hyperpolarization under increasing light, although alternative mechanisms cannot be excluded. In degenerate retina, both ON and OFF photovoltaic responses were observed, but in the absence of visual responses, it is not clear what functional RGC types they correspond to. Degenerate retina maintained the antagonistic center-surround organization of receptive fields. These fast and spatially localized network-mediated ON and OFF responses to subretinal stimulation via photovoltaic pixels with local return electrodes raise confidence in the possibility of providing more functional prosthetic vision. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Retinal prostheses currently in clinical use have struggled to deliver visual information at naturalistic frequencies, resulting in discontinuous percepts. We

  20. A2E induces IL-1ß production in retinal pigment epithelial cells via the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Owen A; Finkelstein, Arthur; Shima, David T

    2013-01-01

    With ageing extracellular material is deposited in Bruch's membrane, as drusen. Lipofuscin is deposited in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Both of these changes are associated with age related macular degeneration, a disease now believed to involve chronic inflammation at the retinal-choroidal interface. We hypothesise that these molecules may act as danger signals, causing the production of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines by the retinal pigment epithelium, via activation of pattern recognition receptors. ARPE-19 cells were stimulated in vitro with the following reported components of drusen: amyloid-ß (1-42), Carboxyethylpyrrole (CEP) modified proteins (CEP-HSA), Nε-(Carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) modified proteins and aggregated vitronectin. The cells were also stimulated with the major fluorophore of lipofuscin: N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E). Inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production was assessed using Multiplex assays and ELISA. The mechanistic evaluation of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway was assessed in a stepwise fashion. Of all the molecules tested only A2E induced inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production. 25 µM A2E induced the production of significantly increased levels of the chemokines IL-8, MCP-1, MCG and MIP-1α, the cytokines IL-1ß, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α, and the protein VEGF-A. The release of IL-1ß was studied further, and was determined to be due to NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The pathway of activation involved endocytosis of A2E, and the three inflammasome components NLRP3, ASC and activated caspase-1. Immunohistochemical staining of ABCA4 knockout mice, which show progressive accumulation of A2E levels with age, showed increased amounts of IL-1ß proximal to the retinal pigment epithelium. A2E has the ability to stimulate inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production by RPE cells. The pattern recognition receptor NLRP3 is involved in this process. This provides further evidence for the link between A2E

  1. The application of optical coherence tomography angiography in retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambhav, Kumar; Grover, Sandeep; Chalam, Kakarla V

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, noninvasive imaging technique that generates real-time volumetric data on chorioretinal vasculature and its flow pattern. With the advent of high-speed optical coherence tomography, established enface chorioretinal segmentation, and efficient algorithms, OCTA generates images that resemble an angiogram. The principle of OCTA involves determining the change in backscattering between consecutive B-scans and then attributing the differences to the flow of erythrocytes through retinal blood vessels. OCTA has shown promise in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and retinal vascular occlusions. It quantifies vascular compromise reflecting the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA detects the presence of choroidal neovascularization in exudative age-related macular degeneration and maps loss of choriocapillaris in nonexudative age-related macular degeneration. We describe principles of OCTA and findings in common and some uncommon retinal pathologies. Finally, we summarize its potential future applications. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and a tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTAs utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer its utility in decreasing morbidity through early detection and guide therapeutic interventions in retinal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of Rod, Cone, and Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cell Contributions to the Canine Chromatic Pupillary Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Connie Y; Koehl, Kristin L; Harman, Christine D; Iwabe, Simone; Guzman, José M; Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Kardon, Randy H; Komáromy, András M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a chromatic pupillometry protocol for specific functional assessment of rods, cones, and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in dogs. Chromatic pupillometry was tested and compared in 37 dogs in different stages of primary loss of rod, cone, and combined rod/cone and optic nerve function, and in 5 wild-type (WT) dogs. Eyes were stimulated with 1-s flashes of dim (1 cd/m2) and bright (400 cd/m2) blue light (for scotopic conditions) or bright red (400 cd/m2) light with 25-cd/m2 blue background (for photopic conditions). Canine retinal melanopsin/Opn4 was cloned, and its expression was evaluated using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Mean ± SD percentage of pupil constriction amplitudes induced by scotopic dim blue (scDB), scotopic bright blue (scBB), and photopic bright red (phBR) lights in WT dogs were 21.3% ± 10.6%, 50.0% ± 17.5%, and 19.4% ± 7.4%, respectively. Melanopsin-mediated responses to scBB persisted for several minutes (7.7 ± 4.6 min) after stimulus offset. In dogs with inherited retinal degeneration, loss of rod function resulted in absent scDB responses, followed by decreased phBR responses with disease progression and loss of cone function. Primary loss of cone function abolished phBR responses but preserved those responses to blue light (scDB and scBB). Although melanopsin/Opn4 expression was diminished with retinal degeneration, melanopsin-expressing ipRGCs were identified for the first time in both WT and degenerated canine retinas. Pupil responses elicited by light stimuli of different colors and intensities allowed differential functional assessment of canine rods, cones, and ipRGCs. Chromatic pupillometry offers an effective tool for diagnosing retinal and optic nerve diseases.

  3. Retinal pigmentary changes in chronic uveitis mimicking retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevgi, D Damla; Davoudi, Samaneh; Comander, Jason; Sobrin, Lucia

    2017-09-01

    To present retinal pigmentary changes mimicking retinitis pigmentosa (RP) as a finding of advanced uveitis. We retrospectively reviewed charts of patients without a family history of inherited retinal degenerations who presented with retinal pigment changes and signs of past or present intraocular inflammation. Comprehensive eye examination including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp examination and dilated fundus examination was performed on all patients in addition to color fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography (FA), and full-field electroretinogram testing. We identified five patients with ages ranging from 33 to 66 years, who presented with RP-like retinal pigmentary changes which were eventually attributed to longstanding uveitis. The changes were bilateral in three cases and unilateral in two cases. Four of five cases presented with active inflammation, and the remaining case showed evidence of active intraocular inflammation during follow-up. This study highlights the overlapping features of advanced uveitis and RP including the extensive pigmentary changes. Careful review of possible past uveitis history, detailed examination of signs of past or present inflammation and ancillary testing, with FA often being most helpful, are required for the correct diagnosis. This is important, because intervention can prevent further damage if the cause of the pigmentary changes is destructive inflammation.

  4. Microfluidic generated EGF-gradients induce chemokinesis of transplantable retinal progenitor cells via the JAK/STAT and PI3kinase signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchenna J Unachukwu

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies are evaluating retinal progenitor cell (RPC transplantation as an approach to repair retinal degeneration and restore visual function. To advance cell-replacement strategies for a practical retinal therapy, it is important to define the molecular and biochemical mechanisms guiding RPC motility. We have analyzed RPC expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and evaluated whether exposure to epidermal growth factor (EGF can coordinate motogenic activity in vitro. Using Boyden chamber analysis as an initial high-throughput screen, we determined that RPC motility was optimally stimulated by EGF concentrations in the range of 20-400 ng/ml, with decreased stimulation at higher concentrations, suggesting concentration-dependence of EGF-induced motility. Using bioinformatics analysis of the EGF ligand in a retina-specific gene network pathway, we predicted a chemotactic function for EGF involving the MAPK and JAK-STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Based on targeted inhibition studies, we show that ligand binding, phosphorylation of EGFR and activation of the intracellular STAT3 and PI3kinase signaling pathways are necessary to drive RPC motility. Using engineered microfluidic devices to generate quantifiable steady-state gradients of EGF coupled with live-cell tracking, we analyzed the dynamics of individual RPC motility. Microfluidic analysis, including center of mass and maximum accumulated distance, revealed that EGF induced motility is chemokinetic with optimal activity observed in response to low concentration gradients. Our combined results show that EGFR expressing RPCs exhibit enhanced chemokinetic motility in the presence of low nanomole levels of EGF. These findings may serve to inform further studies evaluating the extent to which EGFR activity, in response to endogenous ligand, drives motility and migration of RPCs in retinal transplantation paradigms.

  5. Grafted c-kit+/SSEA1- eye-wall progenitor cells delay retinal degeneration in mice by regulating neural plasticity and forming new graft-to-host synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Chen, Zehua; Li, Zhengya; Zhao, Chen; Zeng, Yuxiao; Zou, Ting; Fu, Caiyun; Liu, Xiaoli; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-12-30

    Despite diverse pathogenesis, the common pathological change observed in age-related macular degeneration and in most hereditary retinal degeneration (RD) diseases is photoreceptor loss. Photoreceptor replacement by cell transplantation may be a feasible treatment for RD. The major obstacles to clinical translation of stem cell-based cell therapy in RD remain the difficulty of obtaining sufficient quantities of appropriate and safe donor cells and the poor integration of grafted stem cell-derived photoreceptors into the remaining retinal circuitry. Eye-wall c-kit + /stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA1) - cells were isolated via fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and their self-renewal and differentiation potential were detected by immunochemistry and flow cytometry in vitro. After labeling with quantum nanocrystal dots and transplantation into the subretinal space of rd1 RD mice, differentiation and synapse formation by daughter cells of the eye-wall c-kit + /SSEA1 - cells were evaluated by immunochemistry and western blotting. Morphological changes of the inner retina of rd1 mice after cell transplantation were demonstrated by immunochemistry. Retinal function of rd1 mice that received cell grafts was tested via flash electroretinograms and the light/dark transition test. Eye-wall c-kit + /SSEA1 - cells were self-renewing and clonogenic, and they retained their proliferative potential through more than 20 passages. Additionally, eye-wall c-kit + /SSEA1 - cells were capable of differentiating into multiple retinal cell types including photoreceptors, bipolar cells, horizontal cells, amacrine cells, Müller cells, and retinal pigment epithelium cells and of transdifferentiating into smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells in vitro. The levels of synaptophysin and postsynaptic density-95 in the retinas of eye-wall c-kit + /SSEA1 - cell-transplanted rd1 mice were significantly increased at 4 weeks post transplantation. The c-kit + /SSEA1 - cells were

  6. Non-invasive retinal imaging in mice with fluorescent Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy and Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein-Javaheri, Nima

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of the internal structures of the retina is critical for clinical diagnosis and monitoring of pathology as well as for medical research investigating the root causes of retinal degeneration. The aim of this thesis is to develop multi-modal non-invasive imaging technology for studying retinal degeneration and gene therapy in mice. We have constructed a FD-OCT prototype and combined it with a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) to permit real time alignment of the retinal field of...

  7. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration.

  8. Retinal stem cells and regeneration of vision system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Henry K

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a well-characterized model for studying neurogenesis. Retinal neurons and glia are generated in a conserved order from a pool of mutlipotent progenitor cells. During retinal development, retinal stem/progenitor cells (RPC) change their competency over time under the influence of intrinsic (such as transcriptional factors) and extrinsic factors (such as growth factors). In this review, we summarize the roles of these factors, together with the understanding of the signaling pathways that regulate eye development. The information about the interactions between intrinsic and extrinsic factors for retinal cell fate specification is useful to regenerate specific retinal neurons from RPCs. Recent studies have identified RPCs in the retina, which may have important implications in health and disease. Despite the recent advances in stem cell biology, our understanding of many aspects of RPCs in the eye remains limited. PRCs are present in the developing eye of all vertebrates and remain active in lower vertebrates throughout life. In mammals, however, PRCs are quiescent and exhibit very little activity and thus have low capacity for retinal regeneration. A number of different cellular sources of RPCs have been identified in the vertebrate retina. These include PRCs at the retinal margin, pigmented cells in the ciliary body, iris, and retinal pigment epithelium, and Müller cells within the retina. Because PRCs can be isolated and expanded from immature and mature eyes, it is possible now to study these cells in culture and after transplantation in the degenerated retinal tissue. We also examine current knowledge of intrinsic RPCs, and human embryonic stems and induced pluripotent stem cells as potential sources for cell transplant therapy to regenerate the diseased retina. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Attenuates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Retinal Pericyte Loss in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Ri Chung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of pericytes, an early hallmark of diabetic retinopathy (DR, results in breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress may be involved in this process. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, a known ameliorator of ER stress, on pericyte loss in DR of streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic mice. To assess the extent of DR, the integrity of retinal vessels and density of retinal capillaries in STZ-induced diabetic mice were evaluated. Additionally, induction of ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR were assessed in diabetic mice and human retinal pericytes exposed to advanced glycation end products (AGE or modified low-density lipoprotein (mLDL. Fluorescein dye leakage during angiography and retinal capillary density were improved in UDCA-treated diabetic mice, compared to the nontreated diabetic group. Among the UPR markers, those involved in the protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK pathway were increased, while UDCA attenuated UPR in STZ-induced diabetic mice as well as AGE- or mLDL-exposed retinal pericytes in culture. Consequently, vascular integrity was improved and pericyte loss reduced in the retina of STZ-induced diabetic mice. Our findings suggest that UDCA might be effective in protecting against DR.

  10. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron H Fronk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included.

  11. Success Rates of Vitrectomy in Treatment of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Yasser Helmy; Ono, Kozue; Kinoshita, Hirofumi; Uematsu, Masafumi; Tsuiki, Eiko; Fujikawa, Azusa; Kitaoka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the anatomical success rates of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) after primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between December 2008 and October 2014 at Nagasaki University Hospital. The preoperative data recorded included the lens status, location of the retinal tear, whether a tear was visualized, presence of multiple tears, macula status, presence of peripheral lattice retinal degeneration, and best-corrected visual ac...

  12. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The immune privilege of the eye has been thought to be dependent on physical barriers and absence of lymphatic vessels. However, the immune privilege may also involve active immunologic processes, as recent studies have indicated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...

  13. Identification of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Using OCT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Punal M., Dr; Krishna, Nanditha; Ashwini, V.; Prathibha, H. M.

    2018-02-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration is the most leading retinal disease in the recent years. Macular degeneration occurs when the central portion of the retina, called macula deteriorates. As the deterioration occurs with the age, it is commonly referred as Age-related Macular Degeneration. This disease can be visualized by several imaging modalities such as Fundus imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique and many other. Optical Coherence Tomography is the widely used technique for screening the Age-related Macular Degeneration disease, because it has an ability to detect the very minute changes in the retina. The Healthy and AMD affected OCT images are classified by extracting the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE) layer of the images using the image processing technique. The extracted layer is sampled, the no. of white pixels in each of the sample is counted and the mean value of the no. of pixels is calculated. The average mean value is calculated for both the Healthy and the AMD affected images and a threshold value is fixed and a decision rule is framed to classify the images of interest. The proposed method showed an accuracy of 75%.

  14. A level-set method for pathology segmentation in fluorescein angiograms and en face retinal images of patients with age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Fatimah; Ansari, Rashid; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2013-03-01

    The visibility and continuity of the inner segment outer segment (ISOS) junction layer of the photoreceptors on spectral domain optical coherence tomography images is known to be related to visual acuity in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Automatic detection and segmentation of lesions and pathologies in retinal images is crucial for the screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of patients with retinal diseases. One of the challenges of using the classical level-set algorithms for segmentation involves the placement of the initial contour. Manually defining the contour or randomly placing it in the image may lead to segmentation of erroneous structures. It is important to be able to automatically define the contour by using information provided by image features. We explored a level-set method which is based on the classical Chan-Vese model and which utilizes image feature information for automatic contour placement for the segmentation of pathologies in fluorescein angiograms and en face retinal images of the ISOS layer. This was accomplished by exploiting a priori knowledge of the shape and intensity distribution allowing the use of projection profiles to detect the presence of pathologies that are characterized by intensity differences with surrounding areas in retinal images. We first tested our method by applying it to fluorescein angiograms. We then applied our method to en face retinal images of patients with AMD. The experimental results included demonstrate that the proposed method provided a quick and improved outcome as compared to the classical Chan-Vese method in which the initial contour is randomly placed, thus indicating the potential to provide a more accurate and detailed view of changes in pathologies due to disease progression and treatment.

  15. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Liu, Yichuan; March, Michael; Pellegrino, Renata; Golhar, Ryan; Corton, Marta; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; López-Molina, Maria Isabel; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Guo, Yiran; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Xuanzhu; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan; Xu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES) in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletion variants (indels) and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies. PMID:26197217

  16. The effect of normal childbirth on eyes with abnormalities predisposing to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, D; Seelenfreund, M H; Tadmor, O; Silverstone, B Z; Diamant, Y

    1995-09-01

    Pregnant women who have high myopia, a history of retinal detachment or retinal holes, or have known lattice degeneration are frequently referred to an ophthalmologist for advice concerning the management of pregnancy and labor, i.e. whether a spontaneous vaginal delivery can be allowed and whether prophylaxis for high-risk retinal pathology is indicated. Many obstetricians still believe that pregnant women with ocular abnormalities predisposing to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment should have an instrumental delivery, and a few even advocate cesarian section. Very little has been written about the management of pregnant women with high-risk retinal pathology, and opinions differ considerably. Patient data on this subject are scarce. We studied 10 women who had 19 deliveries (10 prospective and 9 retrospective) and who had a history of retinal detachment, had been diagnosed as having extensive lattice degeneration, or had been treated for symptomatic retinal holes or breaks. The women were followed from the third trimester of pregnancy through labor and delivery into the postpartum period, looking for changes in the retinal status. We found no changes in the retinal status in the postpartum examination. We conclude that prenatal treatment of asymptomatic retinal pathology is not indicated and that spontaneous vaginal delivery may be allowed to take place in women with high-risk retinal pathology.

  17. Regulatory and Economic Considerations of Retinal Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankoor R; Williams, George A

    2016-01-01

    The advent of anti-VEGF therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion and diabetes mellitus has prevented blindness in tens of thousands of people. However, the costs of these drugs are without precedent in ophthalmic drug therapeutics. An analysis of the financial implications of retinal drugs and the impact of the Food and Drug Administration on treatment of retinal disease must include not only an evaluation of the direct costs of the drugs and the costs associated with their administration, but also the cost savings which accrue from their clinical benefit. This chapter will discuss the financial and regulatory issues associated with retinal drugs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. COMPARISON OF RETINAL PATHOLOGY VISUALIZATION IN MULTISPECTRAL SCANNING LASER IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshi, Amit; Lin, Tiezhu; Dans, Kunny; Chen, Kevin C; Amador, Manuel; Hasenstab, Kyle; Muftuoglu, Ilkay Kilic; Nudleman, Eric; Chao, Daniel; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Freeman, William R

    2018-03-16

    To compare retinal pathology visualization in multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging between the Spectralis and Optos devices. This retrospective cross-sectional study included 42 eyes from 30 patients with age-related macular degeneration (19 eyes), diabetic retinopathy (10 eyes), and epiretinal membrane (13 eyes). All patients underwent retinal imaging with a color fundus camera (broad-spectrum white light), the Spectralis HRA-2 system (3-color monochromatic lasers), and the Optos P200 system (2-color monochromatic lasers). The Optos image was cropped to a similar size as the Spectralis image. Seven masked graders marked retinal pathologies in each image within a 5 × 5 grid that included the macula. The average area with detected retinal pathology in all eyes was larger in the Spectralis images compared with Optos images (32.4% larger, P < 0.0001), mainly because of better visualization of epiretinal membrane and retinal hemorrhage. The average detection rate of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy pathologies was similar across the three modalities, whereas epiretinal membrane detection rate was significantly higher in the Spectralis images. Spectralis tricolor multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging had higher rate of pathology detection primarily because of better epiretinal membrane and retinal hemorrhage visualization compared with Optos bicolor multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging.

  19. Accumulation of neurocan, a brain chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, in association with the retinal vasculature in RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqin; Rauch, Uwe; Perez, Maria-Thereza R

    2003-03-01

    To examine whether and how the retinal distribution of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan neurocan is affected after photoreceptor cell loss and whether it correlates with the multiple secondary cellular changes that accompany the photoreceptor degeneration. Retinas from normal rats (Sprague-Dawley; postnatal days [P]0-P70), RCS rats with dystrophic retinas (P0-P300), RCS-rdy(+) congenic rats with nondystrophic retinas (P0-202), and rhodopsin mutant rats, P23H (P0-P257) and S334ter (P0-P220), were processed for immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal antibody to rat neurocan. The overall distribution of neurocan was similar in all retinas examined. Neurocan immunostaining was detected over the nerve fiber layer, the plexiform layers, the photoreceptor outer segments region, and the ciliary epithelium. With age, labeling throughout the plexiform layers decreased continuously. In RCS rats however, conspicuous labeling was also seen in association with retinal vessels, from P15 onward. Accumulation of neurocan in association with the retinal vasculature does not correlate with photoreceptor cell loss, because it was not observed in the rhodopsin mutant rats. During the earliest stages of the disease, accumulation of debris in the subretinal space in RCS rats may be sufficient per se to initiate a cascade of metabolic changes that result in accumulation of neurocan. With time, the neurocan accumulated perivascularly may, by interaction with other matrix molecules, modulate at least some of the vascular alterations observed in this animal model.

  20. Establishing an experimental rat model of photodynamically-induced retinal vein occlusion using erythrosin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To develop a reliable, reproducible rat model of retinal vein occlusion (RVO with a novel photosensitizer (erythrosin B and study the cellular responses in the retina.METHODS:Central and branch RVOs were created in adult male rats via photochemically-induced ischemia. Retinal changes were monitored via color fundus photography and fluorescein angiography at 1 and 3h, and 1, 4, 7, 14, and 21d after irradiation. Tissue slices were evaluated histopathologically. Retinal ganglion cell survival at different times after RVO induction was quantified by nuclear density count. Retinal thickness was also observed.RESULTS:For all rats in both the central and branch RVO groups, blood flow ceased immediately after laser irradiation and retinal edema was evident at one hour. The retinal detachment rate was 100% at 3h and developed into bullous retinal detachment within 24h. Retinal hemorrhages were not observed until 24h. Clearance of the occluded veins at 7d was observed by fluorescein angiography. Disease manifestation in the central RVO eyes was more severe than in the branch RVO group. A remarkable reduction in the ganglion cell count and retinal thickness was observed in the central RVO group by 21d, whereas moderate changes occurred in the branch RVO group.CONCLUSION: Rat RVO created by photochemically-induced ischemia using erythrosin B is a reproducible and reliable animal model for mimicking the key features of human RVO. However, considering the 100% rate of retinal detachment, this animal model is more suitable for studying RVO with chronic retinal detachment.

  1. Hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in primary degenerations of excitable tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Defects in DNA-repair mechanisms render xeroderma pigmentosum cells hypersensitive to killing by the uv-type of DNA-damaging agent. Some xeroderma pigmentosum patients develop a primary neuronal degeneration, and cell lines from patients with the earliest onset of neurodegeneration are the most sensitive to killing by uv radiation. These findings led to the neuronal DNA integrity theory which holds that when the integrity of neuronal DNA is destroyed by the accumulation of unrepaired DNA damaged spontaneously or by endogenous metabolites, the neurons will undergo a primary degeneration. Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome, a demyelinating disorder with a primary retinal degeneration, are also hypersensitive to the uv-type of DNA-damaging agent. Cells from patients with the primary neuronal degeneration of ataxia telangiectasia are hypersensitive to the x-ray-type of DNA-damaging agent. Cells from other patients with primary degeneration of excitable tissue also have hypersensitivity to the x-ray-type of DNA-damaging agent. These disorders include (1) primary neuronal degenerations which are either genetic (e.g., Huntington disease, familial dysautonomia, Friedreich ataxia) or sporadic (e.g., Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease), (2) primary muscle degenerations (e.g., Duchenne muscular dystrophy), and (3) a primary retinal degeneration (Usher syndrome). Death of excitable tissue in vivo in these radiosensitive diseases may result from unrepaired DNA. This hypersensitivity provides the basis for developing suitable presymptomatic and prenatal tests for these diseases, for elucidating their pathogenesis, and for developing future therapies. 119 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  2. Acquired Nonpigmented Vitreous Cyst Associated With Lattice Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Mai, Guiying; Liu, Ruyuan; Luo, Yan; Lu, Lin

    2017-10-01

    A 63-year-old male presented with a round-shaped floater and visual obscuration in the right eye. Clinical evaluation showed a nonpigmented vitreous cyst connected to a lattice degeneration by a stalk. Immunostaining of the vitreous cyst obtained from vitrectomy showed its origin of retinal neuroepithelium. The cyst was formed by continuous vitreous traction, which might tear up the disrupted retina at the area of lattice degeneration. This report added the lattice degeneration to the list of causes for the acquired vitreous cyst. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:856-858.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Neuroprotective Effects of Citicoline in in Vitro Models of Retinal Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Matteucci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, citicoline has been the object of remarkable interest as a possible neuroprotectant. The aim of this study was to investigate if citicoline affected cell survival in primary retinal cultures and if it exerted neuroprotective activity in conditions modeling retinal neurodegeneration. Primary retinal cultures, obtained from rat embryos, were first treated with increasing concentrations of citicoline (up to 1000 µM and analyzed in terms of apoptosis and caspase activation and characterized by immunocytochemistry to identify neuronal and glial cells. Subsequently, excitotoxic concentration of glutamate or High Glucose-containing cell culture medium (HG was administered as well-known conditions modeling neurodegeneration. Glutamate or HG treatments were performed in the presence or not of citicoline. Neuronal degeneration was evaluated in terms of apoptosis and loss of synapses. The results showed that citicoline did not cause any damage to the retinal neuroglial population up to 1000 µM. At the concentration of 100 µM, it was able to counteract neuronal cell damage both in glutamate- and HG-treated retinal cultures by decreasing proapoptotic effects and contrasting synapse loss. These data confirm that citicoline can efficiently exert a neuroprotective activity. In addition, the results suggest that primary retinal cultures, under conditions inducing neurodegeneration, may represent a useful system to investigate citicoline neuroprotective mechanisms.

  4. highroad Is a Carboxypetidase Induced by Retinoids to Clear Mutant Rhodopsin-1 in Drosophila Retinitis Pigmentosa Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Wei Huang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhodopsins require retinoid chromophores for their function. In vertebrates, retinoids also serve as signaling molecules, but whether these molecules similarly regulate gene expression in Drosophila remains unclear. Here, we report the identification of a retinoid-inducible gene in Drosophila, highroad, which is required for photoreceptors to clear folding-defective mutant Rhodopsin-1 proteins. Specifically, knockdown or genetic deletion of highroad blocks the degradation of folding-defective Rhodopsin-1 mutant, ninaEG69D. Moreover, loss of highroad accelerates the age-related retinal degeneration phenotype of ninaEG69D mutants. Elevated highroad transcript levels are detected in ninaEG69D flies, and interestingly, deprivation of retinoids in the fly diet blocks this effect. Consistently, mutations in the retinoid transporter, santa maria, impairs the induction of highroad in ninaEG69D flies. In cultured S2 cells, highroad expression is induced by retinoic acid treatment. These results indicate that cellular quality-control mechanisms against misfolded Rhodopsin-1 involve regulation of gene expression by retinoids.

  5. Stem cells in retinal regeneration: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Conor M; Powner, Michael B; Carr, Amanda-Jayne F; Smart, Matthew J K; da Cruz, Lyndon; Coffey, Peter J

    2013-06-01

    Stem cell therapy for retinal disease is under way, and several clinical trials are currently recruiting. These trials use human embryonic, foetal and umbilical cord tissue-derived stem cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells to treat visual disorders such as age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease and retinitis pigmentosa. Over a decade of analysing the developmental cues involved in retinal generation and stem cell biology, coupled with extensive surgical research, have yielded differing cellular approaches to tackle these retinopathies. Here, we review these various stem cell-based approaches for treating retinal diseases and discuss future directions and challenges for the field.

  6. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:22275207

  7. Contribution of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation to retinal degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Maria H; Boia, Raquel; Santos, Paulo F; Ambrósio, António F; Santiago, Ana R

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are major causes of vision loss and blindness worldwide and are characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. One common feature of retinal degenerative diseases and brain neurodegenerative diseases is chronic neuroinflammation. There is growing evidence that retinal microglia, as in the brain, become activated in the course of retinal degenerative diseases, having a pivotal role in the initiation and propagation of the neurodegenerative process. A better understanding of the events elicited and mediated by retinal microglia will contribute to the clarification of disease etiology and might open new avenues for potential therapeutic interventions. This review aims at giving an overview of the roles of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in major retinal degenerative diseases like glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.

  8. Retinal function in deaf-blind syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Malm, Eva

    2011-01-01

    A variety of disorders can cause retinal degeneration and hearing impairment, and it is of great value to have an early diagnosis since there is a large variation in phenotype and prognosis both within and between the different disorders. The general aim of this thesis was to characterize the retinal function, to describe the phenotype, and – where appropriate – to relate the phenotype to genotype in patients with combined visual and hearing impairment. Alström syndrome is a rare auto...

  9. Consumption of Polyphenol-Rich Zingiber Zerumbet Rhizome Extracts Protects against the Breakdown of the Blood-Retinal Barrier and Retinal Inflammation Induced by Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thing-Fong Tzeng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the amelioration of diabetic retinopathy (DR by Zingiber zerumbet rhizome ethanol extracts (ZZRext in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats. ZZRext contains high phenolic and flavonoid contents. STZ-diabetic rats were treated orally with ZZRext (200, 300 mg/kg per day for three months. Blood-retinal barrier (BRB breakdown and increased vascular permeability were found in diabetic rats, with downregulation of occludin, and claudin-5. ZZRext treatment effectively preserved the expression of occludin, and claudin-5, leading to less BRB breakdown and less vascular permeability. Retinal histopathological observation showed that the disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Retinal gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were all decreased in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Moreover, ZZRext treatment not only inhibited the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB activation, but also downregulated the protein expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in diabetic retina. In conclusion, the results suggest that the retinal protective effects of ZZRext occur through improved retinal structural change and inhibiting retinal inflammation. The antiretinopathy property of ZZRext might be related to the downregulation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signal transduction induced by diabetes.

  10. X-box binding protein 1 is essential for the anti-oxidant defense and cell survival in the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin Zhong

    Full Text Available Damage to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an early event in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1 is a key transcription factor that regulates endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis and cell survival. This study aimed to delineate the role of endogenous XBP1 in the RPE. Our results show that in a rat model of light-induced retinal degeneration, XBP1 activation was suppressed in the RPE/choroid complex, accompanied by decreased anti-oxidant genes and increased oxidative stress. Knockdown of XBP1 by siRNA resulted in reduced expression of SOD1, SOD2, catalase, and glutathione synthase and sensitized RPE cells to oxidative damage. Using Cre/LoxP system, we generated a mouse line that lacks XBP1 only in RPE cells. Compared to wildtype littermates, RPE-XBP1 KO mice expressed less SOD1, SOD2, and catalase in the RPE, and had increased oxidative stress. At age 3 months and older, these mice exhibited apoptosis of RPE cells, decreased number of cone photoreceptors, shortened photoreceptor outer segment, reduced ONL thickness, and deficit in retinal function. Electron microscopy showed abnormal ultrastructure, Bruch's membrane thickening, and disrupted basal membrane infolding in XBP1-deficient RPE. These results indicate that XBP1 is an important gene involved in regulation of the anti-oxidant defense in the RPE, and that impaired activation of XBP1 may contribute to RPE dysfunction and cell death during retinal degeneration and AMD.

  11. Temporal Progression of Retinal Progenitor Cell Identity: Implications in Cell Replacement Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awais Javed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Retinal degenerative diseases, which lead to the death of rod and cone photoreceptor cells, are the leading cause of inherited vision loss worldwide. Induced pluripotent or embryonic stem cells (iPSCs/ESCs have been proposed as a possible source of new photoreceptors to restore vision in these conditions. The proof of concept studies carried out in mouse models of retinal degeneration over the past decade have highlighted several limitations for cell replacement in the retina, such as the low efficiency of cone photoreceptor production from stem cell cultures and the poor integration of grafted cells in the host retina. Current protocols to generate photoreceptors from stem cells are largely based on the use of extracellular factors. Although these factors are essential to induce the retinal progenitor cell (RPC fate from iPSCs/ESCs, developmental studies have shown that RPCs alter fate output as a function of time (i.e., their temporal identity to generate the seven major classes of retinal cell types, rather than spatial position. Surprisingly, current stem cell differentiation protocols largely ignore the intrinsic temporal identity of dividing RPCs, which we argue likely explains the low efficiency of cone production in such cultures. In this article, we briefly review the mechanisms regulating temporal identity in RPCs and discuss how they could be exploited to improve cone photoreceptor production for cell replacement therapies.

  12. Posterior Lattice Degeneration Characterized by Spectral Domain Optical Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Manjunath, Varsha; Taha, Mohammed; Fujimoto, James G.; Duker, Jay S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To utilize high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in the characterization of retinal and vitreal morphological changes overlying posterior lattice degeneration. METHODS: A cross-sectional, retrospective analysis was performed on 13 eyes of 13 nonconsecutive subjects with posterior lattice degeneration seen at the New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center between October 2009 and January 2010. SD-OCT images taken through the region of latti...

  13. Toxicity and detoxification of lipid-derived aldehydes in cultured retinal pigmented epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, S.; Xiao, T.; Srivastava, S.; Zhang, W.; Chan, L.L.; Vergara, L.A.; Van Kuijk, F.J.G.M.; Ansari, N.H.

    2005-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world and yet its pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Retina has high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and functions under conditions of oxidative stress. To investigate whether peroxidative products of PUFAs induce apoptosis in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and possibly contribute to ARMD, human retinal pigmented epithelial cells (ARPE-19) were exposed to micromolar concentrations of H 2 O 2 , 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 4-hydroxyhexenal (HHE). A concentration- and time-dependent increase in H 2 O 2 -, HNE-, and HHE-induced apoptosis was observed when monitored by quantifying DNA fragmentation as determined by ELISA, flow cytometry, and Hoechst staining. The broad-spectrum inhibitor of apoptosis Z-VAD inhibited apoptosis. Treatment of RPE cells with a thionein peptide prior to exposure to H 2 O 2 or HNE reduced the formation of protein-HNE adducts as well as alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis. Using 3 H-HNE, various metabolic pathways to detoxify HNE by ARPE-19 cells were studied. The metabolites were separated by HPLC and characterized by ElectroSpray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) and gas chromatography-MS. Three main metabolic routes of HNE detoxification were detected: (1) conjugation with glutathione (GSH) to form GS-HNE, catalyzed by glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (2) reduction of GS-HNE catalyzed by aldose reductase, and (3) oxidation of HNE catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Preventing HNE formation by a combined strategy of antioxidants, scavenging HNE by thionein peptide, and inhibiting apoptosis by caspase inhibitors may offer a potential therapy to limit retinal degeneration in ARMD

  14. [To cognize retinitis pigmentosa with scientific view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gen-lin

    2009-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited eye disease that usually leads into blind, and is high simplex and clinical heterogeneity. Recent years, some new hereditary forms have been found, such as digenic RP, mitochondrial RP, incomplete dominant inheritance RP. The phenotype of RP is multiplicity. Incompatible phenomenon between genotype and phenotypes was shown in some genes such as peripherin/RDS, RHO, RP2 and RP3. The complicated phenotype was shown in the rare RP forms, such as centricity RP, stemma RP, retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento, and retinal degeneration slow. Retinal transplantation, retinal implantation, drug and neurotrophic factor therapy, and gene therapy have been well studied worldwide and presented some hopeful efficacy. Ophthalmologists and practitioners should cognize the new advance and new knowledge on RP therapy with a scientific view for better serving the RP patients.

  15. Subpopulations of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exhibit Differential Effects in Delaying Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Tian, H; Li, Z; Wang, L; Gao, F; Ou, Q; Lian, C; Li, W; Jin, C; Zhang, J; Xu, J-Y; Wang, J; Zhang, J; Wang, F; Lu, L; Xu, G-T

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have a therapeutic role in retinal degeneration (RD). However, heterogeneity of BMSCs may be associated with differential therapeutic effects in RD. In order to confirm this hypothesis, two subsets of rat BMSCs, termed rBMSC1 and rBMSC2, were obtained, characterized and functionally evaluated in the treatment of RD of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Both subpopulations expressed mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) markers CD29 and CD90, but were negative for hemacyte antigen CD11b and CD45 expression. In comparison with rBMSC2, rBMSC1 showed higher rate of proliferation, stronger colony formation, and increased adipogenic potential, whereas rBMSC2 exhibited higher osteogenic potential. Microarray analysis showed differential gene expression patterns between rBMSC1 and rBMSC2, including functions related to proliferation, differentiation, immunoregulation, stem cell maintenance and division, survival and antiapoptosis. After subretinal transplantation in RCS rats, rBMSC1 showed stronger rescue effect than rBMSC2, including increased b-wave amplitude, restored retinal nuclear layer thickness, and decreased number of apoptotic photoreceptors, whereas the rescue function of rBMSC2 was essentially not better than the control. Histological analysis also demonstrated that rBMSC1 possessed a higher survival rate than rBMSC2 in subretinal space. In addition, treatment of basic fibroblast growth factor, an accompanying event in subretinal injection, triggered more robust increase in secretion of growth factors by rBMSC1 as compared to rBMSC2. Taken together, these results have suggested that the different therapeutic functions of BMSC subpopulations are attributed to their distinct survival capabilities and paracrine functions. The underlying mechanisms responsible for the different functions of BMSC subpopulation may lead to a new strategy for the treatment of RD.

  16. RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIAL TEAR AFTER INTRAVITREAL RANIBIZUMAB TREATMENT FOR NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han Joo; Kim, Hyoung Seok; Yoo, Seul Gi; Han, Jung Il; Lew, Young Ju; Cho, Sung Won; Lee, Tae Gon; Kim, Jong Woo

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the risk factors for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) tears after intravitreal ranibizumab injections in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and to determine the efficacy of continued ranibizumab treatment after RPE tears. A total of 407 treatment-naïve eyes (377 patients) with nAMD were retrospectively included. All patients were treated with an initial series of 3 monthly loading injections, followed by further injections as required. Baseline characteristics and pigment epithelial detachment (PED) lesion features were evaluated as potential risk factors for RPE tear. The visual and anatomical outcomes after treatment during 12 months were also evaluated. By 12 months, RPE tears developed in 32 eyes (7.9%). Pigment epithelial detachment height was associated with a higher risk of RPE tear (odds ratio [OR], 1.318; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.217-2.031, P = 0.018). Fibrovascular PED compared with serous PED had a higher risk of developing tears (OR, 9.129; 95% CI, 6.228-32.124, P = 0.039), and typical nAMD (OR, 4.166; 95% CI, 2.030-14.913, P = 0.031) and retinal angiomatous proliferation (OR, 3.778; 95% CI, 2.185-9.277, P = 0.040) had a higher risk of developing tears compared with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of RPE tear patients showed no significant improvement after treatment at 12 months; however, patients with RPE tears without foveal involvement (19 eyes) showed significant BCVA improvement at 12 months (P = 0.034). PED type and nAMD subtype are associated with the development of RPE tears after intravitreal ranibizumab injections. Continued ranibizumab therapy after RPE tear development can maintain visual acuity when the fovea is not involved.

  17. Protective Effect of Hesperetin and Naringenin against Apoptosis in Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Retinal Injury in Rats

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    Selcuk Kara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hesperetin and naringenin are naturally common flavonoids reported to have antioxidative effects. This study was performed to investigate whether either hesperetin or naringenin has a protective effect against apoptosis on retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Methods. Retinal I/R was induced by increasing the intraocular pressure to 150 mmHg for 60 minutes. Thirty-three male Wistar albino rats were randomised into 5 groups named control, I/R + sham, I/R + solvent (DMSO, I/R + hesperetin, and I/R + naringenin. Animals were given either hesperetin, naringenin, or the solvent intraperitoneally immediately following reperfusion. Thickness of retinal layers and retinal cell apoptosis were detected by histological analysis, tunel assay, and immunohistochemistry assay. Results. Hesperetin and naringenin attenuated the I/R-induced apoptosis of retinal cells in the inner and outer nuclear cells of the rat retina. Retinal layer thickness of the naringenin treatment group was significantly thicker than that of the hesperetin, sham, and solvent groups (P<0.05. Conclusions. Hesperetin and naringenin can prevent harmful effects induced by I/R injury in the rat retina by inhibiting apoptosis of retinal cells, which suggests that those flavanones have a therapeutic potential for the protection of ocular ischemic diseases.

  18. Estrogen signalling in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Machalińska, Anna; Veréb, Zoltán; Salminen, Antero; Petrovski, Goran; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial eye disease that is associated with aging, family history, smoking, obesity, cataract surgery, arteriosclerosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and unhealthy diet. Gender has commonly been classified as a weak or inconsistent risk factor for AMD. This disease is characterized by degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris, which secondarily lead to damage and death of photoreceptor cells and central visual loss. Pathogenesis of AMD involves constant oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and increased accumulation of lipofuscin and drusen. Estrogen has both anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacity and it regulates signaling pathways that are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this review, we discuss potential cellular signaling targets of estrogen in retinal cells and AMD pathology.

  19. Amyloid β induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation in retinal pigment epithelial cells via NADPH oxidase- and mitochondria-dependent ROS production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Yao, Yong; Zhu, Xue; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Fanfan; Zhu, Ling

    2017-06-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ)-induced chronic inflammation is believed to be a key pathogenic process in early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation triggered by Aβ is responsible for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) dysfunction in the onset of AMD; however, the detailed molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the involvement of NADPH oxidase- and mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the process of Aβ 1-40 -induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in LPS-primed ARPE-19 cells. The results showed that Aβ 1-40 could induce excessive ROS generation, MAPK/NF-κB signaling activation and subsequently NLRP3 inflammasome activation in LPS-primed ARPE-19 cells. Furthermore, the inductive effect of Aβ 1-40 on NLRP3 inflammasome activation was mediated in a manner dependent on NADPH oxidase- and mitochondria-derived ROS. Our findings may provide a novel insight into the molecular mechanism by which Aβ contributes to the early-stage AMD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Agmatine protects retinal ganglion cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis in transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine formed by the decarboxylation of L-arginine. We investigated the protective effects of agmatine against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of immortalized rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5. RGC-5 cells were cultured in a closed hypoxic chamber (5% O2 with or without agmatine. Cell viability was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Expression and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; JNK, ERK p44/42, and p38 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB were investigated by Western immunoblot analysis. The effects of agmatine were compared to those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a well-known protective neurotrophin for retinal ganglion cells. Results After 48 hours of hypoxic culture, the LDH assay showed 52.3% cell loss, which was reduced to 25.6% and 30.1% when agmatine and BDNF were administered, respectively. This observed cell loss was due to apoptotic cell death, as established by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Although total expression of MAPKs and NF-κB was not influenced by hypoxic injury, phosphorylation of these two proteins was increased. Agmatine reduced phosphorylation of JNK and NF-κB, while BDNF suppressed phosphorylation of ERK and p38. Conclusion Our results show that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage in RGC-5 cells and that its effects may act through the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Our data suggest that agmatine may lead to a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce retinal ganglion cell injury related to hypoxia.

  1. Agmatine protects retinal ganglion cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis in transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Samin; Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Chan Yun; Seong, Gong Je

    2007-01-01

    Background Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine formed by the decarboxylation of L-arginine. We investigated the protective effects of agmatine against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of immortalized rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5). RGC-5 cells were cultured in a closed hypoxic chamber (5% O2) with or without agmatine. Cell viability was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Expression and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; JNK, ERK p44/42, and p38) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) were investigated by Western immunoblot analysis. The effects of agmatine were compared to those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a well-known protective neurotrophin for retinal ganglion cells. Results After 48 hours of hypoxic culture, the LDH assay showed 52.3% cell loss, which was reduced to 25.6% and 30.1% when agmatine and BDNF were administered, respectively. This observed cell loss was due to apoptotic cell death, as established by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Although total expression of MAPKs and NF-κB was not influenced by hypoxic injury, phosphorylation of these two proteins was increased. Agmatine reduced phosphorylation of JNK and NF-κB, while BDNF suppressed phosphorylation of ERK and p38. Conclusion Our results show that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage in RGC-5 cells and that its effects may act through the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Our data suggest that agmatine may lead to a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce retinal ganglion cell injury related to hypoxia. PMID:17908330

  2. The fellow eye in patients with unilateral retinal detachment: findings and prophylactic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laatikainen, L

    1985-10-01

    During a 4-year period, 1978-1981, 312 patients were operated on for unilateral rhegmatogenous detachment of the retina. Of the fellow eyes, 11% showed moderate (VA 0.15-0.4) and 5% severe (VA less than or equal to 0.1) visual impairment. Of the fellow eyes 49% were myopic (- 1.0 D. or more), and aphakia was present in 14%. Details of the peripheral fundus were adequately recordable for 260 fellow eyes. Degenerations considered to predispose to retinal detachment were found in 98 eyes (38%): lattice degeneration in 54 (21%), granular tuft in 17 (7%), retinal tear(s) in 12 (5%), and retinoschisis in 15 (6%). Prophylactic treatment of predisposing degenerations was performed in 91 of the 98 eyes using cryo- or photocoagulation (argon laser). No intra- or permanent post-operative complications were noticed. One of the treated fellow eyes (1.1%) detached 10 months after prophylactic treatment due to new tears. In the untreated group, 6 of the 221 eyes detached (2.7%). The difference was not statistically significant, but the groups were not comparable because 93% of the eyes showing predisposing degenerations were treated. None of the eyes treated for retinal breaks or lattice degeneration has detached. In these cases prophylactic treatment of the fellow eye is recommended. In most eyes cryocoagulation seems to be preferable to photocoagulation.

  3. Photostress Testing Device for Diagnosing Retinal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Swan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Retinal diseases such as Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD affect nearly one in three elderly patients. ARMD damages the central vision photoreceptors in the fovea. The Photostress Test is a simple technique for testing for the early effects of ARMD. Here, the illumination sources in a novel self-administered Photostress Testing device were modeled for safety and distribution in illumination software. After satisfying the design constraints in the model, a prototype of the illumination system was fabricated and tested to confirm the modeling results. The resultant prototype can be used to aid in the diagnosis of retinal disease and is well within retinal safety levels.

  4. [The incidence of retinal tears in patients with posterior vitreous detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ksenija; Gverović-Antunica, Antonela; Bućan, Kajo; Znaor, Ljubo; Bulović, Dijana; Skelin, Sinia

    2006-01-01

    Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common finding in older patients, characterized by detachment of the posterior hyaloid membrane (PHM) from the retinal surface. The detachment of PHM normally occurs without complications, however, one has to be aware that retinal tear is its most common complication. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of retinal tears in eyes with PVD. A series of 40 patients (70 eyes) with PVD were included in this retrospective study. Eyes with a history of ocular trauma, surgery or intraocular inflammation were excluded. Patient charts were reviewed to collect the following information: age, sex, profession, type and duration of symptoms, best corrected visual acuity, refractive status, prior ocular disease, coincidental retinal pathology-lattice degeneration, number, type and location of retinal tears and treatment. Statistical analysis was done with the SPSS 11.0.3 software (SPSS Inc., USA). Besides descriptive statistics, Student's t-test and chi2-test were used. Among all study eyes with PVD, 34 (48.6%) were myopic, 24 (34.3%) hypermetropic and 12 (17.1%) emetropic; statistical analysis showed a significant difference (chi2 = 10.40, df=2, p lattice malignant degeneration of peripheral retinal was diagnosed. Thorough examination of the fundus periphery revealed 16 (22.8%) eyes with PVD were found to have retinal tears, 11 (15.7%) had only one retinal tear and 5 (7.1%) two retinal tears. All retinal tears were treated with argon laser photocoagulation. Superotemporal eye quadrant was the most common localization of retinal tears (56.25%). These results indicate that thorough fundus periphery examination should be done in all patients with PVD because it can cause rather rarely though retinal tears that represent a potentially sight threatening condition.

  5. Concurrent OCT imaging of stimulus evoked retinal neural activation and hemodynamic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that major retinal diseases involve distortions of the retinal neural physiology and blood vascular structures. However, the details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood. In this study, a multi-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system was developed to enable concurrent imaging of retinal neural activity and vascular hemodynamics. Flicker light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to evoke retinal neural responses and hemodynamic changes. The OCT images were acquired continuously during the pre-stimulation, light-stimulation, and post-stimulation phases. Stimulus-evoked intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) and hemodynamic changes were observed over time in blood-free and blood regions, respectively. Rapid IOSs change occurred almost immediately after stimulation. Both positive and negative signals were observed in adjacent retinal areas. The hemodynamic changes showed time delays after stimulation. The signal magnitudes induced by light stimulation were observed in blood regions and did not show significant changes in blood-free regions. These differences may arise from different mechanisms in blood vessels and neural tissues in response to light stimulation. These characteristics agreed well with our previous observations in mouse retinas. Further development of the multimodal OCT may provide a new imaging method for studying how retinal structures and metabolic and neural functions are affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and other diseases, which promises novel noninvasive biomarkers for early disease detection and reliable treatment evaluations of eye diseases.

  6. Adaptive Optics Technology for High-Resolution Retinal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging. PMID:23271600

  7. Maximum principles for boundary-degenerate linear parabolic differential operators

    OpenAIRE

    Feehan, Paul M. N.

    2013-01-01

    We develop weak and strong maximum principles for boundary-degenerate, linear, parabolic, second-order partial differential operators, $Lu := -u_t-\\tr(aD^2u)-\\langle b, Du\\rangle + cu$, with \\emph{partial} Dirichlet boundary conditions. The coefficient, $a(t,x)$, is assumed to vanish along a non-empty open subset, $\\mydirac_0!\\sQ$, called the \\emph{degenerate boundary portion}, of the parabolic boundary, $\\mydirac!\\sQ$, of the domain $\\sQ\\subset\\RR^{d+1}$, while $a(t,x)$ may be non-zero at po...

  8. [Paediatric retinal detachment and hereditary vitreoretinal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, P

    2013-09-01

    The number of retinal detachments in children is very low in comparison to the number in adults. One predisposing factor for development of paediatric retinal detachment is suffering from hereditary vitreoretinal degeneration (e.g., Stickler syndrome, Wagner syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, congenital X-linked retinoschisis, Knobloch syndrome, incontinentia pigmenti, Norrie disease). Hereditary vitreoretinopathies are characterised by an abnormal-appearing vitreous gel with associated retinal changes. In most of these eyes further ocular abnormalities can be diagnosed. A group of hereditary disorders is associated with characteristic systemic abnormalities. Allied conditions should be considered in the clinical diagnosis. Vitreoretinopathies are the most common cause of inherited retinal detachment. In most eyes primary vitrectomy is necessary, and disease-specific surgical treatment is discussed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Altered Antioxidant-Oxidant Status in the Aqueous Humor and Peripheral Blood of Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Salom, David; Sequedo, Ma Dolores; Hervás, David; Marín-Lambíes, Cristina; Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Díaz-LLopis, Manuel; Millán, José María; Rodrigo, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa is a common form of hereditary retinal degeneration constituting the largest Mendelian genetic cause of blindness in the developed world. It has been widely suggested that oxidative stress possibly contributes to its pathogenesis. We measured the levels of total antioxidant capacity, free nitrotyrosine, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) activity, protein, metabolites of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP pathway, heme oxygenase-I and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in aqueous humor or/and peripheral blood from fifty-six patients with retinitis pigmentosa and sixty subjects without systemic or ocular oxidative stress-related disease. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that retinitis pigmentosa alters ocular antioxidant defence machinery and the redox status in blood. Patients with retinitis pigmentosa present low total antioxidant capacity including reduced SOD3 activity and protein concentration in aqueous humor. Patients also show reduced SOD3 activity, increased TBARS formation and upregulation of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP pathway in peripheral blood. Together these findings confirmed the hypothesis that patients with retinitis pigmentosa present reduced ocular antioxidant status. Moreover, these patients show changes in some oxidative-nitrosative markers in the peripheral blood. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between these peripheral markers and retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:24069283

  10. Protective Effects of Blueberry Anthocyanins against H2O2-Induced Oxidative Injuries in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wu-Yang; Wu, Han; Li, Da-Jing; Song, Jiang-Feng; Xiao, Ya-Dong; Liu, Chun-Quan; Zhou, Jian-Zhong; Sui, Zhong-Quan

    2018-02-21

    Blueberry anthocyanins are considered protective of eye health because of their recognized antioxidant properties. In this study, blueberry anthocyanin extract (BAE), malvidin (Mv), malvidin-3-glucoside (Mv-3-glc), and malvidin-3-galactoside (Mv-3-gal) all reduced H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress by decreasing the levels of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde and increasing the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. BAE and the anthocyanin standards enhanced cell viability from 63.69 ± 3.36 to 86.57 ± 6.92% (BAE), 115.72 ± 23.41% (Mv), 98.15 ± 9.39% (Mv-3-glc), and 127.97 ± 20.09% (Mv-3-gal) and significantly inhibited cell apoptosis (P blueberry anthocyanins could inhibit the induction and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) through antioxidant mechanisms.

  11. Liraglutide attenuates the migration of retinal pericytes induced by advanced glycation end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Jian; Ma, Xue-Fei; Hao, Ming; Zhou, Huan-Ran; Yu, Xin-Yang; Shao, Ning; Gao, Xin-Yuan; Kuang, Hong-Yu

    2018-07-01

    Retinal pericyte migration represents a novel mechanism of pericyte loss in diabetic retinopathy (DR), which plays a crucial role in the early impairment of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been shown to protect the diabetic retina in the early stage of DR; however, the relationship between GLP-1 and retinal pericytes has not been discussed. In this study, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) significantly increased the migration of primary bovine retinal pericytes without influencing cell viability. AGEs also significantly enhanced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt activation, and changed the expressions of migration-related proteins, including phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and vinculin. PI3K inhibition significantly attenuated the AGEs-induced migration of retinal pericytes and reversed the overexpression of MMP-2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r) was expressed in retinal pericytes, and liraglutide, a GLP-1 analog, significantly attenuated the migration of pericytes by Glp1r and reversed the changes in p-Akt/Akt, p-FAK/FAK, vinculin and MMP-2 levels induced by AGEs, indicating that the protective effect of liraglutide was associated with the PI3K/Akt pathway. These results provided new insights into the mechanism underlying retinal pericyte migration. The early use of liraglutide exerts a potential bebefical effect on regulating pericyte migration, which might contribute to mechanisms that maintain the integrity of vascular barrier and delay the development of DR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An Optic Nerve Crush Injury Murine Model to Study Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhongshu; Zhang, Shuihua; Lee, Chunsik; Kumar, Anil; Arjunan, Pachiappan; Li, Yang; Zhang, Fan; Li, Xuri

    2011-01-01

    Injury to the optic nerve can lead to axonal degeneration, followed by a gradual death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which results in irreversible vision loss. Examples of such diseases in human include traumatic optic neuropathy and optic nerve degeneration in glaucoma. It is characterized by typical changes in the optic nerve head, progressive optic nerve degeneration, and loss of retinal ganglion cells, if uncontrolled, leading to vision loss and blindness. The optic nerve crush (ONC) injury mouse model is an important experimental disease model for traumatic optic neuropathy, glaucoma, etc. In this model, the crush injury to the optic nerve leads to gradual retinal ganglion cells apoptosis. This disease model can be used to study the general processes and mechanisms of neuronal death and survival, which is essential for the development of therapeutic measures. In addition, pharmacological and molecular approaches can be used in this model to identify and test potential therapeutic reagents to treat different types of optic neuropathy. Here, we provide a step by step demonstration of (I) Baseline retrograde labeling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) at day 1, (II) Optic nerve crush injury at day 4, (III) Harvest the retinae and analyze RGC survival at day 11, and (IV) Representative result. PMID:21540827

  13. Different effects of valproic acid on photoreceptor loss in Rd1 and Rd10 retinal degeneration mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton, Kenneth P; Guzman, Alvaro E; Deshpande, Mrinalini; Byrd, David; DeLooff, Camryn; Mkoyan, Kristina; Zlojutro, Paul; Wallace, Adrianne; Metcalf, Brandon; Laux, Kirsten; Sotzen, Jason; Tran, Trung

    2014-01-01

    The histone-deacetylase inhibitor activity of valproic acid (VPA) was discovered after VPA's adoption as an anticonvulsant. This generated speculation for VPA's potential to increase the expression of neuroprotective genes. Clinical trials for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are currently active, testing VPA's potential to reduce photoreceptor loss; however, we lack information regarding the effects of VPA on available mammalian models of retinal degeneration, nor do we know if retinal gene expression is perturbed by VPA in a predictable way. Thus, we examined the effects of systemic VPA on neurotrophic factor and Nrl-related gene expression in the mouse retina and compared VPA's effects on the rate of photoreceptor loss in two strains of mice, Pde6b(rd1/rd1) and Pde6b(rd10/rd10) . The expression of Bdnf, Gdnf, Cntf, and Fgf2 was measured by quantitative PCR after single and multiple doses of VPA (intraperitoneal) in wild-type and Pde6b(rd1/rd1) mice. Pde6b(rd1/rd1) mice were treated with daily doses of VPA during the period of rapid photoreceptor loss. Pde6b(rd10/rd10) mice were also treated with systemic VPA to compare in a partial loss-of-function model. Retinal morphology was assessed by virtual microscopy or spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Full-field and focal electroretinography (ERG) analysis were employed with Pde6b(rd10/rd10) mice to measure retinal function. In wild-type postnatal mice, a single VPA dose increased the expression of Bdnf and Gdnf in the neural retina after 18 h, while the expression of Cntf was reduced by 70%. Daily dosing of wild-type mice from postnatal day P17 to P28 resulted in smaller increases in Bdnf and Gdnf expression, normal Cntf expression, and reduced Fgf2 expression (25%). Nrl gene expression was decreased by 50%, while Crx gene expression was not affected. Rod-specific expression of Mef2c and Nr2e3 was decreased substantially by VPA treatment, while Rhodopsin and Pde6b gene expression was normal at P28. Daily

  14. Common variants in the COL4A4 gene confer susceptibility to lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Akira; Ideta, Hidenao; Ota, Masao; Ito, Norihiko; Ideta, Ryuichi; Yonemoto, Junichi; Takeuchi, Masaki; Uemoto, Riyo; Nishide, Tadayuki; Iijima, Yasuhito; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Okada, Eiichi; Shiota, Tomoko; Hagihara, Yuta; Oka, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is a vitreoretinal disorder characterized by a visible fundus lesion predisposing the patient to retinal tears and detachment. The etiology of this degeneration is still uncertain, but it is likely that both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in its development. To identify genetic susceptibility regions for lattice degeneration of the retina, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a dense panel of 23,465 microsatellite markers covering the entire human genome. This GWAS in a Japanese cohort (294 patients with lattice degeneration and 294 controls) led to the identification of one microsatellite locus, D2S0276i, in the collagen type IV alpha 4 (COL4A4) gene on chromosome 2q36.3. To validate the significance of this observation, we evaluated the D2S0276i region in the GWAS cohort and in an independent Japanese cohort (280 patients and 314 controls) using D2S0276i and 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the region. The strong associations were observed in D2S0276i and rs7558081 in the COL4A4 gene (Pc = 5.8 × 10(-6), OR = 0.63 and Pc = 1.0 × 10(-5), OR = 0.69 in a total of 574 patients and 608 controls, respectively). Our findings suggest that variants in the COL4A4 gene may contribute to the development of lattice degeneration of the retina.

  15. Common variants in the COL4A4 gene confer susceptibility to lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Meguro

    Full Text Available Lattice degeneration of the retina is a vitreoretinal disorder characterized by a visible fundus lesion predisposing the patient to retinal tears and detachment. The etiology of this degeneration is still uncertain, but it is likely that both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in its development. To identify genetic susceptibility regions for lattice degeneration of the retina, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS using a dense panel of 23,465 microsatellite markers covering the entire human genome. This GWAS in a Japanese cohort (294 patients with lattice degeneration and 294 controls led to the identification of one microsatellite locus, D2S0276i, in the collagen type IV alpha 4 (COL4A4 gene on chromosome 2q36.3. To validate the significance of this observation, we evaluated the D2S0276i region in the GWAS cohort and in an independent Japanese cohort (280 patients and 314 controls using D2S0276i and 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the region. The strong associations were observed in D2S0276i and rs7558081 in the COL4A4 gene (Pc = 5.8 × 10(-6, OR = 0.63 and Pc = 1.0 × 10(-5, OR = 0.69 in a total of 574 patients and 608 controls, respectively. Our findings suggest that variants in the COL4A4 gene may contribute to the development of lattice degeneration of the retina.

  16. Compromised Integrity of Central Visual Pathways in Patients With Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malania, Maka; Konrad, Julia; Jägle, Herbert; Werner, John S; Greenlee, Mark W

    2017-06-01

    Macular degeneration (MD) affects the central retina and leads to gradual loss of foveal vision. Although, photoreceptors are primarily affected in MD, the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and central visual pathways may also be altered subsequent to photoreceptor degeneration. Here we investigate whether retinal damage caused by MD alters microstructural properties of visual pathways using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Six MD patients and six healthy control subjects participated in the study. Retinal images were obtained by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Diffusion tensor images (DTI) and high-resolution T1-weighted structural images were collected for each subject. We used diffusion-based tensor modeling and probabilistic fiber tractography to identify the optic tract (OT) and optic radiations (OR), as well as nonvisual pathways (corticospinal tract and anterior fibers of corpus callosum). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial and radial diffusivity values (AD, RD) were calculated along the nonvisual and visual pathways. Measurement of RNFL thickness reveals that the temporal circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in eyes with macular degeneration than normal. While we did not find significant differences in diffusion properties in nonvisual pathways, patients showed significant changes in diffusion scalars (FA, RD, and AD) both in OT and OR. The results indicate that the RNFL and the white matter of the visual pathways are significantly altered in MD patients. Damage to the photoreceptors in MD leads to atrophy of the ganglion cell axons and to corresponding changes in microstructural properties of central visual pathways.

  17. Photobiomodulation for the treatment of retinal diseases: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivayla I. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photobiomodulation (PBM, also known as low level laser therapy, has recently risen to the attention of the ophthalmology community as a promising new approach to treat a variety of retinal conditions including age-related macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy, Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, amblyopia, methanol-induced retinal damage, and possibly others. This review evaluates the existing research pertaining to PBM applications in the retina, with a focus on the mechanisms of action and clinical outcomes. All available literature until April 2015 was reviewed using PubMed and the following keywords: “photobiomodulation AND retina”, “low level light therapy AND retina”, “low level laser therapy AND retina”, and “FR/NIR therapy AND retina”. In addition, the relevant references listed within the papers identified through PubMed were incorporated. The literature supports the conclusion that the low-cost and non-invasive nature of PBM, coupled with the first promising clinical reports and the numerous preclinical-studies in animal models, make PBM well-poised to become an important player in the treatment of a wide range of retinal disorders. Nevertheless, large-scale clinical trials will be necessary to establish the PBM therapeutic ranges for the various retinal diseases, as well as to gain a deeper understanding of its mechanisms of action.

  18. The synthetic progestin norgestrel modulates Nrf2 signaling and acts as an antioxidant in a model of retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh M. Byrne

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is one of the most common retinal degenerative conditions affecting people worldwide, and is currently incurable. It is characterized by the progressive loss of photoreceptors, in which the death of rod cells leads to the secondary death of cone cells; the cause of eventual blindness. As rod cells die, retinal-oxygen metabolism becomes perturbed, leading to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and thus oxidative stress; a key factor in the secondary death of cones. In this study, norgestrel, an FDA-approved synthetic analog of progesterone, was found to be a powerful neuroprotective antioxidant, preventing light-induced ROS in photoreceptor cells, and subsequent cell death. Norgestrel also prevented light-induced photoreceptor morphological changes that were associated with ROS production, and that are characteristic of RP. Further investigation showed that norgestrel acts via post-translational modulation of the major antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2; bringing about its phosphorylation, subsequent nuclear translocation, and increased levels of its effector protein superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2. In summary, these results demonstrate significant protection of photoreceptor cells from oxidative stress, and underscore the potential of norgestrel as a therapeutic option for RP.

  19. Early rhegmatogenous retinal detachment following laser in situ keratomileusis for high myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, M E; Höfling-Lima, A L; Nascimento, E

    2000-01-01

    Four eyes had early rhegmatogenous retinal detachment within 3 months of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for correction of high myopia using the microkeratome, Clear Corneal Molder. In two eyes, retinal detachment resulted from horseshoe tears, one occurring in an otherwise normal region of the retina and the other at the margin of an area of lattice degeneration detected during preoperative examination. The first eye was treated with retinopexy using a 287 encircling scleral exoplant, drainage of subretinal fluid, and laser photocoagulation by indirect ophthalmoscopy. The other eye was treated with pneumatic retinopexy and cryotherapy. In the other eyes, retinal detachment was the result of giant tears with no evidence of prior retinal degeneration. These eyes were treated with pars plana vitrectomy, fluid-gas exchange with 15% perfluoropropane (C3F8), endolaser photocoagulation, and a 42 encircling scleral exoplant. After treatment, the first two eyes achieved spectacle-corrected visual acuity of 20/40. In the last two eyes, final spectacle-corrected visual acuity was 20/400 in one eye and light perception in the other. Although no cause-effect relationship between LASIK and retinal detachment can be stated, these cases suggest that LASIK may be associated with retinal detachment, particularly in highly myopic eyes. Further studies are necessary to determine high-risk patient characteristics.

  20. Chronic intravitreous infusion of ciliary neurotrophic factor modulates electrical retinal stimulation thresholds in the RCS rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Tiffany L; Glybina, Inna V; Abrams, Gary W; Iezzi, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether the sustained intravitreous delivery of CNTF modulates cortical response thresholds to electrical retinal stimulation in the RCS rat model of retinal degeneration. Animals were assigned to four groups: untreated, nonsurgical control and infusion groups of 10 ng/d CNTF, 1 ng/d CNTF, and PBS vehicle control. Thresholds for electrically evoked cortical potentials (EECPs) were recorded in response to transcorneal electrical stimulation of the retina at p30 and again at p60, after a three-week infusion. As the retina degenerated over time, EECP thresholds in response to electrical retinal stimulation increased. Eyes treated with 10 ng/d CNTF demonstrated significantly greater retinal sensitivity to electrical stimulation when compared with all other groups. In addition, eyes treated with 1 ng/d CNTF demonstrated significantly greater retinal sensitivity than both PBS-treated and untreated control groups. Retinal sensitivity to electrical stimulation was preserved in animals treated with chronic intravitreous infusion of CNTF. These data suggest that CNTF-mediated retinal neuroprotection may be a novel therapy that can lower stimulus thresholds in patients about to undergo retinal prosthesis implantation. Furthermore, it may maintain the long-term efficacy of these devices in patients.

  1. Highly sensitive measurements of disease progression in rare disorders: Developing and validating a multimodal model of retinal degeneration in Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertus, Stanley; Bax, Nathalie M; Fakin, Ana; Groenewoud, Joannes M M; Klevering, B Jeroen; Moore, Anthony T; Michaelides, Michel; Webster, Andrew R; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Hoyng, Carel B

    2017-01-01

    Each inherited retinal disorder is rare, but together, they affect millions of people worldwide. No treatment is currently available for these blinding diseases, but promising new options-including gene therapy-are emerging. Arguably, the most prevalent retinal dystrophy is Stargardt disease. In each case, the specific combination of ABCA4 variants (> 900 identified to date) and modifying factors is virtually unique. It accounts for the vast phenotypic heterogeneity including variable rates of functional and structural progression, thereby potentially limiting the ability of phase I/II clinical trials to assess efficacy of novel therapies with few patients. To accommodate this problem, we developed and validated a sensitive and reliable composite clinical trial endpoint for disease progression based on structural measurements of retinal degeneration. We used longitudinal data from early-onset Stargardt patients from the Netherlands (development cohort, n = 14) and the United Kingdom (external validation cohort, n = 18). The composite endpoint was derived from best-corrected visual acuity, fundus autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Weighting optimization techniques excluded visual acuity from the composite endpoint. After optimization, the endpoint outperformed each univariable outcome, and showed an average progression of 0.41° retinal eccentricity per year (95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.52). Comparing with actual longitudinal values, the model accurately predicted progression (R2, 0.904). These properties were largely preserved in the validation cohort (0.43°/year [0.33-0.53]; prediction: R2, 0.872). We subsequently ran a two-year trial simulation with the composite endpoint, which detected a 25% decrease in disease progression with 80% statistical power using only 14 patients. These results suggest that a multimodal endpoint, reflecting structural macular changes, provides a sensitive measurement of disease progression in

  2. Highly sensitive measurements of disease progression in rare disorders: Developing and validating a multimodal model of retinal degeneration in Stargardt disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Lambertus

    Full Text Available Each inherited retinal disorder is rare, but together, they affect millions of people worldwide. No treatment is currently available for these blinding diseases, but promising new options-including gene therapy-are emerging. Arguably, the most prevalent retinal dystrophy is Stargardt disease. In each case, the specific combination of ABCA4 variants (> 900 identified to date and modifying factors is virtually unique. It accounts for the vast phenotypic heterogeneity including variable rates of functional and structural progression, thereby potentially limiting the ability of phase I/II clinical trials to assess efficacy of novel therapies with few patients. To accommodate this problem, we developed and validated a sensitive and reliable composite clinical trial endpoint for disease progression based on structural measurements of retinal degeneration.We used longitudinal data from early-onset Stargardt patients from the Netherlands (development cohort, n = 14 and the United Kingdom (external validation cohort, n = 18. The composite endpoint was derived from best-corrected visual acuity, fundus autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Weighting optimization techniques excluded visual acuity from the composite endpoint. After optimization, the endpoint outperformed each univariable outcome, and showed an average progression of 0.41° retinal eccentricity per year (95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.52. Comparing with actual longitudinal values, the model accurately predicted progression (R2, 0.904. These properties were largely preserved in the validation cohort (0.43°/year [0.33-0.53]; prediction: R2, 0.872. We subsequently ran a two-year trial simulation with the composite endpoint, which detected a 25% decrease in disease progression with 80% statistical power using only 14 patients.These results suggest that a multimodal endpoint, reflecting structural macular changes, provides a sensitive measurement of disease

  3. Activation of liver X receptor delayed the retinal degeneration of rd1 mice through modulation of the immunological function of glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao; Sun, Dayu; Chen, Siyu; Xu, Haiwei

    2017-05-09

    Retinal degeneration (RD), including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is an inherited eye disease characterized by progressive degeneration of photoreceptors. Recently, immune cells, including microglia, Müller cells and astrocytes, in degenerative retina are demonstrated to play key roles in the development of RD and can be used as potential therapeutic targets. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are important immuno-inflammatory response transcription factors that have been reported to be a new potential therapeutic drug target for neurodegenerative diseases. However, the potential therapeutic utility of LXRs for RP has not been evaluated. In the present study, Pde6β (rd1) mice received intraperitoneal injections of T0901317 (T0, 50 mg/kg/d) or vehicle (2% DMSO) for 7 days with age-matched C57/BL6 mice as controls. The effect of T0 was examined by quantitating photoreceptor apoptosis, microglial density and the expression of inflammatory mediators; the underlying mechanisms were then explored with a microarray assay. T0 markedly delayed apoptosis of the photoreceptors, partially through suppressing the activation of microglia and the gliosis of Müller cells, and decreased the expression levels of IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and ENG in rd1 mice; as a result, the visual function of T0-treated rd1 mice measured with electroretinograms (ERG) was preserved for a longer time than that of vehicle-treated rd1 mice. The microarray assay showed that the Janus kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway was significantly affected in the retina of rd1 mice with T0 treatment. Our data suggested that T0 modulated the immunologic function of glia cells in the degenerative retina through the JAK3/STAT pathway and delayed the apoptosis of photoreceptors.

  4. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage from Chronic Laser Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    and the other by 15 a slower, partly reversible rod cell degeneration It appears that a normal light cycle protects the rat eye somewhat from the...lium, disturbing the metabolic support of the receptors. Gross separation as in retinal detachment is known to cause degeneration of receptors and...border by scatter and reflection. A particular kind of specialization in the retina is represented by the fovea and macula . In the center of the macula

  5. Neovascular Glaucoma Induced by Peripheral Retinal Ischemia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Management and Imaging Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pichi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the case of a young patient affected by neurofibromatosis 1 (NF-1 with peripheral retinal ischemia-induced neovascular glaucoma and the peculiar spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT features. Material and Methods: A 13-year-old boy affected by NF-1, as diagnosed according to established criteria, was referred with a diagnosis of hypertensive uveitis in his left eye. He underwent a complete ophthalmic examination and comprehensive blood work with viral and immunological tests. The case was documented with fluorescein angiography (FA and SD-OCT. When the intraocular pressure (IOP of the left eye decreased and the cornea cleared, FA revealed retinal ischemia and leakage from pathologic retinal vessels. SD-OCT revealed foveal hypoplasia secondary to the complete absence of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Results: Peripheral retinal ischemia-induced neovascular glaucoma was diagnosed. The patient underwent Ahmed valve implantation to control his IOP, and subsequent retinal photocoagulation by argon laser and intravitreal bevacizumab injection were performed to control neovascularization. Discussion: Retinal ischemia in NF-1 might lead to neovascular glaucoma: lowering of the IOP with surgical implantation of an Ahmed valve, regression of neovascularization by argon laser panretinal photocoagulation and intravitreal injection of bevacizumab can be a helpful way to control such a complication.

  6. Retinal Vessels Segmentation Techniques and Algorithms: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Almotiri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vessels identification and localization aim to separate the different retinal vasculature structure tissues, either wide or narrow ones, from the fundus image background and other retinal anatomical structures such as optic disc, macula, and abnormal lesions. Retinal vessels identification studies are attracting more and more attention in recent years due to non-invasive fundus imaging and the crucial information contained in vasculature structure which is helpful for the detection and diagnosis of a variety of retinal pathologies included but not limited to: Diabetic Retinopathy (DR, glaucoma, hypertension, and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD. With the development of almost two decades, the innovative approaches applying computer-aided techniques for segmenting retinal vessels are becoming more and more crucial and coming closer to routine clinical applications. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview for retinal vessels segmentation techniques. Firstly, a brief introduction to retinal fundus photography and imaging modalities of retinal images is given. Then, the preprocessing operations and the state of the art methods of retinal vessels identification are introduced. Moreover, the evaluation and validation of the results of retinal vessels segmentation are discussed. Finally, an objective assessment is presented and future developments and trends are addressed for retinal vessels identification techniques.

  7. Semiautomated segmentation and analysis of retinal layers in three-dimensional spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images of patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhihong; Shi, Yue; Nandanan, Kiran; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-01-01

    Historically, regular drusen and geographic atrophy (GA) have been recognized as the hallmarks of nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Recent imaging developments have revealed another distinct nonneovascular AMD phenotype, reticular pseudodrusen (RPD). We develop an approach to semiautomatically quantify retinal surfaces associated with various AMD lesions (i.e., regular drusen, RPD, and GA) in spectral domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. More specifically, a graph-based algorithm was used to segment multiple retinal layers in SD-OCT volumes. Varying surface feasibility constraints based on the presegmentation were applied on the double-surface graph search to refine the surface segmentation. The thicknesses of these layers and their correlation with retinal functional measurements, including microperimetry (MP) sensitivity and visual acuity (VA), were investigated. The photoreceptor outer segment layer demonstrated significant thinning with a reduction in MP sensitivity and VA score when atrophic AMD lesions were present. Regular drusen and RPD were separately segmented on SD-OCT images to allow their characteristics and distribution to be studied separately. The mean thickness of regular drusen was found to significantly correlate with the VA score. RPD appeared to be distributed evenly throughout the macula and regular drusen appeared to be more concentrated centrally.

  8. Moderately delayed post-insult treatment with normobaric hyperoxia reduces excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration but increases ischemia-induced brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haelewyn Benoit

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use and benefits of normobaric oxygen (NBO in patients suffering acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. Results Here we show for the first time to the best of our knowledge that NBO reduces both NMDA-induced calcium influxes in vitro and NMDA-induced neuronal degeneration in vivo, but increases oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury in vitro and ischemia-induced brain damage produced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in vivo. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that NBO reduces excitotoxin-induced calcium influx and subsequent neuronal degeneration but favors ischemia-induced brain damage and neuronal death. These findings highlight the complexity of the mechanisms involved by the use of NBO in patients suffering acute ischemic stroke.

  9. Lipoic Acid and Progesterone Alone or in Combination Ameliorate Retinal Degeneration in an Experimental Model of Hereditary Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores T. Ramírez-Lamelas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a group of inherited retinopathies characterized by photoreceptors death. Our group has shown the positive progesterone (P4 actions on cell death progression in an experimental model of RP. In an effort to enhance the beneficial effects of P4, the aim of this study was to combine P4 treatment with an antioxidant [lipoic acid (LA] in the rd1 mice. rd1 and control mice were treated with 100 mg/kg body weight of P4, LA, or a combination of both on postnatal day 7 (PN7, 9, and 11, and were sacrificed at PN11. The administration of LA and/or P4 diminishes cell death in rd1 retinas. The effect obtained after the combined administration of LA and P4 is higher than the one obtained with LA or P4 alone. The three treatments decreased GFAP staining, however, in the far peripheral retina, and the two treatments that offered better results were LA and LA plus P4. LA or LA plus P4 increased retinal glutathione (GSH concentration in the rd1 mice. Although LA and P4 are able to protect photoreceptors from death in rd1 mice retinas, a better effectiveness is achieved when administering LA and P4 at the same time.

  10. Protective effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on retinal injury induced by argon laser photocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P; San, Q; Wang, C Z; Yang, Z F; Kang, H X; Qian, H W; Zhang, C P

    2010-01-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment is often complicated by a side effect of visual impairment, which is caused by the unavoidable laser-induced retinal destruction. At present no specific is found to cure this retinopathy. The aim of this study was to observe the neuroprotective effect of bFGF on laser-induced retinal injury. Chinchilla rabbits were divided into three groups and argon laser lesions were created in the retinas. Then bFGF or dexamethasone, a widely used ophthalmic preparation, or saline was given severally by retrobulbar injection. The retinal lesions were evaluated histologically and morphometrically, and visual function was examined by ERG. The results showed that bFGF administration better preserved morphology of retinal photoreceptors and significantly diminished the area of the lesions. Furthermore, bFGF promoted the restoration of the ERG b-wave amplitude. In rabbits treated with dexamethasone, however, the lesions showed almost no ameliorative changes. This is the first study to investigate the potential role of bFGF as a remedial agent in laser photocoagulation treatment. These findings suggest that bFGF has significant neuroprotective properties in the retina and this type of neuroprotection may be of clinical significance in reducing iatrogenic laser-induced retinal injuries in humans

  11. Retinal and Optic Nerve Degeneration in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Followed up for 5 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Ara, Jose R; Martin, Jesus; Almarcegui, Carmen; Dolz, Isabel; Vilades, Elisa; Gil-Arribas, Laura; Fernandez, Francisco J; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose M; Pablo, Luis E; Satue, Maria

    2017-05-01

    To quantify retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) changes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls with a 5-year follow-up and to analyze correlations between disability progression and RNFL degeneration. Observational and longitudinal study. One hundred patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 50 healthy controls. All participants underwent a complete ophthalmic and electrophysiologic exploration and were re-evaluated annually for 5 years. Visual acuity (Snellen chart), color vision (Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates), visual field examination, optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser polarimetry (SLP), and visual evoked potentials. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration, treatments, prior optic neuritis episodes, and quality of life (QOL; based on the 54-item Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Scale score). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed changes in all RNFL thicknesses in both groups. In the MS group, changes were detected in average thickness and in the mean deviation using the GDx-VCC nerve fiber analyzer (Laser Diagnostic Technologies, San Diego, CA) and in the P100 latency of visual evoked potentials; no changes were detected in visual acuity, color vision, or visual fields. Optical coherence tomography showed greater differences in the inferior and temporal RNFL thicknesses in both groups. In MS patients only, OCT revealed a moderate correlation between the increase in EDSS and temporal and superior RNFL thinning. Temporal RNFL thinning based on OCT results was correlated moderately with decreased QOL. Multiple sclerosis patients exhibit a progressive axonal loss in the optic nerve fiber layer. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning based on OCT results is a useful marker for assessing MS progression and correlates with increased disability and reduced QOL. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Discovery of a Cynomolgus Monkey Family With Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Miya, Fuyuki; Shimozawa, Nobuhiro; Funatsu, Jun; Nakatake, Shunji; Fujiwara, Kohta; Tachibana, Takashi; Murakami, Yusuke; Hisatomi, Toshio; Yoshida, Shigeo; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Nakazawa, Toru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2018-02-01

    To accelerate the development of new therapies, an inherited retinal degeneration model in a nonhuman primate would be useful to confirm the efficacy in preclinical studies. In this study, we describe the discovery of retinitis pigmentosa in a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) pedigree. First, screening with fundus photography was performed on 1443 monkeys at the Tsukuba Primate Research Center. Ophthalmic examinations, such as indirect ophthalmoscopy, ERGs using RETeval, and optic coherent tomography (OCT) measurement, were then performed to confirm diagnosis. Retinal degeneration with cystoid macular edema was observed in both eyes of one 14-year-old female monkey. In her examinations, the full-field ERGs were nonrecordable and the outer layer of the retina in the parafoveal area was not visible on OCT imaging. Moreover, less frequent pigmentary retinal anomalies also were observed in her 3-year-old nephew. His full-field ERGs were almost nonrecordable and the outer layer was not visible in the peripheral retina. His father was her cousin (the son of her mother's older brother) and his mother was her younger half-sibling sister with a different father. The hereditary nature is highly probable (autosomal recessive inheritance suspected). However, whole-exome analysis performed identified no pathogenic mutations in these monkeys.

  13. Towards a Completely Implantable, Light-Sensitive Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humayun, M

    2001-01-01

    .... Previous studies have established the feasibility of the retinal prosthesis. Short-term tests in blind humans have shown that degenerated retina will respond to light in a way that is consistent with form vision...

  14. ROCK-1 mediates diabetes-induced retinal pigment epithelial and endothelial cell blebbing: Contribution to diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Pierre-Raphaël; Salah, Sawsen; Berdugo, Marianne; Gélizé, Emmanuelle; Delaunay, Kimberley; Naud, Marie-Christine; Klein, Christophe; Moulin, Alexandre; Savoldelli, Michèle; Bergin, Ciara; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Jonet, Laurent; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Crisanti, Patricia

    2017-08-18

    In diabetic retinopathy, the exact mechanisms leading to retinal capillary closure and to retinal barriers breakdown remain imperfectly understood. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), an effector of the small GTPase Rho, involved in cytoskeleton dynamic regulation and cell polarity is activated by hyperglycemia. In one year-old Goto Kakizaki (GK) type 2 diabetic rats retina, ROCK-1 activation was assessed by its cellular distribution and by phosphorylation of its substrates, MYPT1 and MLC. In both GK rat and in human type 2 diabetic retinas, ROCK-1 is activated and associated with non-apoptotic membrane blebbing in retinal vessels and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) that respectively form the inner and the outer barriers. Activation of ROCK-1 induces focal vascular constrictions, endoluminal blebbing and subsequent retinal hypoxia. In RPE cells, actin cytoskeleton remodeling and membrane blebs in RPE cells contributes to outer barrier breakdown. Intraocular injection of fasudil, significantly reduces both retinal hypoxia and RPE barrier breakdown. Diabetes-induced cell blebbing may contribute to ischemic maculopathy and represent an intervention target.

  15. Reduced-illuminance autofluorescence imaging in ABCA4-associated retinal degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Swider, Malgorzata; Aleman, Tomas S.; Roman, Marisa I.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Stone, Edwin M.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2007-05-01

    The health of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) can be estimated with autofluorescence (AF) imaging of lipofuscin, which accumulates as a byproduct of retinal exposure to light. Lipofuscin may be toxic to the RPE, and its toxicity may be enhanced by short-wavelength (SW) illumination. The high-intensity and SW excitation light used in conventional AF imaging could, at least in principle, increase the rate of lipofuscin accumulation and/or increase its toxicity. We considered two reduced-illuminance AF imaging (RAFI) methods as alternatives to conventional AF imaging. RAFI methods use either near-infrared (NIR) light or reduced-radiance SW illumination for excitation of fluorophores. We quantified the distribution of RAFI signals in relation to retinal structure and function in patients with the prototypical lipofuscin accumulation disease caused by mutations in ABCA4. There was evidence for two subclinical stages of macular ABCA4 disease involving hyperautofluorescence of both SW- and NIR-RAFI with and without associated loss of visual function. Use of RAFI methods and microperimetry in future clinical trials involving lipofuscinopathies should allow quantification of subclinical disease expression and progression without subjecting the diseased retina/RPE to undue light exposure.

  16. Investigation of PACAP Fragments and Related Peptides in Chronic Retinal Hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werling, Dora; Reglodi, Dora; Kiss, Peter; Toth, Gabor; Szabadfi, Krisztina; Tamas, Andrea; Biro, Zsolt; Atlasz, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has neuroprotective effects in different neuronal and retinal injuries. Retinal ischemia can be effectively modelled by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO), which causes chronic hypoperfusion-induced degeneration in the entire rat retina. The retinoprotective effect of PACAP 1-38 and VIP is well-established in ischemic retinopathy. However, little is known about the effects of related peptides and PACAP fragments in ischemic retinopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential retinoprotective effects of different PACAP fragments (PACAP 4-13, 4-22, 6-10, 6-15, 11-15, and 20-31) and related peptides (secretin, glucagon) in BCCAO-induced ischemic retinopathy. Wistar rats (3-4 months old) were used in the experiment. After performing BCCAO, the right eyes of the animals were treated with PACAP fragments or related peptides intravitreal (100 pM), while the left eyes were injected with saline serving as control eyes. Sham-operated (without BCCAO) rats received the same treatment. Routine histology was performed 2 weeks after the surgery; cells were counted and the thickness of retinal layers was compared. Our results revealed significant neuroprotection by PACAP 1-38 but did not reveal retinoprotective effect of the PACAP fragments or related peptides. These results suggest that PACAP 1-38 has the greatest efficacy in ischemic retinopathy.

  17. Investigation of PACAP Fragments and Related Peptides in Chronic Retinal Hypoperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Werling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP has neuroprotective effects in different neuronal and retinal injuries. Retinal ischemia can be effectively modelled by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO, which causes chronic hypoperfusion-induced degeneration in the entire rat retina. The retinoprotective effect of PACAP 1-38 and VIP is well-established in ischemic retinopathy. However, little is known about the effects of related peptides and PACAP fragments in ischemic retinopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential retinoprotective effects of different PACAP fragments (PACAP 4-13, 4-22, 6-10, 6-15, 11-15, and 20-31 and related peptides (secretin, glucagon in BCCAO-induced ischemic retinopathy. Wistar rats (3-4 months old were used in the experiment. After performing BCCAO, the right eyes of the animals were treated with PACAP fragments or related peptides intravitreal (100 pM, while the left eyes were injected with saline serving as control eyes. Sham-operated (without BCCAO rats received the same treatment. Routine histology was performed 2 weeks after the surgery; cells were counted and the thickness of retinal layers was compared. Our results revealed significant neuroprotection by PACAP 1-38 but did not reveal retinoprotective effect of the PACAP fragments or related peptides. These results suggest that PACAP 1-38 has the greatest efficacy in ischemic retinopathy.

  18. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone ameliorates high-glucose induced diabetic apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells by activating TrkB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyi; Liu, Qiuhong; Wang, Xiaochuan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    In diabetic retinopathy, prolonged high-level blood glucose induced significant impairments among various retinal tissues, including retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In an in vitro model of human RPE cells, we evaluated whether 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone (DHF) may effectively prevent high glucose-induced diabetic apoptosis among human RPE cells. ARPE-19 cells, a Human RPE cell line, were treated with d-glucose (50 mM) to induce apoptosis in vitro. Prior to glucose, ARPE-19 cells were pre-incubated with various concentrations of DHF. The effect of DHF on d-glucose-induced apoptosis was examined by TUNEL assay, in a concentration-dependent manner. The biological effects of DHF on Caspase-9 (Casp-9) and TrkB signaling pathways in d-glucose-injured ARPE-19 cells were evaluated by qRT-PCR and western blot (WB) assays. A TrkB antagonist, K252a, was also applied in DHF and d-glucose treated ARPE-19 cells. Possible effect of K252a blocking TrkB signaling pathway, thus reversing DHF-modulated apoptosis prevention was also examined by TUNEL and WB assays. DHF ameliorated d-glucose-induced diabetic apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. Apoptotic factor Casp-9, at both mRNA and protein levels, were drastically inhibited by DHF in d-glucose-injured ARPE-19 cells. Also, DHF activated TrkB signaling pathway through phosphorylation. K252a dramatically reversed the preventive effect of DHF on d-glucose-induced apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. Further investigation showed that K252a functioned through de-activating or de-phosphorylating TrkB signaling pathway. This work demonstrates that DHF, through activation of TrkB signaling pathway, has a preventive function in d-glucose-induced apoptosis in PRE cells in diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Circulating anti-retinal antibodies in response to anti-angiogenic therapy in exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicka-Trząska, Agnieszka; Wilańska, Joanna; Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena; Sanak, Marek

    2014-12-01

    To determine changes in anti-retinal antibodies (ARAs) during anti-VEGF therapy in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to assess the correlations between ARAs and disease activity. The study comprised 98 patients treated with intravitreal bevacizumab. The ophthalmic examination included best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), slit lamp biomicroscopy, fundoscopy, fluorescein angiography (FA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Serum ARAs levels were assessed by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on normal monkey retina substrate. These studies were repeated at 4 week intervals within 8 months of a follow-up. The sera of 50 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects were used as controls. At baseline examination, 94 (95.5%) of the 98 patients were positive for ARAs. The ARAs titres were significantly higher (p = 0.0000) than in controls. A positive correlation was found between titres of ARAs and the diameter of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) as measured by FA (p = 0.0000), and central retinal thickness (CRT) assessed by OCT (p = 0.0000). A positive correlation was also found between the diameter of CNV, CRT and the complexity of circulating ARAs. Following treatment all patients demonstrated significant decrease in ARAs levels as well as improvement of BCVA, reduction of subretinal fluid on OCT and decreased leakage on FA. Changes in serum ARAs levels occurred in parallel with clinical outcomes of anti-VEGF therapy. Treatment reduced serum levels of ARAs, with the greatest reduction occurring during the 'loading' phase. This study demonstrated that ARAs may act as a serum biomarker of the efficacy of anti-VEGF therapy. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Bcl-2 expression during the development and degeneration