WorldWideScience

Sample records for q1 q2 q3

  1. Q2/Q3 2016 Solar Industry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David; Boff, Daniel; Margolis, Robert

    2016-10-11

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in the Q2 and Q3 of 2016. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  2. Q2/Q3 2017 Solar Industry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hoskins, Jack [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Margolis, Robert M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-24

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in Q2 and Q3 of 2017. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  3. Susceptibility of MED-Q1 and MED-Q3 Biotypes of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Populations to Essential and Seed Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel Fogné, Drabo; Olivier, Gnankine; Bassolé, Imael H N; Nébié, Roger Charles; Laurence, Mouton

    2017-06-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a major pest of many agricultural and ornamental crops in tropical and subtropical regions causing damages that result in important economic losses. Insecticides are commonly used in greenhouses or fields to control B. tabaci populations leading to rapid evolution of resistance that render treatments inefficient. Therefore, and for environmental and human health concerns, other approaches must be developed for this pest management. In the present study, we compare, using the leaf dip method, the toxicity of three essential oils (Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum americanum, and Hyptis spicigera) and three seed oils (Lannea microcarpa, Lannea acida, and Carapa procera) with three chemical insecticides (acetamiprid, deltamethrin, and chlorpyrifos-ethyl) on adults. Two B. tabaci biotypes (MED-Q1 and MED-Q3) belonging to the Mediterranean species and collected in Burkina Faso were used. Essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. We showed that these two biotypes have different levels of resistance to the three insecticides, MED-Q3 being more sensitive than MED-Q1. Moreover, they differ in the frequency of resistance alleles to insecticides, especially for organophosphates, as these alleles are almost fixed in MED-Q1. On the other hand, the two biotypes prove to be more susceptible to the plant extracts than to insecticides except for chlorpyrifos-ethyl, with essential oils that showed the highest insecticidal activities. Monoterpenes content were the most abundant and showed the highest insecticidal activities. Our results indicated that essential oils, but also seed oils, have the potential to constitute an alternative strategy of pest management. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The test of variables of attention (TOVA): Internal consistency (Q1 vs. Q2 and Q3 vs. Q4) in children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The internal consistency of the Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA) was examined in a cohort of 6- to 12-year-old children (N = 63) strictly diagnosed with ADHD. The internal consistency of errors of omission (OMM), errors of commission (COM), response time (RT), and response time variability (RTV...

  5. Identification of expressed genes in cDNA library of hemocytes from the RLO-challenged oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis Gould with special functional implication of three complement-related fragments (CaC1q1, CaC1q2 and CaC3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Xie, Jiasong; Li, Jianming; Luo, Ming; Ye, Shigen; Wu, Xinzhong

    2012-06-01

    A SMARTer™ cDNA library of hemocyte from Rickettsia-like organism (RLO) challenged oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis Gould was constructed. Random clones (400) were selected and single-pass sequenced, resulted in 200 unique sequences containing 96 known genes and 104 unknown genes. The 96 known genes were categorized into 11 groups based on their biological process. Furthermore, we identified and characterized three complement-related fragments (CaC1q1, CaC1q2 and CaC3). Tissue distribution analysis revealed that all of three fragments were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues studied including hemocyte, gills, mantle, digestive glands, gonads and adductor muscle, while the highest level was seen in the hemocyte. Temporal expression profile in the hemocyte monolayers reveled that the mRNA expression levels of three fragments presented huge increase after the RLO incubation at 3 h and 6 h in post-challenge, respectively. And the maximal expression levels at 3 h in post-challenge are about 256, 104 and 64 times higher than the values detected in the control of CaC1q1, CaC1q2 and CaC3, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Community Survey Q2: What to emphasize in Q1

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This question is from the 2015 Chapel Hill Community Survey.Which THREE of these items do you think should receive the most emphasis from Town leaders over the next...

  7. FEMA Q3 Floodways

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Q3 Flood Data are derived from the Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The file is georeferenced to...

  8. Chemical failure modes of AlQ3-based OLEDs: AlQ3 hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, John E; Halls, Mathew D; Hratchian, Hrant P; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2006-03-28

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum(III), AlQ3, is used in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) as an electron-transport material and emitting layer. The reaction of AlQ3 with trace H2O has been implicated as a major failure pathway for AlQ3-based OLEDs. Hybrid density functional calculations have been carried out to characterize the hydrolysis of AlQ3. The thermochemical and atomistic details for this important reaction are reported for both the neutral and oxidized AlQ3/AlQ3+ systems. In support of experimental conclusions, the neutral hydrolysis reaction pathway is found to be a thermally activated process, having a classical barrier height of 24.2 kcal mol(-1). First-principles infrared and electronic absorption spectra are compared to further characterize AlQ3 and the hydrolysis pathway product, AlQ2OH. The activation energy for the cationic AlQ3 hydrolysis pathway is found to be 8.5 kcal mol(-1) lower than for the neutral reaction, which is significant since it suggests a role for charge imbalance in promoting chemical failure modes in OLED devices.

  9. FEMA Q3 Flood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Q3 Flood Data are derived from the Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMS) published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The file is georeferenced to...

  10. Soliton solutions for Q3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, James; Nijhoff, Frank; Hietarinta, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    We construct N-soliton solutions to the equation called Q3 in the recent Adler-Bobenko-Suris classification. An essential ingredient in the construction is the relationship of (Q3) δ=0 to the equation proposed by Nijhoff, Quispel and Capel in 1983 (the NQC equation). This latter equation has two extra parameters, and depending on their sign choices we get a 4-to-1 relationship from NQC to (Q3) δ=0 . This leads to a four-term background solution, and then to a 1-soliton solution using a Baecklund transformation. Using the 1SS as a guide allows us to get the N-soliton solution in terms of the τ-function of the Hirota-Miwa equation. (fast track communication)

  11. The new Audi Q3; Der neue Audi Q3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebl, Johannes; Siebenpfeiffer, Wolfgang (eds.)

    2011-07-15

    The contribution under consideration reports on the launch of the new Audi Q3 from Audi AG (Ingolstadt, Federal Republic of Germany). Design, drive, vehicle concept, driving dynamics, car body, interior, aerodynamics/aeroacoustics, driving assistance as well as vehicle safety are described.

  12. Q2 anti Q2 states with relatively narrow widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Seiji.

    1978-09-01

    Using the mass formulas which correctly predict the mass of mesons and baryons the mass of diquark states is computed. From this mass spectrum the existance of the observed narrow baryonia and wide baryonia can be naturally understood. Other relatively narrow Q 2 anti Q 2 states are predicted to exist. (orig.) [de

  13. PRP Comments for ICF Q1/Q2 FY17 Experiments 3/10/16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-14

    The PRP generally endorsed the Program plan during the short time for discussions. We agree that the strategy to develop a hohlraum that is symmetric and has low laser-plasma instabilities and to develop an alternative method for supporting the capsule is the best path forward for making progress in understanding ignition performance. The Program is oriented toward a milestone in 2020 for “determining the efficacy of NIF for ignition and credible physics-scaling to multi-megajoule yields for all ICF approaches.” We are concerned that the time and resources are not sufficient to vet all of the various approaches that are being pursued to make an informed decision by this date. For NIF to meet this goal, a process will be needed to to select the most promising paths forward. We recommend that the Program develop this process for selecting the path forward to optimize resources. We were glad to see that the direct drive program took our comments under consideration. We think that the proposed experiments have the program headed in a better direction. The PRP had only a short time to discuss the detailed experimental proposals. The following are comments on the detailed proposals. We did not have time to discuss them as a group. They represent individual opinions and provided to you as feedback to your proposals.

  14. Low Q2 kaon electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowitz, P.; Acha, A.

    2010-01-01

    A measurement of the H(e, e′ K + ) reaction was performed at Hall A, TJNAF as part of the hypernuclear experiment E94-107. Data was taken at very low Q 2 (~ 0.07 (GeV/c) 2 ) and W = 2.2 GeV. Kaons were detected along the direction of q-vector, the momentum transferred by the incident electron (θ CM = 6°). These measurements provide data about the Σ 0 /Λ ratio which drops rapidly with Q 2 , the angular dependence of the cross sections as Q 2 → 0, and the dependence of the cross section with respect to Q 2 ,W and θ CM . The dependence of the cross section at very forward angles has been poorly known. Available models are inadequate to describe the results. The measurement of the elementary cross section will constrain models for the elementary reaction which are inadequate to describe these results. It is also a key ingredient in the hypernuclear spectroscopy studies performed at the same kinematics. Details of the calculations and results will be shown. (author)

  15. Minimum Data Set Q1a Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS Q1a report summarizes, by state and county, percentages of residents that answered Yes to Q1a - Residents expresses or indicates preference to return to the...

  16. QCD calculation of π0γγ vertex at equal Euclidean q2 of both photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshin, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The form factor of the π 6 γγ vertex at equal space-like four- momentum q 2 of the photons (q 1 2 =q 2 2 =-Q 2 ) and a small four- momentum p 2 of the pion is calculated within QCD. Explicit expressions for leading perturbative and non perturbative preasymptotic corrections are derived. To find the latter correction matrix elements of operators of dimension d=5 between the pion and vacuum are calculated. The result for the form factor smoothly matches at Q 2 approximately 0.5 GeV 2 the estimate based on the vector mesom dominance model [ru

  17. Feedstock Interface Fy2017 Q3 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Danny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Howe, Daniel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westover, Tyler [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klinger, HJordan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hernandez, Sergio [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-10

    This report summarized the results obtained in FY2017 Q3 of a collaborative effort between researchers at NREL, PNNL, and INL to develop rapid screening methods and models to predict the fact pyrolysis conversion performance of a range of biomass materials.

  18. Backward ejected electrons produced by 1-MeV/u Oq+ (q=3--8) projectile ions colliding with argon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breinig, M.; Berryman, J.W.; Segner, F.; Desai, D.D.

    1994-01-01

    The cross sections for ejecting electrons into a cone of half-angle ∼2 degree centered on the backward direction have been measured as a function of electron energy for 1-MeV/u O q+ (q=3--8) projectiles colliding with Ar. For O 3+ and O 4+ projectiles, the cross sections have also been measured in coincidence with exit charge states (q+1) and (q+2) of the projectile. A prominent feature in all spectra is a target LMM Auger peak. The cross sections for producing Ar LMM Auger electrons are nearly independent of projectile incident charge states. A projectile electron-loss peak is produced when the projectile brings loosely bound L-shell electrons into the collision. The shape of this peak is independent of the projectile exit charge state within experimental error. The measured electron-loss production cross sections at 180 degree are compared with the predictions of various on-shell approximations to the impulse approximation. Peak height and position are sensitive functions of the on-shell approximation used. The predictions of the elastic scattering model agree well with the data

  19. Thermodynamic properties of a quantum group boson gas GLp,q(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellal, Ahmed

    2000-10-01

    An approach is proposed enabling to effectively describe the behaviour of a bosonic system. The approach uses the quantum group GL p,q (2) formalism. In effect, considering a bosonic Hamiltonian in terms of the GL p,q (2) generators, it is shown that its thermodynamic properties are connected to deformation parameters p and q. For instance, the average number of particles and the pressure have been computed. If p is fixed to be the same value for q, our approach coincides perfectly with some results developed recently in this subject. The ordinary results, of the present system, can be found when we take the limit p = q = 1. (author)

  20. Improved double Q2 rescaling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yonghua

    2001-01-01

    The authors present an improved double Q 2 rescaling model. Based on this condition of the nuclear momentum conservation, the authors have found a Q 2 rescaling parameters' formula of the model, where authors have established the connection between the Q 2 rescaling parameter ζ i (i = v, s, g) and the mean binding energy in nucleus. By using this model, the authors coned explain the experimental data of the EMC effect in the whole x region, the nuclear Drell-Yan process and J/Ψ photoproduction process

  1. Marfan syndrome is closely linked to a marker on chromosome 15q1. 5 r arrow q2. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsipouras, P.; Sarfarazi, M.; Devi, A. (Univ. of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington (United States)); Weiffenbach, B. (Collaborative Research, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)); Boxer, M. (Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (Scotland))

    1991-05-15

    Marfan syndrome is a systemic disorder of the connective tissue inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The disorder imparts significant morbidity and martality. The etiology of the disorder remains elusive. A recent study localized the gene for Marfan syndrome on chromosome 15. The authors present data showing that marker D15S48 is genetically linked to Marfan syndrome. Pairwise linkage analysis gave a maximum lod (logarithm of odds) score of Z = 11.78 at {theta} = 0.02. Furthermore our data suggest that the Marfan syndrome locus is possibly flanked on either side by D15S48 and D15S49.

  2. Rotational stabilization of q < 1 modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelbroeck, F.L.; Aydemir, A.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of high performance discharges with central safety factor below unity have shown that the ideal Magnetohydrodynamic stability threshold for the n=1 kink mode is often violated with impunity. For TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) supershots, the experimental observations can be explained by diamagnetic stabilization of the reconnecting model provided that the fluid free energy is suitably reduced by trapped particle effects. For the broader profiles typical of other high confinement regimes, however, diamagnetic effects cannot account for the experimental results. Furthermore, there is evidence that the Mercier stability condition can also be violated in some cases. Here, we show that toroidal rotation of the plasma can stabilize the kink mode even in the presence of resistivity in configurations that would otherwise be ideally unstable. Two effects can be distinguished. The first effect consists in a reduction of the ideal driving energy. This can be understood in view of the fact that, to a good approximation, the internal kink is a rigid body displacement combining a tilt of the plasma inside the q = 1 surface with a translation along the tilt axis. In the presence of rotation, this displacement must be accompanied by a precessional motion so as to conserve angular momentum. The kinetic energy of the precessional motion must be extracted from the energy driving the displacement. The second effect of rotation is to resolve the Alfven singularity. This is a consequence of the pressure perturbation caused by the equilibrium variation of the entropy within the flux surfaces. It results in the stabilization of resistive as well as weak ideal instabilities, including Mercier modes. For rotationally stabilized equilibria, it also implies the presence of a neutrally stable mode with frequency of the order of the growth rate of the internal kink

  3. Image processing with massively parallel computer Quadrics Q1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Rocca, A.B.; La Porta, L.; Ferriani, S.

    1995-05-01

    Aimed to evaluate the image processing capabilities of the massively parallel computer Quadrics Q1, a convolution algorithm that has been implemented is described in this report. At first the discrete convolution mathematical definition is recalled together with the main Q1 h/w and s/w features. Then the different codification forms of the algorythm are described and the Q1 performances are compared with those obtained by different computers. Finally, the conclusions report on main results and suggestions

  4. Q3/Q4 2016 Solar Industry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David; Boff, Daniel; Margolis, Robert

    2016-12-21

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in the Q3 and Q4 of 2016. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  5. Q3/Q4 2017 Solar Industry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hoskins, Jack [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Margolis, Robert M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-15

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in the Q3 and Q4 of 2017. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  6. The photon structure function at large Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, A.

    1987-01-01

    LEP II offers the unique opportunity to measure the photon structure function over a large Q 2 range up to ∼ 2000 GeV 2 . Two crucial predictions of QCD can be tested in this experiment: the linear rise in log Q 2 as a consequence of asymptotic freedom, and the large renormalization O(1) of the shape of the structure function due to gluon bremsstrahlung, unperturbed by higher-twist effects

  7. The homological content of the Jones representations at $q = -1$

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Jens Kristian; Fuglede Jørgensen, Søren

    We generalize a discovery of Kasahara and show that the Jones representations of braid groups, when evaluated at $q = -1$, are related to the action on homology of a branched double cover of the underlying punctured disk. As an application, we prove for a large family of pseudo-Anosov mapping...

  8. Q4 2017/Q1 2018 Solar Industry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hoskins, Jack [U.S. Department of Energy

    2018-05-16

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in Q4 2017 and Q1 2018. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  9. Excited baryon form factors at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Stoler; Gary Adams; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Chris Armstrong; K. Assamagan; Steven Avery; K. Baker; Peter Bosted; Volker Burkert; Jim Dunne; Tom Eden; Rolf Ent; V. Frolov; David Gaskell; P. Gueye; Wendy Hinton; Cynthia Keppel; Wooyoung Kim; Michael Klusman; Doug Koltenuk; David Mack; Richard Madey; David Meekins; Ralph Minehart; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; James Napolitano; Gabriel Niculescu; Ioana Niculescu; Mina Nozar; John Price; Paul Stoler; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Michael Witkowski; Stephen Wood

    1998-01-01

    The role of resonance electroproduction at high Q 2 is discussed in the context of exclusive reactions, as well as the alternative theoretical models which are proposed to treat exclusive reactions in the few GeV 2 /c 2 region of momentum transfer. Jefferson Lab experiment 94-014, which measured the excitation of the Delta (1232) and S 11 (1535) via the reactions p(e,e ' p)pi 0 and p(e,e ' p)eta respectively at Q 2 ∼ 2.8 and 4 GeV 2 /c 2 is described, and the state of analysis reported

  10. Text, Style, and Author in Hamlet Q1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy Desmet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The first quarto of Hamlet has traditionally been an embarrassment to attribution studies. Textual and bibliographical studies from the 1980s and beyond have permitted suspect texts to be recovered and performed, but critical appreciation tends to focus on such matters as characterization and performance possibilities rather than the text’s rhetorical integrity and aesthetic qualities. More recently, we have seen greater critical attention to Shakespeare’s suspect texts, which has increased our appreciation for and expanded our notion of Q1 Hamlet as a ‘text’. Opinion remains divided, however, on the question of who ‘wrote’ this play. This essay addresses the authorship debate somewhat indirectly by providing a different view of Hamlet Q1 based on a stylistic analysis that is grounded in Renaissance rhetoric. It characterizes the play’s style as the rhetoric of speed, with brachylogia as its representative rhetorical figure. Through review of theories about the composition of Hamlet Q1 and a rhetorical analysis of its style, the essay seeks to examine how Hamlet’s first quarto might have a recognizable style and how that style might be related to current concepts of authorship.

  11. Analytic derivation of the leading-order gluon distribution function G(x,Q2)=xg(x,Q2) from the proton structure function F2p(x,Q2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, Martin M.; Durand, Loyal; McKay, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    We derive a second-order linear differential equation for the leading-order gluon distribution function G(x,Q 2 )=xg(x,Q 2 ) which determines G(x,Q 2 ) directly from the proton structure function F 2 p (x,Q 2 ). This equation is derived from the leading-order evolution equation for F 2 p (x,Q 2 ), and does not require knowledge of either the individual quark distributions or the gluon evolution equation. Given an analytic expression that successfully reproduces the known experimental data for F 2 p (x,Q 2 ) in a domain x min (Q 2 )≤x≤x max (Q 2 ), Q min 2 ≤Q 2 ≤Q max 2 of the Bjorken variable x and the virtuality Q 2 in deep inelastic scattering, G(x,Q 2 ) is uniquely determined in the same domain. We give the general solution and illustrate the method using the recently proposed Froissart-bound-type parametrization of F 2 p (x,Q 2 ) of E. L. Berger, M. M. Block and C.-I. Tan [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 242001 (2007)]. Existing leading-order gluon distributions based on power-law descriptions of individual parton distributions agree roughly with the new distributions for x > or approx. 10 -3 as they should, but are much larger for x -3 .

  12. Two-body form factors at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.; Keister, B.D.

    1983-02-01

    The charge form factor of a scalar deuteron at high momentum transfer is examined in a model employing scalar nucleons and mesons. With an eye toward establishing consistency criteria for more realistic calculations, several aspects of the model are examined in detail: the role of nucleon and meson singularities in the one-loop impulse diagram, the role of positive-and negative-energy nucleons, and the relationship to time-ordered perturbation theory. It is found that at large Q 2 (1) the form factor is dominated by a term in which the spectator nucleon is on the mass shell, and (2) the meson singularity structure of the d-n-p vertex function is unimportant in determining the overall high-Q 2 behaviour of the form factor

  13. GDH sum rule measurement at low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, N.

    1996-01-01

    The Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule is based on a general dispersive relation for the forward Compton scattering. Multipole analysis suggested the possible violation of the sum rule. Some propositions have been made to modify the original GDH expression. An effort is now being made in several laboratories to shred some light on this topic. The purposes of the different planned experiments are briefly presented according to their Q 2 range

  14. Q2 evolution of a soft gluon distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enkovskij, L.L.; Kotikov, A.V.; Pakkanoni, F.

    1992-01-01

    Model parameter dependence refferring to the function of gluon distribution linked with the exchange of a dipole pomeron from Q 2 is calculated within the framework of the Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equation (GLAP) both in the leading logarithm approximation and in the double logarithmic approximation. The behaviour of logarithmic parametrization ∼ (ln(1/x)) b appears to be unstable in relation to perturbative calculations

  15. Current density profile inside q=1 on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.; Desgranges, C.; Sabot, R.; Dubois, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Tore Supra polarimeter used to measure the poloidal field distribution is described. The current density profiles are computed in two different ways using the interferometric and polarimetric data in conjunction with the magnetic data and the location of the inversion radius determined by the soft X-ray camera. The current density inside the q=1 surface is investigated for normal and monster sawteeth. Its variation are also measured by the polarimeter and compared with that predicted by the current diffusion equation assuming complete reconnection. Finally, the safety factor profile is compared with that obtained with the striation data of the pellet ablation. The results of the evolution of the q profile during sawteeth are in good agreement with those obtained in other devices. (author) 9 refs.; 4 figs

  16. THE ROTATION PERIOD OF C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra-Ricart, Miquel; Licandro, Javier, E-mail: mserra@iac.es, E-mail: jlicandr@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-11-20

    C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) was observed around perihelion (2015 January 30) on 15 nights between 2015 January 21 and February 11 using the TADer 0.3-m astrograph telescope at Teide Observatory (IAC, Tenerife, Spain). Two large spiral jet structures were observed over several cometary rotations. A new method of searching for periodicities in the PA of spiral jets in the coma region at a fixed distance (20,624 km) from the cometary optocenter is presented and used to determine a nuclear rotation period of 17.89 ± 0.17 hr.

  17. Measurement of Dijet Production at Low $Q^{2}$ at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chyla, J.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz, I.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tasevsky, M.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Yan, W.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    Triple differential dijet cross sections in e^\\pm p interactions are presented in the region of photon virtualities 27GeV, E_T2>5GeV, and pseudorapidities -2.5 < eta_1^*, eta_2^* <0. The measurements are made in the gamma^* p centre-of-mass frame, using an integrated luminosity of 57pb^-1. The data are compared with NLO QCD calculations and LO Monte Carlo programs with and without a resolved virtual photon contribution. NLO QCD calculations fail to describe the region of low Q^2 and low jet transverse energies, in contrast to a LO Monte Carlo generator which includes direct and resolved photon interactions with both transversely and longitudinally polarised photons. Initial and final state parton showers are tested as a mechanism for including higher order QCD effects in low E_T jet production.

  18. Development of 99Tcm-Q3 as a new type myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yunchun; Tan Tianzhi; Fan Chengzhong; Zhao Keqing; Wei Xihe; Li Quan

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To develop 99 Tc m -N,N'-ethylene-bis (acetylacetone iminato) bis [tris (3-methoxy-1-propyl) phosphine] ( 99 Tc m -Q 3 ) as a new type of myocardial perfusion imaging agent. Methods: After N,N'-ethylene-bis (acetylacetone iminato) and tris (3-methoxy-1-propyl) phosphine were made, N,N'-ethylene-bis (acetylacetone iminato) was labelled using reduced 99 Tc m O 4 - by SnCl 2 ·2H 2 O under the presence of alkali, then tris (3-methoxy-1-propyl) phosphine was added and reacted for ten minutes, 99 Tc m -Q 3 was obtained at the end. Biodistribution in mice, in vitro stability and acute toxicity of 99 Tc m -Q 3 were examined. Results: 99 Tc m -Q 3 was taken up rapidly by the heart, and the uptake rate was very high, by 5 minutes post injection, 24.66% of the injected dose was taken up in per gram heart, and no significant washout was shown up by 4 hours. But 99 Tc m -Q 3 was cleaned out rapidly from blood, lung and liver. No poisonousness and adverse effects were observed, and its stability lasted more than 6 hours. Conclusions: 99 Tc m -Q 3 is a fairly good myocardial perfusion imaging agent for improving the quality of myocardial perfusion imaging

  19. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions and anomalous dimensions for the structure function F2(x,Q2 and transversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F2(x,Q2 in the asymptotic region Q2≫m2 and the associated operator matrix element Aqq,Q(3,NS(N to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N. This matrix element is associated with the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments N, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to O(NF and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in N space and harmonic polylogarithms in x-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to F2(x,Q2.

  20. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions and anomalous dimensions for the structure function F2(x,Q2) and transversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablinger, J.; Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; Hasselhuhn, A.; Manteuffel, A. von; Round, M.; Schneider, C.; Wißbrock, F.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) in the asymptotic region Q 2 ≫m 2 and the associated operator matrix element A qq,Q (3),NS (N) to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N. This matrix element is associated with the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments N, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to O(N F ) and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in N space and harmonic polylogarithms in x-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to F 2 (x,Q 2 )

  1. GVMD Model Predictions for the Low Q2 Behaviour of the Spin Structure Function g1(x,Q2) and of the DHGHY Integral I(Q2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badelek, B.; Kwiecinski, J.; Ziaja, B.

    2002-01-01

    Predictions for g 1 ( x, Q 2 ) at low Q 2 are obtained in the framework of the GVMD model. contributions from both light and heavy vector mesons are evaluated. The DHGHY sum rule is employed to fix the magnitude of the light vector meson contribution to g 1 , using the Recent measurements in the region of baryonic resonances. The DHGHY moment function is calculated. Predictions are compared to the data. (author)

  2. Daughter Species Abundances in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Adam; Cochran, Anita; Dello Russo, Neil; Kelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present analysis of high spectral resolution optical spectra of C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) acquired with the Tull Coude spectrometer on the 2.7-meter Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory and the ARCES spectrometer mounted on the 3.5-meter Astrophysical Research Consortium Telescope at Apache Point Observatory. Both Tull Coude and ARCES provide high spectral resolution (R=30,000-60,000) and a large spectral range of approximately 3500-10000 Angstroms. We obtained two observation epochs, one in February 2015 at a heliocentric distance of 1.3 AU, and another in May 2015 at a heliocentric distance of 1.9 AU. Another epoch in late August 2015 at a heliocentric distance of 3.0 AU is scheduled. We will present production rates of the daughter species CN, C3, CH, C2, and NH2. We will also present H2O production rates derived from the [OI]6300 emission, as well as measurements of the flux ratio of the [OI]5577 Angstrom line to the sum of the [OI]6300 and [OI]6364 Angstrom lines (sometimes referred to as the oxygen line ratio). This ratio is indicative of the CO2 abundance of the comet. As we have observations at several heliocentric distances, we will examine how production rates and mixing ratios of the various species change with heliocentric distance. We will compare our oxygen line measurements to observations of CO2 made with Spitzer, as well as our other daughter species observations to those of candidate parent molecules made at IR wavelengths.

  3. On QCD Q2-evolution of deuteron structure function F2D(xD, Q2) for xD>1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, A.V.; Tokarev, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    The deep-inelastic deuteron structure function (SF) F 2 D (x D ,Q 2 ) in the covariant approach in light-cone variables is considered. The x D and Q 2 -dependences of SF are calculated. The QCD analysis of generated data both for non-cumulative x D D >1 ranges was performed. It was shown that Q 2 -evolution of SF is valid for ranges 0.275 D D D -dependence of SF for the ranges is essentially different. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. 31 CFR 30.1 - Q-1: What definitions apply in this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-1: What definitions apply in this part? 30.1 Section 30.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.1 Q-1: What definitions apply in this part...

  5. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 improves impaired dermal wound healing in old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyanenko, Ilya A; Popova, Ekaterina N; Zakharova, Vlada V; Ilyinskaya, Olga P; Vasilieva, Tamara V; Romashchenko, Valeria P; Fedorov, Artem V; Manskikh, Vasily N; Skulachev, Maxim V; Zinovkin, Roman A; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Chernyak, Boris V

    2015-07-01

    The process of skin wound healing is delayed or impaired in aging animals. To investigate the possible role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) in cutaneous wound healing of aged mice, we have applied the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1. The SkQ1 treatment resulted in accelerated resolution of the inflammatory phase, formation of granulation tissue, vascularization and epithelization of the wounds. The wounds of SkQ1-treated mice contained increased amount of myofibroblasts which produce extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors mediating granulation tissue formation. This effect resembled SkQ1-induced differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblast, observed earlierin vitro. The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFb) produced by SkQ1-treated fibroblasts was found to stimulated motility of endothelial cells in vitro, an effect which may underlie pro-angiogenic action of SkQ1 in the wounds. In vitro experiments showed that SkQ1 prevented decomposition of VE-cadherin containing contacts and following increase in permeability of endothelial cells monolayer, induced by pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF. Prevention of excessive reaction of endothelium to the pro-inflammatory cytokine(s) might account for anti-inflammatory effect of SkQ1. Our findings point to an important role of mtROS in pathogenesis of age-related chronic wounds.

  6. On Combining High and Low Q2 Information on the Polarized Parton Densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leader, Elliot; Stamenov, Dimiter B.

    2000-01-01

    We draw attention to some problems in the combined use of high-Q 2 deep inelastic scattering (DIS) data and low-Q 2 hyperon β-decay data in the determination of the polarized parton densities. We explain why factorization schemes like the JET or AB schemes are the simplest in which to study the implications of the DIS parton densities for the physics of the low-Q 2 region. (author)

  7. QCD at low Q2 - a correspondence relation for moments of structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrempp, B.; Schrempp, F.

    1980-01-01

    The precocious validity of QCD predictions in deep inelastic lepton nucleon scattering and e + e - annihilation is interpreted as a signal for an underlying 'correspondence principle' relating perturbative and nonperturbative physics on the Q 2 average. Correspondence relations for nonsinglet moments of deep inelastic structure functions are formulated, discussed and successfully tested against experiment. The relations provide an independent determination of the QCD Λ-parameter from low Q 2 data in perfect agreement with results from large Q 2 analyses. (author)

  8. Present status and plans for experiments at the Q3D of Strasbourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, J.P.; Jundt, F.; Rebmeister, R.; Seltz, R.; Wagner, P.

    1979-01-01

    In describing the Q3D spectrometer of Strasbourg, features with characteristics particular to this instrument are discussed. The light ion counter and the heavy ion counter which have been developed to equip the focal plane are described. Three experiments already undertaken with the facility are briefly mentioned and the future research programme outlined. (UK)

  9. Antifungal activity of indigenous bacillus sp. isolate Q3 against marshmallow mycobiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jošić Dragana Lj.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Marshmallow is a host of a number of saprophytic and parasitic fungi in Serbia. The seeds of marshmallow are contaminated with fungi from different genera, especially Alternaria and Fusarium, which significantly reduced seed germination and caused seedling decay. In this study we investigate antagnonism of indigenous Bacillus sp. isolate Q3 against marshmallow mycopopulation. Bacillus sp. Q3 was isolated from maize rhizosphere, characterized by polyphasic approch and tested for plant growth promoting treats. Bacillus sp. Q3 produced antifungal metabolites with growth inhibition activity against numerous fungi in dual culture: 61.8% of Alternaria alternata, 74.8% of Myrothecium verrucaria and 33.6% of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. That effect could be caused by different antifungal metabolites including siderophores, hydrolytic enzymes, organic acids and indole acetic acid (IAA. Suppression of natural marshmallow seed infection by Q3 isolate was observed. The seeds were immersed in different concentrations of bacterial suspension during 2h and their infections by phytopathogenic fungi were estimated. The results showed significant reduction of seed infection by Alternaria spp. The presented results indicate possible application of this isolate as promising biological agent for control of marshmallow seed pathogenic fungi.

  10. 31 CFR 30.2 - Q-2: To what entities does this part apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-2: To what entities does this part apply? 30.2 Section 30.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.2 Q-2: To what entities does this part apply? This...

  11. Mellin moments of heavy flavor contributions to F2(x,Q2) at NNLO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Sebastian Werner Gerhard

    2009-10-01

    The main parts of this thesis are the extension of the description of the contributions of heavy quark mass-effects to the deep-inelastic Wilson coefficients to NNLO. In course of that, we also obtain a first independent calculation of fixed moments of the fermionic parts of the NNLO anomalous dimensions. The calculation of the 3-loop heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in the whole Q 2 region is currently not within reach. However, a very precise description of the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients contributing to the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) at NLO is obtained for Q 2 >or similar 10 m Q 2 , disregarding the power corrections ∝(m Q 2 /Q 2 ) k , k ≥ 1. If one considers the charm quark, this covers an important region for deep-inelastic physics at HERA. In this limit, the massive Wilson coefficients factorize into universal massive operator matrix elements (OMEs) A ij (x, μ 2 /m Q 2 ) and the light flavor Wilson coefficients C (q,g),(2,L) (x,Q 2 /μ 2 ). The former are process independent quantities and describe all quark mass effects. They are given by matrix elements of the leading twist local composite operators O i between partonic states j (i, j = q, g), including quark masses. The process dependence is described by the massless Wilson coefficients. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of the $Q^2$ evolution of the photon structure function $F^{\\gamma}_{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1997-01-01

    New measurements are presented of the photon structure function F_2^gamma(Q) at four values of Q^2 between 9 and 59 GeV/c^2 based on data collected with the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161-172 GeV, with a total integrated luminosity of 18.1 pb^-1. The evolution of F_2^gamma with Q^2 in bins of x is determined in the Q^2 range from 1.86 to 135 GeV/c^2 using data taken at centre-of-mass energies of 91 GeV and 161-172 GeV. F_2^gamma is observed to increase with Q^2 with a slope of 1/alpha_em dF_2^gamma/dln(Q^2) = 0.10 +0.05 -0.03 measured in the range 0.1 < x < 0.6.

  13. The proton and deuteron F2 structure function at low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tvaskis, Vladas; Arrington, John; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, Oliver; Blok, Henk; Bosted, Peter; Boswell, Melissa; Bruell, Antje; Christy, Michael; Cochran, Anthony; Ent, Rolf; Filippone, Bradley; Gasparian, Ashot; Keppel, Cynthia; Kinney, Edward; Lapikas, L.; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Mack, David; Mammei, Juliette; Martin, J.W.; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Piercey, Rodney; Potterveld, David; Smith, Gregory; Spurlock, Kurt; Van der Steenhoven, Gerard; Stepanyan, Stepan; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Wood, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the proton and deuteron F2 structure functions are presented. The data, taken at Jefferson Lab Hall C, span the four-momentum transfer range 0:06 < Q2 < 2:8 GeV2, and Bjorken x values from 0.009 to 0.45, thus extending the knowledge of F2 to low values of Q2 at low x. Next-to-next-to-leading order calculations using recent parton distribution functions start to deviate from the data for Q2 < 2 GeV2 at the low and high x-values. Down to the lowest value of Q2, the structure function is in good agreement with a parameterization of F2 based on data that have been taken at much higher values of Q2 or much lower values of x, and which is constrained by data at the photon point. The ratio of the deuteron and proton structure functions at low x remains well described by a logarithmic dependence on Q2 at low Q2.

  14. Dipole model analysis of highest precision HERA data, including very low Q"2's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luszczak, A.; Kowalski, H.

    2016-12-01

    We analyse, within a dipole model, the final, inclusive HERA DIS cross section data in the low χ region, using fully correlated errors. We show, that these highest precision data are very well described within the dipole model framework starting from Q"2 values of 3.5 GeV"2 to the highest values of Q"2=250 GeV"2. To analyze the saturation effects we evaluated the data including also the very low 0.35< Q"2 GeV"2 region. The fits including this region show a preference of the saturation ansatz.

  15. Charged Particle Production in High Q2 Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    The average charged track multiplicity and the normalised distribution of the scaled momentum, $\\xp$, of charged final state hadrons are measured in deep-inelastic $\\ep$ scattering at high $Q^2$ in the Breit frame of reference. The analysis covers the range of photon virtuality $100 < Q^2 < 20 000 \\GeV^{2}$. Compared with previous results presented by HERA experiments this analysis has a significantly higher statistical precision and extends the phase space to higher $Q^{2}$ and to the full range of $\\xp$. The results are compared with $e^+e^-$ annihilation data and with various calculations based on perturbative QCD using different models of the hadronisation process.

  16. Charged particle production in high Q2 deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, F. D.; Aktas, A.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Avila, K. B. Cantun; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A. Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2007-10-01

    The average charged track multiplicity and the normalised distribution of the scaled momentum, xp, of charged final state hadrons are measured in deep-inelastic ep scattering at high Q2 in the Breit frame of reference. The analysis covers the range of photon virtuality 100 <Q2 < 20 000 GeV2. Compared with previous results presented by HERA experiments this analysis has a significantly higher statistical precision and extends the phase space to higher Q2 and to the full range of xp. The results are compared with e+e- annihilation data and with various calculations based on perturbative QCD using different models of the hadronisation process.

  17. Equipment and performance of the Q3D spectrometer installed at the tandem laboratory of Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, B.

    1979-01-01

    A quadrupole - dipole - dipole - dipole (Q3D) magnetic spectrometer with proportional gas counter which has been installed at the tandem laboratory of Saclay is described. Typical results are given indicating the performance of the apparatus in studies of heavy ion reactions at tandem energies for which good energy resolution and large solid angles are required. Improvements to allow the detection of heavier masses and less energetic ions with better energy resolution are planned. (U.K.)

  18. AMS Measurement of 36Cl with a Q3D Magnetic Spectrometer at CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chaoli; He Ming; Wu Shaoyong; Li Zhenyu; Liu Jiancheng; Dong Kejun; Jiang Shan; Zhang Wei; He Xianwen

    2012-01-01

    The ratio of 36 Cl/Cl can determine the exposure age of surface rocks and monitor the secular equilibrium of 36 Cl of sedimentary and igneous rock in groundwater. Due to the uncertainty effects of different chemical separation processes for removing 36 S, there is a high degree of uncertainty in 36 Cl accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements if the ratio of 36 Cl/Cl is lower than 10 -14 . A 36 Cl AMS higher sensitivity measurement has been set up by using a ΔE-Q3D method at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The performances of ΔE-Q3D method for 36 Cl-AMS measurement had been systemically studied. The experimental results show that the ΔE-Q3D method has a higher isobar suppression factor. Taking advantage of direct removing 36 S, the sample preparation can be simplified and the uncertainty effects of different chemical separation processes can be reduced in 36 Cl AMS measurements.

  19. On the Q2-dependence of quark and diquark fragmentation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, A.

    1988-01-01

    The Q 2 -dependence of quark and diquark fragmentation functions is studied by means of evolution equations and compared with the experimental data. Some comments on the evolution of charm quark fragmentation are also presented. 20 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  20. 78 FR 69943 - Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Q3s 3-Year-Old Child Side Impact Test Dummy, Incorporation by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... airbag tests, Stapp Car Crash Journal, V44: 25-50. Since the Q3 had yet to show it was suitable for side... on May 2, 2002, 67 FR 21836. In early 2002, NHTSA tested a prototype version of the Q3s.\\6\\ NHTSA..., durability, and biofidelity. We determined that the thorax of the prototype appeared biofidelic and...

  1. Detailed structure of the q profile around q=1 in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegourie, B.; Dubois, M.A.; Gill, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The limitation of ablation on rational surfaces has been shown to be an efficient mechanism of striation formation during pellet ablation. In JET, a very large striation is observed when the pellet crosses the q=1 surface. This paper presents a thorough analysis of the pellet ablation in this region and shows that an extended shearless zone around q=1 is necessary to reproduce the experimental signal. Such a feature is likely to be an essential ingredient in the understanding of internal disruptions. (author) 4 refs., 2 figs

  2. Measurement of the Q^{2} Dependence of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g_{1} and its Moments at Low Q^{2} with CLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, K P; Deur, A; El Fassi, L; Kang, H; Kuhn, S E; Ripani, M; Slifer, K; Zheng, X; Adhikari, S; Akbar, Z; Amaryan, M J; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Balossino, I; Barion, L; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Bosted, P; Briscoe, W J; Brock, J; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Thanh Cao, F; Carlin, C; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Charles, G; Chen, J-P; Chetry, T; Choi, S; Ciullo, G; Clark, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Defurne, M; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Drozdov, V; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Filippi, A; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnston, S C; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Kabir, M L; Keith, C D; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khachatryan, M; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kovacs, K; Kubarovsky, V; Lanza, L; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Long, E; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meekins, D G; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niculescu, G; Niccolai, S; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Payette, D; Phelps, W; Phillips, S K; Pierce, J; Pogorelko, O; Poudel, J; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Sharabian, Y G; Shigeyuki, T; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sparveris, N; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sulkosky, V; Taiuti, M; Tan, J A; Ungaro, M; Voutier, E; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W

    2018-02-09

    We measured the g_{1} spin structure function of the deuteron at low Q^{2}, where QCD can be approximated with chiral perturbation theory (χPT). The data cover the resonance region, up to an invariant mass of W≈1.9  GeV. The generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum, the moment Γ_{1}^{d} and the spin polarizability γ_{0}^{d} are precisely determined down to a minimum Q^{2} of 0.02  GeV^{2} for the first time, about 2.5 times lower than that of previous data. We compare them to several χPT calculations and models. These results are the first in a program of benchmark measurements of polarization observables in the χPT domain.

  3. Higher twist contributions to the structure functions Fp2(x,Q2) and Fd2(x,Q2) at large x at higher orders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Boettcher, H.

    2008-02-01

    The higher twist contributions to the deeply inelastic structure functions F p 2 (x,Q 2 ) and F d 2 (x,Q 2 ) for larger values of the Bjorken variable x are extracted extrapolating the twist-2 contributions measured in the large W 2 region to the region 4 GeV 2 ≤W 2 ≤12.5 GeV 2 applying target mass corrections. We compare the results for the NLO, NNLO and N 3 LO analyzes and include also the large x at N 4 LO to the Wilson coefficients. A gradual lowering of the higher twist contributions going from NLO to N 4 LO is observed, which stresses the importance of higher order corrections. (orig.)

  4. O(α3s) contributions to the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients of the structure function F2(x,Q2) at Q2>>m2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissbrock, Fabian Philipp

    2015-10-01

    At O(α s 3 ) the contribution of a single heavy quark to the unpolarized structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) in the asymptotic region Q 2 >>m 2 is written as a convolution of the light flavor Wilson coefficients and the process independent massive operator matrix elements. This thesis extends the present description to allow for the presence of two heavy quark flavors and presents the respective renormalization prescription and first analytic results for these contributions. Furthermore the remaining O(C A,F T F 2 N F ) contributions and various diagrams of more complex topologies have been computed analytically. On the mathematical side different evaluation techniques based on representations in terms of special functions, Mellin-Barnes representations and Hyperlogarithms have been worked out.

  5. Investigations of environmental induced effects on AlQ3 thin films by AFM phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Vivek Kumar; Kumar, Satyendra

    2007-01-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) metal complex (AlQ 3 ) is a widely used light-emitting material in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The environmental stability is still a major problem with OLEDs and needs further improvement. In this report, an additional feature of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was exploited with the aim to understand the environmental induced effects and physical phenomenon involved on AlQ 3 thin films. We have used phase imaging to identify the presence of other aggregation phases formed after annealing the thin film in different ambient and after white light exposure. An enhanced photoluminescence intensity is observed for the samples annealed in oxygen near 100 deg. C. The enhanced photoluminescence is understood in terms of formation of a new aggregation phase. The phase change and the fraction of new phase is estimated by phase images taken by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Light induced effects on AlQ 3 films exposed to white light in air and vacuum are characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) for surface morphology and phases present. The AFM images indicate enhanced crystallinity for the vacuum exposed samples. The phase with increased lifetime and hence enhanced crystallinity for vacuum exposed films has also been found by time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurements. To the best of our knowledge, this study is applied for the first time on this material with the combination of topography and phase imaging in atomic force microscopy (AFM). The major aim was to take advantage of the additional feature of AFM-mode over the conventionally used

  6. 26 CFR 1.408(q)-1 - Deemed IRAs in qualified employer plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408(q)-1... restrictions that a trustee, custodian, or insurance company is permitted to impose on distributions from... accounts of any of the deemed IRAs is invested in life insurance contracts, regardless of whether the...

  7. The Use of Variable Q1 Isolation Windows Improves Selectivity in LC-SWATH-MS Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Bilbao, Aivett; Bruderer, Tobias; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Lisacek, Frédérique; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2015-10-02

    As tryptic peptides and metabolites are not equally distributed along the mass range, the probability of cross fragment ion interference is higher in certain windows when fixed Q1 SWATH windows are applied. We evaluated the benefits of utilizing variable Q1 SWATH windows with regards to selectivity improvement. Variable windows based on equalizing the distribution of either the precursor ion population (PIP) or the total ion current (TIC) within each window were generated by an in-house software, swathTUNER. These two variable Q1 SWATH window strategies outperformed, with respect to quantification and identification, the basic approach using a fixed window width (FIX) for proteomic profiling of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Thus, 13.8 and 8.4% additional peptide precursors, which resulted in 13.1 and 10.0% more proteins, were confidently identified by SWATH using the strategy PIP and TIC, respectively, in the MDDC proteomic sample. On the basis of the spectral library purity score, some improvement warranted by variable Q1 windows was also observed, albeit to a lesser extent, in the metabolomic profiling of human urine. We show that the novel concept of "scheduled SWATH" proposed here, which incorporates (i) variable isolation windows and (ii) precursor retention time segmentation further improves both peptide and metabolite identifications.

  8. Monte Carlo study of the hull distribution for the q = 1 Brauer model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kager, W.; Nienhuis, B.

    2006-01-01

    We study a special case of the Brauer model in which every path of the model has weight q = 1. The model has been studied before as a solvable lattice model and can be viewed as a Lorentz lattice gas. The paths of the model are also called self-avoiding trails. We consider the model in a triangle

  9. Maths-type q-deformed coherent states for q>1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesne, C.; Penson, K.A.; Tkachuk, V.M.

    2003-01-01

    Maths-type q-deformed coherent states with q>1 allow a resolution of unity in the form of an ordinary integral. They are sub-Poissonian and squeezed. They may be associated with a harmonic oscillator with minimal uncertainties in both position and momentum and are intelligent coherent states for the corresponding deformed Heisenberg algebra

  10. 77 FR 71492 - Amendment of Area Navigation Route Q-1; CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ...) route Q-1. This action corrects the spelling of the TOCOS waypoint. DATES: Effective date 0901 UTC... discovered in the spelling of the TOCOS waypoint. Area Navigation Routes are published in paragraph 6011 of..., second column, line 15, remove ``TACOS'' and insert ``TOCOS.'' On page 65462, line 7, remove ``TACOS...

  11. Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of the 490-Q1 tank system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, W.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gee, C.W.; Graser, D.A. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (US)

    1993-07-01

    This Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of used freon storage tanks 490-Q1A1 and 490-Q1A2 has been prepared in response to 40 CFR 265.192(a) and 22 CCR 66265.192(a) for new tank systems that store hazardous waste and have secondary containment. The regulations require that this assessment be completed and certified by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer before the tank system is placed in use as a hazardous waste storage tank system. The technical assessments for the 490-Q1A1 and 490-Q1A2 tank systems have been reviewed by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer, who has certified that the tank systems have sufficient structural integrity, are acceptable for transferring and storing hazardous waste, are compatible with the stored waste, and the tanks and containment system are suitably designed to achieve the requirements of the applicable regulations so they will not collapse, rupture, or fail.

  12. Q2 dependence of the spin structure function in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Li, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin-dependent sum rules in deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry A 1 (x,Q 2 ) approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone cannot determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral ∫ 0 1 {A 1 (x,Q 2 )F 2 (x,Q 2 )/2x[1+R(x,Q 2 )]}dx is estimated from Q 2 =0--2.5 GeV 2 . The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important; thus it provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin-dependent sum rule

  13. Non-Commutative Integration, Zeta Functions and the Haar State for SU{sub q}(2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matassa, Marco, E-mail: marco.matassa@gmail.com [SISSA (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    We study a notion of non-commutative integration, in the spirit of modular spectral triples, for the quantum group SU{sub q}(2). In particular we define the non-commutative integral as the residue at the spectral dimension of a zeta function, which is constructed using a Dirac operator and a weight. We consider the Dirac operator introduced by Kaad and Senior and a family of weights depending on two parameters, which are related to the diagonal automorphisms of SU{sub q}(2). We show that, after fixing one of the parameters, the non-commutative integral coincides with the Haar state of SU{sub q}(2). Moreover we can impose an additional condition on the zeta function, which also fixes the second parameter. For this unique choice the spectral dimension coincides with the classical dimension.

  14. Neutron electric form factor up to Q2 = 1.47 GeV/c2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, Richard; Semenov, Andrei; Taylor, S.; Aghalaryan, Aram; Crouse, Erick; MacLachlan, Glen; Plaster, Bradley; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Chenyu Yan; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; Baker, O.; Alan Baldwin; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Christy, E.; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Areg Danagoulian; Donal Day; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; Manley, D.; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Smith, G.; Samuel Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; Watson, J. W.; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2003-01-01

    The ratio of the electric to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, g /equiv G En /G Mn , was measured via recoil polarimetry (R.G. Arnold, C.E. Carlson, F. Gross, Phys. Rev. C 23, 363 (1981)) from the quasielastic 2 H (/mathop(e)/limitse' /mathop(n)/limits) 1H reaction at three values of Q 2 (viz, 0.45, 1.15, and 1.47 (GeV/c) 2 ) in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The data reveal that GEn continues to follow the Galster parameterization up to Q 2 = 1.15 (GeV/c) 2 and rises above the Galster parameterization at Q 2 = 1.47 (GeV/c) 2

  15. Deuteron A(Q2) structure function and the neutron electric form factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platchkov, S.; Amroun, A.; Auffret, S.; Cavedon, J.M.; Dreux, P.; Duclos, J.; Frois, B.; Goutte, D.; Hachemi, H.; Martino, J.

    1989-01-01

    We present new measurements of the deuteron A(Q 2 ) structure function in the momentum transfer region between 1 and 18 fm -2 . The accuracy of the data ranges from 2% to 6%. We investigate the sensitivity of A(Q 2 ) to the nucleon-nucleon interaction and to the neutron electric form factor G E n . Our analysis shows that below 20 fm -2 G E n can be inferred from these data with a significantly improved accuracy. The model dependence of this analysis is discussed

  16. Q2 Dependence of Nuclear Transparency for Incoherent ρ0 Electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Arrington; Frank Dohrmann; Ahmed El Alaoui; Don Geesaman; Kawtar Hafidi; Roy Holt; Harold Jackson; David Potterveld; Brahim Mustapha; Paul Reimer; Elaine Schulte; Krishni Wijesooriya; Maurik Holtrop; Jacques Ball; Michel Garcon; Jean Laget; Franck Sabatie; Michel Guidal; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Borissov, A.; Wolfgang Lorenzon; Stepan Stepanyan; Lawrence Weinstein

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of exclusive incoherent electroproduction of ρ 0 (770) meson from 2 D, 12 C, and 63 Cu targets up to Q 2 = 4 GeV 2 are proposed using the CLAS detector. The objective of these measurements is to determine the Q 2 dependence of the nuclear transparency ratio for the two nuclear targets: 12 C and 63 Cu at fixed coherence length of quark-antiquark fluctuations of the virtual photon. A sizeable rise of the nuclear transparency is predicted and can be measured in this experiment. A relatively large increase of the nuclear transparency can be considered as a signature of the onset of color transparency

  17. CLT-koetalon lämpö- ja kosteusteknisen toiminnan analysointiraportti Q2/2014

    OpenAIRE

    Autioniemi, Juha; Pirttinen, Valtteri; Vatanen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    CLT-koetalo-projektin yhtenä päätavoitteena on tutkia CLT-materiaalin rakennusfysikaalista toimintaa Suomen haastavissa olosuhteissa. Tämä Q2-raportti on toinen CLT-koetalon lämpö- ja kosteusteknisen toiminnan analysointiraportista, joita julkaistaan vuoden 2014 aikana yhteensä neljä. Q2/2014 -raportissa analysoidaan Kemissä sijaitsevasta CLT-koetalon rakenteista saatua mittausdataa. Koetalon rakenteissa sijaitsee yhteensä 48 mittausanturia, jotka mittaavat lämpötilaa ja suhteellista kosteutt...

  18. Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic structure Function A(Q2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Abbott; A. Ahmidouch; H. Anklin; J. Arvieux; J. Bail; S. Beedoe; E. J. Beise; L. Bimbot; W. Boeglin; H. Breuer; R. Carlini; N. S. Chant; S. Danagoulian; K. Dow; J.E. Ducret; J. Dunne; R. Ent; L. Ewell; L. Eyraud; C. Furget; M. Garcon; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; P. Gucye; K. Gustafsson; K. Hafidi; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; S. Kox; G. Kumbartzki; L. Lu; A. Lung; D. Mack; P. Markowitz; J. McIntyre; D. Meekins; F. Merchez; J. Mitchell; R. Mohring; S. Mtingwa; H. Mrktchyan; D. Pitz; L. Qin; R. Ransome; J.S. Real; P. G. Roos; P. Rutt; R. Sawafta; S. Stepanyan; R. Tieulent; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; W. Turchinetz; K. Vansyoc; J. Volmer; E. Voutier; W. Vulcan; C. Williamson; S. A. Wood; C. Yan; J. Zhao; W. Zhao

    1999-01-01

    The A(Q 2 ) structure function in elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured at six momentum transfers Q 2 between 0.66 and 1.80 (GeV/c) 2 in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. The scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence, at a fixed deuteron angle of 60.5 o . These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older sets of data. They put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure, and on the strength of isoscalar meson exchange currents

  19. Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2 )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Ducret, J.; Garcon, M.; Hafidi, K.; Pitz, D.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Honegger, A.; Jourdan, J.; Zhao, J.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Chant, N.S.; Ewell, L.; Gustafsson, K.; Lung, A.; Mohring, R.; Pitz, D.; Roos, P.G.; Eyraud, L.; Furget, C.; Kox, S.; Lu, L.; Merchez, F.; Real, J.; Tieulent, R.; Voutier, E.; Abbott, D.; Carlini, R.; Dunne, J.; Ent, R.; Gilman, R.; Gueye, P.; Mack, D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J.; Pitz, D.; Qin, L.; Vansyoc, K.; Volmer, J.; Vulcan, W.; Wood, S.A.; Yan, C.; Gilman, R.; Glashausser, C.; Kumbartzki, G.; McIntyre, J.; Ransome, R.; Rutt, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Dow, K.; Turchinetz, W.; Williamson, C.; Zhao, W.; Anklin, H.; Boeglin, W.; Markowitz, P.; Mrktchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Beedoe, S.; Danagoulian, S.; Mtingwa, S.; Sawafta, R.; Arvieux, J.; Ball, J.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Arvieux, J.; Bimbot, L.

    1999-01-01

    The A(Q 2 ) structure function in elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured at six momentum transfers Q 2 between 0.66 and 1.80 (GeV/c) 2 in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. The scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence, at a fixed deuteron angle of 60.5 degree. These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older sets of data. They put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure, and on the strength of isoscalar meson exchange currents. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  20. Lower bounds for ν and Q2 values leading to scaling in the simple parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nataf, R.S.

    1979-06-01

    The simple parton model leads to the Bjorken scaling law only for rather large values of the transfer. For small values, the scale invariance is broken by a purely kinematical effect which is shown to depend on: (1+(4M 2 x 2 /Q 2 ))sup(1/2)-1, M being the mass of the target nucleon. Thus, one has to consider: ν>=5M (5GeV) and: Q 2 >=10M 2 x (9GeV/c) 2 for the whole x range) if it is demanded that scaling holds within 10% to error

  1. Measurement of αs(Q2) from the Gross endash Llewellyn Smith Sum Rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.A.; Vakili, M.; Kim, J.H.; Arroyo, C.G.; Bazarko, A.O.; Conrad, J.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; McNulty, C.; Mishra, S.R.; Quintas, P.Z.; Romosan, A.; Schellman, H.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; Bernstein, R.H.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; McFarland, K.S.; Yu, J.; Bolton, T.; Naples, D.; Barbaro, L. de; Harris, D.A.; Barbaro, P. de; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Yang, U.K.; Kinnel, T.; Smith, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    We extract a set of values for the Gross endash Llewellyn Smith sum rule at different values of 4-momentum transfer squared (Q 2 ), by combining revised CCFR neutrino data with data from other neutrino deep-inelastic scattering experiments for 1 2 2 /c 2 . A comparison with the order α 3 s theoretical predictions yields a determination of α s at the scale of the Z -boson mass of 0.114± 0.009 0.012 . This measurement provides a new and useful test of perturbative QCD at low Q 2 , because of the low uncertainties in the higher order calculations. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  2. U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ran [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chung, Donald [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lowder, Travis [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Feldman, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ardani, Kristen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    NREL has been modeling U.S. photovoltaic (PV) system costs since 2009. This report benchmarks costs of U.S. solar PV for residential, commercial, and utility-scale systems built in the first quarter of 2016 (Q1 2016). Our methodology includes bottom-up accounting for all system and project-development costs incurred when installing residential, commercial, and utility-scale systems, and it models the capital costs for such systems.

  3. U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ran; Chung, Donald; Lowder, Travis; Feldman, David; Ardani, Kristen; Margolis, Robert

    2016-07-19

    NREL has been modeling U.S. photovoltaic (PV) system costs since 2009. This report benchmarks costs of U.S. solar PV for residential, commercial, and utility-scale systems built in the first quarter of 2016 (Q1 2016). Our methodology includes bottom-up accounting for all system and project-development costs incurred when installing residential, commercial, and utility-scale systems, and it models the capital costs for such systems.

  4. A characterization of the desarguesian planes of order q2 by SL(2,q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Foulser

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The main result is that if the translation complement of a translation plane of order q2 contains a group isomorphic to SL(2,q and if the subgroups of order q are elations (shears, then the plane is Desarguesian. This generalizes earlier work of Walker, who assumed that the kernel of the plane contained GF(q.

  5. Measuring the Neutron and 3He Spin Structure at Low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vince Sulkosky

    2005-01-01

    The spin structure of the nucleon has been of great interest over the past few decades. Sum rules, including the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH), and moments of the spin structure functions are powerful tools for understanding nucleon structure. The GDH sum rule, originally derived for real photon absorption, has been generalized to nonzero Q 2 . The goal of Jefferson Lab experiment E97-110 is to perform a precise measurement of the Q 2 dependence of the generalized GDH integral and of the moments of the neutron and 3 He spin structure functions between 0.02 and 0.3 GeV 2 . This Q 2 range will allow us to test predictions of Chiral Perturbation Theory, and verify the GDH sum rule by extrapolating the integral to the real photon point. The measurement will also contribute to the understanding of nucleon resonances. The data have been taken in Hall A using a high resolution spectrometer with the addition of a septum magnet, which allowed us to access the low Q 2 region. The analysis's status, prospects and impact will be discussed

  6. Light meson form factors at high Q2 from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Jonna; Zimermmane-Santos, André; Davies, Christine; Lepage, G. Peter; Lytle, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    Measurements and theoretical calculations of meson form factors are essential for our understanding of internal hadron structure and QCD, the dynamics that bind the quarks in hadrons. The pion electromagnetic form factor has been measured at small space-like momentum transfer |q2| theory is applicable. This leaves a gap in the intermediate Q2 where the form factors are not known. As a part of their 12 GeV upgrade Jefferson Lab will measure pion and kaon form factors in this intermediate region, up to Q2 of 6 GeV2. This is then an ideal opportunity for lattice QCD to make an accurate prediction ahead of the experimental results. Lattice QCD provides a from-first-principles approach to calculate form factors, and the challenge here is to control the statistical and systematic uncertainties as errors grow when going to higher Q2 values. Here we report on a calculation that tests the method using an ηs meson, a 'heavy pion' made of strange quarks, and also present preliminary results for kaon and pion form factors. We use the nf = 2 + 1 + 1 ensembles made by the MILC collaboration and Highly Improved Staggered Quarks, which allows us to obtain high statistics. The HISQ action is also designed to have small dicretisation errors. Using several light quark masses and lattice spacings allows us to control the chiral and continuum extrapolation and keep systematic errors in check. Warning, no authors found for 2018EPJWC.17506016.

  7. Ytarget optimization for E93050 experiment. Pt. 1. Q2 = 1 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaminion, S.; Fonvieille, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Espace y tg optimization that has been performed for experiment E93050 at Q 2 = 1 GeV 2 is summarized. The method and results are presented. The optic Y tensor elements obtained can be used for first pass analysis, although a more refined analysis may need further optimized optic elements. (author)

  8. On the behaviour of DIS structure function ratio R(x, Q2) at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotikov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    The behaviour of deep inelastic structure functions is studied at small x in the leading and next-to-leading orders of perturbation theory. The scheme-invariant analysis for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions ratio R(x, Q 2 ), is given. It is found that this ratio tends to zero asymptotically when x -> 0. (author). 12 refs.; 1 fig

  9. Statistical Analysis of Poverty in Oyo-State: A Q 2 -Approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The limited scope of uni-dimensional money-metric approach of analyzing poverty based on either expenditure or income has made approaches that allow poverty to be studied at several dimensions a necessity. It is in the light of this, that this study was aimed at analyzing poverty in Oyo State using a Q2-approach.

  10. Experimental study of the photon structure function F2 in the high Q2 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, W.; Cords, D.; Dietrich, G.; Dittmann, P.; Eichler, R.; Felst, R.; Haidt, D.; Krehbiel, H.; Meier, K.; Naroska, B.

    1982-09-01

    We report on a measurement of the process e + e - → e + e - + hadrons, where one of the scattered electron is detected at large angles, with an average Q 2 of 23 GeV 2 . The results are analysed in terms of the photon structure function F 2 and are compared with QCD predictions. (orig.)

  11. API Specification Q1: The quality system specification for the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurifoy, C.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Oil and Gas Production Industry began using the American Petroleum Institute's Specification Q1, ''Specification for Quality Programs'' (1st Edition, January 1, 1985) in late 1984. The generic ISO 9000 Series Standards, ''Quality management and quality assurance standards,'' were developed at about the same time and were published for public use in 1987. By late 1989 and into the early nineties, the formation of the European Economic Community and the issuance of the EC Procurement Directives sparked a rush by companies worldwide to comply with all the requirements necessary to do business in Europe. The ensuing ''ISO Mania'' has created a windfall for any company providing ISO 9000 quality system certification, consulting, training and almost anything to do with ISO 9000. It is difficult to miss one of the hundreds of newspaper and trade magazine articles promoting the ISO 9000 Quality Standards for use in almost every industry. This paper discusses the latest developments of both the lesser known API Spec Q1 and the much publicized ISO 9001 as well as discusses some of the similarities and differences between them and possible future trends. It also reviews some of the strengths and weaknesses of both documents to support the sentiment that API Spec Q1, in conjunction with the API Monogram Program, is the best quality standard for use in ordering equipment, materials and services for the Oil and Gas Industry

  12. Diagnostic and clinical observation on the infectious bronchitis virus strain Q1 in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Toffan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the diagnostic and clinical observations of an infectious bronchitis virus (IBV variant, referred to as Q1, in clinically ill chickens in Italy. This IBV variant was described for the first time in 1998 in China. In the autumn of 2011 it caused a small-scale epidemic in non-vaccinated meat chickens in farms located in Northern Italy. The disease was characterized by increased mortality, kidney lesions and proventriculitis. Histopatological observations confirmed the nephritis and described an unusual erosive/necrotic proventriculitis with infiltration of lymphocytes, plasma cells and heterophils, as well as fibroplasia in the lamina propria. Despite these findings and the isolation of the Q1 IB virus directly from proventricular tissue, further studies are necessary to confirm the role of this IBV strain in the development of proventricular lesions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the IBV isolates were very similar and probably had a common origin. The IBV Q1 variant appears to be now endemic in the North of Italy and at times it is detected in vaccinated backyard and commercial broiler farms. The importance of continuous monitoring in controlling the spread of known or emerging IBV variants is underlined.

  13. Evaluation of two new STR loci 9q2h2 and wg3f12 in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, M; Huang, X L; Tamaki, K; Yoshimoto, T; Uchihi, R; Yamamoto, T; Katsumata, Y; Armour, J A

    1999-09-01

    Two short tandem repeat (STR) loci (9q2h2 and wg3f12) have been evaluated in a Japanese population. Ten and seven different alleles were observed in 9q2h2 and wg3f12 respectively. 9q2h2 displayed simple polymorphism in tetrameric repeat structure; by contrast, wg3f12 contained variable numbers of tetrameric repeats and a 30-bp deletion/insertion polymorphism. No "interalleles" were found. The expected heterozygosities of 9q2h2 and wg3fl2 were 0.749 and 0.574, respectively. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was found.

  14. Measurement of the proton structure function F2 at low χand low Q2 at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-10-01

    We report on a measurement of the proton structure function F 2 in the range 3.5x10 -5 ≤x≤4x10 -3 and 1.5 GeV 2 ≤Q 2 ≤15 GeV 2 at the ep collider HERA operating at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=300 GeV. The rise of F 2 with decreasing x observed in the previous HERA measurements persists in this lower x and Q 2 range. The Q 2 evolution of F 2 , even at the lowest Q 2 and x measured, is consistent with perturbative QCD. (orig.)

  15. The Q2 and Transverse Momentum Dependence of Jet Production in Photon-Photon Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylka, Allan Joseph

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of jet production in photon-photon interactions is presented. The study is based on events collected with the PLUTO detector at the e + e - storage ring PETRA. The data sample, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ∼40 pb -1 taken at an e + e - center-of- mass energy of 34.6 GeV, consists of 1226 events in the so-called 'single-tagged' mode, in which only one of the scattered beam electrons is detected. The data sample extends over the kinematic ranges 0.1 < Q 2 < 18.0. GeV , where Q 2 is the squared invariant mass of the tagged virtual photon, and jet transverse momentum (p T ) up to ∼5 GeV/c, where p T is measured with respect to the photon-photon collision axis in the center-of-mass frame of the observed hadrons. At all Q 2 the data show a high p T tail characteristic of hard, point-like interactions, as exemplified by the fundamental reaction γγ → qq-bar. The jet production cross-section approaches the standard Quark Parton Model (QPM) expectation for fractionally-charged quarks of three colors from above as either Q 2 or jet p T increases. At Q 2 ≥ 10 GeV the observed cross-section is consistent with the standard QPM to within ∼20% statistical uncertainty at all values of p T . This result rules out the naive Han-Nambu integrally-charged quark model at a level of about five standard deviations. It is demonstrated that overall the data are consistent with the hypothesis of a two-jet final state. Moreover, the total jet production cross-section is shown to be well-described by an incoherent sum of the Generalized Vector Dominance Model (GVDM), for which the final state is hadronized as two oppositely-directed low p T jets, and the QPM, which accounts for final states consisting of two high p T jets. Some discrepancies between the data and the GVDM+QPM Ansatz are observed. At Q 2 ≤ 1 GeV 2 and 1.5 ≤ jet p T ≤ 4.0 GeV/c, the data lie systematically above the GVDM+QPM prediction. The thrust distribution

  16. Evidence for short range corelations from high Q2 (e,e') reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strikman, M.I.; Frankfurt, L.L.; Sargayan, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    For many years now short-range correlations (SRC) in nuclei have been considered as an essential feature of the nuclear wave function. At high energy (e,e') reactions, where Q 2 > 1 (GeV/c) 2 , x = Q 2 /2mq o > 1 and 1 GeV > q o > 300 ∼ 400 MeV the scattering from low momentum nucleons is kinematically suppressed and there the evidence of SRC expected to be more prominent. These reactions have been intensively investigated during the last decade or so at SLAC on both light and heavy nuclei. The above kinematics allows one to compute the cross section through the processes local in space. To explain this the authors analyse the representation of the cross section as a Fourier transform of the commutator of electromagnetic currents and see that the major contribution in the cross section is given by the region of integration

  17. Q2 evolution of generalized Baldin sum rule for the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Y.; Christy, M. E.; Ent, R.; Keppel, C. E.

    2006-01-01

    The generalized Baldin sum rule for virtual photon scattering, the unpolarized analogy of the generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn integral provides an important way to investigate the transition between perturbative QCD and hadronic descriptions of nucleon structure. This sum rule requires integration of the nucleon structure function F 1 , which until recently had not been measured at low Q 2 and large x, i.e., in the nucleon resonance region. This work uses new data from inclusive electron-proton scattering in the resonance region obtained at Jefferson Lab, in combination with SLAC deep inelastic scattering data, to present first precision measurements of the generalized Baldin integral for the proton in the Q 2 range of 0.3 to 4.0 GeV 2

  18. A set of sums for continuous dual q-2-Hahn polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gade, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    An infinite set {τ (l) (y;r,z)} r,lisanelementofN 0 of linear sums of continuous dual q -2 -Hahn polynomials with prefactors depending on a complex parameter z is studied. The sums τ (l) (y;r,z) have an interpretation in context with tensor product representations of the quantum affine algebra U q ' (sl(2)) involving both a positive and a negative discrete series representation. For each l>0, the sum τ (l) (y;r,z) can be expressed in terms of the sum τ (0) (y;r,z), continuous dual q 2 -Hahn polynomials, and their associated polynomials. The sum τ (0) (y;r,z) is obtained as a combination of eight basic hypergeometric series. Moreover, an integral representation is provided for the sums τ (l) (y;r,z) with the complex parameter restricted by |zq| -2 -Hahn polynomials.

  19. Measurement of the proton structure function FL(x,Q2) at low x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.

    2008-05-01

    A first measurement is reported of the longitudinal proton structure function F L (x,Q 2 ) at the ep collider HERA. It is based on inclusive deep inelastic e + p scattering cross section measurements with a positron beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 575 and 460 GeV. Employing the energy dependence of the cross section, F L is measured in a range of squared four-momentum transfers 12≤Q 2 ≤90 GeV 2 and low Bjorken x 0.00024≤x≤0.0036. The FL values agree with higher order QCD calculations based on parton densities obtained using cross section data previously measured at HERA. (orig.)

  20. Violations of the Callan-Gross relation as function of X,Q2 from QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Arroyo, A.

    1980-07-01

    The Callan-Gross relation, originally based on the parton model, predicts that, in (say) electroproduction, sigmasub(L)/sigmasub(T) = 0. When QCD corrections are taken into account this relation gets modified by terms of order αsub(c)(Q 2 ). We define R approximately sigmasub(L)/sigmasub(T) to measure the violation of the Callan-Gross relation. One can obtain exactly the behaviour of R(x,Q 2 ) at the endpoints x = 0,1 from QCD. This will incidentally allow us to write a simple and explicit parametrization, which is exact at x = 0,1 and a good approximation at all other x. We will carry out the analysis for proton targets and e, μ projectiles; the extension to ν scattering or other targets is straightforward

  1. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2009-12-01

    A high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio µpGEp/GMp in the range Q2 = 0.3–0.7 GeV2/c2 was performed using recoil polarimetry in Jefferson Lab Hall A. In this low Q2 range, previous data from LEDEX [5] along with many fits and calculations [2, 3, 4] indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. In this new measurement, with 80% polarized electron beam for 24 days, we are able to achieve <1% statistical uncertainty. Preliminary results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, indicating a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the improved form factor measurements also have implications for DVCS, determinations of the proton Zemach radius and strangeness form factors through parity violation experiments.

  2. Measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section at low Q2 and x at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Preda, T.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Boer, Y. de; Roeck, A. de; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Glazov, A.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Janssen, M.E.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; List, J.; Marti, L.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Rurikova, Z.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Asmone, A.; Stella, B.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Gouzevitch, M.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Olivier, B.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Del Degan, M.; Grab, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Sauter, M.; Zimmermann, T.; Dodonov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Povh, B.; Eckstein, D.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lobodzinska, E.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Habib, S.; Jemanov, V.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Naroska, B.; Hansson, M.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Meier, K.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Schmitz, C.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Schoening, A.; Tsakov, I.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV 2 ≤Q 2 ≤12 GeV 2 , and low Bjorken x, 5.10 -6 ≤x≤0.02. The result is based on two data sets collected in dedicated runs by the H1 Collaboration at HERA at beam energies of 27.6 GeV and 920 GeV for positrons and protons, respectively. A combination with data previously published by H1 leads to a cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q 2 and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Section at Low Q^2 and x at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lastovicka, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 12 GeV^2, and low Bjorken x, 5x10^-6 < x < 0.02. The result is based on two data sets collected in dedicated runs by the H1 Collaboration at HERA at beam energies of 27.6 GeV and 920 GeV for positrons and protons, respectively. A combination with data previously published by H1 leads to a cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q^2 and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering.

  4. Jet Production in ep Collisions at High $Q^2$ and Determination of $\\alpha_s$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic ep scattering at large negative four momentum transfer squared 150<Q^2<15000 GeV^2 using HERA data taken in 1999-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 395 pb^-1. Inclusive jet, 2-jet and 3-jet cross sections, normalised to the neutral current deep-inelastic scattering cross sections, are measured as functions of Q^2, jet transverse momentum and proton momentum fraction. The measurements are well described by perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects. The strong coupling as determined from these measurements is alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1168 +/-0.0007 (exp.) +0.0046/-0.0030 (th.) +/-0.0016(pdf).

  5. Jet Production in ep Collisions at Low Q^2 and Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kosior, E.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Tabasco, J.E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic e+p scattering at low negative four momentum transfer squared 5<Q^2<100 GeV^2 and at inelasticity 0.2Q^2 and jet transverse momentum. The 2-jet cross section is also measured as a function of the proton momentum fraction xi. The measurements are well described by perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects and are subsequently used to extract the strong coupling alpha_s.

  6. Measurement of the proton structure function FL (x ,Q2) at low x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, F. D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2008-07-01

    A first measurement is reported of the longitudinal proton structure function FL (x ,Q2) at the ep collider HERA. It is based on inclusive deep inelastic e+ p scattering cross section measurements with a positron beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 575 and 460 GeV. Employing the energy dependence of the cross section, FL is measured in a range of squared four-momentum transfers 12 ⩽Q2 ⩽ 90 GeV2 and low Bjorken x 0.00024 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.0036. The FL values agree with higher order QCD calculations based on parton densities obtained using cross section data previously measured at HERA.

  7. HIFI observations of water in the atmosphere of comet C/2008 Q3 (Garradd)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartogh, P.; Crovisier, J.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Lis, D. C.; Moreno, R.; Jarchow, C.; Rengel, M.; Emprechtinger, M.; Szutowicz, S.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Bensch, F.; Blecka, M. I.; Cavalié, T.; Encrenaz, T.; Jehin, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L.-M.; Lellouch, E.; Swinyard, B. M.; Vandenbussche, B.; Bergin, E. A.; Blake, G. A.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Encrenaz, P.; de Graauw, T.; Hutsemekers, D.; Kidger, M.; Manfroid, J.; Medvedev, A. S.; Naylor, D. A.; Schieder, R.; Thomas, N.; Waelkens, C.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Dieleman, P.; Güsten, R.; Klein, T.; Kasemann, C.; Caris, M.; Olberg, M.; Benz, A. O.

    2010-07-01

    High-resolution far-infrared and sub-millimetre spectroscopy of water lines is an important tool to understand the physical and chemical properties of cometary atmospheres. We present observations of several rotational ortho- and para-water transitions in comet C/2008 Q3 (Garradd) performed with HIFI on Herschel. These observations have provided the first detection of the 212-101 (1669 GHz) ortho and 111-000 (1113 GHz) para transitions of water in a cometary spectrum. In addition, the ground-state transition 110-101 at 557 GHz is detected and mapped. By detecting several water lines quasi-simultaneously and mapping their emission we can constrain the excitation parameters in the coma. Synthetic line profiles are computed using excitation models which include excitation by collisions, solar infrared radiation, and radiation trapping. We obtain the gas kinetic temperature, constrain the electron density profile, and estimate the coma expansion velocity by analyzing the map and line shapes. We derive water production rates of 1.7-2.8 × 1028 s-1 over the range rh = 1.83-1.85 AU. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Figure 5 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Equipment and performance of the Q3D spectrometer installed at the Tandem Laboratory of Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, B.

    1979-01-01

    A variety of heavy ion induced reactions has been studied with the Q3D spectrometer, examples are given. The proportional counter has shown a great ability to identify masses up to A=24 at energies greater than 20 MeV. For lower energies and heavier masses the resolution of the residual energy signal get worse due to the fact that almost all the energy of the particles is lost in the intermediate mylar foil. This is a limitation in the use of the proportional counter. In order to improve the detection along the focal surface we decided to build a detector with the following properties: - a clean geometry without any intermediate foils, - Esub(total) information with a good resolution instead of a residual energy information, - improved ΔE resolution, - wider energy range, 16% instead of approximately 10%, - measurement of the vertical position. The improvements presented above will allow to detect heavier masses and less energizing ions with a better energy resolution

  9. Planetary Candidates Observed by Kepler IV: Planet Sample from Q1-Q8 (22 Months)

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jessie L.; Ciardi, David R.; Morton, Timothy D.; Shporer, Avi

    2014-01-01

    We provide updates to the Kepler planet candidate sample based upon nearly two years of high-precision photometry (i.e., Q1-Q8). From an initial list of nearly 13,400 threshold crossing events, 480 new host stars are identified from their flux time series as consistent with hosting transiting planets. Potential transit signals are subjected to further analysis using the pixel-level data, which allows background eclipsing binaries to be identified through small image position shifts during tra...

  10. A new method of distinguishing models of the high-Q2 events at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Z.; He, X.G.; McKellar, B.

    1997-07-01

    A new method is proposed to distinguish models for the high Q 2 e + p → e + X anomaly at HERA by looking at a new observable which is insensitive to parton distribution function (PDF), but sensitive to new physics. Three models have been considered: modification of PDF's, new physics due to s-channel production of new particle and new physics due to contact interactions. Using this new method it is possible to distinguish different models with increased luminosity

  11. Measurements of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2) for 0.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. C. Alexa; B. D. Anderson; K. A. Aniol; K. Arundell; L. Auerbach; F. T. Baker; J. Berthot; P. Y. Bertin; W. Bertozzi; L. Bimbot; W. U. Boeglin; E. J. Brash; V. Breton; H. Breuer; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; L. S. Cardman; C. Cavata; C.-C. Chang; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; D. S. Dale; N. Degrande; R. De Leo; A. Deur; N. d'Hose; B. Diederich; J. J. Domingo; M. B. Epstein; L. A. Ewell; J. M. Finn; K. G. Fissum; H. Fonvieille; B. Frois; S. Frullani; H. Gao; J. Gao; F. Garibaldi; A. Gasparian,; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; J. Gomez; V. Gorbenko; J.-O. Hansen; R. Holmes; M. Holtrop; C. Howell; G. M. Huber; C. Hyde-Wright; M. Iodice; C. W. de Jager; S. Jaminion; J. Jardillier; M. K. Jones; C. Jutier,; W. Kahl; S. Kato; A. T. Katramatou; J. J. Kelly; S. Kerhoas; A. Ketikyan; M. Khayat; K. Kino; L. H. Kramer; K. S. Kumar; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; G. Lavessiere; A. Leone; J. J. LeRose; M. Liang; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; R. Madey,; K. Maeda; S. Malov; D. M. Manley; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; J. Marroncle; J. Martino; C. J. Martoff; K. McCormick; J. McIntyre; R. L. J. van der Meer; S. Mehrabyan; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; G. W. Miller; J. Y. Mougey; S. K. Nanda; D. Neyret; E. A. J. M. Offermann; Z. Papandreou; C. F. Perdrisat; R. Perrino; G. G. Petratos; S. Platchkov; R. Pomatsalyuk; D. L. Prout; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; G. Quemener; R. D. Ransome; O. Ravel; Y. Roblin; D. Rowntree; G. Rutledge; P. M. Rutt; A. Saha; T. Saito; A. J. Sarty; A. Serdarevic,; T. Smith; K. Soldi; P. Sorokin; P. A. Souder; R. Suleiman; J. A. Templon; T. Terasawa; L. Todor; H. Tsubota; H. Ueno; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. Van Hoorebeke; P. Vernin; B. Vlahovic; H. Voskanyan; J. W. Watson; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; R. Wilson; B. B. Wojtsekhowski; D. G. Zainea; W-M. Zhang; J. Zhao; Z.-L. Zhou

    1999-01-01

    The deuteron elastic structure function A(Q 2 ) has been extracted in the range 0.7 2 2 from cross section measurements of elastic electron-deuteron scattering in coincidence using the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Laboratory. The data are compared to theoretical models, based on the impulse approximation with the inclusion of meson-exchange currents, and to predictions of quark dimensional scaling and perturbative quantum chromodynamics

  12. Nuclear effects in the F3 structure function for finite and asymptotic Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    We study nuclear effects in the structure function F 3 which describes the parity violating part of the charged-current neutrino nucleon deep inelastic scattering. Starting from a covariant approach we derive a factorized expression for the nuclear structure function in terms of the nuclear spectral function and off-shell nucleon structure functions valid for arbitrary momentum transfer Q and in the limit of weak nuclear binding, i.e. when a nucleus can be treated as a non-relativistic system. We develop a systematic expansion of nuclear structure functions in terms of a Q -2 series caused by nuclear effects (''nuclear twist'' series). Basing ourselves on this expansion we calculate nuclear corrections to the Gross-Llewellyn-Smith sum rule as well as to higher moments of F 3 . We show that corrections to the GLS sum rule due to nuclear effects cancel out in the Bjorken limit and calculate the corresponding Q -2 correction. Special attention is paid to the discussion of the off-shell effects in the structure functions. A sizable impact of these effects both on the Q 2 and x dependence of nuclear structure functions is found. (orig.)

  13. When semantics turns to substance: reformulating QCD analysis of F2{γ}(x,Q2)}

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyla, J.

    2000-01-01

    QCD analysis of F 2 {γ} (x,Q 2 ) is revisited. It is emphasized that the presence of the inhomogeneous term in the evolution equations for quark distribution functions of the photon implies important difference in the way factorization mechanism works in photon-hadron and photon-photon collisions as compared to the hadronic ones. Moreover, a careful definitions of the very concepts of the ''leading order'' and ''next-to-leading order'' QCD analysis of F 2 {γ} are needed in order to separate genuine QCD effects from those of pure QED origin. After presenting such definitions, I show that all existing allegedly LO, as well as NLO analyses of F 2 {γ} (x,Q 2 ) are incomplete. The source of this incompleteness of the conventional approach is traced back to the lack of clear identification of QCD effects and to the misinterpretation of the behaviour of q {γ} (x,M) as a function of /α s (M). Complete LO and NLO QCD analyses of F 2 {γ} (x,Q 2 ) are shown to differ substantially from the conventional ones. Whereas complete NLO analysis requires the knowledge of two so far uncalculated quantities, a complete LO one is currently possible, but compared to the conventional formulation requires the inclusion of four known, but in the existing LO analyses unused quantities. The arguments recently advanced in favour of the conventional approach are analyzed and shown to contain a serious flaw. If corrected, they actually lend support to my claim. (author)

  14. One Adaptive Synchronization Approach for Fractional-Order Chaotic System with Fractional-Order 1 < q < 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Bai, Rongji

    2014-01-01

    Based on a new stability result of equilibrium point in nonlinear fractional-order systems for fractional-order lying in 1 < q < 2, one adaptive synchronization approach is established. The adaptive synchronization for the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system with fractional-order 1 < q < 2 is considered. Numerical simulations show the validity and feasibility of the proposed scheme. PMID:25247207

  15. One Adaptive Synchronization Approach for Fractional-Order Chaotic System with Fractional-Order 1<q<2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a new stability result of equilibrium point in nonlinear fractional-order systems for fractional-order lying in 1<q<2, one adaptive synchronization approach is established. The adaptive synchronization for the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system with fractional-order 1<q<2 is considered. Numerical simulations show the validity and feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  16. Kepler Stellar Properties Catalog Update for Q1-Q17 DR25 Transit Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Savita; Huber, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Huber et al. (2014) presented revised stellar properties for 196,468 Kepler targets, which were used for the Q1-Q16 TPSDV planet search (Tenenbaum et al. 2014). The catalog was based on atmospheric properties (i.e., temperature (Teff), surface gravity (log(g)), and metallicity ([FeH])) published in the literature using a variety of methods (e.g., asteroseismology, spectroscopy, exoplanet transits, photometry), which were then homogeneously fitted to a grid of Dartmouth (DSEP) isochrones (Dotter et al. 2008). The catalog was updated in early 2015 for the Q1-Q17 Data Release (DR) 24 transit search (Seader et al. 2015) based on the latest classifications of Kepler targets in the literature at that time. The methodology followed Huber et al. (2014). Here we provide updated stellar properties of 197,096 Kepler targets. Like the previous catalog, this update is based on atmospheric properties that were either published in the literature or provided by the Kepler community follow-up program (CFOP). The input values again come from different methods: asteroseismology, spectroscopy, flicker, and photometry. This catalog update was developed to support the SOC 9.3 TPSDV planet search (Twicken et al. 2016), which is expected to be the final search and data release by the Kepler project.In this document, we describe the method and the inputs that were used to build the catalog. The methodology follows Huber et al. (2014) with a few improvements as described in Section 2.

  17. PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER IV: PLANET SAMPLE FROM Q1-Q8 (22 MONTHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Mullally, F.; Rowe, Jason F.; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Ciardi, David R.; Still, Martin; Barclay, Thomas; Chaplin, William J.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cochran, William D.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.

    2014-01-01

    We provide updates to the Kepler planet candidate sample based upon nearly two years of high-precision photometry (i.e., Q1-Q8). From an initial list of nearly 13,400 threshold crossing events, 480 new host stars are identified from their flux time series as consistent with hosting transiting planets. Potential transit signals are subjected to further analysis using the pixel-level data, which allows background eclipsing binaries to be identified through small image position shifts during transit. We also re-evaluate Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) 1-1609, which were identified early in the mission, using substantially more data to test for background false positives and to find additional multiple systems. Combining the new and previous KOI samples, we provide updated parameters for 2738 Kepler planet candidates distributed across 2017 host stars. From the combined Kepler planet candidates, 472 are new from the Q1-Q8 data examined in this study. The new Kepler planet candidates represent ∼40% of the sample with R P ∼ 1 R ⊕ and represent ∼40% of the low equilibrium temperature (T eq < 300 K) sample. We review the known biases in the current sample of Kepler planet candidates relevant to evaluating planet population statistics with the current Kepler planet candidate sample

  18. Development of formulation Q1As method for quadrupole noise prediction around a submerged cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo-Seb Choi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that quadrupole noise has a significant influence on the overall characteristics of flow-induced noise and on the performance of underwater appendages such as sonar domes. However, advanced research generally uses the Ffowcs Williams–Hawkings analogy without considering the quadrupole source to reduce computational cost. In this study, flow-induced noise is predicted by using an LES turbulence model and a developed formulation, called the formulation Q1As method to properly take into account the quadrupole source. The noise around a circular cylinder in an underwater environment is examined for two cases with different velocities. The results from the method are compared to those obtained from the experiments and the permeable FW–H method. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data, with a difference of less than 1 dB, which indicates that the formulation Q1As method is suitable for use in predicting quadrupole noise around underwater appendages.

  19. Measurement of charged and neutral current e-p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-03-01

    Deep inelastic e - p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared, Q 2 , between 400 GeV 2 and the kinematic limit of 87500 GeV 2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections, dσ/dQ 2 , are presented. For Q 2 ∝M W 2 , where M W is the mass of the W boson, the CC and NC cross sections have comparable magnitudes, demonstrating the equal strengths of the weak and electromagnetic interactions at high Q 2 . The Q 2 dependence of the CC cross section determines the mass term in the CC propagator to be M W =76±16±13 GeV. (orig.)

  20. Development and construction of a focal-plane detector for the Munich Q3D spectrograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, H.

    1989-01-01

    For the Munich Q3D magnet spectrograph a focal-plane detector was developed, constructed, and taken in operation. It is primary layed out for light ions like p, d, t 3 He, and 4 He, but can be also applied for heavy ions. The position resolution amounts to about 0.1 mm at counting rates of about 10 kHz. In the detector filled with counting gas on anode wires along the focal plane charge avalanches are formed, which influence in several neighbouring cathode stripes of the dimension (3x25) mm 2 signals. These signals are singularily read out and digitized, i.e. to each of the at the whole 114 cathode strips is assigned an own preamplifier, puls shaper, peak detector, and analog-to-digital converter (ADC). After the digitization in a hardware-like constructed calculator unit the center of mass of the charge distribution influenced by the charge avalanche is calculated, the position of the incident particle is obtained. The detector yields beyond the position signal yet also a signal ΔE form the anode wires, which gives the energy loss of the particle in the gas space, as well as a residual-energy signal E rest from a scintillator, in which the particles are stopped. By this the radiation background (γ's and n) can be separated very well from the required particles. With the focal-plane detector the 103 Rh(d, p) 104 Rh transfer reaction was measured at three different spectrograph angles. The measured level energies and angular momentum transfers are compared with (n, γ) data and discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae KpQ3, a DHA-1 β-Lactamase-Producing Nosocomial Isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobes, Raquel; Codoñer, Francisco M.; López-Camacho, Elena; Salanueva, Iñigo J.; Manrique, Marina; Brozynska, Marta; Gómez-Gil, Rosa; Martínez-Blanch, Juan F.; Álvarez-Tejado, Miguel; Pareja, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae KpQ3 is a multidrug-resistant isolate obtained from a blood culture of a patient in a burn unit in the Hospital Universitario La Paz (Madrid, Spain) in 2008. The genome contains multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including a plasmid-mediated DHA-1 cephalosporinase gene. PMID:23469341

  2. Comparision of the Q3 and P3 dummy kinematics and kinetics in frontal and oblique impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratingen, M.R. van; Twisk, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    European child restraints are designed and manufactured according to the ECE-R44 standard. This standard specifies the use of the 3 years old dummy TNO P3 (nominal mass of 15 kg) for homoligation testing of group I and II child restraint systems. Recently, the successor of the P3, the TNO Q3 has

  3. Nonpointlike-parton model with asymptotic scaling and with scaling violationat moderate Q2 values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    A nonpointlike-parton model is formulated on the basis of the assumption of energy-independent total cross sections of partons and the current-algebra sum rules. No specific strong-interaction Lagrangian density is introduced in this approach. This model predicts asymptotic scaling for the inelastic structure functions of nucleons on the one hand and scaling violation at moderate Q 2 values on the other hand. The predicted scaling-violation patterns at moderate Q 2 values are consistent with the observed scaling-violation patterns. A numerical fit of F 2 functions is performed in order to demonstrate that the predicted scaling-violation patterns of this model at moderate Q 2 values fit the data, and to see how the predicted asymptotic scaling behavior sets in at various x values. Explicit analytic forms of F 2 functions are obtained from this numerical fit, and are compared in detail with the analytic forms of F 2 functions obtained from the numerical fit of the quantum-chromodynamics (QCD) parton model. This comparison shows that this nonpointlike-parton model fits the data better than the QCD parton model, especially at large and small x values. Nachtman moments are computed from the F 2 functions of this model and are shown to agree with data well. It is also shown that the two-dimensional plot of the logarithm of a nonsinglet moment versus the logarithm of another such moment is not a good way to distinguish this nonpointlike-parton model from the QCD parton model

  4. Variation of multiplicity and transverse energy flow with W2 and Q2 in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmander, H.

    1995-04-01

    Charged particle and transverse energy flow for deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA have been investigated in the hadronic center of mass systems as a function of pseudorapidity η* in different W 2 and Q 2 intervals. In addition, the mean charged particle multiplicity ch > and the mean transverse energy * Τ > as a function of W 2 and Q 2 have been studied. The measurements were made in the kinematic region 85 2 2 . The ch > was found to increase with increasing W 2 at fixed Q 2 but did not show any significant dependence on Q 2 at fixed W 2 . The best description of the mean charged multiplicity is given by ch >=a+b·ln(W 2 /GeV 2 ) with a=-1.38±0.07 and b=0.93±0.05. The * Τ > increased both with increasing W 2 at fixed Q 2 and with increasing Q 2 at fixed W 2 . The mean transverse energy is described by * Τ >=a+b·ln(W 2 /GeV 2 )+c·ln (Q 2 /GeV 2 )GeV with a=-5.93±0.07, b=1.28±0.06 and c=0.69±0.02. Different QCD models have been compared with data. Only the Color Dipole Model, as implemented in the Monte Carlo program Ariadne, describes the data satisfactorily. 29 refs

  5. Jet production in ep collisions at low Q 2 and determination of αs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Antunovic, B.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kosior, E.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Marti, Ll.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Brinkmann, M.; Habib, S.; List, B.; Pokorny, B.; Toll, T.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Grab, C.; Zimmermann, T.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Stella, B.; Tsakov, I.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic e + p scattering at low negative four momentum transfer squared 5 2 2 and at inelasticity 0.2 -1 . Inclusive jet, 2-jet and 3-jet cross sections as well as the ratio of 3-jet to 2-jet cross sections are measured as a function of Q 2 and jet transverse momentum. The 2-jet cross section is also measured as a function of the proton momentum fraction ξ. The measurements are well described by perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects and are subsequently used to extract the strong coupling α s . (orig.)

  6. The hadronic component of the photon structure function F2γ(Q2, x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotsman, E.

    1988-01-01

    The quality of the high Q 2 data presently available in photon-photon scattering, is not sufficient to allow for a unique determination of the QCD parameter Λ (as it is strongly correlated with the hadronic component of the photon). The authors show that a combination of the QPM point-like cross section and a hadronic cross section given by a simple power expansion in energy, provides a good description of the experimental photon structure function and photon-photon total cross section

  7. Hunting Down Interpretations of the HERA Large-$Q^{2}$ data

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Possible interpretations of the HERA large-Q^2 data are reviewed briefly. The possibility of statistical fluctuations cannot be ruled out, and it seems premature to argue that the H1 and ZEUS anomalies are incompatible. The data cannot be explained away by modifications of parton distributions, nor do contact interactions help. A leptoquark interpretation would need a large tau-q branching ratio. Several R-violating squark interpretations are still viable despite all the constraints, and offer interesting experimental signatures, but please do not hold your breath.

  8. On propagation of sound waves in Q2D conductors in a quantizing magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichenko, O V; Galbova, O; Ivanovski, G; Krstovska, D

    2003-01-01

    The attenuation of sound waves propagating normally to the layers of a Q2D conductor is analysed at low enough temperatures when quantization of the energy of conduction electrons results in an oscillatory dependence of the sound attenuation rate on the inverse magnetic field. The sound wave decrement is found for different orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the layers. A layered conductor is shown to be most transparent in the case when the magnetic field is orthogonal to the layers.

  9. Two-photon collisions at very low Q2 from LEP2. Forthcoming results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almehed, S.; Jarlskog, G.; Mjornmark, U.; Nygren, A.; Zimin, N.; Kapusta, F.; Tyapkin, I.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental results that may soon be obtained in two-photon collisions at very low momentum transfer Q 2 at LEP2 are reviewed. A kinematical range is presented for both the forward and very forward detectors used to measure scattered electrons and positrons. A new acceptance, after this year's upgrade of the beam pipe at the position of the very forward detectors, is evaluated. The corresponding statistics is calculated for an integrated luminosity of 400 pb -1 , that must be collected by the end of LEP2 operation according to current plans

  10. On propagation of sound waves in Q2D conductors in a quantizing magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichenko, O.V.; Peschansky, V.G.; Galbova, O.; Ivanovski, G.; Krstovska, D.

    2003-01-01

    The attenuation of sound waves propagating normally to the layers of a Q2D conductor is analysed at low enough temperatures when quantization of the energy of conduction electrons results in an oscillatory dependence of the sound attenuation rate on the inverse magnetic field. The sound wave decrement is found for different orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the layers. A layered conductor is shown to be most transparent in the case when the magnetic field is orthogonal to the layers

  11. FORMATION CONDITIONS OF ICY MATERIALS IN COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ). I. MIXING RATIOS OF ORGANIC VOLATILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hitomi; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2009-01-01

    We observed comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) with the Keck II telescope in late 2005 January and we obtained the spectra of C/2004 Q2 including many emission lines of volatile species such as H 2 O, HCN, C 2 H 2 , NH 3 , CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , CH 3 OH, and H 2 CO with high-signal-to-noise ratios. Based on our observations, we determined the mixing ratios of the molecules relative to H 2 O in C/2004 Q2. Since C/2004 Q2 is one of Oort Cloud comets, it is interesting to compare our results with other Oort Cloud comets. The mixing ratios of C 2 H 2 /H 2 O and C 2 H 6 /H 2 O in C/2004 Q2 are lower than typical Oort Cloud comets. Especially, C 2 H 2 /H 2 O ratio in C/2004 Q2 is as lower as Jupiter Family comets. However, mixing ratios of other molecules in C/2004 Q2 are similar to typical Oort Cloud comets. C/2004 Q2 might be the intermediate type between Oort Cloud and Jupiter Family comets. To investigate the formation conditions of such intermediate type comet, we focused on the (C 2 H 2 +C 2 H 6 )/H 2 O ratios and C 2 H 6 /(C 2 H 6 +C 2 H 2 ) ratios in comets from the viewpoint of conversion from C 2 H 2 to C 2 H 6 in the precometary ices. We found that (C 2 H 2 +C 2 H 6 )/H 2 O ratio in C/2004 Q2 is lower than the ratio in typical Oort Cloud comets while C 2 H 6 /(C 2 H 6 +C 2 H 2 ) ratio in C/2004 Q2 is consistent with the ratio of the typical Oort Cloud comets and Jupiter family comets. If we assume that the cometary volatiles such as H 2 O, CH 4 , and C 2 H 2 formed similar environment, the C 2 H 6 /(C 2 H 6 +C 2 H 2 ) ratio might not be sensitive in the temperature range where hydrogen-addition reactions occurred and cometesimals formed (∼30 K). We employed the dynamical-evolutional model and the chemical-evolutional model to determine the formation region of C/2004 Q2 more precisely. We found that comet C/2004 Q2 might have formed in relatively inner region of the solar nebula than the typical Oort Cloud comet (but slightly further than 5 AU from the proto-Sun).

  12. Measurement of charged and neutral current e-p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R.L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.; Katz, U.F.; Mari, S.M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, C.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G.P.; Heath, H.F.; Llewellyn, T.J.; Morgado, C.J.S.; Norman, D.J.P.; O'Mara, J.A.; Tapper, R.J.; Wilson, S.S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R.R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J.A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P.B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jelen, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Kotanski, A.; Przybycien, M.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J.K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasinski, M.; Gilkinson, D.J.; Glasman, C.; Goettlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Koepke, L.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Loehr, B.; Loewe, M.; Lueke, D.; Manczak, O.; Ng, J.S.T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.

    1995-01-01

    Deep inelastic e - p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared Q 2 above 400GeV 2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 are presented. From the Q 2 dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be M W =76±16±13 GeV

  13. Electroproduction of $\\phi(1020)$ Mesons at High $Q^2$ with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Joseph; Smith, Elton; Garcon, Michel; Guidal, Michel; Laget, Jean; Weiss, Christian; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, James; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crannell, Hall; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Sanctis, Enzo; De Vita, Raffaella; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feuerbach, Robert; Ficenec, John; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Park, Sungkyun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, A

    2008-08-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.025210
    Electroproduction of exclusive $\\phi$ vector mesons has been studied with the CLAS detector in the kinematical range $1.6\\leq Q^2\\leq 3.8$ GeV$^{2}$, $0.0\\leq t^{\\prime}\\leq 3.6$ GeV$^{2}$, and $2.0\\leq W\\leq 3.0$ GeV. The scaling exponent for the total cross section as $1/(Q^2+M_{\\phi}^2)^n$ was determined to be $n=2.49\\pm 0.33$. The slope of the four-momentum transfer $t'$ distribution is $b_{\\phi}=0.98 \\pm 0.17$ GeV$^{-2}$. The data are consistent with the assumption of s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC). Under this assumption, we determine the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross sections to be $R=0.86 \\pm 0.24$. A 2-gluon exchange model is able to reproduce the main features of the data.

  14. Measurement of high-Q2 charged current cross sections in e+p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautenberg, J.

    2004-06-01

    Cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering have been measured in e + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the running periods 1999 and 2000 correspond to an integrated luminosity of 61 pb -1 . Single differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy have been measured for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 , as well as the double differential reduced cross section d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 in the kinematic range 280 GeV 2 2 2 and 0.008 - p charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections. The helicity structure is investigated in particular. The mass of the space-like W boson propagator has been determined from a fit to dσ/dQ 2 . (orig.)

  15. Magnetic Microcalorimeters with Ultra-High Energy Resolution (FY17 Q2 report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramos, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-28

    We will continue to characterize the Ag:Er MMC in detail to compare it with existing models and understand its limiting performance, both in New Mexico and at LLNL. For best resolution, it will be important to reduce external electromagnetic interference and ensure good thermal coupling to the cryostat. Improved resolution will be important for our presentations at the LTD-17 conference in Japan in Q3. We have also hired Cameron Flynn, a junior in physics at the university of New Hampshire, as a summer student to work on the MMC detector project. If he turns out to be as smart and as strong in the lab as his letters of recommendation and his interview performance suggests, we will try to attract him into one of the bay area universities for his Ph.D. and recruit him to LLNL for his thesis research.

  16. The Q2-Dependence of the Gross-Llewellyn Smith Sum Rule and of the Parton Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataev, A.L.; AN SSSR, Moscow; Sidorov, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the results of our recent work on the determination of the value of the parameter Λ and of the Q 2 -dependence of the Gross-Llewellyn Smith (GLS) sum rule from the experimental data of the CCFR collaboration on neutrino-nucleon deep inelastic scattering, using the Jacobi polynomials QCD analysis. The new information on the Q 2 -dependence of the parton distributions is presented. 37 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Overexpression of the mulberry latex gene MaMLX-Q1 enhances defense against Plutella xylostella in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purified mulberry latex chitinase (MLX has a role in defense against some lepidopteran insects. In this study, a full length chitinase gene, MaMLX-Q1, of 1405 bp with a 1140 bp open reading frame, was obtained from mulberry leaves by the degenerate primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR procedure. The gene encoded a mature protein with the predicted molecular mass of 39.38 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI of 6.43; it contained two chitin-binding domains and a hydrolase family 19 chitinase domain. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis grouped it in the class I chitinase protein group. Heterogeneous expression of this MaMLX-Q1 in Arabidopsis showed non-visible alterations in growth phenotype, except for the higher transcriptional expression of MaMLX-Q1 when compared to that of wild-type Arabidopsis. This ectopic MaMLX-Q1 exhibited toxicity to the growth and development of Plutella xylostella larvae, causing significantly lower weight gain and higher mortality. These results indicate an application of MaMLX-Q1 as an insecticide for plant protection.

  18. Wet-plate culture studies of Penicillium sp. PT95 and Q1 for mass production of sclerotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen-Jing; An, Cui-Hong; Han, Jian-Rong

    2014-04-01

    Penicillium sp. PT95 and Q1 strains were able to form abundant orange, sand-shaped sclerotia in which carotenoids were accumulated. To determine the potential availability of the wet-plate method for mass production of sclerotia, nine kinds of liquid media were used culture the PT95 and Q1 strains. The results of the wet-plate culture showed that on 25% glycerol nitrate broth medium, the growth of both strains was relatively slow, and no sclerotia were found. Q1 strain cultured on Czapek's yeast extract broth medium could not form sclerotia. On other media, both strains could form sclerotia. For PT95 strain, the highest sclerotial biomass (380 mg plate(-1) ) and carotenoids yield (20.88 µg plate(-1) ) could be obtained on Czapek's yeast extract broth and Georgiou's liquid medium, respectively. For Q1 strain, malt extract broth medium gave the highest sclerotial biomass (340 mg plate(-1) ) and omitting iron Joham's liquid medium gave the highest carotenoids yield (18.29 µg plate(-1) ). The results from this study suggest the potential usage of wet-plate method in the mass production of sclerotia of the PT95 and Q1 strains. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Influence of Alkali Metal Substitution on the Phase Transition Behavior of CsGaQ2 (Q = S, Se

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Friedrich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The formation of solid solution series Cs1−xMxGaQ2-mC64 (M = K, Rb; Q = S, Se; x = 0–1 was studied by X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic methods, revealing a complete miscibility of CsGaQ2-mC64 with RbGaQ2 and KGaSe2, and a large miscibility gap with KGaS2. All solid solution members exhibit similar Raman spectra, indicating the covalent Ga-Q bonding character. The similar optical band gaps likewise further contribute to this conclusion. Up to a certain degree of substitution, these solid solutions undergo a phase transition similar to CsGaQ2-mC64. The influence of the substitution parameter x on phase transition process was investigated in situ using high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction experiments. Phase-pure solid solutions of the high-temperature polymorphs Cs1−xMxGaQ2-mC16 were obtained up to xmax(K = 0.1 and xmax(Rb = 0.3. The crystal structures of these new CsGaQ2-mC16 analogous high-temperature phases were refined from synchrotron diffraction data by Rietveld-refinement.

  20. Measuring molecular abundances in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) using the APEX telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Milam, S. N.; Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Coulson, I. M.; Remijan, A. J.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2018-02-01

    Comet composition provides critical information on the chemical and physical processes that took place during the formation of the Solar system. We report here on millimetre spectroscopic observations of the long-period bright comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) band 1 receiver between 2015 January UT 16.948 and 18.120, when the comet was at heliocentric distance of 1.30 au and geocentric distance of 0.53 au. Bright comets allow for sensitive observations of gaseous volatiles that sublimate in their coma. These observations allowed us to detect HCN, CH3OH (multiple transitions), H2CO and CO, and to measure precise molecular production rates. Additionally, sensitive upper limits were derived on the complex molecules acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and formamide (NH2CHO) based on the average of the strongest lines in the targeted spectral range to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Gas production rates are derived using a non-LTE molecular excitation calculation involving collisions with H2O and radiative pumping that becomes important in the outer coma due to solar radiation. We find a depletion of CO in C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) with a production rate relative to water of 2.0 per cent, and relatively low abundances of Q(HCN)/Q(H2O), 0.1 per cent, and Q(H2CO)/Q(H2O), 0.2 per cent. In contrast, the CH3OH relative abundance Q(CH3OH)/Q(H2O), 2.2 per cent, is close to the mean value observed in other comets. The measured production rates are consistent with values derived for this object from other facilities at similar wavelengths taking into account the difference in the fields of view. Based on the observed mixing ratios of organic molecules in four bright comets including C/2014 Q2, we find some support for atom addition reactions on cold dust being the origin of some of the molecules.

  1. U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ran [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Feldman, David J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Woodhouse, Michael A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ardani, Kristen B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-11

    NREL has been modeling U.S. photovoltaic (PV) system costs since 2009. This year, our report benchmarks costs of U.S. solar PV for residential, commercial, and utility-scale systems built in the first quarter of 2017 (Q1 2017). Costs are represented from the perspective of the developer/installer, thus all hardware costs represent the price at which components are purchased by the developer/installer, not accounting for preexisting supply agreements or other contracts. Importantly, the benchmark this year (2017) also represents the sales price paid to the installer; therefore, it includes profit in the cost of the hardware, along with the profit the installer/developer receives, as a separate cost category. However, it does not include any additional net profit, such as a developer fee or price gross-up, which are common in the marketplace. We adopt this approach owing to the wide variation in developer profits in all three sectors, where project pricing is highly dependent on region and project specifics such as local retail electricity rate structures, local rebate and incentive structures, competitive environment, and overall project or deal structures.

  2. U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ran [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Feldman, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Woodhouse, Mike [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ardani, Kristen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report benchmarks U.S. solar photovoltaic (PV) system installed costs as of the first quarter of 2017 (Q1 2017). We use a bottom-up methodology, accounting for all system and projectdevelopment costs incurred during the installation to model the costs for residential, commercial, and utility-scale systems. In general, we attempt to model the typical installation techniques and business operations from an installed-cost perspective. Costs are represented from the perspective of the developer/installer; thus, all hardware costs represent the price at which components are purchased by the developer/installer, not accounting for preexisting supply agreements or other contracts. Importantly, the benchmark also represents the sales price paid to the installer; therefore, it includes profit in the cost of the hardware, 1 along with the profit the installer/developer receives, as a separate cost category. However, it does not include any additional net profit, such as a developer fee or price gross-up, which is common in the marketplace. We adopt this approach owing to the wide variation in developer profits in all three sectors, where project pricing is highly dependent on region and project specifics such as local retail electricity rate structures, local rebate and incentive structures, competitive environment, and overall project or deal structures. Finally, our benchmarks are national averages weighted by state installed capacities.

  3. New nonbinary quantum codes with larger distance constructed from BCH codes over 𝔽q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gen; Li, Ruihu; Fu, Qiang; Ma, Yuena; Guo, Luobin

    2017-03-01

    This paper concentrates on construction of new nonbinary quantum error-correcting codes (QECCs) from three classes of narrow-sense imprimitive BCH codes over finite field 𝔽q2 (q ≥ 3 is an odd prime power). By a careful analysis on properties of cyclotomic cosets in defining set T of these BCH codes, the improved maximal designed distance of these narrow-sense imprimitive Hermitian dual-containing BCH codes is determined to be much larger than the result given according to Aly et al. [S. A. Aly, A. Klappenecker and P. K. Sarvepalli, IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 53, 1183 (2007)] for each different code length. Thus families of new nonbinary QECCs are constructed, and the newly obtained QECCs have larger distance than those in previous literature.

  4. Jet production in ep collisions at high Q2 and determination of αs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Preda, T.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Zus, R.; Alimujiang, K.; Antunovic, B.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Boer, Y. de; Roeck, A. de; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Janssen, M.E.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; List, J.; Marti, L.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Rurikova, Z.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Asmone, A.; Stella, B.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Brinkmann, M.; Habib, S.; Jemanov, V.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Naroska, B.; Pokorny, B.; Toll, T.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Olivier, B.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Del Degan, M.; Grab, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Sauter, M.; Zimmermann, T.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Dodonov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Schmitz, C.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Schoening, A.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Tsakov, I.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic e ± p scattering at large negative four momentum transfer squared 150 2 2 using HERA data taken in 1999-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 395 pb -1 . Inclusive jet, 2-jet and 3-jet cross sections, normalised to the neutral current deep-inelastic scattering cross sections, are measured as functions of Q 2 , jet transverse momentum and proton momentum fraction. The measurements are well described by perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects. The strong coupling as determined from these measurements is α s (M Z )=0.1168±0.0007(exp.) +0.0046 -0.0030 (th.)±0.0016 (PDF). (orig.)

  5. Strangeness Production at low $Q^2$ in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2009-01-01

    The production of neutral strange hadrons is investigated using deep-inelastic scattering events measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurements are made in the phase space defined by the negative four-momentum transfer squared of the photon 2 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2 and the inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.6. The K_s and Lambda production cross sections and their ratios are determined. K_s production is compared to the production of charged particles in the same region of phase space. The Lambda - anti-Lambda asymmetry is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. Predictions of leading order Monte Carlo programs are compared to the data.

  6. Measurement of the Photon Structure Function at High $Q^{2}$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Campanelli, Mario; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A.P.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; Cozzoni, B.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Leonardi, Emanuele; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Marchesini, P.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G.G.G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Molnar, P.; Monteleoni, B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muheim, F.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Produit, N.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruschmeier, D.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Sarakinos, M.E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zoller, M.

    2000-01-01

    The structure functions of real and virtual photons are derivedfrom cross section measurements of the reaction$\\rm e^+e^-\\rightarrow e^+e^- + \\hbox{hadrons}$ at LEP.The reaction is studied at $\\sqrt{\\rm {s}} \\simeq 91$ GeV with the L3detector. One of the final state electrons is detected at a large angle relative to the beam direction, leading to $Q^2$ values between40 GeV$^2$ and 500 GeV$^2$.The other final state electron is either undetected or it is detected ata four-momentum transfer squared $P^2$ between 1 GeV$^2$ and 8 GeV$^2$.These measurements are compared with predictions of the Quark PartonModel and other QCD based models.

  7. Unitarized model of inclusive and diffractive DIS with Q2 evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armesto, Nestor; Salgado, Carlos A.; Tywoniuk, Konrad; Kaidalov, Alexei B.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the interplay of low-x physics and QCD scaling violations by extending the unified approach describing inclusive structure functions and diffractive production in γ*p interactions proposed in previous papers to large values of Q 2 . We describe the procedure of extracting, from the nonperturbative model, initial conditions for the QCD evolution that respect unitarity. Assuming Regge factorization of the diffractive structure function, a similar procedure is proposed for the calculation of hard diffraction. The results are in good agreement with experimental data on the proton structure function F 2 and the most recent data on the reduced diffractive cross section, x P σ r D(3) . Predictions for both F 2 and F L are presented in a wide kinematical range and compared to calculations within high-energy QCD.

  8. Search for QCD Instanton-Induced Processes at HERA in the High-$Q^2$ Domain

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Vladimir; Begzsuren, Khurelbaatar; Belousov, Anatoli; Bolz, Arthur; Boudry, Vincent; Brandt, Gerhard; Brisson, Violette; Britzger, Daniel; Buniatyan, Armen; Bylinkin, Alexander; Bystritskaya, Lena; Campbell, Alan; Cantun Avila, Karla~Beatriz; Cerny, Karel; Chekelian, Vladimir; Contreras, Guillermo; Cvach, Jaroslav; Dainton, John; Daum, Karin; Diaconu, Cristinel; Dobre, Monica; Dodonov, Vitaliy; Eckerlin, Guenter; Egli, Stephan; Elsen, Eckhard; Favart, Laurent; Fedotov, Alexandre; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, Jozef; Fleischer, Manfred; Fomenko, Alexander; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gayler, Joerg; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, Lidia; Gogitidze, Nelly; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grab, Christoph; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, Dieter; Henderson, Rob~CW; Hladky, Jan; Hoffmann, Dirk; Horisberger, Roland; Hreus, Tomas; Huber, Florian; Jacquet, Marie; Janssen, Xavier; Jung, Hannes; Kapichine, Mikhail; Katzy, Judith; Kiesling, Christian; Klein, Max; Kleinwort, Claus; Kogler, Roman; Kostka, Peter; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krücker, Dirk; Krüger, K.; Landon, Murrough; Lange, Wolfgang; Laycock, Paul; Lebedev, Andrei; Levonian, Sergey; Lipka, Katerina; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Lobodzinski, Bogdan; Malinovski, Evgenij; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maxfield, Steve~J; Mehta, Andrew; Meyer, Andreas; Meyer, Hinrich; Meyer, Joachim; Mikocki, Stanislav; Morozov, Anatoly; Müller, Katharina; Naumann, Thomas; Newman, Paul~R; Niebuhr, Carsten; Nowak, Grazyna; Olsson, Jan~Erik; Ozerov, Dmitri; Pascaud, Christian; Patel, Girish; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrukhin, Alexey; Picuric, Ivana; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Pokorny, Boris; Polifka, Richard; Radescu, Voica; Raicevic, Natasa; Ravdandorj, Togoo; Reimer, Petr; Rizvi, Eram; Robmann, Peter; Roosen, Robert; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Rotaru, Marina; Rusakov, Serguei; Salek, David; Sankey, Dave~PC; Sauter, Michel; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Stefan; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schöning, Andre; Sefkow, Felix; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Soloviev, Yuri; Sopicki, Pawel; South, David; Spaskov, Vladimir; Specka, Arnd; Steder, Michael; Stella, Bruno; Straumann, Ulrich; Sykora, Tomas; Thompson, Paul; Traynor, Daniel; Truöl, Peter; Tsakov, Ivan; Tseepeldorj, Baatar; Turnau, Jacek; Valkarova, Alice; Vallee, Claude; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Vazdik, Iakov; Wegener, Dietrich; Wünsch, Eberhard; Zacek, Jozef; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zlebcik, Radek; Zohrabyan, Hamlet; Zomer, Fabian

    2016-07-07

    Signals of QCD instanton-induced processes are searched for in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering at the electron-proton collider HERA in the kinematic region defined by the Bjorken-scaling variable $x > 10^{-3}$, the inelasticity $0.2< y < 0.7$ and the photon virtuality $150 < Q^2 < 15000$ GeV$^2$. The search is performed using H1 data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ~$351$ pb$^{-1}$. No evidence for the production of QCD instanton-induced events is observed. Upper limits on the cross section for instanton-induced processes between $1.5$~pb and $6$~pb, at $95\\%$~ confidence level, are obtained depending on the kinematic domain in which instantons could be produced. Compared to earlier publications, the limits are improved by an order of magnitude and for the first time are challenging theory predictions.

  9. Dijet Production in Charged and Neutral Current $e^{+}p$ Interactions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Bernardi, G.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hoprich, W.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Kaufmann, O.; Kausch, M.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Krucker, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Kutuev, R.; Lachnit, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Metlica, F.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Siegmon, G.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; von Dombrowski, S.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wengler, T.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    Jet production in charged and neutral current events in the kinematic range of Q^2 from 640 to 35000 GeV^2 is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The measured rate of multi-jet events and distributions of jet polar angle, transverse energy, dijet mass, and other dijet variables are presented. Using parton densities derived from inclusive DIS cross sections, perturbative QCD calculations in NLO are found to give a consistent description of both the neutral and charged current dijet production. A direct, model independent comparison of the jet distributions in charged and neutral current events confirms that the QCD dynamics of the hadronic final state is independent of the underlying electroweak scattering process.

  10. Search for QCD instanton-induced processes at HERA in the high-Q2 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.

    2016-03-01

    Signals of QCD instanton-induced processes are searched for in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering at the electron-proton collider HERA in the kinematic region defined by the Bjorken-scaling variable x>10 -3 , the inelasticity 0.2Q 2 <15000 GeV 2 . The search is performed using H1 data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 351 pb -1 . No evidence for the production of QCD instanton-induced events is observed. Upper limits on the cross section for instanton-induced processes between 1.5 pb and 6 pb, at 95% confidence level, are obtained depending on the kinematic domain in which instantons could be produced. Compared to earlier publications, the limits are improved by an order of magnitude and for the first time are challenging theory predictions.

  11. Renormalization of dijet operators at order 1 /Q 2 in soft-collinear effective theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, Raymond; Inglis-Whalen, Matthew

    2018-05-01

    We make progress towards resummation of power-suppressed logarithms in dijet event shapes such as thrust, which have the potential to improve high-precision fits for the value of the strong coupling constant. Using a newly developed formalism for Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), we identify and compute the anomalous dimensions of all the operators that contribute to event shapes at order 1 /Q 2. These anomalous dimensions are necessary to resum power-suppressed logarithms in dijet event shape distributions, although an additional matching step and running of observable-dependent soft functions will be necessary to complete the resummation. In contrast to standard SCET, the new formalism does not make reference to modes or λ-scaling. Since the formalism does not distinguish between collinear and ultrasoft degrees of freedom at the matching scale, fewer subleading operators are required when compared to recent similar work. We demonstrate how the overlap subtraction prescription extends to these subleading operators.

  12. Strangeness production at low Q 2 in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, F. D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2009-05-01

    The production of neutral strange hadrons is investigated using deep-inelastic scattering events measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurements are made in the phase space defined by the negative four-momentum transfer squared of the photon 2< Q 2<100 GeV2 and the inelasticity 0.1< y<0.6. The K {/s 0} and \\varLambda(bar{\\varLambda}) production cross sections and their ratios are determined. K {/s 0} production is compared to the production of charged particles in the same region of phase space. The Λ- bar{\\varLambda} asymmetry is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. Predictions of leading order Monte Carlo programs are compared to the data.

  13. 31 CFR 30.3 - Q-3: How are the SEOs and most highly compensated employees identified for purposes of compliance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-3: How are the SEOs and most highly... GOVERNANCE § 30.3 Q-3: How are the SEOs and most highly compensated employees identified for purposes of... applicable to the most highly compensated employees, the determination of whether an employee is a most...

  14. Determination of the K/sub L/0 → π-μ+ν/sub μ/ form factor xi(q2) by muon polarization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, G.

    1975-09-01

    The polarization of the muon in the decay K 0 /sub L/ → π - μ + ν/sub μ/ was measured as a function of q 2 , the four-momentum transferred to the lepton pair. The kinematic information was used to compute the polarization expected on the basis of various assumed values of the form factor xi(q 2 ). By comparing the interpolated curve of the polarization as a function of xi(q 2 ) to the experimentally measured polarization, one has determined xi(q 2 ) as a function of q 2 . If one parameterizes the q 2 dependence of xi by xi(q 2 ) = xi(0) + Λ q 2 /m 2 /sub π/, then xi(0) = 0.178 +- 0.105 - 3.80 Λ

  15. Identification of highly brominated analogues of Q1 in marine mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuten, Emma L. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: emma.teuten@plymouth.ac.uk; Pedler, Byron E. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: bpedler@whoi.edu; Hangsterfer, Alexandra N. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: ahangsterfer@whoi.edu; Reddy, Christopher M. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: creddy@whoi.edu

    2006-11-15

    Three novel halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) have been identified in the blubber of marine mammals from coastal New England with the molecular formulae C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 6}Cl, C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 7}, and C{sub 9}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}Br{sub 5}Cl. They were identified using high and low resolution gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and appear to be highly brominated analogues of Q1, a heptachlorinated HOC suspected to be naturally produced. These compounds were found in Atlantic white sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), common dolphin (Delphinus delphis), Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus), harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) and a potential food source (Loligo pealei) with concentrations as high as 2.7 {mu}g/g (lipid weight). The regiospecificity of C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 6}Cl is suggestive of a biogenic origin. Debromination of C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 6}Cl may be significant in the formation of C{sub 9}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}Br{sub 5}Cl. - Three novel bioaccumulated compounds were identified as C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 6}Cl, C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 7} and C{sub 9}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}Br{sub 5}Cl.

  16. Electron-impact ionization of Pbq+ ions for q=1-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loch, S.D.; Ludlow, J.A.; Pindzola, M.S.; Scheuermann, F.; Kramer, K.; Fabian, B.; Huber, K.; Salzborn, E.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental crossed-beam measurements are compared for electron-impact single ionization of Pb q+ ions for q=1-10. We compare with two main theoretical methods. First, we check against configuration-average distorted-wave calculations, which include both direct-ionization and indirect excitation-autoionization contributions. Second, for ion stages Pb + through to Pb 5+ , we calculate the dominant excitation-autoionization channels using level-resolved distorted-wave theory to evaluate the excitation cross sections. We find that for ion stages Pb + , Pb 2+ , and Pb 3+ , distorted-wave theory significantly overestimates the total-ionization cross section, due to an overestimation of the direct-ionization cross section from the 5d subshell. For ion stages Pb 4+ through to Pb 10+ there is good agreement between theory and experiment. We find evidence for significant metastable fraction in the ion beam of the experiment for ion stages Pb 2+ , Pb 3+ , Pb 4+ , Pb 5+ , and Pb 6+ . For ion stage Pb 3+ we find that the level-resolved distorted-wave calculation of the excitation autoionization results in a slight reduction of the configuration-average theoretical results, due to splitting of levels within the autoionizing configurations. We also investigate two semiempirical methods of calculating the direct-ionization cross sections: namely, the Lotz method and the binary encounter Bethe method. We find that both methods provide results which are significantly lower than the distorted-wave method for the 5d-subshell direct ionization of Pb + , Pb 2+ , and Pb 3+ . For the higher ion stages, both methods are lower than the distorted-wave direct-ionization cross-section results, trending towards the distorted-wave results as the ion stage increases

  17. Investigation into the limits of perturbation theory at low Q"2 using HERA deep inelastic scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abt, I.; Myronenko, V.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.

    2017-01-01

    A phenomenological study of the final combined HERA data on inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) has been performed. The data are presented and investigated for a kinematic range extending from values of the four-momentum transfer, Q"2, above 10"4 GeV"2 down to the lowest values observable at HERA of Q"2=0.045 GeV"2 and Bjorken x, x_B_j=6.10"-"7. The data are well described by fits based on perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD) using collinear factorisation and evolution of the parton densities encompassed in the DGLAP formalism from the highest Q"2 down to Q"2 of a few GeV"2. The Regge formalism with the soft Pomeron pole can describe the data up to Q"2∼0.65 GeV"2. The complete data set can be described by a new fit using the Abramowicz-Levin-Levy-Maor (ALLM) parameterisation. The region between the Regge and the perturbative QCD regimes is of particular interest.

  18. Preventive and therapeutic effects of SkQ1-containing Visomitin eye drops against light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Yu P; Gancharova, O S; Eichler, O V; Philippov, P P; Grigoryan, E N

    2014-10-01

    The human retina is constantly affected by light of varying intensity, this being especially true for photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium. Traditionally, photoinduced damages of the retina are induced by visible light of high intensity in albino rats using the LIRD (light-induced retinal degeneration) model. This model allows study of pathological processes in the retina and the search for retinoprotectors preventing retinal photodamage. In addition, the etiology and mechanisms of retina damage in the LIRD model have much in common with the mechanisms of the development of age-related retinal disorders, in particular, with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have studied preventive and therapeutic effects of Visomitin eye drops (based on the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1) on albino rat retinas damaged by bright light. In the first series of experiments, rats receiving Visomitin for two weeks prior to illumination demonstrated significantly less expressed atrophic and degenerative changes in the retina compared to animals receiving similar drops with no SkQ1. In the second series, the illuminated rats were treated for two weeks with Visomitin or similar drops without SkQ1. The damaged retinas of the experimental animals were repaired much more effectively than those of the control animals. Therefore, we conclude that Visomitin SkQ1-containing eye drops have pronounced preventive and therapeutic effects on the photodamaged retina and might be recommended as a photoprotector and a pharmaceutical preparation for the treatment of AMD in combination with conventional medicines.

  19. Detection and molecular cloning of CYP74Q1 gene: identification of Ranunculus acris leaf divinyl ether synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorina, Svetlana S; Toporkova, Yana Y; Mukhtarova, Lucia S; Chechetkin, Ivan R; Khairutdinov, Bulat I; Gogolev, Yuri V; Grechkin, Alexander N

    2014-09-01

    Enzymes of the CYP74 family, including the divinyl ether synthase (DES), play important roles in plant cell signalling and defence. The potent DES activities have been detected before in the leaves of the meadow buttercup (Ranunculus acris L.) and few other Ranunculaceae species. The nature of these DESs and their genes remained unrevealed. The PCR with degenerate primers enabled to detect the transcript of unknown P450 gene assigned as CYP74Q1. Besides, two more CYP74Q1 isoforms with minimal sequence variations have been found. The full length recombinant CYP74Q1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The preferred substrates of this enzyme are the 13-hydroperoxides of α-linolenic and linoleic acids, which are converted to the divinyl ether oxylipins (ω5Z)-etherolenic acid, (9Z,11E)-12-[(1'Z,3'Z)-hexadienyloxy]-9,11-dodecadienoic acid, and (ω5Z)-etheroleic acid, (9Z,11E)-12-[(1'Z)-hexenyloxy]-9,11-dodecadienoic acid, respectively, as revealed by the data of mass spectrometry, NMR and UV spectroscopy. Thus, CYP74Q1 protein was identified as the R. acris DES (RaDES), a novel DES type and the opening member of new CYP74Q subfamily. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of SkQ1 Antioxidant on Structural and Functional Conditions of The Brain in PostResuscitation Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Lovat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to assess the efficacy of mitochondriatargeted antioxidant SkQ1 in prevention of structural and functional abnormalities of brain postresuscitation after cardiac arrest.Materials and methods. Adult male Wistar rats (n=19 underwent cardiac arrest for 7 minutes followed by resuscitation. Nine rats were administered with 500 nmol/kg SkQ1 per os with water for 2 weeks (1 week before and 1 week after resuscitation. A control group consisted of shamoperated animals (n=10. At days 4—6 post operation locomotor activity and anxiety («elevated plus maze» test and sensorimotor function of limbs («beam walking» test were examined. Total numbers of neurons per 1 mm of their layer length in vulnerable neuronal populations (cerebellar Purkinje cells and piramidal neurons of hippocampus fields CA1 and CA4 were estimated by histological analysis of the specimens stained with cresyl violet on day 7 postresuscitation. To identify possible mechanisms of SkQ1 action, the immunohistochemical study of a glialderived neurotrophic factor (GDNF expression in piramidal neurons of hippocampus was performed by indirect peroxidaseantiperoxidase method and antiGDNF primary polyclonal antibodies.Results. Ischemiareperfusion resulted in neuronal loss in all studied brain areas followed by reduction in locomotor activity and development of sensorimotor deficit. SkQ1 prevented development of postresuscitative locomotor and sensorimotor irregularities, significantly reduced Purkinje cells loss, prevented death of piramidal neurons in hippocampal field CA4, but not in CA1. Data demonstrated, that iIn Purkinje cells from resuscitated rats treated with SkQ1 there was a significant increase in number of GDNFpositive neurons, which were more resistant to ischemia (transition of GDNFnegative cells toward the category of cells actively expressing this factor that promoted their survival postresuscitation.Conclusion. Data confirm the positive effects of SkQ1

  1. Submillimetric Spectroscopic Observations of Volatiles in Comet C-2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVal-Borro, M.; Hartogh, P.; Jarchow, C.; Rengel, M.; Villanueva, G. L.; Kueppers, M.; Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.

    2012-01-01

    Submillimeter spectroscopic observations of comets provide an important tool for understanding their chemical composition and enable a taxonomic classification. Aims. We aim to determine the production rates of several parent- and product volatiles and the C-12/C-13 isotopic carbon ratio in the long-period comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), which is likely to originate from the Oort Cloud. Methods. The line emission from several molecules in the coma was measured with high signal-to-noise ratio in January 2005 at heliocentric distance of 1.2 AU by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) at the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Results. We have obtained production rates of several volatiles (CH3OH, HCN, H(sup 13)CN, HNC, H2CO, CO, and CS) by comparing the observed and simulated line-integrated intensities. We calculated the synthetic profiles using a radiative transfer code that includes collisions between neutrals and electrons, and the effects of radiative pumping of the fundamental vibrational levels by solar infrared radiation. Furthermore, multiline observations of the CH3OH J = 7-6 series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We find that the CH3OH population distribution of the levels sampled by these lines can be described by a rotational temperature of 40 +/- 3 K. Derived mixing ratios relative to hydrogen cyanide are CO/CH3OH/H2CO/CS/HNC/HC-13N/HCN= 30.9/24.6/4.8/0.57/0.031/0.013/1 assuming a pointing offset of 8" due to the uncertain ephemeris at the time of the observations and the telescope pointing error. Conclusions. The measured relative molecular abundances in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) are between low- to typical values of those obtained in Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that it has visited the inner solar system previously and undergone thermal processing. The HNC/HCN abundance ratio of approx 3.1% is comparable to that found in other comets, accounting for the

  2. Measurements of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2 ) for 0.7 ≤ Q2 ≤ 6.0 (GeV/c) 2 at Jefferson Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Breton, V.; Deur, A.; Fonvieille, H.; Jaminion, S.; Jutier, C.; Lavessiere, G.; Ravel, O.; Roblin, Y.; Aniol, K.A.; Epstein, M.B.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Howell, C.; Boeglin, W.U.; Kramer, L.H.; Markowitz, P.; Sarty, A.J.; Degrande, N.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Baker, F.T.; Templon, J.A.; Mougey, J.Y.; Gasparian, A.; Madey, R.; Wilson, R.; De Leo, R.; Leone, A.; Perrino, R.; Cisbani, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Iodice, M.; Urciuoli, G.M.; Anderson, B.D.; Katramatou, A.T.; Khayat, M.; Madey, R.; Manley, D.M.; Petratos, G.G.; Prout, D.L.; Suleiman, R.; Watson, J.W.; Zhang, W.; Dale, D.S.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Gorbenko, V.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Sorokin, P.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C.; Ewell, L.A.; Kelly, J.J.; Bertozzi, W.; Fissum, K.G.; Gao, H.; Gao, J.; Gilad, S.; Liyanage, N.; Rowntree, D.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The deuteron elastic structure function A(Q 2 ) has been extracted in the range 0.7≤Q 2 ≤6.0 (GeV /c) 2 from cross section measurements of elastic electron-deuteron scattering in coincidence using the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Laboratory. The data are compared to theoretical models, based on the impulse approximation with the inclusion of meson-exchange currents, and to predictions of quark dimensional scaling and perturbative quantum chromodynamics. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  3. Measurement of D*± production at low Q2 with the beam-pipe calorimeter of ZEUS at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irrgang, P.

    2004-12-01

    The production of D* mesons in deep-inelastic ep-scattering has been studied using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The total D* production cross-section and the differential cross-sections as functions of Q 2 , y, p t (D*) and η(D*) have been measured at low Q 2 . The data sample used was collected during the period 1998-2000 and amounts to an integrated luminosity of 82.2 pb -1 . The low Q 2 region could be reached using the beam-pipe calorimeter which measures the scattered electron at very small angles. Therefore special emphasis was put on the calibration of the BPC in order to reconstruct events in the kinematic range 0.05 2 2 and 0.02 * +→K - π + π - and the charged conjugated decay in the kinematic region 1.5 t (D*) 2 in agreement with the corresponding perturbative QCD predictions. (orig.)

  4. Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at High Q2 with Longitudinally Polarised Lepton Beams at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kramer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive e\\pmp single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were taken at a centre-of-mass energy of \\surds = 319GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 333.7 pb-1 shared between two lepton beam charges and two longitudinal lepton polarisation modes. The differential cross sections are measured in the range of negative fourmomentum transfer squared, Q2, between 60 and 50 000GeV2, and Bjorken x between 0.0008 and 0.65. The measurements are combined with earlier published unpolarised H1 data to improve statistical precision and used to determine the structure function xF_3^gammaZ. A measurement of the neutral current parity violating structure function F_2^gammaZ is presented for the first time. The polarisation dependence of the charged current total cross section is also measured. The new measurements are well described by a next-to-leading order QCD fit based on all published H1 inclusi...

  5. STABILITY OF DOW CORNING Q2-3183A ANTIFOAM IN IRRADIATED HYDROXIDE SOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Calloway, B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the stability of Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam to radiation and aqueous hydroxide solutions. Initial foam control studies with Hanford tank waste showed the antifoam reduced foaming. The antifoam was further tested using simulated Hanford tank waste spiked with antifoam that was heated and irradiated (2.1 x 10 4 rad/h) at conditions (90 C, 3 M NaOH, 8 h) expected in the processing of radioactive waste through the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford. After irradiation, the concentration of the major polymer components polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG) in the antifoam was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). No loss of the major polymer components was observed after 24 h and only 15 wt% loss of PDMS was reported after 48 h. The presence of degradation products were not observed by gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) or high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). G values were calculated from the GPC analysis and tabulated. The findings indicate the antifoam is stable for 24 h after exposure to gamma radiation, heat, and alkaline simulated waste

  6. KS0 production at high Q2 in deep inelastic ep scattering at H1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Tabasco, Julia Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    The production of K S 0 mesons is studied using deep-inelastic scattering events (DIS) recorded with the H1 detector at the HERA ep collider. The measurements are performed in the phase space defined by the four-momentum transfer squared of the photon, 145 GeV 2 2 . The differential production cross sections of the K S 0 meson are presented as function of the kinematic variables Q 2 and x, the transverse momentum p T and the pseudorapidity η of the particle in laboratory frame, and as function of the momentum fraction x p BF and transverse momentum p T BF in the Breit Frame. Moreover, the K S 0 production rate is compared to the production of charged particles and to the production of DIS events in the same region of phase space. The data are compared to theoretical predictions, based on leading order Monte Carlo programs with matched parton showers. The Monte Carlo models are also used for studies of the flavour contribution to the K S 0 production and parton density function dependence. (orig.)

  7. Res-Parity: Parity Violation in Inelastic scattering at Low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Reimer; Peter Bosted; John Arrington; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Xiaochao Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Parity violating electron scattering has become a well established tool which has been used, for example, to probe the Standard Model and the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon. While much of this work has focused on elastic scattering, the RES-Parity experiment, which has been proposed to take place at Jefferson Laboratory, would focus on inelastic scattering in the low-Q 2 , low-W domain. RES-Parity would search for evidence of quark-hadron duality and resonance structure with parity violation in the resonance region. In terms of parity violation, this region is essentially unexplored, but the interpretation of other high-precision electron scattering experiments will rely on a reasonable understanding of scattering at lower energy and low-W through the effects of radiative corrections. RES-Parity would also study nuclear effects with the weak current. Because of the intrinsic broad band energy spectrum of neutrino beams, neutrino experiments are necessarily dependent on an untested, implicit assumption that these effects are identical to electromagnetic nuclear effects. RES-Parity is a relatively straight forward experiment. With a large expected asymmetry (∼ 0.5 x 10 -4 ) these studies may be completed with in a relatively brief period

  8. Measurement of Exclusive $\\rho^0 \\rho^0$ Production in Two-Photon Collisions at High $Q^2$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2003-01-01

    Exclusive rho rho production in two-photon collisions involving a single highly virtual photon is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 89GeV rho rho is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2 and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, Wgg, in the kinematic region: 1.2GeV^2 < Q^2 < 30GeV^2 and 1.1GeV < Wgg < 3GeV.

  9. Measurement of the total photon-photon cross section for the production of hadrons at small Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Deuter, A.; Genzel, H.; Lackas, W.; Pielorz, J.; Raupach, F.; Wagner, W.; Bussey, P.J.; Cartwright, S.L.; Dainton, J.B.; King, B.T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Thomson, J.C.; Achterberg, O.; Blobel, V.; Burkart, D.; Diehlmann, K.; Feindt, M.; Kapitza, H.; Koppitz, B.; Krueger, M.; Poppe, M.; Spitzer, H.; Staa, R. van; Almeida, F.; Baecker, A.; Barreiro, F.; Brandt, S.; Derikum, K.; Grupen, C.; Meyer, H.J.; Mueller, H.; Neumann, B.; Rost, M.; Stupperich, K.; Zech, G.; Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Gnat, Y.; Grunhaus, J.; Junge, H.; Kraski, K.; Maxeiner, C.; Maxeiner, H.; Meyer, H.; Schmidt, D.; Buerger, J.; Criegee, L.; Ferrarotto, F.; Franke, G.; Gaspero, M.; Gerke, C.; Knies, G.; Lewendel, B.; Meyer, J.; Michelsen, U.; Pape, K.H.; Stella, B.; Timm, U.; Winter, G.G.; Zachara, M.; Zimmermann, W.

    1984-09-01

    The total photon-photon cross section for the production of hadrons, sigmasub(γγ)(W,Q 2 ), has been measured in the single tag condition for 0.1 2 2 and 1.5 2 dependence of sigmasub(γγ) averaged over W can be described by GVDM. The dependence of sigmasub(γγ) on the mass W of the hadronic final state has been extracted at Q 2 =0.44 GeV 2 by unfolding the effects of experimental resolution and acceptance. The cross section is found to rise at small W. The result is compared with VDM and the parton model. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of Exclusive $\\rho^+ \\rho^-$ Production in High-$Q^2$ Two-Photon Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2004-01-01

    Exclusive rho^+ rho^- production in two-photon collisions involving a single highly-virtual photon is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 89 GeV rho^+ rho^- is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2, and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, W_gg, in the kinematic region: 1.2 GeV^2 rho^0 rho^0, measured in the same kinematic region by L3, and to have similar W_gg and Q^2 dependences.

  11. A measurement of the Q2, W and t dependences of deeply virtual Compton scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering, γ*p → γp, has been measured in e + p collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 61.1 pb -1 . Cross sections are presented as a function of the photon virtuality, Q 2 , and photon-proton centre-of-mass energy, W, for a wide region of the phase space, Q 2 > 1.5 GeV 2 and 40 -1 , is used for the first direct measurement of the differential cross section as a function of t, where t is the square of the four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex.

  12. A-dependence of nuclear transparency in quasielastic A(e,e'p) at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, T.G.; Lorenzon, W.; Arrington, J.

    1994-01-01

    The A-dependence of the quasielastic A(e,e'p) reaction has been studied with 3 H, C, Fe, and Au nuclei at momentum transfers Q 2 = 1, 3, 5, and 6.8(GeV/c) 2 . The authors extract the nuclear transparency T(A,Q 2 ), a measure of the average probability of escape of a proton from a nucleus A. Several calculations predict a significant increase in T with momentum transfer, a phenomenon known as color transparency. No statistically significant rise is seen for any of the nuclei studied

  13. Measurement of the Proton Structure Function $F_{2}$ at low $Q^{2}$ in QED Compton Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    The proton structure function F_2(x,Q^2) is measured in inelastic QED Compton scattering using data collected with the H1 detector at HERA. QED Compton events are used to access the kinematic range of very low virtualities of the exchanged photon, Q^2, down to 0.5 GeV^2, and Bjorken x up to \\sim 0.06, a region which has not been covered previously by inclusive measurements at HERA. The results are in agreement with the measurements from fixed target lepton-nucleon scattering experiments.

  14. A measurement of the Q2, W and t dependences of deeply virtual Compton scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering, γ * p→γp, has been measured in e + p collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 61.1 pb -1 . Cross sections are presented as a function of the photon virtuality, Q 2 , and photon-proton centre-of-mass energy, W, for a wide region of the phase space, Q 2 >1.5 GeV 2 and 40 -1 , is used for the first direct measurement of the differential cross section as a function of t, where t is the square of the four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex. (orig.)

  15. The research of preparing methodology and pharmacokinetics for a novel myocardial perfusion imaging agent 99Tcm-Q3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yunchun; Tan Tianzhi; Fan Chengzhong; Kuang Anren; Liang Zhenglu

    1999-01-01

    The preparing methodology and pharmacokinetics of myocardial perfusion imaging agent 99 Tc m -Q 3 are studied. The optimum scheme of 99 Tc m labelling on the basis of exploring the effects of varied labelled condition on radiochemical purity is established by multivariate orthogonal experimental design. The pharmacokinetics is investigated in rabbits, and the plasma protein binding rate is also measured. '30 μL of 1 mol/L KOH in 50% ethanol, 20 μL of 2 g/L SnCl 2 ·2H 2 O in degassed ethanol, 20 mg of N,N'-ethylene-bis (acetylacetone imine) and 5 mg of tris (3-methoxy-1-propyl) phosphine' are chosen as the optimum scheme of this labelled complex. Each of the factors exists significant effect on the radiochemical purity and there is no one-class cross effect on the radiochemical purity between them. The pharmacokinetics of 99 Tc m -Q 3 conform to two-compartment model with 0.23 +- 0.09 mL/min of excellent blood clearance, an initial half-time of 1.6 +- 0.4 min and a late half-time of 203.0 +- 25.8 min. In vitro protein binding rate is lower

  16. A measurement of the proton’s spin structure function g2 at low Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Pengjia [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2015-10-21

    JLab E08-027, a measurement of g2p and the longitudinal-transverse (LT) spin polarizability, successfully collected data from March to May, 2012. Nucleon spin structure study has been an active research area, which has attracted a very large effort from both experimentalists and theorists. The spin structure study for the last 2 decades has provided us with many exciting and often surprising results. Recently, new precision results in the low-to-intermediate momentum transfer Q2 region from JLab have provided extensive information on the nucleon structure in the confinement region and the transition region between asymptotic free to confinement. In particular, the extensive comparisons of experimental results with Chiral Perturbation Theory (the effective theory of QCD at low energy) calculations show general good agreements, but strong disagreement in the case of the neutron LT spin polarizability. This experiment completed the measurements of gp2 and the LT spin polarizability on the proton in the low-to-intermediate Q2 region. The experiment used a polarized proton (NH3) target for the first time in Hall A. Scattered electrons were detected by a pair of Hall A high resolution spectrometer (HRS) with a pair of septum magnets. To avoid too much depolarization of the target, beam current was limited to 50-100 nA during the experiment. Since the existing beam current monitors (BCMs), beam position monitors (BPMs) and calibration methods did not work at such a low current range, new BPM and BCM receivers were designed and used for current condition. A pair of super-harps and a tungsten calorimeter were installed to calibrate the BPMs and BCMs. To compensate for the effect of the 2.5/5T transverse magnet field, two chicane dipole magnets were installed. A pair of slow rasters were installed for the first time in Hall A, combining with a pair of fast raster. The standard Hall A DAQ system and the improved high resolution DAQ system were used to record the detector

  17. Jets at high Q2 at HERA and test beam measurements with the EUDET pixel telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, Joerg

    2010-09-01

    In this thesis the measurement of inclusive dijet and trijet cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA is presented. The kinematic phase space of the measurement was defined by 125 2 2 and 0.2 2 and y are the virtuality and the inelasticity, respectively. The data sample was taken during the years 1998-2000 and 2004-2007 with the ZEUS detector and corresponded to an integrated luminosity of 374 pb -1 . The inclusive k t jet algorithm was applied to the massless final-state objects in the Breit reference frame. The cross sections referred to jets with E T,B jet >8 GeV and -1 LAB jet 3/2 , between the cross sections for trijet and dijet production was determined as a function of the average transverse jet energy in the Breit frame, E T,B jet , in intervals of Q 2 . The quantity R 3/2 was utilised for an extraction of the strong coupling, α s , with partially reduced systematic uncertainties. The extracted value was in agreement with the world average value of α s . In a second part, test-beam measurements were performed with the EUDET pixel telescope. During the work for this thesis, the online-monitoring software was improved, the MIMOSA 26 sensors were integrated into the offline analysis software and the first data taken with these sensors were analysed. The first data were taken with the demonstrator telescope together with three MIMOSA 26 sensors that were operated as devices-under-test. The second data sample was taken with a telescope that consisted of six MIMOSA 26 sensors, of which five could be used. The single-point resolution and the detection efficiency were determined and found to be consistent with the expectation. (orig.)

  18. Q2 - a very low level quantitative and qualitative waste assay and release certification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronson, F.L.

    1990-01-01

    Low level radioactive waste disposal is very expensive, especially when all of the handling transportation and documentation costs are included. However for most generators, a large fraction of this low level waste is not contaminated at all, or only slightly so. The paper describes the development and performance of a low level counter that is convenient to use, and that can accurately identify and quantify the radioactivity of any gamma emitter thing that can be placed in a 55 gallon (200 liter) container. These measurement results can be used to verify the absence of radioactivity at a very low levels (10 nCi (370 Bq)/sample), and to identify the nuclides and quantities present, while differentiating against natural radioactivity (Radium, Thorium, Potassium). These results can be used as part of a 10CFR20.302 waste stream exemption program, and thus allow significant savings and a less than 1 year payback at a typical nuclear power plant. The Q1 system is fully shielded to allow it's use in the low level radwaste storage area. The detectors are either 3 Intrinsic Germanium detectors or 2 large NaI detectors. The software is fully automated for simple operation. Correlation factors can be entered to estimate non-gamma emitters from pre-established correlations to other nuclides. Typical Ge detector sensitivities are 8 nCi (300 Bq) LLD for Cs-137 at 0.8 g/cc for a 10 minute count time. NaI detector systems can achieve the same LLD in a 1 minute count. 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. What can be learned from a precise measurement of the deuteron A(q2) structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platchkov, S.

    1989-01-01

    New accurate measurements of the deuteron A(q 2 ) structure function for momentum transfers between 1 and 18 fm -2 are reported. Data are compared to several representative theoretical predictions. The neutron electric form factor is inferred from the data and its model dependence is discussed

  20. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current cross-sections with longitudinally polarised positrons with the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Trevor P.

    2012-07-01

    The cross sections for neutral current (NC) deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in e + p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are measured at high momentum transfer squared (Q 2 >185 GeV 2 ) at the ZEUS detector at HERA. The HERA accelerator provides e ± p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, which allows the weak contribution to the NC process to be studied at high Q 2 . The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb -1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007. The single differential NC cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the reduced cross section σ are measured. The structure function xF 3 is determined by combining the e + p NC reduced cross sections with the previously measured e - p measurements. The interference structure function xF 3 γZ is extracted at Q 2 =1500 GeV 2 . The cross-section asymmetry between the positive and negative polarisation of the positron beam is measured and the parity violation effects of the electroweak interaction are observed. The predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics agree well with the measurements. (orig.)

  1. On P-Adic Quasi Gibbs Measures for Q + 1-State Potts Model on the Cayley Tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedov, Farrukh

    2010-06-01

    In the present paper we introduce a new class of p-adic measures, associated with q +1-state Potts model, called p-adic quasi Gibbs measure, which is totally different from the p-adic Gibbs measure. We establish the existence p-adic quasi Gibbs measures for the model on a Cayley tree. If q is divisible by p, then we prove the occurrence of a strong phase transition. If q and p are relatively prime, then there is a quasi phase transition. These results are totally different from the results of [F.M.Mukhamedov, U.A. Rozikov, Indag. Math. N.S. 15(2005) 85-100], since q is divisible by p, which means that q + 1 is not divided by p, so according to a main result of the mentioned paper, there is a unique and bounded p-adic Gibbs measure (different from p-adic quasi Gibbs measure). (author)

  2. Coulomb sums for 7Li nucleus at 3-momentum transfers q=1,250...1,625 fm-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buki, A.Yu.; Shevchenko, N.G.; Timchenko, I.S.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental response functions of 7 Li nucleus at effective 3-momentum transfers q = 1.250; 1.375; 1.500 and 1.625 fm -1 are presented. The longitudinal response functions were used to evaluate the Coulomb sum values. The Coulomb sums for 6 Li obtained by us earlier were applied to analyze these data. The Coulomb sums of lithium isotopes were compared with the well-known Coulomb sums values of the other nuclei

  3. Measurement of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton in virtual Compton scattering at Q2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laveissière, G; Todor, L; Degrande, N; Jaminion, S; Jutier, C; Di Salvo, R; Van Hoorebeke, L; Alexa, L C; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K A; Arundell, K; Audit, G; Auerbach, L; Baker, F T; Baylac, M; Berthot, J; Bertin, P Y; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Boeglin, W U; Brash, E J; Breton, V; Breuer, H; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cardman, L S; Cavata, C; Chang, C-C; Chen, J-P; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Dale, D S; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A; d'Hose, N; Dodge, G E; Domingo, J J; Elouadrhiri, L; Epstein, M B; Ewell, L A; Finn, J M; Fissum, K G; Fonvieille, H; Fournier, G; Frois, B; Frullani, S; Furget, C; Gao, H; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gomez, J; Gorbenko, V; Grenier, P; Guichon, P A M; Hansen, J O; Holmes, R; Holtrop, M; Howell, C; Huber, G M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Incerti, S; Iodice, M; Jardillier, J; Jones, M K; Kahl, W; Kato, S; Katramatou, A T; Kelly, J J; Kerhoas, S; Ketikyan, A; Khayat, M; Kino, K; Kox, S; Kramer, L H; Kumar, K S; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Leone, A; LeRose, J J; Liang, M; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Madey, R; Maeda, K; Malov, S; Manley, D M; Marchand, C; Marchand, D; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marroncle, J; Martino, J; McCormick, K; McIntyre, J; Mehrabyan, S; Merchez, F; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Miller, G W; Mougey, J Y; Nanda, S K; Neyret, D; Offermann, E A J M; Papandreou, Z; Pasquini, B; Perdrisat, C F; Perrino, R; Petratos, G G; Platchkov, S; Pomatsalyuk, R; Prout, D L; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Quémenér, G; Ransome, R D; Ravel, O; Real, J S; Renard, F; Roblin, Y; Rowntree, D; Rutledge, G; Rutt, P M; Saha, A; Saito, T; Sarty, A J; Serdarevic, A; Smith, T; Smirnov, G; Soldi, K; Sorokin, P; Souder, P A; Suleiman, R; Templon, J A; Terasawa, T; Tieulent, R; Tomasi-Gustaffson, E; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Vanderhaeghen, M; Van De Vyver, R; Van der Meer, R L J; Vernin, P; Vlahovic, B; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zainea, D G; Zhang, W-M; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z-L

    2004-09-17

    We report a virtual Compton scattering study of the proton at low c.m. energies. We have determined the structure functions P(LL)-P(TT)/epsilon and P(LT), and the electric and magnetic generalized polarizabilities (GPs) alpha(E)(Q2) and beta(M)(Q2) at momentum transfer Q(2)=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2. The electric GP shows a strong falloff with Q2, and its global behavior does not follow a simple dipole form. The magnetic GP shows a rise and then a falloff; this can be interpreted as the dominance of a long-distance diamagnetic pion cloud at low Q2, compensated at higher Q2 by a paramagnetic contribution from piN intermediate states.

  4. A UNIFORM SEARCH FOR SECONDARY ECLIPSES OF HOT JUPITERS IN KEPLER Q2 LIGHT CURVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, J. L.; López-Morales, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of searching the Kepler Q2 public data set for the secondary eclipses of 76 hot Jupiter planet candidates from the list of 1235 candidates published by Borucki et al. This search has been performed by modeling both the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curves and new light curves produced via our own photometric pipeline. We derive new stellar and planetary parameters for each system, while calculating robust errors for both. We find 16 systems with 1σ-2σ, 14 systems with 2σ-3σ, and 6 systems with >3σ confidence level secondary eclipse detections in at least one light curve produced via the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curve or our own pipeline; however, results can vary depending on the light curve modeled and whether eccentricity is allowed to vary or not. We estimate false alarm probabilities of 31%, 10%, and 6% for the 1σ-2σ, 2σ-3σ, and >3σ confidence intervals, respectively. Comparing each secondary eclipse result to theoretical expectations, we find that the majority of detected planet candidates emit more light than expected owing to thermal blackbody emission in the optical Kepler bandpass, and present a trend of increasing excess emission with decreasing maximum effective planetary temperature. These results agree with previously published optical secondary eclipse data for other hot Jupiters. We explore modeling biases, significant planetary albedos, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium or other thermal emission, significant internal energy generation, and misidentification of brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, or stellar blends as possible causes of both the excess emission and its correlation with expected planetary temperature. Although we find that no single cause is able to explain all of the planet candidates, significant planetary albedos, with a general trend of increasing planetary albedos with decreasing atmospheric temperatures, are able to explain most of the systems. Identifying

  5. Q2 Dependence of Quadrupole Strength in the gamma*p-->Delta+(1232) --> p pi0 Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volker Burkert; Kyungseon Joo; Lee Smith; Ralph Minehart

    2002-01-01

    Models of baryon structure predict a small quadrupole deformation of the nucleon due to residual tensor forces between quarks or distortions from the pion cloud. Sensitivity to quark versus pion degrees of freedom occurs through the Q 2 dependence of the magnetic (M 1+ ), electric (E 1+ ), and scalar (S 1+ ) multipoles in the γ*p → Δ + (1232) → pπ 0 transition. New precision measurements of the ratios E 1+ /M 1+ and S 1+ /M 1+ are reported here over the range Q 2 = 0.4-1.8 GeV 2 . Results are best described by recent unitary models in which the pion cloud plays a dominant role

  6. Measurement of Inclusive Jet Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at High Q$^{2}$ and Determination of the Strong Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    Inclusive jet production is studied in neutral current deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at large four momentum transfer squared Q^2>150 GeV^2 with the H1 detector at HERA. Single and double differential inclusive jet cross sections are measured as a function of Q^2 and of the transverse energy E_T of the jets in the Breit frame. The measurements are found to be well described by calculations at next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD. The running of the strong coupling is demonstrated and the value of alpha_s(M_Z) is determined. The ratio of the inclusive jet cross section to the inclusive neutral current cross section is also measured and used to extract a precise value for alpha_s(M_Z)=0.1193+/-0.0014(exp.)^{+0.0047}_{-0.0030}(th.)+/-0.0016(pdf).

  7. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via γ*p→nπ+ at high Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K.; Gothe, R. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Boiarinov, S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Y.; Tkachenko, S.; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the nπ+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum-rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4π CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the π-N multipole E0+/GD were measured using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.

  8. Production of the Q2 doubly excited states of the hydrogen molecule by electron impact in a single step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Leonardo O.; Rocha, Alexandre B.; Faria, Nelson Velho de Castro; Jalbert, Ginette

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the single step cross sections for excitation of Q 2 states of H2 and its subsequent dissociation. The cross section calculations were performed within the first Born approximation and the electronic wave functions were obtained via State-Averaged Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field followed by Configuration Interaction. We have assumed autoionization is the only important process competing with dissociation into neutral atoms. We have estimated its probability through a semi classical approach and compared with results of literature. Special attention was given to the Q 2 1Σg +(1) state which, as has been shown in a previous work, may dissociate into H(2 sσ) + H(2 sσ) fragments (some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version).

  9. On the measurability of the structure function g1(x,Q2) in ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.

    1995-08-01

    The possibility is investigated to measure the polarized structure function g 1 (x, Q 2 ) in the collider mode of HERA operating with a polarized lepton and proton beam. The x dependence of g 1 can be measured at a statistical precision of ∝15% to 70% in the range 0.0005 2 > 2 at beam polarizations λ p ∝λ e =0.8 and L int =60 pb -1 . (orig.)

  10. Measurement of the Elastic Ep Cross Section at Q2 = 0.66, 1.10, 1.51 and 1.65 Gev2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The nucleon form factors have been investigated by physicists for decades because of their fundamental importance. The world data of the proton magnetic form factor GMp has been focused on Q2 lower than 5 GeV2 and they have large uncertainties at higher Q2. Jefferson Lab experiment E12-07-108 aims to improve the accuracy of the e ? p elastic cross section to better than 2% over a Q2 range of 7 ? 14 GeV2. From 2015 to 2016, the e ? p elastic cross section was measured over a wide range of Q2 from 0.66 ? 12.56 GeV2 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, USA. An unpolarized electron beam was scattered o? a cryogenic hydrogen target and the scattered electron was detected in the high resolution spectrometers. This thesis focuses on the cross section calculations of the data taken in the spring of 2015, where Q2 = 0.66, 1.10, 1.51 and 1.66 GeV2. At Q2 = 0.66 GeV2, an uncertainty < 3% was achieved and < 5% was achieved for the other three Q2 at the moment. The results were compared with the world data and the good agreement provides confidence for the experimental measurements at higher Q2.

  11. Investigating the prevalence of queuine in Escherichia coli RNA via incorporation of the tritium-labeled precursor, preQ1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Allen F.; Vélez-Martínez, Carol S.; Hollis Showalter, H.D.; Garcia, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Escherichia coli cells deficient in preQ 1 biosynthesis can utilize exogenous preQ 1 from growth media. ► Exogenous radiolabeled preQ 1 is incorporated into cellular RNA in both wild-type and preQ 1 deficient cells. ► Radiolabeled preQ 1 is incorporated into RNAs of differing sizes larger than tRNA. ► Analysis of isolated ribosomes shows that radiolabeled preQ 1 is incorporated into ribosomal RNA. ► The conclusion of this study is that queuine is incorporated into many other RNAs in addition to the known tRNAs. -- Abstract: There are over 100 modified bases that occur in RNA with the majority found in transfer RNA. It has been widely believed that the queuine modification is limited to four transfer RNA species in vivo. However, given the vast amount of the human genome (60–70%) that is transcribed into non-coding RNA (Mattick ), probing the presence of modified bases in these RNAs is of fundamental importance. The mechanism of incorporation of queuine, via transglycosylation, makes this uniquely poised to probe base modification in RNA. Results of incubations of Escherichia coli cell cultures with [ 3 H] preQ 1 (a queuine precursor in eubacteria) clearly demonstrate preQ 1 incorporation into a number of RNA species of various sizes larger than transfer RNA. Specifically, significant levels of preQ 1 incorporation into ribosomal RNA are observed. The modification of other large RNAs was also observed. These results confirm that non-coding RNAs contain modified bases and lead to the supposition that these modifications are necessary to control non-coding RNA structure and function as has been shown for transfer RNA.

  12. Radial flow in non-extensive thermodynamics and study of particle spectra at LHC in the limit of small (q - 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Khuntia, Arvind; Pareek, Pooja; Sahoo, Raghunath; Cleymans, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We expand the Tsallis distribution in a Taylor series of powers of (q - 1), where q is the Tsallis parameter, assuming q is very close to 1. This helps in studying the degree of deviation of transverse momentum spectra and other thermodynamic quantities from a thermalized Boltzmann distribution. After checking thermodynamic consistency, we provide analytical results for the Tsallis distribution in the presence of collective flow up to the first order of (q - 1). The formulae are compared with the experimental data. (orig.)

  13. Radial flow in non-extensive thermodynamics and study of particle spectra at LHC in the limit of small (q - 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Khuntia, Arvind; Pareek, Pooja; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India); Cleymans, Jean [University of Cape Town, UCT-CERN Research Centre and Department of Physics, Rondebosch (South Africa)

    2016-02-15

    We expand the Tsallis distribution in a Taylor series of powers of (q - 1), where q is the Tsallis parameter, assuming q is very close to 1. This helps in studying the degree of deviation of transverse momentum spectra and other thermodynamic quantities from a thermalized Boltzmann distribution. After checking thermodynamic consistency, we provide analytical results for the Tsallis distribution in the presence of collective flow up to the first order of (q - 1). The formulae are compared with the experimental data. (orig.)

  14. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants SkQ1 and MitoTEMPO Failed to Exert a Long-Term Beneficial Effect in Murine Polymicrobial Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Rademann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species have been deemed an important contributor in sepsis pathogenesis. We investigated whether two mitochondria-targeted antioxidants (mtAOX; SkQ1 and MitoTEMPO improved long-term outcome, lessened inflammation, and improved organ homeostasis in polymicrobial murine sepsis. 3-month-old female CD-1 mice (n=90 underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP and received SkQ1 (5 nmol/kg, MitoTEMPO (50 nmol/kg, or vehicle 5 times post-CLP. Separately, 52 SkQ1-treated CLP mice were sacrificed at 24 h and 48 h for additional endpoints. Neither MitoTEMPO nor SkQ1 exerted any protracted survival benefit. Conversely, SkQ1 exacerbated 28-day mortality by 29%. CLP induced release of 10 circulating cytokines, increased urea, ALT, and LDH, and decreased glucose but irrespectively of treatment. Similar occurred for CLP-induced lymphopenia/neutrophilia and the NO blood release. At 48 h post-CLP, dying mice had approximately 100-fold more CFUs in the spleen than survivors, but this was not SkQ1 related. At 48 h, macrophage and granulocyte counts increased in the peritoneal lavage but irrespectively of SkQ1. Similarly, hepatic mitophagy was not altered by SkQ1 at 24 h. The absence of survival benefit of mtAOX may be due to the extended treatment and/or a relatively moderate-risk-of-death CLP cohort. Long-term effect of mtAOX in abdominal sepsis appears different to sepsis/inflammation models arising from other body compartments.

  15. The Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SkQ1 Downregulates Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Genes in the Retina of OXYS Rats with AMD-Like Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Perepechaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 is a novel drug thought to retard development of age-related diseases. It has been shown that SkQ1 reduces clinical signs of retinopathy in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats, which are a known animal model of human age-related macular degeneration (AMD. The aim of this work was to test whether SkQ1 affects transcriptional activity of AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, which are considered as AMD-associated genes in the retina of OXYS and Wistar rats. Our results showed that only AhR and AhR-dependent genes were sensitive to SkQ1. Dietary supplementation with SkQ1 decreased the AhR mRNA level in both OXYS and Wistar rats. At baseline, the retinal Cyp1a1 mRNA level was lower in OXYS rats. SkQ1 supplementation decreased the Cyp1a1 mRNA level in Wistar rats, but this level remained unchanged in OXYS rats. Baseline Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 mRNA expression was stronger in OXYS than in Wistar rats. In the OXYS strain, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 mRNA levels decreased as a result of SkQ1 supplementation. These data suggest that the Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 enzymes are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD-like retinopathy of OXYS rats and are possible therapeutic targets of SkQ1.

  16. Observation of the Hadronic Final State Charge Asymmetry in High Q^2 Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-01-01

    A first measurement is presented of the charge asymmetry in the hadronic final state from the hard interaction in deep-inelastic ep neutral current scattering at HERA. The measurement is performed in the range of negative squared four momentum transfer 100<Q^2<8,000 GeV^2. The difference between the event normalised distributions of the scaled momentum, x_p, for positively and negatively charged particles, measured in the current region of the Breit frame, is studied together with its evolution as a function of Q. The results are compared to Monte Carlo models at the hadron and parton level.

  17. Strange magnetic form factor of the proton at $Q^2 = 0.23$ GeV$^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ping; Leinweber, Derek; Thomas, Anthony; Young, Ross

    2009-06-01

    We determine the $u$ and $d$ quark contributions to the proton magnetic form factor at finite momentum transfer by applying chiral corrections to quenched lattice data. Heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is applied at next to leading order in the quenched, and full QCD cases for the valence sector using finite range regularization. Under the assumption of charge symmetry these values can be combined with the experimental values of the proton and neutron magnetic form factors to deduce a relatively accurate value for the strange magnetic form factor at $Q^2=0.23$ GeV$^2$, namely $G_M^s=-0.034 \\pm 0.021$ $\\mu_N$.

  18. Determination of the pion charge form factor for Q2 = 0.60-1.60 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardan Tadevosyan; Henk Blok; Garth Huber; David Abbott; Heinz Anklin; Christopher Armstrong; John Arrington; Ketevi Assamagan; Steven Avery; O. Baker; C. Bochna; Edward Brash; Herbert Breuer; Nicholas Chant; James Dunne; T. Eden; Rolf Ent; David Gaskell; Ronald Gilman; Kenneth Gustafsson; Wendy Hinton; Harold Jackson; Mark Jones; Cynthia Keppel; Pyunghun Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Douglas Koltenuk; Meihua Liang; George Lolos; Allison Lung; David Mack; David McKee; David Meekins; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Robert Mueller; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; David Pitz; David Potterveld; Liming Qin; Joerg Reinhold; Ilkyoung Shin; Stepan Stepanyan; Liguang Tang; Rob van der Meer; Kelley Vansyoc; D. Van Westrum; Jochen Volmer; William Vulcan; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Wenxia Zhao; Benedikt Zihlmann

    2006-01-01

    The data analysis for the reaction H(e,e(prime) pi + )n, which was used to determine values for the charged pion form factor Fpi for values of Q2 = 0.6-1.6 (gEv/C) 2 , has been repeated with careful inspection of all steps and special attention to systematic uncertainties. Also the method used to extract Fpi from the measured longitudinal cross section was critically reconsidered. Final values for the separated longitudinal and transverse cross sections and the extracted values of Fpi are presented

  19. Near threshold electroproduction of the ω meson at Q2≅0.5 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozewicz, P.; Mitchell, J.; Dunne, J.; Abbott, D.J.; Carlini, R.; Ent, R.; Mack, D.J.; Wood, S.; Yan, C.; Markowitz, P.; Martoff, C.J.; Reinhold, J.; Zeidman, B.; Arrington, J.; Bailey, K.; Cummings, W.J.; Gao, H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Hansen, J.-O.; O'Neill, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    Electroproduction of the ω meson was investigated in the 1 H(e,e ' p)ω reaction. The measurement was performed at a four-momentum transfer Q 2 ≅0.5 GeV 2 . Angular distributions of the virtual photon-proton center-of-momentum cross sections have been extracted over the full angular range. These distributions exhibit a strong enhancement over t-channel parity exchange processes in the backward direction. According to a newly developed electroproduction model, this enhancement provides significant evidence of resonance formation in the γ*p→ωp reaction channel

  20. Near threshold electroproduction of the omega meson at Q2 ∼ 0.5 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozewicz, P.; Mitchell, J.; Dunne, J.; Markowitz, P.; Martoff, C. J.; Reinhold, J.; Zeidman, B.

    2004-01-01

    Electroproduction of the omega meson was investigated in the p(e,e'p)omega reaction. The measurement was performed at a 4-momentum transfer Q2 ∼ 0.5 GeV2. Angular distributions of the virtual photon-proton center-of-momentum cross sections have been extracted over the full angular range. These distributions exhibit a strong enhancement over t-channel parity exchange processes in the backward direction. According to a newly developed electroproduction model, this enhancement provides significant evidence of resonance formation in the gamma* p -> omega p reaction channel

  1. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via $\\gamma^* p \\to n\\pi^+$ at high $Q^2$

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kijun; Gothe, Ralf; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Anghinolfi, Marco; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Battaglieri, Marco; Baturin, Vitaly; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bennett, Robert; Biselli, Angela; Bookwalter, Craig; Boyarinov, Sergey; Branford, Derek

    2012-01-01

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the $n\\pi^+$ channel at relatively high momentum transfer ($Q^2$ up to 4.2 $\\rm{GeV^2}$). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole ($E_{0+}$), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor $G_1$ within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor $G_A$. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly $4\\pi$ CEBAF Large Acc...

  2. U.S. Photovoltaic Prices and Cost Breakdowns. Q1 2015 Benchmarks for Residential, Commercial, and Utility-Scale Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Donald [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davidson, Carolyn [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fu, Ran [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ardani, Kristen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has continued to decline across all major market sectors. This report provides a Q1 2015 update regarding the prices of residential, commercial, and utility scale PV systems, based on an objective methodology that closely approximates the book value of a PV system. Several cases are benchmarked to represent common variations in business models, labor rates, and system architecture choice. We estimate a weighted-average cash purchase price of $3.09/W for residential scale rooftop systems, $2.15/W for commercial scale rooftop systems, $1.77/W for utility scale systems with fixed mounting structures, and $1.91/W for utility scale systems using single-axis trackers. All systems are modeled assuming standard-efficiency, polycrystalline-silicon PV modules, and further assume installation within the United States.

  3. Central MHD activities and role of the q=1 rational surface for pellet fuelled JT-60 plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Yutaka; Ozeki, Takahisa; Azumi, Masafumi; Yoshino, Ryuji; Nagami, Masayuki; Konoshima, Shigeru

    1990-08-01

    Improved energy confinement for the pellet fuelled plasmas on JT-60 is mainly due to the peaked density and pressure profiles inside the q=1 rational surface, where the confinement characteristics appear to be better than those in the outer (q>1) region. In the well-center-fuelled pellet injection discharges, the sawtooth activity can be suppressed completely during 0.4∼1 sec or the frequency of sawtooth is reduced by up to one order of magnitude during 0.5∼1.5 sec after the pellet injection. For high high-current low-q (Ip = 2.5∼3.1 MA; q(a) < 3) discharges, reduction in the sawtooth frequency has a strong relationship with enhanced confinement and peakedness of the electron density profile. The contribution of the sawtooth activity to the global energy confinement increases systematically with decreasing q(a). At the sawtooth emerging after the pellet injection into high-Ip limiter discharges, only small amount of the central kinetic energy is released and the sawtooth does not follow the fully reconnecting style. The release of the central kinetic energy and the existence of precursor and successor m = 1 oscillations are discussed. The sawtooth crash tends to have more ideal-like characteristics for higher beta values and lower safety factors. The rotation velocity of the central plasma column after the pellet injection is also discussed with the frequencies of the m = 1 oscillations. Just after the pellet injection, the plasma column starts to rotate in the ion-diamagnetic direction or the co-direction to the plasma current. At each sawtooth, the rotation frequency changes suddenly to the ion-diamagnetic direction or the co-direction. (author) 47 refs. 44 figs

  4. Measurement of Bose-Einstein correlations in the decays of W boson pairs by the ALEPH detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Franck

    1999-01-01

    The measurement of the W boson mass is a key issue of LEP2. In the W + W - → q 1 q 2 -bar q 3 q 4 -bar channel, a large systematic error comes from Bose-Einstein correlations, which could induce a non-independent fragmentation of the two W. This thesis deals with the measurements of these correlations in W boson pair decays. We will focus on the measurement of such correlations between points from different decaying W. The standard model theory and the ALEPH experiment are described in the two first chapters. The analysis requires a selection of W + W - → q 1 q 2 -bar lν l events, which is presented in chapter three. The W + W - → q 1 q 2 -bar q 3 q 4 -bar and W + W - → q 1 q 2 -bar τν event selections are also described in this part. The different phenomenological models of Bose-Einstein correlations are reviewed in chapter four, with their adjustment on the ALEPH data recorded at √s = 91 GeV. The model predictions are compared to results of measurements done in W + W - decays observed at energies of collisions of 172, 183 and 189 GeV. Bose-Einstein correlations between pions coming from different W in the W + W - → q 1 q 2 -bar q 3 q 4 -bar channel are disfavored by 2.7 standard deviations. (author)

  5. The O(α3s) Heavy Flavor Contributions to the Charged Current Structure Function xF3(x,Q2) at Large Momentum Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behring, A.; Bluemlein, J.; Freitas, A. de; Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz; Hasselhuhn, A.; Manteuffel, A. von; Schneider, C.

    2015-08-01

    We calculate the massive Wilson coefficients for the heavy flavor contributions to the non-singlet charged current deep-inelastic scattering structure function xF W+ 3 (x,Q 2 )+xF W- 3 (x,Q 2 ) in the asymptotic region Q 2 >>m 2 to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at general values of the Mellin variable N and the momentum fraction x. Besides the heavy quark pair production also the single heavy flavor excitation s→c contributes. Numerical results are presented for the charm quark contributions and consequences on the Gross-Llewellyn Smith sum rule are discussed.

  6. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions to the structure function g1(x,Q2 at large momentum transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behring

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the polarized structure function g1(x,Q2 in the asymptotic region Q2≫m2 to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N and the momentum fraction x, and derive heavy flavor corrections to the Bjorken sum-rule. Numerical results are presented for the charm quark contribution. Results on the structure function g2(x,Q2 in the twist-2 approximation are also given.

  7. Angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay in the low-$q^2$ region

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-04-14

    An angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay is performed using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 ${\\mbox{fb}^{-1}}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. For the first time several observables are measured in the dielectron mass squared ($q^2$) interval between 0.002 and 1.120${\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V^2\\!/}c^4}$. The angular observables $F_{\\mathrm{L}}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}}$ which are related to the $K^{*0}$ polarisation and to the lepton forward-backward asymmetry, are measured to be $F_{\\mathrm{L}}= 0.16 \\pm 0.06 \\pm0.03$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}} = 0.10 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.05$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The angular observables $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Im}}$ which are sensitive to the photon polarisation in this $q^2$ range, are found to be $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)} = -0.23 \\pm 0.23 \\pm 0.05$ a...

  8. Measurement of the proton structure function FL(x,Q2) with the H1 detector at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piec, Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    A measurement of the inclusive cross section for the deep-inelastic scattering of positrons on protons at low four-momentum transfer squared Q 2 is presented. The measurement is used for the extraction of the longitudinal proton structure function F L . The analysis is based on data collected by the H1 experiment during special, low energy runs in the year 2007. The direct technique of the F L determination based on the extraction of the reduced DIS cross sections for three different centre-of-mass energies is used. For the purpose of the analysis a dedicated electron finder has been developed and integrated with the standard H1 reconstruction software H1REC. The algorithm employs information from two independent tracking detectors the Backward Silicon Tracker and the Central Jet Chamber. The performance of the finder is studied. The thesis presents the cross section and the F L measurements in the range of 2.5 GeV 2 ≤Q 2 ≤25 GeV 2 . (orig.)

  9. A Measurement of Nuclear Structure Functions in the Large $X$ Large $Q^{2}$ Kinematic Region in Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakili, Masoud [Cincinnati U.

    1997-01-01

    Data from the CCFR E770 Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scatter- ing (DIS) experiment at Fermilab contain large Bjorken x, high $Q^2$ events. A comparison of the data with a model, based on no nuclear effects at large $x$, shows an excess of events in the data. Addition of Fermi gas motion of the nucleons in the nucleus to the model does not explain the model's deficit. Adding higher momentum tail due to the formation of "quasi-deuterons" makes the agreement better. Certain models based on "multi- quark clusters" and "few-nucleon correlations" predict an exponentially falling behavior for $F_2$ as $F_2 \\sim e^{s(x -x_0)}$ at large $x$. We measure a $s$ = 8.3 $\\pm$ 0.8 for the best fit to our data. This corresponds to a value of $F_2$($x = 1, Q^2 > 50) \\approx 2$ x $10^{-3}$ in neutrino DIS. These values agree with results from theoretical models and the $SLAC$ $E133$ experiment but seem to be different from the result of the BCDMS experiment

  10. Measurement of Neutral and Charged Current Cross Sections in Electron-Proton Collisions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Bernardi, G.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazarian, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyian, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.I.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassilev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    The inclusive e^-p single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA, in the range of four-momentum transfer squared Q^2 between 150 and 30000 GeV^2, and Bjorken x between 0.002 and 0.65. The data were taken in 1998 and 1999 with a centre-of-mass energy of 320 GeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 16.4 pb^(-1). The data are compared with recent measurements of the inclusive neutral and charged current e^+p cross sections. For Q^2>1000 GeV^2 clear evidence is observed for an asymmetry between e^+p and e^-p neutral current scattering and the generalised structure function xF_3 is extracted for the first time at HERA. A fit to the charged current data is used to extract a value for the W boson propagator mass. The data are found to be in good agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  11. Tensor products of Uq′sl-caret(2)-modules and the big q2-Jacobi function transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gade, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Four tensor products of evaluation modules of the quantum affine algebra U q ′ sl-caret(2) obtained from the negative and positive series, the complementary and the strange series representations are investigated. Linear operators R(z) satisfying the intertwining property on finite linear combinations of the canonical basis elements of the tensor products are described in terms of two sets of infinite sums {τ (r,t) } r,t∈Z ≥0 and {τ (r,t) } r,t∈Z ≥0 involving big q 2 -Jacobi functions or related nonterminating basic hypergeometric series. Inhomogeneous recurrence relations can be derived for both sets. Evaluations of the simplest sums provide the corresponding initial conditions. For the first set of sums the relations entail a big q 2 -Jacobi function transform pair. An integral decomposition is obtained for the sum τ (r,t) . A partial description of the relation between the decompositions of the tensor products with respect to U q sl(2) or with respect to its complement in U q ′ sl-caret(2) can be formulated in terms of Askey-Wilson function transforms. For a particular combination of two tensor products, the occurrence of proper U q ′ sl-caret(2)-submodules is discussed.

  12. MOD13Q1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). This dataset is associated with the following publication: Shao, Y., R. Lunetta , B. Wheeler, J. Iiames , and J....

  13. Comparison of a preQ1 riboswitch aptamer in metabolite-bound and free states with implications for gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jermaine L; Krucinska, Jolanta; McCarty, Reid M; Bandarian, Vahe; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2011-07-15

    Riboswitches are RNA regulatory elements that govern gene expression by recognition of small molecule ligands via a high affinity aptamer domain. Molecular recognition can lead to active or attenuated gene expression states by controlling accessibility to mRNA signals necessary for transcription or translation. Key areas of inquiry focus on how an aptamer attains specificity for its effector, the extent to which the aptamer folds prior to encountering its ligand, and how ligand binding alters expression signal accessibility. Here we present crystal structures of the preQ(1) riboswitch from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis in the preQ(1)-bound and free states. Although the mode of preQ(1) recognition is similar to that observed for preQ(0), surface plasmon resonance revealed an apparent K(D) of 2.1 ± 0.3 nm for preQ(1) but a value of 35.1 ± 6.1 nm for preQ(0). This difference can be accounted for by interactions between the preQ(1) methylamine and base G5 of the aptamer. To explore conformational states in the absence of metabolite, the free-state aptamer structure was determined. A14 from the ceiling of the ligand pocket shifts into the preQ(1)-binding site, resulting in "closed" access to the metabolite while simultaneously increasing exposure of the ribosome-binding site. Solution scattering data suggest that the free-state aptamer is compact, but the "closed" free-state crystal structure is inadequate to describe the solution scattering data. These observations are distinct from transcriptional preQ(1) riboswitches of the same class that exhibit strictly ligand-dependent folding. Implications for gene regulation are discussed.

  14. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  15. A measurement of the photon structure function F$_{2}^{\\gamma}$ at an average Q$^{2}$ of 12 GeV$^{2}$/c$^{4}$ : results from DELPHI

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Batyunya, B; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fürstenau, H; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, G; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    The hadronic photon structure function F_{2}^{\\gamma} has been measured in the Q^{2} range from 4 to 30~GeV^2/c^{4} and down to x values of order 0.001, using data taken with the DELPHI detector at LEP between 1991 and 1993. A comparison is made with several F_{2}^{\\gamma} parameterizations with special emphasis on their low x behaviour. A result on the Q^{2} evolution of F_{2}^{\\gamma} is presented.

  16. Electroexcitation of the Roper resonance for 1.7 < Q**2 < 4.5 -GeV2 in vec-ep ---> en pi+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznauryan, Inna; Burkert, Volker; Kim, Wooyoung; Park, Kil; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Bagdasaryan, H.; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Batourine, V.; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, Wilbert; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Donnelly, J.; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Golovach, Evgeny; Gonenc, Atilla; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, L.; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hafnaoui, Khadija; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hakobyan, Rafael; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Andreas; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lee, T.; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, Konstantin; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, S.; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Jerome; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Polli, Ermanno; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, J.; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045209
    The helicity amplitudes of the electroexcitation of the Roper resonance are extracted for 1.7 < Q2 < 4.5 GeV2 from recent high precision JLab-CLAS cross section and longitudinally polarized beam asymmetry data for pi+ electroproduction on protons at W=1.15-1.69 GeV. The analysis is made using two approaches, dispersion relations and a unitary isobar model, which give consistent results. It is found that the transverse helicity amplitude A_{1/2} for the gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 transition, which is large and negative at Q2=0, becomes large and positive at Q2 ~ 2 GeV2, and then drops slowly with Q2. The longitudinal helicity amplitude S_{1/2}, which was previously found from CLAS ep -> eppi0,enpi+ data to be large and positive at Q2=0.4,0.65 GeV2, drops with Q2. Available model predictions for gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 allow us to conclude that these results provide strong evidence in favor of N(1440)P11 as a first radial excitation of

  17. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

    2009-02-01

    The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

  18. Measurement of D*± meson produciton in e±p scattering at low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2007-02-01

    The production of D *± (2010) mesons in e ± p scattering in the range of exchanged photon virtuality 0.05 2 2 has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82 pb -1 . The decay channels D *+ →D 0 π + with D 0 →K - π + and corresponding antiparticle decay were used to identify D * mesons and the ZEUS beampipe calorimeter was used to identify the scattered electron. Differential D * cross sections as functions of Q 2 , inelasticity, y, transverse momentum of the D * meson, p T (D * ), and pseudorapidity of the D * meson, η(D * ), have been measured in the kinematic region 0.02 T (D * ) * ) vertical stroke <1.5. The measured differential cross sections are in agreement with two different NLO QCD calculations. The cross sections are also compared to previous ZEUS measurements in the photoproduction and DIS regimes. (orig.)

  19. An estimate of higher twist at small xB and low Q2 based upon a saturation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.; Peters, K.

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the influence of higher twist corrections to deep inelastic structure functions in the low-Q 2 and small-x HERA region. We review the general features of the lowest-order QCD diagrams which contribute to twist-4 at small-x, in particular the sign structure of longitudinal and transverse structure functions which offers the possibility of strong cancellations in F 2 . For a numerical analysis we perform a twist analysis of the saturation model which has been very successful both in describing the structure function and the DIS diffractive cross section at HERA. As the main conclusion, twist 4 corrections are not small in F L or F T but in F 2 = F L + F T they almost cancel. We point out that F L analysis needs a large twist-4 correction. We also indicate the region of validity of the twist expansion. (orig.)

  20. Fluorescence Excitation Models of Ammonia and Amidogen Radical (NH2) in Comets: Application to Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH2 -- a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH3/H2O is 0.46% +/- 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH2 observations (0.31% -- 0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH3 could be the sole parent of NH2 in this comet.

  1. FLUORESCENCE EXCITATION MODELS OF AMMONIA AND AMIDOGEN RADICAL (NH2) IN COMETS: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 μm wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 μm wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH 2 -a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 μm wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH 3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH 3 /H 2 O is 0.46% ± 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH 2 observations (0.31%-0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH 3 could be the sole parent of NH 2 in this comet.

  2. M.H.D. activity associated with the q=1 surface in the Tore-Supra tokamak; Activite M.H.D. associee a la surface q=1 dans le tokamak Tore-Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristofani, P.

    1996-02-12

    In order to increase the temperature, density and confinement time of the plasma energy inside tokamak devices, several heating and fuel injection techniques have been used. However, the increase of the energy content of the central part of the plasma leads to instabilities in the confinement magnetic structure which can degrade the confinement properties and the temperature performances. Inside the plasma, the ``q=1`` surface plays an important role in the confinement process. The aim of this thesis is to study the experimental physics related to this surface with the analysis of the ``saw-tooth`` periodical internal relaxations and of the ``snake`` structure. The first chapter gives a general introduction about thermonuclear fusion and a description of the plasma and of its equilibrium. Chapter 2 is devoted to the description of the soft X-ray tomography, the diagnostic technique used in this work. In chapter 3, a theoretical presentation of plasma stability and a comparison with experimental results obtained in the Tore-Supra tokamak are given. The observations of saw-tooth instabilities are presented with the principal theoretical models which are used to explain this phenomenon. The snake density instability localized in the central part of the plasma is described in chapter 4 with an attempt of interpretation. The equation of the size evolution of a magnetic island was modified to test different models which can explain the snake stability. One model is based on the modification of the bootstrap current induced by the presence of the snake, and on the local modification of the current induced by the accumulation of impurities inside the snake. (J.S.). 107 refs.

  3. Socioeconomic inequities and payment coping mechanisms used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A socioeconomic status (SES) index was used to divide the respondents into SES quartiles (Q1 (poorest), Q2, Q3, Q4 (least poor)). The coping mechanisms were disaggregated by SES. Results: The mean monthly expenditure for the treatment of diabetes was .56,245.11 ($356). Expenditures were mostly incurred through ...

  4. Nuclear safeguards research and development program. Status report, January--April 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapir, J.L. (comp.)

    1977-06-01

    The status of the Nuclear Safeguards Research and Development program pursued by LASL Safeguards Groups Q-1, Q-2, Q-3, and Q-4 is presented . Topics covered include nondestructive assay technology development and applications, international safeguards, perimeter safeguards and surveillance, concepts and subsystems development (e.g., DYMAC program), integrated safeguards systems, training courses, and technology transfer.

  5. Novel charge density wave transition in crystals of R5Ir4Si10

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rate state below 55 K. The positions of these super lattice reflections can be described by modulation wave vectors q1 =(0, 0, 1/4δ), q2 =(0, 0, 1/4+δ) and q3 ..... [18] H T Stokes and D M Hatch, Isotropy subgroups of the 230 crystallographic space groups (World. Scientific, Singapore, 1988). [19] Very recently dissimilarities ...

  6. Nuclear safeguards research and development program. Status report, January--April 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapir, J.L.

    1977-06-01

    The status of the Nuclear Safeguards Research and Development program pursued by LASL Safeguards Groups Q-1, Q-2, Q-3, and Q-4 is presented . Topics covered include nondestructive assay technology development and applications, international safeguards, perimeter safeguards and surveillance, concepts and subsystems development (e.g., DYMAC program), integrated safeguards systems, training courses, and technology transfer

  7. Experimental study of the spin structure of the neutron (3He) with low Q2: a relationship between the Bjorken and Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deur, A.

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of the neutron (and 3 He) spin structure with a particular emphasis in the resonance domain (experiment E94010 that took place in 1997 at Jefferson Lab (TJNAF or formerly CEBAF) in Virginia). A polarized 3 He target was built in order to achieve this study since polarized 3 He nuclei can be seen as polarized neutrons. This target allowed the measurement of the polarized absolute cross sections σ 1/2 (Q 2 , ν) and σ 3/2 (Q 2 , ν) from the inclusive reaction → 3 He( → e, e')X for incident beam energies ranging from 0.86 GeV to 5.07 GeV at a scattering angle of 15.5 deg. The Q 2 evolution of the generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) integral on 3 He and on neutron was measured from 0.1 GeV 2 to 1.0 GeV 2 in order to understand the transition between perturbative QCD and non-perturbative QCD. The integration domain in ν (the energy loss of the scattered electron) is from the pion threshold to about 2.5 GeV which covers both the resonance region and the Deep Inelastic Scattering. The high precision of our data constrains the models giving the Q 2 evolution of the generalized GDH integral. The polarized quasi-elastic scattering was also measured. The cross section σ TT (Q 2 , ν) on 3 He and the spin structure functions g 1 3 He (Q 2 , ν) and g 2 3 He (Q 2 , ν) are presented. These data are an indication that the higher-twists are small in our kinematics domain and that the Bloom-Gilman duality seems to hold for the polarized spin structure functions. (author)

  8. Comet 2001 Q2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravec, Petr; Kušnirák, Peter; Bouma, R. J.; Raymundo, P. M.

    č. 7687 (2001), s. 1 ISSN 0081-0304 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/99/0255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : comet s * astrometry Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  9. M.H.D. activity associated with the q=1 surface in the Tore-Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristofani, P.

    1996-01-01

    In order to increase the temperature, density and confinement time of the plasma energy inside tokamak devices, several heating and fuel injection techniques have been used. However, the increase of the energy content of the central part of the plasma leads to instabilities in the confinement magnetic structure which can degrade the confinement properties and the temperature performances. Inside the plasma, the ''q=1'' surface plays an important role in the confinement process. The aim of this thesis is to study the experimental physics related to this surface with the analysis of the ''saw-tooth'' periodical internal relaxations and of the ''snake'' structure. The first chapter gives a general introduction about thermonuclear fusion and a description of the plasma and of its equilibrium. Chapter 2 is devoted to the description of the soft X-ray tomography, the diagnostic technique used in this work. In chapter 3, a theoretical presentation of plasma stability and a comparison with experimental results obtained in the Tore-Supra tokamak are given. The observations of saw-tooth instabilities are presented with the principal theoretical models which are used to explain this phenomenon. The snake density instability localized in the central part of the plasma is described in chapter 4 with an attempt of interpretation. The equation of the size evolution of a magnetic island was modified to test different models which can explain the snake stability. One model is based on the modification of the bootstrap current induced by the presence of the snake, and on the local modification of the current induced by the accumulation of impurities inside the snake. (J.S.)

  10. Electromagnetic form factors for nucleons and pions at positive and negative q2 in the model of quark-gluon strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidalov, A.B.; Kondratyuk, L.A.; Tchekin, D.V.

    2000-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factors for pions and nucleons are considered within the model of quark-gluon strings, where the momentum-transfer dependence of hadronic form factors is determined by the intercepts of the corresponding Regge trajectories and by the Sudakov form factor. Analytic expressions found for form factors in the timelike region admit an analytic continuation to the spacelike region. The resulting form factors for pions and nucleons comply well with experimental data both for positive and for negative values of the squared momentum transfer q 2 . It is shown that the distinctions between the absolute values of the pion and nucleon form factors F π (q 2 ), G m (q 2 ), and F 2 (q 2 ) at positive values of q 2 and those at negative values of this variable are associated with the analytic properties of the double-logarithmic term in the exponent of the Sudakov form factor. The spin structure of the amplitudes for quark transitions into hadrons that is proposed in the present study makes it possible to describe fairly well available experimental data on the Pauli form factor F 2 and on the ratio G e /G m

  11. Study of charged-current ep interactions at Q2 > 200 GeV2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1996-06-01

    Deep inelastic charged-current reactions have been studied in e + p and e - p collisions at a center of mass energy of about 300 GeV in the kinematic region Q 2 >200 GeV 2 and x>0.006 using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The integrated cross sections for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 are found to be σ e + p→ anti νX =30.3 -4.2-2.6 +5.5+1.6 pb and σ e - p→νX =54.7 -9.8-3.4 +15.9+2.8 pb. Differential cross sections have been measured as functions of the variables x, y and Q 2 . From the measured differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , the W boson mass is determined to be M W =79 -7-4 +8+4 GeV. Measured jet rates and transverse energy profiles agree with model predictions. A search for charged-current interactions with a large rapidity gap yielded one candidate event, corresponding to a cross section σ e + p→ anti νX (Q 2 >200 GeV 2 ; η max -0.7 +1.8 ±0.1 pb. (orig.)

  12. Jets at low Q2 at HERA and radiation damage studies for silicon sensors for the XFEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrey, Hanno

    2011-06-01

    In the first part this thesis, jet cross-sections were measured for inclusive jet, inclusive dijet, and inclusive trijet production at photon virtualities in the range of 10 2 2 . The data analyzed were recorded with the Zeus detector in the years 2004-2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 296 pb -1 . Events in neutral current deep inelastic scattering were selected in the above stated Q 2 region for an inelasticity of 0.2 T,B >8 GeV and to have a pseudorapidity in the laboratory frame in the range of -1 lab jj >20 GeV to avoid phase space regions where the fixed order calculations are sensitive to infrared divergences. The presented analysis is the first jet analysis at such low values of Q 2 to exploit the full HERA-II ZEUS data set, and as such is performed at significant higher luminosities than previous publications. Overall, the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculations correctly predict the measured cross-sections within the uncertainties in all studied quantities and over most of the investigated regions of phase space, except in the pseudorapidity region close to the proton beam direction (''forward'' region) in inclusive jet production where the prediction is considerably below the data. The uncertainty of the NLO prediction, dominated by the uncertainty associated with the choice of the renormalization scale, is typically larger than the experimental uncertainty, which is for the most part dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale. The large theoretical uncertainties indicate the need for calculations including higherorders. Such NNLO calculations will allow to fully exploit the sensitivity of the low Q 2 jet data in QCD PDF fits and in fits to extract values of α s . In the second part of this thesis, a study of radiation damage of silicon sensors by 12 keV X-rays for doses up to 1GGy is presented. For this study, an irradiation facility has been set up at Hasylab at Desy. Test structures (gate-controlled diodes) have been

  13. Therapeutic action of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 on retinopathy in OXYS rats linked with improvement of VEGF and PEDF gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton M Markovets

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: The incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the main cause of blindness in older patients in the developed countries, is increasing with the ageing population. At present there is no effective treatment for the prevailing geographic atrophy, dry AMD, whereas antiangiogenic therapies successful used in managing the wet form of AMD. Recently we showed that mitochondria-targeted antioxidant plastoquinonyl-decyl-triphenylphosphonium (SkQ1 is able to prevent the development and moreover caused regression of pre-existing signs of the retinopathy in OXYS rats, an animal model of AMD. Here we examine the effects of SkQ1 on expression of key regulators of angiogenesis vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF and its antagonist pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF genes in the retina of OXYS rats as evidenced by real-time PCR and an ELISA test for VEGF using Wistar rats as control. Ophthalmoscopic examinations confirmed that SkQ1 supplementation (from 1.5 to 3 months of age, 250 nmol/kg prevented development while eye drops SkQ1 (250 nM, from 9 to 12 months caused some reduction of retinopathy signs in OXYS rats and did not reveal any negative effects on the control Wistar rat's retina. Prevention of premature retinopathy by SkQ1 was connected with an increase of VEGF mRNA and protein in OXYS rat's retina up to the levels corresponding to the Wistar rats, and did not involve changes in PEDF expression. In contrast the treatment with SkQ1 drops caused a decrease of VEGF mRNA and protein levels and an increase in the PEDF mRNA level in the middle-aged OXYS rats, but in Wistar rats the changes of gene expression were the opposite. CONCLUSIONS: The beneficial effects of SkQ1 on retinopathy connected with normalization of expression of VEGF and PEDF in the retina of OXYS rats and depended on age of the animals and the stage of retinopathy.

  14. Q^2 Dependence of the S_{11}(1535) Photocoupling and Evidence for a P-wave resonance in eta electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haluk Denizli; James Mueller; Steven Dytman; M.L. Leber; R.D. Levine; J. Miles; Kui Kim; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Catalina Cetina; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Laurent Farhi; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Tony Forest; Valera Frolov; Herbert Funsten; Sally Gaff; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Pascal Girard; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; David Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Jingliang Hu; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; J.H. Kelley; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; K. Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; K. Lukashin; Marion MacCormick; Joseph Manak; Nikolai Markov; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; Valeria Muccifora; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Steve Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O' Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Gerald Peterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Ermanno Polli; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Konstantin Sabourov; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; Jeremiah Shaw; Nikolay Shvedunov; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Kebin Wang; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Junho Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-07-01

    New cross sections for the reaction $ep \\to e'\\eta p$ are reported for total center of mass energy $W$=1.5--2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer $Q^2$=0.13--3.3 GeV$^2$. This large kinematic range allows extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and $\\eta N$ coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at $W\\sim$ 1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a $P$-wave resonance that persists to high $Q^2$. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the $S_{11}$(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expands the $Q^2$ range covered and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parameterization is provided.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a new photoluminescent aluminium complex bis (8-hydroxyquinoline) (2,2'bipyridine) aluminium Al(Bpy)q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Bhargava, Parag

    2018-04-01

    A new photoluminescent material, Bis(8-hydroxyquinoline) (2,2'bipyridine) aluminium Al(Bpy)q2 has been synthesized and characterized. Solution of this material Al(Bpy)q2 in ethanol showed absorption maxima at 370nm which was attributed to the moderate energy (π - π*) transitions of the aromatic rings. The photoluminescence spectrum of Al(Bpy)q2 in ethanol solution showed peak at 516 nm. This material shows thermal stability up to 385°C. The time resolved photoluminescence spectra of the material showed two life time components. The decay times of the first and second component are 6.1 ns and 24.5 ns respectively.

  16. The Electric Form Factor of the Neutron via Recoil Polarimetry to Q2 1.47 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley Plaster; Richard Madey; Andrei Semenov; Simon Taylor; Aram Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Chenyu Yan; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; Paul Brewer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Kenneth Garrow; Calvin Howell; Paul Gueye; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Samuel Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2003-01-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory E93-038 collaboration conducted measurements of the ratio of the electric form factor to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, G n E/G n M, via recoil polarimetry from the quasielastic 2 H((rvec e),e/(rvec n)) 1 H reaction at three values of Q 2 [viz., 0.45, 1.15, and 1.47 (GeV/c) 2 ] in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The preliminary results for G n E at Q 2 = 0.45 and 1.15 (GeV/c) 2 are consistent with the Galster parameterization; however, the preliminary result for G n E at Q 2 = 1.47 (GeV/c) 2 lies slightly above the Galster parameterization

  17. Ground-based Detection of Deuterated Water in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) at IR Wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Gibb, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-02-20

    We conducted a deep search for deuterated water (HDO) in the Oort Cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), through infrared (IR) spectroscopy with NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory. In this Letter, we present our detections of HDO and water (H{sub 2}O) in comet Lovejoy on 2015 February 4 (post-perihelion) after 1 hr integration on source. The IR observations allowed simultaneous detection of H{sub 2}O and HDO, yielding production rates of 5.9 ± 0.13 × 10{sup 29} and 3.6 ± 1.0 × 10{sup 26} molecules s{sup −1}, respectively. The simultaneous detection permitted accurate determination of the isotopic ratio (D/H) in water of 3.02 ± 0.87 × 10{sup −4}, i.e., larger than the value for water in terrestrial oceans (or Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW) by a factor of 1.94 ± 0.56. This D/H ratio in water exceeds the value obtained independently at millimeter wavelengths (0.89 ± 0.25 VSMOW; pre-perihelion). We discuss these parameters in the context of origins and emphasize the need for contemporaneous measurements of HDO and H{sub 2}O.

  18. Theoretical investigations of the IO,{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions: Metastability, characterization and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammami, H. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); EMIR, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs, Monastir (Tunisia); Yazidi, O. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique Moléculaire et Applications, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis-El Manar, Le Belvédère, 1060 Tunis (Tunisia); Ben El Hadj Rhouma, M. [EMIR, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs, Monastir (Tunisia); Al Mogren, M. M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, PO Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Hochlaf, M., E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France)

    2014-07-07

    Using ab initio methodology, we studied the IO{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions. Benchmark computations on the IO(X{sup 2}Π) neutral species allow validate the current procedure. For IO{sup 2+}, several potential wells were found on the ground and the electronic excited states potentials with potential barriers with respect to dissociation, where this dication can exist in the gas phase as long-lived metastable molecules. We confirm hence the recent observation of the dication by mass spectrometry. Moreover, we predict the existence of the metastable IO{sup 3+} trication, where a shallow potential well along the IO internuclear distance is computed. This potential well supports more than 10 vibrational levels. The IO{sup 3+} excited states are repulsive in nature, as well as the computed potentials for the IO{sup 4+} tetracation. For the bound states, we give a set of spectroscopic parameters including excitation transition energies, equilibrium distances, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational terms, and rotational constants. At the MRCI + Q/aug-cc-pV5Z(-PP) level, the adiabatic double and triple ionization energies of IO are computed to be ∼28.1 eV and ∼55.0 eV, respectively.

  19. Ground-based Detection of Deuterated Water in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) at IR Wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Gibb, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a deep search for deuterated water (HDO) in the Oort Cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), through infrared (IR) spectroscopy with NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory. In this Letter, we present our detections of HDO and water (H 2 O) in comet Lovejoy on 2015 February 4 (post-perihelion) after 1 hr integration on source. The IR observations allowed simultaneous detection of H 2 O and HDO, yielding production rates of 5.9 ± 0.13 × 10 29 and 3.6 ± 1.0 × 10 26 molecules s −1 , respectively. The simultaneous detection permitted accurate determination of the isotopic ratio (D/H) in water of 3.02 ± 0.87 × 10 −4 , i.e., larger than the value for water in terrestrial oceans (or Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW) by a factor of 1.94 ± 0.56. This D/H ratio in water exceeds the value obtained independently at millimeter wavelengths (0.89 ± 0.25 VSMOW; pre-perihelion). We discuss these parameters in the context of origins and emphasize the need for contemporaneous measurements of HDO and H 2 O.

  20. Hierarchy of the low-lying excitations for the (2+1-dimensional q=3 Potts model in the ordered phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Nishiyama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The (2+1-dimensional q=3 Potts model was simulated with the exact diagonalization method. In the ordered phase, the elementary excitations (magnons are attractive, forming a series of bound states in the low-energy spectrum. We investigate the low-lying spectrum through a dynamical susceptibility, which is readily tractable with the exact diagonalization method via the continued-fraction expansion. As a result, we estimate the series of (scaled mass gaps, m2,3,4/m1 (m1: single-magnon mass, in proximity to the transition point.

  1. Measurement of the Q2 dependence of the charged and neutral current cross sections in e±p scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.

    1996-03-01

    The Q 2 dependence and the total cross sections for charged and neutral current processes are measured in e ± p reactions for transverse momenta of the outgoing lepton larger than 25 GeV. Comparable size of cross sections for the neutral current process and for the weak charged current process are observed above Q 2 ∼5000 GeV 2 . Using the shape and magnitude of the charged current cross section we determine a propagator mass of m W =84 -7 +10 GeV. (orig.)

  2. The 3-loop pure singlet heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F2(x,Q2 and the anomalous dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pure singlet asymptotic heavy flavor corrections to 3-loop order for the deep-inelastic scattering structure function F2(x,Q2 and the corresponding transition matrix element AQq(3,PS in the variable flavor number scheme are computed. In Mellin-N space these inclusive quantities depend on generalized harmonic sums. We also recalculate the complete 3-loop pure singlet anomalous dimension for the first time. Numerical results for the Wilson coefficients, the operator matrix element and the contribution to the structure function F2(x,Q2 are presented.

  3. The 3-loop pure singlet heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F2(x,Q2) and the anomalous dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablinger, J.; Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; Manteuffel, A. von; Schneider, C.

    2015-01-01

    The pure singlet asymptotic heavy flavor corrections to 3-loop order for the deep-inelastic scattering structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) and the corresponding transition matrix element A Qq (3),PS in the variable flavor number scheme are computed. In Mellin-N space these inclusive quantities depend on generalized harmonic sums. We also recalculate the complete 3-loop pure singlet anomalous dimension for the first time. Numerical results for the Wilson coefficients, the operator matrix element and the contribution to the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) are presented

  4. Mapping and validation of quantitative trait loci for resistance to Cercospora zeae-maydis infection in tropical maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozar, Gilberto; Butruille, David; Silva, Heyder Diniz; McCuddin, Zoe Patterson; Penna, Julio Cesar Viglioni

    2009-02-01

    Breeding for resistance to gray leaf spot, caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis (Cz) is paramount for many maize environments, in particular under warm and humid growing conditions. In this study, we mapped and characterized quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in the resistance of maize against Cz. We confirmed the impact of the QTL on disease severity using near-isogenic lines (NILs), and estimated their effects on three major agronomic traits using their respective near isogenic hybrids (NIHs), which we obtained by crossing the NILs with an inbred from a complementary heterotic pool. We further validated three of the four QTL that were mapped using the Multiple Interval Mapping approach and showed LOD values>2.5. NILs genotype included all combinations between favorable alleles of the two QTL located in chromosome 1 (Q1 in bin 1.05 and Q2 in bin 1.07), and the allele in chromosome 3 (Q3 in bin 3.07). Each of the three QTL separately significantly reduced the severity of Cz. However, we found an unfavorable epistatic interaction between Q1 and Q2: presence of the favorable allele at one of the QTL allele effectively nullified the effect of the favorable allele at the other. In contrast, the interaction between Q2 and Q3 was additive, promoting the reduction of the severity to a greater extent than the sum of their individual effects. When evaluating the NIH we found significant individual effects for Q1 and Q3 on gray leaf spot severity, for Q2 on stalk lodging and grain yield, and for Q3 on grain moisture and stalk lodging. We detected significant epitasis between Q1 and Q2 for grain moisture and between Q1 and Q3 for stalk lodging. These results suggest that the combination of QTL impacts the effectiveness of marker-assisted selection procedures in commercial product development programs.

  5. A new family of N dimensional superintegrable double singular oscillators and quadratic algebra Q(3) ⨁ so(n) ⨁ so(N-n)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazlul Hoque, Md; Marquette, Ian; Zhang, Yao-Zhong

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new family of N dimensional quantum superintegrable models consisting of double singular oscillators of type (n, N-n). The special cases (2,2) and (4,4) have previously been identified as the duals of 3- and 5-dimensional deformed Kepler-Coulomb systems with u(1) and su(2) monopoles, respectively. The models are multiseparable and their wave functions are obtained in (n, N-n) double-hyperspherical coordinates. We obtain the integrals of motion and construct the finitely generated polynomial algebra that is the direct sum of a quadratic algebra Q(3) involving three generators, so(n), so(N-n) (i.e. Q(3) ⨁ so(n) ⨁ so(N-n)). The structure constants of the quadratic algebra itself involve the Casimir operators of the two Lie algebras so(n) and so(N-n). Moreover, we obtain the finite dimensional unitary representations (unirreps) of the quadratic algebra and present an algebraic derivation of the degenerate energy spectrum of the superintegrable model.

  6. The Spin Structure of the Proton at Low Q2: A Measurement of the Structure Function g2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Chao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The spin structure of the nucleon has remained as one of the key points of interest in hadronic physics, which has attracted many efforts from both experimentalists and theorists. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental theory that describes the strong interaction. It has been verified in the asymptotically free region. However, the non-perturbative confinement of quarks within the nucleon is still not well understood within QCD. In the non-perturbative regime, low-energy effective field theories such as chiral perturbation theory (XPT) provide predictions for the spin structure functions. The neutron spin structure functions, gp1 and gp2 , and the proton spin structure function, gp1, have been measured over a wide kinematic range and compared with the theoretical predictions. However, the proton spin structure function, gp2, remains largely unmeasured. The E08-027 collaboration successfully performed the first measurement of the inclusive electron-proton scattering in the kinematic range 0.02 < Q2 < 0.2 GeV2. The experiment took place in experimental Hall A at Jefferson Lab in 2012. A longitudinally polarized electron beam with incident energies between 1.1 GeV and 3.3 GeV was scattered from a longitudinally or transversely polarized NH3 target. Asymmetries and polarized cross-section differences were measured in the resonance region to extract the proton spin structure functions g2. The results allow us to obtain the generalized spin polarizabilities γ0 and δLT and test the Burkhardtt-Cottingham (BC) sum rule. Chiral perturbation theory is expected to work in this kinematic range and this measurement of δLT will give a benchmark test to XPT calculations. This thesis will discuss preliminary results from the E08-027 data analysis.

  7. NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIO OF COMETARY AMMONIA FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kawakita, Hideyo, E-mail: yoshiharu.shinnaka@nao.ac.jp [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    The icy materials present in comets provide clues to the origin and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems. High-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) were performed on 2015 January 11 (at 1.321 au pre-perihelion) with the High Dispersion Spectrograph mounted on the Subaru Telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii. We derive the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio of NH{sub 2} (126 ± 25), as well as the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of the H{sub 2}O{sup +} ion (2.77 ± 0.24) and NH{sub 2} (3.38 ± 0.07), which correspond to nuclear spin temperatures of >24 K (3 σ lower limit) and 27 ± 2 K, respectively. We also derive the intensity ratio of the green-to-red doublet of forbidden oxygen lines (0.107 ± 0.007). The ammonia in the comet must have formed under low-temperature conditions at ∼10 K or less to reproduce the observed {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in this molecule if it is assumed that the {sup 15}N-fractionation of ammonia occurred via ion–molecule chemical reactions. However, this temperature is inconsistent with the nuclear spin temperatures of water and ammonia estimated from the OPRs. The interpretation of the nuclear spin temperature as the temperature at molecular formation may therefore be incorrect. An isotope-selective photodissociation of molecular nitrogen by protosolar ultraviolet radiation might play an important role in the {sup 15}N-fractionation observed in cometary volatiles.

  8. Sum rule measurements of the spin-dependent compton amplitude (nucleon spin structure at Q2 = 0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babusci, D.; Giordano, G.; Baghaei, H.; Cichocki, A.; Blecher, M.; Breuer, M.; Commeaux, C.; Didelez, J.P.; Caracappa, A.; Fan, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Energy weighted integrals of the difference in helicity-dependent photo-production cross sections (σ 1/2 - σ 3/2 ) provide information on the nucleon's Spin-dependent Polarizability (γ), and on the spin-dependent part of the asymptotic forward Compton amplitude through the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov (DHG) sum rule. (The latter forms the Q 2 =0 limit of recent spin-asymmetry experiments in deep-inelastic lepton-scattering.) There are no direct measurements of σ 1/2 or σ 3/2 , for either the proton or the neutron. Estimates from current π-photo-production multipole analyses, particularly for the proton-neutron difference, are in good agreement with relativistic-l-loop Chiral calculations (χPT) for γ but predict large deviations from the DHG sum rule. Either (a) both the 2-loop corrections to the Spin-Polarizability are large and the existing multipoles are wrong, or (b) modifications to the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule are required to fully describe the isospin structure of the nucleon. The helicity-dependent photo-reaction amplitudes, for both the proton and the neutron, will be measured at LEGS from pion-threshold to 470 MeV. In these double-polarization experiments, circularly polarized photons from LEGS will be used with SPHICE, a new frozen-spin target consisting of rvec H · rvec D in the solid phase. Reaction channels will be identified in SASY, a large detector array covering about 80% of 4π. A high degree of symmetry in both target and detector will be used to minimize systematic uncertainties

  9. A Meteorite Dropping Superbolide from the Catastrophycally Disrupted Comet C1919Q2 Metcalf: A Pathway for Meteorites from Jupiter Family Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Madiedo, J. M.; Williams, I. P.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Llorca, J.; Vítek, S.; Jelínek, M.

    2009-03-01

    A meter-sized meteoroid probably produced during the disintegration of comet C1919Q2 Metcalf was observed producing a -18 magn. bolide (MNRAS, in press).The progenitor meteoroid was sufficiently large and of high enough tensile strength to produce meteorites.

  10. W 2 and Q 2 dependence of charged hadron and pion multiplicities in vp andbar vp charged current interactionscharged current interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Hoffmann, E.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Allport, P.; Borner, H. P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1990-03-01

    Using data on vp andbar vp charged current interactions from a bubble chamber experiment with BEBC at CERN, the average multiplicities of charged hadrons and pions are determined as functions of W 2 and Q 2. The analysis is based on ˜20000 events with incident v and ˜10000 events with incidentbar v. In addition to the known dependence of the average multiplicity on W 2 a weak dependence on Q 2 for fixed intervals of W is observed. For W>2 GeV and Q 2>0.1 GeV2 the average multiplicity of charged hadrons is well described by =a 1+ a 2ln( W 2/GeV2)+ a 3ln( Q 2/GeV2) with a 1=0.465±0.053, a 2=1.211±0.021, a 3=0.103±0.014 for the vp and a 1=-0.372±0.073, a 2=1.245±0.028, a 3=0.093±0.015 for thebar vp reaction.

  11. W2 and Q2 dependence of charged hadron and pion multiplicities in νp and anti νp charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Allport, P.; Borner, H.P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1990-01-01

    Using data on νp and anti νp charged current interactions from a bubble chamber experiment with BEBC at CERN, the average multiplicities of charged hadrons and pions are determined as functions of W 2 and Q 2 . The analysis is based on ∝20000 events with incident ν and ∝10000 events with incident anti ν. In addition to the known dependence of the average multiplicity on W 2 a weak dependence on Q 2 for fixed intervals of W is observed. For W>2 Gev and Q 2 >0.1 GeV 2 the average multiplicity of charged hadrons is well described by =a 1 +a 2 ln(W 2 /GeV 2 )+a 3 ln(Q 2 /GeV 2 ) with a 1 =0.465±0.053, a 2 =1.211±0.021, a 3 =0.103±0.014 for the νp and a 1 =-0.372±0.073, a 2 =1.245±0.028, a=30.093±0.015 for the anti νp reaction. (orig.)

  12. Antioxidant mechanism of mitochondria-targeted plastoquinone SkQ1 is suppressed in aglycemic HepG2 cells dependent on oxidative phosphorylation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, J.; Engstová, Hana; Ježek, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1858, č. 9 (2017), s. 750-762 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-01813S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 * mitochondrial Complex I superoxide formation * mitochondrial Complex III superoxide formation * HepG2 cell s * NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.932, year: 2016

  13. Improved extraction of two-photon exchange amplitudes from elastic electron-proton scattering cross section data up to Q2=5.20 (GeV/c ) 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qattan, I. A.; Homouz, D.; Riahi, M. K.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we improve on and extend to low- and high-Q2 values the extractions of the two-photon-exchange (TPE) amplitudes and the ratio Pl/PlBorn(ɛ ,Q2) using world data on electron-proton elastic scattering cross section σR(ɛ ,Q2) with an emphasis on data covering the high-momentum region, up to Q2=5.20 (GeV/c ) 2 , to better constrain the TPE amplitudes in this region. We provide a new parametrization of the TPE amplitudes, along with an estimate of the fit uncertainties. We compare the results to several previous phenomenological extractions and hadronic TPE predictions. We use the new parametrization of the TPE amplitudes to extract the ratio Pl/PlBorn(ɛ ,Q2) , and then compare the results to previous extractions, several theoretical calculations, and direct measurements at Q2=2.50 (GeV/c ) 2 .

  14. Shelf life of fresh air packaged and precooked vacuum packaged quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Piras

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The shelf-life of 3 batches (Q1, Q2, Q3 of quail meat, were examined. Q1 were cut and seasoned with commercial olive oil, stoned green olive and sliced bacon. Q2 were divided into two subgroups: Q2.1 produced in the previously described conditions; Q2.2 seasoned also with rosemary. Quails were placed in lowdensity polystirene barrier trays and aerobically packaged. Q3 quails were boiled in salted hot water for 40 min, seasoned with myrtle leafs, placed in low density polyethylene bags and vacuum packaged. All samples were stored at +2 and +7°C. Analysis were conducted at 0, 3, 7, 9 and 14 days (T0, T3, T7, T9, and T14, respectively. For all the samples, pH measurement and microbial analysis [total viable count (TVC, Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, Lactobacillus spp. (LAB, Pseudomonas spp., Brochothrix thermosphacta, coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CNS, Enterococcus spp., yeasts and moulds, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes] were performed. Initial TVC levels of fresh quails (ca. 4 log CFU/g were rather high and this may be due to the microbial population of the raw material. In Q1 and Q2.1 samples, TVC reached the value of 7 log, which is considered as the upper acceptability limit for fresh poultry meat (after T9 under storage at +2°C and after T7 at +7°C. In Q2.2 samples such limit was reached earlier, after T3. In Q3 samples, lower TVC levels were recorded and did not reach the above mentioned limit, not even at the end of storage. However, mean counts >5 log were reached, maybe because of a post-cooking cross-contamination. Salmonella spp. prevalence was 33% in Q1, Q2.1 and Q2.2 samples.

  15. Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron at Q2=0.45 and 1.13 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeyuki Tajima

    2003-01-01

    Precise measurements of the electric form factor of the neutron, Gn E, over a wide range of the square of the four-momentum transfer, Q2, are important for understanding nucleon and nuclear electromagnetic structure. In the non-relativistic limit, the electric and magnetic form factors are related to the charge and magnetization distribution inside a nucleon, respectively. The measured values of the form factors also serve as an important test for nucleon models. Among the four nucleon form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron, Gn E, is the most difficult one to measure and therefore has been very poorly known especially in the region Q2 > 1 (GeV/c)2 due to the lack of a free neutron target and the small value of Gn E. The Jefferson Laboratory E93-038 collaboration measured the ratio of the electric to magnetic form factor of the neutron, g = Gn E/Gn M, at three acceptance-averaged Q2 values of 0.45, 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c)2 using the quasi-elastic 2H(∼e, e0∼n)1H reaction. In our experiment, an electron was scattered quasielastically from a neutron in a liquid-deuterium target, and the electron was detected in an electron spectrometer in coincidence with the neutron which was detected in a neutron polarimeter. The polarimeter was used to analyze the polarization of the recoil neutrons by measuring the np elastic scattering asymmetry. The experiment was performed in Hall-C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility during the period from September 2000 to April 2001. The value of g was determined from the measured ratio of the sideways and longitudinal components of the neutron polarization vector. The values for Gn E were computed from our measured values of g = Gn E/Gn M using the Gn M values obtained from a fit to the world data. The E93-038 collaboration reported the first measurements of Gn E using polarization techniques at Q2 greater than 1 (GeV/c)2. Furthermore, our measurements of Gn E at the two higher Q2 values of 1.13 and 1.45 (Ge

  16. Effect of NN correlations on predictions of nuclear transparencies for protons, knocked out in high Q2 (e,e'p) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinat, A.S.; Taragin, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    We study the transparency T of nuclei for nucleons knocked out in high-energy semi-inclusive (e,e'p) reactions, using an improved theoretical input, discussed by Nikolaev et al. We establish that neglect of NN correlations between the knocked-out and core nucleons reduces nuclear transparencies by ∼15 % for light, to ∼10% for heavy nuclei. About the same is predicted for transparencies, integrated over the transverse or longitudinal momentum of the outgoing proton. Hadron dynamics predicts a roughly constant T beyond Q 2 ∼2 GeV 2 , whereas for all targets the largest measured data point Q 2 =6.7 GeV 2 appears to lie above that plateau. Large error bars on those data points preclude a conclusion regarding the onset of colour transparency. (orig.)

  17. Measurement of F_2^ccbar and F_2^bbbar at High Q^2 using the H1 Vertex Detector at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, J.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements are presented of inclusive charm and beauty cross sections in e^+p collisions at HERA for values of photon virtuality Q^2 > 150 GeV^2 and of inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.7. The charm and beauty fractions are determined using a method based on the impact parameter, in the transverse plane, of tracks to the primary vertex, as measured by the H1 vertex detector. The data are divided into four regions in Q^2 and Bjorken x, and values for the structure functions F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} are obtained. The results are found to be compatible with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  18. Determination of the Pion Charge Form Factor at Q2=1.60 and 2.45 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, T.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C. C.; King, P. M.; Liu, J.; Roos, P. G.; Aniol, K.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Potterveld, D.; Reimer, P.; Zheng, X.; Barrett, B.; Sarty, A.; Blok, H. P.; Tvaskis, V.; Boeglin, W.; Markowitz, P.

    2006-01-01

    The 1 H(e,e ' π + )n cross section was measured at four-momentum transfers of Q 2 =1.60 and 2.45 GeV 2 at an invariant mass of the photon nucleon system of W=2.22 GeV. The charged pion form factor (F π ) was extracted from the data by comparing the separated longitudinal pion electroproduction cross section to a Regge model prediction in which F π is a free parameter. The results indicate that the pion form factor deviates from the charge-radius constrained monopole form at these values of Q 2 by one sigma, but is still far from its perturbative quantum chromodynamics prediction

  19. The O(αs3) massive operator matrix elements of O(nf) for the structure function F2(x,Q2) and transversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablinger, J.; Bluemlein, J.; Klein, S.; Schneider, C.; Wissbrock, F.

    2011-01-01

    The contributions ∝n f to the O(α s 3 ) massive operator matrix elements describing the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in the limit Q 2 >>m 2 are computed for the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) and transversity for general values of the Mellin variable N. Here, for two matrix elements, A qq,Q PS (N) and A qg,Q (N), the complete result is obtained. A first independent computation of the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions γ qg (N), γ qq PS (N), and γ qq NS,(TR) (N) is given. In the computation advanced summation technologies for nested sums over products of hypergeometric terms with harmonic sums have been used. For intermediary results generalized harmonic sums occur, while the final results can be expressed by nested harmonic sums only.

  20. A measurement of jet cross sections at low Q2 and an interpretation of the results in terms of a partonic structure of the virtual photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of single inclusive jet cross-sections are presented using deep inelastic scattering data from H1 in the kinematic region 0.65 2 2 and 0.3 2 2 and 0.1 T *2 >> Q 2 . The ratio σ(res)/σ(dir) is also presented and shows the partonic structure of the photon to decrease with increasing photon virtuality. (author)

  1. Deep inelastic inclusive and diffractive scattering at Q2 values from 25 to 320 GeV2 with the ZEUS forward plug calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-01-01

    Deep inelastic scattering and its diffractive component, ep→e'γ * p→e'XN, have been studied at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 52.4 pb -1 . The M X method has been used to extract the diffractive contribution. A wide range in the centre-of-mass energy W (37-245 GeV), photon virtuality Q 2 (20-450 GeV 2 ) and mass M X (0.28-35 GeV) is covered. The diffractive cross section for 2 X 2 increases. The data are also presented in terms of the diffractive structure function, F D(3) 2 , of the proton. For fixed Q 2 and fixed M X , x P F D(3) 2 shows a strong rise as x P →0, where x P is the fraction of the proton momentum carried by the Pomeron. For Bjorken-x -3 , x P F D(3) 2 shows positive log Q 2 scaling violations, while for x≥5 x 10 -3 negative scaling violations are observed. The diffractive structure function is compatible with being leading twist. The data show that Regge factorisation is broken. (orig.)

  2. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions and anomalous dimensions for the structure function F2(x,Q2) and transversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablinger, J.; Hasselhuhn, A.; Schneider, C.; Manteuffel, A. von

    2014-06-01

    We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) in the asymptotic region Q 2 >>m 2 and the associated operator matrix element A (3),NS qq,Q (N) to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N. This matrix element is associated to the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments N, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to O(N F ) and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in N space and harmonic polylogarithms in x-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to F 2 (x,Q 2 ).

  3. Production of Q2Q-bar2 mesoniums in γγ reactions, hardonic collisions, and J/psi radiative decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    The rho 0 rho 0 enhancement and the rho + rho - supression in γγ reactions near the threshold is taken as a strong evidence for an exotic isotensor quantum number which signals for the multi-quark (Q 2 Q-bar 2 ) structure. The mass and the cross sections agree well with the prediction based on the Q 2 Q-bar 2 structure. The 2 ++ phiphi resonance at 2.16 GeV in πp and pp collisions has been interpreted as a 2 ++ s 2 s-bar 2 mesonium. The calculated mass, width, and the cross sections are all in accord with the experimental data. The correlated J/psi pair produced around 7 GeV in πN collisions at 150 and 280 GeV/c has been considered as a 2 ++ c 2 c-bar 2 mesonium. The calculated cross sections and the longitudinal and transverse momentum distributions are consistent with the data. The calculated branching ratio for J/psi → γ(Q 2 Q-bar 2 ) 2 ++ → γ rho - rho 0 is compatible with the recent experimental upper limit and the ratios of the helicity amplitudes are distinct from the ones measured in J/psi → γ θ(1700) → γ etaeta, γ KK-bar. The branching ratio for J/γ → γ(s 2 s-bar 2 ) 2 ++ → γ phiphi is predicted to be --10 -6

  4. xF 3( x,Q 2) Structure Function and Gross-Llewellyn Smith Sum Rule with Nuclear Effect and Higher Twist Correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, N.M.; Mukharjee, A.; Das, M.K.; Sarma, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the xF 3 (x,Q 2 ) structure function and Gross-Llewellyn Smith(GLS) sum rule taking into account the nuclear effects and higher twist correction. This analysis is based on the results presented in [N.M. Nath, et al, Indian J. Phys. 90 (2016) 117]. The corrections due to nuclear effects predicted in several earlier analysis are incorporated to our results of xF 3 (x,Q 2 ) structure function and GLS sum rule for free nucleon, corrected upto next-next-to-leading order (NNLO) perturbative order and calculate the nuclear structure function as well as sum rule for nuclei. In addition, by means of a simple model we have extracted the higher twist contributions to the non-singlet structure function xF 3 (x,Q 2 ) and GLS sum rule in NNLO perturbative orders and then incorporated them to our results. Our NNLO results along with nuclear effect and higher twist corrections are observed to be compatible with corresponding experimental data and other phenomenological analysis. (paper)

  5. On the use of the stabilised Q1P0 element for geodynamical simulations and why this is a bad choice for buyoancy-driven flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieulot, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    Many Finite Element geodynamical codes (Fullsack,1995; Zhong et al., 2000; Thieulot, 2011) are based on bi/tri­-linear velocity constant pressure element (commonly called Q1P0), because of its ease of programming and rather low memory footprint, despite the presence of (pressure) checker­board modes. However, it is long known that the Q1P0 is not inf­-sup stable and does not lend itself to the use of iterative solvers, which makes it a less­ than­ ideal candidate for high resolution 3D models. Other attempts were made more recently (Burstedde et al., 2013; Le Pourhiet et al., 2012) with the use of the stabilised Q1Q1 element (bi/tri­-linear velocity and pressure). This element, while also attractive from an implementation and memory standpoint, suffers a major drawback due to the artificial compressibility introduced by the polynomial projection stabilization. These observations have shifted part of the community towards the Finite Difference Method while the remaining part is now embracing inf­sup stable second­ order elements [May et al., 2015; Kronbichler,2012). Rather surprinsingly, a third option exists when it comes to first ­order elements in the form of the stabilised Q1P0 element, but virtually no literature exists concerning its use for geodynamical applications. I will then recall the specificity of the stabilisation and will carry out a series of benchmark experiments and geodynamical tests to assess its performance. While being shown to work as expected in benchmark experiments, the stabilised Q1P0 element turns out to introduce first-order numerical artefacts in the velocity and pressure solutions in the case of buoyancy-driven flows. Burstedde, C., Stadler, G., Alisic, L., Wilcox, L. C., Tan, E., Gurnis, M., & Ghattas, O. (2013). Large­scale adaptive mantle convection simulation. Geophysical Journal International, 192(3), 889­906. Fullsack, P. (1995). An arbitrary Lagrangian­Eulerian formulation for creeping flows and its application in

  6. Induced Proton Polarization for pi0 Electroproduction at Q2 = 0.126 GeV2/c2 Around the Delta(1232) Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen Warren; Ricardo Alarcon; Christopher Armstrong; Burin Asavapibhop; David Barkhuff; William Bertozzi; Volker Burkert; Chen, J.; Jian-Ping Chen; Joseph Comfort; Daniel Dale; George Dodson; Dolfini, S.; Dow, K.; Martin Epstein; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; John Finn; Shalev Gilad; Ralf Gothe; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Kyungseon Joo; Karabarbounis, A.; James Kelly; Stanley Kowalski; Kunz, C.; Liu, D.; Lourie, R.W.; Richard Madey; Demetrius Margaziotis; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; Mertz, C.; Brian Milbrath; Rory Miskimen; Joseph Mitchell; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Costas Papanicolas; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Liming Qin; Paul Rutt; Adam Sarty; Jeffrey Shaw; Soong, S.B.; Tieger, D.; Christoph Tschalaer; William Turchinetz; Paul Ulmer; Scott Van Verst; Vellidis, C.; Lawrence Weinstein; Steven Williamson; Rhett Woo; Alaen Young

    1998-01-01

    We present a measurement of the induced proton polarization P n in π 0 electroproduction on the proton around the Δ resonance. The measurement was made at a central invariant mass and a squared four-momentum transfer of W = 1231 MeV and Q 2 = 0.126 GeV 2 /c 2 , respectively. We measured a large induced polarization, P n = -0.397 ± 0.055 ± 0.009. The data suggest that the scalar background is larger than expected from a recent effective Hamiltonian model

  7. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g_1^d(x) for 1 (GeV/c)^2 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2

    OpenAIRE

    E155 Collaboration

    1999-01-01

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g_1^d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g_1^d, including Gamma_1^d, and the net quark polarization Delta Si...

  8. Measurement of the deuteron spin structure function $g^{d}_1(x)$ for $1\\ (GeV/c)^2 < Q^2 < 40\\ (GeV/c)^2$.

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony , P.L.; Arnold , R.G.; Averett , T.; Band , H.R.; Berisso , M.C.; Borel , H.; Bosted , P.E.; Bultmann , S.L.; Buenerd , M.; Chupp , T.; Churchwell , S.; Court , G.R.; Crabb , D.; Day , D.; Decowski , P.

    1999-01-01

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g_1^d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g_1^d, including Gamma_1^d, and the net quark polarization Delta Si...

  9. Measurement of the cross-section ratio σn/σp in inelastic muon-nucleon scattering at very low x and Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavassiliou, V.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented on the measurement of the cross-section ratio σ n /σ p inelastic μN scattering obtained by the E-665 experiment using the Fermilab 490 GeV/c muon beam and liquid H 2 and D 2 targets. The results extend the previously measured x range by two orders of magnitude, down to 2 x 10 -5 , at Q 2 > 10 -2 GeV 2 /C 2 . The ratio is consistent with 1 throughout the new range

  10. Precision measurement of the cross section of charged-current and neutral current processes at large Q2 at HERA with the polarized-electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Trong Hieu

    2010-03-01

    The inclusive cross sections for both charged and neutral current processes have been measured in interactions of longitudinally polarized electrons (positrons) with unpolarized protons using the full data samples collected by H1 at HERA-II. The data taken at a center-of-mass energy of 319 GeV correspond to an integrated luminosity of 149.1 pb -1 and 180.0 pb -1 for e - p and e + p collisions, representing an increase in statistics of a factor of 10 and 2, respectively, over the data from HERA-I. The measured double differential cross sections d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 cover more than two orders of magnitude in both Q 2 , the negative four-momentum transfer squared, up to 30000 GeV 2 , and Bjorken x, down to 0.003. The cross section data are compared to predictions of the Standard Model which is able to provide a good description of the data. The polarization asymmetry as a function of Q 2 is measured with improved precision, confirming the previous observation of P violation effect in neutral current ep scattering at distances down to 10 -18 m. The total cross sections of the charged current process, for Q 2 > 400 GeV 2 and inelasticity y ± beams and different polarization values. Together with the corresponding cross section obtained from the previously published unpolarized data, the polarization dependence of the charged current cross section is measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model prediction with the absence of right-handed charged current. The cross sections are combined with previously published data from H1 to obtain the most precise unpolarized measurements. These are used to extract the structure function xF 3 γZ which is sensitive to the valence quark distributions down to low x values. The new cross sections have also been used in a combined electroweak and QCD fit to significantly improve the light quark couplings to the Z-boson than those obtained based on the HERA-I data alone. (orig.)

  11. Spin asymmetries $A_1$ of the proton and the deuteron in the low $x$ and low $Q^2$ region from polarized high energy muon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Krämer, Dietrich; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Willumeit, R; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of the spin asymmetries $A_1$ of the proton and the deuteron in the kinematic region extending down to $x=6\\cdot 10^{-5}$ and $Q^2=0.01$ GeV$^2$. The data were taken with a dedicated low $x$ trigger, which required hadron detection in addition to the scattered muon, so as to reduce the background at low $x$. The results complement our previous measurements and the two sets are consistent in the overlap region. No sig\\-ni\\-fi\\-cant spin effects are found in the newly explored region.

  12. Spin asymmetry $A^d_1$ and the spin-dependent structure function $g^d_1$ of the deuteron at low values of $x$ and $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, E.S.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berglund, P.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Cerini, L.; Chapiro, A.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz Kavka, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Dolgopolov, A.V.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Ehlers, J.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Fabro, M.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchs, U.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grunemaier, A.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; He, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Ijaduola, R.B.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kang, D.; Karstens, F.; Kastaun, W.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomutov, N.V.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kowalik, K.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Manuilov, I.V.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Medved, K.S.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pereira, H.D.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Platzer, K.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Rebourgeard, P.C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymann, J.; Rith, K.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Rondio, E.; Sadovski, A.B.; Saller, E.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sans, M.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Savin, Igor A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, H.; Schmitt, L.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Shishkin, A.A.; Siebert, H.-W.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Skachkova, A.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sozzi, F.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takabayashi, N.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Thers, D.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Toeda, T.; Tretyak, V.I.; Trusov, Sergey V.; Varanda, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Wagner, M.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Wiedner, U.; Wiesmann, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zaremba, K.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Zvyagin, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a precise measurement of the deuteron longitudinal spin asymmetry $A_1^d$ and of the deuteron spin-dependent structure function $g_1^d$ at $Q^2 < $ 1~(GeV/$c$)$^2$ and $4\\cdot$10$^{-5} < x < $~2.5$\\cdot$10$^{-2}$ based on the data collected by the COMPASS experiment at CERN during the years 2002 and 2003. The statistical precision is tenfold better than that of the previous measurement in this region. The measured $A_1^d$ and $g_1^d$ are found to be consistent with zero in the whole range of $x$.

  13. The evolution of configuration from q > 1 to q < 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng

    1993-06-01

    The evolution of configuration from an initial state of tokamak-like plasma to RFP (reversed field pinch) along the trajectory of minimum energy state is studied. the high plasma current allowed in a RFP is expected to be sufficient to heat the plasma to ignition without the need of auxiliary neutral-beam or radio-frequency heating

  14. Chromosome break points in T-lymphocytes from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Kamada, Nanao; Ohkita, Takeshi; Kuramoto, Atsushi

    1982-01-01

    In 22 healthy A-bomb survivors who passed more than 30 years since receiving radiation, distribution of 592 chromosome break points found in T-lymphocytes of the peripheral blood was not proportional to the length, the arm length of chromosomes, nor the length of regions, but it was non-random on the chromosomes. High distribution of chromosome break points occurred in 11 regions: 22q1, 14q3, 5q3, 21q2, 6q2, 18p1, 13q3. The regions, 22q1, 14q3, 21q2, and 6q2, contained the chromosome break points which were frequently found in leukemic chromosomes. Some of the changes in nuclear-type observed in leukemic cells of A-bomb survivors were similar to those found in leukemic cells of non-exposed leukemic patients. In abnormal chromosomes of T-lymphocytes of healthy A-bomb survivors, no cells with abnormal nuclear types such as t(4;11), t(8;21), t(9;22), and t(15;17) which are seen in various types of leukemia were not found. However, cells with chromosome aberrations, 22q-, 14q+, and 6q-, were found to be 0.99%, 0.55%, and 0.25% respectively. On the basis of these results, implication of chromosome aberrations in developing cancer was discussed. (Ueda, J.)

  15. Experimental study of cross-section ratios in the collisions of Cq+ and Oq+ (q = 1–4) on atomic helium in strong-interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xi-Meng; Jiang Li-Juan; Zhou Peng; Zhou Chun-Lin; Gao Zhi-Min; Qiu Xi-Yu; Cui Ying; Wang Xing-An; Lou Feng-Jun; Lü Xue-Yang; Jia Juan-Juan; Chen Lin; Shao Jian-Xiong; Lü Ying; Wang Fan

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the cross-section ratios of helium induced by C q+ and O q+ (q = 1–4) in an energy range from 20 keV/amu to 500 keV/amu, and obtained the two-dimensional spectra by employing the coincidence method combined with the MPA-3 data acquisition system. Hence, we obtain the ratios of total single-ionization cross-sections (SI, SC, SLSI, and DLSI), total double-ionization cross-sections (DI, DC, TI, SLDI, and DLDI) and cross-sections of every process (SI, SC, SLSI, DLSI, DI, DC, TI, SLDI, and DLDI), which induce the single-ionization and double-ionization, to the total cross sections respectively. The competitive relations between the reaction-channels and the experimental data law of each reaction-channel are revealed explicitly, and the qualitative explanations involved in those results are also presented accordingly. (atomic and molecular physics)

  16. HYPOLIPIDEMIC EFFECT OF CURCUMIN OR CO-ENZYME Q1-0 AND THEIR MIXTURE ON OBESE RATS FED A HIGH CHOLESTEROL DIET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHAHIN, M.I.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, hyperlipidemia was induced in the rats by feeding diet enriched with cholesterol for two weeks. After 2 weeks of induction of hypercholesterolemia in rats and in comparison to normal rats, the results showed that incorporation of extra cholesterol in diet led to significant increases in serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, leptin and MDA levels. On the other hand, total serum triiodothyronine (T3), liver glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were decreased significantly in cholesterol fed rats. The concentration of TBARS in the liver was elevated.All previous parameters were corrected after the hypercholesterolemic rats were treated with curcumin or co-enzyme Q 1 -0 or a mixture of them dependent on the time of treatment. These findings are consistent with the concept that curcumin and co-enzyme Q 10 are antioxidant agents. The underlying mechanisms of these effects were discussed

  17. The dynamics of the quasielastic 16O(e,e'p) reaction at Q2 = 0.8 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissum, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    The physics program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab commenced in the summer of 1997 with a detailed investigation of the 16O(e,e'p) reaction in quasielastic, constant (q,w) kinematics at Q 2 ∼ 0.8 (GeV/c) 2 , q ∼ 1 GeV/c, and w ∼ 445 MeV. Use of a self-calibrating, self-normalizing, thin-film waterfall target enabled a systematically rigorous measurement. Differential cross-section data for proton knockout were obtained for 0 < Emiss < 120 MeV and 0 < pmiss < 350 MeV/c. These results have been used to extract the ALT asymmetry and the RL, RT, RLT, and RL+TT effective response functions. Detailed comparisons of the data with Relativistic Distorted-Wave Impulse Approximation, Relativistic Optical-Model Eikonal Approximation, and Relativistic Multiple-Scattering Glauber Approximation calculations are made. The kinematic consistency of the 1p-shell normalization factors extracted from these data with respect to all available 16O(e,e'p) data is examined. The Q2-dependence of the normalization factors is also discussed

  18. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e-p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e - p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q 2 and x are measured in the kinematic region y 2 > 185GeV 2 for both positively and negatively polarised electron beams and for each polarisation state separately. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 169.9 pb -1 taken with the ZEUS detector in 2005 and 2006 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV. The structure functions xF 3 and xF 3 γZ are determined by combining the e - p results presented in this paper with previously measured e + p neutral current data. The asymmetry parameter A - is used to demonstrate the parity violating effects of electroweak interactions at large spacelike photon virtuality. The measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  19. A Study of the $Q^{2}$ Dependence of the QCD Coupling Constant from the Transverse Momentum of Jets in Deep Inelastic Muon Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Janet Marie [Harvard U.

    1993-01-01

    Experiment 665 at Fermilab is the first deep inelastic scattering experiment to obtain data in a kinematic range where jets can be identified on an event-by-event basis. In this thesis, using the average squared transverse momentum of the jets produced in deep inelastic muon scattering, a quantity is calculated which Perturbative QCD predicts to be equal to $\\alpha_3$ the strong coupling constant. The quantity is studied as a function of $Q^2$, the negative 4-momentum squared of the virtual photon, for 3 < $Q^2$ < 25 $GeV^2$. The data a.re shown to be consistent with the predictions of PQCD with $\\Lambda ^{\\eta_f = 4}_{DIS}$ = 359 ± 31 (stat) ± 149 (sys) MeV. However this may have a significant theoretical error due to uncalculated higher order corrections. This thesis provides a detailed description of the characteristics of the identified jets. The transverse momentum due to fragmentation is measured to be ($P^2_{\\tau}frag$) = 0.0820 ±0.002(stat) ±0.005(sys). Using naive assumptions about the jets, the intrinsic transverse momentum is measured to be ($k^2_{\\tau}$) = 0.27 ±0.01 (stat) ±0.03 (sys) Gev·2

  20. Assessment of Bias in the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Reanalysis Radar-Only Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, B. R.; Prat, O. P.; Stevens, S. E.; Seo, D. J.; Zhang, J.; Howard, K.

    2014-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is nearly completed for the period covering from 2001 to 2012. Reanalysis data are available at 1-km and 5-minute resolution. An important step in generating the best possible precipitation data is to assess the bias in the radar-only product. In this work, we use data from a combination of rain gauge networks to assess the bias in the NMQ reanalysis. Rain gauge networks such as the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), the Climate Reference Network (CRN), and the Global Historical Climatology Network Daily (GHCN-D) are combined for use in the assessment. These rain gauge networks vary in spatial density and temporal resolution. The challenge hence is to optimally utilize them to assess the bias at the finest resolution possible. For initial assessment, we propose to subset the CONUS data in climatologically representative domains, and perform bias assessment using information in the Q2 dataset on precipitation type and phase.

  1. Cross sections and Rosenbluth separations in 1H(e,e'K+)Λ up to Q2=2.35 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coman, M.; Markowitz, P.; Boeglin, W. U.; Klein, F.; Kramer, L.; Raue, B.; Reinhold, J.; Aniol, K. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Baker, K.; Cha, J.; Cole, L.; Gueye, P.; Hinton, W.; Jackson, C.; Keppel, C.; Tang, L.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C. C.; Chant, N.

    2010-01-01

    The kaon electroproduction reaction 1 H(e,e ' K + )Λ was studied as a function of the virtual-photon four-momentum, Q 2 , total energy, W, and momentum transfer, t, for different values of the virtual-photon polarization parameter. Data were taken at electron beam energies ranging from 3.40 to 5.75 GeV. The center of mass cross section was determined for twenty-one kinematics corresponding to Q 2 of 1.90 and 2.35 GeV 2 , and the longitudinal, σ L , and transverse, σ T , cross sections were separated using the Rosenbluth technique at fixed W and t. The separated cross sections reveal a flat energy dependence at forward kaon angles not satisfactorily described by existing electroproduction models. Influence of the kaon pole on the cross sections was investigated by adopting an off-shell form factor in the Regge model, which better describes the observed energy dependence of σ T and σ L .

  2. Angular analysis of the $B^0 \\to K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay in the low-$q^2$ region at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Borsato, Martino

    2015-01-01

    An angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay is performed using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0${\\mbox {fb}^{-1}}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. For the first time several observables are measured in the dielectron mass squared ($q^2$) interval between 0.002 and 1.120${\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V^2\\!/}c^4}$. The angular observables $F_{\\mathrm{L}}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}}$ which are related to the \\Kstarz polarisation and to the lepton forward-backward asymmetry, are measured to be $F_{\\mathrm{L}}= 0.16 \\pm 0.06 \\pm0.03$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}} = 0.10 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.05$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The angular observables $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Im}}$ which are sensitive to the photon polarisation in this $q^2$ range, are found to be $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)} = -0.23 \\pm 0.23 \\pm...

  3. Determination of the proton spin structure functions for 0.05 <Q2<5 GeV2 using CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fersch, R. G.; Guler, N.; Bosted, P.; Deur, A.; Griffioen, K.; Keith, C.; Kuhn, S. E.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adhikari, S.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Balossino, I.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Thanh Cao, Frank; Carman, D. S.; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khachatryan, M.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lagerquist, V. G.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pierce, J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Riser, D.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of our final analysis of the full data set of g1p(Q2) , the spin structure function of the proton, collected using CLAS at Jefferson Laboratory in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2, and 5.7 GeV were scattered from proton targets (NH153 dynamically polarized along the beam direction) and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetries, we extracted virtual photon asymmetries A1p and A2p and spin structure functions g1p and g2p over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2<Q2< 5 GeV2 and 1.08 GeV

  4. Resource Letter Q-1: quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, O.W.

    1982-01-01

    Quarks as fundamental constituents of hadrons play a central role in elementary particle physics. We give an annotated bibliography of references to quarks and related topics in elementary particle physics, as well as to the role of quarks in areas outside elementary particle physics, such as nuclear physics, and astrophysics and cosmology. We label references E (elementary), I (intermediate), and A (advanced) to guide the reader. Articles selected for incorporation in a reprint volume (to be published separately by the American Association of Physics Teachers) are indicated by an an asterisk. A short list of particularly helpful elementary and intermediate references is indicated by a star

  5. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio GEn/GMn via the 2H(e→,e'n→)1H reaction to Q2=1.45 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaster, B.; Semenov, A.Yu.; Semenova, I.A.; Aghalaryan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Tadevosyan, V.; Crouse, E.; Finn, J.M.; Perdrisat, C.; Roche, J.; MacLachlan, G.; Opper, A.K.; Tajima, S.; Churchwell, S.; Howell, C.R.; Tireman, W.; Ahmidouch, A.; Anderson, B. D.

    2006-01-01

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G En /G Mn , deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic 2 H(e→,e ' n→) 1 H reaction, at three Q 2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c) 2 . The data at Q 2 =1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c) 2 are the first direct experimental measurements of G En employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q 2 >1 (GeV/c) 2 region and stand as the most precise determinations of G En for all values of Q 2

  6. Measurement of the electron--deuteron elastic scattering cross section in the range 0.8 less than or equal to q2 less than or equal to 6 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.G.; Chertok, B.T.; Dally, E.B.; Grigorian, A.; Jordan, C.L.; Schuetz, W.P.; Zdarko, R.; Martin, F.; Mecking, B.A.

    1975-06-01

    Preliminary results of elastic eD scattering at large momentum transfer performed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using two high resolution spectrometers in coincidence are reported. The deuteron structure function A(q 2 ) is deduced at 9 values of q 2 from a comparison of elastic eD and eP coincident yields and the world's eP cross sections. These measurements extend the range of q 2 by 4.5 over previous work, and in this new range A(q 2 ) is observed to approach 1/q 20 momentum dependence. Results are in sharp disagreement with the meson exchange calculations, and they are in rough agreement with the nonrelativistic potential models, and they are in agreement with the predictions of the quark dimensional scaling model which pictures the deuteron as a bound state of 6 quarks at large momentum transfer

  7. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form-factor ratio GEn/GMn via the 2H((rvec e), e(prime)(rvec n)) 1H reaction to Q2 = 1.45-(GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley Plaster; A.Yu. Semenov; A. Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; David Barkhuff; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Eden; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; Richard Madey; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Nikolai Savvinov; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Shawn Taylor; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2006-01-01

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G En /G Mn , deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic 2 H((rvec e), e(prime)(rvec n)) 1 H reaction, at three Q 2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c) 2 . The data at Q 2 = 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c) 2 are the first direct experimental measurements of GEn employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q 2 > 1 (GeV/c) 2 region and stand as the most precise determinations of GEn for all values of Q 2

  8. SkQ1 Ophthalmic Solution for Dry Eye Treatment: Results of a Phase 2 Safety and Efficacy Clinical Study in the Environment and During Challenge in the Controlled Adverse Environment Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anton; Perekhvatova, Natalia; Skulachev, Maxim; Stein, Linda; Ousler, George

    2016-01-01

    This Phase 2 clinical trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the novel antioxidative, renewable compound SkQ1 for topical treatment of dry eye signs and symptoms. In a single-center, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, 29-day study, 91 subjects with mild to moderate dry eye instilled the study drug twice daily and recorded dry eye symptoms daily. Subjects were randomized 1:1:1 into one of three ophthalmic solution treatment groups: SkQ1 1.55 µg/mL, SkQ1 0.155 µg/mL, or 0.0 µg/mL (placebo). Subjects were exposed to a controlled adverse environment chamber at 3 of the 4 study visits (Day -7, Day 1, and Day 29). Investigator assessments occurred at all study visits. SkQ1 was safe and efficacious in treating dry eye signs and symptoms. Statistically significant improvements with SkQ1 compared to placebo occurred for the dry eye signs of corneal fluorescein staining and lissamine green staining in the central region and lid margin redness, and for the dry eye symptoms of ocular discomfort, dryness, and grittiness. In addition, SkQ1 demonstrated greater efficacy compared to placebo, although the differences were not statistically significant, for corneal fluorescein staining in other regions and/or time points (total staining score, central region, corneal sum score, and temporal region), lissamine green staining for the central and nasal regions, and blink rate scores. This Phase 2 study indicated that SkQ1 is safe and efficacious for the treatment of dry eye signs and symptoms and supported previous study results. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02121301. Miotech S.A.

  9. O(αs2) and O(αs3) heavy flavor contributions to transversity at Q2 >> m2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, Johannes; Klein, Sebastian; Toedtli, Beat

    2009-09-01

    In deep-inelastic processes the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients factorize for Q 2 >>m 2 into the light flavor Wilson coefficients of the corresponding process and the massive operator matrix elements (OMEs). We calculate the O(α s 2 ) and O(α s 3 ) massive OME for the flavor non-singlet transversity distribution. At O(α s 2 ) the OME is obtained for general values of the Mellin variable N, while at O(α s 3 ) the moments N=1 to 13 are computed. The terms ∝ T F of the 3.loop transversity anomalous dimension are obtained and results in the literature are confirmed. We discuss the relation of these contributions to the Soffer bound for transversity. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of the proton structure from high-Q2 neutral current events in e+p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnurbusch, H.

    2002-09-01

    Inclusive Neutral Current cross sections in e + p deep inelastic scattering yielding the generalised structure function F 2 have been measured in the regime of Q 2 > 185 GeV 2 . The data sample of 63.2 pb -1 was collected in the 1999/2000 data-taking period of the ZEUS experiment at the HERA collider. The centre-of-mass energy was √(s) = 318 GeV. Statistical and systematic uncertainties have been calculated throughout the kinematical range of the data. Systematic uncertainties were studied including photoproduction background, first-level trigger efficiency and the hadronic final state in the Forward Tracking Devices of the detector. The structure function F 2 was measured more precisely than in earlier measurements due to the larger data set and due to increased knowledge about systematic effects. The results are in good agreement with the Standard Model evaluated with the CTEQ5D parton distribution functions. (orig.)

  11. Deuteron electrofission in forward direction at a four-momentum transfer of Q2=0.12 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boden, B.

    1990-12-01

    The deuteron electrodisintegration has been performed as the first experiment at the new Bonn 3.5 GeV high duty-cycle electron accelerator ELSA (Electron Stretcher and Accelerator). The cross section was measured in the region of the Δ(1232) resonance excitation at four-momentum-transfer of Q 2 = 0.12 (GeV/c) 2 . An enhancement of the cross section has been observed at the mass of the NΔ system(W = 2.19 GeV) at each of the three hadron spectrometer angles Θ p LAB = 44 0 , 56 0 , 68 0 ) which were set. The results are compared with theoretical calculations. (orig.) [de

  12. Electric form factor of the neutron from the 2H(e-->,e'n-->)1H reaction at Q2=0.255 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Eden; R. Madey; W.-M. Zhang; B. D. Anderson; H. Arenhvel; A. R. Baldwin; D. Barkhuff; K. B. Beard; W. Bertozzi; J. M. Cameron; C. C. Chang; G. W. Dodson; K. Dow; M. Farkhondeh; J. M. Finn; B. S. Flanders; C. Hyde-Wright; W.-D. Jiang; D. Keane; J. J. Kelly; W. Korsch; S. Kowalski; R. Lourie; D. M. Manley; P. Markowitz; J. Mougey; B. Ni; T. Payerle; P. J. Pella; T. Reichelt; P. M. Rutt; M. Spraker; D. Tieger; W. Turchinetz; P. E. Ulmer; S. Van Verst; J. W. Watson; L. B. Weinstein; and R. R. Whitney

    1994-01-01

    We determined the electric form factor GnE of the neutron from the quasielastic 2H(e-->,e'n-->)1H reaction at a central squared four-momentum transfer Q2=0.255 (GeV/c)2 with a longitudinally polarized electron beam of 868 MeV and a low (∼0.8%) duty factor. A neutron polarimeter designed and constructed specifically for this experiment was used to measure the sideways polarization of the recoil neutron, which was detected in coincidence with the scattered electron. Theoretical calculations have established that this polarization-transfer technique for quasielastic scattering produces a value of GnE that shows little sensitivity to the influence of final-state interactions, meson-exchange currents, isobar configurations, and deuteron structure. The value for GnE from this measurement is 0.066 ± 0.036 ± 0.009

  13. Measurement of e-p→e-X differential cross sections at high Q2 and of the structure function xF3 with ZEUS at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappes, A.

    2001-12-01

    The 16 pb -1 of e - p data taken with the ZEUS detector during the 1998/99 running period of HERA have been used to measure neutral current single- and double-differential cross sections in deep inelastic e - p scattering in the range 200 GeV 2 2 2 and 3.7.10 -3 2 is visible. A comparison of the measured e - p cross sections to those from e + p clearly reveals the influence of the Z-boson contribution for Q 2 >or∼ M Z 2 . This dependence is exploited to determine the mass of the Z boson, M Z , and by combining the e - p and e + p cross sections the parity violating structure function xF 3 is extracted for the first time in deep-inelastic ep scattering at ZEUS. (orig.)

  14. Mellin moments of the O(αs3) heavy flavor contributions to unpolarized deep-inelastic scattering at Q2 >> m2 and anomalous dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierenbaum, I.; Bluemlein, J.; Klein, S.

    2009-04-01

    We calculate the O(α s 3 ) heavy flavor contributions to theWilson coefficients of the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) and the massive operator matrix elements (OMEs) for the twist-2 operators of unpolarized deeply inelastic scattering in the region Q 2 >>m 2 . The massive Wilson coefficients are obtained as convolutions of massive OMEs and the known light flavor Wilson coefficients. We also compute the massive OMEs which are needed to evaluate heavy flavor parton distributions in the variable flavor number scheme (VFNS) to 3-loop order. All contributions to the Wilson coefficients and operator matrix elements but the genuine constant terms at O(α s 3 ) of the OMEs are derived in terms of quantities, which are known for general values in the Mellin variable N. For the operator matrix elements A (3) Qg , A (3) gq,Q and A (3) gg,Q the moments N=2 to 10, for A (3),PS Qq to N=12, and for A (3),NS qq,Q , A (3),PS qq,Q , A (3),PS gq,Q to N=14 are computed. These terms contribute to the light flavor +-combinations. For the flavor non-singlet terms, we calculate as well the odd moments N=1 to 13, corresponding to the light flavor --combinations. We also obtain the moments of the 3-loop anomalous dimensions, their color projections for the present processes respectively, in an independent calculation, which agree with the results given in the literature. (orig.)

  15. Single-electron-capture processes in collisions of He2+, Liq+ (q=1,2,3), C6+, and O8+ ions with helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, R.; Purkait, M.; Mandal, C. R.

    2011-01-01

    Cross sections for single-electron capture in collisions of He 2+ , Li q+ (q = 1,2,3), C 6+ , and O 8+ ions with helium atoms at incident energy ranging from 50 to 5000 keV/amu have been calculated in the framework of four-body boundary-corrected continuum intermediate state (BCCIS-4B) approximation in both prior and post forms. In this formalism, distortion in the final channel related to the Coulomb continuum states of the projectile ion and the active electron in the field of residual target ion are included. In all cases, total single-electron-capture cross sections have been calculated by summing over all contributions up to n = 3 shells and subshells, respectively. It has been observed that the contribution of the capture cross section into the excited states is significant for asymmetric collision (Z P >Z T ) and is insignificant for symmetric collision. Numerical results for the total cross sections show good agreement with the available experimental findings, particularly in the post form. Post-prior discrepancy has been found to be within 30% except for Li + + He interactions below 150 keV/amu.

  16. The correct Q1D electrodynamical part of a model for the fluid flow in a faraday segmented magnetohydrodynamic generator channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajovic, V.S.

    1995-01-01

    A Faraday ideally segmented (the absence of the Hall electric current I x =0) MHD generator channel, with a weakly ionized plasma as a working fluid, is considered. The magnetic field is applied along the z axis and the working fluid flows along the x axis. The stationary state of the flow and the stationary electric current are considered. The new quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) electrodynamical part of a model is developed. The main assumption (besides j z = 0, E z = 0) taken in the whole working fluid flow, is j x = 0. It means that the bending of the electric current pattern in the working fluid, due to the nonmassive electrodes and the presence of the magnetic field, is not explicitly considered. In the frame of the assumption taken, the legitimacy regarding the equation of conservation of charges: div rvec j = 0 suggests that the straight electric current pattern in the model should be narrow. In other words, it suggests replacing of a rather complicated electric current pattern in a working fluid by an artificially straight and narrow one in the modeling, promising that it would still be possible to describe the global channel parameters - its electrical output, the influence of the shape and the size of the channel on the generator performance etc

  17. Helicity description of e+e- → qanti qg and e+e- → Qanti Q(1--) → ggg on and off the Z0: quark, gluon and beam polarization effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, D.H.; Koerner, J.G.

    1981-07-01

    We develop the helicity description for the processes e + e - → qanti qg and e + e - → Qanti Q(1 -- ) → ggg(γgg) in the purely electromagnetic case, in the γ-Z 0 interference region and on the Z 0 -pole. We present complete differential cross section formulas including beam, quark and gluon polarization effects. We also treat the corresponding processes e + e - → qanti qS and e + e - → Qanti Q(1 -- ) → SSS(γSS) involving scalar gluons. (orig.)

  18. Relationship Between the Relative Age Effect and Lengths of Professional Careers in Male Japanese Baseball Players: a Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Hiroki

    2017-12-01

    The mechanisms underlying the relative age effect in sport events have been investigated for more than two decades. The present study focused on the relationship between the relative age effect and lengths of professional careers among professional male Japanese baseball players. The birth dates of players and lengths of professional careers were collected from an official publication, and data were divided into four quarters (Q1: April-June; Q2: July-September; Q3: October-December; Q4: January-March of the following year) grouped by 3 years. Based on the data for Q4, the expected numbers for the lengths of professional careers were calculated for Q1, Q2, and Q3. The number of players with professional careers of more than 19 years was significantly smaller in Q4 than in Q1, Q2, and Q3. The relative age effect among professional male Japanese baseball players was associated with the lengths of professional careers. Relative age appears to be a very important factor for the development of expertise among male Japanese baseball players and involves long-term disadvantages after becoming professional players.

  19. Association between self-reported sleep duration and serum vitamin D level in elderly Korean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Hong; Chang, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong Young; Kang, Ju Wan

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the association between self-reported sleep duration and serum vitamin D level in elderly Korean adults. Cross-sectional data analysis. Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010. Noninstitutionalized adults aged 60 to 80 (N = 1,614). The confounding variables were serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level, age, sex, body mass index, smoking history, alcohol consumption, and self-reported daily sun exposure and sleep duration. Self-reported daily sleep duration was divided into four groups: Q1 (≤4 hours), Q2 (5-6 hours), Q3 (7-8 hours), and Q4 (≥9 hours). Mean serum vitamin D levels of subjects in the Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4 groups were 44.18, 48.08, 48.83, and 51.78 nmol/L, respectively. On multivariate linear regression analysis, subjects in the Q2 (B = 3.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.42-7.19), Q3 (B = 4.89, 95% CI = 1.54-8.24), and Q4 (B = 5.18, 95% CI = 0.78-9.58) groups had significantly higher serum vitamin D levels than subjects in the Q1 group. Serum vitamin D level is positively associated with self-reported daily sleep duration in elderly Korean individuals. These results suggest that inadequate sleep duration may be associated with lower vitamin D levels in elderly adults. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Decays of mesons containing heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannathan, K.

    1980-01-01

    We find that the spectator model fails to describe the non-leptonic decays satisfactorily because the hadronization of the two quark-antiquark pairs in the final state is not treated properly. A final state q anti q pair, in this model, can be in both color-singlet and color-octet states; however a color-octet q anti q state cannot evolve into ordinary (color-singlet) hadrons without exchanging color with the other color-octet q anti q pair. Such interactions are ignored in the usual treatment. We propose an alternative model - called the color singlet model - where we consider the final state to be made up of jets of only color-singlet (q anti q) states, and the interactions leading to this configuration are described by an effective Hamiltonian. In our model, any final state of the type anti q 1 q 2 anti q 3 q 4 will form two different color-singlet jet configurations vis. (anti q 1 q 2 )(anti q 3 q 4 )(anti q 1 q 4 )(anti q 3 q 2 ). We show that these considerations lead naturally to a difference in the lifetimes of the D 0 and D - mesons. An alternative model discussed in the literature for explaining the difference in D 0 and D + lifetimes is also outlined and a critical account of the differences in the predictions of the two models is presented

  1. On colour rearrangement in hadronic W+W- events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, T.; Khoze, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of colour rearrangement in e + e - →W + W - →q 1 anti q 2 q 3 anti q 4 events, i.e. that the original colour singlets q 1 anti q 2 and q 3 anti q 4 may be transmuted, for instance, into new singlets q 1 anti q 4 and q 3 anti q 2 . The effects on event properties could be quite large if such a rearrangement would occur instantaneously, so that gluon emission would be restricted to each of the new singlets separately. We argue that such a scenario is unlikely for two reasons. Firstly, the W + and W - usually decay at separate times after the W + W - production, which leads to large relative phases for energetic radiation off the two constituents of a rearranged system, and a corresponding dampening of the QCD cascades. Secondly, within the perturbative scenario the colour transmutation appears only in order α s 2 and is colour-suppressed. Colour reconnection at longer time scales is quite feasible, however, and may affect the fragmentation phase. If so, the nature of non-perturbative QCD can be probed in a new way. We formulate several alternative toy models and use these to estimate the colour reconnection probability as a function of the event kinematics. Possible consequences for LEP 2 events are illustrated, with special attention to systematic errors in W mass determinations. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of Inclusive ep Cross Sections at High Q2 at sqrt(s) = 225 and 252 GeV and of the Longitudinal Proton Structure Function FL at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Herbst, M.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raspereza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2014-04-08

    Inclusive ep double differential cross sections for neutral current deep inelastic scattering are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were taken with a lepton beam energy of 27.6 GeV and two proton beam energies of Ep = 460 and 575 GeV corresponding to centre-of-mass energies of 225 and 252 GeV, respectively. The measurements cover the region of 6.5 *10^{-4}<=x<= 0.65 for 35<=Q^2<=800 GeV^2 up to y = 0.85. The measurements are used together with previously published H1 data at Ep = 920 GeV and lower Q2 data at Ep = 460, 575 and 920 GeV to extract the longitudinal proton structure function FL in the region 1.5<=Q^2 <=800 GeV^2.

  3. Precise Extraction of the Neutron Magnetic Form Factor from Quasi-elastic 3He(pol)(e(pol),e') at Q2 = 0.1-0.6 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jens-ole Hansen; Brian Anderson; Leonard Auerbach; Todd Averett; William Bertozzi; Tim Black; John Calarco; Lawrence Cardman; Gordon Cates; Zhengwei Chai; Jiang-Ping Chen; Seonho Choi; Eugene Chudakov; Steve Churchwell; G Corrado; Christopher Crawford; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Dipangkar Dutta; John Finn; Haiyan Gao; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Charles Glashausser; Walter Gloeckle; Jacek Golak; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Calvin Howell; Emlyn Hughes; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Piotr Zolnierczuk; Cornelis De Jager; John Jensen; Xiaodong Jiang; Cathleen Jones; Mark Jones; R Kahl; H Kamada; A Kievsky; Ioannis Kominis; Wolfgang Korsch; Kevin Kramer; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Michael Kuss; Enkeleida Lakuriqi; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; John LeRose; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Jeffery Martin; Kathy McCormick; Robert McKeown; Kevin McIlhany; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Greg Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Sirish Nanda; Emanuele Pace; Tina Pavlin; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; David Pripstein; David Prout; Ronald Ransome; Yves Roblin; Marat Rvachev; Giovanni Salme; Michael Schnee; Charles Seely; Taeksu Shin; Karl Slifer; Paul Souder; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Mark Sutter; Bryan Tipton; Luminita Todor; M Viviani; Branislav Vlahovic; John Watson; Claude Williamson; H Witala; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Feng Xiong; Wang Xu; Jen-chuan Yeh

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the transverse asymmetry A T' in the quasi-elastic 3 /rvec He/(/rvec e/,e') process with high precision at Q 2 -values from 0.1 to 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 . The neutron magnetic form factor G M n was extracted at Q 2 -values of 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c) 2 using a non-relativistic Faddeev calculation which includes both final-state interactions (FSI) and meson-exchange currents (MEC). Theoretical uncertainties due to the FSI and MEC effects were constrained with a precision measurement of the spin-dependent asymmetry in the threshold region of 3 /rvec He/(/rvec e/,e'). We also extracted the neutron magnetic form factor G M n at Q 2 -values of 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 based on Plane Wave Impulse Approximation calculations

  4. Measurement of the magnetic neutron form factor at a four-momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.255 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reike, H.

    1993-12-01

    The Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA of Bonn University delivers an external electron beam with a duty factor of up to 55%. Thus nonmagnetic detectors can be used to perform electron nucleon coincidence experiments with high precision. The magnetic form factor of the neutron G m n is determined by the so-called ratio method, i.e. G m n is extracted from the measured ratio of the cross sections of the d(e,e'n) and d(e,e'p) reactions in a region of quasi-free kinematics. Protons and neutrons are detected simultaneously in the same scintillation counter, so many systematic errors cancel out. The neutron detection efficiency is measured in situ by the associated particle method using the p(γ,π + n) reaction. For this reaction the high energy part of the photons produced by the electron beam in the target is used. The value of G m n found at a four momentum transfer of Q 2 = 0.255 (GeV/c) 2 is (10.1 ± 3.8)% higher than the dipole value. (orig.)

  5. DETAILED ANALYSIS OF NEAR-IR WATER (H2O) EMISSION IN COMET C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY) WITH THE GIANO/TNG SPECTROGRAPH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faggi, S.; Brucato, J. R.; Tozzi, G. P.; Oliva, E.; Massi, F.; Sanna, N.; Tozzi, A.; Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    We observed the Oort cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) on 2015 January 31 and February 1 and 2 at a heliocentric distance of 1.3 au and geocentric distance of 0.8 au during its approach to the Sun. Comet Lovejoy was observed with GIANO, the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph mounted at the Nasmyth-A focus of the TNG (Telescopio Nazionale Galileo) telescope in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. We detected strong emissions of radical CN and water, along with many emission features of unidentified origin, across the 1–2.5 μ m region. Spectral lines from eight ro-vibrational bands of H 2 O were detected, six of them for the first time. We quantified the water production rate [ Q (H 2 O), (3.11 ± 0.14) × 10 29 s −1 ] by comparing the calibrated line fluxes with the Goddard full non-resonance cascade fluorescence model for H 2 O. The production rates of ortho-water [ Q (H 2 O) ORTHO , (2.33 ± 0.11) × 10 29 s −1 ] and para-water [ Q (H 2 O) PARA , (0.87 ± 0.21) × 1029 s −1 ] provide a measure of the ortho-to-para ratio (2.70 ± 0.76)). The confidence limits are not small enough to provide a critical test of the nuclear spin temperature.

  6. Detailed Analysis of Near-IR Water (H2O) Emission in Comet C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY) with the GIANO/TNG Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggi, S.; Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Brucato, J.R.; Tozzi, G. P.; Oliva, E.; Massi, F.; Sanna, N.; Tozzi, A.

    2016-01-01

    We observed the Oort cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) on 2015 January 31 and February 1 and 2 at a heliocentric distance of 1.3 au and geocentric distance of 0.8 au during its approach to the Sun. Comet Lovejoy was observed with GIANO, the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph mounted at the Nasmyth-A focus of the TNG (Telescopio Nazionale Galileo) telescope in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. We detected strong emissions of radical CN and water, along with many emission features of unidentified origin, across the 1-2.5 micron region. Spectral lines from eight ro-vibrational bands of H2O were detected, six of them for the first time. We quantified the water production rate [Q(H2O), (3.11+/- 0.14) x 10(exp 29)/s] by comparing the calibrated line fluxes with the Goddard full non-resonance cascade fluorescence model for H2O. The production rates of ortho-water [Q(H2O)ORTHO, (2.33+/- 0.11) x 10(exp 29)/s] and para-water [Q(H2O)PARA, (0.87+/-0.21) x 10(exp 29)/s] provide a measure of the ortho-to-para ratio (2.70+/- 0.76)). The confidence limits are not small enough to provide a critical test of the nuclear spin temperature.

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION (VOLUME 31)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-01-01

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce

  8. Molecular structure and spectral properties of ethyl 3-quinolinecarboxylate (E3Q) and [Ag(E3Q)2(TCA)] complex (TCA = Trichloroacetate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Saied M.; Kassem, Taher S.; Badr, Ahmed M. A.; Abou Youssef, Morsy A.; Assem, Rania

    2014-09-01

    A new [Ag(E3Q)2(TCA)] complex; (E3Q = Ethyl 3-quinolinecarboxylate and TCA = Trichloroacetate) has been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, FTIR, NMR and mass spectroscopy. The molecular geometry and spectroscopic properties of the complex as well as the free ligand have been calculated using the hybrid B3LYP method. The calculations predicted a distorted tetrahedral arrangement around Ag(I) ion. The vibrational spectra of the studied compounds have been assigned using potential energy distribution (PED). TD-DFT method was used to predict the electronic absorption spectra. The most intense absorption band showed a bathochromic shift and lowering of intensity in case of the complex (233.7 nm, f = 0.5604) compared to E3Q (λmax = 228.0 nm, f = 0.9072). The calculated 1H NMR chemical shifts using GIAO method showed good correlations with the experimental data. The computed dipole moment, polarizability and HOMO-LUMO energy gap were used to predict the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. It is found that Ag(I) enhances the NLO activity. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses were used to elucidate the intramolecular charge transfer interactions causing stabilization for the investigated systems.

  9. DETAILED ANALYSIS OF NEAR-IR WATER (H{sub 2}O) EMISSION IN COMET C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY) WITH THE GIANO/TNG SPECTROGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggi, S.; Brucato, J. R.; Tozzi, G. P.; Oliva, E.; Massi, F.; Sanna, N.; Tozzi, A. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J., E-mail: sfaggi@arcetri.astro.it [NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    We observed the Oort cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) on 2015 January 31 and February 1 and 2 at a heliocentric distance of 1.3 au and geocentric distance of 0.8 au during its approach to the Sun. Comet Lovejoy was observed with GIANO, the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph mounted at the Nasmyth-A focus of the TNG (Telescopio Nazionale Galileo) telescope in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. We detected strong emissions of radical CN and water, along with many emission features of unidentified origin, across the 1–2.5 μ m region. Spectral lines from eight ro-vibrational bands of H{sub 2}O were detected, six of them for the first time. We quantified the water production rate [ Q (H{sub 2}O), (3.11 ± 0.14) × 10{sup 29} s{sup −1}] by comparing the calibrated line fluxes with the Goddard full non-resonance cascade fluorescence model for H{sub 2}O. The production rates of ortho-water [ Q (H{sub 2}O){sup ORTHO}, (2.33 ± 0.11) × 10{sup 29} s{sup −1}] and para-water [ Q (H{sub 2}O){sup PARA}, (0.87 ± 0.21) × 1029 s{sup −1}] provide a measure of the ortho-to-para ratio (2.70 ± 0.76)). The confidence limits are not small enough to provide a critical test of the nuclear spin temperature.

  10. Steps toward a CONUS-wide reanalysis with archived NEXRAD data using National Mosaic and Multisensor Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (NMQ/Q2) algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, S. E.; Nelson, B. R.; Langston, C.; Qi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The National Mosaic and Multisensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) software suite, developed at NOAA's National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) in Norman, OK, addresses a large deficiency in the resolution of currently archived precipitation datasets. Current standards, both radar- and satellite-based, provide for nationwide precipitation data with a spatial resolution of up to 4-5 km, with a temporal resolution as fine as one hour. Efforts are ongoing to process archived NEXRAD data for the period of record (1996 - present), producing a continuous dataset providing precipitation data at a spatial resolution of 1 km, on a timescale of only five minutes. In addition, radar-derived precipitation data are adjusted hourly using a wide variety of automated gauge networks spanning the United States. Applications for such a product range widely, from emergency management and flash flood guidance, to hydrological studies and drought monitoring. Results are presented from a subset of the NEXRAD dataset, providing basic statistics on the distribution of rainrates, relative frequency of precipitation types, and several other variables which demonstrate the variety of output provided by the software. Precipitation data from select case studies are also presented to highlight the increased resolution provided by this reanalysis and the possibilities that arise from the availability of data on such fine scales. A previously completed pilot project and steps toward a nationwide implementation are presented along with proposed strategies for managing and processing such a large dataset. Reprocessing efforts span several institutions in both North Carolina and Oklahoma, and data/software coordination are key in producing a homogeneous record of precipitation to be archived alongside NOAA's other Climate Data Records. Methods are presented for utilizing supercomputing capability in expediting processing, to allow for the iterative nature of a reanalysis effort.

  11. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Mayer, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected in 2000-2001 with Jefferson Lab's continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS). Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2, and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3 ) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double-spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry A1d and the polarized structure function g1d were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2<Q2<5 GeV2 and 0.9 GeV

  12. Measurement of the pion form factor in the time-like region for q2 values between 0.1 (GeV/c)2 and 0.18 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Badelek, B.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bizzeti, A.; Bosisio, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giazotto, A.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Frank, S.G.F.; Harvey, J.; Menasce, D.; Meroni, E.; Moroni, L.; Milan Univ.

    1984-01-01

    The EM form factor of the pion has been studied in the time-like region by measuring sigma(e + e - ->π + π - ) normalization to sigma(e + e - ->μ + μ - ). Results have been obtained for q 2 down to the physical threshold. (orig.)

  13. ELABORACIÓN DE QUESITO ANTIOQUEÑO REDUCIDO EN SODIO Y ADICIONADO CON Bifidobacterium lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDINSON ELIÉCER BEJARANO TORO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The quesito antioqueño (QA, fresh, soft, milled and salty cheese, without added bacteria. This cheese contains 2,1% of sodium chloride. Were supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis (bb12 and It was salty with NaCl (Q1 and some mixtures of NaCl/KCl (3:1 (Q2 and 1:1 (Q3, w/w, to reduce the sodium content and give probiotic characteristics. There were no significant differences between treatments (Q1, Q2 and Q3 (P>0,05 in some compositional (moisture, MG/MS, total protein, ash, acidity, chemical (pH and physical (hardness, adhesiveness, springiness, cohesiveness, gumminess, chewiness, resilience characteristics. A significant difference was observed by storage time in moisture, pH, protein content and acidity (P<0,05. With respect to Na and K content, there was a significant differences between treatments (P<0,05 but was not in the Ca content. In Q2 the Na level was decreased 24,2% and K increased 143% in average; in Q3 the Na level was decreased 48,3% and K increased 311%. The processed QA with 50% of Na substitution maintains the traditional compositional a physicochemical characteristics, therefore, according to this investigation results, can be performed this substitution and it is an excellent matrix to include probiotics in the people diet.

  14. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive pion electroproduction for Q2>1 GeV2. II. e p →e π0p

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosted, P. E.; Kim, A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Balossino, I.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Hakobyan, H.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Hollis, G.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, D. G.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klei, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V. I.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries were measured for the exclusive π0 electroproduction reaction γ*p →p π0 , expanding an analysis of the γ*p →n π+ reaction from the same experiment. The results were obtained from scattering of 6-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory. The kinematic ranges covered are 1.1 Q2<6 GeV2. Results were obtained for about 5700 bins in W , Q2, cos(θ*) , and ϕ*. The beam-target asymmetries were found to generally be greater than zero, with relatively modest ϕ* dependence. The target asymmetries exhibit very strong ϕ* dependence, with a change in sign occurring between results at low W and high W , in contrast to π+ electroproduction. Reasonable agreement is found with phenomenological fits to previous data for W <1.6 GeV, but significant differences are seen at higher W . When combined with cross-sectional measurements, as well as π+ observables, the present results will provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.4 GeV.

  15. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive pion electroproduction for Q2>1 GeV2 . I. e p →e π+n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosted, P. E.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T.; Fradi, A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lanza, L.; Net, L. A.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V. I.; Montgomery, R. A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries were measured for the exclusive π+ electroproduction reaction γ*p →n π+ . The results were obtained from scattering of 6-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory. The kinematic range covered is 1.1 Q2<6 GeV2 . Results were obtained for about 6000 bins in W , Q2, cos(θ*) , and ϕ*. Except at forward angles, very large target-spin asymmetries are observed over the entire W region. Reasonable agreement is found with phenomenological fits to previous data for W <1.6 GeV, but very large differences are seen at higher values of W . A generalized parton distributions (GPD)-based model is in poor agreement with the data. When combined with cross-sectional measurements, the present results provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.4 GeV.

  16. Paramagnetic centers in AlQ3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecu, M. N.; Mirea, A.; Schwoerer, M.; Grecu, V. V.

    2004-01-01

    Since the discovery in 1987 of its electroluminescent properties, Alq 3 (tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum(III)) has become one of the most used material in OLEDs (organic light-emitting diodes). Many researches have been carried out for improving its quantum efficiency of light emission. In spite of these, rather many fundamental questions concerning its properties, their dependence on thermal and annealing treatments and crystalline structure remained unanswered. Recently, a significant blue shift of luminescent spectrum of a specially treated fraction (so called δ-phase) has been reported, increasing even more the interest in such a material. In this contribution we shall report on the existence of paramagnetic centers in different Alq 3 fractions formed by using the train sublimation method, as well as in those which have undergone various thermal treatments. Several centers have been observed by cw X- and Q-band EPR spectroscopy, corresponding to spin 1/2 and even spin 3/2. The spin Hamiltonian parameters are given, the temperature dependencies are reported and proposals for model structures are made. (author)

  17. ECP Milestone Report WBS 2.3.4.13 ECP/VTK-m FY18Q1 [MS-18/01-03] Multiblock / Gradients / Release STDA05-5.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, Kenneth D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pugmire, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The FY18Q1 milestone of the ECP/VTK-m project includes the implementation of a multiblock data set, the completion of a gradients filtering operation, and the release of version 1.1 of the VTK-m software. With the completion of this milestone, the new multiblock data set allows us to iteratively schedule algorithms on composite data structures such as assemblies or hierarchies like AMR. The new gradient algorithms approximate derivatives of fields in 3D structures with finite differences. Finally, the release of VTK-m version 1.1 tags a stable release of the software that can more easily be incorporated into external projects.

  18. Rise in prostate-specific antigen in men with untreated low-grade prostate cancer is slower during spring-summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, R; Choo, R; Deboer, L; Danjoux, C; Morton, G C; Klotz, L

    2006-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the rate of rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is slower during the spring-summer than during the rest of the year, we used PSA data from a prospective single-arm cohort study of men who had been followed to characterize a watchful observation protocol with selective delayed intervention for clinically localized, low-to-intermediate grade prostate adenocarcinoma. The rate of PSA increase was calculated as the visit-to-visit slope of log (PSA) against time, from 1 calendar-quarter visit to the next. The nonparametric Friedman test confirmed differences in rate of PSA rise among the calendar quarters (P = 0.041). Post hoc analysis showed the rate of PSA increase during Q2 was significantly slower than in each one of the other calendar quarters (Q1 versus Q2, P = 0.025; Q3 versus Q2, P = 0.002; Q4 versus Q2, P = 0.013), with no differences among quarters Q1, Q3, and Q4. These results are consistent with the vitamin D hypothesis that the higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels associated with spring and summer have a desirable effect on prostate biology. The therapeutic implication is that vitamin D supplementation in the range of 2000 IU/d, a dose comparable to the effect of summer, can benefit men monitored for rising PSA.

  19. Insulin resistance in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with C-reactive protein independent of abdominal obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiaocheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is debate as to whether the association between C-reactive protein (CRP and insulin resistance is independent of body fatness, particularly central obesity. Therefore, the association among CRP, insulin resistance and obesity was analyzed in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods The study included 520 Chinese patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes with CRP levels not exceeding 10 mg/L. The degree of insulin resistance was determined with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. The CRP levels were categorized into quartiles from the lowest to the highest concentrations (Q1-Q4. Results Body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC were both higher in Q4, Q3 and Q2 than those in Q1. HOMA-IR was higher in Q2, Q3 and Q4 than that in Q1 (Q1 vs Q4, P Conclusion These findings showed that insulin resistance was associated with CRP levels independent of abdominal obesity in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that abdominal obesity could only partly explain the link between subclinical inflammation and insulin resistance.

  20. Measurement of the electric neutron form factor in the reaction 3vector (He)(vector e,e'n)pp at Q2=1.58 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlimme, Bjoern Soeren

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic nucleon form factors are fundamental quantities which are closely related to the electromagnetic structure of the nucleon. The evolution of the electric and magnetic Sachs form factors G E and G M with Q 2 , the negative square of the four momentum transfer in the electromagnetic scattering process, is directly connected with the spatial charge and current distributions in the nucleon by means of a Fourier transform. Therefore precise measurements of the form factors over a wide Q 2 range are essential for a quantitative understanding of the nucleon structure. Owing to the lack of a free neutron target measurements of the neutron form factors prove to be difficult compared to the measurements on the proton. Consequently the available neutron data is less precise, and the measured Q 2 range is smaller. In particular the electric neutron Sachs form factor G n E is difficult to measure; due to the vanishing net charge of the neutron, G n E is small compared to the other nucleon form factors. G n E characterizes the charge distribution of the electrically neutral neutron, hence it is very sensitive to the inner structure of the neutron. In the present work G n E was determined from beam helicity asymmetries in the quasielastic scattering process 3 vector (He)(vector e,e'n)pp at a momentum transfer Q 2 =1.58 (GeV/c) 2 . The measurement took place in Mainz at the electron accelerator facility Mainz Microtron within the A1 collaboration in the summer of 2008. Longitudinally polarized electrons with an energy of 1.508 GeV impinged on a polarized 3 He gas target which served as an effective polarized neutron target. The scattered electrons were detected in coincidence with the recoil neutrons; a magnetic spectrometer was used for the electron detection, the contribution of quasielastic scattering off the protons was restricted through the detection of the neutron via a plastic scintillator matrix. Cross section asymmetries with respect to the electron

  1. Evaluation of the Consistency of MODIS Land Cover Product (MCD12Q1 Based on Chinese 30 m GlobeLand30 Datasets: A Case Study in Anhui Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Land cover plays an important role in the climate and biogeochemistry of the Earth system. It is of great significance to produce and evaluate the global land cover (GLC data when applying the data to the practice at a specific spatial scale. The objective of this study is to evaluate and validate the consistency of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS land cover product (MCD12Q1 at a provincial scale (Anhui Province, China based on the Chinese 30 m GLC product (GlobeLand30. A harmonization method is firstly used to reclassify the land cover types between five classification schemes (International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP global vegetation classification, University of Maryland (UMD, MODIS-derived Leaf Area Index and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (LAI/FPAR, MODIS-derived Net Primary Production (NPP, and Plant Functional Type (PFT of MCD12Q1 and ten classes of GlobeLand30, based on the knowledge rule (KR and C4.5 decision tree (DT classification algorithm. A total of five harmonized land cover types are derived including woodland, grassland, cropland, wetland and artificial surfaces, and four evaluation indicators are selected including the area consistency, spatial consistency, classification accuracy and landscape diversity in the three sub-regions of Wanbei, Wanzhong and Wannan. The results indicate that the consistency of IGBP is the best among the five schemes of MCD12Q1 according to the correlation coefficient (R. The “woodland” LAI/FPAR is the worst, with a spatial similarity (O of 58.17% due to the misclassification between “woodland” and “others”. The consistency of NPP is the worst among the five schemes as the agreement varied from 1.61% to 56.23% in the three sub-regions. Furthermore, with the biggest difference of diversity indices between LAI/FPAR and GlobeLand30, the consistency of LAI/FPAR is the weakest. This study provides a methodological reference for evaluating the

  2. Measurement of target and double-spin asymmetries for the e ⃗p ⃗→e π+(n ) reaction in the nucleon resonance region at low Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X.; Adhikari, K. P.; Bosted, P.; Deur, A.; Drozdov, V.; El Fassi, L.; Kang, Hyekoo; Kovacs, K.; Kuhn, S.; Long, E.; Phillips, S. K.; Ripani, M.; Slifer, K.; Smith, L. C.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chen, J.-P.; Chetry, T.; Choi, Seonho; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Golovach, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    We report measurements of target- and double-spin asymmetries for the exclusive channel e ⃗p ⃗→e π+(n ) in the nucleon resonance region at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). These asymmetries were extracted from data obtained using a longitudinally polarized NH3 target and a longitudinally polarized electron beam with energies 1.1, 1.3, 2.0, 2.3, and 3.0 GeV. The new results are consistent with previous CLAS publications but are extended to a low Q2 range from 0.0065 to 0.35 (GeV/c ) 2 . The Q2 access was made possible by a custom-built Cherenkov detector that allowed the detection of electrons for scattering angles as low as 6∘. These results are compared with the unitary isobar models JANR and MAID, the partial-wave analysis prediction from SAID, and the dynamic model DMT. In many kinematic regions our results, in particular results on the target asymmetry, help to constrain the polarization-dependent components of these models.

  3. Amazon Web Services: MOD13Q1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global MODIS vegetation indices are designed to provide consistent spatial and temporal comparisons of vegetation conditions. Blue, red, and near-infrared...

  4. Comet C/2001 Q1 (Neat)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lawrence, K. J.; Helin, E. F.; Pravdo, S. H.; Pravec, Petr; Kušnirák, Peter; Kočer, M.; Spahr, T. B.

    č. 7685 (2001), s. 1 ISSN 0081-0304 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/99/0255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : comet s * astrometry Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  5. Measurement of the elastic electron-proton cross section and separation of the electric and magnetic form factor in the Q2 range from 0.004 to 1 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernauer, Jan C.

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factors of the proton are fundamental quantities sensitive to the distribution of charge and magnetization inside the proton. Precise knowledge of the form factors, in particular of the charge and magnetization radii provide strong tests for theory in the non-perturbative regime of QCD. However, the existing data at Q 2 below 1 (GeV/c) 2 are not precise enough for a hard test of theoretical predictions. For a more precise determination of the form factors, within this work more than 1400 cross sections of the reaction H(e, e ' )p were measured at the Mainz Microtron MAMI using the 3-spectrometer-facility of the A1-collaboration. The data were taken in three periods in the years 2006 and 2007 using beam energies of 180, 315, 450, 585, 720 and 855 MeV. They cover the Q 2 region from 0.004 to 1 (GeV/c) 2 with counting rate uncertainties below 0.2% for most of the data points. The relative luminosity of the measurements was determined using one of the spectrometers as a luminosity monitor. The overlapping acceptances of the measurements maximize the internal redundancy of the data and allow, together with several additions to the standard experimental setup, for tight control of systematic uncertainties. To account for the radiative processes, an event generator was developed and implemented in the simulation package of the analysis software which works without peaking approximation by explicitly calculating the Bethe-Heitler and Born Feynman diagrams for each event. To separate the form factors and to determine the radii, the data were analyzed by fitting a wide selection of form factor models directly to the measured cross sections. These fits also determined the absolute normalization of the different data subsets. The validity of this method was tested with extensive simulations. The results were compared to an extraction via the standard Rosenbluth technique. The dip structure in G E that was seen in the analysis of the previous world data

  6. arXiv Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and spin-dependent structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ of the proton at small values of $x$ and $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Aghasyan, M.; The COMPASS collaboration; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N.V.; Anosov, V.; Antoshkin, A.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtsev, V.E.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chumakov, A.G.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Dünnweber, W.; Dusaev, R.R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; jr.,M.Finger; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giarra, J.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grasso, A.; Gridin, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F.H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Kerbizi, A.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.M.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Kuznetsov, I.I.; Kveton, A.; Lednev, A.A.; Levchenko, E.A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Mamon, S.A.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Moretti, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Pešková, M.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rogacheva, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thiel, A.; Tomsa, J.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Vasilishin, B.I.; Vauth, A.; Veloso, J.; Vidon, A.; Virius, M.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2018-06-10

    We present a precise measurement of the proton longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A1p and the proton spin-dependent structure function g1p at photon virtualities 0.006(GeV/c)2<Q2<1(GeV/c)2 in the Bjorken x range of 4×10−5

  7. Measurement of F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} at Low Q^2 and x using the H1 Vertex Detector at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements are presented of inclusive charm and beauty cross sections in e^+p collisions at HERA for values of photon virtuality 12 \\le Q^2 \\le 60 GeV^2 and of the Bjorken scaling variable 0.0002 \\le x \\le 0.005. The fractions of events containing charm and beauty quarks are determined using a method based on the impact parameter, in the transverse plane, of tracks to the primary vertex, as measured by the H1 vertex detector. Values for the structure functions F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} are obtained. This is the first measurement of F_2^{b\\bar{b}} in this kinematic range. The results are found to be compatible with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics and withprevious measurements of F_2^{c\\bar{c}}.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of three screening questions (3Q/TMD) in relation to the DC/TMD in a specialized orofacial pain clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, Anna; Parvaneh, Hasti; Lobbezoo, Frank; Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta; Wänman, Anders; Visscher, Corine Mirjam

    2018-02-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of three screening questions (3Q/TMD) in relation to the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD), in a specialized clinic. Consecutive patients, >18 years, referred with a possible TMD complaint to the Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction clinic, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, the Netherlands, were included in the study. All patients (n = 449; mean age 44 years; 72% females), answered the 3Q/TMD and the DC/TMD questionnaire before a DC/TMD examination. The 3Q/TMD constitutes of two questions on weekly pain from the jaw, face and temple region (Q1), and on function (Q2), and one function-related question on weekly catching and/or locking of the jaw (Q3). Q1 and Q2 were evaluated in relation to a DC/TMD pain diagnosis and Q3 in relation to a subgroup of DC/TMD intra-articular diagnosis, referred to as the reference standard. In total, 44% of patients received a pain-related DC/TMD diagnosis and 33% an intra-articular reference DC/TMD diagnosis. Sensitivity for the two pain screening questions was high (0.83-0.94), whereas specificity was low (0.41-0.55). For the function-related question, sensitivity was low (0.48), whereas specificity was high (0.96). In a specialized pain clinic, the two pain questions (Q1, Q2) are positive in most patients with pain-related TMD. Therefore, in case of a positive response, further diagnostic procedures for TMD pain are warranted. For the functional screening question (Q3), a positive response is indicative for an intra-articular DC/TMD diagnosis, while in case of a negative outcome, an intra-articular TMD might still be present.

  9. A Study of QMM Hysteresis Cycle Data. Field Linearity and Field Reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernin, P.; Fonvieille, H.; Quemener, G.

    1997-08-01

    A study of the hysteresis data provided by the quadrupole field mapping of the HRS Electron Arm is presented. For each quad Q1, Q2, Q3, a series of runs was performed to obtain the hysteresis curve of the magnet at maximal current. The focus of the present document is not the field maps but a specific analysis of QMM data in terms of hysteresis curves, and field linearity as a function of the current. These measurements allow to put limits on the reproducibility of magnet setting for the presently used operating mode of the quads. (K.A.)

  10. Validity of self-reported hearing loss in adults: performance of three single questions Validez de la pérdida auditiva auto-referida en adultos: desempeño de tres preguntas únicas Validade da perda auditiva auto-referida em adultos: desempenho de três perguntas únicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Ferrite

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the validity of three single questions used to assess self-reported hearing loss as compared to pure-tone audiometry in an adult population. METHODS: A validity study was performed with a random sub-sample of 188 subjects aged 30 to 65 years, drawn from the fourth wave of a population-based cohort study carried out in Salvador, Northeastern Brazil. Data were collected in household visits using questionnaires. Three questions were used to separately assess self-reported hearing loss: Q1, "Do you feel you have a hearing loss?"; Q2, "In general, would you say your hearing is 'excellent,' 'very good,' 'good,' 'fair,' 'poor'?"; Q3, "Currently, do you think you can hear 'the same as before', 'less than before only in the right ear', 'less than before only in the left ear', 'less than before in both ears'?". Measures of accuracy were estimated through seven measures including Youden index. Responses to each question were compared to the results of pure-tone audiometry to estimate accuracy measures. RESULTS: The estimated sensitivity and specificity were 79.6%, 77.4% for Q1; 66.9%, 85.1% for Q2; and 81.5%, 76.4% for Q3, respectively. The Youden index ranged from 51.9% (Q2 to 57.0% (Q1 and 57.9% (Q3. CONCLUSIONS: Each of all three questions provides responses accurate enough to support their use to assess self-reported hearing loss in epidemiological studies with adult populations when pure-tone audiometry is not feasible.OBJETIVO: Estimar la validez de tres preguntas únicas utilizadas para evaluar la pérdida auditiva auto-referida en comparación con la audiometría de sonidos puros en una población adulta. MÉTODOS: Estudio de validez realizado con una sub-muestra aleatoria de 188 individuos, con edad entre 30 y 65 años, seleccionados de la cuarta fase (2006 de un estudio de cohorte de base poblacional conducido en Salvador, noreste de Brasil. Datos fueron colectados en entrevistas domiciliares utilizándose cuestionarios

  11. Uso do produto MOD13Q1 do sensor Modis para análise temporal e mapeamento das florestas nas Serras do Sudeste e Campanha Meridional do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Caroline Paim Benedetti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Imagens NDVI (Índice de Vegetação por Diferença Normalizada do sensor Modis foram utilizadas para mapear as classes de uso e cobertura da terra nas Serras do Sudeste e Campanha Meridional do Rio Grande do Sul. A metodologia compreendeu a elaboração de um banco de dados espaciais e a aplicação de técnicas de processamento digital (contraste linear, classificação digital e operações aritméticas sobre imagens dos satélites Landsat e Terra de diversas datas. Os resultados indicaram que a cobertura florestal passou de 8,6% para 11,6% e 14,3% da área total da microrregião Serras do Sudeste, entre os anos 2000, 2004 e 2008. Na Campanha Meridional, a expansão da cobertura florestal passou de 11,1% para 11,2% e 11,5% da área total no mesmo período. Conclui-se que imagens MOD13Q1, de baixa resolução espacial (250 m, podem ser usadas em grandes áreas para mapear florestas e os demais temas adequadamente.

  12. N*(1535) electroproduction at high Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ramalho, M.T. Pena, K. Tsushima

    2012-04-01

    A covariant spectator quark model is applied to study the {gamma}N {yields} N*(1535) reaction in the large Q{sup 2} region. Starting from the relation between the nucleon and N*(1535) systems, the N*(1535) valence quark wave function is determined without the addition of any parameters. The model is then used to calculate the {gamma}N {yields} N*(1535) transition form factors. A very interesting, useful relation between the A{sub 1/2} and S{sub 1/2} helicity amplitudes for Q{sup 2} > GeV{sup 2}, is also derived.

  13. Combination of the inclusive DIS e"±p cross sections from HERA, QCD and EW analyses and the need for low-Q"2 higher-twist corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myronenko, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    A combination of the inclusive lepton-proton cross sections from the ZEUS and H1 experiments is presented. The data are combined taking into account correlations of the systematic uncertainties of the measurements. The resulting combined inclusive neutral- and charged-current e"±p cross sections derived from ∝1 fb"-"1 of data, cover the kinematic region of 0.045≤Q"2≤50000 GeV"2 and 6.10"-"7≤x_B_j≤0.65. The combined data is an unique legacy of the HERA collider and the core of any parton-density-function extraction. The parton distribution functions are essential ingredients in the evaluation of QCD predictions for the high-energy processes, studied at modern proton colliders. The methodology of HERAPDF fits is used as an ansatz for the global QCD fit. The charm- and beauty-quark mass parameters in the analyses at next-next-to-leading order were found to be M"o"p"t_c=1.43 GeV and M"o"p"t_b=4.5 GeV, respectively. HERAPDF2.0 sets give reasonable DIS data description. The effect of higher-twist corrections on the DIS structure functions was studied. The twist-4 corrections were introduced to the F_2 and F_L structure functions. A minimal improvement in the data description was found for the F_2 correction. The introduction of a higher-twist correction to the F_L structure function improved the QCD fit quality by up to Δχ"2=47, predominantly affecting the low-x_B_j and low-Q"2 regions. The twist-4 correction causes an unphysical rise of the predicted F_L in the low x_B_j region. The results indicate a need for further investigations. The electroweak parameters and PDFs are determined simultaneously using the HERA inclusive cross sections together with information on the lepton beam polarisation. The vector- and axial-vector couplings of the u- and d-type quarks to the Z"0 boson are determined simultaneously. The u-type quark couplings were found to be a_u=0.532"+"0"."1"0"7_-_0_._0_6_3, v_u.144"+"0"."0"6"6_-_0_._0_5_8, which are the most precise measurements

  14. Plane-wave impulse approximation extraction of the neutron magnetic form factor from Quasi-Elastic 3(rvec H)e((rvec e),e(prime)) at Q2 = 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Anderson, B.; Auberbach, L.; Averett, T.; Bertozzi, W.; Black, T.; Calarco, J.; Cardman, L.; Cates, G.D.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, J.P.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Churchwell, S.; Corrado, G.S.; Crawford, C.; Dale, D.; Deur, A.; Djawotho, P.; Donnelly, T.W.; Dutta, D.; Finn, J.M.; Gao, H.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.V.; Glashausser, C.; Gloeckle, Walter; Golak, J.; Gomez, J.; Gorbenko, V.G.; Hansen, J.O.; Hersman, F.W.; Higinbotham, D.W.; Holmes, R.; Howell, C.R.; Hughes, E.; Humensky, B.; Incerti, S.; Jager, C.W. de; Jensen, J.S.; Jiang, X.; Jones, C.E.; Jones, M.; Kahl, R.; Kamada, H.; Kievsky, A.; Kominis, I.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, K.; Kumbartzki, G.; Kuss, M.; Lakuriqi, E.; Liang, M.; Liyanage, N.; LeRose, J.; Malov, S.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Martin, J.W.; McCormick, K.; McKeown, R. D.; McIlhany, K.; Meziani, Z.E.; Michaels, R.; Miller, G.W.; Mitchell, J.; Nanda, S.; Pace, E.; Pavlin, T.; Petratos, G.G.; Pomatsalyuk, R.I.; Pripstein, D.; Prout, D.; Ransome, R.D.; Roblin, Y.; Rvachev, M.; Saha, A.; Salme, G.; Schnee, M.; Shin, T.; Slifer, K.; Souder, P.A.; Strauch, S.; Suleiman, R.; Sutter, M.; Tipton, B.; Todor, L.; Viviani, M.; Vlahovic, B.; Watson, J.; Williamson, C.F.; Witala, H.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Xiong, F.; Yeh, J.; Zolnierczuk, P.

    2003-01-01

    A high precision measurement of the transverse spin-dependent asymmetry A T in 3 (rvec H)e((rvec e),e(prime)) quasielastic scattering was performed in Hall A at Jefferson Lab at values of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q 2 , between 0.1 and 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 . A T is sensitive to the neutron magnetic form factor, G M n . Values of G M n at Q 2 = 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c) 2 , extracted using Faddeev calculations, were reported previously. Here, we report the extraction of G M n for the remaining Q 2 -values in the range from 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 using a Plane-Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. The results are in good agreement with recent precision data from experiments using a deuterium target

  15. Measurement of the D*± meson cross section and extraction of the charm contribution, Fc2(x, Q2), to the proton structure in deep inelastic ep scattering with the H1 detector at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Andreas Werner

    2009-01-01

    Inclusive production of D * mesons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA is studied using data taken with the H1 detector in the years 2004 to 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 347 pb -1 . The measurement covers the region 5 2 2 in photon virtuality and the increased region 0.02 * meson is restricted in transverse momentum and pseudorapidity to p T (D * )>1.5 GeV and vertical stroke η(D * ) vertical stroke c 2 (x,Q 2 ), to the proton structure in different QCD evolution schemes is derived from the D * cross sections and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions. This F c 2 measurement is performed using a factor of 18 more data compared to the previous H1 publication. The present thesis additionally describes a successfully completed hardware project: The commissioning and optimisation of the third level of the H1 Fast Track Trigger (FTT), which was fully operational from 2006 onwards. The FTT is integrated in the first three levels of the H1 trigger system and provides enhanced selectivity for events with charged particles. The third trigger level of the FTT performs a track-based event reconstruction within a latency of about 100 μs. The third trigger level of the FTT is realised by a farm of PowerPC boards. Furthermore, the FTT simulation is now incorporated into the H1 trigger simulation. (orig.)

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  17. Neutral pion electroproduction and virtual Compton scattering on proton with four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 1 GeV2. Measurement of cross-sections and of generalized polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laveissiere, G.

    2001-11-01

    In hadronic physics, the nucleon structure and the quarks confinement are still topical issues. The neutral pion electroproduction and virtual Compton scattering (VCS) reactions allow us to access new observables that describe this structure. This work is focussed on the VCS experiment performed at Jefferson Lab in 1998. The 4 GeV electron beam is scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target, and the scattered electron and recoiled proton are detected in coincidence in the twin hall A spectrometers. The photon (pion) is reconstructed using a missing particle technique. The data analysis allowed to extract the cross sections relative to both process at four-momentum transfer squared Q 2 = 1 GeV 2 . The VCS cross section has been extracted for the first time in the proton resonance region (W between 1.O and 2.0 GeV) through the photon electroproduction reaction. Around the pion-production threshold up to the Delta(1232) resonance region, these results lead to the measurement of the generalized polarizabilities, that describe the proton structure in the same way as the elastic form factors. Moreover, the neutral pion electroproduction cross section measurement in the resonance region has brought new constraints on the existing phenomenological models. (author)

  18. Cross sections and beam asymmetries for $\\vev{e}p \\to en\\pi^+$ in the nucleon resonance region for $1.7 \\le Q^2 \\le 4.5 (GeV)^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Park; V.D. Burkert; W. Kim; CLAS Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    The exclusive electroproduction process $\\vec{e}p \\to e^\\prime n \\pi^+$ was measured in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.7 - 4.5 \\rm{GeV^2}$, and the invariant mass range for the $n\\pi^+$ system of $W = 1.15 - 1.7 \\rm{GeV}$ using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in exclusive $\\pi^+$ production from protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. The $n\\pi^+$ channel has particular sensitivity to the isospin 1/2 excited nucleon states, and together with the $p\\pi^0$ final state will serve to determine the transition form factors of a large number of resonances. The largest discrepancy between these results and present modes was seen in the $\\sigma_{LT'}$ structure function. In this experiment, 31,295 cross section and 4,184 asymmetry data points were measured. Because of the large volume of data, only a reduced set of structure functions and Legendre polynomial moments can be presented that are obtained in model-independent fits to the differential cross sections.

  19. Internal time marker (Q1) of the Cretaceous super chron in the Bay of Bengal - a new age constraint for the oceanic crust evolved between India and Elan Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, K. S.; Ismaiel, M.; Karlapati, S.; Saha, D.; Mishra, J.

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of marine magnetic data of the Bay of Bengal (BOB) led to suggest two different tectonic models for the evolution of lithosphere between India and East Antarctica. The first model explains the presence of M-series (M11 to M0) magnetic anomalies in BOB with a small room leaving for accommodating the crust evolved during the long Cretaceous Magnetic Quiet Period. Second model explains in other way that most part of the crust in BOB was evolved during the quite period together with the possible presence of oldest magnetic chron M1/ M0 in close vicinity of ECMI. It is with this perspective we have reinvestigated the existing and recently acquired magnetic data together with regional magnetic model of BOB for identification of new tectonic constraints, thereby to better understand the evolution of lithosphere. Analysis of magnetic data revealed the presence of spreading anomalies C33 and C34 in the vicinity of 8°N, and internal time marker (Q1) corresponding to the age 92 Ma at 12°N in a corridor between 85°E and Ninetyeast ridges. The new time marker and its location, indeed, become a point of reference and benchmark in BOB for estimating the age of oceanic crust towards ECMI. The magnetic model further reveals the presence of network of fracture zones (FZs) with different orientations. Between 85°E and Ninetyeast ridges, two near N-S FZs, approximately followed 87°E and 89.5°E are found to extend into BOB up to 12°N, from there the FZs reorient in N60°W direction and reach to the continental margin region. Along ECMI two sets of FZs are identified with a northern set oriented in N60°W and southern one in N40°W direction. This suggests that both north and south segments of the ECMI were evolved in two different tectonic settings. The bend in FZs marks the timing (92 Ma) of occurrence of first major plate reorganisation of the Indian Ocean and becomes a very critical constraint for understanding the plate tectonic process in early opening of the

  20. Milestone Completion Report WBS 1.3.5.05 ECP/VTK-m FY17Q2 [MS-17/01] Better Dynamic Types Design SDA05-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2017-04-01

    The FY17Q2 milestone of the ECP/VTK-m project, which is the first milestone, includes the completion of design documents for the introduction of virtual methods into the VTK-m framework. Specifically, the ability from within the code of a device (e.g. GPU or Xeon Phi) to jump to a virtual method specified at run time. This change will enable us to drastically reduce the compile time and the executable code size for the VTK-m library. Our first design introduced the idea of adding virtual functions to classes that are used during algorithm execution. (Virtual methods were previously banned from the so called execution environment.) The design was straightforward. VTK-m already has the generic concepts of an “array handle” that provides a uniform interface to memory of different structures and an “array portal” that provides generic access to said memory. These array handles and portals use C++ templating to adjust them to different memory structures. This composition provides a powerful ability to adapt to data sources, but requires knowing static types. The proposed design creates a template specialization of an array portal that decorates another array handle while hiding its type. In this way we can wrap any type of static array handle and then feed it to a single compiled instance of a function. The second design focused on the mechanics of implementing virtual methods on parallel devices with a focus on CUDA. Our initial experiments on CUDA showed a very large overhead for using virtual C++ classes with virtual methods, the standard approach. Instead, we are using an alternate method provided by C that uses function pointers. With the completion of this milestone, we are able to move to the implementation of objects with virtual (like) methods. The upshot will be much faster compile times and much smaller library/executable sizes.

  1. Functional differential equations for the q-Fourier transform of q-Gaussians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umarov, S; Queiros, S M Duarte

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the question 'is the q-Fourier transform of a q-Gaussian a q'-Gaussian (with some q') up to a constant factor?' is studied for the whole range of q in (- infty, 3). This question is connected with applicability of the q-Fourier transform in the study of limit processes in nonextensive statistical mechanics. Using the functional differential equation approach we prove that the answer is affirmative if and only if 1 ≤ q < 3, excluding two particular cases of q < 1, namely q=1/2 and q=2/3. Complementarily, we discuss some applications of the q-Fourier transform to nonlinear partial differential equations such as the porous medium equation.

  2. Renormalization group treatment of bond percolation in anisotropic and 'inhomogeneous' planar lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, A.C.N. de; Tsallis, C.; Schwaccheim, G.

    1980-04-01

    The uncorrelated bond percolation problem is studied in three planar systems where there are two distinct occupancy probabilities. Two different real space renormalization group approaches (referred as the 'canonical' (CRG) and the 'parametric' (PRG) ones) are applied to the anisotropic first-neighbour square lattice, and both of them exhibit the expected tendency towards the exactly known phase boundary (p+q=1). Then, within the context of PRG calculations for increasingly large cells, an extrapolation method is introduced, which leads to analytic proposals for the other two lattices, namely p+q = 1/2 for the first-and second-neighbour square lattice (p and q are, respectively, the first and second neighbour occupancy probabilities), and 3 (p-1/2) = 4 [(1-q) 2 + (1-q) 3 ] (p and q are, respectively, the occupancy probabilities of the topologically different bonds which are in a 1:2 ratio) for the 4- 8 lattice. (Author) [pt

  3. Functional differential equations for the q-Fourier transform of q-Gaussians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umarov, S [Department of Mathematics, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States); Queiros, S M Duarte, E-mail: sdqueiro@gmail.co [Unilever R and D Port Sunlight, Quarry Road East, Wirral, CH63 3JW (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-05

    In this paper the question 'is the q-Fourier transform of a q-Gaussian a q'-Gaussian (with some q') up to a constant factor?' is studied for the whole range of q in (- infty, 3). This question is connected with applicability of the q-Fourier transform in the study of limit processes in nonextensive statistical mechanics. Using the functional differential equation approach we prove that the answer is affirmative if and only if 1 <= q < 3, excluding two particular cases of q < 1, namely q=1/2 and q=2/3. Complementarily, we discuss some applications of the q-Fourier transform to nonlinear partial differential equations such as the porous medium equation.

  4. Tetraquark, Pentaquark and Hexaquark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The simple quark model describes astonishingly well the spectrum of ordinary mesons and baryons. A first non-trivial achievement is to account for the quantum numbers of the hadrons. The well-established states have non exotic quantum numbers, which correspond to q 1 antiq 2 or q 1 q 2 q 3 configurations with all possible spin and angular momentum wave-functions. Quantitative models (bags, potentials ...) have even produced remarkable quantitative estimates of the mass spectrum. A crucial ingredient is flavour independence of the confining interaction which allows one, for instance, to describe simultaneously the cantic and bantib excitation spectra. In this review, we shall concentrate on states, which are stable under strong interactions. If they exist, they will offer clear experimental signatures, and for theorists, an ideal tool for studying the coherences of the interquark forces, as well as the weak decay of flavoured quarks in new environments

  5. Associations between the degree of early lactation inflammation and performance, metabolism, and immune function in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M M; Yasui, T; Felippe, M J B; Overton, T R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine associations between the severity of systemic inflammation during the early postpartum period and performance, energy metabolism, and immune function in dairy cows. Cows were assigned to categorical quartiles (Q; Q1=0.18-0.59, Q2=0.60-1.14, Q3=1.15-2.05, and Q4=2.06-2.50 g of haptoglobin/L) based on the highest plasma haptoglobin (Hp) concentration measured during wk 1 postpartum. Although cows were assigned to different categories of inflammation during the postpartum period, we detected a quadratic relationship of inflammation on prepartum dry matter intake (DMI) and body weight (BW) such that cows in Q2 had lower prepartum DMI and cows in Q2 and Q3 had lower prepartum BW compared with cows in the other quartiles. We also detected a quadratic association of inflammation with postpartum DMI and BW such that cows in Q2 and Q3 also had generally lower postpartum DMI and BW compared with cows in Q1. There was a tendency for a Q × time interaction for milk yield and Q × time interactions for 3.5% fat-corrected milk and energy-corrected milk yields; quadratic relationships suggested decreased milk yield for Q2 and Q3 cows. We also found Q × parity and Q × time interactions for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, suggesting alterations with differing degrees of inflammation. There was also a Q × time interaction for plasma nonesterified fatty acids concentration. In addition, alterations in liver triglyceride and glycogen contents for cows with inflammation as well as alterations in [1-(14)C]propionate oxidation in vitro were observed. Although we observed limited effects of inflammation on neutrophil and monocyte phagocytosis at d 7 postpartum, inflammation appeared to alter neutrophil and monocyte oxidative burst. Overall, cows with any degree of elevated haptoglobin in the first week after calving had alterations in both pre- and postpartum intake and postpartum metabolism. Copyright © 2016 American

  6. Control the length of beam trajectory with a quadruple triplet for heavy ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wei, Shaoqing; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Do Gyun; Kim, Jang Youl

    2016-01-01

    Beam trajectory is needed to be controlled in heavy ion accelerator system. Quadruple magnets are widely used in heavy ion accelerator for focusing the transporting particles. A quadruple triplet system which consists of three consecutive quadrupoles, Q1, Q2 and Q3, is used to control beam trajectory at a focused position. Q1 and Q3 have symmetry with respect to Q2. The beam trajectory in magnet system is affected by higher order fields existed in real fields. For quadrupoles, the representation simulation of beam trajectory was carried out to study the beam trajectory and to estimate an effect of higher order field in triplet system. SCALA program was used to simulate the beam trajectory in OperaTM. SCALA can analyze a large number of beam trajectories at the same time by adjusting the size of finite element of the emitter. With OperaTM and MatlabTM programs, the position of focused beam spot in quadruple triplet system can be increased or decreased using evolution strategy (ES) method, therefore the length of triplet system can be controlled. Finally, the quadruple triplet system with the appropriate length and expected beam spot range was suggested in this paper

  7. Control the length of beam trajectory with a quadruple triplet for heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wei, Shaoqing; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Gyun; Kim, Jang Youl [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Beam trajectory is needed to be controlled in heavy ion accelerator system. Quadruple magnets are widely used in heavy ion accelerator for focusing the transporting particles. A quadruple triplet system which consists of three consecutive quadrupoles, Q1, Q2 and Q3, is used to control beam trajectory at a focused position. Q1 and Q3 have symmetry with respect to Q2. The beam trajectory in magnet system is affected by higher order fields existed in real fields. For quadrupoles, the representation simulation of beam trajectory was carried out to study the beam trajectory and to estimate an effect of higher order field in triplet system. SCALA program was used to simulate the beam trajectory in OperaTM. SCALA can analyze a large number of beam trajectories at the same time by adjusting the size of finite element of the emitter. With OperaTM and MatlabTM programs, the position of focused beam spot in quadruple triplet system can be increased or decreased using evolution strategy (ES) method, therefore the length of triplet system can be controlled. Finally, the quadruple triplet system with the appropriate length and expected beam spot range was suggested in this paper.

  8. Long-Term Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution over CONUS: Bias-Adjustment of the Radar-Only National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis (2001-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Olivier; Nelson, Brian; Stevens, Scott; Seo, Dong-Jun; Kim, Beomgeun

    2015-04-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2001 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Several in-situ datasets are available to assess the biases of the radar-only product and to adjust for those biases to provide a multi-sensor QPE. The rain gauge networks that are used such as the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily (GHCN-D), the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), and the Climate Reference Network (CRN), have different spatial density and temporal resolution. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. The objective of this work is threefold. First, we investigate how the different in-situ networks can impact the precipitation estimates as a function of the spatial density, sensor type, and temporal resolution. Second, we assess conditional and un-conditional biases of the radar-only QPE for various time scales (daily, hourly, 5-min) using in-situ precipitation observations. Finally, after assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are using a unique in-situ dataset merging the different RG networks (CRN, ASOS, HADS, GHCN-D) to

  9. Long-Term Large-Scale Bias-Adjusted Precipitation Estimates at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Derived from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis over CONUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.; Stevens, S. E.; Seo, D. J.; Kim, B.

    2014-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (Nexrad) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is nearly completed for the period covering from 2000 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Rain gauge networks such as the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), the Climate Reference Network (CRN), and the Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily (GHCN-D) are used to adjust for those biases and to merge with the radar only product to provide a multi-sensor estimate. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. After assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are investigating the kriging method and its variants such as simple kriging (SK), ordinary kriging (OK), and conditional bias-penalized Kriging (CBPK) among others. In addition we hope to generate estimates of uncertainty for the gridded estimate. In this work the methodology is presented as well as a comparison between the radar-only product and the final multi-sensor QPE product. The comparison is performed at various time scales from the sub-hourly, to annual. In addition, comparisons over the same period with a suite of lower resolution QPEs derived from ground based radar

  10. Increased pediatric sub-specialization is associated with decreased surgical complication rates for inpatient pediatric urology procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejwani, R.; Wang, H-H. S.; Young, B. J.; Greene, N. H.; Wolf, S.; Wiener, J. S.; Routh, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Increased case volumes and training are associated with better surgical outcomes. However, the impact of pediatric urology sub-specialization on perioperative complication rates is unknown. Objectives To determine the presence and magnitude of difference in rates of common postoperative complications for elective pediatric urology procedures between specialization levels of urologic surgeons. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), a nationally representative administrative database, was used. Study Design The NIS (1998–2009) was retrospectively reviewed for pediatric (≤18 years) admissions, using ICD-9-CM codes to identify urologic surgeries and National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) inpatient postoperative complications. Degree of pediatric sub-specialization was calculated using a Pediatric Proportion Index (PPI), defined as the ratio of children to total patients operated on by each provider. The providers were grouped into PPI quartiles: Q1, 0–25% specialization; Q2, 25–50%; Q3, 50–75%; Q4, 75–100%. Weighted multivariate analysis was performed to test for associations between PPI and surgical complications. Results A total of 71,479 weighted inpatient admissions were identified. Patient age decreased with increasing specialization: Q1, 7.9 vs Q2, 4.8 vs Q3, 4.8 vs Q4, 4.6 years, PSpecialization was not associated with race (P>0.20), gender (P>0.50), or comorbidity scores (P=0.10). Mortality (1.5% vs 0.2% vs 0.3% vs 0.4%, Pspecialization. Patients treated by more highly specialized surgeons incurred slightly higher costs (Q2, +4%; Q3, +1%; Q4 + 2%) but experienced shorter length of hospital stay (Q2, –5%; Q3, –10%; Q4, –3%) compared with the least specialized providers. A greater proportion of patients treated by Q1 and Q3 specialized urologists had CCS ≥2 than those seen by Q2 or Q4 urologists (12.5% and 12.2%, respectively vs 8.4% and 10.9%, respectively, P=0.04). Adjusting for confounding effects

  11. Measuring the social impact of dental research: An insight into the most influential articles on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delli, K; Livas, C; Spijkervet, F K L; Vissink, A

    2017-11-01

    To identify the most discussed dental articles on the Web and to assess the association between the intensity of online attention, publication characteristics, and citations. An Altmetric Explorer search was conducted for articles published in the 91 dental journals included in 2015 InCites ™ Journal Citation Report ® and mentioned online at all times. The 100 articles with the highest online attention, as measured by the "Altmetric Attention Score" (AAS), were screened for journal title, quartile of impact factor distribution (Q1-Q4), publication date, origin and affiliation of first author, article topic, type, and access. Citation counts were harvested from Scopus. The top 100 articles presented a median AAS of 119 and were mostly discussed on news outlets, Twitter, and Mendeley. Forty-one articles were published in Q1 journals, 24 in Q2 journals, 32 in Q3 journals, and three in Q4 journals. AAS was significantly higher in articles of Q2 journals (median AAS = 398, range = 70-513) than in articles of Q1. A weak reverse correlation existed between AAS and time since publication (r = -.25, p articles is not significantly associated with high citation rates. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Museum Universe Data File FY 2015 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2015. This list contains descriptive information about...

  13. Museum Universe Data File FY 2014 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2014. This list contains descriptive information about...

  14. Formation of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3[2H]-furanone by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii: identification of an intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Tobias; Brühlmann, Fredi; Schwab, Wilfried

    2003-07-01

    The formation of the important flavor compound 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3[2H]-furanone (HDMF; Furaneol) from D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate by the yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii was studied with regard to the identification of intermediates present in the culture medium. Addition of o-phenylenediamine, a trapping reagent for alpha-dicarbonyls, to the culture medium and subsequent analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography with diode array detection revealed the formation of three quinoxaline derivatives derived from D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate under the applied growth conditions (30 degrees C; pH 4 to 5). Isolation and characterization of these compounds by tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy led to the identification of phosphoric acid mono-(2,3,4-trihydroxy-4-quinoxaline-2-yl-butyl) ester (Q1), phosphoric acid mono-[2,3-dihydroxy-3-(3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-yl)-propyl] ester (Q2), and phosphoric acid mono-[2-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-yl)-propyl] ester (Q3). Q1 and Q2 were formed independently of Z. rouxii cells, whereas Q3 was detected only in incubation systems containing the yeast. Identification of Q2 demonstrated for the first time the chemical formation of 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose-6-phosphate in the culture medium, a generally expected but never identified intermediate in the formation pathway of HDMF. Since HDMF was detected only in the presence of Z. rouxii cells, additional enzymatic steps were presumed. Incubation of periplasmic and cytosolic protein extracts obtained from yeast cells with D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate led to the formation of HDMF, implying the presence of the required enzymes in both extracts.

  15. Relationship between daily isoflavone intake and sleep in Japanese adults: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yufei; Niu, Kaijun; Huang, Cong; Momma, Haruki; Guan, Lei; Kobayashi, Yoritoshi; Guo, Hui; Chujo, Masahiko; Otomo, Atsushi; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2015-12-29

    Isoflavones comprise a class of phytoestrogens that resemble human estrogen in chemical structure, and have weak estrogenic effects. Because estrogen modulates sleep duration and quality, we hypothesized that isoflavones would have a beneficial effect on sleep status in a way similar to estrogen. We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate the relationship between daily isoflavone intake and sleep status in Japanese subjects. Our study included 1076 Japanese adults aged 20-78 years. Daily isoflavone intake was assessed using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire, and sleep was evaluated using a self-reported questionnaire. The prevalence of regular sleep duration (7-8 h/day) and sufficient sleep quality were 13.3% and 56.2%, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the odds ratios (95% CIs) for optimal sleep duration (7-8 h) when higher isoflavone intakes (Q2-Q4) were compared with low isoflavone intake (Q1) were Q2: 0.94 (0.53-1.56); Q3: 1.28 (0.73-2.24); and Q4: 1.84 (1.06-3.18) (p for trend = 0.013). In the final adjusted model, sufficient sleep quality across categories of isoflavone intake was Q1: 1.00 (reference); Q2: 1.30 (0.91-1.84); Q3: 1.48 (1.03-2.12); and Q4: 1.78 (1.22-2.60); (p for trend = 0.002). Higher daily isoflavone intake was positively associated with optimal sleep duration and quality in a Japanese population. This finding suggests that daily isoflavone intake may have a potentially beneficial effect on sleep status.

  16. Neighbourhood income level and outcomes of extremely preterm neonates: protection conferred by a universal health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gary; Shah, Prakesh; Kovacs, Lajos; Ojah, Cecil; Riley, Patricia; Lee, Shoo K

    2012-11-07

    To determine the impact of neighbourhood income and maternal residence population density on mortality and various morbidities at discharge or transfer from the NICU among extremely preterm neonates (<27 weeks gestation) in Canada. Neighbourhood income level and residential status was derived using a postal code conversion file and census data. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the risk-adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of mortality and survival without major morbidities (chronic lung disease, necrotizing enterocolitis, severe intraventricular hemorrhage, and retinopathy of prematurity) among 2,752 extremely preterm infants admitted to 25 tertiary level neonatal intensive care units in Canada between 2007 and 2008. There were no significant differences between mothers from different neighbourhood income quintiles (Q1 = low; Q5 = high) and neonatal mortality AOR (95% confidence interval): Q1: 1.10 (0.74-1.62), Q2: 1.00 (0.67-1.49), Q3: 1.39 (0.93-2.07), Q4: 1.01 (0.67-1.52), Q5: 1 (reference); or survival without major morbidity: Q1: 1.01 (0.70-1.44), Q2: 0.84 (0.58-1.23), Q3: 0.85 (0.58-1.24), Q4: 0.92 (0.63-1.35), Q5: 1 (reference). There were no significant differences in mortality (AOR 1.14 [0.83-1.57]) or in survival without major morbidity (AOR 0.92 [0.67-1.26]) between infants of mothers residing in sparsely populated areas compared to densely populated areas. Maternal residence in a low-income neighbourhood or sparsely populated area was not associated with higher odds of mortality or survival free of major morbidities in extremely preterm infants.

  17. AcEST: BP915037 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1.8 tr|Q2QKJ8|Q2QKJ8_DANRE Fog2b OS=Danio rerio GN=zfpm2b PE=2 SV=1 35 2.4 tr|Q1LYK9|Q1LYK9_DANRE Novel pro... 255 GMYPTPEVQRYGTPQEYRRGPPPMNEP--GREPGRMHQGPPRPSSQPKMYNNMPPG 308 >tr|Q2QKJ8|Q2QKJ8_DANRE Fog

  18. The association between socioeconomic factors and breast cancer-specific survival varies by race.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Agarwal

    Full Text Available Although racial disparity is well described for oncologic outcomes, factors associated with survival within racial groups remains unexplored. The objective of this study is to determine whether breast cancer survival among White or Black patients is associated with differing patient factors. Women diagnosed with breast cancer from 1998 through 2012 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER database. Cox proportional hazard logistic regression was used to estimate cause-specific survival in the combined cohort, and separate cohorts of Black or White patients only. Main outcomes included cause-specific survival in cohorts of Black only, White only, or all patients adjusted for demographic and oncologic factors. A total of 406,907 Black (10.8% or White (89.2% patients diagnosed with breast cancer from 1998 through 2012 were isolated. Cancer-specific survival analysis of the combined cohort showed significantly decreased hazard ratio (H.R. in patients from the higher economic quartiles (Q1: 1.0 (ref, Q2: 0.95 (p<0.01, Q3: 0.94 (p<0.01, Q4: 0.87 (p<0.001. Analysis of the White only cohort showed a similar relationship with income (Q1: 1.0 (ref, Q2: 0.95 (p<0.01, Q3: 0.95 (p<0.01, Q4: 0.86 (p<0.001. However, analysis of the Black only cohort did not show a relationship with income (Q1: 1.0 (ref, Q2: 1.04 (p = 0.34, Q3: 0.97 (p = 0.53, Q4: 1.04 (p = 0.47. A test of interaction confirmed that the association between income and cancer-specific survival is dependent on patient race, both with and without adjustment for demographic and oncologic characteristics (p<0.01. While median county income is positively associated with cancer-specific survival among White patients, this is not the case with Black patients. Similar findings were noted for education level. These findings suggest that the association between socioeconomic status and breast cancer survival commonly reported in the literature is specific to White patients

  19. Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Third Quarter of 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James J.

    2010-11-08

    This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the third quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010 Q1+Q2+Q3). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $132 billion (in real 2010 US$) invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.4 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first three quarters of 2010 is close to $2.4 billion accounting for slightly less than 15% of all venture capital investments during the first three quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $2.1 billion (11% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first three quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $2.8 billion (18% of all US venture capital investments made during the first three quarters of

  20. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG): Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Kat A.

    2014-01-10

    The Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) brought together a consortium of 14 leading clean energy rural, suburban, and low income communities throughout Connecticut. N2N was awarded $4.2 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competitive BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program on August 10, 2010 to run a two-year pilot program (plus one year of transition and evaluation) (Award No. EMCBC- 00969-10). N2N tested innovative program models and hypotheses for improving Connecticut’s existing residential energy efficiency programs that are overseen by the ratepayer fund board and administered by CT utilities. N2N’s original goal was to engage 10 percent of households in participating communities to reduce their energy usage by 20 percent through energy upgrades and clean energy measures. N2N planned for customers to complete more comprehensive whole-home energy efficiency and clean energy measures and to achieve broader penetration than existing utility-administered regulated programs. Since this was an ARRA award, we report the following figures on job creation in Table 1. Since N2N is not continuing in its current form, we do not provide figures on job retention. Table 1 N2N Job Creation by Quarter Jobs Created 2010 Q4 6.65 2011 Q1 7.13 2011 Q2 4.98 2011 Q3 9.66 2011 Q4 5.43 2012 Q1 11.11 2012 Q2 6.85 2012 Q3 6.29 2012 Q4 6.77 2013 Q1 5.57 2013 Q2 8.35 2013 Q3 6.52 Total 85.31 The N2N team encountered several gaps in the existing efficiency program performance that hindered meeting N2N’s and DOE’s short-term program goals, as well as the State of Connecticut’s long-term energy, efficiency, and carbon reduction goals. However, despite the slow program start, N2N found evidence of increasing upgrade uptake rates over time, due to delayed customer action of one to two years from N2N introduction to completion of deeper household upgrades. Two main social/behavioral principles have contributed to driving deeper upgrades in CT: 1. Word of mouth

  1. Relationship Between the Urine Flow Rate and Risk of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy After Emergent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Lin, Lixia; Li, Yun; Li, Hualong; Wu, Deng-Xuan; Zhao, Jian-bin; Lian, Dan; Zhou, Yingling; Liu, Yuanhui; Ye, Piao; Ran, Peng; Duan, Chongyang; Chen, Shiqun; Chen, Pingyan; Xian, Ying; Chen, Jiyan; Tan, Ning

    2015-12-01

    A low urine flow rate is a marker of acute kidney injury. However, it is unclear whether a high urine flow rate is associated with a reduced risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in high-risk patients. We conducted this study to evaluate the predictive value of the urine flow rate for the risk of CIN following emergent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We prospectively examined 308 patients undergoing emergent PCI who provided consent. The predictive value of the 24-hour postprocedural urine flow rate, adjusted by weight (UR/W, mL/kg/h) and divided into quartiles, for the risk of CIN was assessed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The cumulative incidence of CIN was 24.4%. In particular, CIN was observed in 29.5%, 19.5%, 16.7%, and 32.0% of cases in the UR/W quartile (Q)-1 (≤0.94  mL/kg/h), Q2 (0.94-1.30  mL/kg/h), Q3 (1.30-1.71  mL/kg/h), and Q4 (≥1.71  mL/kg/h), respectively. Moreover, in-hospital death was noted in 7.7%, 3.9%, 5.1%, and 5.3% of patients in Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounding predictors, multivariate analysis indicated that compared with the moderate urine flow rate quartiles (Q2 + Q3), a high urine flow rate (Q4) (odds ratio [OR], 2.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27-5.68; P = 0.010) and low urine flow rate (Q1) (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.03-4.82; P = 0.041) were significantly associated with an increased risk of CIN. Moreover, a moderate urine flow rate (0.94-1.71  mL/kg/h) was significantly associated with a decreased risk of mortality. Our data suggest that higher and lower urine flow rates were significantly associated with an increased risk of CIN after emergent PCI, and a moderate urine flow rate (0.94-1.71  mL/kg/h) may be associated with a decreased risk of CIN with a good long-term prognosis after emergent PCI.

  2. RI E-911 Sites; e911Sites13q1

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — These data were originally developed and designed for Rhode Island Enhanced 9-1-1 purposes only. These data represent every known building or structure in the state...

  3. Q4 2016/Q1 2017 Solar Industry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolis, Robert; Feldman, David; Boff, Daniel

    2017-05-17

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in the fourth quarter of 2016 and the first quarter of 2017. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  4. Radiative corrections to the quark masses in the ferromagnetic Ising and Potts field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkevich, Sergei B.

    2017-10-01

    We consider the Ising Field Theory (IFT), and the 3-state Potts Field Theory (PFT), which describe the scaling limits of the two-dimensional lattice q-state Potts model with q = 2, and q = 3, respectively. At zero magnetic field h = 0, both field theories are integrable away from the critical point, have q degenerate vacua in the ferromagnetic phase, and q (q - 1) particles of the same mass - the kinks interpolating between two different vacua. Application of a weak magnetic field induces confinement of kinks into bound states - the "mesons" (for q = 2 , 3) consisting predominantly of two kinks, and "baryons" (for q = 3), which are essentially the three-kink excitations. The kinks in the confinement regime are also called "the quarks". We review and refine the Form Factor Perturbation Theory (FFPT), adapting it to the analysis of the confinement problem in the limit of small h, and apply it to calculate the corrections to the kink (quark) masses induced by the multi-kink fluctuations caused by the weak magnetic field. It is shown that the subleading third-order ∼h3 correction to the kink mass vanishes in the IFT. The leading second order ∼h2 correction to the kink mass in the 3-state PFT is estimated by truncation the infinite form factor expansion at the first term representing contribution of the two-kink fluctuations into the kink self-energy.

  5. Multiquark exotics (baryonium, dibaryons etc)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The multiquark exotic resonant states q 2 -(anti q) 2 , q 3 -(anti q) 3 , q 6 and q 9 are discussed as systems composed of the few colour clusters. Special attention is devoted to the problem of narrow resonances in channels anti NN, Δanti p+pions, πNN and NN. 42 refs.; 2 figs.; 5 tabs

  6. Space, time and color in hadron production via e+ e- --> Z$^{0}$ and e+ e- --> W$^{+}$W$^{-}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.; Ellis, John; Geiger, Klaus

    1996-01-01

    The time-evolution of jets in hadronic e+ e- events at LEP is investigated in both position- and momentum-space, with emphasis on effects due to color flow and particle correlations. We address dynamical aspects of the four simultanously-evolving, cross-talking parton cascades that appear in the reaction e+ e- --> .gamma./Z.sup(0) --> W+W- --> q1 q~2 q3 q~4, and compare with the familiar two-parton cascades in e+ e- --> Z.sup(0) --> q1 q~2. We use a QCD statistical transport approach, in which the multiparticle final state is treated as an evolving mixture of partons and hadrons, whose proportions are controlled by their local space-time geography via standard perturbative QCD parton shower evolution and a phenomenological model for non-perturbative parton-cluster formation followed by cluster decays into hadrons. Our numerical simulations exhibit a characteristic "inside-outside" evolution simultanously in position and momentum space. We compare three different model treatments of color flow, and find large ...

  7. Plasma zinc in institutionalized elderly individuals: Relation with immune and cardiometabolic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Márcia Cristina; de Oliveira, Larissa Praça; de Araújo Cabral, Natalia Louise; de Sousa, Sara Estéfani Soares; das Graças Almeida, Maria; Lemos, Telma Maria Araújo Moura; de Oliveira Lyra, Clélia; de Lima, Kenio Costa; Sena-Evangelista, Karine Cavalcanti Mauricio; de Fatima Campos Pedrosa, Lucia

    2018-04-24

    Changes in zinc metabolism caused by aging and the institutionalization process may contribute to zinc deficiency in elderly individuals. Hypozincemia results in changes in glycemic, lipid, and inflammatory profiles. The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma zinc concentrations and their relationships with sociodemographic, dietary, inflammatory, and cardiometabolic biomarkers in institutionalized elderly individuals. A cross-sectional study was carried out including 255 elderly adults living in nursing homes. The associations between plasma zinc and dietary zinc intake, sociodemographic indicators, and glycemic, lipid, and inflammatory biomarkers were evaluated. Independent variables were analyzed according to quartiles of plasma zinc concentrations (Q1: 93.7 μg/dL). The relationship between plasma zinc concentrations and predictor variables was also tested. In Q1, higher concentrations of the following variables were observed, compared with those in other quartiles: total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c; Q1 > Q2, Q3, Q4; all p  Q3, Q4; all p  Q3, Q4; p = 0.024 and p = 0.010, respectively); tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (Q1 > Q3, p = 0.003). A significant reduction in plasma zinc concentrations was observed with increasing age-adjusted institutionalization time (Δ = - 0.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.18 to -0.01). The concentrations of total cholesterol (Δ = - 0.19; 95% CI: -0.23 to -0.15), LDL-c (Δ = - 0.19; 95% CI: -0.23 to -0.15), triglycerides (Δ = - 0.11; 95% CI: -0.16 to -0.06), IL-6 (Δ = - 1.41; 95% CI: -2.64 to -0.18), and TNF-α (Δ = - 1.04; 95% CI: -1.71 to -0.36) were also significantly increased. In conclusion, decreased plasma zinc concentrations were associated with longer institutionalization time and worse lipid and inflammatory profiles in elderly institutionalized individuals. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Exchange rate misalignment, capital accumulation and income distribution: Theory and evidence from the case of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oreiro José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the relationship between economic growth, income distribution and real exchange rate within the neo-Kaleckian literature, through the construction of a nonlinear macrodynamic model for an open economy in which investment in fixed capital is assumed to be a quadratic function of the real exchange rate. The model demonstrates that the prevailing regime of accumulation in a given economy depends on the type of currency misalignment, so if the real exchange rate is overvalued, then the regime of accumulation will be profit-led, but if the exchange rate is undervalued, then the accumulation regime is wage-led. Subsequently, the adherence of the theoretical model to data is tested for Brazil in the period 1994/Q3-2008/Q4. The econometric results are consistent with the theoretical non-linear specification of the investment function used in the model, so that we can define the existence of a real exchange rate that maximizes the rate of capital accumulation for the Brazilian economy. From the estimate of this optimal rate we show that the real exchange rate is overvalued in 1994/Q3- 2001/Q1 and 2005/Q4-2008/Q4 and undervalued in the period 2001/Q2-2005/Q3. As a direct corollary of this result, it follows that the prevailing regime of accumulation in the Brazilian economy after the last quarter of 2005 is profit-led.

  9. A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW ABOUT SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS ELICITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LENIS R. WONG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Requirements Elicitation is recognized as one of the most important activity in software development process as it has direct impact on its success. Although there are many proposals for improving this task, still there are issues which have to be solved. This paper aims to identify the current status of the latest researches related to software requirements elicitation through general framework for literature review, in order to answer the following research questions: Q1 What aspects have been covered by different proposal of requirements elicitation? Q2 What activities of the requirements elicitation process have been covered? And Q3 What factors influence on requirements elicitation and how? A cross-analysis of the outcome was performed. One of the results showed that requirements elicitation process needs improvements.

  10. Parametric study of the fractional-order Chen-Lee system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, L.M.; Tou, W.M.S.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of fractional-order systems have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. In this paper, the effects of parameter changes on the dynamics of the fractional-order Chen-Lee system were studied numerically. The parameter ranges used were relatively broad. The order used for the system was fixed at 2.7 (q 1 = q 2 = q 3 = 0.9). The system displays rich dynamic behaviors, such as a fixed point, periodic motion (including period-3 motion), chaotic motion, and transient chaos. The chaotic motion identified was validated by the confirmation of a positive Lyapunov exponent. Period-doubling routes to chaos in the fractional-order Chen-Lee system were also found

  11. Research on the Multilayer Free Damping Structure Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Meng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to put forward a design model for multilayer free damping structures. It sets up a mathematical model and deduces the formula for its structural loss factor η and analyzes the change rules of η along with the change rate of the elastic modulus ratio q1, the change rate of the loss factors of damping materials q2, and the change rate of the layer thickness ratio q3 under the condition with the layer thickness ratio h2=1,3,5,10 by software MATLAB. Based on three specific damping structures, the mathematical model is verified through ABAQUS. With the given structural loss factor (η≥2 and the layer number (n=3,4,5,6, 34 kinds of multilayer free damping structures are then presented. The study is meant to provide a more flexible and more diverse design solution for multilayer free damping structures.

  12. Nuclear opacity for neutrinos at small Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B.Z.

    1989-01-01

    The causes of nuclear screening of the vector and the weak axial currents are quite different. The hadronic fluctuations of neutrino in the nuclear matter live much longer than in the vacuum, due to interaction with nucleons. Nuclear opacity for neutrinos calculated using Glauber-Gribov theory, differs considerably from that given by the Bell optical model. A good agreement of the theory with the recent BEBC WA59 Collaboration measurements is found. 14 refs.; 4 figs

  13. Structure functions and low Q2 physics at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeck, A. de; Klein, M.

    1991-12-01

    Important new insights into the hadron structure are expected from the data which will be collected at the electron-proton storage ring HERA at DESY, Hamburg. In this paper the physics opportunities for cross section related measurements at HERA are reviewed. Emphasis is put on the derivation of the proton structure functions, on the QCD effects expected in the newly accessible low χ region and on almost real photoproduction physics. (orig.)

  14. A study of low Q2 radiative Bhabha scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlen, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    This thesis presents a study of electron-positron scattering, via nearly real photon exchange, where in the process one or more high energy photons are produced. The motivations behind the work are twofold. Firstly, the study is a sensitive test of the theory of electron-photon interactions, quantum electrodynamics. A deviation from the theory could indicate that the electron is a composite particle. Secondly, a thorough understanding of this process is necessary for experiments to be done in the near future at the Stanford Linear Collider and the LEP facility at CERN. Calculations for the process to third and fourth order in pertubation theory are described. Methods for simulating the process by a Monte Carlo event generator are given. Results from the calculations are compared to data from the Mark II experiment at the PEP storage ring. The ratio of measured to calculated cross sections are 0.993 /+-/ 0.017 /+-/ 0.015 and 0.99 /+-/ 0.16 /+-/ 0.08 for final states with one and two observed photons respectively, where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. The excellent agreement verifies the calculations of the fourth order radiative correction. No evidence for electron substructure is observed

  15. Weekday and weekend sedentary time and physical activity in differentially active children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Stuart J; Boddy, Lynne M; Mackintosh, Kelly A; Valencia-Peris, Alexandra; Ramirez-Rico, Elena

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether weekday-weekend differences in sedentary time and specific intensities of physical activity exist among children categorised by physical activity levels. Cross-sectional observational study. Seven-day accelerometer data were obtained from 810 English children (n=420 girls) aged 10-11 years. Daily average minday(-1) spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity were calculated for each child. Sex-specific moderate to vigorous physical activity quartile cut-off values categorised boys and girls separately into four graded groups representing the least (Q1) through to the most active (Q4) children. Sex- and activity quartile-specific multilevel linear regression analyses analysed differences in sedentary time, light physical activity, moderate physical activity, vigorous physical activity, and moderate to vigorous physical activity between weekdays and weekends. On weekdays Q2 boys spent longer in light physical activity (pboys (pphysical activity, and Q1-Q3 boys accumulated significantly more vigorous physical activity and moderate to vigorous physical activity than at weekends. There were no significant differences in weekday and weekend sedentary time or physical activity for Q4 boys. On weekdays Q2 and Q3 girls accumulated more sedentary time (pgirls did significantly more moderate physical activity (pgirls engaged in more vigorous physical activity (pphysical activity (pgirls' sedentary time and physical activity varied little between weekdays and weekends. The most active children maintained their sedentary time and physical activity levels at weekends, while among less active peers weekend sedentary time and physical activity at all intensities was lower. Low active children may benefit most from weekend intervention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of complications due to intratympanic injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chuan Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study is to report and to analyze the complications following intratympanic injections (ITI of steroids. The occurrence rate of complications at different ITI sites, four quadrants of eardrum, was also compared. Methods: A retrospective clinical review in a medical center. Each patient received ITI twice in a week for 2–3 consecutive weeks as a salvage therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Post-injection complications, especially transient dizziness and vertigo, were recorded. Patients with acute or chronic vertigo episodes in 1 month were excluded. Results: A total of 59 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss and a total of 278 times of ITI were performed in 1 year. The post-injection complications included pain, tongue numbness, transient dizziness, vertigo, tinnitus, and a small persistent perforation. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of these complications between the injections sites on the 4 quadrants of the tympanic membrane. However, there was statistical significance in the post-injection vertiginous episode after IT injections to posterior-inferior quadrant (Q3 and posterior-superior quadrant (Q4 compared to anterior-superior quadrant (Q1 and anterior-inferior quadrant (Q2 (P = 0.0113. Conclusion: IT injection is recommended to be applied to the Q2 since the Q1 and Q4 injections are more likely to induce the adverse effect of tongue numbness, while the Q3 and Q4 areas are more likely to induce post-injection vertigo. Keywords: Intratympanic injection, Sudden deafness, Complications, Vertigo

  17. Effectiveness and efficacy of nutritional therapy: A systematic review following Cochrane methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Krznarić, Zeljko; Singer, Pierre; Barazzoni, Rocco; Cederholm, Tommy; Golay, Alain; Van Gossum, André; Kennedy, Nicholas; Kreymann, Georg; Laviano, Alessandro; Pavić, Tajana; Puljak, Livia; Sambunjak, Dario; Utrobičić, Ana; Schneider, Stéphane M

    2017-08-01

    Disease-related malnutrition has deleterious consequences on patients' outcome and healthcare costs. The demonstration of improved outcome by appropriate nutritional management is on occasion difficult. The European Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) appointed the Nutrition Education Study Group (ESPEN-NESG) to increase recognition of nutritional knowledge and support in health services. To obtain the best available evidence on the potential effects of malnutrition on morbidity, mortality and hospital stay; cost of malnutrition; effect of nutritional treatment on outcome parameters and pharmaco-economics of nutritional therapy, a systematic review of the literature was performed following Cochrane methodology, to answer the following key questions: Q1) Is malnutrition an independent predictive factor for readmission within 30 days from hospital discharge? Q2) Does nutritional therapy reduce the risk of readmission within 30 days from hospital discharge? Q3) Is nutritional therapy cost-effective/does it reduce costs in hospitalized patients? and Q4) Is nutritional therapy cost effective/does it reduce costs in outpatients? For Q1 six of 15 identified observational studies indicated that malnutrition was predictive of re-admissions, whereas the remainder did not. For Q2 nine randomized controlled trials and two meta-analyses gave non-conclusive results whether re-admissions could be reduced by nutritional therapy. Economic benefit and cost-effectiveness of nutritional therapy was consistently reported in 16 identified studies for hospitalized patients (Q3), whereas the heterogeneous and limited corresponding data on out-patients (Q4) indicated cost-benefits in some selected sub-groups. This result of this review supports the use of nutritional therapy to reduce healthcare costs, most evident from large, homogeneous studies. In general, reports are too heterogeneous and overall of limited quality for conclusions on impact of malnutrition and its

  18. Walkability around primary schools and area deprivation across Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Laura; McCrorie, Paul; Nicholls, Natalie; Ellaway, Anne

    2016-04-14

    A number of studies based in the US, Canada, and Australia, have found evidence of associations between the built environment (BE) and mode of transport to school, and links between active travel and deprivation. Limited research in the UK compares potential BE supports for walking to school by area deprivation. Within this study, we gathered data on BE attributes previously linked to active travel, i.e., street/path connectivity, and dwelling density, created a composite 'walkability score' (WS) for areas around primary schools across urban Scotland, and explored whether poorer areas exhibit lower scores than more affluent areas, or vice versa. We consider this to be a novel approach as few studies have compared BE features by deprivation across a whole country. Address and road/path maps were obtained and primary schools (N = 937) across mainland Scotland were mapped. Schools were attributed income deprivation scores (scores divided into quintiles (Q1: least deprived, Q5: most deprived)). Catchment area (CA) boundaries, i.e., the geographic area representing eligibility for local school attendance, were drawn around schools, and WS calculated for each CA. We compared mean WS by income quintile (ANOVA), for all local authorities (LAs) combined (N = 29), and separately for the four LAs with the greatest number of schools included in the analysis. For all LAs combined, the least deprived quintile (Q1) showed a significantly lower WS (-0.61), than quintiles 3, 4 and 5 (Q2: -0.04 (non-sig), Q3: 0.38, Q4: 0.09, Q5: 0.18); while for Glasgow the second least deprived quintile (Q2) showed significantly higher WS (Q1: 1.35, Q2: 1.73), than middling (Q3: 0.18) and most deprived quintiles (Q4: 0.06, Q5: -0.10). WS differ by deprivation with patterns varying depending on the spatial scale of the analysis. It is essential that less walkable areas are provided with the resources to improve opportunities to engage in active travel.

  19. Timing and nature of alluvial fan and strath terrace formation in the Eastern Precordillera of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Kathryn; Owen, Lewis A.; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Meigs, Andrew; Costa, Carlos; Caffee, Marc W.; Masana, Eulalia; Ahumada, Emilio

    2013-11-01

    Sixty-eight 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) surface exposure ages are presented to define the timing of alluvial fan and strath terrace formation in the hyper-arid San Juan region of the Argentine Precordillera. This region is tectonically active, and numerous fault scarps traverse Quaternary landforms. The three study sites, Marquesado strath complex, Loma Negra alluvial fan and Carpintería strath complex reveal a history of alluvial fan and strath terrace development over the past ˜225 ka. The Marquesado complex Q3m surface dates to ˜17 ± 3 ka, whereas the Loma Negra Q1ln, Q2ln, Q3ln, Q4ln, and Q5ln surfaces date to ˜24 ± 3 ka, ˜48 ± 2 ka, ˜65 ± 13 ka, ˜105 ± 21 ka, and ˜181 ± 29 ka, respectively. The Carpintería complex comprises eight surfaces that have been dated and include the Q1c (˜23 ± 3 ka), Q2c (˜5 ± 5 ka), Q3ac (˜25 ± 12 ka), Q3bc (˜29 ± 15 ka), Q4c (˜61 ± 12 ka), Q5c (˜98 ± 18 ka), Q6c (˜93 ± 18 ka), and Q7c (˜212 ± 37 ka). 10Be TCN depth profile data for the Loma Negra alluvial fan complex and Carpintería strath terrace complex, as well as OSL ages on some Carpintería deposits, aid in refining surface ages for comparison with local and global climate proxies, and additionally offer insights into inheritance and erosion rate values for TCNs (˜10 × 10410Be atoms/g of SiO2 and ˜5 m Ma-1, respectively). Comparison with other alluvial fan studies in the region show that less dynamic and older preserved surfaces occur in the Carpintería and Loma Negra areas with only younger alluvial fan surfaces preserved both to the north and south. These data in combination with that of other studies illustrate broad regional agreement between alluvial fan and strath terrace ages, which suggests that climate is the dominant forcing agent in the timing of terrace formation in this region.

  20. AcEST: BP912121 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Q1L0Q7 Definition tr|Q1L0Q7|Q1L0Q7_BOEDR At3g12490-like protein OS=Boechera drummondii Align length 119 Sco... alignments: (bits) Value tr|Q1L0Q7|Q1L0Q7_BOEDR At3g12490-like protein OS=Boechera drummo... 94 4e-18 tr|Q3..._29, whole genome... 71 4e-11 >tr|Q1L0Q7|Q1L0Q7_BOEDR At3g12490-like protein OS=Boechera drummondii PE=4 SV=

  1. EVALUACIÓN DE DIFERENTES DRENAJES EN TANQUES CIRCULARES PARA CULTIVO DE TRUCHA EN SISTEMAS DE RECIRCULACIÓN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROBERTO GARCÍA-CRIOLLO

    Full Text Available La evaluación de diferentes alternativas de captura y remoción eficiente de sólidos en tanques de cultivo en sistemas de recirculación para acuacultura cobra importancia como primer mecanismo para garantizar un adecuado tratamiento de las aguas residuales y su posterior vertimiento o reuso. El objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar durante un mes el desempeño de remoción aparente de sólidos sedimentables en 12 tanques de cultivo circulares de 250 L en un sistema de recirculación de agua para cuatro diferentes mecanismos de drenaje: D1-tubería perforada de fondo con salida lateral y rebalse externo, D2-rebalse lateral, D3-rebalse interno, D4-doble drenaje, y para tres tiempos de retención hidráulica Q1, Q2 y Q3 equivalentes a un recambio cada 25, 50 y 82 minutos. El experimento se desarrolló con alevinos de trucha arco iris con biomasa inicial de 1,6 kg/m³ alimentados a una tasa del 3% del peso vivo diario, se monitorearon los parámetros oxígeno disuelto, temperatura y pH. Hubo diferencias significativas tanto para los drenajes como para los tiempos de retención, los mejores resultados se obtuvieron para el D3-Q1, cuya combinación reportó una eficiencia media del 88,02% de remoción de sólidos, seguido del D1-Q1; el tratamiento con menor eficiencia fue el constituido por el D2-Q3.

  2. Effect of nutritional status on mortality in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Muhammed; İpek, Göktük; Aldağ, Mustafa; Altay, Servet; Hayıroğlu, Mert İlker; Börklü, Edibe Betül; İnan, Duygu; Kozan, Ömer

    2018-04-01

    The prognostic effects of poor nutritional status and cardiac cachexia on coronary artery disease (CAD) are not clearly understood. A well-accepted nutritional status parameter, the prognostic nutritional index (PNI), which was first demonstrated to be valuable in patients with cancer and those undergoing gastrointestinal surgery, was introduced to patients requiring coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of PNI in patients with CAD undergoing CABG. We evaluated the in-hospital and long-term (3-y) prognostic effect of PNI on 644 patients with CAD undergoing CABG. Baseline characteristics and outcomes were compared among the patients by PNI and categorized accordingly: Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4. Patients with lower PNI had significantly higher in-hospital and long-term mortality. Patients with lower PNI levels (Q1) had higher in-hospital mortality and had 12 times higher mortality rates than those with higher PNI levels (Q4). The higher PNI group had the lower rates and was used as the reference. Long-term mortality was higher in patients with lower PNI (Q1)-4.9 times higher than in the higher PNI group (Q4). In-hospital and long-term mortality rates were similar in the non-lower PNI groups (Q2-4). The present study demonstrated that PNI, calculated based on serum albumin level and lymphocyte count, is an independent prognostic factor for mortality in patients undergoing CABG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preoperative blood glucose and prognosis in diabetic patients undergoing lower extremity amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayak, Raj Kumar; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    -extremity amputation (LEA) is a decisive factor behind post-operative outcomes (re-amputation/mortality) within three months after the first amputation. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, the independent sample t-test, Pearson's chi-squared test and a Cox proportional hazards model were used. RESULTS......: A total of 270 patients underwent non-traumatic LEA of whom 105 had diabetes, whereas 81 patients were included for this study. The mean age was 71 years (standard deviation: ± 11.8). Mortality was 27% and 16% were re-amputated within three months after their first amputation.The median pre-operative RBS...... level was 8.6 mmol/l (range: 4.6-18.7 mmol/l) with tertile ranges as follows: Q1 4.0-7.0 mmol/l; Q2 7.1-11.0 mmol/l; Q3 > 11.0 mmol/l. For the Q3 tertile, the age-adjusted hazard ratio for re-amputation was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16-3.62) and for mortality it was 1.90 (95% CI: 0...

  4. Further Studies on Malaysian Nuclear Agency Competency Profile: Analysis on SARCON Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuraida Zainudin; Fazila Said; Zakaria Taib; Salahbiah Abdul Majid; Nita Salina Abu Bakar; Zakaria Dris

    2016-01-01

    A project on competency profile study was conducted in 2015 to identify and update the competence of Malaysian Nuclear Agency officers. This competency profile study is using the Modified SARCoN tool adapted from the original framework of the IAEA SARCoN. This paper will present further analysis of the Modified SARCoN data. A total of five divisions under the Research and Development programme namely BAB, BAS, BTI, BTP and BTS which involved 159 respondents as samples in this study. The collected data were analyzed via inferential statistics using the IBM SPSS Statistics software version 23. The results show that there are correlations and influences between the quadrant of organizational basic knowledge (Q1), technical knowledge (Q2), special skills (Q3a) and the effectiveness of personality/ attitude (Q4) with the quadrant of individual achievement and expertise (Q3b), but the influences are varies between the divisions involved. The influence of demographic factors are also discussed in this study. (author)

  5. LHC Inner Triplet Powering Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Bordry, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    In order to achieve a luminosity in excess of 10**34 cm**-2s**-1 at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), special high gradient quadrupoles are required for the final focusing triplets. These low-b triplets, located in the four experimental insertions (ATLAS, CMS, ALICE, LHC-B), consist of four wide-aperture superconducting magnets: two outer quadrupoles, Q1 and Q3, with a maximum current of 7 kA and a central one divided into two identical magnets, Q2a and Q2b, with a maximum current of 11.5 kA. To optimise the powering of these mixed quadrupoles, it was decided to use two nested high-current power converters : [8kA, 8V] and [6kA, 8V]. This paper presents the consequence of the interaction between the two galvanically coupled circuits. A control strategy, using two independent, standard, LHC digital controllers, to decouple the two systems is proposed and described. The converter protection during the discharge of the magnet energy due to quenches or interlocks of the magnets are discussed. Simulation and experim...

  6. Impact of short-term preconceptional exposure to particulate air pollution on treatment outcome in couples undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF/ET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, Mariangela; Czeresnia, Carlos Eduardo; Januário, Daniela Aparecida Nicolosi Foltran; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the potential effects of short-term exposure to particulate air pollution during follicular phase on clinical, laboratory, and pregnancy outcomes of women undergoing IVF/ET. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 400 first IVF/ET cycles of women exposed to ambient particulate matter during follicular phase. Particulate matter (PM) was categorized into quartiles (Q1: ≤30.48 µg/m3, Q2: 30.49–42.00 µg/m3, Q3: 42.01–56.72 µg/m3, and Q4: >56.72 µg/m3). Results Clinical, laboratory, or treatment variables were not affected by follicular phase PM exposure periods. Women exposed to Q4 period during the follicular phase of conception cycles had a higher risk of miscarriage (odds ratio, 5.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.04–25.51) when compared to women exposed to Q1–3 periods. Conclusion Our results show an association between brief exposure to high levels of ambient PM during the preconceptional period and early pregnancy loss, although no effect of this exposure on clinical, laboratory, and treatment outcomes was observed. PMID:20405197

  7. Modifications of the design of the final transformer in the FFS to accommodate lower gradients in the final quadrupole triplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The final transformer of the FFS includes the soft bend magnet and two symmetric quadrupole triplets. It ends at the IP. It is a telescopic transformer (meaning that its transfer matrix is diagonal) with a magnification of -1/5 in both planes. In the current design, L*, the distance between the downstream end of Q1 and the IP, is equal to 7.25 feet (2.21 m) and space is provided upstream of Q6 to accommodate a 27 foot long soft bend magnet. Satisfaction of the foregoing conditions leads to field gradients of about 19.8 kg/cm in Q1 and Q3 and 18.1 kg/cm in Q2. It now appears that it would be very difficult to attain such gradients. For practical superconducting quad designs, meaning iron-free, 5 cm bore, two-layer windings and 4.2 0 K, experts have estimated that gradients of at least 14 kg/cm would be reasonable. This raises the question, can the final transformer in the FFS be modified to accommodate gradients of 14 kg/cm or less and if so at what price in performance

  8. Uric Acid Level Has a J-Shaped Association with Arterial Stiffness in Korean Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungbin; Jung, Young-Hyo; Kwon, Yu-Jin; Park, Byoungjin

    2017-11-01

    Uric acid has been reported to function both as an oxidant or antioxidant depending on the context. A previous study in the Korean population reported a positive linear association between serum uric acid level and arterial stiffness in men, but little is known about how serum uric acid level is related to the risk of increased arterial stiffness in Korean postmenopausal women. We performed a cross-sectional study of 293 subjects who participated in a health examination program run by the health promotion center of Gangnam Severance Hospital between October 2007 and July 2010. High brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was defined as a brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity of more than 1,450 cm/s. The odds ratios (ORs) for high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across uric acid quartiles after adjusting for other indicators of cardiovascular risk. The 293 postmenopausal women were divided into quartiles according to uric acid level. The mean brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity values of each quartile were as follows: Q1, 1,474 cm/s; Q2, 1,375 cm/s; Q3, 1,422 cm/s; Q4, 1,528 cm/s. The second quartile was designated as the control group based on mean brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity value. Multivariate adjusted ORs (95% confidence intervals) for brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity across the uric acid quartiles were 2.642 (Q1, 1.095-6.3373), 1.00, 4.305 (Q3, 1.798-10.307), and 4.375 (Q4, 1.923-9.949), after adjusting for confounding variables. Serum uric acid level has a J-shaped association with arterial stiffness in Korean postmenopausal women.

  9. Changes in metal mobility assessed by EDTA kinetic extraction in three polluted soils after repeated phytoremediation using a cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhu; Wu, Longhua; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Phytoextraction is one of the most promising technologies for the decontamination of metal-polluted agricultural soils. Effects of repeated phytoextraction by the cadmium (Cd)/zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola on metal (Cd, Zn, copper (Cu) and lead (Pb)) mobility were investigated in three contaminated soils with contrasting properties. EDTA kinetic extraction and the two first-order reactions model showed advantages in the assessment of soil metal mobility and clearly discriminated changes in metal fractions induced by phytoextraction. Repeated phytoextraction led to large decreases in readily labile (Q 1 0 ) and less labile (Q 2 0 ) fractions of Cd and Zn in all three soils with the sole exception of an increase in the Q 2 0 of Zn in the highly polluted soil. However, Q 1 0 fractions of soil Cu and Pb showed apparent increases with the sole exception of Pb in the acid polluted soil but showed a higher desorption rate constant (k 1 ). Furthermore, S. plumbizincicola decreased the non-labile fraction (Q 3 0 ) of all metals tested, indicating that the hyperaccumulator can redistribute soil metals from non-labile to labile fractions. This suggests that phytoextraction decreased the mobility of the metals hyperaccumulated by the plant (Cd and Zn) but increased the mobility of the metals not hyperaccumulated (Cu and Pb). Thus, phytoextraction of soils contaminated with mixtures of metals must be performed carefully because of potential increases in the mobility of non-hyperaccumulated metals in the soil and the consequent environmental risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Altered plasma lysophosphatidylcholines and amides in non-obese and non-diabetic subjects with borderline-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Young Lee

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG is a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD. We investigated alterations in plasma metabolites associated with borderline-to-moderate HTG (triglycerides (TG 150-500 mg/dL. Using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis, the metabolomics profiles of 111 non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG were compared with those of 111 age- and sex-matched controls with normotriglyceridemia (NTG, TG <150 mg/dL. When compared to the NTG control group, the HTG group exhibited higher plasma levels of lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs, including C14:0 (q = 0.001 and C16:0 (q = 1.8E-05, and several amides, including N-ethyldodecanamide (q = 2.9E-05, N-propyldodecanamide (q = 3.5E-05, palmitoleamide (q = 2.9E-06, and palmitic amide (q = 0.019. The metabolomic profiles of the HTG group also exhibited lower plasma levels of cis-4-octenedioic acid (q<1.0E-9 and docosanamide (q = 0.002 compared with those of the NTG controls. LysoPC 16:0 and palmitoleamide emerged as the primary metabolites able to discriminate the HTG group from the NTG group in a partial least-squares discriminant analysis and were positively associated with the fasting triglyceride levels. We identified alterations in lysoPCs, amides, and cis-4-octenedioic acid among non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG. These results provide novel insights into the metabolic alterations that occur in the early metabolic stages of HTG. This information may facilitate the design of early interventions to prevent disease progression.

  11. Tricriticality in the q-neighbor Ising model on a partially duplex clique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Anna; Sienkiewicz, Julian; Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna

    2017-12-01

    We analyze a modified kinetic Ising model, a so-called q-neighbor Ising model, with Metropolis dynamics [Phys. Rev. E 92, 052105 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.052105] on a duplex clique and a partially duplex clique. In the q-neighbor Ising model each spin interacts only with q spins randomly chosen from its whole neighborhood. In the case of a duplex clique the change of a spin is allowed only if both levels simultaneously induce this change. Due to the mean-field-like nature of the model we are able to derive the analytic form of transition probabilities and solve the corresponding master equation. The existence of the second level changes dramatically the character of the phase transition. In the case of the monoplex clique, the q-neighbor Ising model exhibits a continuous phase transition for q=3, discontinuous phase transition for q≥4, and for q=1 and q=2 the phase transition is not observed. On the other hand, in the case of the duplex clique continuous phase transitions are observed for all values of q, even for q=1 and q=2. Subsequently we introduce a partially duplex clique, parametrized by r∈[0,1], which allows us to tune the network from monoplex (r=0) to duplex (r=1). Such a generalized topology, in which a fraction r of all nodes appear on both levels, allows us to obtain the critical value of r=r^{*}(q) at which a tricriticality (switch from continuous to discontinuous phase transition) appears.

  12. Dielectronic recombination of heavy species: the tin 4p64dq - 4p64d(q-1)4f + 4p54d(q+1) transition arrays for q = 1-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badnell, N R; Foster, A; O'Mullane, M; Summers, H P; Griffin, D C; Kilbane, D

    2011-01-01

    We report on detailed calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for Sn 4+ -Sn 13+ using three approaches of differing degrees of complexity. These are configuration-mixed Breit-Pauli using the autostructure code, bundled-nl using the Burgess-Bethe general program (BBGP) and configuration average (CA) using the DRACULA code. We find that target Δn = 0 dipole promotions dominate the total DR rate coefficients; configuration-mixing effects are small for the totals; results for the totals are highly dependent on the initial levels averaged over-the results for averaging over all levels of the ground configuration being typically nearly a factor of 2 smaller than for using only the ground level. On comparing the total DR rate coefficients obtained using the three methods we find that the BBGP results are systematically lower than those obtained from autostructure-in some cases they are significantly lower (by a factor of 2)-while the CA results are systematically and significantly higher (by up to 80%) in general. These findings need to be borne in mind for the finite-density modelling of tin plasma sources for microlithography and tin markers for magnetic fusion plasmas especially when using simple descriptions of DR. They apply also to heavy species in general such as tungsten ions which are of great importance for magnetic fusion plasmas.

  13. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele Loci in the Qatari Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L O'Beirne

    Full Text Available The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D is increasing in the Middle East. However, the genetic risk factors for T2D in the Middle Eastern populations are not known, as the majority of studies of genetic risk for T2D are in Europeans and Asians.All subjects were ≥3 generation Qataris. Cases with T2D (n = 1,124 and controls (n = 590 were randomly recruited and assigned to the 3 known Qatari genetic subpopulations [Bedouin (Q1, Persian/South Asian (Q2 and African (Q3]. Subjects underwent genotyping for 37 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 29 genes known to be associated with T2D in Europeans and/or Asian populations, and an additional 27 tag SNPs related to these susceptibility loci. Pre-study power analysis suggested that with the known incidence of T2D in adult Qataris (22%, the study population size would be sufficient to detect significant differences if the SNPs were risk factors among Qataris, assuming that the odds ratio (OR for T2D SNPs in Qatari's is greater than or equal to the SNP with highest known OR in other populations.Haplotype analysis demonstrated that Qatari haplotypes in the region of known T2D risk alleles in Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations were similar to European haplotypes. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment for multiple testing, only two SNPs (rs7903146 and rs4506565, both associated with transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2, achieved statistical significance in the whole study population. When T2D subjects and control subjects were assigned to the known 3 Qatari subpopulations, and analyzed individually and with the Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations combined, one of these SNPs (rs4506565 was also significant in the admixed group. No other SNPs associated with T2D in all Qataris or individual genetic subpopulations.With the caveats of the power analysis, the European/Asian T2D SNPs do not contribute significantly to the high prevalence of T2D in the Qatari population, suggesting that the genetic risks for T2D are

  14. Self-Reported Measures Of Strength And Sport-Specific Skills Distinguish Ranking In An International Online Fitness Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Paul R; Feito, Yuri; Mangine, Gerald T

    2017-02-08

    To determine if self-reported performance measures could distinguish ranking during the 2016 CrossFit Open, data from three thousand male (n=1500; 27.2±8.4 y; 85.2±7.9 kg; 177.0±6.5 cm) and female (n=1500, 28.7±4.9 y; 63.7±5.8 kg; 163.7±6.6 cm) competitors was used for this study. Competitors were split by gender and grouped into quintiles (Q1-Q5) based upon their final ranking. Quintiles were compared for one-repetition maximum (1RM) squat, deadlift, clean and jerk (CJ), snatch, 400-m sprint, 5,000-m run, and benchmark workouts (Fran, Helen, Grace, Filthy-50, and Fight-gone-bad). Separate one-way analyses of variance revealed all competitors in Q1 reported greater (p<0.05) 1RM loads for squat (Males: 201.6±19.1 kg; Females: 126.1±13.0 kg), deadlift (Males: 232.4±20.5 kg; Females: 148.3±14.5 kg), CJ (Males: 148.9±12.1 kg; Females: 95.7±8.4 kg), and snatch (Males: 119.4±10.9 kg; Females 76.5±7.6 kg) compared to other quintiles. In addition, Males in Q1 (59.3±5.9 sec) reported faster (p<0.05) 400-m times than Q3 only (62.6±7.3 sec), but were not different from any group in the 5,000-m run. Females in Q2 (67.5 ± 8.8 sec) reported faster (p<0.05) 400-m times than Q3-Q5 (73.5-74.8 sec) and faster (21.3 ± 1.8 min, p<0.02) 5,000-m times than Q4 (22.6±2.2 min) and Q5 (22.6±1.9 min). Faster (p<0.05) Fran times were reported by Q1 (males: 138.2±13.3 sec; females: 159.4±28.3 sec) compared to other groups, while the results of other workouts were variable. These data indicate that the most successful athletes excel in all areas of fitness/skill, while lower-ranking athletes should focus on developing strength and power after achieving sufficient proficiency in sport-specific skills.

  15. Double diffractive ρ -production in γ*γ* collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2005-01-01

    We present a first estimate of the cross-section for the exclusive process γ * L (Q 1 2 )γ * L (Q 2 2 )→ρ L 0 ρ L 0 , which will be studied in the future high energy e + e - -linear collider. As a first step, we calculate the Born order approximation of the amplitude for longitudinally polarized virtual photons and mesons, in the kinematical region s >>-t, Q 1 2 , Q 2 2 . This process is completely calculable in the hard region Q 1 2 , Q 2 2 >>Λ 2 QCD . We perform most of the steps in an analytical way. The resulting cross-section turns out to be large enough for this process to be measurable with foreseen luminosity and energy, for Q 1 2 and Q 2 2 in the range of a few GeV 2 . (orig.)

  16. The relative age effect is larger in Italian soccer top-level youth categories and smaller in Serie A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustio, Paolo Riccardo; Lupo, Corrado; Ungureanu, Alexandru Nicolae; Frati, Riccardo; Rainoldi, Alberto; Boccia, Gennaro

    2018-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE; i.e., an asymmetry in the birth distribution) is a bias observed in sport competitions that may favour relatively older athletes in talent identification. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the presence of RAE in elite soccer players competing in the Italian championships, even considering the discriminations of younger and older Serie A players (in relation to the median age of the sample), and different positional roles (i.e., goalkeeper, defender, midfielder, forward) for each observed category. A total of 2051 players competing into the 2017-2018 Italian under-15 (n = 265), under-16 (n = 362), under-17 (n = 403), Primavera (n = 421) and Serie A (n = 600) championships were analysed. The birth-date distributions, grouped in four quartiles (i.e., January-March, Q1; April-June, Q2; July-September, Q3; October-December, Q4), were compared to a uniform distribution using Chi-squared analysis. The week of birth was analysed using Poisson regression. The results showed a large over-representation of players born in Q1 in all soccer player categories. However, the effect size of this trend resulted smaller as age increased. Individuals born in Q1 have about two-folds more chances to become a Serie A player compared to those born in Q4. The Poisson regression analysis showed that RAE was greater for defenders than for forwards among all categories. Therefore, a strongly biased selection emerged among elite soccer players competing in Italian championships, highlighting how young individuals born in the first three months have many more chances to become elite players compared to the others.

  17. Cross sectional study of serum selenium concentration and esophageal squamous dysplasia in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Natalie R; Burgert, Stephen L; Murphy, Gwen A; Brockman, John D; White, Russell E; Lando, Justus; Chepkwony, Robert; Topazian, Mark D; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Mwachiro, Michael M

    2017-12-08

    Low serum selenium status has been associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). East Africa is a region of high ESCC incidence and is known to have low soil selenium levels, but this association has not previously been evaluated. In this study we assessed the association of serum selenium concentration and the prevalence of esophageal squamous dysplasia (ESD), the precursor lesion of ESCC, in a cross-sectional study of subjects from Bomet, Kenya. 294 asymptomatic adult residents of Bomet, Kenya completed questionnaires and underwent endoscopy with Lugol's iodine staining and biopsy for detection of ESD. Serum selenium concentrations were measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (95% CI) for associations between serum selenium and ESD were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. The mean serum selenium concentration was 85.5 (±28.3) μg/L. Forty-two ESD cases were identified (14% of those screened), including 5 (12%) in selenium quartile 1 (Q1), 5 (12%) in Q2, 15 (36%) in Q3, and 17 (40%) in Q4. Higher serum selenium was associated with prevalence of ESD (Q4 vs Q1: OR: 3.03; 95% CI: 1.05-8.74) and this association remained after adjusting for potential confounders (Q4 vs Q1: OR: 3.87; 95% CI: 1.06-14.19). This is the first study to evaluate the association of serum selenium concentration and esophageal squamous dysplasia in an African population at high risk for ESCC. We found a positive association between higher serum selenium concentration and prevalence of ESD, an association contrary to our original hypothesis. Further work is needed to better understand the role of selenium in the etiology of ESCC in this region, and to develop effective ESCC prevention and control strategies.

  18. Some spectroscopic problems in the bag theory of quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, R.L.

    1976-04-01

    In addition to conventional mesons and baryons, the bag model predicts the existence of several classes of unusual hadrons. The spectroscopy of two classes of unconventional hadrons is discussed: first are the Q 2 antiQ 2 mesons; second are Q 3 baryons or QantiQ mesons with quantum numbers forbidden by the nonrelativistic quark model

  19. AcEST: BP918479 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eracting protein-like protein (F... 75 3e-12 tr|Q2TU77|Q2TU77_HUMAN Aging-associated protein 2 OS=Homo sapie...n... 75 3e-12 tr|Q1XBU6|Q1XBU6_HUMAN Aging-associated protein 14b OS=Homo sapi... 75 3e-12 tr|B7ZA40|B7ZA40_

  20. D Malone Travel Expenses 2010-2011Q3 ENGLISH.xlsx

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    acray

    David M. Malone - President. Travel Expenses 2010-2011. Other. Travel. Other. Meals &. Expenses. Total. Amount. Net Expenses. Organization. Dates. Destination(s). Purpose. Airfare. Transportation. Hotels. Incidentals. (note 1). Expenses. Recovered. Paid by IDRC. Recovered from. April 7-8. Montreal. IDRC sponsored ...

  1. Emission color tuning in AlQ3 complexes with extended conjugated chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Radek; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2003-08-07

    [reaction: see text] A new method for the synthesis of 5-arylethynyl-8-hydroxyquinoline ligands using Sonogashira-Hagihara coupling was developed. The electronic nature of arylethynyl substituents affects the emission color and quantum yield of the resulting Al(III) complex. Photophysical properties of the metallocomplexes correspond to the electron-withdrawing/-donating character of the arylethynyl substituents. Optical properties of such Al(III) complexes correlate with the Hammett constant values of the respective substituents. This strategy offers a powerful tool for the preparation of electroluminophores with predictable photophysical properties.

  2. Highly sensitive heavy metal ion detection using AlQ3 microwire functionalized QCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Nursel; Aǧar, Meltem; Altındal, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) microwires was successfully synthesized for the fabrication of Alq3 microwires-coated QCM sensors to detect the heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. AT-cut quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) of 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency having gold electrodes were used as transducers. Typical measuring cycle consisted of repeated flow of target measurands through the flow cell and subsequent washing to return the baseline. The QCM results indicated that the Alq3 microwires exhibit excellent sensitivity, stability and short response-recovery time, which are much attractive for the development of portable and highly sensitive heavy metal ion sensors in water samples.

  3. Probing Metal Carbonation Reactions of CO2 in a Model System Containing Forsterite and H2O Using Si-29, C-13 Magic Angle Sample Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J.; Kwak, J.; Hoyt, D. W.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Felmy, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    Ex situ solid state NMR have been used for the first time to study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+scCO2 with and without H2O. Run conditions were 80C and 96 bar. Si-29 NMR clearly shows that in the absence of CO2, the role of H2O is to hydrolyze surface Mg-O-Si bonds to produce Mg2+, and mono- and oligomeric hydroxylated silica species. The surface hydrolysis products contain only Q0 (Si(OH)4) and Q1 (Si(OH)3OSi) species. An equilibrium between Q0, Q1 and Mg2+ with a saturated concentration equivalent to less than 3.2% of the Mg2SiO4 conversion is obtained at a reaction time of up to 7 days. Using scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is observed within 7 days. Using both scCO2 and H2O, the surface reaction products for silica are mainly Q3 (SiOH(OSi)3) species accompanied by a lesser amount of Q2 (Si(OH)2(OSi)2) and Q4 (Si(OSi)4). However, no Q0 and Q1 were detected, indicating the carbonic acid formation/deprotonation and magnesite (MgCO3) precipitation reactions are faster than the forsterite hydrolysis process. Thus it can be concluded that the Mg2SiO4 hydrolysis process is the rate limiting step of the overall mineral carbonation process. Si-29 NMR combined with XRD, TEM, SAED and EDX further reveal that the reaction is a surface reaction with the Mg2SiO4 crystallite in the core and with condensed Q2-Q4 species forming amorphous surface layers. C-13 MAS NMR identified a possible reaction intermediates as (MgCO3)4*Mg(OH)2*5H2O. However, at long reaction times only crystallite magnesite MgCO3 products are observed. This research is part of a broader effort at PNNL to develop experimental tools and fundamental insights into chemical transformations affecting subsurface CO2 reactive transport. Si-29 (left) and C-13 (right) MAS NMR spectra of Mg2SiO4 under various reaction conditions. Si-29 NMR reveals that in scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is

  4. Yogurt consumption and abdominal obesity reversion in the PREDIMED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, S; Sayón-Orea, C; Babio, N; Ruiz-Canela, M; Martí, A; Corella, D; Estruch, R; Fitó, M; Aros, F; Ros, E; Gómez-García, E; Fiol, M; Lapetra, J; Serra-Majem, Ll; Becerra-Tomás, N; Salas-Salvadó, J; Pinto, X; Schröder, H; Martínez, J A

    2016-06-01

    Evidence on the association yogurt consumption and obesity is not conclusive. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the association between yogurt consumption, reversion of abdominal obesity status and waist circumference change in elderly. 4545 individuals at high cardiovascular risk were prospectively followed. Total, whole-fat and low-fat yogurt consumption were assessed using food frequency questionnaires. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the association between yogurt consumption and waist circumference change (measured at baseline and yearly during the follow-up). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs of the reversion rate of abdominal obesity for each quintile of yogurt consumption compared with the lowest quintile. After multivariable adjustment, the average yearly waist circumference change in the quintiles of whole-fat yogurt consumption was: Q1: 0.00, Q2: 0.00 (-0.23 to 0.23), Q3: -0.15 (-0.42 to 0.13), Q4: 0.10 (-0.21 to 0.42), and Q5: -0.23 (-0.46 to -0.00) cm; p for trend = 0.05. The ORs for the reversion of abdominal obesity for whole-fat yogurt consumption were Q1: 1.00, Q2: 1.40 (1.04-1.90), Q3: 1.33 (0.94-1.89), Q4: 1.21 (0.83-1.77), and Q5: 1.43 (1.06-1.93); p for trend = 0.26. Total yogurt consumption was not significantly associated with reversion of abdominal obesity status and a lower waist circumference. However, consumption of whole-fat yogurt was associated with changes in waist circumference and higher probability for reversion of abdominal obesity. Therefore, it seems that whole-fat yogurt has more beneficial effects in management of abdominal obesity in elderly population at high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  5. Body Size and the Risk of Primary Hyperparathyroidism in Women: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anand; Curhan, Gary C; Paik, Julie M; Wang, Molin; Taylor, Eric N

    2017-09-01

    Greater body weight and fat mass have been associated with higher serum parathyroid hormone levels and a higher prevalence of primary hyperparathyroidism (P-HPTH) in women. However, prospective studies to evaluate whether greater body size associates with a higher incidence of developing P-HPTH have not been reported. We investigated whether greater body size was independently associated with a higher risk for developing P-HPTH in women. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 85,013 female participants in the Nurses' Health Study I followed for up to 26 years. Body size was measured via multiple metrics: weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC). Weight and BMI were assessed every 2 years from 1986 to 2012, and WC was assessed in 1986, 1996, and 2000. Detailed dietary and demographic exposures were quantified via validated biennial questionnaires. Incident cases of P-HPTH were confirmed by individual medical record review. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate whether WC, weight, and BMI were independent risk factors for developing P-HPTH. Models were adjusted for demographic variables, comorbidities, medications, intakes of calcium and vitamin D, and exposure to ultraviolet light. We confirmed 491 incident cases of P-HPTH during 2,128,068 person-years of follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted relative risks for incident P-HPTH increased across quartiles of WC: Q1, ref; Q2, 1.34 (0.97, 1.86); Q3, 1.70 (1.24, 2.31); Q4, 2.27 (1.63, 3.18); p trend < 0.001. Similarly, the multivariable-adjusted risks for incident P-HPTH increased across quartiles of weight: Q1, ref; Q2, 1.23 (0.92, 1.65); Q3, 1.63 (1.24, 2.14); Q4, 1.65 (1.24, 2.19); p trend < 0.001. A similar but statistically non-significant trend was observed across quartiles of BMI (p trend = 0.07). In summary, body size may be an independent and modifiable risk factor for developing P-HPTH in women. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American

  6. FY14-Q1 1.2.1.3.ML.1 INL Biomass Feeding Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler L. Westover

    2014-04-01

    Approximately 20 institutions were contacted by telephone and/or electronic mail and requested to provide responses to a survey on feeding biomass feedstock materials. Fourteen individuals responded. Responses from the participants, including information that was offered in addition to answers to the survey questions are summarized in this report, which fully meets the requirements of the milestone.

  7. Die Q 1 gemeenskap as een van die grondtipes van die kerk in die ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The New Testament bears witness to a wide variety of communities, representing a spectrum of ideas and teachings about Jesus and the meaning of his life. In this article these communities are regarded as prototypes of churches which have a certain bearing on churches and their teachings today. The article aims to ...

  8. Sewall Wright's equation Deltaq=(q(1-q) partial differentialw/ partial differentialq)/2w.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, A W

    2000-02-01

    An equation of Sewall Wright's expresses the change in the frequency of an allele under selection at a multiallelic locus as a function of the gradient of the mean fitness "surface" in the direction in which the relative proportions of the other alleles do not change. An attempt to derive this equation using conventional vector calculus shows that this description leads to a different equation and that the purported gradient in Wright's equation is not a gradient of the mean fitness surface except in the diallelic case, where the two equations are the same. It is further shown that if Fisher's angular transformation is applied to the diallelic case the genic variance is exactly equal to one-eighth of the square of the gradient of the mean fitness with respect to the transformed gene frequency. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. RI E-911 Road Centerlines; e911Roads13q1

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — These data were originally developed and designed for Rhode Island Enhanced 9-1-1 purposes only. These data contain street center lines and address ranges for all...

  10. RI E-911 Fire Hydrants; e911Hydrants13q1

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — These data were originally developed and designed for Rhode Island Enhanced 9-1-1 purposes only. These data represents every known fire hydrant in the state of Rhode...

  11. 26 CFR 31.3402(q)-1 - Extension of withholding to certain gambling winnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extension of withholding to certain gambling... to certain gambling winnings. (a)(1) General rule. Every person, including the Government of the.... With respect to reporting requirements for certain payments of gambling winnings not subject to...

  12. 24.1.3.3 Quarterly Report FY18 Q1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtz, Ron E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-17

    Here, we will develop an enhanced statistical framework to evaluate environmental swipe samples collected at nuclear facilities with the goal of identifying anomalies associated with potential undeclared activities. Our approach will be based on Bayesian methodology and time series analysis. This overall framework should result in a more cost effective and operationally effective approach to environmental swipe sample analysis and interpretation.

  13. Molecular Mechanism of preQ(1) Riboswitch Action: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Banáš, Pavel; Sklenovský, P.; Wedekind, J.E.; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 42 (2012), s. 12721-12734 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD203/09/H046; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/1476; GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/12/1878; GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Program:GB Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : HEPATITIS -DELTA VIRUS * PARTICLE MESH EWALD * SAM-II RIBOSWITCH Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (BFU-R) Impact factor: 3.607, year: 2012

  14. q=1 advanced tokamak experiments in JET and comparison with ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.; Wolf, R.; Alper, B.

    2002-01-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade advanced tokamak scenario with central q close to 1 has been reproduced on JET. For almost identical q profiles, the comparative analysis does show similar features like the fishbone activity and the current profile evolution. In JET, transport analyses indicates that an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been produced. Gradient length criterions based on the ion temperature gradient turbulence stabilization are used to characterize the ITBs in both devices. The trigger of ITBs is associated with rational surfaces in both devices although the underlying physics for this triggering seems different. This experiment has the prospect to get closer to identity experiments between the two tokamaks. (author)

  15. 26 CFR 1.414(q)-1T - Highly compensated employee (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-10Definition of officer and rules on inclusion of officers in highly compensated group. Q&A-11Rules with... rules for permanent and total disability and employee stock ownership plans respectively). (c) Other... pursuant to section 401(c)(1). This rule with respect to the inclusion of certain self-employed individuals...

  16. Okounkov's BC-Type Interpolation Macdonald Polynomials and Their q=1 Limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornwinder, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper surveys eight classes of polynomials associated with A-type and BC-type root systems: Jack, Jacobi, Macdonald and Koornwinder polynomials and interpolation (or shifted) Jack and Macdonald polynomials and their BC-type extensions. Among these the BC-type interpolation Jack polynomials were

  17. 26 CFR 31.3121(q)-1 - Tips included for employee taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... employment. (d) Computation of annual wage limitation. In connection with the application of the annual wage... 1966, A is employed as a waiter by X restaurant and is paid wages by X restaurant at the rate of $100 a... of $100 and on November 9, 1966, A furnishes X restaurant a report of tips actually received by him...

  18. FY 17 Q1 Commercial integrated heat pump with thermal storage milestone report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Heiba, Ahmad [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rice, C. Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The commercial integrated heat pump with thermal storage (AS-IHP) offers significant energy saving over a baseline heat pump with electric water heater. The saving potential is maximized when the AS-IHP serves coincident high water heating and high space cooling demands. A previous energy performance analysis showed that the AS-IHP provides the highest benefit in the hot-humid and hot-dry/mixed dry climate regions. Analysis of technical potential energy savings for these climate zones based on the BTO Market calculator indicated that the following commercial building market segments had the highest water heating loads relative to space cooling and heating loads education, food service, health care, lodging, and mercantile/service. In this study, we focused on these building types to conservatively estimate the market potential of the AS-IHP. Our analysis estimates maximum annual shipments of ~522,000 units assuming 100% of the total market is captured. An early replacement market based on replacement of systems in target buildings between 15 and 35 years old was estimated at ~136,000 units. Technical potential energy savings are estimated at ~0.27 quad based on the maximum market estimate, equivalent to ~13.9 MM Ton CO2 emissions reduction.

  19. Milestone Deliverable: FY18-Q1: Deploy production sliding mesh capability with linear solver benchmarking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domino, Stefan P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This milestone was focused on deploying and verifying a “sliding-mesh interface,” and establishing baseline timings for blade-resolved simulations of a sub-MW-scale turbine. In the ExaWind project, we are developing both sliding-mesh and overset-mesh approaches for handling the rotating blades in an operating wind turbine. In the sliding-mesh approach, the turbine rotor and its immediate surrounding fluid are captured in a “disk” that is embedded in the larger fluid domain. The embedded fluid is simulated in a coordinate system that rotates with the rotor. It is important that the coupling algorithm (and its implementation) between the rotating and inertial discrete models maintains the accuracy of the numerical methods on either side of the interface, i.e., the interface is “design order.”

  20. Installed Cost Benchmarks and Deployment Barriers for Residential Solar Photovoltaics with Energy Storage: Q1 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardani, Kristen; O' Shaughnessy, Eric; Fu, Ran; McClurg, Chris; Huneycutt, Joshua; Margolis, Robert

    2016-12-01

    In this report, we fill a gap in the existing knowledge about PV-plus-storage system costs and value by providing detailed component- and system-level installed cost benchmarks for residential systems. We also examine other barriers to increased deployment of PV-plus-storage systems in the residential sector. The results are meant to help technology manufacturers, installers, and other stakeholders identify cost-reduction opportunities and inform decision makers about regulatory, policy, and market characteristics that impede solar plus storage deployment. In addition, our periodic cost benchmarks will document progress in cost reductions over time. To analyze costs for PV-plus-storage systems deployed in the first quarter of 2016, we adapt the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's component- and system-level cost-modeling methods for standalone PV. In general, we attempt to model best-in-class installation techniques and business operations from an installed-cost perspective. In addition to our original analysis, model development, and review of published literature, we derive inputs for our model and validate our draft results via interviews with industry and subject-matter experts. One challenge to analyzing the costs of PV-plus-storage systems is choosing an appropriate cost metric. Unlike standalone PV, energy storage lacks universally accepted cost metrics, such as dollars per watt of installed capacity and lifetime levelized cost of energy. We explain the difficulty of arriving at a standard approach for reporting storage costs and then provide the rationale for using the total installed costs of a standard PV-plus-storage system as our primary metric, rather than using a system-size-normalized metric.

  1. Improving PTSD Symptoms and Preventing Progression of Subclinical PTSD to an Overt Disorder by Treating Comorbid OSA With CPAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M I; Campbell, Douglas G; Bhagat, Rajesh; Lyons, Judith A; Tamanna, Sadeka

    2017-10-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common in United States veterans. These conditions often coexist and symptoms overlap. Previous studies reported improvement in PTSD symptoms with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for comorbid OSA but its effect has not been assessed in a non-PTSD cohort. We have prospectively assessed the effect of CPAP therapy on clinical symptom improvement as a function of CPAP compliance levels among PTSD and non-PTSD veterans. Veterans in whom OSA was newly diagnosed were enrolled in our study (n = 192). Assignment to PTSD and non-PTSD cohorts was determined by chart review. Each patient completed the military version of the PTSD Checklist (PCL), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and reported nightmare frequency (NMF) at baseline and 6 months after CPAP therapy. CPAP adherence was objectively documented from machine compliance data. We had complete data for 177 veterans (PTSD n = 59, non-PTSD n = 118) for analysis. The mean ages were 51.24 years in the PTSD cohort and 52.36 years in the non-PTSD cohort ( P = .30). In the PTSD cohort, the mean total PCL score (baseline = 66.06, post-CPAP = 61.27, P = .004, d = -0.34) and NMF (baseline = 4.61, post-CPAP = 1.49, P = .0001, d = -0.51) decreased after 6 months of CPAP treatment. Linear regression analysis showed that the CPAP compliance was the only significant predictor for these changes among veterans with PTSD (PCL score: P = .033, R 2 = .65; NMF; P = .03, R 2 = .61). Further analysis by CPAP compliance quartiles in this cohort (Q1 = 0% to 25%, Q2 = 26% to 50%, Q3 = 51% to 75%, Q4 > 75%) revealed that mean total PCL score declined in Q2 (change = -3.91, P = .045, d = 0.43), Q3 (change = -6.6, P = .002, d = 0.59), and Q4 (change = -7.94, P = .037, d = 0.49). In the non-PTSD cohort, the PCL score increased despite CPAP therapy in lower CPAP compliance quartiles Q1 (change = 8.71, P = .0001, d = 0.46) and Q2 (change = 4.51, P = .046, d = 0

  2. Integrable and nonintegrable non-KAM Hamiltonians and magnetic field topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salat, A.

    1986-01-01

    The integrability of Hamiltonians H(P 1 , P 2 , Q 1 , Q 2 )=P 1 G 1 (Q 1 ,Q 2 )+P 2 G 2 (Q 1 ,Q 2 ), with arbitrary analytic G 1 and G 2 , 2π-periodic in Q 1 and Q 2 , is analytically investigated. Such H cannot be separated into two parts, H=H 0 +H 21 , such that the KAM theorem would apply for vertical strokeH 1 vertical stroke 0 vertical stroke. For G 2 =const such Hamiltonians correspond to toroidal magnetic fields with constant rotational transform. Integrability is then equivalent to the existence of closed magnetic surfaces. The winding number w of the Q 1 , Q 2 flow (i.e. the rotational transform) is rational in 'tongue'-like domains in (ω 2 /ω 1 ,A) diagrams. Here ω i = i > is the average over both Q 1 and Q 2 , G i =ω i +F i , i=1, 2, and A is an amplitude parameter of F i (F i =0 for A=0). Integrability is proved almost everywhere in the complementary domains, namely where w is sufficiently irrational. In the generic case ('conditional') nonintegrability is proved for the class dG 1 /dQ 1 +dG 2 /dQ 2 =0 in the tongues, which in this case shrink to lines with w=ω 1 /ω 2 . It is shown that if the number of dimensions in the Hamiltonian were larger than two, qualitatively different results would be expected. (orig.)

  3. Relationship between the onset of depression and stress response measured by the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire among Japanese employees: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Wada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proportion of Japanese workers experiencing intense worry or stress during working life is in excess of 60%, and the incidence of psychiatric disorders and suicide due to psychological burden from work duties is increasing. To confirm whether the stress response measured by the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ can identify risk for depression, a cohort study was conducted to evaluate whether the stress response measured by BJSQ was associated with the onset of depression. METHODS: A total of 1,810 participants aged 20-70 years in 2005 completed the stress response of the BJSQ and were followed-up until August, 2007 by examining sick pay records. Depression was defined by a description in sick pay records that included "depression" or "depressive symptoms" as a reason for sick leave according to a physician's medical certificate. The participants were divided into quartiles (Ql, Q2, Q3, and Q4 according to the total stress response score of BJSQ at baseline. Furthermore, the participants were divided into a higher score category (Q4 and a lower score category (Q1-Q3. Risk ratios of the stress response of the BJSQ for onset of depression were calculated using a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model. RESULTS: Among 1,810 participants, 14 developed depression during a mean of 1.8 years of follow-up. The risk ratio was 2.96 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-8.42, p for trend = 0.002 when the higher stress response score category of BJSQ was compared with the low stress response score category for sick leave due to depression. After adjusting for gender, age, marital status, and having children, the risk ratios were similar to no adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the stress response measured by the BJSQ can demonstrate risk for the onset of depression.

  4. A One-Dimensional Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Model for a Water Transfer Project with Multihydraulic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Yi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The long Middle Route of the South to North Water Transfer Project is composed of complex hydraulic structures (aqueduct, tunnel, control gate, diversion, culvert, and diverted siphon, which generate complex flow patterns. It is vital to simulate the flow patterns through hydraulic structures, but it is a challenging work to protect water quality and maintain continuous water transfer. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model was built to understand the flow and pollutant movement in this project. Preissmann four-point partial-node implicit scheme was used to solve the governing equations in this study. Water flow and pollutant movement were appropriately simulated and the results indicated that this water quality model was comparable to MIKE 11 and had a good performance and accuracy. Simulation accuracy and model uncertainty were analyzed. Based on the validated water quality model, six pollution scenarios (Q1 = 10 m3/s, Q2 = 30 m3/s, and Q3 = 60 m3/s for volatile phenol (VOP and contaminant mercury (Hg were simulated for the MRP. Emergent pollution accidents were forecasted and changes of water quality were analyzed according to the simulations results, which helped to guarantee continuously transferring water for a large water transfer project.

  5. Association between serum triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and sarcopenia in elderly Korean males: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae-Ha; Kwon, Yu-Jin; Shim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Yong-Jae

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the association between the triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL) ratio and sarcopenia in elderly Korean males. We examined the relationship between the TG/HDL ratio and sarcopenia in 879 elderly males ≥60years who participated in the 2010-2011 KNHANES. Sarcopenia was defined as an appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) divided by the weight (%), which is >1 SD below the mean for young adults. The odds ratios (ORs) for sarcopenia were calculated using multiple logistic regression across the TG/HDL ratio quartiles (Q1: ≤1.4, Q2: 1.5-2.4, Q3: 2.5-3.8 and Q4: ≥3.9) after adjusting for confounding variables. The prevalence of sarcopenia significantly increased in accordance with TG/HDL ratio quartiles. Compared with the lowest quartile of the TG/HDL ratio, the corresponding OR (95% CI) of the highest quartile of the TG/HDL ratio for sarcopenia was 2.10 (1.12-3.91) after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), cigarette smoking, alcohol intake and physical activity. TG/HDL ratio was positively related with a higher risk of sarcopenia in elderly Korean males. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The long-term development of public attitudes towards people with epilepsy in the Czech Republic: 1981, 1984, 1998 and 2009 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotná, I; Rektor, I

    2017-04-01

    The long-term development of public attitudes towards people with epilepsy (PWE) was studied. Four questions (Q) used in Czech questionnaires for studies in 1981, 1984, 1998 and 2009 concerned: Q1, familiarity with the concept of epilepsy; Q2, tolerance towards children with epilepsy; Q3, whether epilepsy is considered to be a mental disease; and Q4, attitudes towards employment of PWE. The quality of information about epilepsy increased significantly between 1981 and 1998, 1981 and 2009, and 1998 and 2009. The 1981 and 1984 studies reflected a level of information inferior to the levels seen in Germany and the USA, and the difference had almost disappeared in 1998 and 2009. The long-term follow-up studies in Czech Republic displayed a permanent increase in knowledge about epilepsy. This may reflect the progress in the spread of information, the efforts of patient associations and specialists and perhaps also a change in general attitudes towards people with disabilities. The dramatic change of information levels in Czech surveys could also reflect the change of the political system in 1989. A question that remains to be answered is the extent to which the positive trend reflects positive attitudes in real life. The answers to questions concerning whether people would be willing to help a person having a seizure remain unsatisfactory. Greater efforts should be made to improve the situation of PWE and to minimize their stigmatization. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Study of the peptide length and amino acid specific substitution in the antigenic activity of the chimeric synthetic peptides, containing the p19 core and gp46 envelope proteins of the HTLV-I virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Milenen Hernández; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Higginson-Clarke, David; Bocalandro, Yadaris Márquez; Peña, Lilliam Pozo

    2005-10-28

    Four chimeric synthetic peptides (Q5, Q6, Q7(multiply sign in circle), and Q8(multiply sign in circle)), incorporating immunodominant epitopes of the core p19 (105-124 a.a.) and envelope gp46 proteins (175-205 a.a.), of HTLV-I were obtained. Also, two gp46 monomeric peptides M4 and M5(multiply sign in circle) (Ser at position 192) were synthesized. The analysis of the influence of the peptide lengths and the proline to serine substitution on the chimeric and monomeric peptides' antigenicity, with regard to the chimeric peptides Q1, Q2, Q3(multiply sign in circle), and Q4(multiply sign in circle), reported previously, for HTLV-I was carried out. The peptides' antigenicity was evaluated in an ultramicroenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (UMELISA) using sera of HTLV-I/II. The peptides' antigenicity was affected appreciably by the change of the peptide length and amino acid substitutions into the immunodominant sequence of gp46 peptide.

  8. Two new ternary chalcogenides Ba{sub 2}ZnQ{sub 3} (Q = Se, Te) with chains of ZnQ{sub 4} tetrahedra. Syntheses, crystal structure, and optical and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Jai; Beard, Jessica; Malliakas, Christos D.; Ibers, James A. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Mesbah, Adel [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; ICSM, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Rocca, Dario; Lebegue, Sebastien [Univ. de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France). Lab. de Cristallographie, Resonance Magnetique et Modelisations (CRM2, UMR CNRS 7036)

    2016-08-01

    Single crystals of Ba{sub 2}ZnQ{sub 3} (Q = Se, Te) were obtained by solid-state reactions at 1173 K. These isostructural compounds crystallize in the K{sub 2}AgI{sub 3} structure type. The Zn atoms in this structure are coordinated to four Q atoms (2 Q1, 1 Q2, 1 Q3) and these form a distorted tetrahedron around each Zn atom. Each ZnQ{sub 4} tetrahedron shares two corners with neighboring ZnQ{sub 4} tetrahedra resulting in the formation of infinite chains of [ZnQ{sub 4}{sup 4-}] units. The absorption spectrum of a single crystal of Ba{sub 2}ZnTe{sub 3} shows an absorption edge at 2.10(2) eV, consistent with the dark-red color of the crystals. From DFT calculations Ba{sub 2}ZnSe{sub 3} and Ba{sub 2}ZnTe{sub 3} are found to be semiconductors with electronic band gaps of 2.6 and 1.9 eV, respectively.

  9. The Relative Age Effect on Soccer Players in Formative Stages with Different Sport Expertise Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Práxedes, Alba; Moreno, Alberto; García-González, Luis; Pizarro, David; Del Villar, Fernando

    2017-12-01

    The Relative Age Effect (RAE) in sport has been targeted by many research studies. The objective of this study was to analyze, in amateur clubs, the RAE of soccer players, according to the sport expertise level of the team (e.g., A, B, C and subsequent) that they belong to within the same game category. 1,098 soccer players in formative stages took part in the study, with ages varying between 6 and 18 years old (U8 to U19 categories). All of them were members of 4 Spanish federated clubs. The birth dates were classified into 4 quartiles (Q1 = Jan-Mar; Q2 = Apr-Jun; Q3 = Jul-Sept; Q4 = Oct-Dec)according to the team they belonged to. The results obtained in the chi-squared test and d value (effect size) revealed the existence of RAE in the teams with the highest expertise level, "A" (X2 = 15.342, p = .002, d = 0.4473) and "B" (X2 = 10.905, p = .012, d = 0.3657). However, in the lower level teams, "C and subsequent", this effect was not observed. Present findings show that players born during the first months of the year tend to be selected to play in teams with a higher sport expertise level of each category, due to their physical maturity. Consequently, this causes differences in terms of the experience they accumulate and the motivation that this creates in these players.

  10. Exome Sequencing Identifies Potential Risk Variants for Mendelian Disorders at High Prevalence in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Fakhro, Khalid; Hackett, Neil R.; Salit, Jacqueline; Fuller, Jennifer; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Gharbiah, Maey; Malek, Joel A.; Zirie, Mahmoud; Jayyousi, Amin; Badii, Ramin; Al-Marri, Ajayeb Al-Nabet; Chouchane, Lotfi; Stadler, Dora J.; Hunter-Zinck, Haley; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    Exome sequencing of families of related individuals has been highly successful in identifying genetic polymorphisms responsible for Mendelian disorders. Here, we demonstrate the value of the reverse approach, where we use exome sequencing of a sample of unrelated individuals to analyze allele frequencies of known causal mutations for Mendelian diseases. We sequenced the exomes of 100 individuals representing the three major genetic subgroups of the Qatari population (Q1 Bedouin, Q2 Persian-South Asian, Q3 African) and identified 37 variants in 33 genes with effects on 36 clinically significant Mendelian diseases. These include variants not present in 1000 Genomes and variants at high frequency when compared to 1000 Genomes populations. Several of these Mendelian variants were only segregating in one Qatari subpopulation, where the observed subpopulation specificity trends were confirmed in an independent population of 386 Qataris. Pre-marital genetic screening in Qatar tests for only 4 out of the 37, such that this study provides a set of Mendelian disease variants with potential impact on the epidemiological profile of the population that could be incorporated into the testing program if further experimental and clinical characterization confirms high penetrance. PMID:24123366

  11. Preliminary Trials on Embryo Production and Collection in the Somba Cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cristofori

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Trials were conducted to collect embryos in a herd of trypanotolerant Somba cows. The trial period covered four superovulation cycles induced during various seasons. A progestagen (Norgestomet, Crestar® Intervet and gonadotropins (p-FSH Pluset® Serono, or Folltropin® Vetrepharm were used at various doses according to the animal weight. The donors were then fertilized twice at 12-hour interval, either by natural or artificial insemination, the semen of three bulls having been previously collected and frozen in straw on the site. The overall superovulation response rate was 72%. The embryos were collected at 6.5 days at the stage of compacted morula or young blastocyst. Of the 30 flushings performed, 87 embryos were recovered. Among them, 39 (45% belonged to categories Q1 and Q2, and could be cryopreserved, 19 (22% belonged to category Q3, and the remaining 29 (33% belonged to category Q4 (non-viable. The average production of viable embryos (1.9 per donor was not significantly affected by the type of gonadotropin used. However, the rate of embryos that could be selected for cryopreservation was higher in the cool rainy season than in the hot rainy season (59 vs 38%, respectively.

  12. Comparison of oral hygiene and periodontal status in patients with clefts of palate and patients with unilateral cleft lip, palate and alveolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutthineni Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to analyze and compare the oral hygiene and periodontal status in patients with clefts of palate (CP and patients with unilateral cleft lip, palate and alveolus (UCLPA. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 120 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into two groups of 60 each. Group I - patients with UCLPA and Group II - patients with CP. For comparison, all the four quadrants were defined, Q1-right upper quadrant, Q2-left upper quadrant, Q3-left lower quadrant and Q4-right lower quadrant, in both groups and the following parameters were recorded: Plaque Index (PI, Silness and Loe, Sulcus Bleeding Index (SBI, Muhlemann and Son, Probing Pocket Depth (PPD, Clinical Attachment Level (CAL, Mobility Index (Miller and Radiographic Amount of Bone Loss. Results: The periodontal destruction was seen to be higher in UCLPA patients compared with CP patients. The poor oral hygiene status, as indicated by higher values of PI, and the periodontal status, evaluated by SBI, PPD, CAL, mobility and Radiographic Amount of Bone Loss, were higher in patients with UCLPA than in patients with CP. Conclusion: In this study, patients with cleft lip, palate and alveolus had poor oral hygiene and periodontal status compared with patients with cleft palate.

  13. The relative age effect on Brazilian Elite Futsal: Men and Women Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Ruiz Morales Júnior

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract AIMS The relative age effect (RAE has been a research subject in several fields of society. RAE is present in different sports, influencing the young athlete’s opportunities of participation. The aim of this study was to analyze the occurrence of RAE in Brazilian elite men and women futsal. METHODS Birthdate of 376 athletes from Brazilian Men National Futsal League (LNF/2013 and 227 from Brazilian Women National Futsal League/2014 were collected on leagues’ homepages and divided into four quarters (Q1:January-March, Q2:April-June, Q3:July-September and Q4:October-December and two semesters (S1:January-June, S2:July-December. In men case, results were compared with Penna and Moraes (2010 data on LNF/2009. Chi-square test was used to analyze differences between distributions of birthdates by quarters and semesters. The significance level was set at α<0.05, with Bonferroni correction when necessary. RESULTS there is RAE in men futsal, predominantly on athletes born in first semester. In women futsal, there is no evidence of RAE. CONCLUSIONS On men futsal, there is a need for offering similar opportunities to young players, while on women, the small amount of athletes in Brazil must be regarded as an alert to the culture of futsal as a men social space, which deters the entry of new practitioners.

  14. Numerical Simulations of TRMM LBA, TOGA, COARE, GATE, ARM and PRESTORM Convective Systems: Sensitivity tests on Microphysical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W.-K.; Wang, Y.; Lang, S.; Ferrier, B.; Simpson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was utilized to examine the behavior and response of simulated deep tropical cloud systems that occurred over the west Pacific warm pool region, the Atlantic ocean and the central United States. The periods chosen for simulation were convectively active periods during TOGA-COARE (February 22 1993, December 11-17, 1992; December 19-28, February 9-13, 1993), GATE (September 4, 1974), LBA (January 26 and February 23, 1998), ARM (1997 IOP) and PRESTORM (June 11, 1985). We will examine differences in the microphysics for both warm rain and ice processes (evaporation /sublimation and condensation/ deposition), Q1 (Temperature), Q2 (Water vapor) and Q3 (momentum both U and V) budgets for these three convective events from different large-scale environments. The contribution of stratiform precipitation and its relationship to the vertical shear of the large-scale horizontal wind will also be examined. New improvements to the GCE model (i.e., microphysics: 4ICE two moments and 3ICE one moment; advection schemes) as well as their sensitivity to the model results will be discussed. Preliminary results indicated that various microphysical schemes could have a major impact on stratiform formation as well as the size of convective systems. However, they do not change the major characteristics of the convective systems, such as: arc shape, strong rotational circulation on both ends of system, heavy precipitation along the leading edge of systems.

  15. Genomic imbalances in 5918 malignant epithelial tumors: an explorative meta-analysis of chromosomal CGH data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with most human malignancies, with gains and losses on some genomic regions associated with particular entities. Of the 15429 cases collected for the Progenetix molecular-cytogenetic database, 5918 malignant epithelial neoplasias analyzed by chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) were selected for further evaluation. For the 22 clinico-pathological entities with more than 50 cases, summary profiles for genomic imbalances were generated from case specific data and analyzed. With large variation in overall genomic instability, recurring genomic gains and losses were prominent. Most entities showed frequent gains involving 8q2, while gains on 20q, 1q, 3q, 5p, 7q and 17q were frequent in different entities. Loss 'hot spots' included 3p, 4q, 13q, 17p and 18q among others. Related average imbalance patterns were found for clinically distinct entities, e.g. hepatocellular carcinomas (ca.) and ductal breast ca., as well as for histologically related entities (squamous cell ca. of different sites). Although considerable case-by-case variation of genomic profiles can be found by CGH in epithelial malignancies, a limited set of variously combined chromosomal imbalances may be typical for carcinogenesis. Focus on the respective regions should aid in target gene detection and pathway deduction

  16. Deprivation index and dependency ratio are key determinants of emergency medical admission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Richard; Byrne, Declan; O'Riordan, Deirdre; Cournane, Seán; Coveney, Seamus; Silke, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Patients from deprived backgrounds have a higher in-patient mortality following an emergency medical admission; there has been debate as to the extent to which deprivation and population structure influences hospital admission rate. All emergency medical admissions to an Irish hospital over a 12-year period (2002-2013) categorized by quintile of Deprivation Index and Dependency Ratio (proportion of population Dependency Ratio was an independent predictor of the admission rate with adjusted predicted rates of Q1 20.8 (95%CI 20.5 to 21.1), Q2 19.2 (95%CI 19.0 to 19.4), Q3 27.6 (95%CI 27.3 to 27.9), Q4 43.9 (95%CI 43.5 to 44.4) and Q5 34.4 (95%CI 34.1 to 34.7). A high concurrent Deprivation Index and Dependency Ratio were associated with very high admission rates. Deprivation Index and population Dependency Ratio are key determinants of the rate of emergency medical admissions. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase I study of imatinib, cisplatin and 5-fluoruracil or capecitabine in advanced esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, Martina; Becker, Karen; Schulte, Nadine; Belle, Sebastian; Hofheinz, Ralf; Krause, Annekatrin; Schmid, Roland M; Röcken, Christoph; Ebert, Matthias P

    2012-01-01

    Despite all benefit provided by established therapies prognosis of gastric cancer remains poor. Targeted inhibition of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) by imatinib may influence tumor growth and amplify chemotherapeutic effects. This phase I study evaluated dose limiting toxicity (DLT) of imatinib combinated with chemotherapy according to a 3-patient cohort dose-escalating design. Thirty-five patients received cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 d1 q 3w)/ capecitabine (1250 mg/m 2 bid d1-14 q 21) or cisplatin (50 mg/m 2 d1 q 2w)/ 5-fluoruracil (2 g/m 2 d1, q 1w). Imatinib was started d - 4 with dose escalation from 300 to 700 mg QD in 100 mg steps. At imatinib dose level 1 (300mg) one DLT was observed, three more patients were enrolled without further DLT. At dose level 5 (700 mg) two gastric perforations occurred, so 600 mg imatinib emerged as the maximum tolerated dose. Major grade 3/4 toxicities were nausea (6%), anemia (6%) and fatigue (3%). Response evaluation revealed partial response in 27% and stable disease in 43% of the assessable patients. Combination of imatinib and chemotherapy is well tolerated. Response rates were not superior to those of standard therapy. Further investigations of a larger group of patients are required to confirm the amplification of chemotherapy effects by imatinib. European Clinical Trials Database: Eudra-CT2006-005792-17 and Clinical Trials Database: NCT00601510

  18. A Precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering at Low Q^2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G.

    2005-01-28

    The electroweak theory has been probed to a high level of precision at the mass scale of the Z{sup 0} through the joint contributions of LEP at CERN and the SLC at SLAC. The E158 experiment at SLAC complements these results by measuring the weak mixing angle at a Q{sup 2} of 0.026 (GeV/c){sup 2}, far below the weak scale. The experiment utilizes a 48 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on unpolarized atomic electrons in a target of liquid hydrogen to measure the parity-violating asymmetry A{sup PV} in Moeller scattering. The tree-level prediction for A{sup PV} is proportional to 1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. Since sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} {approx} 0.25, the effect of radiative corrections is enhanced, allowing the E158 experiment to probe for physics effects beyond the Standard Model at the TeV scale. This work presents the results from the first two physics runs of the experiment, covering data collected in the year 2002. The parity-violating asymmetry A{sup PV} was measured to be A{sup PV} = -158 ppb {+-} 21 ppb (stat) {+-} 17 ppb (sys). The result represents the first demonstration of parity violation in Moeller scattering. The observed value of A{sup PV} corresponds to a measurement of the weak mixing angle of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2380 {+-} 0.0016(stat) {+-} 0.0013(sys), which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2385 {+-} 0.0006 (theory).

  19. QCD analysis of dijet production at low Q2 at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyla, J.; Cvach, J.; Sedlak, K.; Tasevsky, M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent H1 data on triple differential dijet cross sections in e ± p interactions in the region of low photon virtualities are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the predictions of the NLO QCD calculations obtained using the program NLOJET++. The implications of this observation for the phenomenological relevance of the concept of resolved virtual photon are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Transverse momentum of charged particles in low-Q2 DIS at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenyuk, Anastasia

    2012-04-01

    In this thesis, measurement of the transverse momentum and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in deep-inelastic ep scattering at a centre of mass energy of √(s)=319 GeV are presented. The analysis is based on data collected by the H1 detector in 2006, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 88.64 pb -1 . The phase space of the measurement is defined by 5 2 2 and 0.05 2 . The measured distributions are compared to predictions from different Monte Carlo generators using different approaches to simulate the parton cascade. The measurement shows the importance of parton emissions unordered in transverse momentum. A QCD model, exhibiting this feature, such as the BFKL-like colour dipole model is best in the description of the data, whereas a model generating emissions according to the DGLAP approach undershoots the data at low Bjorken-x. It is shown that the region of small transverse momenta is primarily affected by the hadronisation process, whereas the region of large transverse momenta is mainly driven by perturbative parton radiation. (orig.)

  1. Simple parametrizations of parton distributions with Q$^{2}$ dependence given by asymptotic freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    1978-01-01

    The Q/sup 2/ dependence of parton distributions as given by asymptotically free gauge theories can be represented by simple analytic expressions. In particular the sea distributions can be read directly from the first two moments. The results are compared with the SLAC ep data and with the recent Fermilab mu p data. The agreement is good. (32 refs).

  2. Screening of nuclear structure function F2A(x,Q2) at small x values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovs'kij, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The U-matrix method have been applied to build an amplitude for virtual photon absorption by nuclei which satisfies unitarity.This amplitude have been utilised to obtain the expression for the structure function F 2A ,which is convenient to perform analytical calculations with.Profile functions of nuclei with Gauss,Woods-Saxon and constant density distribution have been considered.It is shown that effects of quark-antiquark pair rescattering in nucleus cause the screening of F 2A and the change of power-like behaviour of F 2A to logarithmic one at small x. Numerical estimations are given

  3. Exclusive production of pion pairs in γ*γ collisions at Large Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, M.

    2000-01-01

    The authors perform a QCD analysis of the exclusive production of two mesons in γ*γ collisions in the kinematical domain of large photon virtuality Q and small hadronic invariant mass W. This reaction is dominated by a scale invariant mechanism which factorizes into a perturbative subprocess, γ*γ -> q anti q or γ*γ -> gg, and a generalized two-meson distribution amplitude. The authors develop in detail the phenomenology of this process at e + e - colliders. Using a simple model for the two-pion distribution amplitude, based on its general properties, the authors estimate the cross section for the kinematics accessible at BABAR, BELLE, CLEO and LEP

  4. Nucleon form factors at high q2 within constituent quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desplanques, B.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Cano, F.; Noguera, S.; Gonzalez, P.; .

    2000-01-01

    The nucleon form factors are calculated using a non-relativistic description in terms of constituent quarks. The emphasis is put on present numerical methods used to solve the three-body problem in order to reliably predict the expected asymptotic behavior of form factors. Nucleon wave functions obtained in the hyperspherical formalism or employing Faddeev equations have been considered. While a q -8 behavior is expected at high q for a quark-quark force behaving like 1/r at short distances, it is found that the hyper central approximation in the hyperspherical formalism (K = 0) leads to a q -7 behavior. An infinite set of waves would be required to get the correct behavior. Solutions of the Faddeev equations lead to the q -8 behavior. The coefficient of the corresponding term, however, depends on the number of partial waves retained in the Faddeev amplitude. The convergence to the asymptotic behavior has also been studied. Approximate expressions characterizing this one have been derived. From the comparison with the most complete Faddeev calculation, a validity range is inferred for restricted calculations. Refs. 46 (author)

  5. On sums of q-independent SU[sub q](2) quantum variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenczewski, R. (Politechnika Wroclawska, Wroclaw (Poland). Hugo Steinhaus Center for Stochastic Methods)

    1993-05-01

    A representation-free approach to the q-analog of the quantum central limit theorem for C=SU[sub 1](2) is presented. It is shown that for certain functions [phi][epsilon]-C* one can derive a version of a quantum central limit theorem (qclt) with [radical][N] as a scaling parameter, which may be viewed as a q-analog of qclt. (orig.).

  6. Evidence for factorization breaking in diffractive low-Q2 dijet production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasen, Michael; Kramer, Gustav

    2004-01-01

    We calculate diffractive dijet production in deep-inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order of perturbative QCD, including contributions from direct and resolved photons, and compare our predictions to preliminary data from the H1 Collaboration at DESY HERA. In contrast to recent experimental claims, evidence for factorization breaking is found only for resolved, and not direct, photon contributions. No evidence is found for large normalization uncertainties in diffractive parton densities. The results confirm theoretical expectations for the (non)cancellation of soft singularities in diffractive scattering as well as previous results for (almost) real photoproduction

  7. Beam helicity asymmetries in K+Lambda electroproduction off the proton at low Q(2)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Achenbach, P.; Gayoso, C. A.; Böhm, R.; Borodina, O.; Bosnar, D.; Bozkurt, V.; Bydžovský, Petr; Debenjak, L.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Friscic, I.; Fujii, Y.; Gogami, T.; Rodriguez, M. G.; Hashimoto, O.; Hirose, S.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kim, E.; Margaryan, A.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Pochodzalla, J.; Rappold, C.; Reinhold, J.; Saito, T. R.; Lorente, A.S.; Majos, S. S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Schoth, M.; Schulz, F.; Sfienti, C.; Sirca, S.; Skoupil, Dalibor; Tang, L.; Thiel, M.; Tsukada, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 198. ISSN 1434-6001 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-04301S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : electroproduction * MAMI * higher four-momentum transfers Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 2.833, year: 2016

  8. $\\alpha_{s}$ as at Low Q$^{2}$ from $e^{+}e^{-}$ and $\\tau$ Data

    CERN Document Server

    Menke, S

    2001-01-01

    It has been shown in recent analyses by ALEPH [1] and OPAL [2] that precision QCD tests are possible with hadronic tau decays by comparing spectral moments of the hadronic decay ratio of the tau with QCD calculations. In principle e+e- data can be used in a similar manner by evaluating spectral moments of R. The current e+e- data is compared with the OPAL tau data and a prediction is made on the achievable accuracy of QCD tests with the projected precision of PEP-N [3].

  9. New q-ary quantum MDS codes with distances bigger than q/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianmang; Xu, Liqing; Chen, Hao

    2016-07-01

    The construction of quantum MDS codes has been studied by many authors. We refer to the table in page 1482 of (IEEE Trans Inf Theory 61(3):1474-1484, 2015) for known constructions. However, there have been constructed only a few q-ary quantum MDS [[n,n-2d+2,d

  10. Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency measurements in (p, 2p) reactions at large Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, Alan S.

    2003-01-01

    In this contribution we summarize the results of two experiments to measure the transparency of nuclei in the (p, 2p) quasi-elastic scattering process near 90 deg in the pp center-of-mass. The incident momenta went from 6 to 14.4 GeV/c, corresponding to 4.8 2 2 . First, we describe the measurements with the newer experiment, E850, which has more complete kinematic definition of quasi-elastic events. E850 covers a larger range of incident momenta, and thus provides more information regarding the nature of the unexpected fall in the transparency above 9 GeV/c. Second, we review the techniques used in an earlier experiment, E834, and show that the two experiments are consistent for the carbon data. We use the transparencies measured in the five nuclei from Li to Pb to set limits on the rate of expansion for protons involved in quasi-elastic scattering at large momentum transfer. (author)

  11. Differentiability properties of the efficient (u,q2)-set in the Markowitz portfolio selection method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriens, J.; Strijbosch, L.W.G.; Vörös, J.

    1994-01-01

    The set of efficient (Rho2)-combinations in the (Rho2)-plane of the Markowitz portfolio selection method consists of a series of strictly convex parabola. In the transition points from one parabola to the next one, the curve may be indifferentiable. The article gives necessary and sufficient

  12. A possible early experimental test for a large ΔG(x,Q2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivers, D.; Ramsey, G.

    1988-01-01

    A proposal that the net spin carried by gluons in a polarized proton may be very large compared to 1/2 has recently received considerable theoretical attention. There exists a unique opportunity to test for this dramatic possibility using an existing experimental setup. We urge the consideration of a precision measurement (+-10μb) of Δσ/sub L//sup jet/(pp; p 0 ,√s) at p 0 2 = 5 GeV 2 and s = 400 GeV 2 using the Fermilab polarized beam facility. 10 refs

  13. Computational algebraic geometry for statistical modeling FY09Q2 progress.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David C.; Rojas, Joseph Maurice; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2009-03-01

    This is a progress report on polynomial system solving for statistical modeling. This is a progress report on polynomial system solving for statistical modeling. This quarter we have developed our first model of shock response data and an algorithm for identifying the chamber cone containing a polynomial system in n variables with n+k terms within polynomial time - a significant improvement over previous algorithms, all having exponential worst-case complexity. We have implemented and verified the chamber cone algorithm for n+3 and are working to extend the implementation to handle arbitrary k. Later sections of this report explain chamber cones in more detail; the next section provides an overview of the project and how the current progress fits into it.

  14. On the large-Q2 behavior of the pion transition form factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Eichmann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the transition of non-perturbative to perturbative QCD in situations with possible violations of scaling limits. To this end we consider the singly- and doubly-virtual pion transition form factor π0→γγ at all momentum scales of symmetric and asymmetric photon momenta within the Dyson–Schwinger/Bethe–Salpeter approach. For the doubly virtual form factor we find good agreement with perturbative asymptotic scaling laws. For the singly-virtual form factor our results agree with the Belle data. At very large off-shell photon momenta we identify a mechanism that introduces quantitative modifications to Efremov–Radyushkin–Brodsky–Lepage scaling.

  15. Diffraction and low-$Q^{2}$ physics including two-photon physics

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmann, M

    1999-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the partonic structure of the photon and on the color singlet exchange in strong interaction processes are reviewed. At the LEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ and HERA ep colliders, complementary and consistent measurements have been achieved on the quark-gluon structure of quasi-real and virtual photons. At the HERA ep and Tevatron pp colliders, the quark-gluon configurations of the diffractive exchange is consistently found to have a large gluon component. The rate of diffractive interactions observed by the HERA and Tevatron experiments, however, is largely different and challenges explanation. (74 refs).

  16. Elastic J/ψ production at low Q2 at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Florian

    2010-05-01

    In this diploma thesis the elastic J/ψ vector meson photoproduction (ep→eJ/ψp) is studied in the decay channel J/ψ→e + e - with the H1 detector at the electron proton collider HERA. The data from the runs of the year 2007 with an integrated luminosity of 62.4 pb -1 are used. In this time HERA operated with tree different proton energies E p called high (920 GeV), medium (575 GeV) and low (460 GeV) with integrated luminosities 45.5 (high), 5.96 (medium) and 10.9 pb -1 (low). The kinematical region of vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 , where t is the four momentum transfer at the proton vertex, and Q e 2 γp , is restricted to 40 GeV γp γp γp -b 0 vertical stroke t vertical stroke , which yields to b 0 =4.4±0.2(stat.). The cross section as a function of W γp is fitted by a power law, dσ/dW γp ∝W δ γp , and gives δ=0.66±0.07(stat.). (orig.)

  17. Strangeness production at low Q2 in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Preda, T.; Rotaru, M.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Bacchetta, A.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Boer, Y. de; Roeck, A. de; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Glazov, A.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Janssen, M.E.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; List, J.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.I.; Marti, Ll.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Peng, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Rurikova, Z.; Salvaire, F.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Zhu, Y.C.; Asmone, A.; Stella, B.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Volchinski, V.; Yeganov, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Behnke, O.; Berger, N.; Del Degan, M.; Eichler, R.; Grab, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Sauter, M.; Zimmermann, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boenig, M.O.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Boudry, V.; Gouzevitch, M.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Olivier, B.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Essenov, S.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Dodonov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Tsurin, I.; Goettlich, M.; Habib, S.; Jemanov, V.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Naroska, B.; Hansson, M.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Meier, K.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Schmitz, C.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Nankov, K.; Tsakov, I.; Schoening, A.

    2009-01-01

    The production of neutral strange hadrons is investigated using deep-inelastic scattering events measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurements are made in the phase space defined by the negative four-momentum transfer squared of the photon 2 2 2 and the inelasticity 0.1 s 0 and Λ(anti Λ) production cross sections and their ratios are determined. K s 0 production is compared to the production of charged particles in the same region of phase space. The Λ- anti Λ asymmetry is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. Predictions of leading order Monte Carlo programs are compared to the data. (orig.)