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Sample records for pyrometallurgy

  1. Leaching kinetics of neodymium in sulfuric acid of rare earth elements (REE) slag concentrated by pyrometallurgy from magnetite ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ho-Sung; Kim, Chul-Joo; Chung, Kyung Woo; Lee, Jin-Young; Shin, Shun Myung; Lee, Su-Jeong; Joe, A-Ram; Lee, Se-Il; Yoo, Seung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    We studied the leaching kinetics of recovering neodymium in sulfuric acid from the rare earth elements (REE) slag concentrated by smelting reduction from a magnetite ore containing monazite. The leaching kinetics on neodymium was conducted at a reactant concentration of 1.5 g REE slag per L of 0.3M H 2 SO 4 , agitation of 750 rpm and temperature ranging from 30 to 80 .deg. C. Neodymium oxide included in the REE slag was completely converted into neodymium sulfate phase (Nd 2 (SO 4 ) 3 ) in H 2 SO 4 after the leaching of 5 h, 80 .deg. C. As a result, the leaching mechanism was determined in a two-stage model based on the shrinking core model with spherical particles. The first step was determined by chemical reaction, and the second step was determined by ash layer diffusion because the leaching of REEs by the first chemical reaction increases the formation of the ash layer affecting as a resistance against the leaching. By using the Arrhenius expression, the apparent activation energy of the first chemical reaction step was found to be 9 kJmol -1 . After the first chemical reaction, leaching reaction rate was determined by the ash layer diffusion. The apparent activation energy of ash layer diffusion was found to be 32 kJmol -1

  2. Leaching Kinetics of Praseodymium in Sulfuric Acid of Rare Earth Elements (REE) Slag Concentrated by Pyrometallurgy from Magnetite Ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chul-Joo; Yoon, Ho-Sung; Chung, Kyung Woo; Lee, Jin-Young; Kim, Sung-Don; Shin, Shun Myung; Kim, Hyung-Seop; Cho, Jong-Tae; Kim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Eun-Ji; Lee, Se-Il; Yoo, Seung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    A leaching kinetics was conducted for the purpose of recovery of praseodymium in sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) from REE slag concentrated by the smelting reduction process in an arc furnace as a reactant. The concentration of H 2 SO 4 was fixed at an excess ratio under the condition of slurry density of 1.500 g slag/L, 0.3 mol H 2 SO 4 , and the effect of temperatures was investigated under the condition of 30 to 80 .deg. C. As a result, praseodymium oxide (Pr 6 O 1 1) existing in the slag was completely converted into praseodymium sulfate (Pr 2 (SO 4 ) 3 ·8H 2 O) after the leaching of 5 h. On the basis of the shrinking core model with a shape of sphere, the first leaching reaction was determined by chemical reaction mechanism. Generally, the solubility of pure REEs decreases with the increase of leaching temperatures in sulfuric acid, but REE slag was oppositely increased with increasing temperatures. It occurs because the ash layer included in the slag is affected as a resistance against the leaching. By using the Arrhenius expression, the apparent activation energy of the first chemical reaction was determined to be 9.195 kJmol -1 . In the second stage, the leaching rate is determined by the ash layer diffusion mechanism. The apparent activation energy of the second ash layer diffusion was determined to be 19.106 kJmol -1 . These relative low activation energy values were obtained by the existence of unreacted ash layer in the REE slag

  3. Leaching Kinetics of Praseodymium in Sulfuric Acid of Rare Earth Elements (REE) Slag Concentrated by Pyrometallurgy from Magnetite Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chul-Joo; Yoon, Ho-Sung; Chung, Kyung Woo; Lee, Jin-Young; Kim, Sung-Don; Shin, Shun Myung [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Seop; Cho, Jong-Tae; Kim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Eun-Ji; Lee, Se-Il; Yoo, Seung-Joon [Seonam University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    A leaching kinetics was conducted for the purpose of recovery of praseodymium in sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) from REE slag concentrated by the smelting reduction process in an arc furnace as a reactant. The concentration of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was fixed at an excess ratio under the condition of slurry density of 1.500 g slag/L, 0.3 mol H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and the effect of temperatures was investigated under the condition of 30 to 80 .deg. C. As a result, praseodymium oxide (Pr{sub 6}O{sub 1}1) existing in the slag was completely converted into praseodymium sulfate (Pr{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}·8H{sub 2}O) after the leaching of 5 h. On the basis of the shrinking core model with a shape of sphere, the first leaching reaction was determined by chemical reaction mechanism. Generally, the solubility of pure REEs decreases with the increase of leaching temperatures in sulfuric acid, but REE slag was oppositely increased with increasing temperatures. It occurs because the ash layer included in the slag is affected as a resistance against the leaching. By using the Arrhenius expression, the apparent activation energy of the first chemical reaction was determined to be 9.195 kJmol{sup -1}. In the second stage, the leaching rate is determined by the ash layer diffusion mechanism. The apparent activation energy of the second ash layer diffusion was determined to be 19.106 kJmol{sup -1}. These relative low activation energy values were obtained by the existence of unreacted ash layer in the REE slag.

  4. Leaching kinetics of neodymium in sulfuric acid of rare earth elements (REE) slag concentrated by pyrometallurgy from magnetite ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ho-Sung; Kim, Chul-Joo; Chung, Kyung Woo; Lee, Jin-Young; Shin, Shun Myung [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jeong; Joe, A-Ram; Lee, Se-Il; Yoo, Seung-Joon [Seonam University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We studied the leaching kinetics of recovering neodymium in sulfuric acid from the rare earth elements (REE) slag concentrated by smelting reduction from a magnetite ore containing monazite. The leaching kinetics on neodymium was conducted at a reactant concentration of 1.5 g REE slag per L of 0.3M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, agitation of 750 rpm and temperature ranging from 30 to 80 .deg. C. Neodymium oxide included in the REE slag was completely converted into neodymium sulfate phase (Nd{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}) in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} after the leaching of 5 h, 80 .deg. C. As a result, the leaching mechanism was determined in a two-stage model based on the shrinking core model with spherical particles. The first step was determined by chemical reaction, and the second step was determined by ash layer diffusion because the leaching of REEs by the first chemical reaction increases the formation of the ash layer affecting as a resistance against the leaching. By using the Arrhenius expression, the apparent activation energy of the first chemical reaction step was found to be 9 kJmol{sup -1}. After the first chemical reaction, leaching reaction rate was determined by the ash layer diffusion. The apparent activation energy of ash layer diffusion was found to be 32 kJmol{sup -1}.

  5. Chloride pyrometallurgy of uranium ore. 1. Chlorination of phosphate ore using solid or gas chlorinating agent and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Komoto, Shigetoshi; Otomura, Keiichiro; Takenaka, Toshihide; Sato, Nobuaki; Fujino, Takeo.

    1995-01-01

    A thermodynamical and pyrometallurgical study to recover uranium from the phosphate ores was undertaken using the chloride volatilization method. Iron was chlorinated with solid chlorinating agents such as NaCl and CaCl 2 in combination with activated carbon, which will be used for removing this element from the ore, but uranium was not. On the other hand, the chlorination using Cl 2 gas and activated carbon gave a good result at 1,223 K. Not only uranium but also iron, phosphorus, aluminum and silicon were found to form volatile chlorides which vaporized out of the ore, while calcium remained in the ore as non-volatile CaCl 2 . The chlorination condition was studied as functions of temperature, reaction time and carbon content. The volatilization ratio of uranium around 95% was obtained by heating the mixture of the ore and activated carbon (35 wt%) in a mixed gas flow of Cl 2 (200 ml/min) and N 2 (200 ml/min) at 1,223 K for 120 min. (author)

  6. Chloride pyrometallurgy of uranium ore. 2. Selective extraction of uranium using the mixed gas of chlorine and oxygen in the presence of activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Komoto, Shigetoshi; Otomura, Keiichiro; Takenaka, Toshihide; Sato, Nobuaki; Fujino, Takeo.

    1996-01-01

    Selective extraction of uranium from a phosphate ore was studied by using the mixed gas of Cl 2 and O 2 . On heating the ore and carbon mixture in Cl 2 , the volatilized chloride of uranium is accompanied by iron, aluminum, phosphorus and silicon chlorides. The addition of O 2 gas effectively lowered the volatilization ratios of aluminum, phosphorus and silicon. The ratio decreased with increasing oxygen flow rate up to 50 ml/min at 1,223 K (Cl 2 : 100 ml/min, O 2 +N 2 : 400 ml/min). The volatilization ratio of uranium was almost unchanged at 90% up to 50 ml/min O 2 (carbon amount: 15 wt%). The effect of the other parameters, i.e. Cl 2 flow rate, carbon amount, reaction temperature and time was examined. (author)

  7. Emission of pollutants from the combustion of composite fuels by metallurgical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Łabaj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the study on emission characteristics of pollutants resulting from combustion process of composite alternative fuels for use in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper as an alternative fuel to currently used coke breeze. These fuels are mainly based on waste carrier of “C” element, and the composition of the fuel is modelled in order to obtain the appropriate energy and emission parameters as well as strength parameters. These studies confirmed the possibility of using composite fuels as an alternative reducing agent as well as an energy carrier in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper.

  8. Self-Paced Tutorial Courses for Mineral Science - Metallurgy Departments. Final Progress Report (July 1975-August 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twidwell, L. G.

    Four courses in extractive metallurgy (Pyrometallurgy, Hydrometallurgy, Electrometallurgy; and Physical Chemistry of Iron and Steel) were prepared in a modular, self-paced format. Development of the course materials included: (1) preparation of course outlines by unit coordinators and advisory committees; (2) approval of course outlines (included…

  9. The first polluted river? Repeated copper contamination of fluvial sediments associated with Late Neolithic human activity in southern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, J P; Adams, R B; Friedman, H; Gilbertson, D D; Haylock, K I; Hunt, C O; Kent, M

    2016-12-15

    The roots of pyrometallurgy are obscure. This paper explores one possible precursor, in the Faynan Orefield in southern Jordan. There, at approximately 7000cal. BP, banks of a near-perennial meandering stream (today represented by complex overbank wetland and anthropogenic deposits) were contaminated repeatedly by copper emitted by human activities. Variations in the distribution of copper in this sequence are not readily explained in other ways, although the precise mechanism of contamination remains unclear. The degree of copper enhancement was up to an order of magnitude greater than that measured in Pleistocene fluvial and paludal sediments, in contemporary or slightly older Holocene stream and pond deposits, and in the adjacent modern wadi braidplain. Lead is less enhanced, more variable, and appears to have been less influenced by contemporaneous human activities at this location. Pyrometallurgy in this region may have appeared as a byproduct of the activity practised on the stream-bank in the Wadi Faynan ~7000years ago. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The effect of smelting time and composition of palm kernel shell charcoal reductant toward extractive Pomalaa nickel laterite ore in mini electric arc furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihotang, Iqbal Huda; Supriyatna, Yayat Iman; Ismail, Ika; Sulistijono

    2018-04-01

    Indonesia is a country that is rich in natural resources. Being a third country which has a nickel laterite ore in the world after New Caledonia and Philippines. However, the processing of nickel laterite ore to increase its levels in Indonesia is still lacking. In the processing of nickel laterite ore into metal, it can be processed by pyrometallurgy method that typically use coal as a reductant. However, coal is a non-renewable energy and have high enough levels of pollution. One potentially replace is the biomass, that is a renewable energy. Palm kernel shell are biomass that can be used as a reductant because it has a fairly high fix carbon content. This research aims to make nickel laterite ores become metal using palm kernel shell charcoal as reductant in mini electric arc furnace. The result show that the best smelting time of this research is 60 minutes with the best composition of the reductant is 2,000 gram.

  11. Pyro-chemistry within the FP7 ACSEPT Project-Program and Objective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravaca, Concha [CIEMAT/Nuclear Fission Division/URAA, Avda. Complutense, 22.Madrid 28040 (Spain); Bourg, Stephane [CEA/DEN/MAR/DRCP, CEA Marcoule. BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Actinide recycling by partitioning and transmutation is considered as one of the most promising strategies to reduce the inventory of radioactive waste, thus contributing to make nuclear energy sustainable. To make advances beyond the current state of the art in pyrochemical separations processes, the Domain 2 (DM2) of ACSEPT has been built on considering a process approach based on system studied. Four work packages that represent the main steps of a process block diagram have been identified: head-end steps, core process development, and salt treatment for recycling and waste conditioning. The results obtained in this domain will be integrated in DM 3 (Process) in order to orientate the R and D studies of DM2 and to propose and validate flowsheets at the end of the project. The state of the art on pyrochemical separation within the European Community and the working program of ACSEPT in pyrometallurgy are presented in this work. (authors)

  12. Chemical and petrochemical industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna

    2018-03-01

    The potential sources of various metals in chemical and petrochemical processes are discussed. Special emphasis is put on the catalysts used in the industry. Their main applications, compositions, especially metal contents are presented both for fresh and spent ones. The focus is on the main types of metals used in catalysts: the platinum-group metals, the rare-earth elements, and the variety of transition metals. The analysis suggested that chemical and petrochemical sectors can be considered as the secondary source of metals. Because the utilization of spent refinery catalysts for metal recovery is potentially viable, different methods were applied. The conventional approaches used in metal reclamation as hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy, as well as new methods include bioleaching, were described. Some industrial solutions for metal recovery from spent solution were also presented.

  13. ACSEPT. The current European project on actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, S.; Bouvet, S.; Caravaca, C.

    2011-01-01

    ACSEPT (Actinide reCycling by SEParation and Transmutation) is a European research project dedicated to the development of advanced separation processes for transuranium elements (TRU) in the P and T context. 34 partners from 12 European countries plus Japan and Australia contribute to this project for 130 men years over a period of four years (2008-2012). General objective is developing hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical actinide separation processes suitable for both heterogeneous and homogeneous recycling strategies. To make such a large project manageable, ACSEPT consists of four domains, DM1 (hydrometallurgy), DM2 (pyrometallurgy), DM3 (cross-cutting activities), and DM4 (training and education). DM1 and DM2 are sub-divided into work packages, covering fuel dissolution, core process and refabrication aspects. Both fundamental and process related issues are dealt with. (author)

  14. European Europart integrated project on actinide partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Hudson, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    This poster presents the objectives of EUROPART, a scientific integrated project between 24 European partners, mostly funded by the European Community within the FP6. EUROPART aims at developing chemical partitioning processes for the so-called minor actinides (MA) contained in nuclear wastes, i.e. from Am to Cf. In the case of dedicated spent fuels or targets, the actinides to be separated also include U, Pu and Np. The techniques considered for the separation of these radionuclides belong to the fields of hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy, as in the previous FP5 programs named PARTNEW and PYROREP. The two main axes of research within EUROPART will be: The partitioning of MA (from Am to Cf) from high burn-up UO x fuels and multi-recycled MOx fuels; the partitioning of the whole actinide family for recycling, as an option for advanced dedicated fuel cycles (and in connection with the studies to be performed in the EUROTRANS integrated project). In hydrometallurgy, the research is organised into five Work Packages (WP). Four WP are dedicated to the study of partitioning methods mainly based on the use of solvent extraction methods, one WP is dedicated to the development of actinide co-conversion methods for fuel or target preparation. The research in pyrometallurgy is organized into four WP, listed hereafter: development of actinide partitioning methods, study of the basic chemistry of trans-curium elements in molten salts, study of the conditioning of the wastes, some system studies. Moreover, a strong management team will be concerned not only with the technical and financial issues arising from EUROPART, but also with information, communication and benefits for Europe. Training and education of young researchers will also pertain to the project. EUROPART has also established collaboration with US DOE and Japanese CRIEPI. (authors)

  15. Treatment of spent catalyst from the nitrogenous fertilizer industry-A review of the available methods of regeneration, recovery and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Bina

    2009-01-01

    Disposal of spent catalyst is a problem as it falls under the category of hazardous industrial waste. The recovery of metals from these catalysts is an important economic aspect as most of these catalysts are supported, usually on alumina/silica with varying percent of metal; metal concentration could vary from 2.5 to 20%. Metals like Ni, Mo, Co, Rh, Pt, Pd, etc., are widely used as a catalyst in chemical and petrochemical industries and fertilizer industries. They are generally supported on porous materials like alumina and silica through precipitation or impregnation processes. Many workers have adapted pyrometallurgy and Hydrometallurgy process for recovery of precious metals. Many workers have studied the recovery of nickel from a spent catalyst in an ammonia plant by leaching it in sulphuric acid solution (Hydrometallurgy). Ninety-nine percent of the nickel was recovered as nickel sulphate when the catalyst, having a particle size of 0.09 mm was dissolved in an 80% sulphuric acid solution for 50 min in at 70 deg. C. Many researcher have studied the extraction of metals from spent catalyst by roasting-extraction method (Pyrometallurgy). Chelating agents are the most effective extractants, which can be introduced in the soil washing fluid to enhance heavy metal extraction from contaminated soils. The advantages of chelating agents in soil cleanup include high efficiency of metal extraction, high thermodynamic stabilities of the metal complexes formed, good solubilities of the metal complexes, and low adsorption of the chelating agents on soils, But very few workers have attempted chelating agent to extract metals from spent catalyst.

  16. EUROPART: an European integrated project on actinide partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Baron, P.; Hudson, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The EUROPART project is a scientific integrated project between 24 European partners, from 10 countries, mostly funded by the European Community within the FP6, together with CRIEPI from Japan and ANSTO from Australia. EUROPART aims at developing chemical partitioning processes for the so-called minor actinides (MA) contained in nuclear wastes, i.e. from Am to Cf. In the case of the treatment of dedicated spent fuels or targets, the actinides to be separated also include U, Pu and Np. The techniques considered for the separation of these radionuclides belong to the fields of hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy, as in the previous European FP5 programs named PARTNEW, CALIXPART and PYROREP, respectively. The two main axes of research within EUROPART are: 1/ the partitioning of MA (from Am to Cf) from wastes issuing from the reprocessing of high burn-up UOX fuels and multi-recycled MOX fuels, 2/ the partitioning of the whole actinide family of elements for recycling, as an option for advanced dedicated fuel cycles (this work will be connected to the studies to be performed within the EUROTRANS European integrated project). In hydrometallurgy, the research is organized in five Work Packages (WP). Four are dedicated to the study of partitioning methods mainly based on the use of solvent extraction methods and of solid extractants, one WP is dedicated to the development of actinide co-conversion methods for fuel or target preparations. The research in pyrometallurgy is organized into four WPs, listed hereafter: (i) study of the basic chemistry of transuranium elements and of some fission products in molten salts (chlorides, fluorides), (ii) development of actinide partitioning methods, (iii) study of the conditioning of the salt wastes, (iv) system studies. Moreover, a strong management team is concerned not only with the technical and financial issues arising from EUROPART, but also with information, communication and benefits for Europe

  17. High-temperature experimental and thermodynamic modelling research on the pyrometallurgical processing of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Taufiq; Shishin, Denis; Decterov, Sergei A.; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2017-01-01

    Uncertainty in the metal price and competition between producers mean that the daily operation of a smelter needs to target high recovery of valuable elements at low operating cost. Options for the improvement of the plant operation can be examined and decision making can be informed based on accurate information from laboratory experimentation coupled with predictions using advanced thermodynamic models. Integrated high-temperature experimental and thermodynamic modelling research on phase equilibria and thermodynamics of copper-containing systems have been undertaken at the Pyrometallurgy Innovation Centre (PYROSEARCH). The experimental phase equilibria studies involve high-temperature equilibration, rapid quenching and direct measurement of phase compositions using electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The thermodynamic modelling deals with the development of accurate thermodynamic database built through critical evaluation of experimental data, selection of solution models, and optimization of models parameters. The database covers the Al-Ca-Cu-Fe-Mg-O-S-Si chemical system. The gas, slag, matte, liquid and solid metal phases, spinel solid solution as well as numerous solid oxide and sulphide phases are included. The database works within the FactSage software environment. Examples of phase equilibria data and thermodynamic models of selected systems, as well as possible implementation of the research outcomes to selected copper making processes are presented.

  18. A possible origin of EL6 chondrites from a high temperature-high pressure solar gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blander, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Unger, L. [Purdue Univ., Westiville, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Pelton, A.; Eriksson, G. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering

    1994-05-01

    Condensates from a gas of ``solar`` composition were calculated to investigate the origins of EL6 chondrites using a free energy minimization program with a data base for the thermodynamic properties of multicomponent molten silicates as well as for other liquids solids, solid solutions and gaseous species. Because of high volatility of silicon and silica, the high silicon content of metal (2.6 mole %) can only be produced at pressures 10{sup {minus}2} atm at temperatures above 1475 K. At 100--500 atm, a liquid silicate phase crystallizes at a temperature where the silicon content of the metal, ferrosilite content of the enstatite and albite concentration in the plagioclase are close to measured values. In pyrometallurgy, liquid silicates are catalysts for reactions in which Si-O-Si bridging bonds are broken or formed. Thus, one attractive mode for freezing in the compositions of these three phases is disappearance of fluxing liquid. If the plagioclase can continue to react with the nebula without a liquid phase, lower pressures of 10{sup {minus}1} to 1 atm might be possible. Even if the nebula is more reducing than a solar gas, the measured properties of EL6 chondrites might be reconciled with only slightly lower pressures (less than 3X lower). The temperatures would be about the same as indicated in our calculations since the product of the silicon content of the metal and the square of the ferrosilite content of the enstatite constitute a cosmothermometer for the mineral assemblage in EL6 chondrites.

  19. Biotechnological recovery of heavy metals from secondary sources-An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoque, Md E.; Philip, Obbard J.

    2011-01-01

    The demand for heavy metals is ever increasing with the advance of the industrialized world, whereas worldwide reserves of high-grade ores are diminishing. However, there exist large stockpiles of low and lean grade ores that are yet to be exploited. In addition, heavy metals that are present in a spectrum of waste streams including mine drainage, industrial effluents, river sediments, electronic scraps and ashes are also available for recovery and utilization. Heavy metal recovery from low and lean grade ores using conventional techniques such as pyrometallurgy, etc. chemical metallurgy encompass several inherent constraints like, high energy and capital inputs, and high risk of secondary environmental pollution. As environmental regulations become ever more stringent, particularly regarding the disposal of toxic wastes, the costs for ensuring environmental protection will continue to rise. Therefore, there is a need to utilize more efficient technologies to recover heavy metals from secondary sources in order to minimize capital outlay, environmental impact and to respond to increased demand. Biohydrometallurgy, which exploits microbiological processes to recover heavy metal ions, is regarded as one of the most promising and revolutionary biotechnologies. The products of such processes are deposited in aqueous solution thereby rendering them to be more amenable to containment, treatment and recovery. On top of this, biohydrometallurgy can be conducted under mild conditions, usually without the use of any toxic chemicals. Consequently, the application of biohydrometallurgy in recovery of heavy metals from lean grade ores, and wastes, has made it an eco-friendly biotechnology for enhanced heavy metal production.

  20. Spent lead-acid battery recycling in China - A review and sustainable analyses on mass flow of lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi; Cao, Hongbin; Zhang, Xihua; Lin, Xiao; Zheng, Wenwen; Cao, Guoqing; Sun, Yong; Zhang, Yi

    2017-06-01

    Lead is classified to be one of the top heavy metal pollutants in China. The corresponding environmental issues especially during the management of spent lead-acid battery have already caused significant public awareness and concern. This research gives a brief overview on the recycling situation based on an investigation of the lead industry in China and also the development of technologies for spent lead-acid batteries. The main principles and research focuses of different technologies including pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy and greener technologies are summarized and compared. Subsequently, the circulability of lead based on the entire life cycle analyses of lead-acid battery is calculated. By considering different recycling schemes, the recycling situation of spent lead-acid battery in China can be understood semi-quantitatively. According to this research, 30% of the primary lead production can be shut down that the lead production can still ensure consecutive life cycle operation of lead-acid battery, if proper management of the spent lead-acid battery is implemented according to current lead industry situation in China. This research provides a methodology on the view of lead circulability in the whole life cycle of a specific product and is aiming to contribute more quantitative guidelines for efficient organization of lead industry in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative Investigation of Roasting-magnetic Separation for Hematite Oolitic-ores: Mechanisms and Industrial Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Tiefeng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural high-quality iron can be directly applied to pyro-metallurgy process, however, the availability of these ores has become less and less due to exploitation. This research reports a systematic approach using reduction roasting and magnetic separation for oolitic iron ores from west Hubei Province. Firstly, a mineralogical study was performed and it was shown that the oolitic particles were mainly composed of hematite, with some silicon-quartz inside the oolitic particle. Then, the roasting temperature was examined and shown to have significant influence on both Fe recovery and the Fe content of the concentrate. Also the Fe content gradually increased as the temperature increased from 700 to 850 °C. The most important aspects are the quantitative investigation of change of mineral phases, and reduction area (with ratio during the reduction roasting process. The results showed that Fe2O3 decreased with temperature, and Fe3O4 (magnetite increased considerably from 600 to 800 °C. The reductive reaction was found to occur from the outside in, the original oolitic structure and embedding relationship among the minerals did not change after roasting. Finally, 5% surrounding rock was added to mimic real industrial iron beneficiation. This study could provides useful insight and practical support for the utilization of such iron ores.

  2. Hidden values in bauxite residue (red mud): recovery of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-12-01

    Bauxite residue (red mud) is a hazardous waste generated from alumina refining industries. Unless managed properly, red mud poses significant risks to the local environment due to its extreme alkalinity and its potential impacts on surface and ground water quality. The ever-increasing generation of red mud poses significant challenges to the aluminium industries from management perspectives given the low proportion that are currently being utilized beneficially. Red mud, in most cases, contains elevated concentrations of iron in addition to aluminium, titanium, sodium and valuable rare earth elements. Given the scarcity of iron supply globally, the iron content of red mud has attracted increasing research interest. This paper presents a critical overview of the current techniques employed for iron recovery from red mud. Information on the recovery of other valuable metals is also reviewed to provide an insight into the full potential usage of red mud as an economic resource rather than a waste. Traditional hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy are being investigated continuously. However, in this review several new techniques are introduced that consider the process of iron recovery from red mud. An integrated process which can achieve multiple additional values from red mud is much preferred over the single process methods. The information provided here should help to improve the future management and utilization of red mud. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hidden values in bauxite residue (red mud): Recovery of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Current iron recovery techniques using red mud are depicted. • Advantages and disadvantages exist in different recovering processes. • Economic and environmental friendly integrated usage of red mud is promising. - Abstract: Bauxite residue (red mud) is a hazardous waste generated from alumina refining industries. Unless managed properly, red mud poses significant risks to the local environment due to its extreme alkalinity and its potential impacts on surface and ground water quality. The ever-increasing generation of red mud poses significant challenges to the aluminium industries from management perspectives given the low proportion that are currently being utilized beneficially. Red mud, in most cases, contains elevated concentrations of iron in addition to aluminium, titanium, sodium and valuable rare earth elements. Given the scarcity of iron supply globally, the iron content of red mud has attracted increasing research interest. This paper presents a critical overview of the current techniques employed for iron recovery from red mud. Information on the recovery of other valuable metals is also reviewed to provide an insight into the full potential usage of red mud as an economic resource rather than a waste. Traditional hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy are being investigated continuously. However, in this review several new techniques are introduced that consider the process of iron recovery from red mud. An integrated process which can achieve multiple additional values from red mud is much preferred over the single process methods. The information provided here should help to improve the future management and utilization of red mud

  4. The Effect of CaO on Gas/Slag/Matte/Tridymite Equilibria in Fayalite-Based Copper Smelting Slags at 1473 K (1200 °C) and P(SO2) = 0.25 Atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2018-04-01

    Fundamental experimental studies have been undertaken to determine the effect of CaO on the equilibria between the gas phase (CO/CO2/SO2/Ar) and slag/matte/tridymite phases in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si-Ca system at 1473 K (1200 °C) and P(SO2) = 0.25 atm. The experimental methodology developed in the Pyrometallurgy Innovation Centre was used. New experimental data have been obtained for the four-phase equilibria system for fixed concentrations of CaO (up to 4 wt pct) in the slag phase as a function of copper concentration in matte, including the concentrations of dissolved sulfur and copper in slag, and Fe/SiO2 ratios in slag at tridymite saturation. The new data provided in the present study are of direct relevance to the pyrometallurgical processing of copper and will be used as an input to optimize the thermodynamic database for the copper-containing multi-component multi-phase system.

  5. Biotechnological recovery of heavy metals from secondary sources-An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoque, Md E., E-mail: enamul.hoque@nottingham.edu.my [Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Philip, Obbard J., E-mail: esejpo@nus.edu.sg [Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 119260 (Singapore)

    2011-03-12

    The demand for heavy metals is ever increasing with the advance of the industrialized world, whereas worldwide reserves of high-grade ores are diminishing. However, there exist large stockpiles of low and lean grade ores that are yet to be exploited. In addition, heavy metals that are present in a spectrum of waste streams including mine drainage, industrial effluents, river sediments, electronic scraps and ashes are also available for recovery and utilization. Heavy metal recovery from low and lean grade ores using conventional techniques such as pyrometallurgy, etc. chemical metallurgy encompass several inherent constraints like, high energy and capital inputs, and high risk of secondary environmental pollution. As environmental regulations become ever more stringent, particularly regarding the disposal of toxic wastes, the costs for ensuring environmental protection will continue to rise. Therefore, there is a need to utilize more efficient technologies to recover heavy metals from secondary sources in order to minimize capital outlay, environmental impact and to respond to increased demand. Biohydrometallurgy, which exploits microbiological processes to recover heavy metal ions, is regarded as one of the most promising and revolutionary biotechnologies. The products of such processes are deposited in aqueous solution thereby rendering them to be more amenable to containment, treatment and recovery. On top of this, biohydrometallurgy can be conducted under mild conditions, usually without the use of any toxic chemicals. Consequently, the application of biohydrometallurgy in recovery of heavy metals from lean grade ores, and wastes, has made it an eco-friendly biotechnology for enhanced heavy metal production.

  6. Hidden values in bauxite residue (red mud): Recovery of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@unisa.edu.au

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Current iron recovery techniques using red mud are depicted. • Advantages and disadvantages exist in different recovering processes. • Economic and environmental friendly integrated usage of red mud is promising. - Abstract: Bauxite residue (red mud) is a hazardous waste generated from alumina refining industries. Unless managed properly, red mud poses significant risks to the local environment due to its extreme alkalinity and its potential impacts on surface and ground water quality. The ever-increasing generation of red mud poses significant challenges to the aluminium industries from management perspectives given the low proportion that are currently being utilized beneficially. Red mud, in most cases, contains elevated concentrations of iron in addition to aluminium, titanium, sodium and valuable rare earth elements. Given the scarcity of iron supply globally, the iron content of red mud has attracted increasing research interest. This paper presents a critical overview of the current techniques employed for iron recovery from red mud. Information on the recovery of other valuable metals is also reviewed to provide an insight into the full potential usage of red mud as an economic resource rather than a waste. Traditional hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy are being investigated continuously. However, in this review several new techniques are introduced that consider the process of iron recovery from red mud. An integrated process which can achieve multiple additional values from red mud is much preferred over the single process methods. The information provided here should help to improve the future management and utilization of red mud.

  7. Precedents for diversion-resistant nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culler, F.L. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The urgent need to limit the spread of nuclear weapons and to control the means of production of fissionable material has been the dominant force in the worldwide development of civilian nuclear power. The author follows the historical perspective for institutional control. To improve diversion resistance of the back end of the fuel recycle, the Civex process is proposed. The Civex process does not use new separation process principles or new methods for fuel fabrication. Rather, it is a combination of processes used and partially developed techniques for breeder fuel reprocessing and refabrication. Its characteristics are listed. The process steps and the design knowledge to meet these criteria, and to operate under conditions that provide maximum diversion resistance, can be adaptations of methods studied earlier and, in most cases, used for both military and civilian fuel recycle. The adaptations change the original techniques enough to make the technology different from that used for existing power reactors. The author discusses tried or partially demonstrated techniques from which Civex has been or could be fashioned. Separation processes discussed are bismuth phosphate; Purex; Thorex; fluoride volatility; pyrometallurgy. The Sol--Gel Uranium--Plutonium Spherepak and Pellet Fuels processes are discussed as candidates for Civex fuel-production methods. The author concludes that, in his opinion, the Civex process is as far as technology can go in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle from illicit diversion of fissile materials

  8. Atmospheric Depositions of Natural and Anthropogenic Aerosols on the Guliya Ice Cap (Northwestern Tibetan Plateau) during the last 340 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra Hernandez, R.; Gabrielli, P.; Beaudon, E.; Thompson, L. G.; Wegner, A.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions (e.g., greenhouse gases, trace elements (TE) including toxic metals) to the atmosphere have dramatically increased since the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century. High temperature processes such as fossil fuel combustion and pyrometallurgy generate fumes and fine particles (industrial times. Thus, ice core records of TEs from mid- and low-latitudes are needed to assess the spatial and temporal extent and levels of pollution in the environment. Here we present records of 29 TEs spanning the period 1650-1991 CE from the Guliya ice cap in the western Kunlun Mountains, northwest Tibetan Plateau to assess their natural and anthropogenic sources. The Guliya TEs records show two distinct periods with only crustal contributions prior to the 1850s and non-crustal contributions (Pb, Cd, Sb, Zn, Sn) after the 1850s. Enrichments of Pb, Cd, Sb, and Zn in Guliya between 1850 and 1950 can be attributed primarily to coal combustion emissions from western countries (Europe) while regional emissions (fossil fuel combustion, mining/smelting, fertilizers) from Central Asia, and probably from Kashgar in western China, and South Asia (India, Nepal) could be the source of the TE enrichments (Cd, Pb, Sn) observed in Guliya after 1950. This information can be used by modelers to assess pollution transport at local, regional, and global scales and by policy makers to develop strategies and policies to reduce their emissions.

  9. Overview of the Main Achievements of the FP7 EURATOM Collaborative Project ACSEPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, S.; Geist, A.; Cassayre, L.; Rhodes, C.; Ekberg, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power plays a key role in limiting European Union’s greenhouse gases emissions, and makes an important contribution to improve EU’s independence, security and diversity of energy supply. However, its social acceptance is closely linked to an enhanced safety in the management of long-lived radioactive waste contributing to resource efficiency and cost-effectiveness of this energy and ensuring a robust and socially acceptable system of protection of man and environment. Among the different strategies, partitioning and transmutation (P&T) allows a reduction of the amount, the radiotoxicity and the thermal power of these wastes, leading to an optimal use of geological repository sites. ACSEPT successfully addressed the partitioning issues by focusing on the development of advanced separation processes, both aqueous and pyrochemical. Head-end steps, fuel refabrication, solvent treatment, waste management were also taken into account. In aqueous process development, the SANEX, innovative SANEX and GANEX flowsheets were designed and tested in hot cells. In pyrometallurgy, studies on actinide back-extraction from aluminium and exhaustive electrolysis allowed the validation of two flowsheets developed from more then 10 years in Europe. A training and education program including seminars, workshops, brainstorming meeting but also student exchanges and support to post-doctorate fellowships was a key point for maintaining and increasing a high expertise level in actinide separation sciences in Europe. Six month after the end of ACSEPT, and when its follow-up, SACSESS, just begins, it is time to highlight its main achievements. (author)

  10. Separation and recovery of uranium ore by chlorinating, chelate resin and molten salt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomohiro

    2000-12-01

    Three fundamental researches of separation and recovery of uranium from uranium ore are reported in this paper. Three methods used the chloride pyrometallurgy, sodium containing molten salts and chelate resin. When uranium ore is mixed with activated carbon and reacted for one hour under the mixed gas of chlorine and oxygen at 950 C, more than 90% uranium volatilized and vaporization of aluminum, silicone and phosphorus were controlled. The best activated carbon was brown coal because it was able to control the large range of oxygen concentration. By blowing oxygen into the molten sodium hydroxide, the elution rate of uranium attained to about 95% and a few percent of uranium was remained in the residue. On the uranium ore of unconformity-related uranium deposits, a separation method of uranium, molybdenum, nickel and phosphorus from the sulfuric acid elusion solution with U, Ni, As, Mo, Fe and Al was developed. Methylene phosphonic acid type chelate resin (RCSP) adsorbed Mo and U, and then 100 % Mo was eluted by sodium acetate solution and about 100% U by sodium carbonate solution. Ni and As in the passing solution were recovered by imino-diacetic acid type chelate resin and iron hydroxide, respectively. (S.Y.)

  11. Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Flowsheet. A Report by the WPFC Expert Group on Chemical Partitioning of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Chan; Yamagishi, Isao; Choi, Yong-Joon; Glatz, Jean-Paul; Hyland, Bronwyn; Uhlir, Jan; Baron, Pascal; Warin, Dominique; De Angelis, Giorgio; Luce, Alfredo; INOUE, Tadashi; Morita, Yasuji; Minato, Kazuo; Lee, Han Soo; Ignatiev, Victor V.; Kormilitsyn, Mikhail V.; Caravaca, Concepcion; Lewin, Robert G.; Taylor, Robin J.; Collins, Emory D.; Laidler, James J.

    2012-06-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Fuel Cycle (WPFC) has been established to co-ordinate scientific activities regarding various existing and advanced nuclear fuel cycles, including advanced reactor systems, associated chemistry and flowsheets, development and performance of fuel and materials, and accelerators and spallation targets. The WPFC has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific fields in the nuclear fuel cycle. The Expert Group on Chemical Partitioning was created in 2001 to (1) perform a thorough technical assessment of separations processes in application to a broad set of partitioning and transmutation (P and T) operating scenarios and (2) identify important research, development and demonstration necessary to bring preferred technologies to a deployable stage and (3) recommend collaborative international efforts to further technological development. This report aims to collect spent nuclear fuel reprocessing flowsheet of various processes developed by member states: aqueous, pyro and fluoride volatility. Contents: 1 - Hydrometallurgy process: Standard PUREX, Extended PUREX, UREX+3, Grind/Leach; 2 - Pyrometallurgy process: pyro-process (CRIEPI - Japan), 4-group partitioning process, pyro-process (KAERI - Korea), Direct electrochemical processing of metallic fuel, PyroGreen (reduce radiotoxicity to the level of low and intermediate level waste - LILW); 3 - Fluoride volatility process: Fluoride volatility process, Uranium and protactinium removal from fuel salt compositions by fluorine bubbling, Flowsheet studies on non-aqueous reprocessing of LWR/FBR spent nuclear fuel; Appendix A: Flowsheet studies of RIAR (Russian Federation), List of contributors, Members of the expert group

  12. Innovative leaching of cobalt and lithium from spent lithium-ion batteries and simultaneous dechlorination of polyvinyl chloride in subcritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kang; Zhang, Fu-Shen, E-mail: fszhang@rcees.ac.cn

    2016-10-05

    Highlights: • A co-treatment process for recovery of Co and Li and simultaneous detoxification of PVC in subcritical water was proposed. • PVC was used as a hydrochloric acid source. • More than 95% Co and nearly 98% Li were leached under the optimum conditions. • Neither corrosive acid nor reducing agent was used. • The co-treatment process has technical, economic and environmental benefits over the traditional recovery processes. - Abstract: In this work, an effective and environmentally friendly process for the recovery of cobalt (Co) and lithium (Li) from spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and simultaneously detoxification of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) in subcritical water was developed. Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO{sub 2}) power from spent LIBs and PVC were co-treated by subcritical water oxidation, in which PVC served as a hydrochloric acid source to promote metal leaching. The dechlorination of PVC and metal leaching was achieved simultaneously under subcritical water oxidation. More than 95% Co and nearly 98% Li were recovered under the optimum conditions: temperature 350 °C, PVC/LiCoO{sub 2} ratio 3:1, time 30 min, and a solid/liquid ratio 16:1 (g/L), respectively. Moreover, PVC was completely dechlorinated at temperatures above 350 °C without any release of toxic chlorinated organic compounds. Assessment on economical and environmental impacts revealed that the PVC and LiCoO{sub 2} subcritical co-treatment process had significant technical, economic and environmental benefits over the traditional hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy processes. This innovative co-treatment process is efficient, environmentally friendly and adequate for Co and Li recovery from spent LIBs and simultaneous dechlorination of PVC in subcritical water.

  13. Evaluation of Wet Digestion Methods for Quantification of Metal Content in Electronic Scrap Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhabrata Das

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the electronics sector and the short life-span of electronic products have triggered an exponential increase in the generation of electronic waste (E-waste. Effective recycling of E-waste has thus become a serious solid waste management challenge. E-waste management technologies include pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, and bioleaching. Determining the metal content of an E-waste sample is critical in evaluating the efficiency of a metal recovery method in E-waste recycling. However, E-waste is complex and of diverse origins. The lack of a standard digestion method for E-waste has resulted in difficulty in comparing the efficiencies of different metal recovery processes. In this study, several solid digestion protocols including American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM-D6357-11, United States Environment Protection Agency Solid Waste (US EPA SW 846 Method 3050b, ultrasound-assisted, and microwave digestion methods were compared to determine the metal content (Ag, Al, Au, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Pd, Sn, and Zn of electronic scrap materials (ESM obtained from two different sources. The highest metal recovery (mg/g of ESM was obtained using ASTM D6357-11 for most of the metals, which remained mainly bound to silicate fractions, while a microwave-assisted digestion protocol (MWD-2 was more effective in solubilizing Al, Pb, and Sn. The study highlights the need for a judicious selection of digestion protocol, and proposes steps for selecting an effective acid digestion method for ESM.

  14. Life-cycle implications and supply chain logistics of electric vehicle battery recycling in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Thomas P.; Kavvada, Olga; Shah, Nihar; Sathre, Roger; Scown, Corinne D.

    2015-01-01

    Plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) use in the United States (US) has doubled in recent years and is projected to continue increasing rapidly. This is especially true in California, which makes up nearly one-third of the current US PEV market. Planning and constructing the necessary infrastructure to support this projected increase requires insight into the optimal strategies for PEV battery recycling. Utilizing life-cycle perspectives in evaluating these supply chain networks is essential in fully understanding the environmental consequences of this infrastructure expansion. This study combined life-cycle assessment and geographic information systems (GIS) to analyze the energy, greenhouse gas (GHG), water use, and criteria air pollutant implications of end-of-life infrastructure networks for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in California. Multiple end-of-life scenarios were assessed, including hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical recycling processes. Using economic and environmental criteria, GIS modeling revealed optimal locations for battery dismantling and recycling facilities for in-state and out-of-state recycling scenarios. Results show that economic return on investment is likely to diminish if more than two in-state dismantling facilities are constructed. Using rail as well as truck transportation can substantially reduce transportation-related GHG emissions (23-45%) for both in-state and out-of-state recycling scenarios. The results revealed that material recovery from pyrometallurgy can offset environmental burdens associated with LIB production, namely a 6-56% reduction in primary energy demand and 23% reduction in GHG emissions, when compared to virgin production. Incorporating human health damages from air emissions into the model indicated that Los Angeles and Kern Counties are most at risk in the infrastructure scale-up for in-state recycling due to their population density and proximity to the optimal location.

  15. Apcom 87. Proceedings of the twentieth international symposium on the application of computers and mathematics in the mineral industries V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.P.; Barker, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    APCOM symposia provide a medium of exchange of technical expertise and experience for practitioners in the general field of applications of computers, operations research, mathematical and geostatistical techniques in the mineral industries. Contributors represent mine and plant personnel, academic and government or semi-government representatives, and the topics covered range from mining and metallurgical techniques and planning to financial analysis, project valuation, information systems, computer graphics, geostatistics, etc. For the 20th APCOM, the Proceedings have been divided into the three broad categories of mining, metallurgy and geostatistics, and are grouped accordingly into the three published volumes. APCOM '87, the twentieth in this series of international meetings, places major emphasis on the practical application of computers in the workplace to implement the theoretical techniques. Modelling, simulation and process control still seem to attract the major research efforts. Modelling of milling and flotation have a long history but are still active areas for research. Pyrometallurgy, gold recovery, separation processes with distributed partition functions like screening and gravity separation, and electrowinning, are also attracting attention. Computeraided design (CAD) is becoming a lot more usable and available throughout the industry. Process control is at the door of a new era, with the combination of sensor technology, reliable on-plant computers and viable theoretical techniques now becoming available as never before. CAD and process control have also given new impetus to the need to develop and test computer-based models of a wider range of unit operations. APCOM remains the most important forum for the discussion of new developments in the application of computer methods and mathematical techniques in the metallurgical industry

  16. The prediction and representation of phase equilibria and physicochemical properties in complex coal ash slag systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Jak; A. Kondratiev; S. Christie; P.C. Hayes [Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD), Brisbane (Australia)

    2003-07-01

    A range of problems in coal utilisation technologies, including ash slag flow in slagging gasifiers, deposit formation, slagging, fouling, fusibility tests, fluxing, blending etc, are related to the melting behaviour of the mineral matter in the coal. To assist with solving these practical issues i) thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibria, and ii) viscosity modelling studies are being undertaken at the Pyrometallurgy Research Centre (The University of Queensland, Australia) with support from the Collaborative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD). The thermodynamic modelling has been carried out using the computer system FactSage, which is used for the calculation of multi-phase slag / solid / gas / matte / alloy / salt equilibria in multi-component systems of industrial interest. A modified quasi-chemical solution model is used for the liquid slag phase. New model optimisations have been carried out, which have significantly improved the accuracy of the thermodynamic models for coal combustion processes. Viscosity modelling, using a modified Urbain formalism, is carried out in conjunction with FactSage calculations to predict the viscosities of fully liquid as well as heterogeneous, partly crystallised slags. Custom designed software packages are developed using these fundamental models for wider use by industrial researchers and engineers, and for incorporation as process control modules. The new custom-designed computer software package can be used to produce limiting operability diagrams for slag systems. These diagrams are used to describe phase equilibria and physico-chemical properties in complex slag systems. The approach is illustrated with calculations on the system SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-FeO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO at metallic iron saturation, slags produced in coal slagging gasifiers. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Life-cycle implications and supply chain logistics of electric vehicle battery recycling in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, Thomas P; Kavvada, Olga; Shah, Nihar; Sathre, Roger; D Scown, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) use in the United States (US) has doubled in recent years and is projected to continue increasing rapidly. This is especially true in California, which makes up nearly one-third of the current US PEV market. Planning and constructing the necessary infrastructure to support this projected increase requires insight into the optimal strategies for PEV battery recycling. Utilizing life-cycle perspectives in evaluating these supply chain networks is essential in fully understanding the environmental consequences of this infrastructure expansion. This study combined life-cycle assessment and geographic information systems (GIS) to analyze the energy, greenhouse gas (GHG), water use, and criteria air pollutant implications of end-of-life infrastructure networks for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in California. Multiple end-of-life scenarios were assessed, including hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical recycling processes. Using economic and environmental criteria, GIS modeling revealed optimal locations for battery dismantling and recycling facilities for in-state and out-of-state recycling scenarios. Results show that economic return on investment is likely to diminish if more than two in-state dismantling facilities are constructed. Using rail as well as truck transportation can substantially reduce transportation-related GHG emissions (23–45%) for both in-state and out-of-state recycling scenarios. The results revealed that material recovery from pyrometallurgy can offset environmental burdens associated with LIB production, namely a 6–56% reduction in primary energy demand and 23% reduction in GHG emissions, when compared to virgin production. Incorporating human health damages from air emissions into the model indicated that Los Angeles and Kern Counties are most at risk in the infrastructure scale-up for in-state recycling due to their population density and proximity to the optimal location. (letter)

  18. Advanced reprocessing developments in Europe contribution of European projects ACSEPT and ACTINET-I3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, S.; Poinssot, C. [CEA DEN, Nuclear Energy Div., RadioChemistry and Processes Dept., F-30207Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Geist, A. [KIT-INE (Germany); Cassayre, L. [CIEMAT (Spain); Rhodes, C. [NNL-UK (United Kingdom); Ekberg, C. [CHALMERS (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    selected for GANEX and a hot-test under finalization thanks to an important collaboration between European teams. In pyrometallurgy, studies on actinide back-extraction from aluminium and exhaustive electrolysis allowed the validation of two flowsheets developed from more then 10 years in Europe. In addition, efforts were made to increase collaborations, mutualize and homogenise procedures and share good practices. A training and education program including seminars, workshops, brainstorming meeting but also student exchanges and support to post-doctorate fellowships was a key point for maintaining and increasing a high expertise level in actinide separation sciences in Europe. The second ACSEPT International workshop, organised as a specific session of the next Atalante 2012 International Conference, will conclude the ACSEPT project. (authors)

  19. The 6th European metallurgical conference EMC 2011: Proceedings review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srećko R. Stopić

    2011-10-01

    : Vol. 1: Copper, General Pyrometallurgy, Vessel Integrity, Process Gas Treatment; Vol. 2: Lead and Zinc, Process Control, Process Modeling, Vol. 3: Light metals, General Hydrometallurgy, Precious Metals; Vol. 4: Process Metallurgy, Recycling, Waste Treatment and Prevention, Vol 5: Sustainable technologies, Sustainable of non-ferrous metals production, waste effluents Treatment and Biohydrometallurgical application. The plenary lectures will be published in the scientific journal 'World of Metallurgy - ERZMETALL', which is published by the GDMB.

  20. 7th european metallurgical conference EMC 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srećko R. Stopić

    2014-02-01

    /Process Modelling, Waste heat recovery by ORC Power Generation Vol. 3: General Hydrometallurgy, General Pyrometallurgy, Vessel Integrity, Process Gas Treatment; Recycling The plenary lectures will be published in the scientific journal “World of Metallurgy – ERZMETALL”, published by GDMB. The next 8th European Metallurgical Conference will be held between June 14 and June 17, 2015 in Duesseldorf. 

  1. The hydrometallurgy, the agglomeration and the absorption like alternative of cleaner production in the processes of gold benefit in the northeast antioqueno

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Moreno, Alvaro

    2004-01-01

    glass and with a similar yield to the obtained with the traditional retorts. For the handling of the effluents, initially they have been promoted among the mining community the use of the different systems (traps) for the retention of concentrated, amalgams and metallic mercury, as strategy for the decrease of the sources contamination of natural water for mercury, reaching near recovery levels to 75% that don't satisfy the outlined goals completely and that it gives base to the execution of a second stage which goes directed toward the fixation of the heavy metals of the mining effluents in activated coal and zeolites, reaching near levels to 100% inside the bank tests carried out up to date. On the other hand, considering the serious problems that it generates environmental and socio - economically the use of the mercury inside the handmade processes of the gold mining, it this developing a program investigation at the moment for the adaptation and the transfer of the Mass technology of the Gold in Coal, like an economically accessible alternative for the miners in general that it allows the environmental sustainability of the activity contributing progressively in the reduction of the volume of used mercury. In consequent form and inside the search of alternatives that they integrate the problem of the benefit processes, the corporation works at the moment also in the development for the transfer of the Hydrometallurgy inside of the benefit process of the cyanide precipitate those which traditionally are processed by pyro-metallurgy (incineration) of the precipitates generating highly toxic emissions to the atmosphere. By means of the transfer of the different developed processes and the integral articulation with the miners, is hoped to reach environmental indicators that allow the sustainability of the mining sector and the miner's self-regulation from the source