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Sample records for q2 machholz parent

  1. Submillimetric Spectroscopic Observations of Volatiles in Comet C-2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVal-Borro, M.; Hartogh, P.; Jarchow, C.; Rengel, M.; Villanueva, G. L.; Kueppers, M.; Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.

    2012-01-01

    Submillimeter spectroscopic observations of comets provide an important tool for understanding their chemical composition and enable a taxonomic classification. Aims. We aim to determine the production rates of several parent- and product volatiles and the C-12/C-13 isotopic carbon ratio in the long-period comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), which is likely to originate from the Oort Cloud. Methods. The line emission from several molecules in the coma was measured with high signal-to-noise ratio in January 2005 at heliocentric distance of 1.2 AU by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) at the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Results. We have obtained production rates of several volatiles (CH3OH, HCN, H(sup 13)CN, HNC, H2CO, CO, and CS) by comparing the observed and simulated line-integrated intensities. We calculated the synthetic profiles using a radiative transfer code that includes collisions between neutrals and electrons, and the effects of radiative pumping of the fundamental vibrational levels by solar infrared radiation. Furthermore, multiline observations of the CH3OH J = 7-6 series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We find that the CH3OH population distribution of the levels sampled by these lines can be described by a rotational temperature of 40 +/- 3 K. Derived mixing ratios relative to hydrogen cyanide are CO/CH3OH/H2CO/CS/HNC/HC-13N/HCN= 30.9/24.6/4.8/0.57/0.031/0.013/1 assuming a pointing offset of 8" due to the uncertain ephemeris at the time of the observations and the telescope pointing error. Conclusions. The measured relative molecular abundances in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) are between low- to typical values of those obtained in Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that it has visited the inner solar system previously and undergone thermal processing. The HNC/HCN abundance ratio of approx 3.1% is comparable to that found in other comets, accounting for the

  2. Fluorescence Excitation Models of Ammonia and Amidogen Radical (NH2) in Comets: Application to Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH2 -- a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH3/H2O is 0.46% +/- 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH2 observations (0.31% -- 0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH3 could be the sole parent of NH2 in this comet.

  3. FLUORESCENCE EXCITATION MODELS OF AMMONIA AND AMIDOGEN RADICAL (NH2) IN COMETS: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 μm wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 μm wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH 2 -a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 μm wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH 3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH 3 /H 2 O is 0.46% ± 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH 2 observations (0.31%-0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH 3 could be the sole parent of NH 2 in this comet.

  4. FORMATION CONDITIONS OF ICY MATERIALS IN COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ). I. MIXING RATIOS OF ORGANIC VOLATILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hitomi; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2009-01-01

    We observed comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) with the Keck II telescope in late 2005 January and we obtained the spectra of C/2004 Q2 including many emission lines of volatile species such as H 2 O, HCN, C 2 H 2 , NH 3 , CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , CH 3 OH, and H 2 CO with high-signal-to-noise ratios. Based on our observations, we determined the mixing ratios of the molecules relative to H 2 O in C/2004 Q2. Since C/2004 Q2 is one of Oort Cloud comets, it is interesting to compare our results with other Oort Cloud comets. The mixing ratios of C 2 H 2 /H 2 O and C 2 H 6 /H 2 O in C/2004 Q2 are lower than typical Oort Cloud comets. Especially, C 2 H 2 /H 2 O ratio in C/2004 Q2 is as lower as Jupiter Family comets. However, mixing ratios of other molecules in C/2004 Q2 are similar to typical Oort Cloud comets. C/2004 Q2 might be the intermediate type between Oort Cloud and Jupiter Family comets. To investigate the formation conditions of such intermediate type comet, we focused on the (C 2 H 2 +C 2 H 6 )/H 2 O ratios and C 2 H 6 /(C 2 H 6 +C 2 H 2 ) ratios in comets from the viewpoint of conversion from C 2 H 2 to C 2 H 6 in the precometary ices. We found that (C 2 H 2 +C 2 H 6 )/H 2 O ratio in C/2004 Q2 is lower than the ratio in typical Oort Cloud comets while C 2 H 6 /(C 2 H 6 +C 2 H 2 ) ratio in C/2004 Q2 is consistent with the ratio of the typical Oort Cloud comets and Jupiter family comets. If we assume that the cometary volatiles such as H 2 O, CH 4 , and C 2 H 2 formed similar environment, the C 2 H 6 /(C 2 H 6 +C 2 H 2 ) ratio might not be sensitive in the temperature range where hydrogen-addition reactions occurred and cometesimals formed (∼30 K). We employed the dynamical-evolutional model and the chemical-evolutional model to determine the formation region of C/2004 Q2 more precisely. We found that comet C/2004 Q2 might have formed in relatively inner region of the solar nebula than the typical Oort Cloud comet (but slightly further than 5 AU from the proto-Sun).

  5. Periodic Comet Machholz and its idiosyncrasies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics and physical characteristics of Comet P/Machholz are analyzed. The discovery of the comet (Machholz, 1986) is discussed, including the observational conditions and the theory that the comet is inactive over extensive periods of time. Consideration is given to observations of the two tails of Comet P/Machholz (Emerson, 1986), the brightness variations and light curve of the comet, and nuclear photometry of the comet (Green, 1987). It is suggested that the increase in activity beginning one day after perihelion was triggered by a discrete source within 15 deg of the rotation pole that became sunlit after perihelion. Also, the possibility that Comet P/Machholz is associated with a meteor stream is examined. 45 refs

  6. Formation and past evolution of the showers of 96P/Machholz complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Abedin; Wiegert, Paul; Janches, Diego; Pokorný, Petr; Brown, Peter; Hormaechea, Jose Luis

    2018-01-01

    In this work we model the dynamical evolution of meteoroid streams of comet 96P/Machholz, and the largest member of the Marsden sunskirters, comet P/1999 J6. We simultaneously fit the characteristics of eight meteor showers which have been proposed to be linked to the complex, using observations from a range of techniques - visual, video, TV and radar. The aim is to obtain a self-consistent scenario of past capture of a large comet into a short-period orbit, and its subsequent fragmentation history. Moreover, we also aim to constrain the dominant parent of these showers. The fit of our simulated shower characteristics to observations is consistent with the scenario of a capture of a proto-comet 96P/Machholz by Jupiter circa 20000 BCE, and a subsequent major breakup around 100-950 CE which resulted in the formation of the Marsden group of comets. We find that the Marsden group of comets are not the immediate parents of the daytime Arietids and Northern and Southern δ-Aquariids, as previously suggested. In fact, the hypothesis that the Northern δ-Aquariids are related to the Marsden group of comets is not supported by this study. The bulk of the observational characteristics of all eight showers can be explained by meteoroid ejection primarily from comet 96P/Machholz between 10000 BCE and 20000 BCE. Assuming the Marsden group of comets originated between 100 CE-950 CE, we conclude that sunskirting comets contribute mainly to the meteoroid stream near the time of the peak of the daytime Arietids, Southern δ-Aquariids, κ-Velids. Finally, we find that the meteor showers identified by Babadzhanov and Obrubov (1992) as the α-Cetids, the Ursids and Carinids correspond to the daytime λ-Taurids, the November ι-Draconids or December α-Draconids and the θ-Carinids.

  7. Q2 anti Q2 states with relatively narrow widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Seiji.

    1978-09-01

    Using the mass formulas which correctly predict the mass of mesons and baryons the mass of diquark states is computed. From this mass spectrum the existance of the observed narrow baryonia and wide baryonia can be naturally understood. Other relatively narrow Q 2 anti Q 2 states are predicted to exist. (orig.) [de

  8. Low Q2 kaon electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowitz, P.; Acha, A.

    2010-01-01

    A measurement of the H(e, e′ K + ) reaction was performed at Hall A, TJNAF as part of the hypernuclear experiment E94-107. Data was taken at very low Q 2 (~ 0.07 (GeV/c) 2 ) and W = 2.2 GeV. Kaons were detected along the direction of q-vector, the momentum transferred by the incident electron (θ CM = 6°). These measurements provide data about the Σ 0 /Λ ratio which drops rapidly with Q 2 , the angular dependence of the cross sections as Q 2 → 0, and the dependence of the cross section with respect to Q 2 ,W and θ CM . The dependence of the cross section at very forward angles has been poorly known. Available models are inadequate to describe the results. The measurement of the elementary cross section will constrain models for the elementary reaction which are inadequate to describe these results. It is also a key ingredient in the hypernuclear spectroscopy studies performed at the same kinematics. Details of the calculations and results will be shown. (author)

  9. Improved double Q2 rescaling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yonghua

    2001-01-01

    The authors present an improved double Q 2 rescaling model. Based on this condition of the nuclear momentum conservation, the authors have found a Q 2 rescaling parameters' formula of the model, where authors have established the connection between the Q 2 rescaling parameter ζ i (i = v, s, g) and the mean binding energy in nucleus. By using this model, the authors coned explain the experimental data of the EMC effect in the whole x region, the nuclear Drell-Yan process and J/Ψ photoproduction process

  10. A search for the millimetre lines of HCN in Comets Wilson 1987 VII and Machholz 1988 XV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouvisier, J.; Despois, D.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Gerard, E.; Paubert, G.; Johansson, L. E. B.; Ekelund, L.; Winnberg, A.; Ge, W.; Irvine, W. M.; Kinzel, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1990-08-01

    The J(1-0) lines of HCN at 89 GHz were searched for in Comet Wilson 1987 VII, with the FCRAO, the SEST and the IRAM radio telescopes between February and June 1987. There was no firm detection, but significant upper limits were obtained, which put severe constraints on the HCN production rate in that comet. A direct comparison with the observations of P/Halley suggests that the HCN abundance relative to water might be smaller in Comet Wilson by at least a factor of two. The J(1-0) and J(3-2) lines of HCN at 89 and 266 GHz were searched for in Comet Machholz 1988 XV when it was close to perihelion at 0.17 AU from the sun. There was no detection. At that moment, the comet was probably no longer active.

  11. Daughter Species Abundances in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Adam; Cochran, Anita; Dello Russo, Neil; Kelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present analysis of high spectral resolution optical spectra of C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) acquired with the Tull Coude spectrometer on the 2.7-meter Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory and the ARCES spectrometer mounted on the 3.5-meter Astrophysical Research Consortium Telescope at Apache Point Observatory. Both Tull Coude and ARCES provide high spectral resolution (R=30,000-60,000) and a large spectral range of approximately 3500-10000 Angstroms. We obtained two observation epochs, one in February 2015 at a heliocentric distance of 1.3 AU, and another in May 2015 at a heliocentric distance of 1.9 AU. Another epoch in late August 2015 at a heliocentric distance of 3.0 AU is scheduled. We will present production rates of the daughter species CN, C3, CH, C2, and NH2. We will also present H2O production rates derived from the [OI]6300 emission, as well as measurements of the flux ratio of the [OI]5577 Angstrom line to the sum of the [OI]6300 and [OI]6364 Angstrom lines (sometimes referred to as the oxygen line ratio). This ratio is indicative of the CO2 abundance of the comet. As we have observations at several heliocentric distances, we will examine how production rates and mixing ratios of the various species change with heliocentric distance. We will compare our oxygen line measurements to observations of CO2 made with Spitzer, as well as our other daughter species observations to those of candidate parent molecules made at IR wavelengths.

  12. The photon structure function at large Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, A.

    1987-01-01

    LEP II offers the unique opportunity to measure the photon structure function over a large Q 2 range up to ∼ 2000 GeV 2 . Two crucial predictions of QCD can be tested in this experiment: the linear rise in log Q 2 as a consequence of asymptotic freedom, and the large renormalization O(1) of the shape of the structure function due to gluon bremsstrahlung, unperturbed by higher-twist effects

  13. Excited baryon form factors at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Stoler; Gary Adams; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Chris Armstrong; K. Assamagan; Steven Avery; K. Baker; Peter Bosted; Volker Burkert; Jim Dunne; Tom Eden; Rolf Ent; V. Frolov; David Gaskell; P. Gueye; Wendy Hinton; Cynthia Keppel; Wooyoung Kim; Michael Klusman; Doug Koltenuk; David Mack; Richard Madey; David Meekins; Ralph Minehart; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; James Napolitano; Gabriel Niculescu; Ioana Niculescu; Mina Nozar; John Price; Paul Stoler; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Michael Witkowski; Stephen Wood

    1998-01-01

    The role of resonance electroproduction at high Q 2 is discussed in the context of exclusive reactions, as well as the alternative theoretical models which are proposed to treat exclusive reactions in the few GeV 2 /c 2 region of momentum transfer. Jefferson Lab experiment 94-014, which measured the excitation of the Delta (1232) and S 11 (1535) via the reactions p(e,e ' p)pi 0 and p(e,e ' p)eta respectively at Q 2 ∼ 2.8 and 4 GeV 2 /c 2 is described, and the state of analysis reported

  14. Q2/Q3 2016 Solar Industry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David; Boff, Daniel; Margolis, Robert

    2016-10-11

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in the Q2 and Q3 of 2016. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  15. Q2/Q3 2017 Solar Industry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hoskins, Jack [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Margolis, Robert M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-24

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in Q2 and Q3 of 2017. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  16. Analytic derivation of the leading-order gluon distribution function G(x,Q2)=xg(x,Q2) from the proton structure function F2p(x,Q2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, Martin M.; Durand, Loyal; McKay, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    We derive a second-order linear differential equation for the leading-order gluon distribution function G(x,Q 2 )=xg(x,Q 2 ) which determines G(x,Q 2 ) directly from the proton structure function F 2 p (x,Q 2 ). This equation is derived from the leading-order evolution equation for F 2 p (x,Q 2 ), and does not require knowledge of either the individual quark distributions or the gluon evolution equation. Given an analytic expression that successfully reproduces the known experimental data for F 2 p (x,Q 2 ) in a domain x min (Q 2 )≤x≤x max (Q 2 ), Q min 2 ≤Q 2 ≤Q max 2 of the Bjorken variable x and the virtuality Q 2 in deep inelastic scattering, G(x,Q 2 ) is uniquely determined in the same domain. We give the general solution and illustrate the method using the recently proposed Froissart-bound-type parametrization of F 2 p (x,Q 2 ) of E. L. Berger, M. M. Block and C.-I. Tan [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 242001 (2007)]. Existing leading-order gluon distributions based on power-law descriptions of individual parton distributions agree roughly with the new distributions for x > or approx. 10 -3 as they should, but are much larger for x -3 .

  17. Two-body form factors at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.; Keister, B.D.

    1983-02-01

    The charge form factor of a scalar deuteron at high momentum transfer is examined in a model employing scalar nucleons and mesons. With an eye toward establishing consistency criteria for more realistic calculations, several aspects of the model are examined in detail: the role of nucleon and meson singularities in the one-loop impulse diagram, the role of positive-and negative-energy nucleons, and the relationship to time-ordered perturbation theory. It is found that at large Q 2 (1) the form factor is dominated by a term in which the spectator nucleon is on the mass shell, and (2) the meson singularity structure of the d-n-p vertex function is unimportant in determining the overall high-Q 2 behaviour of the form factor

  18. GDH sum rule measurement at low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, N.

    1996-01-01

    The Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule is based on a general dispersive relation for the forward Compton scattering. Multipole analysis suggested the possible violation of the sum rule. Some propositions have been made to modify the original GDH expression. An effort is now being made in several laboratories to shred some light on this topic. The purposes of the different planned experiments are briefly presented according to their Q 2 range

  19. Q2 evolution of a soft gluon distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enkovskij, L.L.; Kotikov, A.V.; Pakkanoni, F.

    1992-01-01

    Model parameter dependence refferring to the function of gluon distribution linked with the exchange of a dipole pomeron from Q 2 is calculated within the framework of the Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equation (GLAP) both in the leading logarithm approximation and in the double logarithmic approximation. The behaviour of logarithmic parametrization ∼ (ln(1/x)) b appears to be unstable in relation to perturbative calculations

  20. THE ROTATION PERIOD OF C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra-Ricart, Miquel; Licandro, Javier, E-mail: mserra@iac.es, E-mail: jlicandr@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-11-20

    C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) was observed around perihelion (2015 January 30) on 15 nights between 2015 January 21 and February 11 using the TADer 0.3-m astrograph telescope at Teide Observatory (IAC, Tenerife, Spain). Two large spiral jet structures were observed over several cometary rotations. A new method of searching for periodicities in the PA of spiral jets in the coma region at a fixed distance (20,624 km) from the cometary optocenter is presented and used to determine a nuclear rotation period of 17.89 ± 0.17 hr.

  1. Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parents, people are always ready to offer advice. Parenting tips, parents' survival guides, dos, don'ts, shoulds ... right" way to be a good parent. Good parenting includes Keeping your child safe Showing affection and ...

  2. Measurement of Dijet Production at Low $Q^{2}$ at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chyla, J.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz, I.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tasevsky, M.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Yan, W.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    Triple differential dijet cross sections in e^\\pm p interactions are presented in the region of photon virtualities 27GeV, E_T2>5GeV, and pseudorapidities -2.5 < eta_1^*, eta_2^* <0. The measurements are made in the gamma^* p centre-of-mass frame, using an integrated luminosity of 57pb^-1. The data are compared with NLO QCD calculations and LO Monte Carlo programs with and without a resolved virtual photon contribution. NLO QCD calculations fail to describe the region of low Q^2 and low jet transverse energies, in contrast to a LO Monte Carlo generator which includes direct and resolved photon interactions with both transversely and longitudinally polarised photons. Initial and final state parton showers are tested as a mechanism for including higher order QCD effects in low E_T jet production.

  3. GVMD Model Predictions for the Low Q2 Behaviour of the Spin Structure Function g1(x,Q2) and of the DHGHY Integral I(Q2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badelek, B.; Kwiecinski, J.; Ziaja, B.

    2002-01-01

    Predictions for g 1 ( x, Q 2 ) at low Q 2 are obtained in the framework of the GVMD model. contributions from both light and heavy vector mesons are evaluated. The DHGHY sum rule is employed to fix the magnitude of the light vector meson contribution to g 1 , using the Recent measurements in the region of baryonic resonances. The DHGHY moment function is calculated. Predictions are compared to the data. (author)

  4. On QCD Q2-evolution of deuteron structure function F2D(xD, Q2) for xD>1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, A.V.; Tokarev, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    The deep-inelastic deuteron structure function (SF) F 2 D (x D ,Q 2 ) in the covariant approach in light-cone variables is considered. The x D and Q 2 -dependences of SF are calculated. The QCD analysis of generated data both for non-cumulative x D D >1 ranges was performed. It was shown that Q 2 -evolution of SF is valid for ranges 0.275 D D D -dependence of SF for the ranges is essentially different. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. On Combining High and Low Q2 Information on the Polarized Parton Densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leader, Elliot; Stamenov, Dimiter B.

    2000-01-01

    We draw attention to some problems in the combined use of high-Q 2 deep inelastic scattering (DIS) data and low-Q 2 hyperon β-decay data in the determination of the polarized parton densities. We explain why factorization schemes like the JET or AB schemes are the simplest in which to study the implications of the DIS parton densities for the physics of the low-Q 2 region. (author)

  6. QCD at low Q2 - a correspondence relation for moments of structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrempp, B.; Schrempp, F.

    1980-01-01

    The precocious validity of QCD predictions in deep inelastic lepton nucleon scattering and e + e - annihilation is interpreted as a signal for an underlying 'correspondence principle' relating perturbative and nonperturbative physics on the Q 2 average. Correspondence relations for nonsinglet moments of deep inelastic structure functions are formulated, discussed and successfully tested against experiment. The relations provide an independent determination of the QCD Λ-parameter from low Q 2 data in perfect agreement with results from large Q 2 analyses. (author)

  7. 31 CFR 30.2 - Q-2: To what entities does this part apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-2: To what entities does this part apply? 30.2 Section 30.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.2 Q-2: To what entities does this part apply? This...

  8. Mellin moments of heavy flavor contributions to F2(x,Q2) at NNLO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Sebastian Werner Gerhard

    2009-10-01

    The main parts of this thesis are the extension of the description of the contributions of heavy quark mass-effects to the deep-inelastic Wilson coefficients to NNLO. In course of that, we also obtain a first independent calculation of fixed moments of the fermionic parts of the NNLO anomalous dimensions. The calculation of the 3-loop heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in the whole Q 2 region is currently not within reach. However, a very precise description of the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients contributing to the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) at NLO is obtained for Q 2 >or similar 10 m Q 2 , disregarding the power corrections ∝(m Q 2 /Q 2 ) k , k ≥ 1. If one considers the charm quark, this covers an important region for deep-inelastic physics at HERA. In this limit, the massive Wilson coefficients factorize into universal massive operator matrix elements (OMEs) A ij (x, μ 2 /m Q 2 ) and the light flavor Wilson coefficients C (q,g),(2,L) (x,Q 2 /μ 2 ). The former are process independent quantities and describe all quark mass effects. They are given by matrix elements of the leading twist local composite operators O i between partonic states j (i, j = q, g), including quark masses. The process dependence is described by the massless Wilson coefficients. (orig.)

  9. Measurement of the $Q^2$ evolution of the photon structure function $F^{\\gamma}_{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1997-01-01

    New measurements are presented of the photon structure function F_2^gamma(Q) at four values of Q^2 between 9 and 59 GeV/c^2 based on data collected with the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161-172 GeV, with a total integrated luminosity of 18.1 pb^-1. The evolution of F_2^gamma with Q^2 in bins of x is determined in the Q^2 range from 1.86 to 135 GeV/c^2 using data taken at centre-of-mass energies of 91 GeV and 161-172 GeV. F_2^gamma is observed to increase with Q^2 with a slope of 1/alpha_em dF_2^gamma/dln(Q^2) = 0.10 +0.05 -0.03 measured in the range 0.1 < x < 0.6.

  10. The proton and deuteron F2 structure function at low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tvaskis, Vladas; Arrington, John; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, Oliver; Blok, Henk; Bosted, Peter; Boswell, Melissa; Bruell, Antje; Christy, Michael; Cochran, Anthony; Ent, Rolf; Filippone, Bradley; Gasparian, Ashot; Keppel, Cynthia; Kinney, Edward; Lapikas, L.; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Mack, David; Mammei, Juliette; Martin, J.W.; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Piercey, Rodney; Potterveld, David; Smith, Gregory; Spurlock, Kurt; Van der Steenhoven, Gerard; Stepanyan, Stepan; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Wood, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the proton and deuteron F2 structure functions are presented. The data, taken at Jefferson Lab Hall C, span the four-momentum transfer range 0:06 < Q2 < 2:8 GeV2, and Bjorken x values from 0.009 to 0.45, thus extending the knowledge of F2 to low values of Q2 at low x. Next-to-next-to-leading order calculations using recent parton distribution functions start to deviate from the data for Q2 < 2 GeV2 at the low and high x-values. Down to the lowest value of Q2, the structure function is in good agreement with a parameterization of F2 based on data that have been taken at much higher values of Q2 or much lower values of x, and which is constrained by data at the photon point. The ratio of the deuteron and proton structure functions at low x remains well described by a logarithmic dependence on Q2 at low Q2.

  11. Dipole model analysis of highest precision HERA data, including very low Q"2's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luszczak, A.; Kowalski, H.

    2016-12-01

    We analyse, within a dipole model, the final, inclusive HERA DIS cross section data in the low χ region, using fully correlated errors. We show, that these highest precision data are very well described within the dipole model framework starting from Q"2 values of 3.5 GeV"2 to the highest values of Q"2=250 GeV"2. To analyze the saturation effects we evaluated the data including also the very low 0.35< Q"2 GeV"2 region. The fits including this region show a preference of the saturation ansatz.

  12. Charged Particle Production in High Q2 Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    The average charged track multiplicity and the normalised distribution of the scaled momentum, $\\xp$, of charged final state hadrons are measured in deep-inelastic $\\ep$ scattering at high $Q^2$ in the Breit frame of reference. The analysis covers the range of photon virtuality $100 < Q^2 < 20 000 \\GeV^{2}$. Compared with previous results presented by HERA experiments this analysis has a significantly higher statistical precision and extends the phase space to higher $Q^{2}$ and to the full range of $\\xp$. The results are compared with $e^+e^-$ annihilation data and with various calculations based on perturbative QCD using different models of the hadronisation process.

  13. Charged particle production in high Q2 deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, F. D.; Aktas, A.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Avila, K. B. Cantun; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A. Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2007-10-01

    The average charged track multiplicity and the normalised distribution of the scaled momentum, xp, of charged final state hadrons are measured in deep-inelastic ep scattering at high Q2 in the Breit frame of reference. The analysis covers the range of photon virtuality 100 <Q2 < 20 000 GeV2. Compared with previous results presented by HERA experiments this analysis has a significantly higher statistical precision and extends the phase space to higher Q2 and to the full range of xp. The results are compared with e+e- annihilation data and with various calculations based on perturbative QCD using different models of the hadronisation process.

  14. On the Q2-dependence of quark and diquark fragmentation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, A.

    1988-01-01

    The Q 2 -dependence of quark and diquark fragmentation functions is studied by means of evolution equations and compared with the experimental data. Some comments on the evolution of charm quark fragmentation are also presented. 20 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  15. Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This document contains the fifth volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of the family and delinquency, examining the impact of parental behavior on the production of delinquent behavior. "Parents: Neglectful and Neglected" (Laurence D. Steinberg) posits…

  16. Measurement of the Q^{2} Dependence of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g_{1} and its Moments at Low Q^{2} with CLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, K P; Deur, A; El Fassi, L; Kang, H; Kuhn, S E; Ripani, M; Slifer, K; Zheng, X; Adhikari, S; Akbar, Z; Amaryan, M J; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Balossino, I; Barion, L; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Bosted, P; Briscoe, W J; Brock, J; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Thanh Cao, F; Carlin, C; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Charles, G; Chen, J-P; Chetry, T; Choi, S; Ciullo, G; Clark, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Defurne, M; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Drozdov, V; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Filippi, A; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnston, S C; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Kabir, M L; Keith, C D; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khachatryan, M; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kovacs, K; Kubarovsky, V; Lanza, L; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Long, E; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meekins, D G; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niculescu, G; Niccolai, S; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Payette, D; Phelps, W; Phillips, S K; Pierce, J; Pogorelko, O; Poudel, J; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Sharabian, Y G; Shigeyuki, T; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sparveris, N; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sulkosky, V; Taiuti, M; Tan, J A; Ungaro, M; Voutier, E; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W

    2018-02-09

    We measured the g_{1} spin structure function of the deuteron at low Q^{2}, where QCD can be approximated with chiral perturbation theory (χPT). The data cover the resonance region, up to an invariant mass of W≈1.9  GeV. The generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum, the moment Γ_{1}^{d} and the spin polarizability γ_{0}^{d} are precisely determined down to a minimum Q^{2} of 0.02  GeV^{2} for the first time, about 2.5 times lower than that of previous data. We compare them to several χPT calculations and models. These results are the first in a program of benchmark measurements of polarization observables in the χPT domain.

  17. Higher twist contributions to the structure functions Fp2(x,Q2) and Fd2(x,Q2) at large x at higher orders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Boettcher, H.

    2008-02-01

    The higher twist contributions to the deeply inelastic structure functions F p 2 (x,Q 2 ) and F d 2 (x,Q 2 ) for larger values of the Bjorken variable x are extracted extrapolating the twist-2 contributions measured in the large W 2 region to the region 4 GeV 2 ≤W 2 ≤12.5 GeV 2 applying target mass corrections. We compare the results for the NLO, NNLO and N 3 LO analyzes and include also the large x at N 4 LO to the Wilson coefficients. A gradual lowering of the higher twist contributions going from NLO to N 4 LO is observed, which stresses the importance of higher order corrections. (orig.)

  18. O(α3s) contributions to the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients of the structure function F2(x,Q2) at Q2>>m2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissbrock, Fabian Philipp

    2015-10-01

    At O(α s 3 ) the contribution of a single heavy quark to the unpolarized structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) in the asymptotic region Q 2 >>m 2 is written as a convolution of the light flavor Wilson coefficients and the process independent massive operator matrix elements. This thesis extends the present description to allow for the presence of two heavy quark flavors and presents the respective renormalization prescription and first analytic results for these contributions. Furthermore the remaining O(C A,F T F 2 N F ) contributions and various diagrams of more complex topologies have been computed analytically. On the mathematical side different evaluation techniques based on representations in terms of special functions, Mellin-Barnes representations and Hyperlogarithms have been worked out.

  19. Q2 dependence of the spin structure function in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Li, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin-dependent sum rules in deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry A 1 (x,Q 2 ) approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone cannot determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral ∫ 0 1 {A 1 (x,Q 2 )F 2 (x,Q 2 )/2x[1+R(x,Q 2 )]}dx is estimated from Q 2 =0--2.5 GeV 2 . The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important; thus it provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin-dependent sum rule

  20. Non-Commutative Integration, Zeta Functions and the Haar State for SU{sub q}(2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matassa, Marco, E-mail: marco.matassa@gmail.com [SISSA (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    We study a notion of non-commutative integration, in the spirit of modular spectral triples, for the quantum group SU{sub q}(2). In particular we define the non-commutative integral as the residue at the spectral dimension of a zeta function, which is constructed using a Dirac operator and a weight. We consider the Dirac operator introduced by Kaad and Senior and a family of weights depending on two parameters, which are related to the diagonal automorphisms of SU{sub q}(2). We show that, after fixing one of the parameters, the non-commutative integral coincides with the Haar state of SU{sub q}(2). Moreover we can impose an additional condition on the zeta function, which also fixes the second parameter. For this unique choice the spectral dimension coincides with the classical dimension.

  1. Neutron electric form factor up to Q2 = 1.47 GeV/c2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, Richard; Semenov, Andrei; Taylor, S.; Aghalaryan, Aram; Crouse, Erick; MacLachlan, Glen; Plaster, Bradley; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Chenyu Yan; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; Baker, O.; Alan Baldwin; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Christy, E.; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Areg Danagoulian; Donal Day; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; Manley, D.; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Smith, G.; Samuel Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; Watson, J. W.; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2003-01-01

    The ratio of the electric to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, g /equiv G En /G Mn , was measured via recoil polarimetry (R.G. Arnold, C.E. Carlson, F. Gross, Phys. Rev. C 23, 363 (1981)) from the quasielastic 2 H (/mathop(e)/limitse' /mathop(n)/limits) 1H reaction at three values of Q 2 (viz, 0.45, 1.15, and 1.47 (GeV/c) 2 ) in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The data reveal that GEn continues to follow the Galster parameterization up to Q 2 = 1.15 (GeV/c) 2 and rises above the Galster parameterization at Q 2 = 1.47 (GeV/c) 2

  2. Deuteron A(Q2) structure function and the neutron electric form factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platchkov, S.; Amroun, A.; Auffret, S.; Cavedon, J.M.; Dreux, P.; Duclos, J.; Frois, B.; Goutte, D.; Hachemi, H.; Martino, J.

    1989-01-01

    We present new measurements of the deuteron A(Q 2 ) structure function in the momentum transfer region between 1 and 18 fm -2 . The accuracy of the data ranges from 2% to 6%. We investigate the sensitivity of A(Q 2 ) to the nucleon-nucleon interaction and to the neutron electric form factor G E n . Our analysis shows that below 20 fm -2 G E n can be inferred from these data with a significantly improved accuracy. The model dependence of this analysis is discussed

  3. Thermodynamic properties of a quantum group boson gas GLp,q(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellal, Ahmed

    2000-10-01

    An approach is proposed enabling to effectively describe the behaviour of a bosonic system. The approach uses the quantum group GL p,q (2) formalism. In effect, considering a bosonic Hamiltonian in terms of the GL p,q (2) generators, it is shown that its thermodynamic properties are connected to deformation parameters p and q. For instance, the average number of particles and the pressure have been computed. If p is fixed to be the same value for q, our approach coincides perfectly with some results developed recently in this subject. The ordinary results, of the present system, can be found when we take the limit p = q = 1. (author)

  4. Q2 Dependence of Nuclear Transparency for Incoherent ρ0 Electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Arrington; Frank Dohrmann; Ahmed El Alaoui; Don Geesaman; Kawtar Hafidi; Roy Holt; Harold Jackson; David Potterveld; Brahim Mustapha; Paul Reimer; Elaine Schulte; Krishni Wijesooriya; Maurik Holtrop; Jacques Ball; Michel Garcon; Jean Laget; Franck Sabatie; Michel Guidal; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Borissov, A.; Wolfgang Lorenzon; Stepan Stepanyan; Lawrence Weinstein

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of exclusive incoherent electroproduction of ρ 0 (770) meson from 2 D, 12 C, and 63 Cu targets up to Q 2 = 4 GeV 2 are proposed using the CLAS detector. The objective of these measurements is to determine the Q 2 dependence of the nuclear transparency ratio for the two nuclear targets: 12 C and 63 Cu at fixed coherence length of quark-antiquark fluctuations of the virtual photon. A sizeable rise of the nuclear transparency is predicted and can be measured in this experiment. A relatively large increase of the nuclear transparency can be considered as a signature of the onset of color transparency

  5. CLT-koetalon lämpö- ja kosteusteknisen toiminnan analysointiraportti Q2/2014

    OpenAIRE

    Autioniemi, Juha; Pirttinen, Valtteri; Vatanen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    CLT-koetalo-projektin yhtenä päätavoitteena on tutkia CLT-materiaalin rakennusfysikaalista toimintaa Suomen haastavissa olosuhteissa. Tämä Q2-raportti on toinen CLT-koetalon lämpö- ja kosteusteknisen toiminnan analysointiraportista, joita julkaistaan vuoden 2014 aikana yhteensä neljä. Q2/2014 -raportissa analysoidaan Kemissä sijaitsevasta CLT-koetalon rakenteista saatua mittausdataa. Koetalon rakenteissa sijaitsee yhteensä 48 mittausanturia, jotka mittaavat lämpötilaa ja suhteellista kosteutt...

  6. Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic structure Function A(Q2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Abbott; A. Ahmidouch; H. Anklin; J. Arvieux; J. Bail; S. Beedoe; E. J. Beise; L. Bimbot; W. Boeglin; H. Breuer; R. Carlini; N. S. Chant; S. Danagoulian; K. Dow; J.E. Ducret; J. Dunne; R. Ent; L. Ewell; L. Eyraud; C. Furget; M. Garcon; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; P. Gucye; K. Gustafsson; K. Hafidi; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; S. Kox; G. Kumbartzki; L. Lu; A. Lung; D. Mack; P. Markowitz; J. McIntyre; D. Meekins; F. Merchez; J. Mitchell; R. Mohring; S. Mtingwa; H. Mrktchyan; D. Pitz; L. Qin; R. Ransome; J.S. Real; P. G. Roos; P. Rutt; R. Sawafta; S. Stepanyan; R. Tieulent; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; W. Turchinetz; K. Vansyoc; J. Volmer; E. Voutier; W. Vulcan; C. Williamson; S. A. Wood; C. Yan; J. Zhao; W. Zhao

    1999-01-01

    The A(Q 2 ) structure function in elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured at six momentum transfers Q 2 between 0.66 and 1.80 (GeV/c) 2 in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. The scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence, at a fixed deuteron angle of 60.5 o . These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older sets of data. They put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure, and on the strength of isoscalar meson exchange currents

  7. Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2 )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Ducret, J.; Garcon, M.; Hafidi, K.; Pitz, D.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Honegger, A.; Jourdan, J.; Zhao, J.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Chant, N.S.; Ewell, L.; Gustafsson, K.; Lung, A.; Mohring, R.; Pitz, D.; Roos, P.G.; Eyraud, L.; Furget, C.; Kox, S.; Lu, L.; Merchez, F.; Real, J.; Tieulent, R.; Voutier, E.; Abbott, D.; Carlini, R.; Dunne, J.; Ent, R.; Gilman, R.; Gueye, P.; Mack, D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J.; Pitz, D.; Qin, L.; Vansyoc, K.; Volmer, J.; Vulcan, W.; Wood, S.A.; Yan, C.; Gilman, R.; Glashausser, C.; Kumbartzki, G.; McIntyre, J.; Ransome, R.; Rutt, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Dow, K.; Turchinetz, W.; Williamson, C.; Zhao, W.; Anklin, H.; Boeglin, W.; Markowitz, P.; Mrktchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Beedoe, S.; Danagoulian, S.; Mtingwa, S.; Sawafta, R.; Arvieux, J.; Ball, J.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Arvieux, J.; Bimbot, L.

    1999-01-01

    The A(Q 2 ) structure function in elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured at six momentum transfers Q 2 between 0.66 and 1.80 (GeV/c) 2 in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. The scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence, at a fixed deuteron angle of 60.5 degree. These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older sets of data. They put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure, and on the strength of isoscalar meson exchange currents. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  8. Lower bounds for ν and Q2 values leading to scaling in the simple parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nataf, R.S.

    1979-06-01

    The simple parton model leads to the Bjorken scaling law only for rather large values of the transfer. For small values, the scale invariance is broken by a purely kinematical effect which is shown to depend on: (1+(4M 2 x 2 /Q 2 ))sup(1/2)-1, M being the mass of the target nucleon. Thus, one has to consider: ν>=5M (5GeV) and: Q 2 >=10M 2 x (9GeV/c) 2 for the whole x range) if it is demanded that scaling holds within 10% to error

  9. Measurement of αs(Q2) from the Gross endash Llewellyn Smith Sum Rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.A.; Vakili, M.; Kim, J.H.; Arroyo, C.G.; Bazarko, A.O.; Conrad, J.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; McNulty, C.; Mishra, S.R.; Quintas, P.Z.; Romosan, A.; Schellman, H.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; Bernstein, R.H.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; McFarland, K.S.; Yu, J.; Bolton, T.; Naples, D.; Barbaro, L. de; Harris, D.A.; Barbaro, P. de; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Yang, U.K.; Kinnel, T.; Smith, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    We extract a set of values for the Gross endash Llewellyn Smith sum rule at different values of 4-momentum transfer squared (Q 2 ), by combining revised CCFR neutrino data with data from other neutrino deep-inelastic scattering experiments for 1 2 2 /c 2 . A comparison with the order α 3 s theoretical predictions yields a determination of α s at the scale of the Z -boson mass of 0.114± 0.009 0.012 . This measurement provides a new and useful test of perturbative QCD at low Q 2 , because of the low uncertainties in the higher order calculations. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  10. A characterization of the desarguesian planes of order q2 by SL(2,q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Foulser

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The main result is that if the translation complement of a translation plane of order q2 contains a group isomorphic to SL(2,q and if the subgroups of order q are elations (shears, then the plane is Desarguesian. This generalizes earlier work of Walker, who assumed that the kernel of the plane contained GF(q.

  11. Measuring the Neutron and 3He Spin Structure at Low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vince Sulkosky

    2005-01-01

    The spin structure of the nucleon has been of great interest over the past few decades. Sum rules, including the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH), and moments of the spin structure functions are powerful tools for understanding nucleon structure. The GDH sum rule, originally derived for real photon absorption, has been generalized to nonzero Q 2 . The goal of Jefferson Lab experiment E97-110 is to perform a precise measurement of the Q 2 dependence of the generalized GDH integral and of the moments of the neutron and 3 He spin structure functions between 0.02 and 0.3 GeV 2 . This Q 2 range will allow us to test predictions of Chiral Perturbation Theory, and verify the GDH sum rule by extrapolating the integral to the real photon point. The measurement will also contribute to the understanding of nucleon resonances. The data have been taken in Hall A using a high resolution spectrometer with the addition of a septum magnet, which allowed us to access the low Q 2 region. The analysis's status, prospects and impact will be discussed

  12. Light meson form factors at high Q2 from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Jonna; Zimermmane-Santos, André; Davies, Christine; Lepage, G. Peter; Lytle, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    Measurements and theoretical calculations of meson form factors are essential for our understanding of internal hadron structure and QCD, the dynamics that bind the quarks in hadrons. The pion electromagnetic form factor has been measured at small space-like momentum transfer |q2| theory is applicable. This leaves a gap in the intermediate Q2 where the form factors are not known. As a part of their 12 GeV upgrade Jefferson Lab will measure pion and kaon form factors in this intermediate region, up to Q2 of 6 GeV2. This is then an ideal opportunity for lattice QCD to make an accurate prediction ahead of the experimental results. Lattice QCD provides a from-first-principles approach to calculate form factors, and the challenge here is to control the statistical and systematic uncertainties as errors grow when going to higher Q2 values. Here we report on a calculation that tests the method using an ηs meson, a 'heavy pion' made of strange quarks, and also present preliminary results for kaon and pion form factors. We use the nf = 2 + 1 + 1 ensembles made by the MILC collaboration and Highly Improved Staggered Quarks, which allows us to obtain high statistics. The HISQ action is also designed to have small dicretisation errors. Using several light quark masses and lattice spacings allows us to control the chiral and continuum extrapolation and keep systematic errors in check. Warning, no authors found for 2018EPJWC.17506016.

  13. Ytarget optimization for E93050 experiment. Pt. 1. Q2 = 1 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaminion, S.; Fonvieille, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Espace y tg optimization that has been performed for experiment E93050 at Q 2 = 1 GeV 2 is summarized. The method and results are presented. The optic Y tensor elements obtained can be used for first pass analysis, although a more refined analysis may need further optimized optic elements. (author)

  14. On the behaviour of DIS structure function ratio R(x, Q2) at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotikov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    The behaviour of deep inelastic structure functions is studied at small x in the leading and next-to-leading orders of perturbation theory. The scheme-invariant analysis for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions ratio R(x, Q 2 ), is given. It is found that this ratio tends to zero asymptotically when x -> 0. (author). 12 refs.; 1 fig

  15. Statistical Analysis of Poverty in Oyo-State: A Q 2 -Approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The limited scope of uni-dimensional money-metric approach of analyzing poverty based on either expenditure or income has made approaches that allow poverty to be studied at several dimensions a necessity. It is in the light of this, that this study was aimed at analyzing poverty in Oyo State using a Q2-approach.

  16. Experimental study of the photon structure function F2 in the high Q2 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, W.; Cords, D.; Dietrich, G.; Dittmann, P.; Eichler, R.; Felst, R.; Haidt, D.; Krehbiel, H.; Meier, K.; Naroska, B.

    1982-09-01

    We report on a measurement of the process e + e - → e + e - + hadrons, where one of the scattered electron is detected at large angles, with an average Q 2 of 23 GeV 2 . The results are analysed in terms of the photon structure function F 2 and are compared with QCD predictions. (orig.)

  17. QCD calculation of π0γγ vertex at equal Euclidean q2 of both photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshin, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The form factor of the π 6 γγ vertex at equal space-like four- momentum q 2 of the photons (q 1 2 =q 2 2 =-Q 2 ) and a small four- momentum p 2 of the pion is calculated within QCD. Explicit expressions for leading perturbative and non perturbative preasymptotic corrections are derived. To find the latter correction matrix elements of operators of dimension d=5 between the pion and vacuum are calculated. The result for the form factor smoothly matches at Q 2 approximately 0.5 GeV 2 the estimate based on the vector mesom dominance model [ru

  18. Evaluation of two new STR loci 9q2h2 and wg3f12 in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, M; Huang, X L; Tamaki, K; Yoshimoto, T; Uchihi, R; Yamamoto, T; Katsumata, Y; Armour, J A

    1999-09-01

    Two short tandem repeat (STR) loci (9q2h2 and wg3f12) have been evaluated in a Japanese population. Ten and seven different alleles were observed in 9q2h2 and wg3f12 respectively. 9q2h2 displayed simple polymorphism in tetrameric repeat structure; by contrast, wg3f12 contained variable numbers of tetrameric repeats and a 30-bp deletion/insertion polymorphism. No "interalleles" were found. The expected heterozygosities of 9q2h2 and wg3fl2 were 0.749 and 0.574, respectively. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was found.

  19. Measurement of the proton structure function F2 at low χand low Q2 at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-10-01

    We report on a measurement of the proton structure function F 2 in the range 3.5x10 -5 ≤x≤4x10 -3 and 1.5 GeV 2 ≤Q 2 ≤15 GeV 2 at the ep collider HERA operating at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=300 GeV. The rise of F 2 with decreasing x observed in the previous HERA measurements persists in this lower x and Q 2 range. The Q 2 evolution of F 2 , even at the lowest Q 2 and x measured, is consistent with perturbative QCD. (orig.)

  20. The Q2 and Transverse Momentum Dependence of Jet Production in Photon-Photon Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylka, Allan Joseph

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of jet production in photon-photon interactions is presented. The study is based on events collected with the PLUTO detector at the e + e - storage ring PETRA. The data sample, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ∼40 pb -1 taken at an e + e - center-of- mass energy of 34.6 GeV, consists of 1226 events in the so-called 'single-tagged' mode, in which only one of the scattered beam electrons is detected. The data sample extends over the kinematic ranges 0.1 < Q 2 < 18.0. GeV , where Q 2 is the squared invariant mass of the tagged virtual photon, and jet transverse momentum (p T ) up to ∼5 GeV/c, where p T is measured with respect to the photon-photon collision axis in the center-of-mass frame of the observed hadrons. At all Q 2 the data show a high p T tail characteristic of hard, point-like interactions, as exemplified by the fundamental reaction γγ → qq-bar. The jet production cross-section approaches the standard Quark Parton Model (QPM) expectation for fractionally-charged quarks of three colors from above as either Q 2 or jet p T increases. At Q 2 ≥ 10 GeV the observed cross-section is consistent with the standard QPM to within ∼20% statistical uncertainty at all values of p T . This result rules out the naive Han-Nambu integrally-charged quark model at a level of about five standard deviations. It is demonstrated that overall the data are consistent with the hypothesis of a two-jet final state. Moreover, the total jet production cross-section is shown to be well-described by an incoherent sum of the Generalized Vector Dominance Model (GVDM), for which the final state is hadronized as two oppositely-directed low p T jets, and the QPM, which accounts for final states consisting of two high p T jets. Some discrepancies between the data and the GVDM+QPM Ansatz are observed. At Q 2 ≤ 1 GeV 2 and 1.5 ≤ jet p T ≤ 4.0 GeV/c, the data lie systematically above the GVDM+QPM prediction. The thrust distribution

  1. Evidence for short range corelations from high Q2 (e,e') reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strikman, M.I.; Frankfurt, L.L.; Sargayan, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    For many years now short-range correlations (SRC) in nuclei have been considered as an essential feature of the nuclear wave function. At high energy (e,e') reactions, where Q 2 > 1 (GeV/c) 2 , x = Q 2 /2mq o > 1 and 1 GeV > q o > 300 ∼ 400 MeV the scattering from low momentum nucleons is kinematically suppressed and there the evidence of SRC expected to be more prominent. These reactions have been intensively investigated during the last decade or so at SLAC on both light and heavy nuclei. The above kinematics allows one to compute the cross section through the processes local in space. To explain this the authors analyse the representation of the cross section as a Fourier transform of the commutator of electromagnetic currents and see that the major contribution in the cross section is given by the region of integration

  2. Q2 evolution of generalized Baldin sum rule for the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Y.; Christy, M. E.; Ent, R.; Keppel, C. E.

    2006-01-01

    The generalized Baldin sum rule for virtual photon scattering, the unpolarized analogy of the generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn integral provides an important way to investigate the transition between perturbative QCD and hadronic descriptions of nucleon structure. This sum rule requires integration of the nucleon structure function F 1 , which until recently had not been measured at low Q 2 and large x, i.e., in the nucleon resonance region. This work uses new data from inclusive electron-proton scattering in the resonance region obtained at Jefferson Lab, in combination with SLAC deep inelastic scattering data, to present first precision measurements of the generalized Baldin integral for the proton in the Q 2 range of 0.3 to 4.0 GeV 2

  3. A set of sums for continuous dual q-2-Hahn polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gade, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    An infinite set {τ (l) (y;r,z)} r,lisanelementofN 0 of linear sums of continuous dual q -2 -Hahn polynomials with prefactors depending on a complex parameter z is studied. The sums τ (l) (y;r,z) have an interpretation in context with tensor product representations of the quantum affine algebra U q ' (sl(2)) involving both a positive and a negative discrete series representation. For each l>0, the sum τ (l) (y;r,z) can be expressed in terms of the sum τ (0) (y;r,z), continuous dual q 2 -Hahn polynomials, and their associated polynomials. The sum τ (0) (y;r,z) is obtained as a combination of eight basic hypergeometric series. Moreover, an integral representation is provided for the sums τ (l) (y;r,z) with the complex parameter restricted by |zq| -2 -Hahn polynomials.

  4. Measurement of the proton structure function FL(x,Q2) at low x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.

    2008-05-01

    A first measurement is reported of the longitudinal proton structure function F L (x,Q 2 ) at the ep collider HERA. It is based on inclusive deep inelastic e + p scattering cross section measurements with a positron beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 575 and 460 GeV. Employing the energy dependence of the cross section, F L is measured in a range of squared four-momentum transfers 12≤Q 2 ≤90 GeV 2 and low Bjorken x 0.00024≤x≤0.0036. The FL values agree with higher order QCD calculations based on parton densities obtained using cross section data previously measured at HERA. (orig.)

  5. Violations of the Callan-Gross relation as function of X,Q2 from QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Arroyo, A.

    1980-07-01

    The Callan-Gross relation, originally based on the parton model, predicts that, in (say) electroproduction, sigmasub(L)/sigmasub(T) = 0. When QCD corrections are taken into account this relation gets modified by terms of order αsub(c)(Q 2 ). We define R approximately sigmasub(L)/sigmasub(T) to measure the violation of the Callan-Gross relation. One can obtain exactly the behaviour of R(x,Q 2 ) at the endpoints x = 0,1 from QCD. This will incidentally allow us to write a simple and explicit parametrization, which is exact at x = 0,1 and a good approximation at all other x. We will carry out the analysis for proton targets and e, μ projectiles; the extension to ν scattering or other targets is straightforward

  6. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2009-12-01

    A high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio µpGEp/GMp in the range Q2 = 0.3–0.7 GeV2/c2 was performed using recoil polarimetry in Jefferson Lab Hall A. In this low Q2 range, previous data from LEDEX [5] along with many fits and calculations [2, 3, 4] indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. In this new measurement, with 80% polarized electron beam for 24 days, we are able to achieve <1% statistical uncertainty. Preliminary results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, indicating a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the improved form factor measurements also have implications for DVCS, determinations of the proton Zemach radius and strangeness form factors through parity violation experiments.

  7. Measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section at low Q2 and x at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Preda, T.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Boer, Y. de; Roeck, A. de; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Glazov, A.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Janssen, M.E.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; List, J.; Marti, L.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Rurikova, Z.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Asmone, A.; Stella, B.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Gouzevitch, M.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Olivier, B.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Del Degan, M.; Grab, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Sauter, M.; Zimmermann, T.; Dodonov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Povh, B.; Eckstein, D.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lobodzinska, E.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Habib, S.; Jemanov, V.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Naroska, B.; Hansson, M.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Meier, K.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Schmitz, C.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Schoening, A.; Tsakov, I.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV 2 ≤Q 2 ≤12 GeV 2 , and low Bjorken x, 5.10 -6 ≤x≤0.02. The result is based on two data sets collected in dedicated runs by the H1 Collaboration at HERA at beam energies of 27.6 GeV and 920 GeV for positrons and protons, respectively. A combination with data previously published by H1 leads to a cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q 2 and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Section at Low Q^2 and x at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lastovicka, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 12 GeV^2, and low Bjorken x, 5x10^-6 < x < 0.02. The result is based on two data sets collected in dedicated runs by the H1 Collaboration at HERA at beam energies of 27.6 GeV and 920 GeV for positrons and protons, respectively. A combination with data previously published by H1 leads to a cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q^2 and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering.

  9. Jet Production in ep Collisions at High $Q^2$ and Determination of $\\alpha_s$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic ep scattering at large negative four momentum transfer squared 150<Q^2<15000 GeV^2 using HERA data taken in 1999-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 395 pb^-1. Inclusive jet, 2-jet and 3-jet cross sections, normalised to the neutral current deep-inelastic scattering cross sections, are measured as functions of Q^2, jet transverse momentum and proton momentum fraction. The measurements are well described by perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects. The strong coupling as determined from these measurements is alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1168 +/-0.0007 (exp.) +0.0046/-0.0030 (th.) +/-0.0016(pdf).

  10. Jet Production in ep Collisions at Low Q^2 and Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kosior, E.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Tabasco, J.E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic e+p scattering at low negative four momentum transfer squared 5<Q^2<100 GeV^2 and at inelasticity 0.2Q^2 and jet transverse momentum. The 2-jet cross section is also measured as a function of the proton momentum fraction xi. The measurements are well described by perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects and are subsequently used to extract the strong coupling alpha_s.

  11. Measurement of the proton structure function FL (x ,Q2) at low x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, F. D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2008-07-01

    A first measurement is reported of the longitudinal proton structure function FL (x ,Q2) at the ep collider HERA. It is based on inclusive deep inelastic e+ p scattering cross section measurements with a positron beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 575 and 460 GeV. Employing the energy dependence of the cross section, FL is measured in a range of squared four-momentum transfers 12 ⩽Q2 ⩽ 90 GeV2 and low Bjorken x 0.00024 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.0036. The FL values agree with higher order QCD calculations based on parton densities obtained using cross section data previously measured at HERA.

  12. A new method of distinguishing models of the high-Q2 events at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Z.; He, X.G.; McKellar, B.

    1997-07-01

    A new method is proposed to distinguish models for the high Q 2 e + p → e + X anomaly at HERA by looking at a new observable which is insensitive to parton distribution function (PDF), but sensitive to new physics. Three models have been considered: modification of PDF's, new physics due to s-channel production of new particle and new physics due to contact interactions. Using this new method it is possible to distinguish different models with increased luminosity

  13. Measurements of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2) for 0.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. C. Alexa; B. D. Anderson; K. A. Aniol; K. Arundell; L. Auerbach; F. T. Baker; J. Berthot; P. Y. Bertin; W. Bertozzi; L. Bimbot; W. U. Boeglin; E. J. Brash; V. Breton; H. Breuer; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; L. S. Cardman; C. Cavata; C.-C. Chang; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; D. S. Dale; N. Degrande; R. De Leo; A. Deur; N. d'Hose; B. Diederich; J. J. Domingo; M. B. Epstein; L. A. Ewell; J. M. Finn; K. G. Fissum; H. Fonvieille; B. Frois; S. Frullani; H. Gao; J. Gao; F. Garibaldi; A. Gasparian,; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; J. Gomez; V. Gorbenko; J.-O. Hansen; R. Holmes; M. Holtrop; C. Howell; G. M. Huber; C. Hyde-Wright; M. Iodice; C. W. de Jager; S. Jaminion; J. Jardillier; M. K. Jones; C. Jutier,; W. Kahl; S. Kato; A. T. Katramatou; J. J. Kelly; S. Kerhoas; A. Ketikyan; M. Khayat; K. Kino; L. H. Kramer; K. S. Kumar; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; G. Lavessiere; A. Leone; J. J. LeRose; M. Liang; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; R. Madey,; K. Maeda; S. Malov; D. M. Manley; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; J. Marroncle; J. Martino; C. J. Martoff; K. McCormick; J. McIntyre; R. L. J. van der Meer; S. Mehrabyan; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; G. W. Miller; J. Y. Mougey; S. K. Nanda; D. Neyret; E. A. J. M. Offermann; Z. Papandreou; C. F. Perdrisat; R. Perrino; G. G. Petratos; S. Platchkov; R. Pomatsalyuk; D. L. Prout; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; G. Quemener; R. D. Ransome; O. Ravel; Y. Roblin; D. Rowntree; G. Rutledge; P. M. Rutt; A. Saha; T. Saito; A. J. Sarty; A. Serdarevic,; T. Smith; K. Soldi; P. Sorokin; P. A. Souder; R. Suleiman; J. A. Templon; T. Terasawa; L. Todor; H. Tsubota; H. Ueno; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. Van Hoorebeke; P. Vernin; B. Vlahovic; H. Voskanyan; J. W. Watson; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; R. Wilson; B. B. Wojtsekhowski; D. G. Zainea; W-M. Zhang; J. Zhao; Z.-L. Zhou

    1999-01-01

    The deuteron elastic structure function A(Q 2 ) has been extracted in the range 0.7 2 2 from cross section measurements of elastic electron-deuteron scattering in coincidence using the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Laboratory. The data are compared to theoretical models, based on the impulse approximation with the inclusion of meson-exchange currents, and to predictions of quark dimensional scaling and perturbative quantum chromodynamics

  14. Nuclear effects in the F3 structure function for finite and asymptotic Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    We study nuclear effects in the structure function F 3 which describes the parity violating part of the charged-current neutrino nucleon deep inelastic scattering. Starting from a covariant approach we derive a factorized expression for the nuclear structure function in terms of the nuclear spectral function and off-shell nucleon structure functions valid for arbitrary momentum transfer Q and in the limit of weak nuclear binding, i.e. when a nucleus can be treated as a non-relativistic system. We develop a systematic expansion of nuclear structure functions in terms of a Q -2 series caused by nuclear effects (''nuclear twist'' series). Basing ourselves on this expansion we calculate nuclear corrections to the Gross-Llewellyn-Smith sum rule as well as to higher moments of F 3 . We show that corrections to the GLS sum rule due to nuclear effects cancel out in the Bjorken limit and calculate the corresponding Q -2 correction. Special attention is paid to the discussion of the off-shell effects in the structure functions. A sizable impact of these effects both on the Q 2 and x dependence of nuclear structure functions is found. (orig.)

  15. When semantics turns to substance: reformulating QCD analysis of F2{γ}(x,Q2)}

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyla, J.

    2000-01-01

    QCD analysis of F 2 {γ} (x,Q 2 ) is revisited. It is emphasized that the presence of the inhomogeneous term in the evolution equations for quark distribution functions of the photon implies important difference in the way factorization mechanism works in photon-hadron and photon-photon collisions as compared to the hadronic ones. Moreover, a careful definitions of the very concepts of the ''leading order'' and ''next-to-leading order'' QCD analysis of F 2 {γ} are needed in order to separate genuine QCD effects from those of pure QED origin. After presenting such definitions, I show that all existing allegedly LO, as well as NLO analyses of F 2 {γ} (x,Q 2 ) are incomplete. The source of this incompleteness of the conventional approach is traced back to the lack of clear identification of QCD effects and to the misinterpretation of the behaviour of q {γ} (x,M) as a function of /α s (M). Complete LO and NLO QCD analyses of F 2 {γ} (x,Q 2 ) are shown to differ substantially from the conventional ones. Whereas complete NLO analysis requires the knowledge of two so far uncalculated quantities, a complete LO one is currently possible, but compared to the conventional formulation requires the inclusion of four known, but in the existing LO analyses unused quantities. The arguments recently advanced in favour of the conventional approach are analyzed and shown to contain a serious flaw. If corrected, they actually lend support to my claim. (author)

  16. One Adaptive Synchronization Approach for Fractional-Order Chaotic System with Fractional-Order 1 < q < 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Bai, Rongji

    2014-01-01

    Based on a new stability result of equilibrium point in nonlinear fractional-order systems for fractional-order lying in 1 < q < 2, one adaptive synchronization approach is established. The adaptive synchronization for the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system with fractional-order 1 < q < 2 is considered. Numerical simulations show the validity and feasibility of the proposed scheme. PMID:25247207

  17. One Adaptive Synchronization Approach for Fractional-Order Chaotic System with Fractional-Order 1<q<2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a new stability result of equilibrium point in nonlinear fractional-order systems for fractional-order lying in 1<q<2, one adaptive synchronization approach is established. The adaptive synchronization for the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system with fractional-order 1<q<2 is considered. Numerical simulations show the validity and feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  18. Measurement of charged and neutral current e-p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-03-01

    Deep inelastic e - p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared, Q 2 , between 400 GeV 2 and the kinematic limit of 87500 GeV 2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections, dσ/dQ 2 , are presented. For Q 2 ∝M W 2 , where M W is the mass of the W boson, the CC and NC cross sections have comparable magnitudes, demonstrating the equal strengths of the weak and electromagnetic interactions at high Q 2 . The Q 2 dependence of the CC cross section determines the mass term in the CC propagator to be M W =76±16±13 GeV. (orig.)

  19. Self-esteem, political efficacy, and perceived parental attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Okçu, Tuba Nur; Okcu, Tuba Nur

    2007-01-01

    This thesis proposes to test the following three hypotheses: perceived political efficacy positively correlates with self-esteem; self-esteem positively correlates with perceived democratic parental attitude; and, lastly, self-esteem negatively correlates with perceived protective-demanding and perceived authoritarian parental attitudes. Two questionnaires (Q1 and Q2), each measure perceived political efficacy, selfesteem,and perceived parental attitudes. In Q2, the items of self-esteem and p...

  20. Nonpointlike-parton model with asymptotic scaling and with scaling violationat moderate Q2 values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    A nonpointlike-parton model is formulated on the basis of the assumption of energy-independent total cross sections of partons and the current-algebra sum rules. No specific strong-interaction Lagrangian density is introduced in this approach. This model predicts asymptotic scaling for the inelastic structure functions of nucleons on the one hand and scaling violation at moderate Q 2 values on the other hand. The predicted scaling-violation patterns at moderate Q 2 values are consistent with the observed scaling-violation patterns. A numerical fit of F 2 functions is performed in order to demonstrate that the predicted scaling-violation patterns of this model at moderate Q 2 values fit the data, and to see how the predicted asymptotic scaling behavior sets in at various x values. Explicit analytic forms of F 2 functions are obtained from this numerical fit, and are compared in detail with the analytic forms of F 2 functions obtained from the numerical fit of the quantum-chromodynamics (QCD) parton model. This comparison shows that this nonpointlike-parton model fits the data better than the QCD parton model, especially at large and small x values. Nachtman moments are computed from the F 2 functions of this model and are shown to agree with data well. It is also shown that the two-dimensional plot of the logarithm of a nonsinglet moment versus the logarithm of another such moment is not a good way to distinguish this nonpointlike-parton model from the QCD parton model

  1. Variation of multiplicity and transverse energy flow with W2 and Q2 in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmander, H.

    1995-04-01

    Charged particle and transverse energy flow for deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA have been investigated in the hadronic center of mass systems as a function of pseudorapidity η* in different W 2 and Q 2 intervals. In addition, the mean charged particle multiplicity ch > and the mean transverse energy * Τ > as a function of W 2 and Q 2 have been studied. The measurements were made in the kinematic region 85 2 2 . The ch > was found to increase with increasing W 2 at fixed Q 2 but did not show any significant dependence on Q 2 at fixed W 2 . The best description of the mean charged multiplicity is given by ch >=a+b·ln(W 2 /GeV 2 ) with a=-1.38±0.07 and b=0.93±0.05. The * Τ > increased both with increasing W 2 at fixed Q 2 and with increasing Q 2 at fixed W 2 . The mean transverse energy is described by * Τ >=a+b·ln(W 2 /GeV 2 )+c·ln (Q 2 /GeV 2 )GeV with a=-5.93±0.07, b=1.28±0.06 and c=0.69±0.02. Different QCD models have been compared with data. Only the Color Dipole Model, as implemented in the Monte Carlo program Ariadne, describes the data satisfactorily. 29 refs

  2. Jet production in ep collisions at low Q 2 and determination of αs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Antunovic, B.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kosior, E.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Marti, Ll.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Brinkmann, M.; Habib, S.; List, B.; Pokorny, B.; Toll, T.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Grab, C.; Zimmermann, T.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Stella, B.; Tsakov, I.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic e + p scattering at low negative four momentum transfer squared 5 2 2 and at inelasticity 0.2 -1 . Inclusive jet, 2-jet and 3-jet cross sections as well as the ratio of 3-jet to 2-jet cross sections are measured as a function of Q 2 and jet transverse momentum. The 2-jet cross section is also measured as a function of the proton momentum fraction ξ. The measurements are well described by perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects and are subsequently used to extract the strong coupling α s . (orig.)

  3. The hadronic component of the photon structure function F2γ(Q2, x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotsman, E.

    1988-01-01

    The quality of the high Q 2 data presently available in photon-photon scattering, is not sufficient to allow for a unique determination of the QCD parameter Λ (as it is strongly correlated with the hadronic component of the photon). The authors show that a combination of the QPM point-like cross section and a hadronic cross section given by a simple power expansion in energy, provides a good description of the experimental photon structure function and photon-photon total cross section

  4. Hunting Down Interpretations of the HERA Large-$Q^{2}$ data

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Possible interpretations of the HERA large-Q^2 data are reviewed briefly. The possibility of statistical fluctuations cannot be ruled out, and it seems premature to argue that the H1 and ZEUS anomalies are incompatible. The data cannot be explained away by modifications of parton distributions, nor do contact interactions help. A leptoquark interpretation would need a large tau-q branching ratio. Several R-violating squark interpretations are still viable despite all the constraints, and offer interesting experimental signatures, but please do not hold your breath.

  5. On propagation of sound waves in Q2D conductors in a quantizing magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichenko, O V; Galbova, O; Ivanovski, G; Krstovska, D

    2003-01-01

    The attenuation of sound waves propagating normally to the layers of a Q2D conductor is analysed at low enough temperatures when quantization of the energy of conduction electrons results in an oscillatory dependence of the sound attenuation rate on the inverse magnetic field. The sound wave decrement is found for different orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the layers. A layered conductor is shown to be most transparent in the case when the magnetic field is orthogonal to the layers.

  6. Two-photon collisions at very low Q2 from LEP2. Forthcoming results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almehed, S.; Jarlskog, G.; Mjornmark, U.; Nygren, A.; Zimin, N.; Kapusta, F.; Tyapkin, I.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental results that may soon be obtained in two-photon collisions at very low momentum transfer Q 2 at LEP2 are reviewed. A kinematical range is presented for both the forward and very forward detectors used to measure scattered electrons and positrons. A new acceptance, after this year's upgrade of the beam pipe at the position of the very forward detectors, is evaluated. The corresponding statistics is calculated for an integrated luminosity of 400 pb -1 , that must be collected by the end of LEP2 operation according to current plans

  7. On propagation of sound waves in Q2D conductors in a quantizing magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichenko, O.V.; Peschansky, V.G.; Galbova, O.; Ivanovski, G.; Krstovska, D.

    2003-01-01

    The attenuation of sound waves propagating normally to the layers of a Q2D conductor is analysed at low enough temperatures when quantization of the energy of conduction electrons results in an oscillatory dependence of the sound attenuation rate on the inverse magnetic field. The sound wave decrement is found for different orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the layers. A layered conductor is shown to be most transparent in the case when the magnetic field is orthogonal to the layers

  8. Measurement of charged and neutral current e-p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R.L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.; Katz, U.F.; Mari, S.M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, C.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G.P.; Heath, H.F.; Llewellyn, T.J.; Morgado, C.J.S.; Norman, D.J.P.; O'Mara, J.A.; Tapper, R.J.; Wilson, S.S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R.R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J.A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P.B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jelen, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Kotanski, A.; Przybycien, M.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J.K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasinski, M.; Gilkinson, D.J.; Glasman, C.; Goettlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Koepke, L.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Loehr, B.; Loewe, M.; Lueke, D.; Manczak, O.; Ng, J.S.T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.

    1995-01-01

    Deep inelastic e - p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared Q 2 above 400GeV 2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 are presented. From the Q 2 dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be M W =76±16±13 GeV

  9. Electroproduction of $\\phi(1020)$ Mesons at High $Q^2$ with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Joseph; Smith, Elton; Garcon, Michel; Guidal, Michel; Laget, Jean; Weiss, Christian; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, James; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crannell, Hall; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Sanctis, Enzo; De Vita, Raffaella; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feuerbach, Robert; Ficenec, John; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Park, Sungkyun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, A

    2008-08-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.025210
    Electroproduction of exclusive $\\phi$ vector mesons has been studied with the CLAS detector in the kinematical range $1.6\\leq Q^2\\leq 3.8$ GeV$^{2}$, $0.0\\leq t^{\\prime}\\leq 3.6$ GeV$^{2}$, and $2.0\\leq W\\leq 3.0$ GeV. The scaling exponent for the total cross section as $1/(Q^2+M_{\\phi}^2)^n$ was determined to be $n=2.49\\pm 0.33$. The slope of the four-momentum transfer $t'$ distribution is $b_{\\phi}=0.98 \\pm 0.17$ GeV$^{-2}$. The data are consistent with the assumption of s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC). Under this assumption, we determine the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross sections to be $R=0.86 \\pm 0.24$. A 2-gluon exchange model is able to reproduce the main features of the data.

  10. Measurement of high-Q2 charged current cross sections in e+p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautenberg, J.

    2004-06-01

    Cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering have been measured in e + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the running periods 1999 and 2000 correspond to an integrated luminosity of 61 pb -1 . Single differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy have been measured for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 , as well as the double differential reduced cross section d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 in the kinematic range 280 GeV 2 2 2 and 0.008 - p charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections. The helicity structure is investigated in particular. The mass of the space-like W boson propagator has been determined from a fit to dσ/dQ 2 . (orig.)

  11. The Q2-Dependence of the Gross-Llewellyn Smith Sum Rule and of the Parton Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataev, A.L.; AN SSSR, Moscow; Sidorov, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the results of our recent work on the determination of the value of the parameter Λ and of the Q 2 -dependence of the Gross-Llewellyn Smith (GLS) sum rule from the experimental data of the CCFR collaboration on neutrino-nucleon deep inelastic scattering, using the Jacobi polynomials QCD analysis. The new information on the Q 2 -dependence of the parton distributions is presented. 37 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Influence of Alkali Metal Substitution on the Phase Transition Behavior of CsGaQ2 (Q = S, Se

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Friedrich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The formation of solid solution series Cs1−xMxGaQ2-mC64 (M = K, Rb; Q = S, Se; x = 0–1 was studied by X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic methods, revealing a complete miscibility of CsGaQ2-mC64 with RbGaQ2 and KGaSe2, and a large miscibility gap with KGaS2. All solid solution members exhibit similar Raman spectra, indicating the covalent Ga-Q bonding character. The similar optical band gaps likewise further contribute to this conclusion. Up to a certain degree of substitution, these solid solutions undergo a phase transition similar to CsGaQ2-mC64. The influence of the substitution parameter x on phase transition process was investigated in situ using high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction experiments. Phase-pure solid solutions of the high-temperature polymorphs Cs1−xMxGaQ2-mC16 were obtained up to xmax(K = 0.1 and xmax(Rb = 0.3. The crystal structures of these new CsGaQ2-mC16 analogous high-temperature phases were refined from synchrotron diffraction data by Rietveld-refinement.

  13. Measuring molecular abundances in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) using the APEX telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Milam, S. N.; Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Coulson, I. M.; Remijan, A. J.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2018-02-01

    Comet composition provides critical information on the chemical and physical processes that took place during the formation of the Solar system. We report here on millimetre spectroscopic observations of the long-period bright comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) band 1 receiver between 2015 January UT 16.948 and 18.120, when the comet was at heliocentric distance of 1.30 au and geocentric distance of 0.53 au. Bright comets allow for sensitive observations of gaseous volatiles that sublimate in their coma. These observations allowed us to detect HCN, CH3OH (multiple transitions), H2CO and CO, and to measure precise molecular production rates. Additionally, sensitive upper limits were derived on the complex molecules acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and formamide (NH2CHO) based on the average of the strongest lines in the targeted spectral range to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Gas production rates are derived using a non-LTE molecular excitation calculation involving collisions with H2O and radiative pumping that becomes important in the outer coma due to solar radiation. We find a depletion of CO in C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) with a production rate relative to water of 2.0 per cent, and relatively low abundances of Q(HCN)/Q(H2O), 0.1 per cent, and Q(H2CO)/Q(H2O), 0.2 per cent. In contrast, the CH3OH relative abundance Q(CH3OH)/Q(H2O), 2.2 per cent, is close to the mean value observed in other comets. The measured production rates are consistent with values derived for this object from other facilities at similar wavelengths taking into account the difference in the fields of view. Based on the observed mixing ratios of organic molecules in four bright comets including C/2014 Q2, we find some support for atom addition reactions on cold dust being the origin of some of the molecules.

  14. New nonbinary quantum codes with larger distance constructed from BCH codes over 𝔽q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gen; Li, Ruihu; Fu, Qiang; Ma, Yuena; Guo, Luobin

    2017-03-01

    This paper concentrates on construction of new nonbinary quantum error-correcting codes (QECCs) from three classes of narrow-sense imprimitive BCH codes over finite field 𝔽q2 (q ≥ 3 is an odd prime power). By a careful analysis on properties of cyclotomic cosets in defining set T of these BCH codes, the improved maximal designed distance of these narrow-sense imprimitive Hermitian dual-containing BCH codes is determined to be much larger than the result given according to Aly et al. [S. A. Aly, A. Klappenecker and P. K. Sarvepalli, IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 53, 1183 (2007)] for each different code length. Thus families of new nonbinary QECCs are constructed, and the newly obtained QECCs have larger distance than those in previous literature.

  15. Jet production in ep collisions at high Q2 and determination of αs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Preda, T.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Zus, R.; Alimujiang, K.; Antunovic, B.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Boer, Y. de; Roeck, A. de; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Janssen, M.E.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; List, J.; Marti, L.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Rurikova, Z.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Asmone, A.; Stella, B.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Brinkmann, M.; Habib, S.; Jemanov, V.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Naroska, B.; Pokorny, B.; Toll, T.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Olivier, B.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Del Degan, M.; Grab, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Sauter, M.; Zimmermann, T.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Dodonov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Schmitz, C.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Schoening, A.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Tsakov, I.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic e ± p scattering at large negative four momentum transfer squared 150 2 2 using HERA data taken in 1999-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 395 pb -1 . Inclusive jet, 2-jet and 3-jet cross sections, normalised to the neutral current deep-inelastic scattering cross sections, are measured as functions of Q 2 , jet transverse momentum and proton momentum fraction. The measurements are well described by perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects. The strong coupling as determined from these measurements is α s (M Z )=0.1168±0.0007(exp.) +0.0046 -0.0030 (th.)±0.0016 (PDF). (orig.)

  16. Strangeness Production at low $Q^2$ in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2009-01-01

    The production of neutral strange hadrons is investigated using deep-inelastic scattering events measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurements are made in the phase space defined by the negative four-momentum transfer squared of the photon 2 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2 and the inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.6. The K_s and Lambda production cross sections and their ratios are determined. K_s production is compared to the production of charged particles in the same region of phase space. The Lambda - anti-Lambda asymmetry is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. Predictions of leading order Monte Carlo programs are compared to the data.

  17. Measurement of the Photon Structure Function at High $Q^{2}$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Campanelli, Mario; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A.P.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; Cozzoni, B.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Leonardi, Emanuele; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Marchesini, P.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G.G.G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Molnar, P.; Monteleoni, B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muheim, F.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Produit, N.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruschmeier, D.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Sarakinos, M.E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zoller, M.

    2000-01-01

    The structure functions of real and virtual photons are derivedfrom cross section measurements of the reaction$\\rm e^+e^-\\rightarrow e^+e^- + \\hbox{hadrons}$ at LEP.The reaction is studied at $\\sqrt{\\rm {s}} \\simeq 91$ GeV with the L3detector. One of the final state electrons is detected at a large angle relative to the beam direction, leading to $Q^2$ values between40 GeV$^2$ and 500 GeV$^2$.The other final state electron is either undetected or it is detected ata four-momentum transfer squared $P^2$ between 1 GeV$^2$ and 8 GeV$^2$.These measurements are compared with predictions of the Quark PartonModel and other QCD based models.

  18. Unitarized model of inclusive and diffractive DIS with Q2 evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armesto, Nestor; Salgado, Carlos A.; Tywoniuk, Konrad; Kaidalov, Alexei B.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the interplay of low-x physics and QCD scaling violations by extending the unified approach describing inclusive structure functions and diffractive production in γ*p interactions proposed in previous papers to large values of Q 2 . We describe the procedure of extracting, from the nonperturbative model, initial conditions for the QCD evolution that respect unitarity. Assuming Regge factorization of the diffractive structure function, a similar procedure is proposed for the calculation of hard diffraction. The results are in good agreement with experimental data on the proton structure function F 2 and the most recent data on the reduced diffractive cross section, x P σ r D(3) . Predictions for both F 2 and F L are presented in a wide kinematical range and compared to calculations within high-energy QCD.

  19. Search for QCD Instanton-Induced Processes at HERA in the High-$Q^2$ Domain

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Vladimir; Begzsuren, Khurelbaatar; Belousov, Anatoli; Bolz, Arthur; Boudry, Vincent; Brandt, Gerhard; Brisson, Violette; Britzger, Daniel; Buniatyan, Armen; Bylinkin, Alexander; Bystritskaya, Lena; Campbell, Alan; Cantun Avila, Karla~Beatriz; Cerny, Karel; Chekelian, Vladimir; Contreras, Guillermo; Cvach, Jaroslav; Dainton, John; Daum, Karin; Diaconu, Cristinel; Dobre, Monica; Dodonov, Vitaliy; Eckerlin, Guenter; Egli, Stephan; Elsen, Eckhard; Favart, Laurent; Fedotov, Alexandre; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, Jozef; Fleischer, Manfred; Fomenko, Alexander; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gayler, Joerg; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, Lidia; Gogitidze, Nelly; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grab, Christoph; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, Dieter; Henderson, Rob~CW; Hladky, Jan; Hoffmann, Dirk; Horisberger, Roland; Hreus, Tomas; Huber, Florian; Jacquet, Marie; Janssen, Xavier; Jung, Hannes; Kapichine, Mikhail; Katzy, Judith; Kiesling, Christian; Klein, Max; Kleinwort, Claus; Kogler, Roman; Kostka, Peter; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krücker, Dirk; Krüger, K.; Landon, Murrough; Lange, Wolfgang; Laycock, Paul; Lebedev, Andrei; Levonian, Sergey; Lipka, Katerina; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Lobodzinski, Bogdan; Malinovski, Evgenij; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maxfield, Steve~J; Mehta, Andrew; Meyer, Andreas; Meyer, Hinrich; Meyer, Joachim; Mikocki, Stanislav; Morozov, Anatoly; Müller, Katharina; Naumann, Thomas; Newman, Paul~R; Niebuhr, Carsten; Nowak, Grazyna; Olsson, Jan~Erik; Ozerov, Dmitri; Pascaud, Christian; Patel, Girish; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrukhin, Alexey; Picuric, Ivana; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Pokorny, Boris; Polifka, Richard; Radescu, Voica; Raicevic, Natasa; Ravdandorj, Togoo; Reimer, Petr; Rizvi, Eram; Robmann, Peter; Roosen, Robert; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Rotaru, Marina; Rusakov, Serguei; Salek, David; Sankey, Dave~PC; Sauter, Michel; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Stefan; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schöning, Andre; Sefkow, Felix; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Soloviev, Yuri; Sopicki, Pawel; South, David; Spaskov, Vladimir; Specka, Arnd; Steder, Michael; Stella, Bruno; Straumann, Ulrich; Sykora, Tomas; Thompson, Paul; Traynor, Daniel; Truöl, Peter; Tsakov, Ivan; Tseepeldorj, Baatar; Turnau, Jacek; Valkarova, Alice; Vallee, Claude; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Vazdik, Iakov; Wegener, Dietrich; Wünsch, Eberhard; Zacek, Jozef; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zlebcik, Radek; Zohrabyan, Hamlet; Zomer, Fabian

    2016-07-07

    Signals of QCD instanton-induced processes are searched for in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering at the electron-proton collider HERA in the kinematic region defined by the Bjorken-scaling variable $x > 10^{-3}$, the inelasticity $0.2< y < 0.7$ and the photon virtuality $150 < Q^2 < 15000$ GeV$^2$. The search is performed using H1 data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ~$351$ pb$^{-1}$. No evidence for the production of QCD instanton-induced events is observed. Upper limits on the cross section for instanton-induced processes between $1.5$~pb and $6$~pb, at $95\\%$~ confidence level, are obtained depending on the kinematic domain in which instantons could be produced. Compared to earlier publications, the limits are improved by an order of magnitude and for the first time are challenging theory predictions.

  20. Dijet Production in Charged and Neutral Current $e^{+}p$ Interactions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Bernardi, G.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hoprich, W.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Kaufmann, O.; Kausch, M.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Krucker, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Kutuev, R.; Lachnit, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Metlica, F.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Siegmon, G.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; von Dombrowski, S.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wengler, T.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    Jet production in charged and neutral current events in the kinematic range of Q^2 from 640 to 35000 GeV^2 is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The measured rate of multi-jet events and distributions of jet polar angle, transverse energy, dijet mass, and other dijet variables are presented. Using parton densities derived from inclusive DIS cross sections, perturbative QCD calculations in NLO are found to give a consistent description of both the neutral and charged current dijet production. A direct, model independent comparison of the jet distributions in charged and neutral current events confirms that the QCD dynamics of the hadronic final state is independent of the underlying electroweak scattering process.

  1. Search for QCD instanton-induced processes at HERA in the high-Q2 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.

    2016-03-01

    Signals of QCD instanton-induced processes are searched for in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering at the electron-proton collider HERA in the kinematic region defined by the Bjorken-scaling variable x>10 -3 , the inelasticity 0.2Q 2 <15000 GeV 2 . The search is performed using H1 data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 351 pb -1 . No evidence for the production of QCD instanton-induced events is observed. Upper limits on the cross section for instanton-induced processes between 1.5 pb and 6 pb, at 95% confidence level, are obtained depending on the kinematic domain in which instantons could be produced. Compared to earlier publications, the limits are improved by an order of magnitude and for the first time are challenging theory predictions.

  2. Renormalization of dijet operators at order 1 /Q 2 in soft-collinear effective theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, Raymond; Inglis-Whalen, Matthew

    2018-05-01

    We make progress towards resummation of power-suppressed logarithms in dijet event shapes such as thrust, which have the potential to improve high-precision fits for the value of the strong coupling constant. Using a newly developed formalism for Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), we identify and compute the anomalous dimensions of all the operators that contribute to event shapes at order 1 /Q 2. These anomalous dimensions are necessary to resum power-suppressed logarithms in dijet event shape distributions, although an additional matching step and running of observable-dependent soft functions will be necessary to complete the resummation. In contrast to standard SCET, the new formalism does not make reference to modes or λ-scaling. Since the formalism does not distinguish between collinear and ultrasoft degrees of freedom at the matching scale, fewer subleading operators are required when compared to recent similar work. We demonstrate how the overlap subtraction prescription extends to these subleading operators.

  3. Strangeness production at low Q 2 in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, F. D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2009-05-01

    The production of neutral strange hadrons is investigated using deep-inelastic scattering events measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurements are made in the phase space defined by the negative four-momentum transfer squared of the photon 2< Q 2<100 GeV2 and the inelasticity 0.1< y<0.6. The K {/s 0} and \\varLambda(bar{\\varLambda}) production cross sections and their ratios are determined. K {/s 0} production is compared to the production of charged particles in the same region of phase space. The Λ- bar{\\varLambda} asymmetry is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. Predictions of leading order Monte Carlo programs are compared to the data.

  4. Determination of the K/sub L/0 → π-μ+ν/sub μ/ form factor xi(q2) by muon polarization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, G.

    1975-09-01

    The polarization of the muon in the decay K 0 /sub L/ → π - μ + ν/sub μ/ was measured as a function of q 2 , the four-momentum transferred to the lepton pair. The kinematic information was used to compute the polarization expected on the basis of various assumed values of the form factor xi(q 2 ). By comparing the interpolated curve of the polarization as a function of xi(q 2 ) to the experimentally measured polarization, one has determined xi(q 2 ) as a function of q 2 . If one parameterizes the q 2 dependence of xi by xi(q 2 ) = xi(0) + Λ q 2 /m 2 /sub π/, then xi(0) = 0.178 +- 0.105 - 3.80 Λ

  5. Investigation into the limits of perturbation theory at low Q"2 using HERA deep inelastic scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abt, I.; Myronenko, V.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.

    2017-01-01

    A phenomenological study of the final combined HERA data on inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) has been performed. The data are presented and investigated for a kinematic range extending from values of the four-momentum transfer, Q"2, above 10"4 GeV"2 down to the lowest values observable at HERA of Q"2=0.045 GeV"2 and Bjorken x, x_B_j=6.10"-"7. The data are well described by fits based on perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD) using collinear factorisation and evolution of the parton densities encompassed in the DGLAP formalism from the highest Q"2 down to Q"2 of a few GeV"2. The Regge formalism with the soft Pomeron pole can describe the data up to Q"2∼0.65 GeV"2. The complete data set can be described by a new fit using the Abramowicz-Levin-Levy-Maor (ALLM) parameterisation. The region between the Regge and the perturbative QCD regimes is of particular interest.

  6. Measurements of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2 ) for 0.7 ≤ Q2 ≤ 6.0 (GeV/c) 2 at Jefferson Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Breton, V.; Deur, A.; Fonvieille, H.; Jaminion, S.; Jutier, C.; Lavessiere, G.; Ravel, O.; Roblin, Y.; Aniol, K.A.; Epstein, M.B.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Howell, C.; Boeglin, W.U.; Kramer, L.H.; Markowitz, P.; Sarty, A.J.; Degrande, N.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Baker, F.T.; Templon, J.A.; Mougey, J.Y.; Gasparian, A.; Madey, R.; Wilson, R.; De Leo, R.; Leone, A.; Perrino, R.; Cisbani, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Iodice, M.; Urciuoli, G.M.; Anderson, B.D.; Katramatou, A.T.; Khayat, M.; Madey, R.; Manley, D.M.; Petratos, G.G.; Prout, D.L.; Suleiman, R.; Watson, J.W.; Zhang, W.; Dale, D.S.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Gorbenko, V.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Sorokin, P.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C.; Ewell, L.A.; Kelly, J.J.; Bertozzi, W.; Fissum, K.G.; Gao, H.; Gao, J.; Gilad, S.; Liyanage, N.; Rowntree, D.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The deuteron elastic structure function A(Q 2 ) has been extracted in the range 0.7≤Q 2 ≤6.0 (GeV /c) 2 from cross section measurements of elastic electron-deuteron scattering in coincidence using the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Laboratory. The data are compared to theoretical models, based on the impulse approximation with the inclusion of meson-exchange currents, and to predictions of quark dimensional scaling and perturbative quantum chromodynamics. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  7. Measurement of D*± production at low Q2 with the beam-pipe calorimeter of ZEUS at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irrgang, P.

    2004-12-01

    The production of D* mesons in deep-inelastic ep-scattering has been studied using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The total D* production cross-section and the differential cross-sections as functions of Q 2 , y, p t (D*) and η(D*) have been measured at low Q 2 . The data sample used was collected during the period 1998-2000 and amounts to an integrated luminosity of 82.2 pb -1 . The low Q 2 region could be reached using the beam-pipe calorimeter which measures the scattered electron at very small angles. Therefore special emphasis was put on the calibration of the BPC in order to reconstruct events in the kinematic range 0.05 2 2 and 0.02 * +→K - π + π - and the charged conjugated decay in the kinematic region 1.5 t (D*) 2 in agreement with the corresponding perturbative QCD predictions. (orig.)

  8. Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at High Q2 with Longitudinally Polarised Lepton Beams at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kramer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive e\\pmp single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were taken at a centre-of-mass energy of \\surds = 319GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 333.7 pb-1 shared between two lepton beam charges and two longitudinal lepton polarisation modes. The differential cross sections are measured in the range of negative fourmomentum transfer squared, Q2, between 60 and 50 000GeV2, and Bjorken x between 0.0008 and 0.65. The measurements are combined with earlier published unpolarised H1 data to improve statistical precision and used to determine the structure function xF_3^gammaZ. A measurement of the neutral current parity violating structure function F_2^gammaZ is presented for the first time. The polarisation dependence of the charged current total cross section is also measured. The new measurements are well described by a next-to-leading order QCD fit based on all published H1 inclusi...

  9. STABILITY OF DOW CORNING Q2-3183A ANTIFOAM IN IRRADIATED HYDROXIDE SOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Calloway, B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the stability of Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam to radiation and aqueous hydroxide solutions. Initial foam control studies with Hanford tank waste showed the antifoam reduced foaming. The antifoam was further tested using simulated Hanford tank waste spiked with antifoam that was heated and irradiated (2.1 x 10 4 rad/h) at conditions (90 C, 3 M NaOH, 8 h) expected in the processing of radioactive waste through the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford. After irradiation, the concentration of the major polymer components polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG) in the antifoam was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). No loss of the major polymer components was observed after 24 h and only 15 wt% loss of PDMS was reported after 48 h. The presence of degradation products were not observed by gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) or high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). G values were calculated from the GPC analysis and tabulated. The findings indicate the antifoam is stable for 24 h after exposure to gamma radiation, heat, and alkaline simulated waste

  10. KS0 production at high Q2 in deep inelastic ep scattering at H1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Tabasco, Julia Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    The production of K S 0 mesons is studied using deep-inelastic scattering events (DIS) recorded with the H1 detector at the HERA ep collider. The measurements are performed in the phase space defined by the four-momentum transfer squared of the photon, 145 GeV 2 2 . The differential production cross sections of the K S 0 meson are presented as function of the kinematic variables Q 2 and x, the transverse momentum p T and the pseudorapidity η of the particle in laboratory frame, and as function of the momentum fraction x p BF and transverse momentum p T BF in the Breit Frame. Moreover, the K S 0 production rate is compared to the production of charged particles and to the production of DIS events in the same region of phase space. The data are compared to theoretical predictions, based on leading order Monte Carlo programs with matched parton showers. The Monte Carlo models are also used for studies of the flavour contribution to the K S 0 production and parton density function dependence. (orig.)

  11. Res-Parity: Parity Violation in Inelastic scattering at Low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Reimer; Peter Bosted; John Arrington; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Xiaochao Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Parity violating electron scattering has become a well established tool which has been used, for example, to probe the Standard Model and the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon. While much of this work has focused on elastic scattering, the RES-Parity experiment, which has been proposed to take place at Jefferson Laboratory, would focus on inelastic scattering in the low-Q 2 , low-W domain. RES-Parity would search for evidence of quark-hadron duality and resonance structure with parity violation in the resonance region. In terms of parity violation, this region is essentially unexplored, but the interpretation of other high-precision electron scattering experiments will rely on a reasonable understanding of scattering at lower energy and low-W through the effects of radiative corrections. RES-Parity would also study nuclear effects with the weak current. Because of the intrinsic broad band energy spectrum of neutrino beams, neutrino experiments are necessarily dependent on an untested, implicit assumption that these effects are identical to electromagnetic nuclear effects. RES-Parity is a relatively straight forward experiment. With a large expected asymmetry (∼ 0.5 x 10 -4 ) these studies may be completed with in a relatively brief period

  12. Measurement of Exclusive $\\rho^0 \\rho^0$ Production in Two-Photon Collisions at High $Q^2$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2003-01-01

    Exclusive rho rho production in two-photon collisions involving a single highly virtual photon is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 89GeV rho rho is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2 and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, Wgg, in the kinematic region: 1.2GeV^2 < Q^2 < 30GeV^2 and 1.1GeV < Wgg < 3GeV.

  13. Measurement of the total photon-photon cross section for the production of hadrons at small Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Deuter, A.; Genzel, H.; Lackas, W.; Pielorz, J.; Raupach, F.; Wagner, W.; Bussey, P.J.; Cartwright, S.L.; Dainton, J.B.; King, B.T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Thomson, J.C.; Achterberg, O.; Blobel, V.; Burkart, D.; Diehlmann, K.; Feindt, M.; Kapitza, H.; Koppitz, B.; Krueger, M.; Poppe, M.; Spitzer, H.; Staa, R. van; Almeida, F.; Baecker, A.; Barreiro, F.; Brandt, S.; Derikum, K.; Grupen, C.; Meyer, H.J.; Mueller, H.; Neumann, B.; Rost, M.; Stupperich, K.; Zech, G.; Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Gnat, Y.; Grunhaus, J.; Junge, H.; Kraski, K.; Maxeiner, C.; Maxeiner, H.; Meyer, H.; Schmidt, D.; Buerger, J.; Criegee, L.; Ferrarotto, F.; Franke, G.; Gaspero, M.; Gerke, C.; Knies, G.; Lewendel, B.; Meyer, J.; Michelsen, U.; Pape, K.H.; Stella, B.; Timm, U.; Winter, G.G.; Zachara, M.; Zimmermann, W.

    1984-09-01

    The total photon-photon cross section for the production of hadrons, sigmasub(γγ)(W,Q 2 ), has been measured in the single tag condition for 0.1 2 2 and 1.5 2 dependence of sigmasub(γγ) averaged over W can be described by GVDM. The dependence of sigmasub(γγ) on the mass W of the hadronic final state has been extracted at Q 2 =0.44 GeV 2 by unfolding the effects of experimental resolution and acceptance. The cross section is found to rise at small W. The result is compared with VDM and the parton model. (orig.)

  14. Measurement of Exclusive $\\rho^+ \\rho^-$ Production in High-$Q^2$ Two-Photon Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2004-01-01

    Exclusive rho^+ rho^- production in two-photon collisions involving a single highly-virtual photon is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 89 GeV rho^+ rho^- is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2, and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, W_gg, in the kinematic region: 1.2 GeV^2 rho^0 rho^0, measured in the same kinematic region by L3, and to have similar W_gg and Q^2 dependences.

  15. A measurement of the Q2, W and t dependences of deeply virtual Compton scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering, γ*p → γp, has been measured in e + p collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 61.1 pb -1 . Cross sections are presented as a function of the photon virtuality, Q 2 , and photon-proton centre-of-mass energy, W, for a wide region of the phase space, Q 2 > 1.5 GeV 2 and 40 -1 , is used for the first direct measurement of the differential cross section as a function of t, where t is the square of the four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex.

  16. A-dependence of nuclear transparency in quasielastic A(e,e'p) at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, T.G.; Lorenzon, W.; Arrington, J.

    1994-01-01

    The A-dependence of the quasielastic A(e,e'p) reaction has been studied with 3 H, C, Fe, and Au nuclei at momentum transfers Q 2 = 1, 3, 5, and 6.8(GeV/c) 2 . The authors extract the nuclear transparency T(A,Q 2 ), a measure of the average probability of escape of a proton from a nucleus A. Several calculations predict a significant increase in T with momentum transfer, a phenomenon known as color transparency. No statistically significant rise is seen for any of the nuclei studied

  17. Measurement of the Proton Structure Function $F_{2}$ at low $Q^{2}$ in QED Compton Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    The proton structure function F_2(x,Q^2) is measured in inelastic QED Compton scattering using data collected with the H1 detector at HERA. QED Compton events are used to access the kinematic range of very low virtualities of the exchanged photon, Q^2, down to 0.5 GeV^2, and Bjorken x up to \\sim 0.06, a region which has not been covered previously by inclusive measurements at HERA. The results are in agreement with the measurements from fixed target lepton-nucleon scattering experiments.

  18. A measurement of the Q2, W and t dependences of deeply virtual Compton scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering, γ * p→γp, has been measured in e + p collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 61.1 pb -1 . Cross sections are presented as a function of the photon virtuality, Q 2 , and photon-proton centre-of-mass energy, W, for a wide region of the phase space, Q 2 >1.5 GeV 2 and 40 -1 , is used for the first direct measurement of the differential cross section as a function of t, where t is the square of the four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex. (orig.)

  19. A measurement of the proton’s spin structure function g2 at low Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Pengjia [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2015-10-21

    JLab E08-027, a measurement of g2p and the longitudinal-transverse (LT) spin polarizability, successfully collected data from March to May, 2012. Nucleon spin structure study has been an active research area, which has attracted a very large effort from both experimentalists and theorists. The spin structure study for the last 2 decades has provided us with many exciting and often surprising results. Recently, new precision results in the low-to-intermediate momentum transfer Q2 region from JLab have provided extensive information on the nucleon structure in the confinement region and the transition region between asymptotic free to confinement. In particular, the extensive comparisons of experimental results with Chiral Perturbation Theory (the effective theory of QCD at low energy) calculations show general good agreements, but strong disagreement in the case of the neutron LT spin polarizability. This experiment completed the measurements of gp2 and the LT spin polarizability on the proton in the low-to-intermediate Q2 region. The experiment used a polarized proton (NH3) target for the first time in Hall A. Scattered electrons were detected by a pair of Hall A high resolution spectrometer (HRS) with a pair of septum magnets. To avoid too much depolarization of the target, beam current was limited to 50-100 nA during the experiment. Since the existing beam current monitors (BCMs), beam position monitors (BPMs) and calibration methods did not work at such a low current range, new BPM and BCM receivers were designed and used for current condition. A pair of super-harps and a tungsten calorimeter were installed to calibrate the BPMs and BCMs. To compensate for the effect of the 2.5/5T transverse magnet field, two chicane dipole magnets were installed. A pair of slow rasters were installed for the first time in Hall A, combining with a pair of fast raster. The standard Hall A DAQ system and the improved high resolution DAQ system were used to record the detector

  20. Jets at high Q2 at HERA and test beam measurements with the EUDET pixel telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, Joerg

    2010-09-01

    In this thesis the measurement of inclusive dijet and trijet cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA is presented. The kinematic phase space of the measurement was defined by 125 2 2 and 0.2 2 and y are the virtuality and the inelasticity, respectively. The data sample was taken during the years 1998-2000 and 2004-2007 with the ZEUS detector and corresponded to an integrated luminosity of 374 pb -1 . The inclusive k t jet algorithm was applied to the massless final-state objects in the Breit reference frame. The cross sections referred to jets with E T,B jet >8 GeV and -1 LAB jet 3/2 , between the cross sections for trijet and dijet production was determined as a function of the average transverse jet energy in the Breit frame, E T,B jet , in intervals of Q 2 . The quantity R 3/2 was utilised for an extraction of the strong coupling, α s , with partially reduced systematic uncertainties. The extracted value was in agreement with the world average value of α s . In a second part, test-beam measurements were performed with the EUDET pixel telescope. During the work for this thesis, the online-monitoring software was improved, the MIMOSA 26 sensors were integrated into the offline analysis software and the first data taken with these sensors were analysed. The first data were taken with the demonstrator telescope together with three MIMOSA 26 sensors that were operated as devices-under-test. The second data sample was taken with a telescope that consisted of six MIMOSA 26 sensors, of which five could be used. The single-point resolution and the detection efficiency were determined and found to be consistent with the expectation. (orig.)

  1. What can be learned from a precise measurement of the deuteron A(q2) structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platchkov, S.

    1989-01-01

    New accurate measurements of the deuteron A(q 2 ) structure function for momentum transfers between 1 and 18 fm -2 are reported. Data are compared to several representative theoretical predictions. The neutron electric form factor is inferred from the data and its model dependence is discussed

  2. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current cross-sections with longitudinally polarised positrons with the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Trevor P.

    2012-07-01

    The cross sections for neutral current (NC) deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in e + p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are measured at high momentum transfer squared (Q 2 >185 GeV 2 ) at the ZEUS detector at HERA. The HERA accelerator provides e ± p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, which allows the weak contribution to the NC process to be studied at high Q 2 . The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb -1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007. The single differential NC cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the reduced cross section σ are measured. The structure function xF 3 is determined by combining the e + p NC reduced cross sections with the previously measured e - p measurements. The interference structure function xF 3 γZ is extracted at Q 2 =1500 GeV 2 . The cross-section asymmetry between the positive and negative polarisation of the positron beam is measured and the parity violation effects of the electroweak interaction are observed. The predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics agree well with the measurements. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton in virtual Compton scattering at Q2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laveissière, G; Todor, L; Degrande, N; Jaminion, S; Jutier, C; Di Salvo, R; Van Hoorebeke, L; Alexa, L C; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K A; Arundell, K; Audit, G; Auerbach, L; Baker, F T; Baylac, M; Berthot, J; Bertin, P Y; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Boeglin, W U; Brash, E J; Breton, V; Breuer, H; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cardman, L S; Cavata, C; Chang, C-C; Chen, J-P; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Dale, D S; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A; d'Hose, N; Dodge, G E; Domingo, J J; Elouadrhiri, L; Epstein, M B; Ewell, L A; Finn, J M; Fissum, K G; Fonvieille, H; Fournier, G; Frois, B; Frullani, S; Furget, C; Gao, H; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gomez, J; Gorbenko, V; Grenier, P; Guichon, P A M; Hansen, J O; Holmes, R; Holtrop, M; Howell, C; Huber, G M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Incerti, S; Iodice, M; Jardillier, J; Jones, M K; Kahl, W; Kato, S; Katramatou, A T; Kelly, J J; Kerhoas, S; Ketikyan, A; Khayat, M; Kino, K; Kox, S; Kramer, L H; Kumar, K S; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Leone, A; LeRose, J J; Liang, M; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Madey, R; Maeda, K; Malov, S; Manley, D M; Marchand, C; Marchand, D; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marroncle, J; Martino, J; McCormick, K; McIntyre, J; Mehrabyan, S; Merchez, F; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Miller, G W; Mougey, J Y; Nanda, S K; Neyret, D; Offermann, E A J M; Papandreou, Z; Pasquini, B; Perdrisat, C F; Perrino, R; Petratos, G G; Platchkov, S; Pomatsalyuk, R; Prout, D L; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Quémenér, G; Ransome, R D; Ravel, O; Real, J S; Renard, F; Roblin, Y; Rowntree, D; Rutledge, G; Rutt, P M; Saha, A; Saito, T; Sarty, A J; Serdarevic, A; Smith, T; Smirnov, G; Soldi, K; Sorokin, P; Souder, P A; Suleiman, R; Templon, J A; Terasawa, T; Tieulent, R; Tomasi-Gustaffson, E; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Vanderhaeghen, M; Van De Vyver, R; Van der Meer, R L J; Vernin, P; Vlahovic, B; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zainea, D G; Zhang, W-M; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z-L

    2004-09-17

    We report a virtual Compton scattering study of the proton at low c.m. energies. We have determined the structure functions P(LL)-P(TT)/epsilon and P(LT), and the electric and magnetic generalized polarizabilities (GPs) alpha(E)(Q2) and beta(M)(Q2) at momentum transfer Q(2)=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2. The electric GP shows a strong falloff with Q2, and its global behavior does not follow a simple dipole form. The magnetic GP shows a rise and then a falloff; this can be interpreted as the dominance of a long-distance diamagnetic pion cloud at low Q2, compensated at higher Q2 by a paramagnetic contribution from piN intermediate states.

  4. A UNIFORM SEARCH FOR SECONDARY ECLIPSES OF HOT JUPITERS IN KEPLER Q2 LIGHT CURVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, J. L.; López-Morales, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of searching the Kepler Q2 public data set for the secondary eclipses of 76 hot Jupiter planet candidates from the list of 1235 candidates published by Borucki et al. This search has been performed by modeling both the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curves and new light curves produced via our own photometric pipeline. We derive new stellar and planetary parameters for each system, while calculating robust errors for both. We find 16 systems with 1σ-2σ, 14 systems with 2σ-3σ, and 6 systems with >3σ confidence level secondary eclipse detections in at least one light curve produced via the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curve or our own pipeline; however, results can vary depending on the light curve modeled and whether eccentricity is allowed to vary or not. We estimate false alarm probabilities of 31%, 10%, and 6% for the 1σ-2σ, 2σ-3σ, and >3σ confidence intervals, respectively. Comparing each secondary eclipse result to theoretical expectations, we find that the majority of detected planet candidates emit more light than expected owing to thermal blackbody emission in the optical Kepler bandpass, and present a trend of increasing excess emission with decreasing maximum effective planetary temperature. These results agree with previously published optical secondary eclipse data for other hot Jupiters. We explore modeling biases, significant planetary albedos, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium or other thermal emission, significant internal energy generation, and misidentification of brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, or stellar blends as possible causes of both the excess emission and its correlation with expected planetary temperature. Although we find that no single cause is able to explain all of the planet candidates, significant planetary albedos, with a general trend of increasing planetary albedos with decreasing atmospheric temperatures, are able to explain most of the systems. Identifying

  5. Q2 Dependence of Quadrupole Strength in the gamma*p-->Delta+(1232) --> p pi0 Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volker Burkert; Kyungseon Joo; Lee Smith; Ralph Minehart

    2002-01-01

    Models of baryon structure predict a small quadrupole deformation of the nucleon due to residual tensor forces between quarks or distortions from the pion cloud. Sensitivity to quark versus pion degrees of freedom occurs through the Q 2 dependence of the magnetic (M 1+ ), electric (E 1+ ), and scalar (S 1+ ) multipoles in the γ*p → Δ + (1232) → pπ 0 transition. New precision measurements of the ratios E 1+ /M 1+ and S 1+ /M 1+ are reported here over the range Q 2 = 0.4-1.8 GeV 2 . Results are best described by recent unitary models in which the pion cloud plays a dominant role

  6. Measurement of Inclusive Jet Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at High Q$^{2}$ and Determination of the Strong Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    Inclusive jet production is studied in neutral current deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at large four momentum transfer squared Q^2>150 GeV^2 with the H1 detector at HERA. Single and double differential inclusive jet cross sections are measured as a function of Q^2 and of the transverse energy E_T of the jets in the Breit frame. The measurements are found to be well described by calculations at next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD. The running of the strong coupling is demonstrated and the value of alpha_s(M_Z) is determined. The ratio of the inclusive jet cross section to the inclusive neutral current cross section is also measured and used to extract a precise value for alpha_s(M_Z)=0.1193+/-0.0014(exp.)^{+0.0047}_{-0.0030}(th.)+/-0.0016(pdf).

  7. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via γ*p→nπ+ at high Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K.; Gothe, R. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Boiarinov, S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Y.; Tkachenko, S.; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the nπ+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum-rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4π CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the π-N multipole E0+/GD were measured using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.

  8. Production of the Q2 doubly excited states of the hydrogen molecule by electron impact in a single step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Leonardo O.; Rocha, Alexandre B.; Faria, Nelson Velho de Castro; Jalbert, Ginette

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the single step cross sections for excitation of Q 2 states of H2 and its subsequent dissociation. The cross section calculations were performed within the first Born approximation and the electronic wave functions were obtained via State-Averaged Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field followed by Configuration Interaction. We have assumed autoionization is the only important process competing with dissociation into neutral atoms. We have estimated its probability through a semi classical approach and compared with results of literature. Special attention was given to the Q 2 1Σg +(1) state which, as has been shown in a previous work, may dissociate into H(2 sσ) + H(2 sσ) fragments (some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version).

  9. On the measurability of the structure function g1(x,Q2) in ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.

    1995-08-01

    The possibility is investigated to measure the polarized structure function g 1 (x, Q 2 ) in the collider mode of HERA operating with a polarized lepton and proton beam. The x dependence of g 1 can be measured at a statistical precision of ∝15% to 70% in the range 0.0005 2 > 2 at beam polarizations λ p ∝λ e =0.8 and L int =60 pb -1 . (orig.)

  10. Measurement of the Elastic Ep Cross Section at Q2 = 0.66, 1.10, 1.51 and 1.65 Gev2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The nucleon form factors have been investigated by physicists for decades because of their fundamental importance. The world data of the proton magnetic form factor GMp has been focused on Q2 lower than 5 GeV2 and they have large uncertainties at higher Q2. Jefferson Lab experiment E12-07-108 aims to improve the accuracy of the e ? p elastic cross section to better than 2% over a Q2 range of 7 ? 14 GeV2. From 2015 to 2016, the e ? p elastic cross section was measured over a wide range of Q2 from 0.66 ? 12.56 GeV2 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, USA. An unpolarized electron beam was scattered o? a cryogenic hydrogen target and the scattered electron was detected in the high resolution spectrometers. This thesis focuses on the cross section calculations of the data taken in the spring of 2015, where Q2 = 0.66, 1.10, 1.51 and 1.66 GeV2. At Q2 = 0.66 GeV2, an uncertainty < 3% was achieved and < 5% was achieved for the other three Q2 at the moment. The results were compared with the world data and the good agreement provides confidence for the experimental measurements at higher Q2.

  11. Observation of the Hadronic Final State Charge Asymmetry in High Q^2 Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-01-01

    A first measurement is presented of the charge asymmetry in the hadronic final state from the hard interaction in deep-inelastic ep neutral current scattering at HERA. The measurement is performed in the range of negative squared four momentum transfer 100<Q^2<8,000 GeV^2. The difference between the event normalised distributions of the scaled momentum, x_p, for positively and negatively charged particles, measured in the current region of the Breit frame, is studied together with its evolution as a function of Q. The results are compared to Monte Carlo models at the hadron and parton level.

  12. Strange magnetic form factor of the proton at $Q^2 = 0.23$ GeV$^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ping; Leinweber, Derek; Thomas, Anthony; Young, Ross

    2009-06-01

    We determine the $u$ and $d$ quark contributions to the proton magnetic form factor at finite momentum transfer by applying chiral corrections to quenched lattice data. Heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is applied at next to leading order in the quenched, and full QCD cases for the valence sector using finite range regularization. Under the assumption of charge symmetry these values can be combined with the experimental values of the proton and neutron magnetic form factors to deduce a relatively accurate value for the strange magnetic form factor at $Q^2=0.23$ GeV$^2$, namely $G_M^s=-0.034 \\pm 0.021$ $\\mu_N$.

  13. Determination of the pion charge form factor for Q2 = 0.60-1.60 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardan Tadevosyan; Henk Blok; Garth Huber; David Abbott; Heinz Anklin; Christopher Armstrong; John Arrington; Ketevi Assamagan; Steven Avery; O. Baker; C. Bochna; Edward Brash; Herbert Breuer; Nicholas Chant; James Dunne; T. Eden; Rolf Ent; David Gaskell; Ronald Gilman; Kenneth Gustafsson; Wendy Hinton; Harold Jackson; Mark Jones; Cynthia Keppel; Pyunghun Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Douglas Koltenuk; Meihua Liang; George Lolos; Allison Lung; David Mack; David McKee; David Meekins; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Robert Mueller; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; David Pitz; David Potterveld; Liming Qin; Joerg Reinhold; Ilkyoung Shin; Stepan Stepanyan; Liguang Tang; Rob van der Meer; Kelley Vansyoc; D. Van Westrum; Jochen Volmer; William Vulcan; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Wenxia Zhao; Benedikt Zihlmann

    2006-01-01

    The data analysis for the reaction H(e,e(prime) pi + )n, which was used to determine values for the charged pion form factor Fpi for values of Q2 = 0.6-1.6 (gEv/C) 2 , has been repeated with careful inspection of all steps and special attention to systematic uncertainties. Also the method used to extract Fpi from the measured longitudinal cross section was critically reconsidered. Final values for the separated longitudinal and transverse cross sections and the extracted values of Fpi are presented

  14. Near threshold electroproduction of the ω meson at Q2≅0.5 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozewicz, P.; Mitchell, J.; Dunne, J.; Abbott, D.J.; Carlini, R.; Ent, R.; Mack, D.J.; Wood, S.; Yan, C.; Markowitz, P.; Martoff, C.J.; Reinhold, J.; Zeidman, B.; Arrington, J.; Bailey, K.; Cummings, W.J.; Gao, H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Hansen, J.-O.; O'Neill, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    Electroproduction of the ω meson was investigated in the 1 H(e,e ' p)ω reaction. The measurement was performed at a four-momentum transfer Q 2 ≅0.5 GeV 2 . Angular distributions of the virtual photon-proton center-of-momentum cross sections have been extracted over the full angular range. These distributions exhibit a strong enhancement over t-channel parity exchange processes in the backward direction. According to a newly developed electroproduction model, this enhancement provides significant evidence of resonance formation in the γ*p→ωp reaction channel

  15. Near threshold electroproduction of the omega meson at Q2 ∼ 0.5 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozewicz, P.; Mitchell, J.; Dunne, J.; Markowitz, P.; Martoff, C. J.; Reinhold, J.; Zeidman, B.

    2004-01-01

    Electroproduction of the omega meson was investigated in the p(e,e'p)omega reaction. The measurement was performed at a 4-momentum transfer Q2 ∼ 0.5 GeV2. Angular distributions of the virtual photon-proton center-of-momentum cross sections have been extracted over the full angular range. These distributions exhibit a strong enhancement over t-channel parity exchange processes in the backward direction. According to a newly developed electroproduction model, this enhancement provides significant evidence of resonance formation in the gamma* p -> omega p reaction channel

  16. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via $\\gamma^* p \\to n\\pi^+$ at high $Q^2$

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kijun; Gothe, Ralf; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Anghinolfi, Marco; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Battaglieri, Marco; Baturin, Vitaly; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bennett, Robert; Biselli, Angela; Bookwalter, Craig; Boyarinov, Sergey; Branford, Derek

    2012-01-01

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the $n\\pi^+$ channel at relatively high momentum transfer ($Q^2$ up to 4.2 $\\rm{GeV^2}$). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole ($E_{0+}$), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor $G_1$ within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor $G_A$. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly $4\\pi$ CEBAF Large Acc...

  17. The O(α3s) Heavy Flavor Contributions to the Charged Current Structure Function xF3(x,Q2) at Large Momentum Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behring, A.; Bluemlein, J.; Freitas, A. de; Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz; Hasselhuhn, A.; Manteuffel, A. von; Schneider, C.

    2015-08-01

    We calculate the massive Wilson coefficients for the heavy flavor contributions to the non-singlet charged current deep-inelastic scattering structure function xF W+ 3 (x,Q 2 )+xF W- 3 (x,Q 2 ) in the asymptotic region Q 2 >>m 2 to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at general values of the Mellin variable N and the momentum fraction x. Besides the heavy quark pair production also the single heavy flavor excitation s→c contributes. Numerical results are presented for the charm quark contributions and consequences on the Gross-Llewellyn Smith sum rule are discussed.

  18. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions to the structure function g1(x,Q2 at large momentum transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behring

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the polarized structure function g1(x,Q2 in the asymptotic region Q2≫m2 to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N and the momentum fraction x, and derive heavy flavor corrections to the Bjorken sum-rule. Numerical results are presented for the charm quark contribution. Results on the structure function g2(x,Q2 in the twist-2 approximation are also given.

  19. Angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay in the low-$q^2$ region

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-04-14

    An angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay is performed using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 ${\\mbox{fb}^{-1}}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. For the first time several observables are measured in the dielectron mass squared ($q^2$) interval between 0.002 and 1.120${\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V^2\\!/}c^4}$. The angular observables $F_{\\mathrm{L}}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}}$ which are related to the $K^{*0}$ polarisation and to the lepton forward-backward asymmetry, are measured to be $F_{\\mathrm{L}}= 0.16 \\pm 0.06 \\pm0.03$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}} = 0.10 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.05$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The angular observables $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Im}}$ which are sensitive to the photon polarisation in this $q^2$ range, are found to be $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)} = -0.23 \\pm 0.23 \\pm 0.05$ a...

  20. Measurement of the proton structure function FL(x,Q2) with the H1 detector at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piec, Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    A measurement of the inclusive cross section for the deep-inelastic scattering of positrons on protons at low four-momentum transfer squared Q 2 is presented. The measurement is used for the extraction of the longitudinal proton structure function F L . The analysis is based on data collected by the H1 experiment during special, low energy runs in the year 2007. The direct technique of the F L determination based on the extraction of the reduced DIS cross sections for three different centre-of-mass energies is used. For the purpose of the analysis a dedicated electron finder has been developed and integrated with the standard H1 reconstruction software H1REC. The algorithm employs information from two independent tracking detectors the Backward Silicon Tracker and the Central Jet Chamber. The performance of the finder is studied. The thesis presents the cross section and the F L measurements in the range of 2.5 GeV 2 ≤Q 2 ≤25 GeV 2 . (orig.)

  1. A Measurement of Nuclear Structure Functions in the Large $X$ Large $Q^{2}$ Kinematic Region in Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakili, Masoud [Cincinnati U.

    1997-01-01

    Data from the CCFR E770 Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scatter- ing (DIS) experiment at Fermilab contain large Bjorken x, high $Q^2$ events. A comparison of the data with a model, based on no nuclear effects at large $x$, shows an excess of events in the data. Addition of Fermi gas motion of the nucleons in the nucleus to the model does not explain the model's deficit. Adding higher momentum tail due to the formation of "quasi-deuterons" makes the agreement better. Certain models based on "multi- quark clusters" and "few-nucleon correlations" predict an exponentially falling behavior for $F_2$ as $F_2 \\sim e^{s(x -x_0)}$ at large $x$. We measure a $s$ = 8.3 $\\pm$ 0.8 for the best fit to our data. This corresponds to a value of $F_2$($x = 1, Q^2 > 50) \\approx 2$ x $10^{-3}$ in neutrino DIS. These values agree with results from theoretical models and the $SLAC$ $E133$ experiment but seem to be different from the result of the BCDMS experiment

  2. Measurement of Neutral and Charged Current Cross Sections in Electron-Proton Collisions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Bernardi, G.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazarian, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyian, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.I.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassilev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    The inclusive e^-p single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA, in the range of four-momentum transfer squared Q^2 between 150 and 30000 GeV^2, and Bjorken x between 0.002 and 0.65. The data were taken in 1998 and 1999 with a centre-of-mass energy of 320 GeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 16.4 pb^(-1). The data are compared with recent measurements of the inclusive neutral and charged current e^+p cross sections. For Q^2>1000 GeV^2 clear evidence is observed for an asymmetry between e^+p and e^-p neutral current scattering and the generalised structure function xF_3 is extracted for the first time at HERA. A fit to the charged current data is used to extract a value for the W boson propagator mass. The data are found to be in good agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  3. Tensor products of Uq′sl-caret(2)-modules and the big q2-Jacobi function transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gade, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Four tensor products of evaluation modules of the quantum affine algebra U q ′ sl-caret(2) obtained from the negative and positive series, the complementary and the strange series representations are investigated. Linear operators R(z) satisfying the intertwining property on finite linear combinations of the canonical basis elements of the tensor products are described in terms of two sets of infinite sums {τ (r,t) } r,t∈Z ≥0 and {τ (r,t) } r,t∈Z ≥0 involving big q 2 -Jacobi functions or related nonterminating basic hypergeometric series. Inhomogeneous recurrence relations can be derived for both sets. Evaluations of the simplest sums provide the corresponding initial conditions. For the first set of sums the relations entail a big q 2 -Jacobi function transform pair. An integral decomposition is obtained for the sum τ (r,t) . A partial description of the relation between the decompositions of the tensor products with respect to U q sl(2) or with respect to its complement in U q ′ sl-caret(2) can be formulated in terms of Askey-Wilson function transforms. For a particular combination of two tensor products, the occurrence of proper U q ′ sl-caret(2)-submodules is discussed.

  4. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  5. A measurement of the photon structure function F$_{2}^{\\gamma}$ at an average Q$^{2}$ of 12 GeV$^{2}$/c$^{4}$ : results from DELPHI

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Batyunya, B; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fürstenau, H; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, G; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    The hadronic photon structure function F_{2}^{\\gamma} has been measured in the Q^{2} range from 4 to 30~GeV^2/c^{4} and down to x values of order 0.001, using data taken with the DELPHI detector at LEP between 1991 and 1993. A comparison is made with several F_{2}^{\\gamma} parameterizations with special emphasis on their low x behaviour. A result on the Q^{2} evolution of F_{2}^{\\gamma} is presented.

  6. Electroexcitation of the Roper resonance for 1.7 < Q**2 < 4.5 -GeV2 in vec-ep ---> en pi+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznauryan, Inna; Burkert, Volker; Kim, Wooyoung; Park, Kil; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Bagdasaryan, H.; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Batourine, V.; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, Wilbert; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Donnelly, J.; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Golovach, Evgeny; Gonenc, Atilla; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, L.; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hafnaoui, Khadija; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hakobyan, Rafael; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Andreas; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lee, T.; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, Konstantin; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, S.; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Jerome; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Polli, Ermanno; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, J.; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045209
    The helicity amplitudes of the electroexcitation of the Roper resonance are extracted for 1.7 < Q2 < 4.5 GeV2 from recent high precision JLab-CLAS cross section and longitudinally polarized beam asymmetry data for pi+ electroproduction on protons at W=1.15-1.69 GeV. The analysis is made using two approaches, dispersion relations and a unitary isobar model, which give consistent results. It is found that the transverse helicity amplitude A_{1/2} for the gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 transition, which is large and negative at Q2=0, becomes large and positive at Q2 ~ 2 GeV2, and then drops slowly with Q2. The longitudinal helicity amplitude S_{1/2}, which was previously found from CLAS ep -> eppi0,enpi+ data to be large and positive at Q2=0.4,0.65 GeV2, drops with Q2. Available model predictions for gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 allow us to conclude that these results provide strong evidence in favor of N(1440)P11 as a first radial excitation of

  7. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

    2009-02-01

    The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

  8. Measurement of D*± meson produciton in e±p scattering at low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2007-02-01

    The production of D *± (2010) mesons in e ± p scattering in the range of exchanged photon virtuality 0.05 2 2 has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82 pb -1 . The decay channels D *+ →D 0 π + with D 0 →K - π + and corresponding antiparticle decay were used to identify D * mesons and the ZEUS beampipe calorimeter was used to identify the scattered electron. Differential D * cross sections as functions of Q 2 , inelasticity, y, transverse momentum of the D * meson, p T (D * ), and pseudorapidity of the D * meson, η(D * ), have been measured in the kinematic region 0.02 T (D * ) * ) vertical stroke <1.5. The measured differential cross sections are in agreement with two different NLO QCD calculations. The cross sections are also compared to previous ZEUS measurements in the photoproduction and DIS regimes. (orig.)

  9. An estimate of higher twist at small xB and low Q2 based upon a saturation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.; Peters, K.

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the influence of higher twist corrections to deep inelastic structure functions in the low-Q 2 and small-x HERA region. We review the general features of the lowest-order QCD diagrams which contribute to twist-4 at small-x, in particular the sign structure of longitudinal and transverse structure functions which offers the possibility of strong cancellations in F 2 . For a numerical analysis we perform a twist analysis of the saturation model which has been very successful both in describing the structure function and the DIS diffractive cross section at HERA. As the main conclusion, twist 4 corrections are not small in F L or F T but in F 2 = F L + F T they almost cancel. We point out that F L analysis needs a large twist-4 correction. We also indicate the region of validity of the twist expansion. (orig.)

  10. Experimental study of the spin structure of the neutron (3He) with low Q2: a relationship between the Bjorken and Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deur, A.

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of the neutron (and 3 He) spin structure with a particular emphasis in the resonance domain (experiment E94010 that took place in 1997 at Jefferson Lab (TJNAF or formerly CEBAF) in Virginia). A polarized 3 He target was built in order to achieve this study since polarized 3 He nuclei can be seen as polarized neutrons. This target allowed the measurement of the polarized absolute cross sections σ 1/2 (Q 2 , ν) and σ 3/2 (Q 2 , ν) from the inclusive reaction → 3 He( → e, e')X for incident beam energies ranging from 0.86 GeV to 5.07 GeV at a scattering angle of 15.5 deg. The Q 2 evolution of the generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) integral on 3 He and on neutron was measured from 0.1 GeV 2 to 1.0 GeV 2 in order to understand the transition between perturbative QCD and non-perturbative QCD. The integration domain in ν (the energy loss of the scattered electron) is from the pion threshold to about 2.5 GeV which covers both the resonance region and the Deep Inelastic Scattering. The high precision of our data constrains the models giving the Q 2 evolution of the generalized GDH integral. The polarized quasi-elastic scattering was also measured. The cross section σ TT (Q 2 , ν) on 3 He and the spin structure functions g 1 3 He (Q 2 , ν) and g 2 3 He (Q 2 , ν) are presented. These data are an indication that the higher-twists are small in our kinematics domain and that the Bloom-Gilman duality seems to hold for the polarized spin structure functions. (author)

  11. Comet 2001 Q2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravec, Petr; Kušnirák, Peter; Bouma, R. J.; Raymundo, P. M.

    č. 7687 (2001), s. 1 ISSN 0081-0304 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/99/0255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : comet s * astrometry Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  12. Electromagnetic form factors for nucleons and pions at positive and negative q2 in the model of quark-gluon strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidalov, A.B.; Kondratyuk, L.A.; Tchekin, D.V.

    2000-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factors for pions and nucleons are considered within the model of quark-gluon strings, where the momentum-transfer dependence of hadronic form factors is determined by the intercepts of the corresponding Regge trajectories and by the Sudakov form factor. Analytic expressions found for form factors in the timelike region admit an analytic continuation to the spacelike region. The resulting form factors for pions and nucleons comply well with experimental data both for positive and for negative values of the squared momentum transfer q 2 . It is shown that the distinctions between the absolute values of the pion and nucleon form factors F π (q 2 ), G m (q 2 ), and F 2 (q 2 ) at positive values of q 2 and those at negative values of this variable are associated with the analytic properties of the double-logarithmic term in the exponent of the Sudakov form factor. The spin structure of the amplitudes for quark transitions into hadrons that is proposed in the present study makes it possible to describe fairly well available experimental data on the Pauli form factor F 2 and on the ratio G e /G m

  13. Study of charged-current ep interactions at Q2 > 200 GeV2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1996-06-01

    Deep inelastic charged-current reactions have been studied in e + p and e - p collisions at a center of mass energy of about 300 GeV in the kinematic region Q 2 >200 GeV 2 and x>0.006 using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The integrated cross sections for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 are found to be σ e + p→ anti νX =30.3 -4.2-2.6 +5.5+1.6 pb and σ e - p→νX =54.7 -9.8-3.4 +15.9+2.8 pb. Differential cross sections have been measured as functions of the variables x, y and Q 2 . From the measured differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , the W boson mass is determined to be M W =79 -7-4 +8+4 GeV. Measured jet rates and transverse energy profiles agree with model predictions. A search for charged-current interactions with a large rapidity gap yielded one candidate event, corresponding to a cross section σ e + p→ anti νX (Q 2 >200 GeV 2 ; η max -0.7 +1.8 ±0.1 pb. (orig.)

  14. Jets at low Q2 at HERA and radiation damage studies for silicon sensors for the XFEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrey, Hanno

    2011-06-01

    In the first part this thesis, jet cross-sections were measured for inclusive jet, inclusive dijet, and inclusive trijet production at photon virtualities in the range of 10 2 2 . The data analyzed were recorded with the Zeus detector in the years 2004-2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 296 pb -1 . Events in neutral current deep inelastic scattering were selected in the above stated Q 2 region for an inelasticity of 0.2 T,B >8 GeV and to have a pseudorapidity in the laboratory frame in the range of -1 lab jj >20 GeV to avoid phase space regions where the fixed order calculations are sensitive to infrared divergences. The presented analysis is the first jet analysis at such low values of Q 2 to exploit the full HERA-II ZEUS data set, and as such is performed at significant higher luminosities than previous publications. Overall, the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculations correctly predict the measured cross-sections within the uncertainties in all studied quantities and over most of the investigated regions of phase space, except in the pseudorapidity region close to the proton beam direction (''forward'' region) in inclusive jet production where the prediction is considerably below the data. The uncertainty of the NLO prediction, dominated by the uncertainty associated with the choice of the renormalization scale, is typically larger than the experimental uncertainty, which is for the most part dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale. The large theoretical uncertainties indicate the need for calculations including higherorders. Such NNLO calculations will allow to fully exploit the sensitivity of the low Q 2 jet data in QCD PDF fits and in fits to extract values of α s . In the second part of this thesis, a study of radiation damage of silicon sensors by 12 keV X-rays for doses up to 1GGy is presented. For this study, an irradiation facility has been set up at Hasylab at Desy. Test structures (gate-controlled diodes) have been

  15. Q^2 Dependence of the S_{11}(1535) Photocoupling and Evidence for a P-wave resonance in eta electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haluk Denizli; James Mueller; Steven Dytman; M.L. Leber; R.D. Levine; J. Miles; Kui Kim; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Catalina Cetina; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Laurent Farhi; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Tony Forest; Valera Frolov; Herbert Funsten; Sally Gaff; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Pascal Girard; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; David Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Jingliang Hu; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; J.H. Kelley; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; K. Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; K. Lukashin; Marion MacCormick; Joseph Manak; Nikolai Markov; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; Valeria Muccifora; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Steve Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O' Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Gerald Peterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Ermanno Polli; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Konstantin Sabourov; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; Jeremiah Shaw; Nikolay Shvedunov; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Kebin Wang; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Junho Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-07-01

    New cross sections for the reaction $ep \\to e'\\eta p$ are reported for total center of mass energy $W$=1.5--2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer $Q^2$=0.13--3.3 GeV$^2$. This large kinematic range allows extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and $\\eta N$ coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at $W\\sim$ 1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a $P$-wave resonance that persists to high $Q^2$. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the $S_{11}$(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expands the $Q^2$ range covered and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parameterization is provided.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of a new photoluminescent aluminium complex bis (8-hydroxyquinoline) (2,2'bipyridine) aluminium Al(Bpy)q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Bhargava, Parag

    2018-04-01

    A new photoluminescent material, Bis(8-hydroxyquinoline) (2,2'bipyridine) aluminium Al(Bpy)q2 has been synthesized and characterized. Solution of this material Al(Bpy)q2 in ethanol showed absorption maxima at 370nm which was attributed to the moderate energy (π - π*) transitions of the aromatic rings. The photoluminescence spectrum of Al(Bpy)q2 in ethanol solution showed peak at 516 nm. This material shows thermal stability up to 385°C. The time resolved photoluminescence spectra of the material showed two life time components. The decay times of the first and second component are 6.1 ns and 24.5 ns respectively.

  17. The Electric Form Factor of the Neutron via Recoil Polarimetry to Q2 1.47 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley Plaster; Richard Madey; Andrei Semenov; Simon Taylor; Aram Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Chenyu Yan; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; Paul Brewer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Kenneth Garrow; Calvin Howell; Paul Gueye; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Samuel Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2003-01-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory E93-038 collaboration conducted measurements of the ratio of the electric form factor to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, G n E/G n M, via recoil polarimetry from the quasielastic 2 H((rvec e),e/(rvec n)) 1 H reaction at three values of Q 2 [viz., 0.45, 1.15, and 1.47 (GeV/c) 2 ] in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The preliminary results for G n E at Q 2 = 0.45 and 1.15 (GeV/c) 2 are consistent with the Galster parameterization; however, the preliminary result for G n E at Q 2 = 1.47 (GeV/c) 2 lies slightly above the Galster parameterization

  18. Ground-based Detection of Deuterated Water in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) at IR Wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Gibb, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-02-20

    We conducted a deep search for deuterated water (HDO) in the Oort Cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), through infrared (IR) spectroscopy with NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory. In this Letter, we present our detections of HDO and water (H{sub 2}O) in comet Lovejoy on 2015 February 4 (post-perihelion) after 1 hr integration on source. The IR observations allowed simultaneous detection of H{sub 2}O and HDO, yielding production rates of 5.9 ± 0.13 × 10{sup 29} and 3.6 ± 1.0 × 10{sup 26} molecules s{sup −1}, respectively. The simultaneous detection permitted accurate determination of the isotopic ratio (D/H) in water of 3.02 ± 0.87 × 10{sup −4}, i.e., larger than the value for water in terrestrial oceans (or Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW) by a factor of 1.94 ± 0.56. This D/H ratio in water exceeds the value obtained independently at millimeter wavelengths (0.89 ± 0.25 VSMOW; pre-perihelion). We discuss these parameters in the context of origins and emphasize the need for contemporaneous measurements of HDO and H{sub 2}O.

  19. Theoretical investigations of the IO,{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions: Metastability, characterization and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammami, H. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); EMIR, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs, Monastir (Tunisia); Yazidi, O. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique Moléculaire et Applications, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis-El Manar, Le Belvédère, 1060 Tunis (Tunisia); Ben El Hadj Rhouma, M. [EMIR, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs, Monastir (Tunisia); Al Mogren, M. M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, PO Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Hochlaf, M., E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France)

    2014-07-07

    Using ab initio methodology, we studied the IO{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions. Benchmark computations on the IO(X{sup 2}Π) neutral species allow validate the current procedure. For IO{sup 2+}, several potential wells were found on the ground and the electronic excited states potentials with potential barriers with respect to dissociation, where this dication can exist in the gas phase as long-lived metastable molecules. We confirm hence the recent observation of the dication by mass spectrometry. Moreover, we predict the existence of the metastable IO{sup 3+} trication, where a shallow potential well along the IO internuclear distance is computed. This potential well supports more than 10 vibrational levels. The IO{sup 3+} excited states are repulsive in nature, as well as the computed potentials for the IO{sup 4+} tetracation. For the bound states, we give a set of spectroscopic parameters including excitation transition energies, equilibrium distances, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational terms, and rotational constants. At the MRCI + Q/aug-cc-pV5Z(-PP) level, the adiabatic double and triple ionization energies of IO are computed to be ∼28.1 eV and ∼55.0 eV, respectively.

  20. Ground-based Detection of Deuterated Water in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) at IR Wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Gibb, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a deep search for deuterated water (HDO) in the Oort Cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), through infrared (IR) spectroscopy with NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory. In this Letter, we present our detections of HDO and water (H 2 O) in comet Lovejoy on 2015 February 4 (post-perihelion) after 1 hr integration on source. The IR observations allowed simultaneous detection of H 2 O and HDO, yielding production rates of 5.9 ± 0.13 × 10 29 and 3.6 ± 1.0 × 10 26 molecules s −1 , respectively. The simultaneous detection permitted accurate determination of the isotopic ratio (D/H) in water of 3.02 ± 0.87 × 10 −4 , i.e., larger than the value for water in terrestrial oceans (or Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW) by a factor of 1.94 ± 0.56. This D/H ratio in water exceeds the value obtained independently at millimeter wavelengths (0.89 ± 0.25 VSMOW; pre-perihelion). We discuss these parameters in the context of origins and emphasize the need for contemporaneous measurements of HDO and H 2 O.

  1. Measurement of the Q2 dependence of the charged and neutral current cross sections in e±p scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.

    1996-03-01

    The Q 2 dependence and the total cross sections for charged and neutral current processes are measured in e ± p reactions for transverse momenta of the outgoing lepton larger than 25 GeV. Comparable size of cross sections for the neutral current process and for the weak charged current process are observed above Q 2 ∼5000 GeV 2 . Using the shape and magnitude of the charged current cross section we determine a propagator mass of m W =84 -7 +10 GeV. (orig.)

  2. The 3-loop pure singlet heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F2(x,Q2 and the anomalous dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pure singlet asymptotic heavy flavor corrections to 3-loop order for the deep-inelastic scattering structure function F2(x,Q2 and the corresponding transition matrix element AQq(3,PS in the variable flavor number scheme are computed. In Mellin-N space these inclusive quantities depend on generalized harmonic sums. We also recalculate the complete 3-loop pure singlet anomalous dimension for the first time. Numerical results for the Wilson coefficients, the operator matrix element and the contribution to the structure function F2(x,Q2 are presented.

  3. The 3-loop pure singlet heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F2(x,Q2) and the anomalous dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablinger, J.; Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; Manteuffel, A. von; Schneider, C.

    2015-01-01

    The pure singlet asymptotic heavy flavor corrections to 3-loop order for the deep-inelastic scattering structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) and the corresponding transition matrix element A Qq (3),PS in the variable flavor number scheme are computed. In Mellin-N space these inclusive quantities depend on generalized harmonic sums. We also recalculate the complete 3-loop pure singlet anomalous dimension for the first time. Numerical results for the Wilson coefficients, the operator matrix element and the contribution to the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) are presented

  4. The Spin Structure of the Proton at Low Q2: A Measurement of the Structure Function g2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Chao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The spin structure of the nucleon has remained as one of the key points of interest in hadronic physics, which has attracted many efforts from both experimentalists and theorists. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental theory that describes the strong interaction. It has been verified in the asymptotically free region. However, the non-perturbative confinement of quarks within the nucleon is still not well understood within QCD. In the non-perturbative regime, low-energy effective field theories such as chiral perturbation theory (XPT) provide predictions for the spin structure functions. The neutron spin structure functions, gp1 and gp2 , and the proton spin structure function, gp1, have been measured over a wide kinematic range and compared with the theoretical predictions. However, the proton spin structure function, gp2, remains largely unmeasured. The E08-027 collaboration successfully performed the first measurement of the inclusive electron-proton scattering in the kinematic range 0.02 < Q2 < 0.2 GeV2. The experiment took place in experimental Hall A at Jefferson Lab in 2012. A longitudinally polarized electron beam with incident energies between 1.1 GeV and 3.3 GeV was scattered from a longitudinally or transversely polarized NH3 target. Asymmetries and polarized cross-section differences were measured in the resonance region to extract the proton spin structure functions g2. The results allow us to obtain the generalized spin polarizabilities γ0 and δLT and test the Burkhardtt-Cottingham (BC) sum rule. Chiral perturbation theory is expected to work in this kinematic range and this measurement of δLT will give a benchmark test to XPT calculations. This thesis will discuss preliminary results from the E08-027 data analysis.

  5. NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIO OF COMETARY AMMONIA FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kawakita, Hideyo, E-mail: yoshiharu.shinnaka@nao.ac.jp [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    The icy materials present in comets provide clues to the origin and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems. High-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) were performed on 2015 January 11 (at 1.321 au pre-perihelion) with the High Dispersion Spectrograph mounted on the Subaru Telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii. We derive the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio of NH{sub 2} (126 ± 25), as well as the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of the H{sub 2}O{sup +} ion (2.77 ± 0.24) and NH{sub 2} (3.38 ± 0.07), which correspond to nuclear spin temperatures of >24 K (3 σ lower limit) and 27 ± 2 K, respectively. We also derive the intensity ratio of the green-to-red doublet of forbidden oxygen lines (0.107 ± 0.007). The ammonia in the comet must have formed under low-temperature conditions at ∼10 K or less to reproduce the observed {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in this molecule if it is assumed that the {sup 15}N-fractionation of ammonia occurred via ion–molecule chemical reactions. However, this temperature is inconsistent with the nuclear spin temperatures of water and ammonia estimated from the OPRs. The interpretation of the nuclear spin temperature as the temperature at molecular formation may therefore be incorrect. An isotope-selective photodissociation of molecular nitrogen by protosolar ultraviolet radiation might play an important role in the {sup 15}N-fractionation observed in cometary volatiles.

  6. Sum rule measurements of the spin-dependent compton amplitude (nucleon spin structure at Q2 = 0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babusci, D.; Giordano, G.; Baghaei, H.; Cichocki, A.; Blecher, M.; Breuer, M.; Commeaux, C.; Didelez, J.P.; Caracappa, A.; Fan, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Energy weighted integrals of the difference in helicity-dependent photo-production cross sections (σ 1/2 - σ 3/2 ) provide information on the nucleon's Spin-dependent Polarizability (γ), and on the spin-dependent part of the asymptotic forward Compton amplitude through the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov (DHG) sum rule. (The latter forms the Q 2 =0 limit of recent spin-asymmetry experiments in deep-inelastic lepton-scattering.) There are no direct measurements of σ 1/2 or σ 3/2 , for either the proton or the neutron. Estimates from current π-photo-production multipole analyses, particularly for the proton-neutron difference, are in good agreement with relativistic-l-loop Chiral calculations (χPT) for γ but predict large deviations from the DHG sum rule. Either (a) both the 2-loop corrections to the Spin-Polarizability are large and the existing multipoles are wrong, or (b) modifications to the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule are required to fully describe the isospin structure of the nucleon. The helicity-dependent photo-reaction amplitudes, for both the proton and the neutron, will be measured at LEGS from pion-threshold to 470 MeV. In these double-polarization experiments, circularly polarized photons from LEGS will be used with SPHICE, a new frozen-spin target consisting of rvec H · rvec D in the solid phase. Reaction channels will be identified in SASY, a large detector array covering about 80% of 4π. A high degree of symmetry in both target and detector will be used to minimize systematic uncertainties

  7. A Meteorite Dropping Superbolide from the Catastrophycally Disrupted Comet C1919Q2 Metcalf: A Pathway for Meteorites from Jupiter Family Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Madiedo, J. M.; Williams, I. P.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Llorca, J.; Vítek, S.; Jelínek, M.

    2009-03-01

    A meter-sized meteoroid probably produced during the disintegration of comet C1919Q2 Metcalf was observed producing a -18 magn. bolide (MNRAS, in press).The progenitor meteoroid was sufficiently large and of high enough tensile strength to produce meteorites.

  8. W 2 and Q 2 dependence of charged hadron and pion multiplicities in vp andbar vp charged current interactionscharged current interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Hoffmann, E.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Allport, P.; Borner, H. P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1990-03-01

    Using data on vp andbar vp charged current interactions from a bubble chamber experiment with BEBC at CERN, the average multiplicities of charged hadrons and pions are determined as functions of W 2 and Q 2. The analysis is based on ˜20000 events with incident v and ˜10000 events with incidentbar v. In addition to the known dependence of the average multiplicity on W 2 a weak dependence on Q 2 for fixed intervals of W is observed. For W>2 GeV and Q 2>0.1 GeV2 the average multiplicity of charged hadrons is well described by =a 1+ a 2ln( W 2/GeV2)+ a 3ln( Q 2/GeV2) with a 1=0.465±0.053, a 2=1.211±0.021, a 3=0.103±0.014 for the vp and a 1=-0.372±0.073, a 2=1.245±0.028, a 3=0.093±0.015 for thebar vp reaction.

  9. W2 and Q2 dependence of charged hadron and pion multiplicities in νp and anti νp charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Allport, P.; Borner, H.P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1990-01-01

    Using data on νp and anti νp charged current interactions from a bubble chamber experiment with BEBC at CERN, the average multiplicities of charged hadrons and pions are determined as functions of W 2 and Q 2 . The analysis is based on ∝20000 events with incident ν and ∝10000 events with incident anti ν. In addition to the known dependence of the average multiplicity on W 2 a weak dependence on Q 2 for fixed intervals of W is observed. For W>2 Gev and Q 2 >0.1 GeV 2 the average multiplicity of charged hadrons is well described by =a 1 +a 2 ln(W 2 /GeV 2 )+a 3 ln(Q 2 /GeV 2 ) with a 1 =0.465±0.053, a 2 =1.211±0.021, a 3 =0.103±0.014 for the νp and a 1 =-0.372±0.073, a 2 =1.245±0.028, a=30.093±0.015 for the anti νp reaction. (orig.)

  10. Improved extraction of two-photon exchange amplitudes from elastic electron-proton scattering cross section data up to Q2=5.20 (GeV/c ) 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qattan, I. A.; Homouz, D.; Riahi, M. K.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we improve on and extend to low- and high-Q2 values the extractions of the two-photon-exchange (TPE) amplitudes and the ratio Pl/PlBorn(ɛ ,Q2) using world data on electron-proton elastic scattering cross section σR(ɛ ,Q2) with an emphasis on data covering the high-momentum region, up to Q2=5.20 (GeV/c ) 2 , to better constrain the TPE amplitudes in this region. We provide a new parametrization of the TPE amplitudes, along with an estimate of the fit uncertainties. We compare the results to several previous phenomenological extractions and hadronic TPE predictions. We use the new parametrization of the TPE amplitudes to extract the ratio Pl/PlBorn(ɛ ,Q2) , and then compare the results to previous extractions, several theoretical calculations, and direct measurements at Q2=2.50 (GeV/c ) 2 .

  11. Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron at Q2=0.45 and 1.13 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeyuki Tajima

    2003-01-01

    Precise measurements of the electric form factor of the neutron, Gn E, over a wide range of the square of the four-momentum transfer, Q2, are important for understanding nucleon and nuclear electromagnetic structure. In the non-relativistic limit, the electric and magnetic form factors are related to the charge and magnetization distribution inside a nucleon, respectively. The measured values of the form factors also serve as an important test for nucleon models. Among the four nucleon form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron, Gn E, is the most difficult one to measure and therefore has been very poorly known especially in the region Q2 > 1 (GeV/c)2 due to the lack of a free neutron target and the small value of Gn E. The Jefferson Laboratory E93-038 collaboration measured the ratio of the electric to magnetic form factor of the neutron, g = Gn E/Gn M, at three acceptance-averaged Q2 values of 0.45, 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c)2 using the quasi-elastic 2H(∼e, e0∼n)1H reaction. In our experiment, an electron was scattered quasielastically from a neutron in a liquid-deuterium target, and the electron was detected in an electron spectrometer in coincidence with the neutron which was detected in a neutron polarimeter. The polarimeter was used to analyze the polarization of the recoil neutrons by measuring the np elastic scattering asymmetry. The experiment was performed in Hall-C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility during the period from September 2000 to April 2001. The value of g was determined from the measured ratio of the sideways and longitudinal components of the neutron polarization vector. The values for Gn E were computed from our measured values of g = Gn E/Gn M using the Gn M values obtained from a fit to the world data. The E93-038 collaboration reported the first measurements of Gn E using polarization techniques at Q2 greater than 1 (GeV/c)2. Furthermore, our measurements of Gn E at the two higher Q2 values of 1.13 and 1.45 (Ge

  12. Effect of NN correlations on predictions of nuclear transparencies for protons, knocked out in high Q2 (e,e'p) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinat, A.S.; Taragin, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    We study the transparency T of nuclei for nucleons knocked out in high-energy semi-inclusive (e,e'p) reactions, using an improved theoretical input, discussed by Nikolaev et al. We establish that neglect of NN correlations between the knocked-out and core nucleons reduces nuclear transparencies by ∼15 % for light, to ∼10% for heavy nuclei. About the same is predicted for transparencies, integrated over the transverse or longitudinal momentum of the outgoing proton. Hadron dynamics predicts a roughly constant T beyond Q 2 ∼2 GeV 2 , whereas for all targets the largest measured data point Q 2 =6.7 GeV 2 appears to lie above that plateau. Large error bars on those data points preclude a conclusion regarding the onset of colour transparency. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of F_2^ccbar and F_2^bbbar at High Q^2 using the H1 Vertex Detector at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, J.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements are presented of inclusive charm and beauty cross sections in e^+p collisions at HERA for values of photon virtuality Q^2 > 150 GeV^2 and of inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.7. The charm and beauty fractions are determined using a method based on the impact parameter, in the transverse plane, of tracks to the primary vertex, as measured by the H1 vertex detector. The data are divided into four regions in Q^2 and Bjorken x, and values for the structure functions F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} are obtained. The results are found to be compatible with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  14. Determination of the Pion Charge Form Factor at Q2=1.60 and 2.45 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, T.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C. C.; King, P. M.; Liu, J.; Roos, P. G.; Aniol, K.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Potterveld, D.; Reimer, P.; Zheng, X.; Barrett, B.; Sarty, A.; Blok, H. P.; Tvaskis, V.; Boeglin, W.; Markowitz, P.

    2006-01-01

    The 1 H(e,e ' π + )n cross section was measured at four-momentum transfers of Q 2 =1.60 and 2.45 GeV 2 at an invariant mass of the photon nucleon system of W=2.22 GeV. The charged pion form factor (F π ) was extracted from the data by comparing the separated longitudinal pion electroproduction cross section to a Regge model prediction in which F π is a free parameter. The results indicate that the pion form factor deviates from the charge-radius constrained monopole form at these values of Q 2 by one sigma, but is still far from its perturbative quantum chromodynamics prediction

  15. The O(αs3) massive operator matrix elements of O(nf) for the structure function F2(x,Q2) and transversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablinger, J.; Bluemlein, J.; Klein, S.; Schneider, C.; Wissbrock, F.

    2011-01-01

    The contributions ∝n f to the O(α s 3 ) massive operator matrix elements describing the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in the limit Q 2 >>m 2 are computed for the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) and transversity for general values of the Mellin variable N. Here, for two matrix elements, A qq,Q PS (N) and A qg,Q (N), the complete result is obtained. A first independent computation of the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions γ qg (N), γ qq PS (N), and γ qq NS,(TR) (N) is given. In the computation advanced summation technologies for nested sums over products of hypergeometric terms with harmonic sums have been used. For intermediary results generalized harmonic sums occur, while the final results can be expressed by nested harmonic sums only.

  16. A measurement of jet cross sections at low Q2 and an interpretation of the results in terms of a partonic structure of the virtual photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of single inclusive jet cross-sections are presented using deep inelastic scattering data from H1 in the kinematic region 0.65 2 2 and 0.3 2 2 and 0.1 T *2 >> Q 2 . The ratio σ(res)/σ(dir) is also presented and shows the partonic structure of the photon to decrease with increasing photon virtuality. (author)

  17. Deep inelastic inclusive and diffractive scattering at Q2 values from 25 to 320 GeV2 with the ZEUS forward plug calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-01-01

    Deep inelastic scattering and its diffractive component, ep→e'γ * p→e'XN, have been studied at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 52.4 pb -1 . The M X method has been used to extract the diffractive contribution. A wide range in the centre-of-mass energy W (37-245 GeV), photon virtuality Q 2 (20-450 GeV 2 ) and mass M X (0.28-35 GeV) is covered. The diffractive cross section for 2 X 2 increases. The data are also presented in terms of the diffractive structure function, F D(3) 2 , of the proton. For fixed Q 2 and fixed M X , x P F D(3) 2 shows a strong rise as x P →0, where x P is the fraction of the proton momentum carried by the Pomeron. For Bjorken-x -3 , x P F D(3) 2 shows positive log Q 2 scaling violations, while for x≥5 x 10 -3 negative scaling violations are observed. The diffractive structure function is compatible with being leading twist. The data show that Regge factorisation is broken. (orig.)

  18. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions and anomalous dimensions for the structure function F2(x,Q2 and transversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F2(x,Q2 in the asymptotic region Q2≫m2 and the associated operator matrix element Aqq,Q(3,NS(N to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N. This matrix element is associated with the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments N, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to O(NF and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in N space and harmonic polylogarithms in x-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to F2(x,Q2.

  19. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions and anomalous dimensions for the structure function F2(x,Q2) and transversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablinger, J.; Hasselhuhn, A.; Schneider, C.; Manteuffel, A. von

    2014-06-01

    We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) in the asymptotic region Q 2 >>m 2 and the associated operator matrix element A (3),NS qq,Q (N) to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N. This matrix element is associated to the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments N, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to O(N F ) and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in N space and harmonic polylogarithms in x-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to F 2 (x,Q 2 ).

  20. Production of Q2Q-bar2 mesoniums in γγ reactions, hardonic collisions, and J/psi radiative decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    The rho 0 rho 0 enhancement and the rho + rho - supression in γγ reactions near the threshold is taken as a strong evidence for an exotic isotensor quantum number which signals for the multi-quark (Q 2 Q-bar 2 ) structure. The mass and the cross sections agree well with the prediction based on the Q 2 Q-bar 2 structure. The 2 ++ phiphi resonance at 2.16 GeV in πp and pp collisions has been interpreted as a 2 ++ s 2 s-bar 2 mesonium. The calculated mass, width, and the cross sections are all in accord with the experimental data. The correlated J/psi pair produced around 7 GeV in πN collisions at 150 and 280 GeV/c has been considered as a 2 ++ c 2 c-bar 2 mesonium. The calculated cross sections and the longitudinal and transverse momentum distributions are consistent with the data. The calculated branching ratio for J/psi → γ(Q 2 Q-bar 2 ) 2 ++ → γ rho - rho 0 is compatible with the recent experimental upper limit and the ratios of the helicity amplitudes are distinct from the ones measured in J/psi → γ θ(1700) → γ etaeta, γ KK-bar. The branching ratio for J/γ → γ(s 2 s-bar 2 ) 2 ++ → γ phiphi is predicted to be --10 -6

  1. xF 3( x,Q 2) Structure Function and Gross-Llewellyn Smith Sum Rule with Nuclear Effect and Higher Twist Correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, N.M.; Mukharjee, A.; Das, M.K.; Sarma, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the xF 3 (x,Q 2 ) structure function and Gross-Llewellyn Smith(GLS) sum rule taking into account the nuclear effects and higher twist correction. This analysis is based on the results presented in [N.M. Nath, et al, Indian J. Phys. 90 (2016) 117]. The corrections due to nuclear effects predicted in several earlier analysis are incorporated to our results of xF 3 (x,Q 2 ) structure function and GLS sum rule for free nucleon, corrected upto next-next-to-leading order (NNLO) perturbative order and calculate the nuclear structure function as well as sum rule for nuclei. In addition, by means of a simple model we have extracted the higher twist contributions to the non-singlet structure function xF 3 (x,Q 2 ) and GLS sum rule in NNLO perturbative orders and then incorporated them to our results. Our NNLO results along with nuclear effect and higher twist corrections are observed to be compatible with corresponding experimental data and other phenomenological analysis. (paper)

  2. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions and anomalous dimensions for the structure function F2(x,Q2) and transversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablinger, J.; Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; Hasselhuhn, A.; Manteuffel, A. von; Round, M.; Schneider, C.; Wißbrock, F.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) in the asymptotic region Q 2 ≫m 2 and the associated operator matrix element A qq,Q (3),NS (N) to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N. This matrix element is associated with the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments N, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to O(N F ) and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in N space and harmonic polylogarithms in x-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to F 2 (x,Q 2 )

  3. Parenting Perfectionism and Parental Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Meghan A.; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J.; Kamp Dush, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    The parental role is expected to be one of the most gratifying and rewarding roles in life. As expectations of parenting become ever higher, the implications of parenting perfectionism for parental adjustment warrant investigation. Using longitudinal data from 182 couples, this study examined the associations between societal- and self-oriented parenting perfectionism and new mothers’ and fathers’ parenting self-efficacy, stress, and satisfaction. For mothers, societal-oriented parenting perf...

  4. Induced Proton Polarization for pi0 Electroproduction at Q2 = 0.126 GeV2/c2 Around the Delta(1232) Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen Warren; Ricardo Alarcon; Christopher Armstrong; Burin Asavapibhop; David Barkhuff; William Bertozzi; Volker Burkert; Chen, J.; Jian-Ping Chen; Joseph Comfort; Daniel Dale; George Dodson; Dolfini, S.; Dow, K.; Martin Epstein; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; John Finn; Shalev Gilad; Ralf Gothe; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Kyungseon Joo; Karabarbounis, A.; James Kelly; Stanley Kowalski; Kunz, C.; Liu, D.; Lourie, R.W.; Richard Madey; Demetrius Margaziotis; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; Mertz, C.; Brian Milbrath; Rory Miskimen; Joseph Mitchell; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Costas Papanicolas; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Liming Qin; Paul Rutt; Adam Sarty; Jeffrey Shaw; Soong, S.B.; Tieger, D.; Christoph Tschalaer; William Turchinetz; Paul Ulmer; Scott Van Verst; Vellidis, C.; Lawrence Weinstein; Steven Williamson; Rhett Woo; Alaen Young

    1998-01-01

    We present a measurement of the induced proton polarization P n in π 0 electroproduction on the proton around the Δ resonance. The measurement was made at a central invariant mass and a squared four-momentum transfer of W = 1231 MeV and Q 2 = 0.126 GeV 2 /c 2 , respectively. We measured a large induced polarization, P n = -0.397 ± 0.055 ± 0.009. The data suggest that the scalar background is larger than expected from a recent effective Hamiltonian model

  5. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g_1^d(x) for 1 (GeV/c)^2 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2

    OpenAIRE

    E155 Collaboration

    1999-01-01

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g_1^d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g_1^d, including Gamma_1^d, and the net quark polarization Delta Si...

  6. Measurement of the deuteron spin structure function $g^{d}_1(x)$ for $1\\ (GeV/c)^2 < Q^2 < 40\\ (GeV/c)^2$.

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony , P.L.; Arnold , R.G.; Averett , T.; Band , H.R.; Berisso , M.C.; Borel , H.; Bosted , P.E.; Bultmann , S.L.; Buenerd , M.; Chupp , T.; Churchwell , S.; Court , G.R.; Crabb , D.; Day , D.; Decowski , P.

    1999-01-01

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g_1^d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g_1^d, including Gamma_1^d, and the net quark polarization Delta Si...

  7. Measurement of the cross-section ratio σn/σp in inelastic muon-nucleon scattering at very low x and Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavassiliou, V.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented on the measurement of the cross-section ratio σ n /σ p inelastic μN scattering obtained by the E-665 experiment using the Fermilab 490 GeV/c muon beam and liquid H 2 and D 2 targets. The results extend the previously measured x range by two orders of magnitude, down to 2 x 10 -5 , at Q 2 > 10 -2 GeV 2 /C 2 . The ratio is consistent with 1 throughout the new range

  8. Precision measurement of the cross section of charged-current and neutral current processes at large Q2 at HERA with the polarized-electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Trong Hieu

    2010-03-01

    The inclusive cross sections for both charged and neutral current processes have been measured in interactions of longitudinally polarized electrons (positrons) with unpolarized protons using the full data samples collected by H1 at HERA-II. The data taken at a center-of-mass energy of 319 GeV correspond to an integrated luminosity of 149.1 pb -1 and 180.0 pb -1 for e - p and e + p collisions, representing an increase in statistics of a factor of 10 and 2, respectively, over the data from HERA-I. The measured double differential cross sections d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 cover more than two orders of magnitude in both Q 2 , the negative four-momentum transfer squared, up to 30000 GeV 2 , and Bjorken x, down to 0.003. The cross section data are compared to predictions of the Standard Model which is able to provide a good description of the data. The polarization asymmetry as a function of Q 2 is measured with improved precision, confirming the previous observation of P violation effect in neutral current ep scattering at distances down to 10 -18 m. The total cross sections of the charged current process, for Q 2 > 400 GeV 2 and inelasticity y ± beams and different polarization values. Together with the corresponding cross section obtained from the previously published unpolarized data, the polarization dependence of the charged current cross section is measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model prediction with the absence of right-handed charged current. The cross sections are combined with previously published data from H1 to obtain the most precise unpolarized measurements. These are used to extract the structure function xF 3 γZ which is sensitive to the valence quark distributions down to low x values. The new cross sections have also been used in a combined electroweak and QCD fit to significantly improve the light quark couplings to the Z-boson than those obtained based on the HERA-I data alone. (orig.)

  9. Spin asymmetries $A_1$ of the proton and the deuteron in the low $x$ and low $Q^2$ region from polarized high energy muon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Krämer, Dietrich; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Willumeit, R; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of the spin asymmetries $A_1$ of the proton and the deuteron in the kinematic region extending down to $x=6\\cdot 10^{-5}$ and $Q^2=0.01$ GeV$^2$. The data were taken with a dedicated low $x$ trigger, which required hadron detection in addition to the scattered muon, so as to reduce the background at low $x$. The results complement our previous measurements and the two sets are consistent in the overlap region. No sig\\-ni\\-fi\\-cant spin effects are found in the newly explored region.

  10. Spin asymmetry $A^d_1$ and the spin-dependent structure function $g^d_1$ of the deuteron at low values of $x$ and $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, E.S.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berglund, P.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Cerini, L.; Chapiro, A.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz Kavka, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Dolgopolov, A.V.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Ehlers, J.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Fabro, M.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchs, U.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grunemaier, A.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; He, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Ijaduola, R.B.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kang, D.; Karstens, F.; Kastaun, W.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomutov, N.V.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kowalik, K.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Manuilov, I.V.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Medved, K.S.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pereira, H.D.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Platzer, K.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Rebourgeard, P.C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymann, J.; Rith, K.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Rondio, E.; Sadovski, A.B.; Saller, E.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sans, M.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Savin, Igor A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, H.; Schmitt, L.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Shishkin, A.A.; Siebert, H.-W.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Skachkova, A.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sozzi, F.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takabayashi, N.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Thers, D.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Toeda, T.; Tretyak, V.I.; Trusov, Sergey V.; Varanda, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Wagner, M.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Wiedner, U.; Wiesmann, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zaremba, K.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Zvyagin, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a precise measurement of the deuteron longitudinal spin asymmetry $A_1^d$ and of the deuteron spin-dependent structure function $g_1^d$ at $Q^2 < $ 1~(GeV/$c$)$^2$ and $4\\cdot$10$^{-5} < x < $~2.5$\\cdot$10$^{-2}$ based on the data collected by the COMPASS experiment at CERN during the years 2002 and 2003. The statistical precision is tenfold better than that of the previous measurement in this region. The measured $A_1^d$ and $g_1^d$ are found to be consistent with zero in the whole range of $x$.

  11. The dynamics of the quasielastic 16O(e,e'p) reaction at Q2 = 0.8 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissum, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    The physics program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab commenced in the summer of 1997 with a detailed investigation of the 16O(e,e'p) reaction in quasielastic, constant (q,w) kinematics at Q 2 ∼ 0.8 (GeV/c) 2 , q ∼ 1 GeV/c, and w ∼ 445 MeV. Use of a self-calibrating, self-normalizing, thin-film waterfall target enabled a systematically rigorous measurement. Differential cross-section data for proton knockout were obtained for 0 < Emiss < 120 MeV and 0 < pmiss < 350 MeV/c. These results have been used to extract the ALT asymmetry and the RL, RT, RLT, and RL+TT effective response functions. Detailed comparisons of the data with Relativistic Distorted-Wave Impulse Approximation, Relativistic Optical-Model Eikonal Approximation, and Relativistic Multiple-Scattering Glauber Approximation calculations are made. The kinematic consistency of the 1p-shell normalization factors extracted from these data with respect to all available 16O(e,e'p) data is examined. The Q2-dependence of the normalization factors is also discussed

  12. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e-p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e - p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q 2 and x are measured in the kinematic region y 2 > 185GeV 2 for both positively and negatively polarised electron beams and for each polarisation state separately. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 169.9 pb -1 taken with the ZEUS detector in 2005 and 2006 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV. The structure functions xF 3 and xF 3 γZ are determined by combining the e - p results presented in this paper with previously measured e + p neutral current data. The asymmetry parameter A - is used to demonstrate the parity violating effects of electroweak interactions at large spacelike photon virtuality. The measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  13. A Study of the $Q^{2}$ Dependence of the QCD Coupling Constant from the Transverse Momentum of Jets in Deep Inelastic Muon Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Janet Marie [Harvard U.

    1993-01-01

    Experiment 665 at Fermilab is the first deep inelastic scattering experiment to obtain data in a kinematic range where jets can be identified on an event-by-event basis. In this thesis, using the average squared transverse momentum of the jets produced in deep inelastic muon scattering, a quantity is calculated which Perturbative QCD predicts to be equal to $\\alpha_3$ the strong coupling constant. The quantity is studied as a function of $Q^2$, the negative 4-momentum squared of the virtual photon, for 3 < $Q^2$ < 25 $GeV^2$. The data a.re shown to be consistent with the predictions of PQCD with $\\Lambda ^{\\eta_f = 4}_{DIS}$ = 359 ± 31 (stat) ± 149 (sys) MeV. However this may have a significant theoretical error due to uncalculated higher order corrections. This thesis provides a detailed description of the characteristics of the identified jets. The transverse momentum due to fragmentation is measured to be ($P^2_{\\tau}frag$) = 0.0820 ±0.002(stat) ±0.005(sys). Using naive assumptions about the jets, the intrinsic transverse momentum is measured to be ($k^2_{\\tau}$) = 0.27 ±0.01 (stat) ±0.03 (sys) Gev·2

  14. Assessment of Bias in the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Reanalysis Radar-Only Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, B. R.; Prat, O. P.; Stevens, S. E.; Seo, D. J.; Zhang, J.; Howard, K.

    2014-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is nearly completed for the period covering from 2001 to 2012. Reanalysis data are available at 1-km and 5-minute resolution. An important step in generating the best possible precipitation data is to assess the bias in the radar-only product. In this work, we use data from a combination of rain gauge networks to assess the bias in the NMQ reanalysis. Rain gauge networks such as the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), the Climate Reference Network (CRN), and the Global Historical Climatology Network Daily (GHCN-D) are combined for use in the assessment. These rain gauge networks vary in spatial density and temporal resolution. The challenge hence is to optimally utilize them to assess the bias at the finest resolution possible. For initial assessment, we propose to subset the CONUS data in climatologically representative domains, and perform bias assessment using information in the Q2 dataset on precipitation type and phase.

  15. Cross sections and Rosenbluth separations in 1H(e,e'K+)Λ up to Q2=2.35 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coman, M.; Markowitz, P.; Boeglin, W. U.; Klein, F.; Kramer, L.; Raue, B.; Reinhold, J.; Aniol, K. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Baker, K.; Cha, J.; Cole, L.; Gueye, P.; Hinton, W.; Jackson, C.; Keppel, C.; Tang, L.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C. C.; Chant, N.

    2010-01-01

    The kaon electroproduction reaction 1 H(e,e ' K + )Λ was studied as a function of the virtual-photon four-momentum, Q 2 , total energy, W, and momentum transfer, t, for different values of the virtual-photon polarization parameter. Data were taken at electron beam energies ranging from 3.40 to 5.75 GeV. The center of mass cross section was determined for twenty-one kinematics corresponding to Q 2 of 1.90 and 2.35 GeV 2 , and the longitudinal, σ L , and transverse, σ T , cross sections were separated using the Rosenbluth technique at fixed W and t. The separated cross sections reveal a flat energy dependence at forward kaon angles not satisfactorily described by existing electroproduction models. Influence of the kaon pole on the cross sections was investigated by adopting an off-shell form factor in the Regge model, which better describes the observed energy dependence of σ T and σ L .

  16. Angular analysis of the $B^0 \\to K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay in the low-$q^2$ region at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Borsato, Martino

    2015-01-01

    An angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay is performed using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0${\\mbox {fb}^{-1}}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. For the first time several observables are measured in the dielectron mass squared ($q^2$) interval between 0.002 and 1.120${\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V^2\\!/}c^4}$. The angular observables $F_{\\mathrm{L}}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}}$ which are related to the \\Kstarz polarisation and to the lepton forward-backward asymmetry, are measured to be $F_{\\mathrm{L}}= 0.16 \\pm 0.06 \\pm0.03$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}} = 0.10 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.05$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The angular observables $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Im}}$ which are sensitive to the photon polarisation in this $q^2$ range, are found to be $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)} = -0.23 \\pm 0.23 \\pm...

  17. Determination of the proton spin structure functions for 0.05 <Q2<5 GeV2 using CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fersch, R. G.; Guler, N.; Bosted, P.; Deur, A.; Griffioen, K.; Keith, C.; Kuhn, S. E.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adhikari, S.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Balossino, I.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Thanh Cao, Frank; Carman, D. S.; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khachatryan, M.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lagerquist, V. G.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pierce, J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Riser, D.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of our final analysis of the full data set of g1p(Q2) , the spin structure function of the proton, collected using CLAS at Jefferson Laboratory in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2, and 5.7 GeV were scattered from proton targets (NH153 dynamically polarized along the beam direction) and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetries, we extracted virtual photon asymmetries A1p and A2p and spin structure functions g1p and g2p over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2<Q2< 5 GeV2 and 1.08 GeV

  18. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio GEn/GMn via the 2H(e→,e'n→)1H reaction to Q2=1.45 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaster, B.; Semenov, A.Yu.; Semenova, I.A.; Aghalaryan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Tadevosyan, V.; Crouse, E.; Finn, J.M.; Perdrisat, C.; Roche, J.; MacLachlan, G.; Opper, A.K.; Tajima, S.; Churchwell, S.; Howell, C.R.; Tireman, W.; Ahmidouch, A.; Anderson, B. D.

    2006-01-01

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G En /G Mn , deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic 2 H(e→,e ' n→) 1 H reaction, at three Q 2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c) 2 . The data at Q 2 =1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c) 2 are the first direct experimental measurements of G En employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q 2 >1 (GeV/c) 2 region and stand as the most precise determinations of G En for all values of Q 2

  19. Measurement of the electron--deuteron elastic scattering cross section in the range 0.8 less than or equal to q2 less than or equal to 6 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.G.; Chertok, B.T.; Dally, E.B.; Grigorian, A.; Jordan, C.L.; Schuetz, W.P.; Zdarko, R.; Martin, F.; Mecking, B.A.

    1975-06-01

    Preliminary results of elastic eD scattering at large momentum transfer performed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using two high resolution spectrometers in coincidence are reported. The deuteron structure function A(q 2 ) is deduced at 9 values of q 2 from a comparison of elastic eD and eP coincident yields and the world's eP cross sections. These measurements extend the range of q 2 by 4.5 over previous work, and in this new range A(q 2 ) is observed to approach 1/q 20 momentum dependence. Results are in sharp disagreement with the meson exchange calculations, and they are in rough agreement with the nonrelativistic potential models, and they are in agreement with the predictions of the quark dimensional scaling model which pictures the deuteron as a bound state of 6 quarks at large momentum transfer

  20. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form-factor ratio GEn/GMn via the 2H((rvec e), e(prime)(rvec n)) 1H reaction to Q2 = 1.45-(GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley Plaster; A.Yu. Semenov; A. Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; David Barkhuff; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Eden; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; Richard Madey; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Nikolai Savvinov; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Shawn Taylor; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2006-01-01

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G En /G Mn , deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic 2 H((rvec e), e(prime)(rvec n)) 1 H reaction, at three Q 2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c) 2 . The data at Q 2 = 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c) 2 are the first direct experimental measurements of GEn employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q 2 > 1 (GeV/c) 2 region and stand as the most precise determinations of GEn for all values of Q 2

  1. O(αs2) and O(αs3) heavy flavor contributions to transversity at Q2 >> m2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, Johannes; Klein, Sebastian; Toedtli, Beat

    2009-09-01

    In deep-inelastic processes the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients factorize for Q 2 >>m 2 into the light flavor Wilson coefficients of the corresponding process and the massive operator matrix elements (OMEs). We calculate the O(α s 2 ) and O(α s 3 ) massive OME for the flavor non-singlet transversity distribution. At O(α s 2 ) the OME is obtained for general values of the Mellin variable N, while at O(α s 3 ) the moments N=1 to 13 are computed. The terms ∝ T F of the 3.loop transversity anomalous dimension are obtained and results in the literature are confirmed. We discuss the relation of these contributions to the Soffer bound for transversity. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of the proton structure from high-Q2 neutral current events in e+p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnurbusch, H.

    2002-09-01

    Inclusive Neutral Current cross sections in e + p deep inelastic scattering yielding the generalised structure function F 2 have been measured in the regime of Q 2 > 185 GeV 2 . The data sample of 63.2 pb -1 was collected in the 1999/2000 data-taking period of the ZEUS experiment at the HERA collider. The centre-of-mass energy was √(s) = 318 GeV. Statistical and systematic uncertainties have been calculated throughout the kinematical range of the data. Systematic uncertainties were studied including photoproduction background, first-level trigger efficiency and the hadronic final state in the Forward Tracking Devices of the detector. The structure function F 2 was measured more precisely than in earlier measurements due to the larger data set and due to increased knowledge about systematic effects. The results are in good agreement with the Standard Model evaluated with the CTEQ5D parton distribution functions. (orig.)

  3. Deuteron electrofission in forward direction at a four-momentum transfer of Q2=0.12 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boden, B.

    1990-12-01

    The deuteron electrodisintegration has been performed as the first experiment at the new Bonn 3.5 GeV high duty-cycle electron accelerator ELSA (Electron Stretcher and Accelerator). The cross section was measured in the region of the Δ(1232) resonance excitation at four-momentum-transfer of Q 2 = 0.12 (GeV/c) 2 . An enhancement of the cross section has been observed at the mass of the NΔ system(W = 2.19 GeV) at each of the three hadron spectrometer angles Θ p LAB = 44 0 , 56 0 , 68 0 ) which were set. The results are compared with theoretical calculations. (orig.) [de

  4. Electric form factor of the neutron from the 2H(e-->,e'n-->)1H reaction at Q2=0.255 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Eden; R. Madey; W.-M. Zhang; B. D. Anderson; H. Arenhvel; A. R. Baldwin; D. Barkhuff; K. B. Beard; W. Bertozzi; J. M. Cameron; C. C. Chang; G. W. Dodson; K. Dow; M. Farkhondeh; J. M. Finn; B. S. Flanders; C. Hyde-Wright; W.-D. Jiang; D. Keane; J. J. Kelly; W. Korsch; S. Kowalski; R. Lourie; D. M. Manley; P. Markowitz; J. Mougey; B. Ni; T. Payerle; P. J. Pella; T. Reichelt; P. M. Rutt; M. Spraker; D. Tieger; W. Turchinetz; P. E. Ulmer; S. Van Verst; J. W. Watson; L. B. Weinstein; and R. R. Whitney

    1994-01-01

    We determined the electric form factor GnE of the neutron from the quasielastic 2H(e-->,e'n-->)1H reaction at a central squared four-momentum transfer Q2=0.255 (GeV/c)2 with a longitudinally polarized electron beam of 868 MeV and a low (∼0.8%) duty factor. A neutron polarimeter designed and constructed specifically for this experiment was used to measure the sideways polarization of the recoil neutron, which was detected in coincidence with the scattered electron. Theoretical calculations have established that this polarization-transfer technique for quasielastic scattering produces a value of GnE that shows little sensitivity to the influence of final-state interactions, meson-exchange currents, isobar configurations, and deuteron structure. The value for GnE from this measurement is 0.066 ± 0.036 ± 0.009

  5. Measurement of e-p→e-X differential cross sections at high Q2 and of the structure function xF3 with ZEUS at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappes, A.

    2001-12-01

    The 16 pb -1 of e - p data taken with the ZEUS detector during the 1998/99 running period of HERA have been used to measure neutral current single- and double-differential cross sections in deep inelastic e - p scattering in the range 200 GeV 2 2 2 and 3.7.10 -3 2 is visible. A comparison of the measured e - p cross sections to those from e + p clearly reveals the influence of the Z-boson contribution for Q 2 >or∼ M Z 2 . This dependence is exploited to determine the mass of the Z boson, M Z , and by combining the e - p and e + p cross sections the parity violating structure function xF 3 is extracted for the first time in deep-inelastic ep scattering at ZEUS. (orig.)

  6. Mellin moments of the O(αs3) heavy flavor contributions to unpolarized deep-inelastic scattering at Q2 >> m2 and anomalous dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierenbaum, I.; Bluemlein, J.; Klein, S.

    2009-04-01

    We calculate the O(α s 3 ) heavy flavor contributions to theWilson coefficients of the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) and the massive operator matrix elements (OMEs) for the twist-2 operators of unpolarized deeply inelastic scattering in the region Q 2 >>m 2 . The massive Wilson coefficients are obtained as convolutions of massive OMEs and the known light flavor Wilson coefficients. We also compute the massive OMEs which are needed to evaluate heavy flavor parton distributions in the variable flavor number scheme (VFNS) to 3-loop order. All contributions to the Wilson coefficients and operator matrix elements but the genuine constant terms at O(α s 3 ) of the OMEs are derived in terms of quantities, which are known for general values in the Mellin variable N. For the operator matrix elements A (3) Qg , A (3) gq,Q and A (3) gg,Q the moments N=2 to 10, for A (3),PS Qq to N=12, and for A (3),NS qq,Q , A (3),PS qq,Q , A (3),PS gq,Q to N=14 are computed. These terms contribute to the light flavor +-combinations. For the flavor non-singlet terms, we calculate as well the odd moments N=1 to 13, corresponding to the light flavor --combinations. We also obtain the moments of the 3-loop anomalous dimensions, their color projections for the present processes respectively, in an independent calculation, which agree with the results given in the literature. (orig.)

  7. Parenting Seminars for Divorcing Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Barry B.

    1995-01-01

    Profiles the parenting seminars and counseling services for divorcing parents offered by the Children of Separation and Divorce Center, a community service agency in Maryland. The seminars are designed to help parents adjust to divorce and understand the needs of their children during and after the divorce process. (MDM)

  8. Measurement of Inclusive ep Cross Sections at High Q2 at sqrt(s) = 225 and 252 GeV and of the Longitudinal Proton Structure Function FL at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Herbst, M.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raspereza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2014-04-08

    Inclusive ep double differential cross sections for neutral current deep inelastic scattering are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were taken with a lepton beam energy of 27.6 GeV and two proton beam energies of Ep = 460 and 575 GeV corresponding to centre-of-mass energies of 225 and 252 GeV, respectively. The measurements cover the region of 6.5 *10^{-4}<=x<= 0.65 for 35<=Q^2<=800 GeV^2 up to y = 0.85. The measurements are used together with previously published H1 data at Ep = 920 GeV and lower Q2 data at Ep = 460, 575 and 920 GeV to extract the longitudinal proton structure function FL in the region 1.5<=Q^2 <=800 GeV^2.

  9. Precise Extraction of the Neutron Magnetic Form Factor from Quasi-elastic 3He(pol)(e(pol),e') at Q2 = 0.1-0.6 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jens-ole Hansen; Brian Anderson; Leonard Auerbach; Todd Averett; William Bertozzi; Tim Black; John Calarco; Lawrence Cardman; Gordon Cates; Zhengwei Chai; Jiang-Ping Chen; Seonho Choi; Eugene Chudakov; Steve Churchwell; G Corrado; Christopher Crawford; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Dipangkar Dutta; John Finn; Haiyan Gao; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Charles Glashausser; Walter Gloeckle; Jacek Golak; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Calvin Howell; Emlyn Hughes; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Piotr Zolnierczuk; Cornelis De Jager; John Jensen; Xiaodong Jiang; Cathleen Jones; Mark Jones; R Kahl; H Kamada; A Kievsky; Ioannis Kominis; Wolfgang Korsch; Kevin Kramer; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Michael Kuss; Enkeleida Lakuriqi; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; John LeRose; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Jeffery Martin; Kathy McCormick; Robert McKeown; Kevin McIlhany; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Greg Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Sirish Nanda; Emanuele Pace; Tina Pavlin; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; David Pripstein; David Prout; Ronald Ransome; Yves Roblin; Marat Rvachev; Giovanni Salme; Michael Schnee; Charles Seely; Taeksu Shin; Karl Slifer; Paul Souder; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Mark Sutter; Bryan Tipton; Luminita Todor; M Viviani; Branislav Vlahovic; John Watson; Claude Williamson; H Witala; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Feng Xiong; Wang Xu; Jen-chuan Yeh

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the transverse asymmetry A T' in the quasi-elastic 3 /rvec He/(/rvec e/,e') process with high precision at Q 2 -values from 0.1 to 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 . The neutron magnetic form factor G M n was extracted at Q 2 -values of 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c) 2 using a non-relativistic Faddeev calculation which includes both final-state interactions (FSI) and meson-exchange currents (MEC). Theoretical uncertainties due to the FSI and MEC effects were constrained with a precision measurement of the spin-dependent asymmetry in the threshold region of 3 /rvec He/(/rvec e/,e'). We also extracted the neutron magnetic form factor G M n at Q 2 -values of 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 based on Plane Wave Impulse Approximation calculations

  10. Measurement of the magnetic neutron form factor at a four-momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.255 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reike, H.

    1993-12-01

    The Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA of Bonn University delivers an external electron beam with a duty factor of up to 55%. Thus nonmagnetic detectors can be used to perform electron nucleon coincidence experiments with high precision. The magnetic form factor of the neutron G m n is determined by the so-called ratio method, i.e. G m n is extracted from the measured ratio of the cross sections of the d(e,e'n) and d(e,e'p) reactions in a region of quasi-free kinematics. Protons and neutrons are detected simultaneously in the same scintillation counter, so many systematic errors cancel out. The neutron detection efficiency is measured in situ by the associated particle method using the p(γ,π + n) reaction. For this reaction the high energy part of the photons produced by the electron beam in the target is used. The value of G m n found at a four momentum transfer of Q 2 = 0.255 (GeV/c) 2 is (10.1 ± 3.8)% higher than the dipole value. (orig.)

  11. DETAILED ANALYSIS OF NEAR-IR WATER (H2O) EMISSION IN COMET C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY) WITH THE GIANO/TNG SPECTROGRAPH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faggi, S.; Brucato, J. R.; Tozzi, G. P.; Oliva, E.; Massi, F.; Sanna, N.; Tozzi, A.; Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    We observed the Oort cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) on 2015 January 31 and February 1 and 2 at a heliocentric distance of 1.3 au and geocentric distance of 0.8 au during its approach to the Sun. Comet Lovejoy was observed with GIANO, the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph mounted at the Nasmyth-A focus of the TNG (Telescopio Nazionale Galileo) telescope in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. We detected strong emissions of radical CN and water, along with many emission features of unidentified origin, across the 1–2.5 μ m region. Spectral lines from eight ro-vibrational bands of H 2 O were detected, six of them for the first time. We quantified the water production rate [ Q (H 2 O), (3.11 ± 0.14) × 10 29 s −1 ] by comparing the calibrated line fluxes with the Goddard full non-resonance cascade fluorescence model for H 2 O. The production rates of ortho-water [ Q (H 2 O) ORTHO , (2.33 ± 0.11) × 10 29 s −1 ] and para-water [ Q (H 2 O) PARA , (0.87 ± 0.21) × 1029 s −1 ] provide a measure of the ortho-to-para ratio (2.70 ± 0.76)). The confidence limits are not small enough to provide a critical test of the nuclear spin temperature.

  12. Detailed Analysis of Near-IR Water (H2O) Emission in Comet C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY) with the GIANO/TNG Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggi, S.; Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Brucato, J.R.; Tozzi, G. P.; Oliva, E.; Massi, F.; Sanna, N.; Tozzi, A.

    2016-01-01

    We observed the Oort cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) on 2015 January 31 and February 1 and 2 at a heliocentric distance of 1.3 au and geocentric distance of 0.8 au during its approach to the Sun. Comet Lovejoy was observed with GIANO, the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph mounted at the Nasmyth-A focus of the TNG (Telescopio Nazionale Galileo) telescope in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. We detected strong emissions of radical CN and water, along with many emission features of unidentified origin, across the 1-2.5 micron region. Spectral lines from eight ro-vibrational bands of H2O were detected, six of them for the first time. We quantified the water production rate [Q(H2O), (3.11+/- 0.14) x 10(exp 29)/s] by comparing the calibrated line fluxes with the Goddard full non-resonance cascade fluorescence model for H2O. The production rates of ortho-water [Q(H2O)ORTHO, (2.33+/- 0.11) x 10(exp 29)/s] and para-water [Q(H2O)PARA, (0.87+/-0.21) x 10(exp 29)/s] provide a measure of the ortho-to-para ratio (2.70+/- 0.76)). The confidence limits are not small enough to provide a critical test of the nuclear spin temperature.

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION (VOLUME 31)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-01-01

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce

  14. Molecular structure and spectral properties of ethyl 3-quinolinecarboxylate (E3Q) and [Ag(E3Q)2(TCA)] complex (TCA = Trichloroacetate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Saied M.; Kassem, Taher S.; Badr, Ahmed M. A.; Abou Youssef, Morsy A.; Assem, Rania

    2014-09-01

    A new [Ag(E3Q)2(TCA)] complex; (E3Q = Ethyl 3-quinolinecarboxylate and TCA = Trichloroacetate) has been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, FTIR, NMR and mass spectroscopy. The molecular geometry and spectroscopic properties of the complex as well as the free ligand have been calculated using the hybrid B3LYP method. The calculations predicted a distorted tetrahedral arrangement around Ag(I) ion. The vibrational spectra of the studied compounds have been assigned using potential energy distribution (PED). TD-DFT method was used to predict the electronic absorption spectra. The most intense absorption band showed a bathochromic shift and lowering of intensity in case of the complex (233.7 nm, f = 0.5604) compared to E3Q (λmax = 228.0 nm, f = 0.9072). The calculated 1H NMR chemical shifts using GIAO method showed good correlations with the experimental data. The computed dipole moment, polarizability and HOMO-LUMO energy gap were used to predict the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. It is found that Ag(I) enhances the NLO activity. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses were used to elucidate the intramolecular charge transfer interactions causing stabilization for the investigated systems.

  15. [Parenting styles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torío López, Susana; Peña Calvo, José Vicente; Inda Caro, Mercedes

    2008-02-01

    Parental educational styles constitute one of the key elements of family socialization. The aim of the present essay is to present the results of a research project carried out in the Principality of Asturias (Spain) among 2,965 families with children of infant and primary-school age (5-8 years old). This research attempts to analyse, among other aspects, parental behaviour tendencies in child upbringing. The analysis of the results obtained allows us to: 1) identify the most common attitudinal and behavioural tendencies of parents in the upbringing of their children; 2) determine how many people have a well defined parental style, and delimit their socio-educational characteristics. Lastly, we consider the need to change some parental behaviour patterns and stress the importance of family education programmes, with the aim of promoting appropriate parenting models and modifying or improving current practices.

  16. Adoptive parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotevant, Harold D; Lo, Albert Yh

    2017-06-01

    Challenges in adoptive parenting continue to emerge as adoption policies and practices evolve. We review three areas of research in adoptive parenting that reflect contemporary shifts in adoption. First, we highlight recent findings concerning openness in adoption contact arrangements, or contact between a child's families of birth and rearing. Second, we examine research regarding racial and cultural socialization in transracial and international adoptions. Finally, we review investigations of parenting experiences of lesbian and gay adoptive parents. Overall, parenting processes (e.g., supportive vs. problematic family interaction) are better predictors of child adjustment than are group differences (e.g., open vs. closed adoptions; adoption by heterosexual vs. same-sex parents). The distinctive needs of adopted children call for preparation of adoption-competent mental health, casework, education, and health care professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  18. DETAILED ANALYSIS OF NEAR-IR WATER (H{sub 2}O) EMISSION IN COMET C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY) WITH THE GIANO/TNG SPECTROGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggi, S.; Brucato, J. R.; Tozzi, G. P.; Oliva, E.; Massi, F.; Sanna, N.; Tozzi, A. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J., E-mail: sfaggi@arcetri.astro.it [NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    We observed the Oort cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) on 2015 January 31 and February 1 and 2 at a heliocentric distance of 1.3 au and geocentric distance of 0.8 au during its approach to the Sun. Comet Lovejoy was observed with GIANO, the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph mounted at the Nasmyth-A focus of the TNG (Telescopio Nazionale Galileo) telescope in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. We detected strong emissions of radical CN and water, along with many emission features of unidentified origin, across the 1–2.5 μ m region. Spectral lines from eight ro-vibrational bands of H{sub 2}O were detected, six of them for the first time. We quantified the water production rate [ Q (H{sub 2}O), (3.11 ± 0.14) × 10{sup 29} s{sup −1}] by comparing the calibrated line fluxes with the Goddard full non-resonance cascade fluorescence model for H{sub 2}O. The production rates of ortho-water [ Q (H{sub 2}O){sup ORTHO}, (2.33 ± 0.11) × 10{sup 29} s{sup −1}] and para-water [ Q (H{sub 2}O){sup PARA}, (0.87 ± 0.21) × 1029 s{sup −1}] provide a measure of the ortho-to-para ratio (2.70 ± 0.76)). The confidence limits are not small enough to provide a critical test of the nuclear spin temperature.

  19. Steps toward a CONUS-wide reanalysis with archived NEXRAD data using National Mosaic and Multisensor Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (NMQ/Q2) algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, S. E.; Nelson, B. R.; Langston, C.; Qi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The National Mosaic and Multisensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) software suite, developed at NOAA's National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) in Norman, OK, addresses a large deficiency in the resolution of currently archived precipitation datasets. Current standards, both radar- and satellite-based, provide for nationwide precipitation data with a spatial resolution of up to 4-5 km, with a temporal resolution as fine as one hour. Efforts are ongoing to process archived NEXRAD data for the period of record (1996 - present), producing a continuous dataset providing precipitation data at a spatial resolution of 1 km, on a timescale of only five minutes. In addition, radar-derived precipitation data are adjusted hourly using a wide variety of automated gauge networks spanning the United States. Applications for such a product range widely, from emergency management and flash flood guidance, to hydrological studies and drought monitoring. Results are presented from a subset of the NEXRAD dataset, providing basic statistics on the distribution of rainrates, relative frequency of precipitation types, and several other variables which demonstrate the variety of output provided by the software. Precipitation data from select case studies are also presented to highlight the increased resolution provided by this reanalysis and the possibilities that arise from the availability of data on such fine scales. A previously completed pilot project and steps toward a nationwide implementation are presented along with proposed strategies for managing and processing such a large dataset. Reprocessing efforts span several institutions in both North Carolina and Oklahoma, and data/software coordination are key in producing a homogeneous record of precipitation to be archived alongside NOAA's other Climate Data Records. Methods are presented for utilizing supercomputing capability in expediting processing, to allow for the iterative nature of a reanalysis effort.

  20. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Mayer, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected in 2000-2001 with Jefferson Lab's continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS). Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2, and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3 ) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double-spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry A1d and the polarized structure function g1d were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2<Q2<5 GeV2 and 0.9 GeV

  1. Parental divorce and parental death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Jette; Thuen, Frode; Poul, Bruun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify research on children and adolescents who experience double bereavement, i.e. the experience of loss through parental divorce followed by either parental death or critical illness with imminent death. This knowledge may identify evidence to underpin knowledge......; challenges in both custodial and non-custodial parental death; risk of mental health problems, and the need of support and interventions....

  2. Measurement of the pion form factor in the time-like region for q2 values between 0.1 (GeV/c)2 and 0.18 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Badelek, B.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bizzeti, A.; Bosisio, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giazotto, A.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Frank, S.G.F.; Harvey, J.; Menasce, D.; Meroni, E.; Moroni, L.; Milan Univ.

    1984-01-01

    The EM form factor of the pion has been studied in the time-like region by measuring sigma(e + e - ->π + π - ) normalization to sigma(e + e - ->μ + μ - ). Results have been obtained for q 2 down to the physical threshold. (orig.)

  3. Parent Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    and parents say given these assumptions? Which management responsibility is addressed through such training of the difficult conversation?  My conclusions are, briefly, that the difficult conversation is more correctly to be called an impossible conversation. It is an asking for the parent's consent...

  4. Parental involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezra S Simon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Parent-Teacher Associations and other community groups can play a significant role in helping to establish and run refugee schools; their involvement can also help refugee adults adjust to their changed circumstances.

  5. Parenting Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Parenting Conflicts Family Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print ...

  6. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive pion electroproduction for Q2>1 GeV2. II. e p →e π0p

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosted, P. E.; Kim, A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Balossino, I.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Hakobyan, H.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Hollis, G.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, D. G.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klei, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V. I.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries were measured for the exclusive π0 electroproduction reaction γ*p →p π0 , expanding an analysis of the γ*p →n π+ reaction from the same experiment. The results were obtained from scattering of 6-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory. The kinematic ranges covered are 1.1 Q2<6 GeV2. Results were obtained for about 5700 bins in W , Q2, cos(θ*) , and ϕ*. The beam-target asymmetries were found to generally be greater than zero, with relatively modest ϕ* dependence. The target asymmetries exhibit very strong ϕ* dependence, with a change in sign occurring between results at low W and high W , in contrast to π+ electroproduction. Reasonable agreement is found with phenomenological fits to previous data for W <1.6 GeV, but significant differences are seen at higher W . When combined with cross-sectional measurements, as well as π+ observables, the present results will provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.4 GeV.

  7. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive pion electroproduction for Q2>1 GeV2 . I. e p →e π+n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosted, P. E.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T.; Fradi, A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lanza, L.; Net, L. A.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V. I.; Montgomery, R. A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries were measured for the exclusive π+ electroproduction reaction γ*p →n π+ . The results were obtained from scattering of 6-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory. The kinematic range covered is 1.1 Q2<6 GeV2 . Results were obtained for about 6000 bins in W , Q2, cos(θ*) , and ϕ*. Except at forward angles, very large target-spin asymmetries are observed over the entire W region. Reasonable agreement is found with phenomenological fits to previous data for W <1.6 GeV, but very large differences are seen at higher values of W . A generalized parton distributions (GPD)-based model is in poor agreement with the data. When combined with cross-sectional measurements, the present results provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.4 GeV.

  8. Parental Power and Adolescents' Parental Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acock, Alan C.; Yang, Wen Shan

    1984-01-01

    Combines McDonald's social power of parental identification with sex-linked models of parental identification to account for the identification of daughters (N=199) and sons (N=147) with their parents. Found that because of a halo effect, a gain in identification with one parent is not at the other parent's expense. (JAC)

  9. Measurement of the electric neutron form factor in the reaction 3vector (He)(vector e,e'n)pp at Q2=1.58 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlimme, Bjoern Soeren

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic nucleon form factors are fundamental quantities which are closely related to the electromagnetic structure of the nucleon. The evolution of the electric and magnetic Sachs form factors G E and G M with Q 2 , the negative square of the four momentum transfer in the electromagnetic scattering process, is directly connected with the spatial charge and current distributions in the nucleon by means of a Fourier transform. Therefore precise measurements of the form factors over a wide Q 2 range are essential for a quantitative understanding of the nucleon structure. Owing to the lack of a free neutron target measurements of the neutron form factors prove to be difficult compared to the measurements on the proton. Consequently the available neutron data is less precise, and the measured Q 2 range is smaller. In particular the electric neutron Sachs form factor G n E is difficult to measure; due to the vanishing net charge of the neutron, G n E is small compared to the other nucleon form factors. G n E characterizes the charge distribution of the electrically neutral neutron, hence it is very sensitive to the inner structure of the neutron. In the present work G n E was determined from beam helicity asymmetries in the quasielastic scattering process 3 vector (He)(vector e,e'n)pp at a momentum transfer Q 2 =1.58 (GeV/c) 2 . The measurement took place in Mainz at the electron accelerator facility Mainz Microtron within the A1 collaboration in the summer of 2008. Longitudinally polarized electrons with an energy of 1.508 GeV impinged on a polarized 3 He gas target which served as an effective polarized neutron target. The scattered electrons were detected in coincidence with the recoil neutrons; a magnetic spectrometer was used for the electron detection, the contribution of quasielastic scattering off the protons was restricted through the detection of the neutron via a plastic scintillator matrix. Cross section asymmetries with respect to the electron

  10. Parenting Styles and Beliefs about Parental Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1994-01-01

    Suggests that models of parenting style, such as Baumrind's popular model, are insensitive to variations in parenting resulting from characteristics of the different situations in which the parenting is expressed. Argues that considering parenting in context adds greater specificity to the model and enhances the potential for predicting child…

  11. Measurement of target and double-spin asymmetries for the e ⃗p ⃗→e π+(n ) reaction in the nucleon resonance region at low Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X.; Adhikari, K. P.; Bosted, P.; Deur, A.; Drozdov, V.; El Fassi, L.; Kang, Hyekoo; Kovacs, K.; Kuhn, S.; Long, E.; Phillips, S. K.; Ripani, M.; Slifer, K.; Smith, L. C.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chen, J.-P.; Chetry, T.; Choi, Seonho; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Golovach, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    We report measurements of target- and double-spin asymmetries for the exclusive channel e ⃗p ⃗→e π+(n ) in the nucleon resonance region at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). These asymmetries were extracted from data obtained using a longitudinally polarized NH3 target and a longitudinally polarized electron beam with energies 1.1, 1.3, 2.0, 2.3, and 3.0 GeV. The new results are consistent with previous CLAS publications but are extended to a low Q2 range from 0.0065 to 0.35 (GeV/c ) 2 . The Q2 access was made possible by a custom-built Cherenkov detector that allowed the detection of electrons for scattering angles as low as 6∘. These results are compared with the unitary isobar models JANR and MAID, the partial-wave analysis prediction from SAID, and the dynamic model DMT. In many kinematic regions our results, in particular results on the target asymmetry, help to constrain the polarization-dependent components of these models.

  12. Parental Influences on Adolescent Adjustment: Parenting Styles Versus Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Min; Daniels, M. Harry; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    The study identified distinct patterns of parental practices that differentially influence adolescent behavior using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey (NELS:88) database. Following Brenner and Fox's research model (1999), the cluster analysis was used to classify the four types of parental practices. The clusters of parenting practices…

  13. Proactive Parent Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Sharel; Backlund, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Presents examples of teacher-parent interactions designed to help teachers communicate with parents. The scenarios involve a teacher communicating with parents about a struggling student, a teacher communicating with parents about a student's behavior problems, and a teacher attempting to communicate with a confrontational parent. Teacher prompts…

  14. Parenting while Being Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Kevin J.; Williams, Reginald; Fields, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the dynamics of parenting while being in a homeless context. The mosaic of stressors involved in this homeless parenting process are explicated and discussed. In addition, resources and strategies that may support parenting are presented and discussed.

  15. Nursemaid's Elbow (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... For Parents / Nursemaid's Elbow Print About Nursemaid's Elbow Toddlers and preschoolers are at risk for a common ...

  16. Parental overprotection revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasgard, M; Metz, W P

    1993-01-01

    Dimensions of parental overprotection are clarified in a critical review of the research and clinical literature. An indulgent style of parenting is distinguished from an overprotective parent-child relationship. Differential antecedents and outcomes are proposed for each of these forms of parent-child interaction. Measures of protection are reviewed. A new conceptual model of parental overprotection is presented which takes into account child, parent, family, socio-cultural, environmental and resiliency factors. Directions for future research are suggested.

  17. Amblyopia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  18. When Parents Argue

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  19. Chlamydia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  20. Oral Thrush (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  1. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  2. Syphilis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  3. Chemotherapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  4. Yersiniosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  5. Amebiasis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  6. Infant Botulism (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  7. Scarlet Fever (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  8. Headaches (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  9. Strep Throat (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  10. Tourette Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  11. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ...

  12. Sinusitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  13. Laryngoscopy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  14. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  15. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  16. Eczema (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  17. Chinese Parenting Reconsideration: Parenting Practices in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-mei; Luster, Tom

    This study examined authoritative and authoritarian parenting and specific parenting practices among Chinese mothers with preschoolers. The final sample consisted of 463 mothers with their 3 to 7 year-olds from 11 preschools, in Taiwan. Mothers completed a Chinese translation of the Parenting Behavior Questionnaire that assessed their parenting…

  18. Measurement of the elastic electron-proton cross section and separation of the electric and magnetic form factor in the Q2 range from 0.004 to 1 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernauer, Jan C.

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factors of the proton are fundamental quantities sensitive to the distribution of charge and magnetization inside the proton. Precise knowledge of the form factors, in particular of the charge and magnetization radii provide strong tests for theory in the non-perturbative regime of QCD. However, the existing data at Q 2 below 1 (GeV/c) 2 are not precise enough for a hard test of theoretical predictions. For a more precise determination of the form factors, within this work more than 1400 cross sections of the reaction H(e, e ' )p were measured at the Mainz Microtron MAMI using the 3-spectrometer-facility of the A1-collaboration. The data were taken in three periods in the years 2006 and 2007 using beam energies of 180, 315, 450, 585, 720 and 855 MeV. They cover the Q 2 region from 0.004 to 1 (GeV/c) 2 with counting rate uncertainties below 0.2% for most of the data points. The relative luminosity of the measurements was determined using one of the spectrometers as a luminosity monitor. The overlapping acceptances of the measurements maximize the internal redundancy of the data and allow, together with several additions to the standard experimental setup, for tight control of systematic uncertainties. To account for the radiative processes, an event generator was developed and implemented in the simulation package of the analysis software which works without peaking approximation by explicitly calculating the Bethe-Heitler and Born Feynman diagrams for each event. To separate the form factors and to determine the radii, the data were analyzed by fitting a wide selection of form factor models directly to the measured cross sections. These fits also determined the absolute normalization of the different data subsets. The validity of this method was tested with extensive simulations. The results were compared to an extraction via the standard Rosenbluth technique. The dip structure in G E that was seen in the analysis of the previous world data

  19. arXiv Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and spin-dependent structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ of the proton at small values of $x$ and $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Aghasyan, M.; The COMPASS collaboration; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N.V.; Anosov, V.; Antoshkin, A.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtsev, V.E.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chumakov, A.G.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Dünnweber, W.; Dusaev, R.R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; jr.,M.Finger; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giarra, J.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grasso, A.; Gridin, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F.H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Kerbizi, A.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.M.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Kuznetsov, I.I.; Kveton, A.; Lednev, A.A.; Levchenko, E.A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Mamon, S.A.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Moretti, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Pešková, M.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rogacheva, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thiel, A.; Tomsa, J.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Vasilishin, B.I.; Vauth, A.; Veloso, J.; Vidon, A.; Virius, M.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2018-06-10

    We present a precise measurement of the proton longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A1p and the proton spin-dependent structure function g1p at photon virtualities 0.006(GeV/c)2<Q2<1(GeV/c)2 in the Bjorken x range of 4×10−5

  20. Measurement of F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} at Low Q^2 and x using the H1 Vertex Detector at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements are presented of inclusive charm and beauty cross sections in e^+p collisions at HERA for values of photon virtuality 12 \\le Q^2 \\le 60 GeV^2 and of the Bjorken scaling variable 0.0002 \\le x \\le 0.005. The fractions of events containing charm and beauty quarks are determined using a method based on the impact parameter, in the transverse plane, of tracks to the primary vertex, as measured by the H1 vertex detector. Values for the structure functions F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} are obtained. This is the first measurement of F_2^{b\\bar{b}} in this kinematic range. The results are found to be compatible with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics and withprevious measurements of F_2^{c\\bar{c}}.

  1. N*(1535) electroproduction at high Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ramalho, M.T. Pena, K. Tsushima

    2012-04-01

    A covariant spectator quark model is applied to study the {gamma}N {yields} N*(1535) reaction in the large Q{sup 2} region. Starting from the relation between the nucleon and N*(1535) systems, the N*(1535) valence quark wave function is determined without the addition of any parameters. The model is then used to calculate the {gamma}N {yields} N*(1535) transition form factors. A very interesting, useful relation between the A{sub 1/2} and S{sub 1/2} helicity amplitudes for Q{sup 2} > GeV{sup 2}, is also derived.

  2. Parenting paradox: parenting after infant loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warland, Jane; O'Leary, Joann; McCutcheon, Helen; Williamson, Victoria

    2011-10-01

    to gain an in-depth understanding of the parenting experiences of bereaved parents in the years following an infant death. an exploratory qualitative study. semi-structured interview in the participants' homes. Data were collected over a five-month period in 2008 and analysed using thematic analysis. a purposive sample of 13 bereaved parents (10 mothers and three fathers) was used. Parents who had accessed the support services offered by two bereavement support agencies were recruited. Participants were asked to describe their experiences of raising their subsequent child. Interviews were conducted when the next born child was at least three years of age. the parents described a 'paradoxical' parenting style where they were trying to parent using two diametrically opposed unsustainable options. For example, they described trying to hold their subsequent child emotionally close but aloof at the same time. the results from this study indicate that the impact of a loss of an infant has far-reaching consequences on subsequent parenting. Support and early intervention at the time of the stillbirth and subsequent pregnancy are likely to be useful. However, further research is required to determine the extent to which early intervention can alter the tendency towards bereaved parents adopting a paradoxical parenting style. The impact of this style on mental health and the emotional health and well-being of the next born child/ren after perinatal loss should also be further examined. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Parent-to-Parent Program in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kae

    2018-01-01

    Parent-to-parent programs provide emotional and informational support to parents of children with special needs by matching trained and experienced parents with parents needing support. This study examined the implementation and effects of a Parent-to-Parent Program in Taiwan that supported 3 families of youngsters with special needs. Based on the…

  4. Maternal Personality, Parenting Cognitions and Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Haynes, O. Maurice

    2011-01-01

    A community sample of 262 European American mothers of firstborn 20-month-olds completed a personality inventory and measures of parenting cognitions (knowledge, self-perceptions, and reports about behavior) and was observed in interaction with their children from which measures of parenting practices (language, sensitivity, affection, and play) were independently coded. Factor analyses of the personality inventory replicated extraction of the Five-Factor model of personality (Openness, Neuroticism, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness). Controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, the five personality factors qua variables and in patterns qua clusters related differently to diverse parenting cognitions and practices, supporting the multidimensional, modular, and specific nature of parenting. Maternal personality in the normal range, a theoretically important but empirically neglected factor in everyday parenting, has meaning in studies of parenting, child development, and family process. PMID:21443335

  5. Combination of the inclusive DIS e"±p cross sections from HERA, QCD and EW analyses and the need for low-Q"2 higher-twist corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myronenko, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    A combination of the inclusive lepton-proton cross sections from the ZEUS and H1 experiments is presented. The data are combined taking into account correlations of the systematic uncertainties of the measurements. The resulting combined inclusive neutral- and charged-current e"±p cross sections derived from ∝1 fb"-"1 of data, cover the kinematic region of 0.045≤Q"2≤50000 GeV"2 and 6.10"-"7≤x_B_j≤0.65. The combined data is an unique legacy of the HERA collider and the core of any parton-density-function extraction. The parton distribution functions are essential ingredients in the evaluation of QCD predictions for the high-energy processes, studied at modern proton colliders. The methodology of HERAPDF fits is used as an ansatz for the global QCD fit. The charm- and beauty-quark mass parameters in the analyses at next-next-to-leading order were found to be M"o"p"t_c=1.43 GeV and M"o"p"t_b=4.5 GeV, respectively. HERAPDF2.0 sets give reasonable DIS data description. The effect of higher-twist corrections on the DIS structure functions was studied. The twist-4 corrections were introduced to the F_2 and F_L structure functions. A minimal improvement in the data description was found for the F_2 correction. The introduction of a higher-twist correction to the F_L structure function improved the QCD fit quality by up to Δχ"2=47, predominantly affecting the low-x_B_j and low-Q"2 regions. The twist-4 correction causes an unphysical rise of the predicted F_L in the low x_B_j region. The results indicate a need for further investigations. The electroweak parameters and PDFs are determined simultaneously using the HERA inclusive cross sections together with information on the lepton beam polarisation. The vector- and axial-vector couplings of the u- and d-type quarks to the Z"0 boson are determined simultaneously. The u-type quark couplings were found to be a_u=0.532"+"0"."1"0"7_-_0_._0_6_3, v_u.144"+"0"."0"6"6_-_0_._0_5_8, which are the most precise measurements

  6. Parenting and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Tamsen; Netsi, Elena; Redinger, Stephanie; Stein, Alan

    2017-06-01

    With the widespread use of antiretroviral therapy and successful prevention of mother-to-child transmission the development of HIV-negative children with HIV-positive parents has become an important focus. There is considerable evidence that children's developmental risk is heightened because a parental HIV-diagnosis is associated with a range of potential problems such as depression, stigma and financial difficulties. Up to a third of children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are cared for by an HIV-positive parent or caregiver. We review the mechanisms by which HIV affects parenting including its negative effects on parental responsiveness in the early years of parenting and parental avoidant coping styles and parenting deficits in the later years. We describe low-cost parenting interventions suited for low resourced HIV endemic settings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Parental authority questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, J R

    1991-08-01

    A questionnaire was developed for the purpose of measuring Baumrind's (1971) permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative parental authority prototypes. It consists of 30 items per parent and yields permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative scores for both the mother and the father; each of these scores is derived from the phenomenological appraisals of the parents' authority by their son or daughter. The results of several studies have supported the Parental Authority Questionnaire as a psychometrically sound and valid measure of Baumrind's parental authority prototypes, and they have suggested that this questionnaire has considerable potential as a valuable tool in the investigation of correlates of parental permissiveness, authoritarianism, and authoritativeness.

  8. Plane-wave impulse approximation extraction of the neutron magnetic form factor from Quasi-Elastic 3(rvec H)e((rvec e),e(prime)) at Q2 = 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Anderson, B.; Auberbach, L.; Averett, T.; Bertozzi, W.; Black, T.; Calarco, J.; Cardman, L.; Cates, G.D.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, J.P.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Churchwell, S.; Corrado, G.S.; Crawford, C.; Dale, D.; Deur, A.; Djawotho, P.; Donnelly, T.W.; Dutta, D.; Finn, J.M.; Gao, H.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.V.; Glashausser, C.; Gloeckle, Walter; Golak, J.; Gomez, J.; Gorbenko, V.G.; Hansen, J.O.; Hersman, F.W.; Higinbotham, D.W.; Holmes, R.; Howell, C.R.; Hughes, E.; Humensky, B.; Incerti, S.; Jager, C.W. de; Jensen, J.S.; Jiang, X.; Jones, C.E.; Jones, M.; Kahl, R.; Kamada, H.; Kievsky, A.; Kominis, I.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, K.; Kumbartzki, G.; Kuss, M.; Lakuriqi, E.; Liang, M.; Liyanage, N.; LeRose, J.; Malov, S.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Martin, J.W.; McCormick, K.; McKeown, R. D.; McIlhany, K.; Meziani, Z.E.; Michaels, R.; Miller, G.W.; Mitchell, J.; Nanda, S.; Pace, E.; Pavlin, T.; Petratos, G.G.; Pomatsalyuk, R.I.; Pripstein, D.; Prout, D.; Ransome, R.D.; Roblin, Y.; Rvachev, M.; Saha, A.; Salme, G.; Schnee, M.; Shin, T.; Slifer, K.; Souder, P.A.; Strauch, S.; Suleiman, R.; Sutter, M.; Tipton, B.; Todor, L.; Viviani, M.; Vlahovic, B.; Watson, J.; Williamson, C.F.; Witala, H.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Xiong, F.; Yeh, J.; Zolnierczuk, P.

    2003-01-01

    A high precision measurement of the transverse spin-dependent asymmetry A T in 3 (rvec H)e((rvec e),e(prime)) quasielastic scattering was performed in Hall A at Jefferson Lab at values of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q 2 , between 0.1 and 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 . A T is sensitive to the neutron magnetic form factor, G M n . Values of G M n at Q 2 = 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c) 2 , extracted using Faddeev calculations, were reported previously. Here, we report the extraction of G M n for the remaining Q 2 -values in the range from 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 using a Plane-Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. The results are in good agreement with recent precision data from experiments using a deuterium target

  9. Parenting children with down syndrome: An analysis of parenting styles, parenting dimensions, and parental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B Allyson; Conners, Frances; Curtner-Smith, Mary Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Effective parenting is vital for a child's development. Although much work has been conducted on parenting typically developing children, little work has examined parenting children with Down syndrome. The purpose of the current study was to compare the parenting styles and dimensions in mothers of children with DS and mothers of TD children. Thirty-five mothers of children with DS and 47 mothers of TD children completed questionnaires about parenting, parental stress, child behavior problems, and child executive function. We found that mothers of children with DS use an authoritative parenting style less and a permissive parenting style more than mothers of TD children. Additionally, we found that mothers of children with DS use reasoning/induction and verbal hostility less and ignoring misbehavior more than mothers of TD children. All of these differences, except for those of reasoning/induction, were at least partially accounted for by the higher levels of parental stress in the DS group. Parenting interventions should be focused on reducing parental stress and training mothers to parent under stress in an effort to improve parenting techniques, which would, in theory, improve long-term child outcomes for children with DS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of the D*± meson cross section and extraction of the charm contribution, Fc2(x, Q2), to the proton structure in deep inelastic ep scattering with the H1 detector at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Andreas Werner

    2009-01-01

    Inclusive production of D * mesons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA is studied using data taken with the H1 detector in the years 2004 to 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 347 pb -1 . The measurement covers the region 5 2 2 in photon virtuality and the increased region 0.02 * meson is restricted in transverse momentum and pseudorapidity to p T (D * )>1.5 GeV and vertical stroke η(D * ) vertical stroke c 2 (x,Q 2 ), to the proton structure in different QCD evolution schemes is derived from the D * cross sections and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions. This F c 2 measurement is performed using a factor of 18 more data compared to the previous H1 publication. The present thesis additionally describes a successfully completed hardware project: The commissioning and optimisation of the third level of the H1 Fast Track Trigger (FTT), which was fully operational from 2006 onwards. The FTT is integrated in the first three levels of the H1 trigger system and provides enhanced selectivity for events with charged particles. The third trigger level of the FTT performs a track-based event reconstruction within a latency of about 100 μs. The third trigger level of the FTT is realised by a farm of PowerPC boards. Furthermore, the FTT simulation is now incorporated into the H1 trigger simulation. (orig.)

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  12. Neutral pion electroproduction and virtual Compton scattering on proton with four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 1 GeV2. Measurement of cross-sections and of generalized polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laveissiere, G.

    2001-11-01

    In hadronic physics, the nucleon structure and the quarks confinement are still topical issues. The neutral pion electroproduction and virtual Compton scattering (VCS) reactions allow us to access new observables that describe this structure. This work is focussed on the VCS experiment performed at Jefferson Lab in 1998. The 4 GeV electron beam is scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target, and the scattered electron and recoiled proton are detected in coincidence in the twin hall A spectrometers. The photon (pion) is reconstructed using a missing particle technique. The data analysis allowed to extract the cross sections relative to both process at four-momentum transfer squared Q 2 = 1 GeV 2 . The VCS cross section has been extracted for the first time in the proton resonance region (W between 1.O and 2.0 GeV) through the photon electroproduction reaction. Around the pion-production threshold up to the Delta(1232) resonance region, these results lead to the measurement of the generalized polarizabilities, that describe the proton structure in the same way as the elastic form factors. Moreover, the neutral pion electroproduction cross section measurement in the resonance region has brought new constraints on the existing phenomenological models. (author)

  13. Cross sections and beam asymmetries for $\\vev{e}p \\to en\\pi^+$ in the nucleon resonance region for $1.7 \\le Q^2 \\le 4.5 (GeV)^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Park; V.D. Burkert; W. Kim; CLAS Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    The exclusive electroproduction process $\\vec{e}p \\to e^\\prime n \\pi^+$ was measured in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.7 - 4.5 \\rm{GeV^2}$, and the invariant mass range for the $n\\pi^+$ system of $W = 1.15 - 1.7 \\rm{GeV}$ using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in exclusive $\\pi^+$ production from protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. The $n\\pi^+$ channel has particular sensitivity to the isospin 1/2 excited nucleon states, and together with the $p\\pi^0$ final state will serve to determine the transition form factors of a large number of resonances. The largest discrepancy between these results and present modes was seen in the $\\sigma_{LT'}$ structure function. In this experiment, 31,295 cross section and 4,184 asymmetry data points were measured. Because of the large volume of data, only a reduced set of structure functions and Legendre polynomial moments can be presented that are obtained in model-independent fits to the differential cross sections.

  14. Maternal Personality, Parenting Cognitions, and Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Haynes, O. Maurice

    2011-01-01

    A community sample of 262 European American mothers of firstborn 20-month-olds completed a personality inventory and measures of parenting cognitions (knowledge, self-perceptions, and reports about behavior) and was observed in interaction with their children from which measures of parenting practices (language, sensitivity, affection, and play)…

  15. Parent training support for intellectually disabled parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coren, Esther; Hutchfield, Jemeela; Thomae, Manuela; Gustafsson, Carina

    2010-06-16

    Intellectual disability may impact on an individual's capacity to parent a child effectively. Research suggests that the number of intellectually disabled people with children is increasing. Children of parents with intellectual disabilities may be at increased risk of neglectful care which could lead to health, developmental and behavioural problems, or increased risk of intellectual disability.However, there is some indication that some parents with intellectual disabilities are able to provide adequate child care if they are given appropriate training and support to do so. To assess the effectiveness of parent training interventions to support the parenting of parents with intellectual disabilities We searched the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ASSIA, Sociological Abstracts, Dissertation Abstracts International, MetaRegister of Controlled Trials, and ZETOC. Randomised controlled trials comparing parent training interventions for parents with intellectual disabilities with usual care or with a control group. Outcomes of interest were: the attainment of parenting skills specific to the intervention, safe home practices and the understanding of child health. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and undertook data extraction. Three trials met the inclusion criteria for this review but no meta-analysis was possible. One study reported improved maternal-child interaction following group parent training compared with the control group. The second study reported some improvements in parents knowledge of life threatening emergencies, ability to recognise dangers and identify precautions and smaller improvements in their ability to implement precautions, use medicines safely and recognise child illness and symptoms. The third study reported improvement in child care and safety skills following the intervention. There is some risk of bias in the

  16. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  17. Parental Involvement in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Tessa

    1979-01-01

    Arguments in favor of increased parental involvement, particularly in nursery education, are presented. Opposition to participation from parents and teachers is discussed and specific areas in which cooperation might be possible are suggested along with different levels of participation. (JMF)

  18. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, M.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted.

  19. Naps (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... during a 24-hour period. For example, one toddler may sleep 13 hours at night with only ...

  20. Playground Safety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... designed for three different age groups: infants and toddlers under 2, 2- to 5-year-olds (preschoolers), ...

  1. Toxocariasis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... with a pet dog or cat (wash a toddler's hands yourself) discourage toddlers from putting dirty hands ...

  2. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Separation Anxiety KidsHealth / For Parents / Separation Anxiety What's in this ... both of you get through it. About Separation Anxiety Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. Parents ...

  3. New Parent Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and tactics to help keep children and families healthy, safe and strong. MilParent Power is Help for Parents May 22, 2018 @ 9: ... that’s your job — helping your kids cope in healthy ways to changing circumstances. 6 Tips to Harness Your MilParent Power March 15, 2018 @ 10:42 AM | 4 Min ...

  4. Children of Incarcerated Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Charlene Wear

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes what is known about the children of incarcerated parents in California. The report estimates the number of children in California who have parents in the state's criminal justice system (jail, prison, parole, and probation) and summarizes key findings from the research literature on the impact of parental arrest and…

  5. The Parent Loan Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Marian; Supiano, Beckie; Fuller, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    As the cost of college has spiraled ever upward and median family income has fallen, the loan program, called Parent PLUS, has become indispensable for increasing numbers of parents desperate to make their children's college plans work. Last year the government disbursed $10.6-billion in Parent PLUS loans to just under a million families. Even…

  6. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  7. Evaluation of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach by Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra; Ekizoglu, Nihat

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of parent involvement in children's education, research clearly shows that it is difficult to effectively involve parents. This study aims to capture parents' views of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach (BPIA) designed to secure parent involvement in education by strengthening school-parent communication. Data…

  8. Parenting Beliefs, Parental Stress, and Social Support Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respler-Herman, Melissa; Mowder, Barbara A.; Yasik, Anastasia E.; Shamah, Renee

    2012-01-01

    The present study built on prior research by examining the relationship of parental stress and social support to parenting beliefs and behaviors. A sample of 87 parents provided their views concerning the importance of parenting characteristics as well as their level of parental stress and perceived social support. These parents completed the…

  9. Personality and Parenting Style in Parents of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huver, Rose M. E.; Otten, Roy; de Vries, Hein; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian,…

  10. 5 CFR 1651.7 - Parent or parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parent or parents. 1651.7 Section 1651.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD DEATH BENEFITS § 1651.7 Parent or parents. If the account is to be paid to the participant's parent or parents under § 1651.2(a)(4), the following...

  11. Intergenerational Transmission of Harsh Parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Ronald L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined harsh parenting across generations by means of parents' and adolescents' reports. Found that grandparents who had engaged in aggressive parenting produced parents who used similar practices. Harsh discipline of male children was a function of socioeconomic characteristics. (BC)

  12. Parenting Culture Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ellie J.; Faircloth, Charlotte; Macvarish, Jan; Bristow, Jennie

    2014-01-01

    Why do we live at a time when the minutiae of how parents raise their children – how they feed them, talk to them, play with them or discipline them – have become routine sources of public debate and policy making? Why are there now so-called 'parenting experts', and social movements like Attachment Parenting, telling us that 'science says' what parents do is the cause of and solution to social problems? \\ud \\ud Parenting Culture Studies provides in-depth answers to these features of contempo...

  13. Parent-child interaction: Does parental language matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menashe, Atara; Atzaba-Poria, Naama

    2016-11-01

    Although parental language and behaviour have been widely investigated, few studies have examined their unique and interactive contribution to the parent-child relationship. The current study explores how parental behaviour (sensitivity and non-intrusiveness) and the use of parental language (exploring and control languages) correlate with parent-child dyadic mutuality. Specifically, we investigated the following questions: (1) 'Is parental language associated with parent-child dyadic mutuality above and beyond parental behaviour?' (2) 'Does parental language moderate the links between parental behaviour and the parent-child dyadic mutuality?' (3) 'Do these differences vary between mothers and fathers?' The sample included 65 children (M age  = 1.97 years, SD = 0.86) and their parents. We observed parental behaviour, parent-child dyadic mutuality, and the type of parental language used during videotaped in-home observations. The results indicated that parental language and behaviours are distinct components of the parent-child interaction. Parents who used higher levels of exploring language showed higher levels of parent-child dyadic mutuality, even when accounting for parental behaviour. Use of controlling language, however, was not found to be related to the parent-child dyadic mutuality. Different moderation models were found for mothers and fathers. These results highlight the need to distinguish parental language and behaviour when assessing their contribution to the parent-child relationship. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Parental Alienation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Torun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Children who have been programmed by one parent to be alienated from the other parent are commonly seen in the context of child-custody disputes. Its primary manifestation is the child’s campaign of denigration against a parent, a campaign that has no justification. It is said to result from a combination of a programming (brainwashing parent’s indoctrinations and the child’s own contributions to the vilification of the targeted parent. Many evaluators use the term parental alienation syndrome to refer to the disorder engendered in such children. However, there is significant controversy going on about the validity of parental alienation syndrome. The purpose of this article has been to describe and help to differentiate parental alienation syndrome and abuse for mental health professionals working in the field, and discuss the arguments about the validity of this syndrome.

  15. Milestone Completion Report WBS 1.3.5.05 ECP/VTK-m FY17Q2 [MS-17/01] Better Dynamic Types Design SDA05-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2017-04-01

    The FY17Q2 milestone of the ECP/VTK-m project, which is the first milestone, includes the completion of design documents for the introduction of virtual methods into the VTK-m framework. Specifically, the ability from within the code of a device (e.g. GPU or Xeon Phi) to jump to a virtual method specified at run time. This change will enable us to drastically reduce the compile time and the executable code size for the VTK-m library. Our first design introduced the idea of adding virtual functions to classes that are used during algorithm execution. (Virtual methods were previously banned from the so called execution environment.) The design was straightforward. VTK-m already has the generic concepts of an “array handle” that provides a uniform interface to memory of different structures and an “array portal” that provides generic access to said memory. These array handles and portals use C++ templating to adjust them to different memory structures. This composition provides a powerful ability to adapt to data sources, but requires knowing static types. The proposed design creates a template specialization of an array portal that decorates another array handle while hiding its type. In this way we can wrap any type of static array handle and then feed it to a single compiled instance of a function. The second design focused on the mechanics of implementing virtual methods on parallel devices with a focus on CUDA. Our initial experiments on CUDA showed a very large overhead for using virtual C++ classes with virtual methods, the standard approach. Instead, we are using an alternate method provided by C that uses function pointers. With the completion of this milestone, we are able to move to the implementation of objects with virtual (like) methods. The upshot will be much faster compile times and much smaller library/executable sizes.

  16. Parenting styles and conceptions of parental authority during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, J G

    1995-04-01

    Reports of parenting styles were assessed in 110 primarily white, middle-class sixth, eighth, and tenth graders (M = 11.98, 13.84, and 16.18 years of age) and their parents (108 mothers and 92 fathers). Parents judged the legitimacy of parental authority and rated family conflict and rules regarding 24 hypothetical moral, conventional, personal, multifaceted (containing conventional and personal components), prudential, and friendship issues. Adolescents viewed their parents as more permissive and more authoritarian than parents viewed themselves, whereas parents viewed themselves as more authoritative than did adolescents. Parents' parenting styles differentiated their conceptions of parental authority, but adolescents' perceptions did not. Differences were primarily over the boundaries of adolescents' personal jurisdiction. Furthermore, conceptions of parental authority and parenting styles both contributed significantly to emotional autonomy and adolescent-parent conflict. The implications of the findings for typological models of parenting and distinct domain views of social-cognitive development are discussed.

  17. Parents of children with enduring epilepsy: predictors of parenting stress and parenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.; Meijer, A.M.; Dekovic, M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the work described here were (1) to predict parenting stress and parenting from stressors, resources, and parental coping behaviors in parents of children with epilepsy, and (2) to determine whether parenting stress mediates the effects of these predictors on parenting.

  18. Parents of children with enduring epilepsy: predictors of parenting stress and parenting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Meijer, A.M.; Dekovic, M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goals of the work described here were (1) to predict parenting stress and parenting from stressors, resources, and parental coping behaviors in parents of children with epilepsy, and (2) to determine whether parenting stress mediates the effects of these predictors on parenting.

  19. Parent and Adolescent Reports of Parenting When a Parent Has a History of Depression: Associations with Observations of Parenting

    OpenAIRE

    Parent, Justin; Forehand, Rex; Dunbar, Jennifer P.; Watson, Kelly H.; Reising, Michelle M.; Seehuus, Martin; Compas, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the congruence of parent and adolescent reports of positive and negative parenting with observations of parent-adolescent interactions as the criterion measure. The role of parent and adolescent depressive symptoms in moderating the associations between adolescent or parent report and observations of parenting also was examined. Participants were 180 parents (88.9% female) with a history of clinical depression and one of their 9-to-15 year old children (49.4% female...

  20. Parenting style, parenting stress, and children's health-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjeong; Walton-Moss, Benita

    2012-07-01

    Parental guidance is critical to the development of children's health-related behaviors. The purpose of this study was to look at the relationship between parenting factors, including parenting style and parenting stress, and children's health-related behaviors. In this descriptive, correlational study, 284 parents of preschool children were interviewed using the Child Rearing Questionnaire and the Korean Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. Parent distress, authoritative and permissive parenting styles, family income, and mother's education were significantly associated with children's health-related behaviors. These findings suggest that higher levels of warmth, characteristics of both parenting styles, may be a critical factor in the development of health-related behaviors.

  1. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeve, M.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted. The first study addressed a meta-analysis on parenting characteristics and styles in relation to delinquency. In this meta-analysis, previous manuscripts were systematically analyzed, computing mean ...

  2. Personality and parenting style in parents of adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huver, R.M.E.; Otten, R.; Vries, H. de; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived

  3. Parental Involvement in Mathematics: Giving Parents a Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, S.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding why parents become involved in their children's education is crucial in strengthening the relationship between parental involvement and academic achievement. The present study focuses on the parental role construction and parental self-efficacy. The resulting trends suggest that parents, regardless of their self-efficacy, may assume…

  4. Parenting Training for Intellectually Disabled Parents: A Cochrane Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coren, Esther; Thomae, Manuela; Hutchfield, Jemeela

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a Cochrane/Campbell systematic review of the evidence on the effect of parent training to support the parenting of parents with intellectual disabilities. Method: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing parent training interventions for parents with intellectual disability with usual care or with a control…

  5. Parenting Styles and Conceptions of Parental Authority during Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1995-01-01

    Reports of parenting styles were assessed in 100 mostly white, middle-class, 6th, 8th, and 10th graders and their parents. Adolescents viewed their parents as more permissive and more authoritarian than parents viewed themselves, whereas parents viewed themselves as more authoritative than did adolescents. Differences were primarily over the…

  6. Parents' Perspectives on Parental Notification of College Students' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosden, Merith; Hughes, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Although many colleges and universities use "parental notification" to inform parents of students' alcohol use, the impact of this intervention on student and parent behavior is unclear. Surveys were obtained from 326 parents of university undergraduates, 56 of whom had received a notification. Parent responses to the notification were…

  7. Long-Term Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution over CONUS: Bias-Adjustment of the Radar-Only National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis (2001-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Olivier; Nelson, Brian; Stevens, Scott; Seo, Dong-Jun; Kim, Beomgeun

    2015-04-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2001 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Several in-situ datasets are available to assess the biases of the radar-only product and to adjust for those biases to provide a multi-sensor QPE. The rain gauge networks that are used such as the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily (GHCN-D), the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), and the Climate Reference Network (CRN), have different spatial density and temporal resolution. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. The objective of this work is threefold. First, we investigate how the different in-situ networks can impact the precipitation estimates as a function of the spatial density, sensor type, and temporal resolution. Second, we assess conditional and un-conditional biases of the radar-only QPE for various time scales (daily, hourly, 5-min) using in-situ precipitation observations. Finally, after assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are using a unique in-situ dataset merging the different RG networks (CRN, ASOS, HADS, GHCN-D) to

  8. Long-Term Large-Scale Bias-Adjusted Precipitation Estimates at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Derived from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis over CONUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.; Stevens, S. E.; Seo, D. J.; Kim, B.

    2014-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (Nexrad) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is nearly completed for the period covering from 2000 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Rain gauge networks such as the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), the Climate Reference Network (CRN), and the Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily (GHCN-D) are used to adjust for those biases and to merge with the radar only product to provide a multi-sensor estimate. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. After assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are investigating the kriging method and its variants such as simple kriging (SK), ordinary kriging (OK), and conditional bias-penalized Kriging (CBPK) among others. In addition we hope to generate estimates of uncertainty for the gridded estimate. In this work the methodology is presented as well as a comparison between the radar-only product and the final multi-sensor QPE product. The comparison is performed at various time scales from the sub-hourly, to annual. In addition, comparisons over the same period with a suite of lower resolution QPEs derived from ground based radar

  9. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First ...

  10. What matters most - what parents model or what parents eat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Amber E; Martin, Chantel L; Ward, Dianne S

    2018-03-28

    Parents have a strong influence on their children's eating habits; however, researchers struggle to identify which food parenting practices to recommend. This study examined the influence of parents modeling of healthy eating ("parent role modeling") and parents' actual food intake ("parent dietary intake") on child diet quality, and explored whether these practices work together to influence children's diets. Baseline data from a larger intervention trial were used for this analysis. The sample included parents of preschool-age children from households with at least one overweight parent. The Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire was used to assess parent modeling of healthy eating ("healthy modeling"). Three days of dietary recalls were used to collect parents' report of their own intake and their children's intake (excluding food at child care). Associations between parent healthy modeling and parent intake of healthy and unhealthy foods were explored using Pearson correlations. Associations between parent healthy modeling and parent Healthy Eating Index (HEI) score on child HEI score were examined with linear regression. Additionally, the interaction between parent healthy modeling and HEI score on child HEI score was tested. Parent healthy modeling was significantly correlated with parent intake of healthy foodsLinear regression showed a significant association between parent modeling and child HEI score, even after controlling for parent diet (β = 3.08, SE = 0.87, p parents had high parent healthy modeling scores had higher HEI scores (mean = 61.5 ± 10.4) regardless of parent HEI score. We did not find evidence that parent healthy modeling and diet quality interact to influence child diet quality. Parents' healthy modeling is an important practice in influencing children's diet quality, possibly more so than the quality of parents' diets. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  12. Parental Divorce, Parental Religious Characteristics, and Religious Outcomes in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E; Ellison, Christopher G

    2012-12-01

    Parental divorce has been linked to religious outcomes in adulthood. Previous research has not adequately accounted for parental religious characteristics or subsequent family context, namely whether one's custodial parent remarries. Using pooled data from three waves of the General Social Survey, we examine the relationships among parental divorce, subsequent family structure, and religiosity in adulthood. Growing up in a single-parent family-but not a stepparent family-is positively associated with religious disaffiliation and religious switching and negatively associated with regular religious attendance. Accounting for parental religious characteristics, however, explains sizable proportions of these relationships. Accounting for parental religious affiliation and attendance, growing up with a single parent does not significantly affect religious attendance. Parental religiosity also moderates the relationship between growing up with a single parent and religious attendance: being raised in a single-parent home has a negative effect on religious attendance among adults who had two religiously involved parents.

  13. Building Relationships with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullaj, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Communicating with parents may seem like one more task on top of an overwhelming workload, but creating a positive relationship with parents has many benefits for all involved. The author discusses the steps to creating these relationships and communicating with families.

  14. Handling "Helicopter Parents"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Lydia

    2006-01-01

    Once upon a time, parents would help their children move into dorm rooms and apartments, then wave good-bye for the semester. Not anymore. Baby boomers have arguably been more involved in their children's educations--and their lives in general--than any preceding generation of parents, university observers say. And boomers see no reason why that…

  15. Parenting, Pressures and Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Graham W.

    2000-01-01

    In the 1990s, parenting became a difficult effort to balance work demands with children's needs. However, Canadian and U.S. government policies have not met changing family needs for child care, other services, paid parental leave, and work flexibility. Canada's long-awaited National Children's Agenda has the potential to modernize family policy…

  16. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ...

  17. Parents, Peers and Pot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatt, Marsha

    This book looks at the problem of drug abuse, particularly the use of marihuana by children ages 9 to 14, and describes one strategy parents can use to prevent drug use by their children. On the premise that nonmedical drug use is not acceptable for children, parents need to provide guidance and exercise discipline with respect to drug use among…

  18. Parent Involvement Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arna

    This handbook on parent involvement, designed to be used with preschool programs, was developed by the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado. Included are: (1) a general statement about parent involvement in an early childhood program, (2) a description of the Jefferson County Early Childhood Program, (3) a description of the…

  19. Pinterest for Parent Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Brianna; Langworthy, Sara; Jastram, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    As more parents are using the Internet to answer their questions, Extension needs to provide practical, research-based resources in an accessible format. Pinterest is a platform that can be used by Extension educators to provide continued education and make reputable resources more discoverable for parents. Based on Knowles adult learning theory…

  20. Gay and Lesbian Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Gay and Lesbian Parents Page Content Article Body I am gay. Should I worry how this will affect my children? Millions of children have one or more gay and/or lesbian parents. For some children, having ...

  1. Sexism in Parenting Manuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFrain, John D.

    1977-01-01

    Parental roles, as delineated in many of the popular parenting manuals on the market, are reviewed and assessed. It is concluded that the vast majority of authors of child-rearing guides implicity or explicitly endorse the traditional roles of father as the dominant breadwinner and mother as the nurturant caretaker. (Author)

  2. Codependency and Parenting Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Judith L.; Crawford, Duane W.

    1992-01-01

    College students (n=175) reported the parenting style of their mother and father and completed a scale assessing their own level of codependency. Parenting style of the father (uninvolved, permissive, authoritarian, or democratic) was related to offspring codependency. Both sons and daughters of authoritarian fathers had higher levels of…

  3. Parenting: An Ecological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster, Tom, Ed.; Okagaki, Lynn, Ed.

    This book examines various aspects of parenting and influences on parents, including such key contexts affecting child development as school, neighborhood, and culture. After a forward by Urie Bronfenbrenner and a preface by Tom Luster and Lynn Okagaki, which together help to introduce the topics to be discussed, the book is divided into nine…

  4. Parents on education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lex Herweijer; Ria Vogels

    2004-01-01

    Original title: Ouders over opvoeding en onderwijs. The position of parents with regard to children' education has been changing in recent years: the government believes that they should have a major influence on what happens at their children's school, and also that parents and schools should

  5. Evolution and Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardwick, Judith M.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews the theory and research on the physiological or genetic origins of parenting behavior, noting that an ethological or evolutionary analysis of parenting behavior supports the idea that primates, including man, have evolved psychological structures which are particularly adapted to respond to cues from young children. (Author/JM)

  6. Puntos Basicos para Padres: Apoyo Padre a Padre (Basics for Parents: Parent to Parent Support).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, Betsy

    This Spanish language information brief describes the Parent to Parent Program, which provides information and one-to-one emotional support to parents of children with special needs. The program trains experienced parents in the program and matches them with similar parents new to the program. Benefits of the program include: (1) providing parents…

  7. Actividades Para Padres: A Parent Handbook (Activities for Parents: A Parent Handbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca, Benjamin

    Thirty Mora, New Mexico parents attended a 13-session parent involvement workshop (The Mora Adventure) designed to help parents foster successful school experiences through non-school activities with their children. A parent involvement model was used as the basis of the workshop in which the parents developed more effective communication skills;…

  8. Foster Parents' Involvement in Authoritative Parenting and Interest in Future Parenting Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.; Kraemer, Linda K.; Bernard, Amy L.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed 191 Southwest Ohio foster parents regarding their involvement in authoritative parenting and interest for additional parenting education. Our results showed that most respondents reported using an authoritative parenting style and were interested in receiving future training. Involvement in authoritative parenting differed…

  9. Parental Cognitions, Parental Behavior, and the Child's Understanding of the Parent-Child Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekovic, Maja; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Studied the relationship of parental reasoning complexity to parental behavior during parent-child interactions, and the effect of this relationship on children's social cognitions. Results indicate that parental reasoning complexity is related to parental behaviors of restrictive control, authoritative control, and support, which, in turn, are…

  10. Parental and child fruit consumption in the context of general parenting, parental education and ethnic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Rodenburg (Gerda); A. Oenema (Anke); S.P.J. Kremers (Stef); H. van de Mheen (Dike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the association between parental and child fruit consumption in the context of general parenting, parental education and ethnic background. A cross-sectional study was performed among 1762 parent-child dyads. Mean age of the children was 8. years. One parent completed

  11. Parents who use drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Tim; Bernays, Sarah; Houmøller, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    Parents who use drugs parent in a context of heightened concern regarding the damaging effects of parental drug use on child welfare and family life. Yet there is little research exploring how parents who use drugs account for such damage and its limitation. We draw here upon analyses of audio......-recorded depth qualitative interviews, conducted in south-east England between 2008 and 2009, with 29 parents who use drugs. Our approach to thematic analysis treated accounts as co-produced and socially situated. An over-arching theme of accounts was 'damage limitation'. Most damage limitation work centred...... on efforts to create a sense of normalcy of family life, involving keeping drug use secret from children, and investing heavily in strategies to maintain ambiguity regarding children's awareness. Our analysis highlights that damage limitation strategies double-up in accounts as resources of child protection...

  12. Parenting stress and affective symptoms in parents of autistic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yun; Du, YaSong; Li, HuiLin; Zhang, XiYan; An, Yu; Wu, Bai-Lin

    2015-10-01

    We examined parenting stress and mental health status in parents of autistic children and assessed factors associated with such stress. Participants were parents of 188 autistic children diagnosed with DSM-IV criteria and parents of 144 normally developing children. Parents of autistic children reported higher levels of stress, depression, and anxiety than parents of normally developing children. Mothers of autistic children had a higher risk of depression and anxiety than that did parents of normally developing children. Mothers compared to fathers of autistic children were more vulnerable to depression. Age, behavior problems of autistic children, and mothers' anxiety were significantly associated with parenting stress.

  13. About Teen Suicide (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thoughts. Teens going through major life changes (parents' divorce, moving, a parent leaving home due to military service or parental separation, financial changes) and those who are victims of ...

  14. Engaging Parents in Parent Engagement Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Steven; List, John; Metcalfe, Robert; Sadoff, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Researchers, policymakers, and educators have long recognized the role of parents in shaping student achievement. A large body of observational studies documents the strong relationship between family background and educational outcomes, but to date there have been very few experimental studies in this area. In this study, the authors offer a…

  15. Personality and parenting style in parents of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huver, Rose M E; Otten, Roy; de Vries, Hein; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2010-06-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and uninvolved) from scores on the underlying dimensions of support and strict control. Regression analyses were used to determine which personality traits were associated with parenting dimensions and styles. As regards dimensions, the two aspects of personality reflecting interpersonal interactions (extraversion and agreeableness) were related to supportiveness. Emotional stability was associated with lower strict control. As regards parenting styles, extraverted, agreeable, and less emotionally stable individuals were most likely to be authoritative parents. Conscientiousness and openness did not relate to general parenting, but might be associated with more content-specific acts of parenting.

  16. von Willebrand Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  17. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  18. Dealing with Cuts (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  19. Parenting and Digital Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sarah M; Radesky, Jenny; Collier, Kevin M; Gentile, Douglas A; Linder, Jennifer Ruh; Nathanson, Amy I; Rasmussen, Eric E; Reich, Stephanie M; Rogers, Jean

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the family dynamic surrounding media use is crucial to our understanding of media effects, policy development, and the targeting of individuals and families for interventions to benefit child health and development. The Families, Parenting, and Media Workgroup reviewed the relevant research from the past few decades. We find that child characteristics, the parent-child relationship, parental mediation practices, and parents' own use of media all can influence children's media use, their attitudes regarding media, and the effects of media on children. However, gaps remain. First, more research is needed on best practices of parental mediation for both traditional and new media. Ideally, this research will involve large-scale, longitudinal studies that manage children from infancy to adulthood. Second, we need to better understand the relationship between parent media use and child media use and specifically how media may interfere with or strengthen parent-child relationships. Finally, longitudinal research on how developmental processes and individual child characteristics influence the intersection between media and family life is needed. The majority of children's media use takes place within a wider family dynamic. An understanding of this dynamic is crucial to understanding child media use as a whole. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Family and relationship influences on parenting behaviors of young parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Trace; Murphy, Alexandrea; Lewis, Jessica; Divney, Anna; Albritton, Tashuna; Magriples, Urania; Gordon, Derrick

    2014-02-01

    Assess the influence of relationship and family factors during pregnancy on parenting behavior 6 months postpartum among low-income young parents. Some 434 young expectant couples were recruited from obstetrics clinics during pregnancy and followed 6 months postpartum. Using a series of general estimating equations to control for the correlated nature of the data, we assessed the influence of relationship factors (e.g., relationship satisfaction, attachment) and family factors (e.g., family functioning, family history) during pregnancy on parenting (e.g., parenting involvement, time spent caregiving, parenting experiences, and parenting sense of competence) 6 months postpartum controlling for covariates. Relationship functioning related to parenting involvement, caregiving, parenting experiences, and parenting sense of competence. In addition, several family factors related to parenting. Mother involvement during childhood was related to more parenting involvement, parenting positive experiences, and parenting sense of competence. History of being spanked as a child related to less time spent caregiving and less positive life change from being a parent. Further, gender significantly moderated the associations between relationship and family factors and parenting behavior. Male parenting behavior was more influenced by relationship and family factors than female parenting. This study suggests the importance of relationship and family contexts for parenting behaviors of young mothers and fathers, highlighting the potential utility of involving both young mothers and fathers in parenting programs, and developing interventions that focus on strengthening young parents' romantic relationships and that address negative parenting experienced during childhood. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Parent-Child Communication and Parental Involvement in Latino Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Tatiana M.; Cardemil, Esteban V.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the associations among parent-child relationship characteristics, acculturation and enculturation, and child externalizing symptoms in a sample of 40 Latino parent-adolescent dyads. Specifically, the associations between parent-child relationship characteristics (i.e., communication and parental involvement) and adolescents'…

  2. Managing "Spoiled Identities": Parents' Experiences of Compulsory Parenting Support Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    While recent years have seen a rapid growth of research exploring the usefulness of parenting support programmes, no empirical research to date has specifically explored experiences of compulsory parenting support. The present study examines the narrative accounts of 17 parents who, through a Parenting Order, were made to participate in such…

  3. Teacher and parent experiences of parent-teacher conferences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teachers are seldom trained to interact with parents, and both parents and teachers often find such encounters stressful and ineffective. This paper investigates parent and teacher perspectives on the parent-teacher conference through a qualitative inquiry. This is framed by the contributions of ecological theorists to home- ...

  4. Who's doing the talking? Teacher and parent experiences of parent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common form of direct communication between parents and teachers in schools worldwide is the parent-teacher conference. Purposeful parent-teacher conferences afford the teacher and the parent the opportunity to address a particular topic related to the child, such as academic progress and behaviour.

  5. Patterns of Parenting during Adolescence: Perceptions of Adolescents and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.; Sputa, Cheryl L.

    1996-01-01

    Explores differences in maternal and paternal parenting styles and involvement, the differences between parents' and adolescents' perceptions of parenting style and involvement, and changes in parenting style and involvement between the adolescents' 9th and 12th grade years. Subjects were 244 ninth graders from the Southeast and Midwest. Discusses…

  6. Parent socialization effects in different cultures: significance of directive parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the controversy of divergent findings in research on parental socialization effects in different cultures is addressed. Three explanations intended to address divergent findings of socialization effects in different cultures, as advanced by researchers who emphasize cultural differences, are discussed. These include cultural differences in socialization values and goals of parents, parental emotional and cognitive characteristics associated with parenting styles, and adolescents' interpretations or evaluations of their parents' parenting styles. The empirical evidence for and against each of these arguments is examined and an alternative paradigm for understanding and empirical study of developmental outcomes associated with parenting styles in different cultures is suggested. Baumrind's directive parenting style is presented as an alternative to the authoritarian parenting style in understanding the positive developmental effects associated with "strict" parenting in cultures said to have a collectivist orientation. Directions for research on the three explanations are mentioned.

  7. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Obstructive Sleep Apnea KidsHealth / For Parents / Obstructive Sleep Apnea What's ... How Is Sleep Apnea Treated? Print What Is Sleep Apnea? Brief pauses in breathing during sleep are ...

  8. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Physical Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Physical Therapy Print en español Terapia física Physical Therapy Basics Doctors often recommend physical therapy (PT) ...

  9. Hernias (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... look like inguinal hernias, but are not: A communicating hydrocele is similar to a hernia, except that ... reviewed: September 2016 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Medical Care and Your Newborn Undescended ...

  10. Ebola (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Ebola KidsHealth / For Parents / Ebola What's in this article? ... take precautions to avoid becoming infected. What Is Ebola? Ebola, or Ebola hemorrhagic fever ( Ebola HF) , is ...

  11. Parental Socialization of Emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Cumberland, Amanda; Spinrad, Tracy L

    1998-01-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of research on emotion, including the socialization of emotion. In this article, a heuristic model of factors contributing to the socialization of emotion is presented. Then literature relevant to the socialization of children's emotion and emotion-related behavior by parents is reviewed, including (a) parental reactions to children's emotions, (b) socializers' discussion of emotion, and (c) socializers' expression of emotion. The relevant literature is not conclusive and most of the research is correlational. However, the existing body of data provides initial support for the view that parental socialization practices have effects on children's emotional and social competence and that the socialization process is bidirectional. In particular, parental negative emotionality and negative reactions to children's expression of emotion are associated with children's negative emotionality and low social competence. In addition, possible moderators of effects such as level of emotional arousal are discussed.

  12. Polio (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Polio KidsHealth / For Parents / Polio What's in this article? ... of fluids and bed rest. The Future of Polio Health groups are working toward wiping out polio ...

  13. Fire Safety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Fire Safety KidsHealth / For Parents / Fire Safety What's in ... event of a fire emergency in your home. Fire Prevention Of course, the best way to practice ...

  14. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain Tumors What's in ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  15. Mononucleosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Mononucleosis KidsHealth / For Parents / Mononucleosis What's in this article? ... and Sports Complications Prevention and Treatment Print About Mononucleosis Kids and teens with mononucleosis (mono) can have ...

  16. Sore Throat (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... another illness, like a cold , the flu , or mononucleosis . They also can be caused by a strep ... topic for: Parents Kids Teens Strep Throat Coughing Mononucleosis Strep Test: Rapid Strep Test: Throat Culture Flu ...

  17. ECG Electrocardiogram (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ECG (Electrocardiogram) KidsHealth / For Parents / ECG (Electrocardiogram) Print en ... whether there is any damage. How Is an ECG Done? There is nothing painful about getting an ...

  18. Fibromyalgia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... think about their condition helps improve their symptoms. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) , a therapy used by mental health professionals, ... reviewed: October 2015 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Childhood Stress Physical ...

  19. Broken Bones (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Broken Bones KidsHealth / For Parents / Broken Bones What's in this ... bone fragments in place. When Will a Broken Bone Heal? Fractures heal at different rates, depending upon ...

  20. Immunotherapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Immunotherapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Immunotherapy What's in this article? ... Types of Immunotherapy Side Effects Outlook Print About Immunotherapy Immunotherapy, also known as targeted therapy or biotherapy, ...

  1. Understanding Puberty (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Understanding Puberty KidsHealth / For Parents / Understanding Puberty What's in this ... your child through all the changes? Stages of Puberty Sure, most of us know the telltale signs ...

  2. Cradle Cap (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cradle Cap (Infantile Seborrheic Dermatitis) KidsHealth / For Parents / Cradle Cap ( ... many babies develop called cradle cap. About Cradle Cap Cradle cap is the common term for seborrheic ...

  3. Surrogacy: the parents' story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpeter, Christine B

    2002-08-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences of 26 parents who were involved in surrogate parenting arrangements in a California-based surrogacy program. Participants were mostly white (n = 23). married (n = 25), females (n = 24), with high levels of education and income. The mean age at the time of the first child's birth was 39 yr. (SD = 5.06). The majority of parents reported having one (n = 10) or two (n = 8) children. All subjects reported infertility as their reason to explore surrogacy as a method of building a family. 18 participants chose in vitro fertilization as heir method of conception. Telephone interviews explored their decision-making, ethod of fertilization, their relationship with their surrogate, and the support that they received during the surrogacy process. Results indicate that parents were able to nticipate some potential pitfalls prior to their experience but did not realize the imortance of other potential difficulties. A conceptual model is presented with implications for helping professionals.

  4. Pinworm (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Pinworm KidsHealth / For Parents / Pinworm Print en español Oxiuros (lombrices intestinales) What Is a Pinworm Infection? Pinworm is an intestinal infection caused by ...

  5. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hepatitis KidsHealth / For Parents / Hepatitis Print en español Hepatitis What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. The ...

  6. Hemophilia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hemophilia KidsHealth / For Parents / Hemophilia What's in this article? ... everyday mishaps are cause for concern. What Is Hemophilia? Hemophilia is a disease that prevents blood from ...

  7. Toxoplasmosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Toxoplasmosis KidsHealth / For Parents / Toxoplasmosis What's in this article? ... t show any signs of a toxoplasmosis infection.) Toxoplasmosis in Kids In kids, toxoplasmosis infections can be: ...

  8. Vitiligo (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Vitiligo KidsHealth / For Parents / Vitiligo What's in this article? ... every bit as healthy as everyone else. About Vitiligo Vitiligo (vih-tih-LY-go) is a skin ...

  9. Testicular Torsion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Kids Teens Hernias Ultrasound: Scrotum Undescended Testicles Male Reproductive System PQ: I have a lump on one of ... to Do a Testicular Self-Exam (Slideshow) Varicocele Male Reproductive System Testicular Torsion View more About Us Contact Us ...

  10. Kidney Stones (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidney Stones KidsHealth / For Parents / Kidney Stones What's in ... other treatments to help remove the stones. How Kidney Stones Form It's the kidneys' job to remove ...

  11. Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Anemia What's in this article? ... Deficiency Anemia in My Kids? Print What Is Anemia? Anemia is when the level of healthy red ...

  12. Dinosaur Reproduction and Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, John R.

    Non-avian dinosaur reproductive and parenting behaviors were mostly similar to those of extant archosaurs. Non-avian dinosaurs were probably sexually dimorphic and some may have engaged in hierarchical rituals. Non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodontidae, Oviraptorosauria) had two active oviducts, each of which produced single eggs on a daily or greater time scale. The eggs of non-coelurosaurian dinosaurs (e.g. Ornithischia, Sauropoda) were incubated in soils, whereas the eggs of non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodon, Oviraptor) were incubated with a combination of soil and direct parental contact. Parental attention to the young was variable, ranging from protection from predators to possible parental feeding of nest-bound hatchlings. Semi-altricial hadrosaur hatchlings exited their respective nests near the time of their first linear doubling. Some reproductive behaviors, once thought exclusive to Aves, arose first in non-avian dinosaurs. The success of the Dinosauria may be related to reproductive strategies.

  13. Tips for Divorcing Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parents and kids, and watching for signs of stress can help prevent problems developing. Getting Help Figure out how ... Move Helping Your Child Through a Divorce Childhood Stress How Can I Help My Child Cope With Divorce? How Can I ...

  14. Spider Bites (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español First Aid: Spider Bites KidsHealth / For Parents / First Aid: Spider Bites ... rare. Signs and Symptoms Of a brown recluse spider bite: red blister in the center with surrounding ...

  15. Sepsis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sepsis KidsHealth / For Parents / Sepsis What's in this article? ... When to Call the Doctor Print What Is Sepsis? Sepsis is when the immune system responds to ...

  16. Parent-Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle Strandgaard

    2016-01-01

    of parents as co-consumers prevailed despite radical changes in views on children’s media consumption. In particular, I examine the shared inter-Scandinavian socio-cultural contexts that structured the changing professional and political groups’ pressure on parents to perform according to their norms......In this article, I examine change and continuity in conceptions of parental agency in public debates about children’s media consumption in Scandinavia, 1945-1975. During this period, public debates about the various kinds of media products children consumed were dominated by different groups....... However, a strong continuity in the debates was the negative influence parents were seen as having on children’s media consumption due to their lack of insight and interest in the topic. Drawing upon recent works on children’s media, consumption and enculturation, I analyse why the negative description...

  17. Allergy Shots (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Allergy Shots KidsHealth / For Parents / Allergy Shots What's in ... to help a child deal with them. Why Allergy Shots Are Used An allergy occurs when the ...

  18. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... diabetes. More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Diabetes Center Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) Diabetes: Grace's ...

  19. Parental Investments in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Esping-Andersen, Gösta

    This study examines parental time investment in their children, distinguishing between developmental and non-developmental care. Our analyses centre on three influential determinants: educational background, marital homogamy, and spouses’ relative bargaining power. We find that the emphasis...

  20. Parental Socialization of Emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Cumberland, Amanda; Spinrad, Tracy L.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of research on emotion, including the socialization of emotion. In this article, a heuristic model of factors contributing to the socialization of emotion is presented. Then literature relevant to the socialization of children’s emotion and emotion-related behavior by parents is reviewed, including (a) parental reactions to children’s emotions, (b) socializers’ discussion of emotion, and (c) socializers’ expression of emotion. The relevant literature is n...

  1. Parental Leave in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Christoffersen, Mogens; Weise, Hanne

    This artcle considders the political aims for different leave schemes and reviews studies af these schemes. The use of parental leave is sensitive to the financial loss involved in taking leave: a decrease in the benefit payments has had a significant influence on take-up, while, in general, fami......, families'' loss of income is less if leave is taken up by the mothers. Only few fathers participate in parental leave....

  2. Parenting styles and economics

    OpenAIRE

    Zilibotti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Does the economy influence the way people bring up their children? How can we determine and measure a child’s utility? How can parenting styles be categorized in an economic model? These are the questions that Professor Fabricio Zilibotti of the University of Zurich addressed in his honorary lecture ‘Parenting with Style’, which he delivered at the April International Academic Conference during the 5th LCSR international workshop ‘Social and Cultural Changes in Cross-National Perspective: Sub...

  3. Parenting Role's Tasks as Parents of Healthy and Disabled Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azade Riyahi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The purpose of this study was to determine how to do parenting role's tasks as parents of healthy and disabled children younger than 7 years old in Iran (Arak. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the parenting role tasks questionnaire was completed for 120 parents of healthy children and 120 parents of disabled children with at least one child with disability and the parents were selected by convenience sampling method. T-test, Mann-Whitney test and analysis of variances was used to compare the scores between parents of healthy and disabled children based on studied variables including child age, parent age, child gender, parent education, family economic status, history of trauma and seizure in children was applied to perform the role of parents. Results: There was a significant difference of parent role in both groups of parents. There was observed a significant relationship between role of healthy children's parents and age of child (r=0.21, P=0.016, but not observed in disabled children's parents. In healthy children, there was no significant correlation between parent's role and maternal age. In contrast, in disabled children, there was found a significant difference (P= 0.04 with correlation coefficient of -0.18 representing the inverse relationship. Moreover, no relationship was found between history of seizure and performance of parenting role's tasks in the group of disabled children (P>0.05. Conclusion The performance of tasks of parenting role in two groups of parents of healthy children and disabled ones in four areas of primary care, education, leisure and improving cognitive level had significant difference. This difference in the area of improving the cognitive level was higher. Due to complications of disability, parents of these children pay more attention to other areas of care except of improving cognitive level. Therefore presence of disabled child has negative effect on the balance of the

  4. Parental Divorce, Parental Religious Characteristics, and Religious Outcomes in Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Uecker, Jeremy E.; Ellison, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Parental divorce has been linked to religious outcomes in adulthood. Previous research has not adequately accounted for parental religious characteristics or subsequent family context, namely whether one’s custodial parent remarries. Using pooled data from three waves of the General Social Survey, we examine the relationships among parental divorce, subsequent family structure, and religiosity in adulthood. Growing up in a single-parent family—but not a stepparent family—is positively associa...

  5. Reflections on Parental Authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela LUPŞAN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The movement in the European Union territory of the family members de jure or de facto - parents married or not, on the one hand, and their children, on the other hand, the birth of litigation related to the content, exercising or limiting the parental authority in the event at least one holder of parental authority is in a Member State other than where the minor child is, and the interest of achieving a good administration of justice within the European Union, led to the development of Community instruments in the area of parental authority, which has provisions on conflicts of jurisdiction, conflict of laws, recognition and enforceability, enforcement, legal aid and cooperation between central authorities, designating the applicable law. In the first part of the study we have analyzed the rules of jurisdiction by establishing the jurisdiction of the court hearing with an application for parental responsibility, whether there are pending divorce proceeding or not. In the second part of the study, we have limited the analysis to the rules applicable to the law causes that have as object parental authority.

  6. Implications of antisocial parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torry, Zachary D; Billick, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Antisocial behavior is a socially maladaptive and harmful trait to possess. This can be especially injurious for a child who is raised by a parent with this personality structure. The pathology of antisocial behavior implies traits such as deceitfulness, irresponsibility, unreliability, and an incapability to feel guilt, remorse, or even love. This is damaging to a child's emotional, cognitive, and social development. Parents with this personality makeup can leave a child traumatized, empty, and incapable of forming meaningful personal relationships. Both genetic and environmental factors influence the development of antisocial behavior. Moreover, the child with a genetic predisposition to antisocial behavior who is raised with a parental style that triggers the genetic liability is at high risk for developing the same personality structure. Antisocial individuals are impulsive, irritable, and often have no concerns over their purported responsibilities. As a parent, this can lead to erratic discipline, neglectful parenting, and can undermine effective care giving. This paper will focus on the implications of parents with antisocial behavior and the impact that this behavior has on attachment as well as on the development of antisocial traits in children.

  7. Do You Recognize This Parent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Edna

    1997-01-01

    Suggests effective ways to work with parents who may be permissive, busy, detached, overprotective, or negative. Recommends that child care professionals be sensitive and understanding, recognize other demands on parents' time and communicate competitively with them, use terms parents understand, accept various levels of parental involvement, be…

  8. Parent and adolescent reports of parenting when a parent has a history of depression: associations with observations of parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Justin; Forehand, Rex; Dunbar, Jennifer P; Watson, Kelly H; Reising, Michelle M; Seehuus, Martin; Compas, Bruce E

    2014-02-01

    The current study examined the congruence of parent and adolescent reports of positive and negative parenting with observations of parent-adolescent interactions as the criterion measure. The role of parent and adolescent depressive symptoms in moderating the associations between adolescent or parent report and observations of parenting also was examined. Participants were 180 parents (88.9 % female) with a history of clinical depression and one of their 9-to-15 year old children (49.4 % female). Parents and adolescents reported on parenting skills and depressive symptoms, and parenting was independently observed subsequently in the same session. Findings indicated adolescent report of positive, but not negative, parenting was more congruent with observations than parent report. For negative parenting, depressive symptoms qualified the relation between the parent or adolescent report and independent observations. For parents, higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with more congruence with observed parenting (supporting a depressive realism hypothesis) whereas an opposite trend emerged for adolescents (providing some supporting evidence for a depression-distortion hypothesis).

  9. Parents, Teens, and Online Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Mary; Cortesi, Sandra; Gasser, Urs; Lenhart, Amanda; Duggan, Maeve

    2012-01-01

    Most parents of teenagers are concerned about what their teenage children do online and how their behavior could be monitored by others. Some parents are taking steps to observe, discuss, and check up on their children's digital footprints. A new survey of 802 parents and their teens shows that: (1) 81% of parents of online teens say they are…

  10. Parent and Adolescent Reports of Parenting When a Parent Has a History of Depression: Associations with Observations of Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Justin; Forehand, Rex; Dunbar, Jennifer P.; Watson, Kelly H.; Reising, Michelle M.; Seehuus, Martin; Compas, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the congruence of parent and adolescent reports of positive and negative parenting with observations of parent-adolescent interactions as the criterion measure. The role of parent and adolescent depressive symptoms in moderating the associations between adolescent or parent report and observations of parenting also was examined. Participants were 180 parents (88.9% female) with a history of clinical depression and one of their 9-to-15 year old children (49.4% female). Parents and adolescents reported on parenting skills and depressive symptoms, and parenting was independently observed subsequently in the same session. Findings indicated adolescent report of positive, but not negative, parenting was more congruent with observations than parent report. For negative parenting, depressive symptoms qualified the relation between the parent or adolescent report and independent observations. For parents, higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with more congruence with observed parenting (supporting a depressive realism hypothesis) whereas an opposite trend emerged for adolescents (providing some supporting evidence for a depression-distortion hypothesis). PMID:23851629

  11. Parent and Child Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Kim F.; And Others

    The Parent and Child Education Program (PACE) is a pilot program, developed in Kentucky, to provide adult, early childhood and parent education. PACE targets families that have one or both parents without a high school diploma or equivalency certificate and one child three or four years of age. Parents and children ride the bus to school together,…

  12. Parental Involvement in Norwegian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jan Merok

    2012-01-01

    This article examines findings on key challenges of school-parent relations in Norway. The review is based on recent large-scale studies on several issues, including formalized school-parent cooperation, parental involvement in the pedagogical discourse, and teacher perspectives on the parents' role in the school community. Findings suggest a…

  13. Active Parenting Now: Program Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkin, Michael H.

    Based largely on the theories of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs, this parent education curriculum is a video-based interactive learning experience that teaches a comprehensive model of parenting to parents of children ages 5 to 12 years. The kit provides parents with the skills needed to help their children develop courage, responsibility, and…

  14. Parenting self-efficacy, parenting stress and child behaviour before and after a parenting programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Linda; Kendall, Sally

    2012-10-01

    To explore whether changes in parenting self-efficacy after attending a parenting programme are related to changes in parenting stress and child behaviour. Adverse parenting is a risk factor in the development of a range of health and behavioural problems in childhood and is predictive of poor adult outcomes. Strategies for supporting parents are recognised as an effective way to improve the health, well-being and development of children. Parenting is influenced by many factors including the behaviour and characteristics of the child, the health and psychological well-being of the parent and the contextual influences of stress and support. Parenting difficulties are a major source of stress for parents, and parenting self-efficacy has been shown to be an important buffer against parenting stress. In all, 63 parents who had a child under the age of 10 years took part in the research. Of those, 58 returned completed measures of parenting self-efficacy, parenting stress and child behaviour at the start of a parenting programme and 37 at three-month follow-up. Improvements in parenting self-efficacy and parenting stress were found at follow-up, but there was less evidence for improvements in child behaviour. The findings clearly suggest a relationship between parenting self-efficacy and parenting stress; parents who are feeling less efficacious experience higher levels of stress, whereas greater parenting self-efficacy is related to less stress. This study adds to the evidence that parent outcomes may be a more reliable measure of programme effectiveness than child outcomes at least in the short term.

  15. Parenting stress among parents of children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Francesco; Operto, Francesca Felicia; De Giacomo, Andrea; Margari, Lucia; Frolli, Alessandro; Conson, Massimiliano; Ivagnes, Sara; Monaco, Marianna; Margari, Francesco

    2016-08-30

    In recent years, studies have shown that parents of children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders (NDDs) experience more parenting stress than parents of typically developing children, but the relation between the type of disorders and parenting stress is far from clear. The purpose of this study was to compare the parenting stress experienced by parents of 239 children with Specific Learning Disorders (SpLD), Language Disorders (LD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and typical development (TD). Parents of children with NDDs experience more parenting stress than those of children who have TD. Although, parents of children with ASD or ADHD report the most high scores of parenting stress, also the parents of children with SpLD or LD report higher parental stress compared with parent of children without NDDs. Another interesting finding was that IQ level or emotional and behavioral problems are associated with the higher levels of parenting stress. This study suggest that parent, both mothers and fathers, of children with different type of NDDs should be provided with interventions and resources to empower them with the knowledge and skills to reduce their stress and to enhance their quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Digital Parenting and Changing Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işıl KABAKÇI YURDAKUL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies are developing rapidly. Developing technologies are integrated in many fields of life. This situation facilitated almost all fields of life. Owing to integration process, children’s technology use and adaption is easy compare to their parents. But technology use and adaption brings several disadvantages for children. Computer and the Internet have been used nearly all home in about last five years. Parents who were worried about their children when they played outside are worried about their children when they are on net at home. Due to these developments, parenting notion has gain new different dimensions and parenting roles are changed. Parents should now be digital parent, the Internet Parent or online parent. In this paper Digital Parenting is examined and described in additon to thisdigital parenting roles are determined. Based on these roles recommendations are presented for future studies and practices

  17. The Relations between Parents' Smoking, General Parenting, Parental Smoking Communication, and Adolescents' Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harakeh, Zeena; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Vermulst, Ad A.; de Vries, Hein; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined whether the associations between general parenting practices (i.e., support, behavioral control, and psychological control) and parental smoking on the one hand and older and younger siblings' smoking on the other were mediated by parental smoking communication (i.e., frequency and quality of parent-adolescent…

  18. The Influences of the Sixth Graders' Parents' Internet Literacy and Parenting Style on Internet Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Shih, Ru-Chu; Liu, Hung-Tzu; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Tseng, Kuo-Hung

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to explore the sixth grade students' parents' Internet literacy and parenting style on Internet parenting in Kaohsiung County in Taiwan. Upon stratified cluster sampling, a total of 822 parents from 34 classes in 28 schools participated in this study. The descriptive statistics and chi-square test were used to analyze the responses…

  19. When a Parent Is Away: Promoting Strong Parent-Child Connections during Parental Absence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeary, Julia; Zoll, Sally; Reschke, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    How does a parent stay connected with an infant or toddler during a prolonged separation? Research has shown how important early connections are for child development. When a parent is not present physically, there are strategies that military parents have been using to keep a parent and child connected, promoting mindfulness. Because infants and…

  20. Parenting interventions in tic disorders: an exploration of parents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G; Wittkowski, A; Butler, H; Hedderly, T; Bunton, P

    2015-05-01

    Parents of children with tic disorders (e.g. Tourette syndrome) experience multiple challenges and stresses, which can impact on family functioning, children's well-being and could indirectly affect tic severity. Parenting interventions have been recommended for tic disorder populations; however, little is known about parents' views. The views of parents of children with tic disorders were sought. Using Q-methodology, 23 parents provided their opinions regarding the acceptability, effectiveness, feasibility and utility of parenting interventions. Four factors emerged, representing four groups of parents with similar opinions. Although all factors evidenced support for parenting interventions, subtle differences emerged between factors regarding the endorsed content, barriers and delivery of interventions. Results indicate a perceived clinical need for parenting interventions and provide guidance to further develop and implement such interventions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Adolescents' aggression to parents: longitudinal links with parents' physical aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Gayla; Baucom, Brian R

    2014-11-01

    To investigate whether parents' previous physical aggression (PPA) exhibited during early adolescence is associated with adolescents' subsequent parent-directed aggression even beyond parents' concurrent physical aggression (CPA) and to investigate whether adolescents' emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning child-to-parent aggression moderate associations. Adolescents (N = 93) and their parents participated in a prospective longitudinal study. Adolescents and parents reported at waves 1-3 on four types of parents' PPA (mother to adolescent, father to adolescent, mother to father, and father to mother). Wave 3 assessments also included adolescents' emotion dysregulation, attitudes condoning aggression, and externalizing behaviors. At waves 4 and 5, adolescents and parents reported on adolescents' parent-directed physical aggression, property damage, and verbal aggression and on parents' CPA. Parents' PPA emerged as a significant indicator of adolescents' parent-directed physical aggression (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-1.55; p = .047), property damage (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5, p = .002), and verbal aggression (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.15-1.6, p controlling for adolescents' sex, externalizing behaviors, and family income. When controlling for parents' CPA, previous mother-to-adolescent aggression still predicted adolescents' parent-directed physical aggression (OR: 5.56, 95% CI: 1.82-17.0, p = .003), and father-to-mother aggression predicted adolescents' parent-directed verbal aggression (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.0-3.3, p = .036). Emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning aggression did not produce direct or moderated the effects. Adolescents' parent-directed aggression deserves greater attention in discourse about lasting, adverse effects of even minor forms of parents' physical aggression. Future research should investigate parent-directed aggression as an early signal of aggression into adulthood. Copyright © 2014 Society for

  2. Parental feeding practices predict authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Kennedy, Tay Seacord; Page, Melanie C; Topham, Glade L; Harrist, Amanda W

    2008-07-01

    Our goal was to identify how parental feeding practices from the nutrition literature link to general parenting styles from the child development literature to understand how to target parenting practices to increase effectiveness of interventions. Stand-alone parental feeding practices could be targeted independently. However, parental feeding practices linked to parenting styles require interventions treating underlying family dynamics as a whole. To predict parenting styles from feeding practices and to test three hypotheses: restriction and pressure to eat are positively related whereas responsibility, monitoring, modeling, and encouraging are negatively related to an authoritarian parenting style; responsibility, monitoring, modeling, and encouraging are positively related whereas restriction and pressure to eat are negatively related to an authoritative parenting style; a permissive parenting style is negatively linked with all six feeding practices. Baseline data of a randomized-controlled intervention study. Two hundred thirty-nine parents (93.5% mothers) of first-grade children (134 boys, 105 girls) enrolled in rural public schools. Parental responses to encouraging and modeling questionnaires and the Child Feeding Questionnaire, as well as parenting styles measured by the Parenting Styles and Dimensions Questionnaire. Correlation and regression analyses. Feeding practices explained 21%, 15%, and 8% of the variance in authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting, respectively. Restriction, pressure to eat, and monitoring (negative) significantly predicted an authoritarian style (Hypothesis 1); responsibility, restriction (negative), monitoring, and modeling predicted an authoritative style (Hypothesis 2); and modeling (negative) and restriction significantly predicted a permissive style (Hypothesis 3). Parental feeding practices with young children predict general parenting styles. Interventions that fail to address underlying parenting styles

  3. Parental perceptions of child vulnerability, overprotection, and parental psychological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasgard, M

    1998-01-01

    While a parental perception of child vulnerability to illness/injury is often used interchangeably with parental overprotection, research suggests that these constructs are independent. Distinct parental psychological characteristics were hypothesized for each construct. The parents of 871 children, ages 22-72 months, completed a four-part protocol (clinical background data, Child Vulnerability Scale, Parent Protection Scale, and Brief Symptom Inventory). A distinct parent symptom profile was found for perceived child vulnerability (somatization, obsessive-compulsiveness, and anxiety). Overprotection was associated with phobic anxiety, psychoticism, and paranoid ideation. These findings provide further support for the differentiation of these constructs.

  4. Parenting intervention effects on parental depressive symptoms: examining the role of parenting and child behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jessie J; Gonzales, Nancy A; Montaño, Zorash; Dumka, Larry; Millsap, Roger E

    2014-06-01

    Parental depression is a major risk factor in child development. Growing research suggests parenting programs can positively impact parental depressive symptoms, although the specific mechanisms that explain these effects are unknown. The current study examined parenting mediated effects of a parenting program on mothers' and fathers' depressive symptoms, as well as the role of child behavior in linking parenting to reductions in depressive symptoms. The study samples included 494 mothers and 288 fathers of Mexican origin adolescents who participated in a randomized trial of the Bridges to High School Program/Proyecto Puentes a la Secundaria, a universal prevention and promotion intervention that included parent training but did not directly target parental depressive symptoms. Parenting mediator models tested program effects on parental depressive symptoms through changes in harsh and supportive parenting. Results showed a significant indirect intervention effect on maternal depressive symptoms through changes in mothers' harsh parenting. Next, child behavior models revealed a partial mediation effect of harsh parenting and a full mediation effect of supportive parenting on maternal depressive symptoms through mothers' reports of child externalizing symptoms. Indirect effects of fathers' harsh and supportive parenting on paternal depressive symptoms were also found through fathers' reports of child behavior. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Perceived parental efficacy: concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montigny, Francine; Lacharité, Carl

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes a concept analysis carried out to remove some of the ambiguity surrounding the conceptual meaning of perceived parental efficacy and to distinguish it from related concepts such as parental confidence and parental competence. Constructing parental efficacy is a crucial step for family members after the birth of their first child. For some authors, perceived parental efficacy is a motor for adequate parental practices. Confusion about the definition and measurement of this concept has hindered both psychology and nursing practice and research. Concept delineation and concept clarification are required in order to further the development of the concept of perceived parental efficacy. A literature search using a variety of online databases yielded 113 articles between the years 1980 and 2000. The final sample (n=60) consisted of 30 articles from two disciplines: nursing and psychology. A content analysis of the literature was done using Rodger's evolutionary concept analysis method. Content analysis of the literature yielded four contributors to perceived parental efficacy: positive enactive mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion and an appropriate physiological and affective state. Perceived parental efficacy can thus be defined as 'beliefs or judgements a parent holds of their capabilities to organize and execute a set of tasks related to parenting a child'. This conceptual analysis has allowed perceived parental efficacy to be distinguished from parental confidence and parental competence. Both nursing and psychology research, practice and education will benefit from a more precise and delineated concept.

  6. Parental representations of transsexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G; Barr, R

    1982-06-01

    The parental representations of 30 male-to-female transsexuals were rated using a measure of fundamental parental dimensions and shown to be of acceptable validity as a measure both of perceived and actual parental characteristics. Scores on that measure were compared separately against scores returned by matched male and female controls. The transsexuals did not differ from the male controls in their scoring of their mothers but did score their fathers as less caring and more overprotective. These differences were weaker for the comparisons made against the female controls. Item analyses suggested that the greater paternal "overprotection" experienced by transsexuals was due to their fathers being perceived as offering less encouragement to their sons' independence and autonomy. Several interpretations of the findings are considered.

  7. Good-parent beliefs of parents of seriously ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, Chris; Walter, Jennifer K; Faerber, Jennifer A; Hill, Douglas L; Carroll, Karen W; Mollen, Cynthia J; Miller, Victoria A; Morrison, Wynne E; Munson, David; Kang, Tammy I; Hinds, Pamela S

    2015-01-01

    Parents' beliefs about what they need to do to be a good parent when their children are seriously ill influence their medical decisions, and better understanding of these beliefs may improve decision support. To assess parents' perceptions regarding the relative importance of 12 good-parent attributes. A cross-sectional, discrete-choice experiment was conducted at a children's hospital. Participants included 200 parents of children with serious illness. Ratings of 12 good-parent attributes, with subsequent use of latent class analysis to identify groups of parents with similar ratings of attributes, and ascertainment of whether membership in a particular group was associated with demographic or clinical characteristics. The highest-ranked good-parent attribute was making sure that my child feels loved, followed by focusing on my child's health, making informed medical care decisions, and advocating for my child with medical staff. We identified 4 groups of parents with similar patterns of good-parent-attribute ratings, which we labeled as: child feels loved (n=68), child's health (n=56), advocacy and informed (n=55), and spiritual well-being (n=21). Compared with the other groups, the child's health group reported more financial difficulties, was less educated, and had a higher proportion of children with new complex, chronic conditions. Parents endorse a broad range of beliefs that represent what they perceive they should do to be a good parent for their seriously ill child. Common patterns of how parents prioritize these attributes exist, suggesting future research to better understand the origins and development of good-parent beliefs among these parents. More important, engaging parents individually regarding what they perceive to be the core duties they must fulfill to be a good parent may enable more customized and effective decision support.

  8. Parenting adolescents with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    and the influence of different parenting styles on the adolescents’ adherence to treatment is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to identify the types of parental support that adolescents and young adults with CF want and find helpful in terms of preparing them for adult life. Methods: Sixteen Danish...... was conducted. Results: The adolescents and young adults wanted their parents educated about the adolescent experience. They wanted their parents to learn a pedagogical parenting style, to learn to trust them, and to learn to gradually transfer responsibility for their medical treatment. Additionally......: chronic illness, parenting style, qualitative research, patient preferences, interpretive description...

  9. The impact of parental self-esteem and parental rearing behavior on adolescent attachment to parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbo Yang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the relationship of parental self-esteem, parental rearing and adolescent adult attachment was investigated. A total 448 senior high school students completed EMBU(Egna Minnen av Barndoms Uppfostran, or ―Own memories of parental rearing‖, Perris et al., 1980, the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (ECR; Brennan, Clark, &Shaver, 1998, and their parents completed The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES; Rosenberg, 1965. The results suggested that parental global self-esteem has no effect on the adolescent attachment to parents. Parental positive rearing behaviors have been significantly associated with avoidance to parents. Furthermore, the negative rearing behaviors, such as paternal denying and rejecting, maternal punitiveness, maternal overinvolved and overprotective behavior, can predict the adolescent avoidance and anxiety to parents.

  10. Parental Monitoring, Parent-Adolescent Communication, and Adolescents' Trust in Their Parents in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuhua Ying

    Full Text Available Trust is an important aspect of interpersonal relationships, but little is known about adolescents' interpersonal trust. The aim of the present study was to examine the associations among parental monitoring, parent-adolescent communication, and adolescents' trust in their parents in China.Data in this study were collected as part of the cross-sectional study of children in China. 3349 adolescents (female 48.6%, age range of 12-15 years were randomly selected from 35 secondary schools in April, 2009 and administered to the Adolescent Interpersonal Trust Scale, the Parental Monitoring Scale, and the Parent-Adolescent Communication Scale.Adolescents' trust in their parents was positively related to parental monitoring and parent-adolescent communication. Furthermore, parent-adolescent communication mediated the association between parental monitoring and adolescents' trust in their parents. The mediation model fit data of both genders and three age groups equally well.Parental monitoring and parent-adolescent communication play an importance role in fostering adolescents' trust in their parents.

  11. Mainland Chinese Parenting Styles and Parent-Child Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiyuan; Farver, Jo Ann M.; Zhang, Zengxiu; Zeng, Qiang; Yu, Lidong; Cai, Beiying

    2005-01-01

    Parenting styles and mother-child interaction were examined with 97 Mainland Chinese mothers (M age = 29.64 years, SD = 3.64) and their young children (M = 24.30 months, SD = 4.57). Mothers completed questionnaires about their parenting styles, orientation to Chinese cultural values, perceived parenting stress, and sources of social support. The…

  12. Parenting Behaviour among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Greet; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Boonen, Hannah; Maes, Bea; Noens, Ilse

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to the extensive amount of empirical findings about parental perceptions, parenting cognitions, and coping in families with a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), research about parenting itself is very scarce. A first goal of this study was to examine the factor structure and internal consistency of two scales to measure parenting…

  13. Parental Care Aids, but Parental Overprotection Hinders, College Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthew B.; Pierce, John D., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has shown that students who have troublesome relationships with their parents show higher risk factors for poorer college adjustment. In the present study, we focused on the balance between two key aspects of parenting style, parental care and overprotection, as they affect the transition to college life. Eighty-three undergraduate…

  14. Parenting Ideals and (Un-)Troubled Parent Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widding, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how some Swedish parents constructed meanings of parenthood. The parents had completed a state-sponsored parenting programme and were interviewed about their experiences of the programme, their everyday lives, their need for support, ideas about the societal context, and their understandings of "good" and…

  15. Child Characteristics, Parenting Stress, and Parental Involvement: Fathers versus Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Brent A.; Schoppe, Sarah J.; Rane, Thomas R.

    2002-01-01

    Examines variations in the relationships among child characteristics, parenting stress, and parental involvement. Analyses revealed significant, yet somewhat different, associations between child temperament and parental stress for mothers and fathers. More significant associations were found between perceptions of child temperament and…

  16. Parent-Child Agreement on Parent-to-Child Maltreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compier-de Block, Laura H.C.G.; Alink, Lenneke R.A.; Linting, Mariëlle; van den Berg, Lisa J.M.; Elzinga, Bernet M.; Voorthuis, Alexandra; Tollenaar, Marieke S.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2017-01-01

    Parent-child agreement on child maltreatment was examined in a multigenerational study. Questionnaires on perpetrated and experienced child maltreatment were completed by 138 parent-child pairs. Multi-level analyses were conducted to explore whether parents and children agreed about levels of

  17. Exploring Parental Perspectives on Parent-Child Sexual Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Sharon M.; Gross, Kevin H.

    2009-01-01

    We examined parental perspectives about parent-child sexual communication through four focus groups conducted with 25 parents of young children. Participant comments fell into six areas: 1) personal experience with sexuality education, 2) current sexuality education efforts, 3) comfort and confidence, 4) content and timing, 5) importance of a…

  18. Vietnamese American Immigrant Parents: A Pilot Parenting Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y. Joel; Tran, Kimberly K.; Schwing, Alison E.; Cao, Lien H.; Ho, Phoenix Phung-Hoang; Nguyen, Quynh-Tram

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this mixed-methods study was to examine the perceived effectiveness of a brief, community-based parenting intervention for Vietnamese American immigrant parents. A key component of the intervention involved participants listening to Vietnamese American adolescents' discussions about their relationships with their parents utilizing…

  19. Modifying the 'Positive Parenting Program' for parents with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazemakers, I; Deboutte, D

    2013-07-01

    Many parents with intellectual disabilities (ID) want and/or need professional guidance and support to learn skills and strategies to prevent and manage child behaviour problems. However, the available support is rarely suitable, and suitable support is rarely available. The aim of this study was to determine whether a popular mainstream parenting training programme, known as 'Group Triple P' (Positive Parenting Program), could be successfully modified for this parent group. A pilot study was undertaken to determine whether a modified version of Group Triple P would engage and retain parents with ID. A non-experimental, pre-test post-test study, involving a total of 30 parents with ID, was then undertaken to obtain preliminary efficacy data. Parent engagement and participation levels were high. No parent 'dropped out' of the programme. After completing the modified Group Triple P programme, parents reported a decrease in psychological distress, maladaptive parenting and child conduct problems. Parents reported high levels of satisfaction with the information and support they received. Research-informed adaptation of mainstream behavioural family interventions, such as Group Triple P, could make 'suitable support' more readily available, and more engaging for parents with ID. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  20. Parental influences on memories of parents and friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Franca; Bonechi, Alice; Peterson, Carole; Smorti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The authors evaluated the role parent-child relationship quality has on two types of memories, those of parents and those of friends. Participants were 198 Italian university students who recalled memories during 4 separate timed memory-fluency tasks about their preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school and university years. Half were instructed to recall memories involving parents and the remainder memories involving friends. Moreover, parent-child relationships were assessed by the Network of Relationships Inventory (NRI; W. Furman & D. Buhrmester, 1985) and Adolescents' Report of Parental Monitoring (D. M. Capaldi & G. R. Patterson, 1989). Results showed that men with positive parent-son relationships had more memories of parents and more affectively positive memories of friends, supporting a consistency model positing similarity between parent-child relationships and memories of friends. Women with positive parental relationship quality had more affectively positive memories of parents but for friends, positive relationship quality only predicted positive memories when young. At older ages, especially middle school-aged children, negative parent-daughter relationships predicted more positive memories of friends, supporting a compensatory model. The gender of parent also mattered, with fathers having a more influential role on affect for memories of friends.

  1. Parenting Style and Parental Involvement: Relations with Adolescent Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Eighty ninth-grade students completed questionnaires regarding their parents' demandingness, responsiveness, school involvement, and commitment to achievement. Boys' reports of both maternal and paternal parenting significantly predicted their achievement, with parental values toward achievement significantly predicting achievement in boys above…

  2. The Investigation of Research-Based Home Parental Involvement Practices, Parental Style, and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Myron Jamal

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship of home parental involvement practices, parental style and student achievement. Dimensions of parental involvement practices are parental instruction, parental reinforcement, parental modeling, and parental encouragement. Dimensions of parental style are authoritarian, permissive, and…

  3. Models of Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindervater, Terry

    2010-01-01

    In this article a literacy lead teacher tells the story what happened when kindergarteners were taught to link certain sounds with particular hand and body gestures. Many children were so intrigued with "using the motions" that they shared these procedures with their parents. Terry Kindervater explains how this happened and describes some of the…

  4. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Blood Transfusions KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Transfusions What's in this ... and help put your child at ease. About Blood Transfusions Blood is like the body's transportation system. As ...

  5. Parents and School

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ria Vogels

    2002-01-01

    Original title: Ouders bij de les. The government is increasingly withdrawing from playing a foreground role in primary and secondary education, transferring competences to local authorities, school boards and school management. Parents are also assigned a role in this process, based on

  6. Rabies (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Rabies KidsHealth / For Parents / Rabies What's in this article? ... Treatment Prevention Print en español La rabia About Rabies Rabies infections in people are rare in the ...

  7. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Diabetes Movie KidsHealth / For Parents / Diabetes ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  8. Dehydration (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Dehydration KidsHealth / For Parents / Dehydration What's in this article? ... Be Prevented? Print en español Deshidratación What Is Dehydration? We all lose some body water every day ...

  9. TIPS Pamphlets for Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algozzine, Bob, Ed.; Ysseldyke, Jim, Ed.

    This manual presents 99 one-sheet informational brochures designed to improve parenting skills for children with and without disabilities. Each brochure is in a format suitable for duplicating, folding, and distributing. Each brochure offers references to related brochures in the collection. Brochures are grouped under the following broad areas:…

  10. Sexual Orientation (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sexual Orientation KidsHealth / For Parents / Sexual Orientation What's in this ... orientation is part of that process. What Is Sexual Orientation? The term sexual orientation refers to the gender ( ...

  11. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Pneumonia KidsHealth / For Parents / Pneumonia What's in this article? ... the Doctor? Print en español Neumonía What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs . The ...

  12. Psoriasis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Psoriasis KidsHealth / For Parents / Psoriasis What's in this article? ... treatment doesn't work, another probably will. About Psoriasis Psoriasis (suh-RYE-uh-sus) is a non- ...

  13. Theme: Parents and Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jund, Suzanne, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This journal issue concentrates on the theme "Parents and Reading." It presents articles on sharing books with young children, using public relations in a reading program, guiding preschool learning, assessing language readiness, working with reading problems, and teaching reading readiness in Wisconsin kindergartens. Resources and a review of…

  14. Alpha Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Alpha Thalassemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Alpha Thalassemia What's in this ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Print en español Alfa talasemia Thalassemias Thalassemias are a group of blood disorders that ...

  15. Beta Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Beta Thalassemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Beta Thalassemia What's in this ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Print en español Beta talasemia Thalassemias Thalassemias are a group of blood disorders that ...

  16. Depression (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Depression KidsHealth / For Parents / Depression What's in this article? ... Ways to Help Print en español Depresión About Depression It's normal for kids to feel sad, down, ...

  17. Mexican Parenting Questionnaire (MPQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgunseth, Linda C.; Ispa, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in four phases and constructed a self-report parenting instrument for use with Mexican immigrant mothers of children aged 6 to 10. The 14-item measure was based on semistructured qualitative interviews with Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 10), was refined by a focus group of Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 5), and was…

  18. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Birth Defects KidsHealth / For Parents / Birth Defects What's in ... Prevented? Print en español Anomalías congénitas What Are Birth Defects? While still in the womb, some babies ...

  19. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Liver Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Liver Tumors What's in this article? Types of Tumors ... Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping Print The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  20. Explaining "DSM" to Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    "The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") is useful for children and families for three practical reasons: (1) It provides a way to communicate about emotional and behavioral problems of youth in a common language; (2) Parents can get an Individual Education Plan (IEP) for a child if that process…

  1. Parenting NICU graduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schappin, R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis reflects the results of our randomized, clinical trial on the effectiveness of a generic parenting intervention named Primary Care Triple P. We investigated whether Primary Care Triple P reduced emotional and behavioral problems in preterm-born and asphyxiated term-born preschoolers. The

  2. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Lead Poisoning KidsHealth / For Parents / Lead Poisoning What's in ... Print en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important ...

  3. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Diabetes Movie KidsHealth / For Parents / Diabetes Movie Print Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from ...

  4. Parenting as a Teenager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobe, Patricia

    1976-01-01

    Today, many government and private agencies, clinics, foundations, and schools are sponsoring programs and literature for teen-age parents. These range in scope from fetal and maternal nutrition, to family planning counseling, to informal rap sessions on parenthood, to workshops on child care. (Author)

  5. Growth Charts (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Growth Charts KidsHealth / For Parents / Growth Charts What's in ... Problem? Print en español Tablas de crecimiento About Growth Charts Look at any class picture, and you' ...

  6. Rotavirus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Rotavirus KidsHealth / For Parents / Rotavirus What's in this article? ... the Doctor Print en español El rotavirus About Rotavirus Almost all kids have had a rotavirus infection ...

  7. Black parental involvement in education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    The South African Schools Act of 1996 (SASA) provides formal power in education to parents as well as communities. ... Review of selected studies on parental involvement in ..... Anna, a Grade 11 teacher, summed up the feelings of the.

  8. Rubella - Fact Sheet for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and 4 through 6 years Fact Sheet for Parents Color [2 pages] Español: Rubéola The best way ... according to the recommended schedule. Fact Sheets for Parents Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent Them Chickenpox ...

  9. Failure to Thrive (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... Doctors usually diagnose the condition in infants and toddlers — an important time of physical and mental development. ...

  10. Living with a Single Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kids in the United States live with one parent. Separation and divorce are the most common reasons for ... Who Are Moving Should Do What Is a Divorce? Getting Along With Parents Going to a Therapist View more About Us ...

  11. Coping with an Alcoholic Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of his parents arguing. Anthony knows that his mother has been drinking again. He starts worrying about ... drugs. Despite what happens, most children of alcoholics love their parents and worry about something bad happening ...

  12. Parenting classes: focus on discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J M

    1992-01-01

    Nurses in community settings have an opportunity to provide instruction related to health and life-style needs. An important consideration is the parental role. A particularly controversial and opinion-laden aspect of parenting is disciplining children. Discipline provides children with the security of clearly enforced rules to help them learn self-control and social standards. Parenting classes are worthwhile for people who have little formal or informal preparation. A survey of middle-class elementary school district parents' and childrens' attitudes toward discipline was conducted to develop meaningful parenting classes. Parents' feelings about being a mother or father were surprisingly negative. A parent educational program was developed to cover child growth and development and disciplinary practices. Parent evaluations led to continuation and an expansion of this program to other schools within the area.

  13. The Problems of Parental Leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sean

    2017-10-01

    The United States is the only major industrialized country in the world to not require paid parental leave. Numerous studies have shown that allowing parents time with a newborn makes the child and the parents healthier, both physically and mentally. Many physicians, especially those who work in practices with five or fewer doctors, worry about how to pay for parental leave for themselves and their staff.

  14. Children's beliefs about parental divorce

    OpenAIRE

    Dovydaitienė, Miglė

    2001-01-01

    This article investigates children's beliefs about parental divorce and attitudes toward environment and people. Children's believes about parental divorce is evaluated in a sample 8 through 10-year children whose parents had been separated for about 3 years. Attitudes toward environment and people between children of separated as well as intact families are compared. We also examined the relation of children's beliefs about parental divorce and attitudes toward environment and people. The me...

  15. Relations among Positive Parenting, parent-child Relationship, and Empathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Liyun; Zhang, Xingli; Shi, Jiannong

    This study demonstrated relations among 2 features of positive parenting——supportive responsiveness to distress and warmth ,parent-child relationship and empathy.171 children aged 8-10 years (mean age = 9.31 years, 89 girls) participated in the study.In school,participants completed Empathic......,Prosocial Response to Another’s Distress Scale,Parental Acceptance-Rejection Questionnaire, Coping with Children’s Negative Emotions Questionaire,Network of Relationships Inventory. Results showed that: (1)Parents' supportive responsiveness to distress, but not warmth, predicted children's empathy.(2)Near parent-child...... parent-child relationship....

  16. Group Work with Abusive Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Lois; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Social work students conclude from an experience that parents can consider alternative means of disciplining children when they participate in a parent group that is comfortable and when attendance is promoted by provision of tangible services. Parents achieved increased sense of self-worth and learned appropriate ways of expressing anger. (Author)

  17. Parenting Style Transitions and Delinquency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Ryan D.; Mowen, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Parenting style has been extensively analyzed as a contributor to juvenile delinquency in the criminological literature, but no research to date has assessed the prevalence of parenting style changes during adolescence or the influence of such parenting style changes on juvenile delinquency. Drawing from the life course theory, the results show…

  18. Parental Separation, Parental Alcoholism, and Timing of First Sexual Intercourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Mary; Doran, Kelly A.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Duncan, Alexis E.; Lynskey, Michael T.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Sartor, Carolyn E.; Heath, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined timing of first voluntary sexual intercourse as a joint function of parental separation during childhood and parental history of alcoholism. Methods Data were drawn from a birth cohort of female like-sex twins (n=569 African Ancestry [AA], n=3415 European or other Ancestry [EA]). Cox proportional hazards regression was conducted predicting age at first sex from dummy variables coding for parental separation and parental alcoholism. Propensity score analysis was also employed comparing intact and separated families, stratified by predicted probability of separation. Results Earlier sex was reported by EA twins from separated and alcoholic families, compared to EA twins from intact nonalcoholic families, with effects most pronounced through age 14. Among AA twins, effects of parental separation and parental alcoholism were largely nonsignificant. Results of propensity score analyses confirmed unique risks from parental separation in EA families, where consistent effects of parental separation were observed across predicted probability of separation. For AA families there was poor matching on risk-factors presumed to predate separation, which limited interpretability of survival-analytic findings. Conclusions In European American families, parental separation during childhood is an important predictor of early-onset sex, beyond parental alcoholism and other correlated risk-factors. To characterize risk for African Americans associated with parental separation, additional research is needed where matching on confounders can be achieved. PMID:25907653

  19. Parenting and Children's Internalizing Symptoms: How Important are Parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, Cathy M; van Steensel, Francisca J A; Bögels, Susan M

    Parenting behaviors are associated with children's internalizing symptoms, however, it is not often examined which factors could possibly influence this relationship. The goals of this study were twofold. One goal was to examine whether the association between parenting and children's internalizing symptoms would increase if parenting behaviors were assessed behaviorally and in a context where the child displayed specific anxious behaviors. Another goal was to examine whether this relationship was influenced by the age and gender of the child, and by possible parenting differences between mothers and fathers. These questions were examined in a sample of 211 children aged 4-12 years; 140 community children and 71 clinically referred anxious children. Parents completed questionnaires regarding children's internalizing symptoms and parenting behaviors (positive reinforcement, punishment, force, reinforcement of dependency, and modeling/reassurance). In line with expectations, more punishment and less modeling/reassurance by parents were related to more internalizing symptoms in children. Child gender, child age, parent gender and clinical anxiety status were not found to influence the relationship between parenting and children's internalizing symptoms. Our results suggest that paternal parenting is as important as maternal parenting with respect to children's internalizing symptoms, and therefore, fathers could be included in child treatment as well.

  20. Parental separation, parental alcoholism, and timing of first sexual intercourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Mary; Doran, Kelly A; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Duncan, Alexis E; Lynskey, Michael T; Madden, Pamela A F; Sartor, Carolyn E; Heath, Andrew C

    2015-05-01

    We examined timing of first voluntary sexual intercourse as a joint function of parental separation during childhood and parental history of alcoholism. Data were drawn from a birth cohort of female like-sex twins (n = 569 African ancestry [AA]; n = 3,415 European or other ancestry [EA]). Cox proportional hazards regression was conducted predicting age at first sex from dummy variables coding for parental separation and parental alcoholism. Propensity score analysis was also employed to compare intact and separated families, stratified by predicted probability of separation. Earlier sex was reported by EA twins from separated and alcoholic families, compared to EA twins from intact nonalcoholic families, with effects most pronounced through the age of 14 years. Among AA twins, effects of parental separation and parental alcoholism were largely nonsignificant. Results of propensity score analyses confirmed unique risks from parental separation in EA families, where consistent effects of parental separation were observed across predicted probability of separation. For AA families, there was poor matching on risk factors presumed to predate separation, which limited interpretability of survival-analytic findings. In European American families, parental separation during childhood is an important predictor of early-onset sex, beyond parental alcoholism and other correlated risk factors. To characterize risk for African Americans associated with parental separation, additional research is needed where matching on confounders can be achieved. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Do parents of obese children use ineffective parenting strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Alina; West, Felicity

    2013-12-01

    Research has shown mixed findings about the relationship between parenting style and child lifestyle outcomes. This paper describes a cross-sectional study that aimed to clarify the relationship between ineffective parenting and childhood obesity by using multiple measures of child and family functioning. Sixty-two families with an obese child (aged four to 11 years) were matched with 62 families with a healthy weight child on key sociodemographic variables. Significant differences were found on several measures, including general parenting style, domain-specific parenting practices, and parenting self-efficacy (d = .53 to 1.96). Parents of obese children were more likely to use permissive and coercive discipline techniques, and to lack confidence in managing children's lifestyle behaviour. In contrast, parents of healthy weight children were more likely to implement specific strategies for promoting a healthy lifestyle.

  2. Identification of expressed genes in cDNA library of hemocytes from the RLO-challenged oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis Gould with special functional implication of three complement-related fragments (CaC1q1, CaC1q2 and CaC3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Xie, Jiasong; Li, Jianming; Luo, Ming; Ye, Shigen; Wu, Xinzhong

    2012-06-01

    A SMARTer™ cDNA library of hemocyte from Rickettsia-like organism (RLO) challenged oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis Gould was constructed. Random clones (400) were selected and single-pass sequenced, resulted in 200 unique sequences containing 96 known genes and 104 unknown genes. The 96 known genes were categorized into 11 groups based on their biological process. Furthermore, we identified and characterized three complement-related fragments (CaC1q1, CaC1q2 and CaC3). Tissue distribution analysis revealed that all of three fragments were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues studied including hemocyte, gills, mantle, digestive glands, gonads and adductor muscle, while the highest level was seen in the hemocyte. Temporal expression profile in the hemocyte monolayers reveled that the mRNA expression levels of three fragments presented huge increase after the RLO incubation at 3 h and 6 h in post-challenge, respectively. And the maximal expression levels at 3 h in post-challenge are about 256, 104 and 64 times higher than the values detected in the control of CaC1q1, CaC1q2 and CaC3, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mindful Parenting Training in Child Psychiatric Settings : Heightened Parental Mindfulness Reduces Parents' and Children's Psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, Renee; de Bruin, Esther I.; Wanders-Mulder, Femy H.; Vennik, Corinne J.; Bogels, Susan M.

    Mindful parenting training is an application of mindfulness-based interventions that allows parents to perceive their children with unbiased and open attention without prejudgment and become more attentive and less reactive in their parenting. This study examined the effectiveness of mindful

  4. The Impact of Parental Religiosity on Parenting Goals and Parenting Style: A Dutch Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Several studies, conducted mainly in the United States, have revealed that parental religiosity influences the way parents raise their children. Against this background, the current study explores if such an effect is also discernible in the Netherlands. Data were gathered as part of a longitudinal study, in which 356 Dutch parents answered…

  5. Relationship between Test Anxiety and Parenting Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thergaonkar, Neerja R.; Wadkar, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between test anxiety and parenting style. Method: Democratic attitude of parents, acceptance of parents by the child, parental attitude regarding academics, parental expectations and gender stereotyped perceptions of parents regarding academics were evaluated in the domain…

  6. Concepts in modern parenting

    OpenAIRE

    Dolenc, Anja

    2011-01-01

    The main focus of my dissertation represents changes in parenthood, which are a consequence of a wider specter of social changes. Besides, I am interested in modern trends of educational strategies and how parents deal with the demands of society and those of professional public for nothing less than a perfect parenthood. Theoretical cognitions are divided into three parts: in the first one, new forms of family and social changes which affected the development of the modern family are describ...

  7. What is good parental education? Interviews with parents who have attended parental education sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Kerstin; Petersson, Christer; Håkansson, Anders

    2004-03-01

    The aim of the study was to highlight the experiences and expectations of Swedish parents with respect to general parental education within child healthcare. Interviews were carried out with 25 parents who had attended education sessions. With a few exceptions the fathers did not take part, and those mothers who did comprised a relatively highly educated group; their views therefore predominate in this study. Socially vulnerable parents such as the unemployed and immigrants took part more sporadically in the meetings, which is why less material is available from these groups. The arrangement and analysis of the material was done using qualitative content analysis. We identified two main categories of importance: 'parental education content' and 'parental education structure'. The parents were on the whole satisfied with the content with respect to the child's physical and psychosocial development. On the other hand, first-time parents expressed a degree of uncertainty with respect to the new parent roles and parent relation and they thought that the education should place more emphasis on the interplay between the parents and between child and parents. The degree of confidence in the nurse as group leader was mainly high. The parents thought that the groups functioned well socially and were satisfied with the organization of the meetings. They did, however, demand clearer structure and framework with respect to the content. Since the aim of legally established parental education is to improve the conditions of childhood growth and to provide support to parents, it must be considered especially important to provide resources so that the socially vulnerable groups in the community may also be reached.

  8. Parents' employment and children's wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Carolyn J

    2014-01-01

    Since modern welfare reform began in the 1980s, we have seen low-income parents leave the welfare rolls and join the workforce in large numbers. At the same time, the Earned Income Tax Credit has offered a monetary incentive for low-income parents to work. Thus, unlike some of the other two-generation mechanisms discussed in this issue of Future of Children, policies that encourage low-income parents to work are both widespread and well-entrenched in the United States. But parents' (and especially mothers') work, writes Carolyn Heinrich, is not unambiguously beneficial for their children. On the one hand, working parents can be positive role models for their children, and, of course, the income they earn can improve their children's lives in many ways. On the other hand, work can impair the developing bond between parents and young children, especially when the parents work long hours or evening and night shifts. The stress that parents bring home from their jobs can detract from their parenting skills, undermine the atmosphere in the home, and thereby introduce stress into children's lives. Unfortunately, it is low-income parents who are most likely to work in stressful, low-quality jobs that feature low pay, little autonomy, inflexible hours, and few or no benefits. And low-income children whose parents are working are more likely to be placed in inadequate child care or to go unsupervised. Two-generation approaches, Heinrich writes, could maximize the benefits and minimize the detriments of parents' work by expanding workplace flexibility, and especially by mandating enough paid leave so that mothers can breastfeed and form close bonds with their infants; by helping parents place their children in high-quality child care; and by helping low-income parents train for, find, and keep a well-paying job with benefits.

  9. Parent-Child Agreement on Parent-to-Child Maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compier-de Block, Laura H C G; Alink, Lenneke R A; Linting, Mariëlle; van den Berg, Lisa J M; Elzinga, Bernet M; Voorthuis, Alexandra; Tollenaar, Marieke S; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2017-01-01

    Parent-child agreement on child maltreatment was examined in a multigenerational study. Questionnaires on perpetrated and experienced child maltreatment were completed by 138 parent-child pairs. Multi-level analyses were conducted to explore whether parents and children agreed about levels of parent-to-child maltreatment (convergence), and to examine whether parents and children reported equal levels of child maltreatment (absolute differences). Direct and moderating effects of age and gender were examined as potential factors explaining differences between parent and child report. The associations between parent- and child-reported maltreatment were significant for all subtypes, but the strength of the associations was low to moderate. Moreover, children reported more parent-to-child neglect than parents did. Older participants reported more experienced maltreatment than younger participants, without evidence for differences in actual exposure. These findings support the value of multi-informant assessment of child maltreatment to improve accuracy, but also reveal the divergent perspectives of parents and children on child maltreatment.

  10. Parental adjustment and attitudes to parenting after in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, F L; Ungerer, J A; Tennant, C C; Saunders, D M

    2000-03-01

    To examine the psychosocial and parenthood-specific adjustment and attitudes to parenting at 1 year postpartum of IVF parents. Prospective, controlled study. Volunteers in a teaching hospital environment. Sixty-five primiparous women with singleton IVF pregnancies and their partners, and a control group of 61 similarly aged primiparous women with no history of infertility and their partners. Completion of questionnaires and interviews. Parent reports of general and parenthood-specific adjustment and attitudes to parenting. The IVF mothers tended to report lower self-esteem and less parenting competence than control mothers. Although there were no group differences on protectiveness, IVF mothers saw their children as significantly more vulnerable and "special" compared with controls. The IVF fathers reported significantly lower self-esteem and marital satisfaction, although not less competence in parenting. Both IVF mothers and fathers did not differ from control parents on other measures of general adjustment (mood) or those more specific to parenthood (e.g., attachment to the child and attitudes to child rearing). The IVF parents' adjustment to parenthood is similar to naturally conceiving comparison families. Nonetheless, there are minor IVF differences that reflect heightened child-focused concern and less confidence in parenting for mothers, less satisfaction with the marriage for the fathers, and vulnerable self-esteem for both parents.

  11. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ALEXITHYMIA, PARENTING STYLE, AND PARENTAL CONTROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzocrea, Francesca; Barberis, Nadia; Costa, Sebastiano; Larcan, Rosalba

    2015-10-01

    Research on the relationship between parental alexithymia and parenting is relatively scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between parental alexithymia and three styles of parenting (authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive) and the relationships between parental alexithymia and two domains of psychological control (dependency and achievement). The participants were 946 parents ages 29-60 years (mothers: n = 473, M age = 44.6 yr., SD = 4.7; fathers: n = 473, M age = 48.1 yr., SD = 5.1) of children ages 11-18 years. All participants completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20), the Parental Authority Questionnaire-Revised (PAQ-R), and the Dependency-Oriented and Achievement-Oriented Psychological Control Scale (DAPCS). Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to examine whether alexithymia could predict the three parenting styles (authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive) and the two domains of psychological control (dependency and achievement). The first model showed that alexithymia was a positive predictor of authoritative and permissive parenting and a negative predictor of authoritarian parenting in both paternal and maternal data. The second model showed that, in both paternal and maternal data, alexithymia was a positive predictor of both dependency-oriented psychological control (DPC) and achievement-oriented psychological control (APC).

  12. Democratic parenting: paradoxical messages in democratic parent education theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Shlomit; Gastil, John

    2013-06-01

    Some prominent parent education theories in the United States and other Western countries base their educational viewpoint explicitly on democratic values, such as mutual respect, equality and personal freedom. These democratic parenting theories advocate sharing power with children and including them in family decision making. This study presents a textual analysis of two such theories, the Adlerian model of parent education and the Parent Effectiveness Training (PET) model, as they are embodied in two original bestselling textbooks. Through content and argumentation analysis of these influential texts, this study examines the paradoxes inherent in these two theories when they articulate how to implement fully democratic principles within the parent-child relationship. We discover that in spite of their democratic rationale, both books offer communication practices that guide the child to modify misbehaviour, enforce parental power, and manipulate the child to make decisions that follow parental judgment, and thus do not endorse the use of a truly democratic parenting style. We suggest, as an alternative to the democratic parenting style, that parents be introduced to a guardianship management style, in which they do not share authority with children, but seek opportunities for enabling children to make more autonomous decisions and participate in more family decision making.

  13. Momentary Parental Stress and Food-Related Parenting Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Tate, Allan; Trofholz, Amanda; Fertig, Angela R; Miner, Michael; Crow, Scott; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2017-12-01

    Research suggests that stress and depressed mood are associated with food-related parenting practices (ie, parent feeding practices, types of food served at meals). However, current measures of parental stress, depressed mood, and food-related parenting practices are typically survey-based and assessed as static/unchanging characteristics, failing to account for fluctuations across time and context. Identifying momentary factors that influence parent food-related parenting practices will facilitate the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting healthy food-related parenting practices. In this study, we used ecological momentary assessment to examine the association between momentary factors (eg, stress, depressed mood) occurring early in the day and food-related parenting practices at the evening meal. Children aged 5 to 7 years and their families ( N = 150) from 6 racial and/or ethnic groups ( n = 25 each African American, Hispanic/Latino, Hmong, American Indian, Somali, and white families) were recruited for this mixed-methods study through primary care clinics. Higher stress and depressed mood earlier in the day predicted pressure-to-eat feeding practices and fewer homemade foods served at meals the same night. Effect modification was found for certain racial and/or ethnic groups with regard to engaging in pressure-to-eat feeding practices (ie, America Indian, Somali) or serving fewer homemade meals (ie, African American, Hispanic/Latino) in the face of high stress or depressed mood. Clinicians may want to consider discussing with parents the influence stress and depressed mood can have on everyday food-related parenting practices. Additionally, future researchers should consider using real-time interventions to reduce parental stress and depressed mood to promote healthy parent food-related parenting practices. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Parenting a Child with ASD: Comparison of Parenting Style between ASD, Anxiety, and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventola, Pamela; Lei, Jiedi; Paisley, Courtney; Lebowitz, Eli; Silverman, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Parenting children with ASD has a complex history. Given parents' increasingly pivotal role in children's treatment, it is critical to consider parental style and behaviours. This study (1) compares parenting style of parents of children with ASD, parents of children with anxiety disorders, and parents of typically developing (TD) children and (2)…

  15. The Interplay between Parental Beliefs about Children's Emotions and Parental Stress Impacts Children's Attachment Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelter, Rebecca L.; Halberstadt, Amy G.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how parental beliefs about children's emotions and parental stress relate to children's feelings of security in the parent-child relationship. Models predicting direct effects of parental beliefs and parental stress, and moderating effects of parental stress on the relationship between parental beliefs and children's…

  16. Partnering with parents to enhance habilitation: a parent's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Lisa

    2012-11-01

    Parents play a very important role in language habilitation for their children who are deaf or hard of hearing. However, many times parents are not aware of the difference they can make in their child's language development. It is important that professionals working with children support parents in understanding their role and identifying language learning strategies that parents can incorporate into their daily routines to increase language development opportunities. Parents also have a key role in monitoring their child's progress to assist the professionals in assessing how well the habilitation strategies they are using are working. Family support and coaching strategies that professionals can use to encourage and support the parent's role in habilitation are discussed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Reunions between adoptees and birth parents: the adoptive parents' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, P R; Campbell, L; Patti, P

    1994-09-01

    This article looks at the reactions of adoptive parents to reunions between their adopted children and the children's birth parents. The focus is on how adoptive parents feel the reunion affects the family's integrity. Three types of family responses are identified: (1) closed, (2) divided, and (3) open. Acceptance of the differences between families created by adoption of children and those created by childbirth was a factor in the families' openness. Closed families saw no difference, and reunion suggested to the adults that they had failed as parents. Parents in open families understood the difference in families, saw the children as separate, and felt no threat to their competence as parents. Families' need for boundaries is examined, and the way the concept of family is constructed is discussed. Implications for the practice of adoption are considered.

  18. Parental affectionless control and suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goschin, Simona; Briggs, Jessica; Blanco-Lutzen, Sally; Cohen, Lisa J; Galynker, Igor

    2013-10-01

    Although poor parental bonding is a known risk factor for suicidality, current literature is inconsistent about the relative role of low parental care and parental overprotection, as well as the combination of the two, termed "affectionless control". This review presents the current state of knowledge of the relationship between suicidality and these two aspects of parental bonding. The computerized databases Medline, PubMed, PsychINFO, PsychLit, and Google Scholar were searched using combinations of the following keywords: suicidality, suicide, suicide attempt, suicidal behavior, parental bonding, and parental bonding instrument. Using the results, we reviewed the reports on the relationship between suicidality and parental bonding as measured by validated parental bonding instruments. Twelve papers were analyzed. All of them used the parental bonding instrument (PBI) and one used both the PBI and the object representation inventory (ORI). Most reports agreed that, in mothers, either lack of maternal care and/or overprotection was associated with an increase in suicidal behavior, while in fathers only low care was consistently associated with suicidality. This lack of constancy with regard to the effect of paternal overprotection appears to be due to cultural differences in fathers' role in child rearing. With these differences acknowledged, affectionless control in both parents emerges as the parenting style most strongly associated with suicidal behavior. Common methodological problems included low numbers of subjects, inconsistent control groups, and the lack of a uniform definition of suicidality. Despite methodological limitations, current literature consistently indicates that parental affectionless control is associated with suicidal behavior. Recognizing affectionless control as a risk factor for suicide and developing early interventions aimed at modifying affectionless and overprotective parenting style in families with a history of affective disorders

  19. The Parental Overprotection Scale: Associations with child and parental anxiety ?

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Kiri; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: Parental overprotection has commonly been implicated in the development and maintenance of childhood anxiety disorders. Overprotection has been assessed using questionnaire and observational methods interchangeably; however, the extent to which these methods access the same construct has received little attention. Edwards, 2008 and Edwards et al., 2010 developed a promising parent-report measure of overprotection (OP) and reported that, with parents of pre-school children, the mea...

  20. Parenting Coordinators' Practices Recommendations: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Barbara Phyllis

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study used a phenomenological approach to understand the experiences of seven parenting coordinators in using parenting coordination practices that they have found to be effective and would recommend to other parenting coordinators to achieve the following goals: educating parents, increasing the quality of parenting and co-parenting, managing conflict, and involving children and other family members in the process of parenting coordination. Data were collected with semi-str...

  1. Parents of the welfare state:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannesboe, Karen Ida; Kjær, Bjørg; Palludan, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    institutions have a fundamental role to play. It would seem to be here – as well as within the family – that the foundation is laid for all that is to come. It has therefore also become a political mantra across the globe that a well-functioning partnership between parents and ECEC institutions is a necessity...... (Bach & Christensen 2016/7). Numerous studies have already shown how parents all over the world are increasingly expected to take an active role at their children’s schools (Axelvoll 2016, Dannesboe), but this seemingly also now applies to ECEC. Based on ethnographic fieldwork carried out in three ECEC...... institutions and interviews with staff and parents, in this article, we discuss the relationship between parents and ECEC institutions in a Danish context. More specifically, we examine the role played by staff at ECEC institutions when parents ‘do’ parenting. Are they a helping hand and a friend in the hour...

  2. [A case of parental alienation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The clinical term "Parental Alienation Syndrome" (PAS) was introduced in 1984 by Richard Gardner, an American psychiatrist. Gardner described PAS and its symptoms, as a personality disorder, which appears chiefly in connection to child custody disputes wherein a child turns suddenly and massively against the non-custodial parent without reasonable grounds for doing so. This action by the child is a result of the custodial parent's emotionally abusive attempts to incite the child against the non-custodial parent.Where the child's rejection is based on some real past experience, there is not PAS. PAS only occurs as a result of the custodial parent's actions. Despite intensive effort, PAS was not included in the new DSM-V. In this case, a particularly impressive case history of parental alienation is described and discussed.

  3. Child to parent violence

    OpenAIRE

    Ansede Fariña, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    [GAO] A violencia filio – parental converteuse nun fenómeno en incremento na nosa sociedade, que se constata, principalmente, polo aumento de denuncias xudiciais interpostas polos pais agredidos. Realizamos un traballo de investigación documental, a través dunha metodoloxía baseada na busca e revisión bibliográfica sobre a temática, co fin de conceptualizar e describir este fenómeno. Expoñemos os principais modelos explicativos propostos por diferentes autores, os factores impl...

  4. Unmarried parents in college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldrick-Rab, Sara; Sorensen, Kia

    2010-01-01

    Noting that access to higher education has expanded dramatically in the past several decades, Sara Goldrick-Rab and Kia Sorensen focus on how unmarried parents fare once they enter college. Contrary to the expectation that access to college consistently promotes family stability and economic security, the authors argue that deficiencies in current policy lead college attendance to have adverse consequences for some families headed by unmarried parents. Although rates of college attendance have increased substantially among unmarried parents, their college completion rates are low. One explanation is inadequate academic preparation. Another is financial constraints, which can force unmarried students to interrupt their studies or increase their work hours, both of which compromise the quality of their educational experiences and the outcomes for their children. The authors point out that although many public programs offer support to unmarried parents attending college, the support is neither well coordinated nor easily accessed. Over the past three decades, loans have increasingly replaced grants as the most common form of federal and state financial aid. Confusion about what is available leads many low-income students to the two most "straightforward" sources of income--loans and work, both of which involve significant costs and can operate at cross-purposes with public forms of support. Too much work can lead to reductions in public benefits, and earnings do not always replace the lost income. A growing body of experimental evidence shows that providing social, financial, and academic supports to vulnerable community college students can improve achievement and attainment. Contextualized learning programs, for example, have enabled participants not only to move on from basic skills to credit-bearing coursework, but also to complete credits, earn certificates, and make gains on basic skills tests. Another successful initiative provided low-performing students with

  5. Parenting stress in parents of children with cochlear implants: relationships among parent stress, child language, and unilateral versus bilateral implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarant, Julia; Garrard, Philippa

    2014-01-01

    Little attention has been focused on stress levels of parents of children with cochlear implants (CIs). This study examined the stress experience of 70 parents of children with CIs by comparing stress levels in this group of parents to those in parents of children without disabilities, identifying primary stressors, examining the relationship between parent stress and child language, and comparing stress in parents of children with bilateral and unilateral CIs. Parents completed a parent stress questionnaire, and the receptive vocabulary and language abilities of the children were evaluated. Results indicated that these parents had a higher incidence of stress than the normative population. Parent stress levels and child language outcomes were negatively correlated. Child behavior and lack of spousal and social support were the prime causes of parent stress. Parents of children with bilateral CIs were significantly less stressed than were parents of children with unilateral CIs.

  6. Parental Divorce and Generalized Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Viitanen, Tarja

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of parental divorce during childhood on generalized trust later on in life using Australian HILDA panel data. The dependent variable is composed of answers to the statement: “Generally speaking, most people can be trusted”. The main explanatory variables include the occurrence of parental divorce for the whole sample and the age at which parents divorced for the sub-sample. The analysis is conducted using random effects ordered probit, correlated random effects ...

  7. Sexual conflict between parents: offspring desertion and asymmetrical parental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Tamás

    2014-09-25

    Parental care is an immensely variable social behavior, and sexual conflict offers a powerful paradigm to understand this diversity. Conflict over care (usually considered as a type of postzygotic sexual conflict) is common, because the evolutionary interests of male and female parents are rarely identical. I investigate how sexual conflict over care may facilitate the emergence and maintenance of diverse parenting strategies and argue that researchers should combine two fundamental concepts in social behavior to understand care patterns: cooperation and conflict. Behavioral evidence of conflict over care is well established, studies have estimated specific fitness implications of conflict for males or females, and experiments have investigated specific components of conflict. However, studies are long overdue to reveal the full implications of conflict for both males and females. Manipulating (or harming) the opposite sex seems less common in postzygotic conflicts than in prezygotic conflicts because by manipulating, coercing, or harming the opposite sex, the reproductive interest of the actor is also reduced. Parental care is a complex trait, although few studies have yet considered the implications of multidimensionality for parental conflict. Future research in parental conflict will benefit from understanding the behavioral interactions between male and female parents (e.g., negotiation, learning, and coercion), the genetic and neurogenomic bases of parental behavior, and the influence of social environment on parental strategies. Empirical studies are needed to put sexual conflict in a population context and reveal feedback between mate choice, pair bonds and parenting strategies, and their demographic consequences for the population such as mortalities and sex ratios. Taken together, sexual conflict offers a fascinating avenue for understanding the causes and consequences of parenting behavior, sex roles, and breeding system evolution. Copyright © 2014 Cold

  8. Parental Engagement: Beyond Parental Involvement in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Louis, Kathleen

    This study critically analyzes parents' complex stories of engagement in school and science education. The purpose is not to essentialize parental involvement, but rather to understand the processes of parental involvement and push forward the current discourse on the engagement of low-income minority and immigrant parents in schools and specifically science education. Employing critical grounded theory methods over a four-year span, this study had three areas of focus. First, voices of marginalized parents in the context of various spaces within the school system are examined. Using a qualitative approach, informal, formal, and research spaces were explored along with how minority parents express voice in these various spaces. Findings indicate parents drew on capital to express voice differently in different spaces, essentially authoring new spaces or the type of engagement in existing spaces. Second, the values and beliefs of traditionally marginalized people, the Discourse of mainstream society, and how they can inform a third, more transformative space for parental engagement in science are considered. The voices of low-income, marginalized parents around science and parental engagement (i.e., first space) are contrasted with the tenets of major national science policy documents (i.e., second space). Findings indicate a disparity between the pathways of engagement for low-income parents and policymakers who shape science education. Third, methodological questions of responsibility and assumption in qualitative research are explored. The author's complex struggle to make sense of her positionality, responsibilities, and assumptions as a researcher is chronicled. Findings focused on insider/outsider issues and implications for culturally sensitive research are discussed. Finally, the implications for policy, teaching, and research are discussed.

  9. Parenting Stress in Parents of Infants With Congenital Heart Disease and Parents of Healthy Infants: The First Year of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfenshtein, Nadya; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Deatrick, Janet A; Medoff-Cooper, Barbara

    2017-12-01

    While we know that the parents of infants with congenital heart disease (CHD), the most prevalent group of congenital anomalies, experience increased parenting stress, the stress levels throughout infancy have yet to be studied. Stress experienced by parents beyond the normative stress of parenting can interfere with parenting processes, and bear adverse family outcomes. This prospective cohort study was conducted to describe and compare parenting stress levels during infancy between parents of infants with complex CHD and parents of healthy infants. The Parenting Stress Index-Long Form was distributed to parents of infants with complex CHD and parents of healthy infants (N = 129). T-tests were used to compare stress between groups at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age. Parents of infants with complex CHD had higher parenting stress than parents of healthy infants on multiple subscales on the Child and Parent Domains, at 3 months of age. The stress remained higher on the demandingness subscale throughout infancy. Parents of CHD infants also demonstrated significantly higher stress scores on the life stress subscale at 12 months of age. Findings highlight stressful periods related to parenting infants with CHD, which may increase existing psycho-social risk for parents of infants with CHD. Early family intervention may promote parental adaptation to the illness, and help establishing healthy parenting practices.

  10. Mental Retardation and Parenting Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Siamaga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Backround: The presence, upbringing and looking after of a mentally retarded child in the family, can become a threat to the mental health of its parents and is the main predisposing factor of stress for the parents.Aim: The purpose of this systematic review is (a to document the contemporary research bibliography related to the stress of parents with mentally retarded children, (b to aggregate the factors and secondary parameters based on the contemporary research related to the influence of the (child’s mental retardation on the parents and (c to show an intercultural aspect regarding the presence of stress to parents with mentally retarded children.Methods: Systematic review of research articles published in scientific journals included in the international academic databases HEAL-LING, SAGE, ELSEVIER, WILSON, SCIENCEDIRECT, MEDLINE, PUBMED, PsycINFO, Cochrane, EMBASE, SCIRUS and CINAHL having as search criteria and key words the terms («parental stress and mental retardation» [MeSH], «parenting stress and persons with special needs» [MeSH], «mental retardation and family problems» [MeSH], «stress and parents» [MeSH], «parenting and stress» [MeSH], «mental delay and parents» [MeSH], «developmental disabilities and family stress» [MeSH], «intellectual handicap and parenting» [MeSH], «maternal stress and child with disabilities» [MeSH].Discussion: The review has proven that all forms of mental retardation have an important -from a statistic point of viewimpacton the parents’ mental health. Anxiety, stress and depression are common symptoms mentioned by the parents.Additionally, there are individual variables such as the husband-wife relationship, the parents’ approach to their child’s disability, the parental strategies used in order to cope with the daily life of the child’s disability and the behavioural problems of their child, all of which contribute to the increase of the level of parental stress

  11. Parenting styles and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui Lobera, I; Bolaños Ríos, P; Garrido Casals, O

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the parental bonding profiles in patients with eating disorders (ED), as well as the relationship among the different styles of parenting and some psychological and psychopathological variables. In addition, the association between the perceived parental bonding and different coping strategies was analysed. Perception of parenting styles was analysed in a sample of 70 ED patients. The Parental Bonding Instrument, Self-Esteem Scale of Rosenberg, Coping Strategies Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory and Eating Disorders Inventory-2 were used. Kruskal-Wallis test (comparisons), Spearman correlation coefficients (association among different variables) and χ(2)-test (parental bonding profiles differences) were applied. The stereotyped style among ED patients is low care-high control during the first 16 years, and the same can be said about current styles of the mothers. Between 8.6% and 12.9% of the patients perceive their parents' styles as neglectful. The neglectful parenting is the style mainly involved in the specific ED symptoms as drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction and bulimia. In order to achieve a better balanced parents' role during the treatment, it would be necessary to improve the role of the mothers as caregivers, decreasing their role mainly based on the overprotection. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  12. YOUTH SPORT AND PARENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Nešić

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the characteristics of contemporary sport is certainly a wide array of sports and sport discliplines young people can choose among. This is particularly obvious through establishment of numerous schools of sport as places where people can acquire fundamental sport knoweldge and skills. The point of selection for such an engagement is the school, or, in other words, primary school children. The development of young athletes starts at a very early stage. They are faced with high demands and exposed to training sessions of different scope and intensity. In order to direct complex processes in sport efficiently and well, various factors need to be considered that affect it to a lesser or higher degree. One of those factors is indisputably the family, i.e. the influence parents have on meeting the children’s need for physical (sport activity. In the process of children’s socialization that factor is given the greatest prominence. Therefore, parents are a crucial factor in young people’s sport engagement and, thus, cannot be taken as a constituent part of a sports organization’s surroundings, but as a partner in their development.

  13. Does Marital Status Influence the Parenting Styles Employed by Parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiono, Benard Litali; Mwoma, Teresa B.

    2015-01-01

    The current study sought to establish whether parents' marital status, influence their use of specific parenting styles in Kisauni District, Kenya. A correlational research design was employed to carry out this study. Stratified sampling technique was used to select preschools while purposive sampling technique was used to select preschool…

  14. Influence of Self-Esteem, Parenting Style and Parental Monitoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on this, this study was set out to investigate the influence of self esteem, parental monitoring and parenting styles on adolescents' risky sexual behavior in Ibadan. Cross-sectional research design was used. A total number of 194 adolescents selected from three secondary schools participated in the study.

  15. Parents in Reading; Parents' Booklet (Folleto Para Los Padres).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truby, Roy

    Developed for Idaho's original Parents in Reading program, this booklet is designed for use by parents of preschool and elementary school students. Topics are discussed in both English and Spanish and include: reading, listening, and talking to children; controlling television viewing; using numbers with children; children's muscles and movements;…

  16. Implementation of parental feeding practices: does parenting style matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefner-Burmeister, Allison; Hoffmann, Debra; Zbur, Samantha; Musher-Eizenman, Dara

    2016-09-01

    To combat childhood obesity, researchers have focused on parental feeding practices that promote child health. The current study investigated how parenting style relates to twelve parental feeding practices. Data on parenting style and parental feeding practices were obtained for a correlational study from users of Amazon's Mechanical Turk, an online survey system. USA. Mothers of children aged 7-11 years (n 193). Parenting style related differentially to eleven out of the twelve measured practices. Authoritative mothers displayed more feeding practices that promote child health and fewer practices that impede child health. Authoritarian and permissive mothers displayed more unhealthy practices than authoritative mothers, but differed from each other on the practices they employed. Parenting style may relate to more aspects of feeding than previously realized. The inclusion of numerous healthy feeding practices along with unhealthy practices in the current study provides suggestions for the application of healthy feeding behaviours. Instruction on feeding behaviours and parenting style should be a focus of future educational programmes.

  17. Raising Competent Kids: The Authoritative Parenting Style. For Parents Particularly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Jeanne

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that the authoritative parenting style without physical punishment produces more positive results and fewest children's problems. Identifies age-appropriate authoritative responses: demanding and responsive; controlling but not restrictive; high parent involvement; participating actively with child's life; communicating openly; following…

  18. Parental GCA testing: how many crosses per parent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.R. Johnson

    1998-01-01

    The impact of increasing the number of crosses per parent (k) on the efficiency of roguing seed orchards (backwards selection, i.e., reselection of parents) was examined by using Monte Carlo simulation. Efficiencies were examined in light of advanced-generation Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) tree improvement programs where...

  19. Parental Belief and Parental Engagement: How Do They Interact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has shown the importance of parental engagement for children's outcomes; a largely separate body of literature has shown that there are clear effects on children's outcomes related to parental religion. This article is a literature review of these two fields, with the aim of relating them to each other. The article suggests two…

  20. Parental Divorce, Adolescents' Feelings toward Parents and Drunkenness in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomcikova, Zuzana; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between parental divorce and adolescent drunkenness and the contribution of adolescents' feelings toward their parents to this association. Cross-sectional data on 3,694 elementary school students from several cities in Slovakia (mean age 14.3,