WorldWideScience

Sample records for pyrolytic gases

  1. PYROLYTIC CARBIDE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    and injector design changes were made to improve the quality of the carbide produced. Niobium carbide and tantalum carbide coated nozzles are described...Additional data for pyrolytic niobium carbide and hafnium carbide is also presented. (Author)

  2. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  3. Pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb

    phosphoric acids) and organic acids (formic and acetic acids) followed by analytical pyrolysis on a micropyrolyzer/GC/MS/FID system. It was found that sulfuric and phosphoric acids are very effective in passivating the AAEM thereby increasing the yield of anhydrosugars. An excellent correlation was discovered between the amount of acid required to obtain the maximum yield of anhydrosugars and the amount of AAEM contained in the biomass feedstock. In the micro-scale studies, up to 56% of the cellulose contained in the biomass was converted into anhydrosugars which is close to the 57% conversion obtained from pure cellulose pyrolysis. It is known that LG polymerization and subsequent charring occur at temperatures above 275°C depending on the vapor pressure of LG in the gas stream. A study of pyrolysis of acid-infused biomass feedstocks at various temperatures revealed that LG recovery is best at lower temperatures than the conventional pyrolysis temperature range of 450-500°C. Pyrolysis of acid-infused biomass failed in a continuous fluidized bed reactor due to clogging of the bed. The feedstock formed vitreous material along with the fluidizing sand that was formed from poor pyrolysis of lignin. However, more investigation of this phenomenon is a subject for future work. Pyrolysis experiments on an auger type reactor were successful in producing bio-oils with unprecedented amounts of sugars. Though there was increase in charring when compared to the control feedstock, pyrolysis of red oak infused with 0.4 wt% of sulfuric acid produced bio-oil with 18wt% of sugars. One of the four fractions of bio-oil collected contained most of the sugars, which shows significant potential for separating the sugars from bio-oil using simple means. This work points towards a new pathway for making advanced biofuels viz. upgrading pyrolytic sugars from biomass that could compete with enzymatic sugars from biomass.

  4. Pyrolytic 3D Carbon Microelectrodes for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Caviglia, Claudia; Amato, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the fabrication and characterization of suspended three-dimensional (3D) pyrolytic carbon microelectrodes for electrochemical applications. For this purpose, an optimized process with multiple steps of UV photolithography with the negative tone photoresist SU-8 followed by pyro...

  5. Production of clean pyrolytic sugars for fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rover, Marjorie R; Johnston, Patrick A; Jin, Tao; Smith, Ryan G; Brown, Robert C; Jarboe, Laura

    2014-06-01

    This study explores the separate recovery of sugars and phenolic oligomers produced during fast pyrolysis with the effective removal of contaminants from the separated pyrolytic sugars to produce a substrate suitable for fermentation without hydrolysis. The first two stages from a unique recovery system capture "heavy ends", mostly water-soluble sugars and water-insoluble phenolic oligomers. The differences in water solubility can be exploited to recover a sugar-rich aqueous phase and a phenolic-rich raffinate. Over 93 wt % of the sugars is removed in two water washes. These sugars contain contaminants such as low-molecular-weight acids, furans, and phenols that could inhibit successful fermentation. Detoxification methods were used to remove these contaminants from pyrolytic sugars. The optimal candidate is NaOH overliming, which results in maximum growth measurements with the use of ethanol-producing Escherichia coli.

  6. Suspended 3D pyrolytic carbon microelectrodes for electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Caviglia, Claudia; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    2017-01-01

    Carbon microelectrodes have a wide range of applications because of their unique material properties and biocompatibility. This work presents the fabrication and characterization of suspended pyrolytic carbon microstructures serving as three-dimensional (3D) carbon microelectrodes for electrochem...

  7. Characterization of the pyrolytic solid derived from used disposable diapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Taek-Keun; Shinogi, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper confirms through physical and chemical analyses the possibility to reuse the solid pyrolytic residue derived from used disposable diapers (UDD), heated at different temperatures ranging from 500, 700 and 900 degrees C as a soil amendment. With an increasing pyrolytic temperature, the pH, electrical conductivity, available P2O5, exchangeable K+ and cation exchange capacity tended to increase; however, total-N and exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ decreased. The pyrolytic diaper solid produced at 500 degrees C had a high volatile matter (60.22%) and low ash content (19.10%), which can negatively affect crop growth and productivity when added to soil. Heavy metal concentrations were less than the maximum allowable limits according to Japan standards. The surface of the pyrolytic diaper solid was coarse, porous and heterogeneous with higher temperatures. Hydrogen-containing functional groups, such as OH, C-H, N-H and CH2, decreased with increasing pyrolytic temperature. Based on these results, we concluded that the pyrolytic product derived from UDD at higher temperatures offers a potentially effective soil amendment option.

  8. Structure and mechanical properties of pyrolytic carbon produced by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Meadows, P.J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.Xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Pyrolytic carbon was deposited on spherical particles using a multi-spout fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition reactor to fabricate TRISO fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Modern techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation supported by porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to analyze the particle coatings directly. Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were given special attention due to their capacity to provide information on the internal structure of pyrolytic carbon and its mechanical properties without the necessity of complex sample preparation. The results obtained were used to study the relationship deposition conditions-microstructure-mechanical properties in more detail. Increasing the deposition temperature reduced the density and Young's modulus as porosity and in-plane disorder of carbon domains increased. There was also a change from a laminar microstructure of PyC to that containing more spherical particles. It appeared that anisotropy, domain size and level of graphitization (examined by Raman and TEM) had a strong influence on the mechanical properties. Clear differences were observed between acetylene and the acetylene/propylene mixture as precursor gases.

  9. Edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrodes in electroanalysis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Craig E; Compton, Richard G

    2005-11-01

    The recent development, behavior and scope of edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrodes in electroanalysis are overviewed. Similarities to, and advantages, over multi-walled CNT modified electrodes are noted and the wide scope of applications, ranging through gas sensing, stripping voltammetry and biosensing, illustrated.

  10. Flame Retardant and Pyrolytic Behaviors of Polyamide 6/Montmorillonite Nanocomposite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-guo; OU Yu-xiang; WU Jun-hao

    2005-01-01

    Na+-montmorillonite(Na+-MMT) was converted to organic montmorillonite(OMMT) using modifier which was synthesized at authors' laboratory. PA6/OMMT nanocomposite was prepared via in situ intercalative polymerization. The limiting oxygen index (LOI), UL 94V flame retardancy and thermal stability of PA6/OMMT using thermal gravity analysis (TGA) were measured. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) technique was used to analyze the pyrolytic residuum and the cone calorimeter (CONE) was applied to determine a number of combustion parameters which were closely related to fire safety, including heat release rate, mass loss rate, effective combustion heat, total heat release, specific extinction area and the time of ignition. In addition, the elemental composition of the surface pyrolytic residuum and the corresponding X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data were obtained, and the morphology of the residuum from CONE measurement was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  11. Friction and wear of metals in contact with pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with gold, iron, and tantalum single crystals sliding on prismatic and basal orientations of pyrolytic graphite in various environments, including vacuum, oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen, and hydrogen bromide. Surfaces were examined in the clean state and with various adsorbates present on the graphite surfaces. Auger and LEED spectroscopy, SEM, and EDXA were used to characterize the graphite surfaces. Results indicate that the prismatic and basal orientations do not contain nor do they chemisorb oxygen, water vapor, acetylene, or hydrogen bromide. All three metals exhibited higher friction on the prismatic than on the basal orientation and these metals transferred to the atomically clean prismatic orientation of pyrolytic graphite. No metal transfer to the graphite was observed in the presence of adsorbates at 760 torr. Ion bombardment of the graphite surface with nitrogen ions resulted in the adherence of nitrogen to the surface.

  12. Optical Properties of Pyrolytic Carbon Films Versus Graphite and Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovbeshko, Galyna I; Romanyuk, Volodymyr R; Pidgirnyi, Denys V; Cherepanov, Vsevolod V; Andreev, Eugene O; Levin, Vadim M; Kuzhir, Polina P; Kaplas, Tommi; Svirko, Yuri P

    2015-12-01

    We report a comparative study of optical properties of 5-20 nm thick pyrolytic carbon (PyC) films, graphite, and graphene. The complex dielectric permittivity of PyC is obtained by measuring polarization-sensitive reflectance and transmittance spectra of the PyC films deposited on silica substrate. The Lorentz-Drude model describes well the general features of the optical properties of PyC from 360 to 1100 nm. By comparing the obtained results with literature data for graphene and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, we found that in the visible spectral range, the effective dielectric permittivity of the ultrathin PyC films are comparable with those of graphite and graphene.

  13. Thermal Performance of an Annealed Pyrolytic Graphite Solar Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Hornacek, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    A solar collector having the combined properties of high solar absorptance, low infrared emittance, and high thermal conductivity is needed for applications where solar energy is to be absorbed and transported for use in minisatellites. Such a solar collector may be used with a low temperature differential heat engine to provide power or with a thermal bus for thermal switching applications. One concept being considered for the solar collector is an Al2O3 cermet coating applied to a thermal conductivity enhanced polished aluminum substrate. The cermet coating provides high solar absorptance and the polished aluminum provides low infrared emittance. Annealed pyrolytic graphite embedded in the aluminum substrate provides enhanced thermal conductivity. The as-measured thermal performance of an annealed pyrolytic graphite thermal conductivity enhanced polished aluminum solar collector, coated with a cermet coating, will be presented.

  14. Fuel properties of bituminous coal and pyrolytic oil mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Hazlin; Sharuddin, Munawar Zaman; Daud, Ahmad Rafizan Mohamad; Syed-Hassan, Syed Shatir A.

    2014-10-01

    Investigation on the thermal decomposition kinetics of coal-biooil slurry (CBS) fuel prepared at different ratios (100:0,70:30,60:40,0:100) was conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The materials consisted of Clermont bituminous coal (Australia) and bio-oil (also known as pyrolytic oil) from the source of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) that was thermally converted by means of pyrolysis. Thermal decomposition of CBS fuel was performed in an inert atmosphere (50mL/min nitrogen) under non-isothermal conditions from room temperature to 1000°C at heating rate of 10°C/min. The apparent activation energy (Ea.) and pre-exponential factor (A) were calculated from the experimental results by using an Arrhenius-type kinetic model which first-order decomposition reaction was assumed. All kinetic parameters were tabulated based on the TG data obtained from the experiment. It was found that, the CBS fuel has higher reactivity than Clermont coal fuel during pyrolysis process, as the addition of pyrolytic oil will reduce the Ea values of the fuel. The thermal profiles of the mixtures showed potential trends that followed the characteristics of an ideal slurry fuel where high degradation rate is desirable. Among the mixture, the optimum fuel was found at the ratio of 60:40 of pyrolytic oil/coal mixtures with highest degradation rate. These findings may contribute to the development of a slurry fuel to be used in the vast existing conventional power plants.

  15. Irritant gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbelt, J

    2016-01-01

    Acute inhalation injury can result from the use of household cleaning agents (e.g. chlorine, ammonia), industrial or combustion gases (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides) or bioterrorism. The severity of the injury is to a great extent determined by the circumstances of exposure. If exposure was i

  16. Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life. Governments all around the world ban and control production and use of several industrial gases that destroy atmospheric ozone and create a hole in the ozone layer . At lower elevations of the atmosphere (the troposphere), ozone is harmful to ... for Future Emissions FAQs How much carbon dioxide is produced when ...

  17. Irritant gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbelt, J

    Acute inhalation injury can result from the use of household cleaning agents (e.g. chlorine, ammonia), industrial or combustion gases (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides) or bioterrorism. The severity of the injury is to a great extent determined by the circumstances of exposure. If exposure was

  18. The batch pyrolysis of tyre waste - fuel properties of the derived pyrolytic oil and overall plant economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P.T.; Besler, S.; Taylor, D.T. (Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Fuel and Energy)

    1993-01-01

    Pyrolysis of scrap tyres is currently receiving renewed attention, since the derived oils may be used directly as fuels or added to petroleum refinery feedstocks; they may also be an important source of refined chemicals. The derived gases are also useful as fuel and the solid char has the potential to be used either as smokeless fuel, carbon black or activated carbon. In this paper, halved and whole scrap tyres were pyrolysed in a commercial two tonne per day batch pyrolysis unit at furnace temperatures from 700 to 950[sup o]C. The proportion of derived products was dependent on pyrolysis conditions, with a maximum yield of 30 per cent oil. The fuel properties of the derived oils, including calorific value, flash point, carbon residue, viscosity, sulphur content, etc., were analysed and compared to refined petroleum products. In addition, the benzene, xylene, toluene, limonene and styrene concentration of the oils was determined to assess the potential of the oils as a source of chemical feedstocks. The oils were also analysed in terms of their chemical composition via liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and molecular mass range. The pyrolytic oils derived from tyres showed properties that were dependent on pyrolytic conditions and showed fuel properties comparable to those of petroleum products. (Author)

  19. Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D.J.; Armstrong, P.S.; Panitz, J.K.G.

    1998-03-17

    A solid electrolytic capacitor is described having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects. 2 figs.

  20. Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the

  1. Aromatics extraction from pyrolytic sugars using ionic liquid to enhance sugar fermentability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Luque-Moreno, L.C.; Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Rehmann, L.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Schuur, B.

    2016-01-01

    Fermentative bioethanol production from pyrolytic sugars was improved via aromatics removal by liquid–liquid extraction. As solvents, the ionic liquid (IL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium dicyanamide (P666,14[N(CN)2]) and ethyl acetate (EA) were compared. Two pyrolytic sugar solutions were created fro

  2. Friction and transfer behavior of pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with various metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with pyrolytic boron nitride in sliding contact with itself and various metals. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor transfer of pyrolytic boron nitride to metals and metals to pyrolytic boron nitride. Results indicate that the friction coefficient for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with metals can be related to the chemical activity of the metals and more particularly to the d valence bond character of the metal. Transfer was found to occur to all metals except silver and gold and the amount of transfer was less in the presence than in the absence of metal oxide. Friction was less for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with a metal in air than in vacuum.

  3. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  4. Pyrolytic carbon film deposit as an electrochemical interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hadi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A pyrolytic carbon (PC film was grown on planar substrate (graphite rods by chemical vapor deposition from gaseous feed of methane using a vertical hot-wall deposition reactor. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the surface structure. The PC film was also characterized by cyclic voltammetry technique to evaluate the background current, stability and the electrochemical response using ascorbic acid, Co(phen32+/3+ and Fe(CN6 3-/4- redox couplesand compared to glassy carbon (GC electrode. High degree of electrochemical activity and the enhanced signal to background (S/B ratio demonstrated that the PC film might be an attractive electrode material for electroanalytical measurements.

  5. Low temperature transport properties of pyrolytic graphite sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sachiko; Miyafuji, Daisuke; Fujii, Takenori; Matsui, Tomohiro; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    We have made thermal and electrical transport measurements of uncompressed pyrolytic graphite sheet (uPGS), a mass-produced thin graphite sheet with various thicknesses between 10 and 100 μ m, at temperatures between 2 and 300 K. Compared to exfoliated graphite sheets like Grafoil, uPGS has much higher conductivities by an order of magnitude because of its high crystallinity confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. This material is advantageous as a thermal link of light weight in a wide temperature range particularly above 60 K where the thermal conductivity is much higher than common thermal conductors such as copper and aluminum alloys. We also found a general relationship between thermal and electrical conductivities in graphite-based materials which have highly anisotropic conductivities. This would be useful to estimate thermal conductance of a cryogenic part made of these materials from its electrical conductance more easily measurable at low temperature.

  6. Xanthine Biosensor Based on Didodecyldimethylammonium Bromide Modified Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG,Ji-Lin(唐纪琳); HAN,Xiao-Jun(韩晓军); HUANG,Wei-Min(黄卫民); WANG,Er-Kang(汪尔康)

    2002-01-01

    The vesicle of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB)which contained tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) was mixed with xanthine oxidase, and the mixture was cast on the pyrolytic graphite electrode. The lipid films were used to supply a biological environment resembling biomembrane on the surface of the electrode. TTF was used as a mediator because of its high electron-transfer efficiency. A novel xanthine biosensor based on cast DDAB film was developed. The effects of pH and operating potential were explored for optimum analytical performance by using the amperometric method. The response time of the biosensor was less than 10 s. The detection limit of the biosensor was 3.2 × 10-7 mol/L and the liner range was from 4 × 10-7 mol/L to 2.4 × 10-6 mol/L.

  7. Pyrolytic characteristics of burning residue of fire-retardant wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Guangjie; LUO Wensheng; Furuno T; REN Qiang; MA Erni

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the pyrolytic characteristics of the burning residue of fire-retardant wood,a multifunctional fire-resistance test oven aimed at simulating the course of a fire was used to burn fire-retardant wood and untreated wood.Samples at different distances from the combustion surface were obtained and a thennogravimetric analysis (TG) was applied to test the pyrolytic process of the burning residue in an atmosphere of nitrogen.The results showed that:1) there was little difference between fireretardant wood and its residue in the initial temperature of thermal degradation.The initial temperature of thermal degradation of the combustion layer in untreated wood was higher than that in the no burning wood sample;2) the temperature of the flame retardant in fire-retardant wood was 200℃ in the differential thermogravimetry (DTG).The peak belonging to the flame retardant tended to dissipate during the time of burning;3) for the burning residue of fire-retardant wood,the peak belonging to hemicellulose near 230℃ in the DTG disappeared and there was a gentle shoulder from 210 to 240℃;4) the temperature of the main peaks of the fireretardant wood and its burning residue in DTG was 100℃ lower than that of the untreated wood and its burning residue.The rate of weight loss also decreased sharply;5) the residual weight of fire-retardant wood at 600~C clearly increased compared with that of untreated wood.Residual weight of the burning residue increased markedly as the heating temperature increased when burning;6) there was a considerable difference with respect to the thermal degradation temperature of the no burning sample and the burning residue between fire-retardant wood and untreated wood.

  8. Pyrolytic transformation from polydihydrosilane to hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Takashi, E-mail: mtakashi@jaist.ac.jp [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Matsuki, Yasuo [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Yokkaichi Research Center, JSR Corporation, 100 Kawajiri-cho, Yokkaichi, Mie, 510-8552 (Japan); Shimoda, Tatsuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 (Japan)

    2012-08-31

    The fabrication of thin film silicon devices based on solution processes rather than on conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest since cost reductions may result. Using a solution process, we coated substrates with polydihydrosilane solution and studied the pyrolytic transformation of the material into hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). From thermal gravimetry and differential thermal analysis data a significant reduction in weight of the material and a construction of Si-Si bonds are concluded for the pyrolysis temperature T{sub p} = 270 to 360 Degree-Sign C. The appearance of amorphous silicon phonon bands in Raman spectra for films prepared at T{sub p} {>=} 330 Degree-Sign C suggests the construction of a three-dimensional amorphous silicon network. Films prepared at T{sub p} {>=} 360 Degree-Sign C exhibit a hydrogen content near 10 at.% and an optical gap near 1.6 eV similar to device-grade vacuum processed a-Si:H. However, the infrared microstructure factor, the spin density, and the photosensitivity require significant improvements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We fabricate hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films by a solution process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The a-Si:H films are prepared by pyrolytic transformation in polysilane solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate basic properties in relation to the pyrolysis temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman spectra, hydrogen content, and optical gap are similar to device-grade a-Si:H. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure factor, spin density, and photoconductivity show poor quality.

  9. Performance evaluation of household pyrolytic stove: Effect of outer air holes condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradana, Yano Surya; Prasetya, Agus

    2017-03-01

    Renewable energy is the future energy for the substitution of the depleting fossil fuels. In Indonesia, biomass is one of promising renewable energy due to its abundant availability. Biomass can be converted into energy by thermochemical process, such as pyrolysis. In the implementation, pyrolysis can be applied in household cookstove, called pyrolytic stove. Pyrolytic stove will be proposed for people still cooking over an open biomass fire. This paper studied the pyrolysis of Indonesian teak using household pyrolytic stove. The effect of outer air holes on the performance of household pyrolytic stove was investigated. The increasing of cross section area of outer air holes effected on the higher of biomass combustion releasing energy for pyrolysis and cooking. Furthermore, the optimum outer air holes condition in the stove was fully open with the minimum of char product and the maximum of energy recovered for cooking.

  10. Determination of Micro U, Np, Pu by Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Pre-diffraction EDXRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Based on the prototype of Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Pre-Diffraction EDXRF, a new device was constructed after optimizing of hardware including high voltage supplier, detector, sample bracket, and software of data processing.

  11. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and diffusion of silver in pyrolytic carbon coatings

    OpenAIRE

    CANCINO TREJOA F.; SÁENZ PADILLA M.; LOPEZ HONORATO Eddie; CARVAJAL NUNEZ URSULA; BOSHOVEN Jacobus; Somers, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that TRISO (tristructural isotropic) coated nuclear fuel particles are capable of retaining fission products up to 1600 ºC, however above this temperature fission products can diffuse through the pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings that act as the containment barriers in this fuel. Despite decades of research and development, little is known on the origin of this fuel temperature limit. Since pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings are an integral part of the safety of ...

  12. Chemical and Pyrolytic Thermogravimetric Characterization of Nigerian Bituminous Coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyakuma Bemgba Bevan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of new coal deposits in Nigeria presents solutions for nation’s energy crises and prospects for socioeconomic growth and sustainable development. Furthermore, the quest for sustainable energy to limit global warming, climate change, and environmental degradation has necessitated the exploration of alternatives using cleaner technologies such as coal pyrolysis. However, a lack of comprehensive data on physico-chemical and thermal properties of Nigerian coals has greatly limited their utilization. Therefore, the physico-chemical properties, rank (classification, and thermal decomposition profiles of two Nigerian bituminous coals – Afuze (AFZ and Shankodi-Jangwa (SKJ – were examined in this study. The results indicate that the coals contain high proportions of C, H, N, S, O and a sufficiently high heating value (HHV for energy conversion. The coal classification revealed that the Afuze (AFZ coal possesses a higher rank, maturity, and coal properties compared to the Shankodi-Jangwa (SKJ coal. A thermal analysis demonstrated that coal pyrolysis in both cases occurred in three stages; drying (30-200 °C, devolatilization (200-600 °C, and char decomposition (600-1000 °C. The results also indicated that pyrolysis at 1000 °C is not sufficient for complete pyrolysis. In general, the thermochemical and pyrolytic fuel properties indicate that the coal from both places can potentially be utilized for future clean energy applications.

  13. X-ray diffraction properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, A.K.; Munkholm, A.; Brennan, S. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The x-ray diffraction properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were studied for x-ray energies ranging from 4 to 60 keV. In particular, the secondary extinction thickness was determined by recording the peak and integrated reflectivity as a function of depth below the surface. The results showed that for the high quality material investigated a thickness of 200 to 300 {micro}m was sufficient to get 80% of the maximum reflectivity that is obtained for a very thick plate. Primary extinction was important for low energy and still persisted at higher energies. Inhomogeneities of the mosaic structure were observed, too, that make this material not a truly ideal mosaic monochromator crystal. However, quite high peak reflectivities between 35% and 58% were measured at FWHM of 0.25 to 0.45 degrees. A 200 {micro}m thick plate was then prepared and glued on a bending device to manufacture a monochromator or analyzer with variable curvature that works from flat down to a minimum bending radius of 10 cm. The successful tests of this device confirmed that HOPG plates much thinner than those commonly used as x-ray monochromators and analyzers still have high efficiency and can be curved to achieve dynamical focusing.

  14. Neutron transmission measurements of poly and pyrolytic graphite crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, M.; Abbas, Y.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Ashry, A.; Kilany, M.; Kenawy, M. A.

    The total neutron cross-section measurements of polycrystalline graphite have been carried out in a neutron wavelength from 0.04 to 0.78 nm. This work also presents the neutron transmission measurements of pyrolytic graphite (PG) crystal in a neutron wavelength band from 0.03 to 0.50 nm, at different orientations of the PG crystal with regard to the beam direction. The measurements were performed using three time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers installed in front of three of the ET-RR-1 reactor horizontal channels. The average value of the coherent scattering amplitude for polycrystalline graphite was calculated and found to be bcoh = (6.61 ± 0.07) fm. The behaviour of neutron transmission through the PG crystal, while oriented at different angles with regard to the beam direction, shows dips at neutron wavelengths corresponding to the reflections from (hkl) planes of hexagonal graphite structure. The positions of the observed dips are found to be in good agreement with the calculated ones. It was also found that a 40 mm thick PG crystal is quite enough to reduce the second-order contamination of the neutron beam from 2.81 to 0.04, assuming that the incident neutrons have a Maxwell distribution with neutron gas temperature 330 K.

  15. Laser sputtering of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite at 248 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnovich, Douglas J.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of excimer laser pulses with a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) target has been studied. HOPG, a close approximation to single crystal graphite, was irradiated along a freshly cleaved basal plane in vacuum by pulses from a KrF excimer laser. The energy fluence was varied between 300-700 mJ/cm2, resulting in material removal rates of plasma effects are minimized. Time-of-flight distributions of the neutral carbon atoms and small carbon clusters were measured and inverted to obtain translational energy flux distributions and relative sputtering yields as a function of fluence. The translational energy distributions are remarkably close to Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions over most of the fluence range studied. However, the mean translational energies are far too high to reconcile with a simple thermal vaporization model. For example, the mean translational energy of C3, the most abundant species, increases from 1.1 eV at 305 mJ/cm2 to 31.7 eV at 715 mJ/cm2. Explanations are considered for this curious mix of thermal and non-thermal behavior. At the high end of our fluence range, the mean translational energies of C1, C2, C3 converge to a 1:2:3 ratio, indicating that the velocity distributions are almost identical. This particular result can be interpreted as a gas dynamic effect. Prolonged sputtering of the same target spot results in a falloff in the sputtering yield and the mean translational energies, but little change in the cluster size distribution. These effects are related to impurity induced topography formation on the target surface.

  16. A study on biocompatibility and bactericidal properties of pyrolytic carbon by silver ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H.Q. [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074 (China); Liu, T. [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074 (China); Liu, X. [Tianjin Urinary Surgery Institute, Tianjin 300211 (China); Gu, H.Q. [Tianjin Urinary Surgery Institute, Tianjin 300211 (China); Zhao, J. [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074 (China)]. E-mail: jiezhao1943@126.com

    2007-02-15

    The biocompatibility and bactericidal properties of Ag{sup +}-implanted pyrolytic carbon were investigated by means of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria and some biocompatible experiments. The pyrolytic carbon samples were implanted by silver ions with the dose ranging from 5 x 10{sup 14} to 5 x 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} at an energy of 70 keV. The silver distribution in pyrolytic carbon was characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The results show that the bactericidal rate for both S. aureus and E. coli increase with the ion dose when the silver ion dose is under the saturated dose of 5 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The bactericidal rate is over 97% when the ion dose exceeds that value. In comparison with the reference sample, Ag{sup +}-implanted pyrolytic carbon shows a good biocompatibility and without biotoxication by means of cytotoxicity, hemolysis and platelet tests. RBS analyses show that silver atoms penetrate into the sample surface and form a silver-rich surface region which plays an important role in killing bacteria. When the ion dose is not exceed 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, the structure of Ag{sup +}-implanted pyrolytic carbon is kept unchanged maintaining the original biocompatibility.

  17. GROWTH CHARACTERS AND MODEL OF PYROLYTIC CARBON IN CHEMICAL VAPOR INFILTRATION PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI) processes are the essential techniques for fabrication of high performance carbon-carbon composites. Based on the polarized light and scanning electron analysis, the authors study the micro-morphology and texture characteristics of pyrolytic carbon deposited in CVI process, as well as the growth behavior of pyrolytic carbon. The research shows that Rough Laminar (RL) texture has the hierarchical and self-similar structural features, which reflects the stage-growth and self-similar behavior during the growth course of pyrolytic carbon. According to the two growth features, a laminated growth model of pyrolytic carbon is proposed with the concept of Cone-Growth Units (CGU). The laminated growth model can provide a fine description for the growth course of RL pyrolytic carbon. The model indicates that formation, developing and combination of local high-order structures (such as CGU structures) are the essential factors for the growth of RL texture. Smooth Laminar (SL) texture and ISO carbon come into being with long-range orderliness and isotropy structure respectively, which no local high-orderliness intermediate involves in.

  18. Mechanics of gases; Mechanik der Gase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Dieter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Berlin (Germany). BESSY II

    2010-07-01

    Compact synopsis for natural scientists, engineers and vacuum specialists. Application-oriented presentation with many practical examples and exercises. Ideal for bachelor study programmes. Knowledge on the movement, speed and energy of gas particles are an important prerequisite for an understanding of modern technologies such as vacuum engineering, or, closely related to the former, of vacuum physics or the handling of gases. This book presents the mechanics of gases in a readily understandable manner. The mathematics used is no more complex than necessary. The material is presented in coherent manner and follows a logical progression. The book begins with a description of Maxwell's velocity distribution. This is followed by a derivation of the equations of state for ideal gases as well as a description of the most important equations of state for real gases. Next the author derives relationships for all important gas kinetic parameters and shows how they can be determined experimentally. The presentation ends with explanations of selected calculations and a synopsis of all important formulas. The book contains a number of examples which are oriented towards questions as they arise in engineering or applied physics. The content level is ''Upper Undergraduate''. Keywords: gas dynamics; gas kinetics; ideal and real gas; kinetic gases; textbook of gas dynamics; textbook of gas kinetics; textbook of gas mechanics; Maxwell's law; gas mechanics; fluid mechanics; equations of state for gases. [German] - Kompakte Zusammenfassung fuer Naturwissenschaftler, Ingenieure und Vakuumspezialisten. - Anwendungsorientierte Praesentation mit vielen Praxisbeispielen und Aufgaben. - Ideal fuer das Bachelor-Studium Kenntnisse ueber die Bewegung von Gasteilchen, deren Geschwindigkeit und Energie sind eine wichtige Voraussetzung zum Verstaendnis moderner Technologien, z. B. der Vakuumtechnik, und eng damit verknuepft der Vakuumphysik oder der Handhabung von

  19. Spray pyrolytic deposition of ZnO thin layers composed of low dimensional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaid Bushiri, M.; Agouram, S.; Reig, C.; Martínez-Tomás, M. C.; Jimenez, J.; Hortelano, V.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.

    ZnO nanolayers composed of fine nanostructures have been successively grown by spray pyrolytic deposition at 300 ∘C over amorphous glass substrates. As deposited samples were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), showing a granular morphology with grain size in the limit of the microscope resolution. CL measurement shows a broad near band edge (3.4 eV) emission of ZnO in the UV region and the defect level emissions in the green region of the spectrum. The use of intermittent spray pyrolytic deposition is shown as an alternative to increase the homogeneity of the samples when temperatures near to the precursor pyrolytic decomposition is selected, long depositions times are involved, and low thermal conductive substrates are used. We have focused on one of these low thermal conductive substrates, glass, on which spheroid shaped microstructures and inhomogeneities appear.

  20. Microstructure of carbon fiber preform and distribution of pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建勋; 黄伯云

    2004-01-01

    The carbon/carbon composites were made by chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) with needled felt preform. The distribution of the pyrolytic carbon in the carbon fiber preform was studied by polarized light microscope(PLM) and scanning electronic microscope(SEM). The experimental results indicate that the amount of pyrolytic carbon deposited on the surface of chopped carbon fiber is more than that on the surface of long carbon fiber. The reason is the different porosity between the layer of chopped carbon fiber and long carbon fiber. The carbon precursor gas which passes through the part of chopped carbon fibers decomposes and deposits on the surface of chopped carbon fiber. The pyrolytic carbon on the surface of long carbon fibers is produced by the carbon precursor gas diffusing from the chopped fiber and the Z-d fiber. Uniform pore distribution and porosity in preform are necessary for producing C/C composites with high properties.

  1. Adsorption of Pb(II by Activated Pyrolytic Char from Used Tire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Ping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a renewable resource, the pyrolytic char derived from used tire has promising adsorption capacities owing to its similar structure and properties with active carbon. The purification and activation of the pyrolytic char from used tire, as well as the application of this material in the adsorption of Pb(II in water is conducted. The influences on the adsorption capacity by temperature and pH value are investigated and discussed; the adsorption thermodynamics and kinetics are also studied. The results show that the pyrolytic char from used tire has remarkable adsorption capacity for Pb(II, and the adsorption is an endothermic process complying with the Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption kinetics is a pseudo second-order reaction.

  2. Using pyrolytic acid leaching as a pretreatment step in a biomass fast pyrolysis plant: process design and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Ham, van der A.G.J.; Berg, van den H.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Removing alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEMs) from biomass, with pyrolytic acids, before pyrolysis leads to increased organic oil and sugar yields. These pyrolytic acids are produced and concentrated within the pyrolysis process itself. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate under which condi

  3. Mechanism of radiation-chemical and pyrolytic transformations in lexan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roustam Aliev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reportamos una nueva metodología para estudiar el mecanismo de transformaciones por radiación en materiales poliméricos basada en el análisis combinado de los gases de origen radiolítico, y los productos pirolíticos, generados mediante la pirólisis rápida de polímeros pre-irradiados, acoplado a la cromatografía de gases -espectroscopía de infrarrojo con transformada de Fourier- espectrometría de masas por impacto electrónico. El Lexan® (policarbonato de bisfenol-A fue estudiado en el rango de dosis de 0.125 a 1.0 MGy. La irradiación del Lexan estuvo acompañada por la liberación preferencial del monóxido de carbono seguida de una producción menor de hidrógeno, dióxido de carbono y metano. El Lexan pirolizado liberó principalmente dióxido de carbono, metano, benceno, tolueno y 4-metilfenol. Con base en los resultados obtenidos sugerimos dos vías principales para la incisión del Lexan por radiación con igual probabilidad: (a ruptura del enlace carbonato y (b ruptura del enlace alifático-aromático.

  4. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  5. Handbook of purified gases

    CERN Document Server

    Schoen, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Technical gases are used in almost every field of industry, science and medicine and also as a means of control by government authorities and institutions and are regarded as indispensable means of assistance. In this complete handbook of purified gases the physical foundations of purified gases and mixtures as well as their manufacturing, purification, analysis, storage, handling and transport are presented in a comprehensive way. This important reference work is accompanied with a large number of Data Sheets dedicated to the most important purified gases.  

  6. Comparative effects of pyrolytic products of fiber reinforced plastic and wood shavings on the respiratory variables in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Deb, Utsab; Gautam, Anshoo; Vijayaraghavan, R; Ratna, Debdatta; Chakraborty, B C

    2010-08-01

    Comparative inhalation toxicity studies of pyrolytic products (smoke) from synthetic polymer, fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) and teak wood shavings were carried out in male Swiss albino mice. The breathing pattern and the respiratory variables were monitored using a computer program that recognizes the modifications of the respiratory pattern. Exposure to the smoke from both the polymers caused a concentration dependent decrease in normal breathing and an increase in sensory irritation measure. The acute lethal concentration 50 values for a 15 min static inhalation exposure to the smoke from FRP and teak wood shavings were found to be > 200.00 and 62.99 g/m(3), respectively. Hence the inhalation toxicity of smoke from FRP sample on a mass basis is approximately one-third that of the smoke from teak wood. The concentration of smoke causing 50% respiratory depression of the exposed animals were found to be 6.877 and 0.106 g/m(3) for FRP and teak wood samples, respectively. Thus the sensory irritancy of the smoke from FRP sample is approximately 65 times lesser than the smoke from teak wood. The higher sensory irritancy potential of wood smoke as compared to FRP smoke may be caused by a greater number of submicron particles (size range of 2 micron and less) and greater percentage of gases present in wood smoke as compared to FRP smoke. Thus in case of accidental fires, synthetic polymers like FRP may be a safer choice for structural parts and interiors than the natural wood.

  7. Pyrolytic Behavior of Citric Acid%柠檬酸的热解特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周顺; 徐迎波; 王程辉; 田振峰

    2011-01-01

    The pyrolytic behavior of citric acid was investigated by thermogravimetric system coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectrometer ( TG-FTIR). The TG curves, DTG curves, and relative contents of pyrolytic gas phase products of citric acid in oxygen of different concentrations were determined and compared. The formation rules of gas phase products and pyrolytic mechanism of citric acid were explored. The results showed that: 1) The main pyrolytic gas phase products of citric acid included C02, H20, CO, anhydride and ketone compounds, in which CO2 was the major, while CO was the minor, H20 emerged first, while anhydride the last. 2) There might exist two pyrolytic pathways, in one of the pathways citric acid was dehydrated and then decarbonated to form anhydride, and in the other to form ketones mainly by decarbonation. At the initial pyrolytic stage, both pathways coexisted, increasing oxygen concentration would benefit the formation of ketones. While at higher temperature, anhydride formation dominated.%使用热失重/傅里叶变换红外联用( TG-FTIR)技术研究了柠檬酸的热裂解特性,测定并比较了不同氧气浓度下柠檬酸的热重(TG)和微商热重(DTG)曲线,以及柠檬酸热解气相产物相对含量和生成规律,探讨了柠檬酸可能的热解机制.结果表明:①柠檬酸的热解气相产物主要有CO2,CO,H2O,酸酐和酮类物质.CO2是气相产物中相对含量最高的物质,CO最低;水最早出现在气相产物中,酸酐是最后存在于气相产物中的物质;②柠檬酸可能有2种主要热解途径:先脱水后脱CO2的酸酐生成模式和主要脱CO2的酮生成模式.在热解初期,2种模式同时发生,氧气浓度的增加有利于酮的生成.在较高温度下,主要以酸酐生成模式为主.

  8. Glass-like carbon, pyrolytic graphite or nanostructured carbon for electrochemical sensing of bismuth ion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Milikić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Different carbon electrodes were explored for application in electroanalysis, namely for sensing of bismuth ion as model analyte. Carbon materials tested included glassy carbon, basal and edge plane pyrolytic graphite, as well as nanostructured carbonized polyaniline prepared in the presence of 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Bismuth ion was chosen as model analyte as protocol for its detection and quantifications is still to be determined. Herein, anodic stripping voltammetry was used with study of effect of several parameters such as scan rate and deposition time. Electrode based on carbonized polyaniline showed the highest activity for bismuth ion sensing in terms of the highest current densities recorded both in a laboratory and in real sample, while basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode gave the lowest limit of detection.

  9. Structural and Compositional Characterization of Fungus-Derived Pyrolytic Carbon Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Campbell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three distinctive pyrolytic carbon structures, derived from three specific tissues of Agaricus bisporus mushroom, were studied and characterized. The three structures discovered within the stalk, cap, and cap skin tissues were found to contain unique microarchitectures, which were preserved upon anoxic carbonization. Experiments also revealed the formation of salt pockets and deposits within each microarchitecture, leading to a potential natural hard-template method for porous carbon structures.

  10. Pyrolytic characteristics and kinetics of the marine green tide macroalgae, Enteromorpha prolifera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hui; YAN Huaxiao; LIU Ming; ZHANG Congwang; QIN Song

    2011-01-01

    The marine macroalgae Enteromorpha prolifera was one of the main algal genera that occurred in the widespread green tides in Qingdao,China,during the summers of 2007,2008 and 2010.It is thus a plentiful source of biomass and could be used as a biofuel.In this study,the pyrolytic characteristics and kinetics of E.prolifera were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)method.Cornstalk and sawdust were used as comparisons.Pyrolytic characteristics were studied using TG-DTG (thermogravimetry-derivative thermogravimetry) curves.Three stages in the pyrolytic process were determined:dehydration,dramatic weight loss and slow weight loss.E.prolifera was pyrolyzed at a lower initial temperature than the two terrestrial biomass forms.The apparent activation energy values for the three types of biomass were calculated and the mechanism functions were determined using 16 different mechanism functions,frequently used in thermal kinetics analysis.Activation energy values varied with mechanism function and the range of activation energy values for E.prolifera,cornstalk,and sawdust were 25-50 kJ/mol,60-90 kJ/mol and 120-155 kJ/mol,respectively.This indicates that E.prolifera has low thermal stability for pyrolysis and good combustion chaxacteristics.

  11. Nanomechanical Pyrolytic Carbon Resonators: Novel Fabrication Method and Characterization of Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, Maksymilian; Larsen, Frederik K.; Larsen, Peter E.; Schmid, Silvan; Boisen, Anja; Keller, Stephan S.

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanomechanical string resonators, which essentially are highly stressed bridges, are of particular interest for micro- and nanomechanical sensing because they exhibit resonant behavior with exceptionally high quality factors. Here, we fabricated and characterized nanomechanical pyrolytic carbon resonators (strings and cantilevers) obtained through pyrolysis of photoresist precursors. The developed fabrication process consists of only three processing steps: photolithography, dry etching and pyrolysis. Two different fabrication strategies with two different photoresists, namely SU-8 2005 (negative) and AZ 5214e (positive), were compared. The resonant behavior of the pyrolytic resonators was characterized at room temperature and in high vacuum using a laser Doppler vibrometer. The experimental data was used to estimate the Young’s modulus of pyrolytic carbon and the tensile stress in the string resonators. The Young’s moduli were calculated to be 74 ± 8 GPa with SU-8 and 115 ± 8 GPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The tensile stress in the string resonators was 33 ± 7 MPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The string resonators displayed maximal quality factor values of up to 3000 for 525-µm-long structures. PMID:27428980

  12. Pyrolytic-carbon coating in carbon nanotube foams for better performance in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nanfei; Yildiz, Ozkan; Pan, Qin; Zhu, Jiadeng; Zhang, Xiangwu; Bradford, Philip D.; Gao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the wide-spread adoption of supercapacitors has been hindered by their inferior energy density to that of batteries. Here we report the use of our pyrolytic-carbon-coated carbon nanotube foams as lightweight, compressible, porous, and highly conductive current collectors in supercapacitors, which are infiltrated with chemically-reduced graphene oxide and later compressed via mechanical and capillary forces to generate the active electrodes. The pyrolytic carbon coatings, introduced by chemical vapor infiltration, wrap around the CNT junctions and increase the surface roughness. When active materials are infiltrated, the pyrolytic-carbon coatings help prevent the π-stacking, enlarge the accessible surface area, and increase the electrical conductivity of the scaffold. Our best-performing device offers 48% and 57% higher gravimetric energy and power density, 14% and 23% higher volumetric energy and power density, respectively, and two times higher knee frequency, than the device with commercial current collectors, while the "true-performance metrics" are strictly followed in our measurements. We have further clarified the solution resistance, charge transfer resistance/capacitance, double-layer capacitance, and Warburg resistance in our system via comprehensive impedance analysis, which will shed light on the design and optimization of similar systems.

  13. The Pyrolytic Profile of Lyophilized and Deep-Frozen Compact Part of the Human Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Lodowska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bone grafts are used in the treatment of nonunion of fractures, bone tumors and in arthroplasty. Tissues preserved by lyophilization or deep freezing are used as implants nowadays. Lyophilized grafts are utilized in the therapy of birth defects and bone benign tumors, while deep-frozen ones are applied in orthopedics. The aim of the study was to compare the pyrolytic pattern, as an indirect means of the analysis of organic composition of deep-frozen and lyophilized compact part of the human bone. Methods. Samples of preserved bone tissue were subjected to thermolysis and tetrahydroammonium-hydroxide- (TMAH- associated thermochemolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. Results. Derivatives of benzene, pyridine, pyrrole, phenol, sulfur compounds, nitriles, saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, and fatty acids (C12–C20 were identified in the pyrolytic pattern. The pyrolyzates were the most abundant in derivatives of pyrrole and nitriles originated from proteins. The predominant product in pyrolytic pattern of the investigated bone was pyrrolo[1,2-α]piperazine-3,6-dione derived from collagen. The content of this compound significantly differentiated the lyophilized graft from the deep-frozen one. Oleic and palmitic acid were predominant among fatty acids of the investigated samples. The deep-frozen implants were characterized by higher percentage of long-chain fatty acids than lyophilized grafts.

  14. Nanomechanical Pyrolytic Carbon Resonators: Novel Fabrication Method and Characterization of Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksymilian Kurek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanomechanical string resonators, which essentially are highly stressed bridges, are of particular interest for micro- and nanomechanical sensing because they exhibit resonant behavior with exceptionally high quality factors. Here, we fabricated and characterized nanomechanical pyrolytic carbon resonators (strings and cantilevers obtained through pyrolysis of photoresist precursors. The developed fabrication process consists of only three processing steps: photolithography, dry etching and pyrolysis. Two different fabrication strategies with two different photoresists, namely SU-8 2005 (negative and AZ 5214e (positive, were compared. The resonant behavior of the pyrolytic resonators was characterized at room temperature and in high vacuum using a laser Doppler vibrometer. The experimental data was used to estimate the Young’s modulus of pyrolytic carbon and the tensile stress in the string resonators. The Young’s moduli were calculated to be 74 ± 8 GPa with SU-8 and 115 ± 8 GPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The tensile stress in the string resonators was 33 ± 7 MPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The string resonators displayed maximal quality factor values of up to 3000 for 525-µm-long structures.

  15. Aromatics extraction from pyrolytic sugars using ionic liquid to enhance sugar fermentability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohua; Luque-Moreno, Luis C; Oudenhoven, Stijn R G; Rehmann, Lars; Kersten, Sascha R A; Schuur, Boelo

    2016-09-01

    Fermentative bioethanol production from pyrolytic sugars was improved via aromatics removal by liquid-liquid extraction. As solvents, the ionic liquid (IL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium dicyanamide (P666,14[N(CN)2]) and ethyl acetate (EA) were compared. Two pyrolytic sugar solutions were created from acid-leached and untreated pinewood, with levoglucosan contents (most abundant sugar) of 29.0% and 8.3% (w/w), respectively. In a single stage extraction, 70% of the aromatics were effectively removed by P666,14[N(CN)2] and 50% by EA, while no levoglucosan was extracted. The IL was regenerated by vacuum evaporation (100mbar) at 220°C, followed by extraction of aromatics from fresh pyrolytic sugar solutions. Regenerated IL extracted aromatics with similar extraction efficiency as the fresh IL, and the purified sugar fraction from pretreated pinewood was hydrolyzed to glucose and fermented to ethanol, yielding 0.46g ethanol/(g glucose), close to the theoretical maximum yield.

  16. Blood Gases Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... known as: Arterial Blood Gases; ABGs Formal name: Arterial Blood Gas Analysis Related tests: Electrolytes , Bicarbonate , BUN , Creatinine , Emergency and ... lives higher than sea level. Results from an arterial blood gas analysis are not diagnostic; they should be used in ...

  17. Kinetic theory of gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kauzmann, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Monograph and text supplement for first-year students of physical chemistry focuses chiefly on the molecular basis of important thermodynamic properties of gases, including pressure, temperature, and thermal energy. 1966 edition.

  18. On Classical Ideal Gases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacques Arnaud; Laurent Chusseau; Fabrice Philippe

    2013-01-01

      We show that the thermodynamics of ideal gases may be derived solely from the Democritean concept of corpuscles moving in vacuum plus a principle of simplicity, namely that these laws are independent...

  19. Gases, liquids and solids

    CERN Document Server

    Tabor, David

    1969-01-01

    It has been tradional to treat gases, liquids and solids as if they were completely unrelated material. However, this book shows that many of their bulk properties can been explained in terms of intermolecular forces.

  20. Strongly correlated Bose gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2016-10-01

    The strongly interacting Bose gas is one of the most fundamental paradigms of quantum many-body physics and the subject of many experimental and theoretical investigations. We review recent progress on strongly correlated Bose gases, starting with a description of beyond mean-field corrections. We show that the Efimov effect leads to non universal phenomena and to a metastability of the low temperature Bose gas through three-body recombination to deeply bound molecular states. We outline differences and similarities with ultracold Fermi gases, discuss recent experiments on the unitary Bose gas, and finally present a few perspectives for future research.

  1. Strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakr W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision measurements on the thermodynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the superfluid transition. The onset of superfluidity is directly observed in the compressibility, the chemical potential, the entropy, and the heat capacity. Our measurements provide benchmarks for current many-body theories on strongly interacting fermions. Secondly, we have studied the evolution of fermion pairing from three to two dimensions in these gases, relating to the physics of layered superconductors. In the presence of p-wave interactions, Fermi gases are predicted to display toplogical superfluidity carrying Majorana edge states. Two possible avenues in this direction are discussed, our creation and direct observation of spin-orbit coupling in Fermi gases and the creation of fermionic molecules of 23Na 40K that will feature strong dipolar interactions in their absolute ground state.

  2. Synthetic gases production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaud, J.P.

    1996-06-01

    The natural gas or naphtha are the main constituents used for the production of synthetic gases. Several production ways of synthetic gases are industrially used as for example the natural gas or naphtha catalytic reforming, the selective oxidation of natural gas or heavy fuels and the coal oxy-vapo-gasification. The aim of this work is to study the different steps of production and treatment of the synthetic gases by the way of catalytic reforming. The first step is the desulfurization of the hydrocarbons feedstocks. The process used in industry is described. Then is realized the catalytic hydrocarbons reforming process. After having recalled some historical data on the catalytic reforming, the author gives the reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. The possible reforming catalysts, industrial equipments and furnaces designs are then exposed. The carbon dioxide is a compound easily obtained during the reforming reactions. It is a wasteful and harmful component which has to be extracted of the gaseous stream. The last step is then the gases de-carbonation. Two examples of natural gas or naphtha reforming reactions are at last given: the carbon monoxide conversion by steam and the carbon oxides reactions with hydrogen (methanization). (O.M.). 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Effect of acoustic, deformation on radiation-induced luminescence of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Kardashev, B K; Plaksin, O A; Stepanov, V A; Stepanov, P A; Chernov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the ultrasound oscillations with the frequency of approximately 100 kHz on the radiation-induced luminescence on the pyrolytic boron nitride, originating by the protons irradiation (the energy of 8 MeV, the flux of 1.6 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm s), is studied. The impact of the ultrasound oscillations manifests itself by high deformation amplitudes (approximately 10 sup - sup 4), when the nonlinear, amplitude-dependent ultrasound absorption is observed. The obtained data are explained by the change in the kinetics of recrystallization, induced by irradiation, whereby the disappearance (radiation annealing) of the small angle boundaries occurs

  4. Mass spectrometric characterization of a pyrolytic radical source using femtosecond ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H.M.; Beaud, P.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P.; Tzannis, A.P.; Gerber, T. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Radicals play, as reactive species, an important role in the chemistry of combustion. In contrast to atmospheric flames where spectra are congested due to high vibrational and rotational excitation, experiments in the cold environment of a molecular beam (MB) yield clean spectra that can be easily attributed to one species by Resonantly Enhanced Multi Photon Ionization (REMP). A pyrolytic radical source has been set up. To characterize the efficiency of the source `soft` ionization with femto second pulses is applied which results in less fragmentation, simplifying the interpretation of the mass spectrum. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  5. Specific heat of pristine and brominated graphite fibers, composites and HOPG. [Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Chen; Maciag, Carolyn

    1987-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to obtain specific heat values of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers and brominated P-100/epoxy composite as well as pristine and brominated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) for comparison. Based on the experimental results obtained, specific heat values are calculated for several different temperatures, with a standard deviation estimated at 1.4 percent of the average values. The data presented here are useful in designing heat transfer devices (such as airplane de-icing heaters) from bromine fibers.

  6. Thermal conductivity mapping of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings on simulated fuel particles by time-domain thermoreflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Chiritescu, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Cahill, David G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Thermal conductivity of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings on spherical particles has been mapped using time-domain thermoreflectance. The thermal conductivities measured for pyrolytic carbon ranged between 3.4 and 13.5 W/m K. The effect of porosity, pore-size distribution, anisotropy, in-plane disorder and domain sizes is discussed. A thermal conductivity of 168 W/m K was obtained for SiC. Mapping of the thermal conductivity of coated fuel particles provides useful data for modeling fuel performance during the operation of nuclear reactors.

  7. Decomposition mechanism of melamine borate in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffendahl, Carmen; Duquesne, Sophie; Fontaine, Gaëlle; Bourbigot, Serge, E-mail: serge.bourbigot@ensc-lille.fr

    2014-08-20

    Highlights: • Decomposition of melamine borate in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions was investigated. • With increasing temperature, orthoboric acid forms boron oxide releasing water. • Melamine decomposes evolving melamine, ammonia and other fragments. • Boron oxide is transformed into boron nitride and boron nitride-oxide structures through presence of ammonia. - Abstract: Decomposition mechanism of melamine borate (MB) in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions is investigated in the condensed and gas phases using solid state NMR ({sup 13}C and {sup 11}B), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pyrolysis-gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (py-GCMS) and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (TGA–FTIR). It is evidenced that orthoboric acid dehydrates to metaboric and then to boron oxide. The melamine is partially sublimated. At the same time, melamine condensates, i.e., melem and melon are formed. Melon is only formed in thermo-oxidative conditions. At higher temperature, melem and melon decompose releasing ammonia which reacts with the boron oxide to form boron nitride (BN) and BNO structures.

  8. DETERMINATION OF WATER CONTENT IN PYROLYTIC TARS USING COULOMETRIC KARL-FISHER TITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Jílková

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid organic fraction of pyrolytic tar has a high energy value which makes possible its utilization as an energy source. However, before utilization, it is crucial to remove water from the liquid fraction. The presence of water reduces the energy value of pyrolytic tars. Water separation from the organic tar fraction is a complex process, since an emulsion can be readily formed. Therefore, after phase separation, it is important to know the residual water content in the organic phase and whether it is necessary to further dry it. The results presented in this manuscript focus on a water determination in liquid products from coal and biomass pyrolysis by a coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is often used for a water content determination in gaseous, liquid and solid samples. However, to date, this titration method has not been used for a water determination in tars. A new water determination method, which has been tested on different types of tar, has been developed. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is suitable for tar samples with a water content not greater than 5 wt. %. The obtained experimental results indicate that the new introduced method can be used with a very good repeatability for a water content determination in tars.

  9. Absence of field anisotropy in the intrinsic ferromagnetic signals of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestar, A. [Laboratorio de Fisica y Sistemas Pequenos y Nanotecnologia, CSIC, Serano 144, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, Linnestrasse 5, Universitaet Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Setzer, A. [Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, Linnestrasse 5, Universitaet Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Esquinazi, P., E-mail: esquin@physik.uni-leipzig.d [Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, Linnestrasse 5, Universitaet Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Garcia, N. [Laboratorio de Fisica y Sistemas Pequenos y Nanotecnologia, CSIC, Serano 144, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    We have measured the magnetization of bulk samples of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at magnetic fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the graphene layers. Within experimental error the intrinsic ferromagnetic signals of the samples show similar magnetic moments at saturation for the two magnetic field directions, in contrast to recently published data (J. Cervenka et al., Nat. Phys. 5 (2009) 840). To check that the SQUID device provides correctly the small ferromagnetic signals obtained after subtracting the 100 times larger diamagnetic background, we have prepared a sample with a superconducting Pb-film deposited on one of the HOPG surfaces. We show that the field dependence of the measured magnetic moment and after the background subtraction is highly reliable even in the sub-{mu} emu range providing the real magnetic properties of the embedded small ferromagnetic and superconducting signals. - Research highlights: > We have measured the magnetization of bulk samples of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at magnetic fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the graphene layers. > Within experimental error the intrinsic ferromagnetic signals of the samples show similar magnetic moments at saturation for the two magnetic field directions. > The absence of magnetic anisotropy of the intrinsic ferromagnetic order found in HOPG samples contrasts recently published data by Cervenka et al., Nat Phys 5, 840 (2009).

  10. Physics of ionized gases

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive textbook and reference for the study of the physics of ionized gasesThe intent of this book is to provide deep physical insight into the behavior of gases containing atoms and molecules from which one or more electrons have been ionized. The study of these so-called plasmas begins with an overview of plasmas as they are found in nature and created in the laboratory. This serves as a prelude to a comprehensive study of plasmas, beginning with low temperature and "ideal" plasmas and extending to radiation and particle transport phenomena, the response of plasmas to external fields, and an insightful treatment of plasma waves, plasma instabilities, nonlinear phenomena in plasmas, and the study of plasma interactions with surfaces

  11. The greenhouse gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, R.

    1987-01-01

    The main greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, CFCs and ozone. They are greenhouse gases as they absorb radiation from the Earth and thus impede its emission back to space. CO{sub 2} is responsible for about half the enhanced greenhouse effect. A global warming of only a few degrees would have a profound effect on climate. Increased levels of CO{sub 2} promote plant growth, but may not benefit agriculture overall. Sea levels may rise. It is difficult to predict the effects of global warming in society. It would be possible to reduce the scale of the greenhouse effect by energy conservation, using alternative energy sources, and possibly by capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel power stations and disposing of it on the ocean floor. 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Strongly interacting ultracold quantum gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui ZHAI

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews recent progresses in ul- tracold quantum gases, and it includes three subjects which are the Fermi gases across a Feshbach resonance, quantum gases in the optical lattices and the fast ro- tating quantum gases. In this article, we discuss many basic physics pictures and concepts in quantum gases, for examples, the resonant interaction, universality and condensation in the lowest Landau level; we introduce fundamental theoretical tools for studying these systems, such as mean-field theory for BEC-BCS crossover and for the boson Hubbard model; also, we emphasize the im- portant unsolved problems in the forefront of this field, for instance, the temperature effect in optical lattices.

  13. Structure-property relations for silicon nitride matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Olivier, C.; Veyret, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Si3N4 matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon (SiC) fibers, were studied using tensile testing and transmission electron microscopy. Three types of samples were evaluated all with a nominal coating thickness of 200 nm. The composites were densified by hot pressing at

  14. Structure-property relations for silicon nitride matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Olivier, C.; Veyret, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Si3N4 matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon (SiC) fibers, were studied using tensile testing and transmission electron microscopy. Three types of samples were evaluated all with a nominal coating thickness of 200 nm. The composites were densified by hot pressing at

  15. On Classical Ideal Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Chusseau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that the thermodynamics of ideal gases may be derived solely from the Democritean concept of corpuscles moving in vacuum plus a principle of simplicity, namely that these laws are independent of the laws of motion, aside from the law of energy conservation. Only a single corpuscle in contact with a heat bath submitted to a z and t-invariant force is considered. Most of the end results are known but the method appears to be novel. The mathematics being elementary, the present paper should facilitate the understanding of the ideal gas law and of classical thermodynamics even though not-usually-taught concepts are being introduced.

  16. Electron spectra line shape analysis of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and nanocrystalline diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Beata; Zemek, Josef; Houdkova, Jana; Kromka, Alexander; Józwik, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) methods were applied in investigating samples of nanocrystalline diamond and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite of various C sp(2)/sp(3) ratios, crystallinity conditions and grain sizes. The composition at the surface was estimated from the XPS. The C sp(2)/sp(3) ratio was evaluated from the width of the XAES first derivative C KLL spectra and from fitting of XPS C 1s spectra into components. The pattern recognition (PR) method applied for analyzing the spectra line shapes exhibited high accuracy in distinguishing different carbon materials. The PR method was found to be a potentially useful approach for identification, especially important for technological applications in fields of materials engineering and for controlling the chemical reaction products during synthesis.

  17. One_dimensional chains of gold clusters on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of gold nanoclusters on thesurface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in ultrahigh vacuum. Studies of ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy revealed that the size distribution of gold clusters was very narrow and quasi-one-dimensional chains of gold nanoclusters of approximately 2 nm diameter were produced after being annealed at 74℃. Unlike the results obtained by previous workers, these chains of gold clusters were not formed along steps on the substrate surface, and some of them could even go across monoatomic steps. The orientation of chains of gold clusters was also dependent on the size of gold nanoclusters. These results suggest the viability of a new route to the creation of ordered nanoscale structures.

  18. Atomic force microscopy study of anion intercalation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliata, D.; Haering, P.; Haas, O.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H. [University of Berne (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, we studied highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in perchloric acid, as a model to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation in graphite. Aim of the work is the local and time dependent investigation of dimensional changes of the host material during electrochemical intercalation processes on the nanometer scale. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, as in-situ tool of analysis during intercalation and expulsion of perchloric anions into the HOPG electrodes. According to the AFM measurements, the HOPG interlayer spacing increases by 32% when perchloric anions intercalate, in agreement with the formation of stage IV of graphite intercalation compounds. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  19. Pyrolytic characteristics of biodiesel prepared from lipids accumulated in diatom cells with growth regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Feng, Jia; Ge, Tingting; Yang, Weijuan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic compositions of lipids accumulated in two diatoms Chaetoceros gracilis and Nitzschia closterium cultured with nitrogen and silicon deprivation were studied. It was found that short-chain fatty acids (C14-C16) content was much higher than long-chain fatty acids (C18-C20) content in lipids of two diatoms. The pyrolytic characteristics of biodiesel made from two diatoms and two plant seeds were compared by thermogravimetric analysis. The highest activation energy of 46.68 kJ mol(-1) and the minimum solid residue of 25.18% were obtained in the pyrolysis of biodiesel made from C. gracilis cells, which were cultured with 0.5 mmol L(-1) of nitrogen (no silicon) and accumulated the minimum polyunsaturated fatty acid (C20:5). The pyrolysis residue percentage of C. gracilis biodiesel was lower than that of N. closterium biodiesel and higher than those of plant (Cormus wilsoniana and Pistacia chinensis) biodiesels.

  20. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of a fuel-cell electrocatalyst deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucernak, A.R.; Chowdhury, P.B.; Wilde, C.P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemistry; Kelsall, G.H. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Huxley School; Zhu, Y.Y.; Williams, D.E. [University College London, (United Kingdom). Department of Chemistry

    2000-07-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been examined on a platinum electrocatalysts (Johnson Matthey HSA platinum black) dispersed onto a flat highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrode using an atomic force microscope (AFM) modified to perform scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). For both STM and SECM experiments the same Pt/Ir tips produced by electrochemical etching of Pt/Ir wire followed by coating with varnish have been used. The coating process leaves only the very end of the tip exposed. Positioning the SECM tip 42 nm from one of the particles allows monitoring of hydrogen evolution from that particle as a function of substrate potential. In a separate experiment the substrate has been polarized at a potential at which hydrogen evolution occurs and the SECM tip rastered over the surface to obtain images of the local concentration of hydrogen. This map indicates the activity of hydrogen production as a function of position. (author)

  1. Mass spectroscopic analysis of a plume induced by laser ablation of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Chae, H B; Lee, I H; Park, S M

    1998-01-01

    The laser ablation of a pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) target was investigated by time-of- flight quadrupole mass spectroscopy. According to the laser-correlated ion mass spectra, B sup + and B sub 2 sup + ions were produced, but neither N sup + , N sub 2 sup + , or BN sup + ions were observed at laser fluences below 1 J/cm sup 2. Instead, neutral N sub 2 molecules were found to be formed. The mean velocities and kinetic energies of the B sup + ions were obtained by time-of-flight analysis. Also, reactive laser ablation under a N sub 2 atmosphere was attempted by using a pulsed valve synchronized with the laser pulse.

  2. Standard specification for pyrolytic and vacuum deposition coatings on flat glass

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers the optical and aesthetic quality requirements for coatings applied to glass for use in building glazing. 1.2 The coatings covered are applied to the glass using either pyrolytic or vacuum (sputtering) deposition methods and are typically applied to control solar heat gain, energy performance, comfort level, and condensation and enhance the aesthetic of the building. 1.3 This specification addresses blemishes related to the coating only. It does not address glass blemishes, applied ceramic frits, and organic films. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard.

  3. Electrocrystallization of Monodisperse Nanocrystal Copper on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄令; LEE,Eun-Sung; KIM,Kwang-Bum

    2005-01-01

    Mechanism of copper electrocrystallization on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode from a solution of 1 mmol/L CuSO4 and 1.0 mol/L H2SO4 has been studied using cyclic voltammogram and chronoamperometry. The results show that in copper electrodeposition the charge-transfer step is fast and the rate of growth is controlled by the rate of mass transfer of copper ions to the growing centers. Reduction of Cu(Ⅱ) ions did not undergo underpotential deposition. The initial deposition kinetics of Cu electrocrystallization corresponds to a model including progressive nucleation and diffusion controlled growth. Copper nanocrystals with size of 75.6 nm and relative standard deviation of 9% can be obtained by modulation potential electrodeposition.

  4. Atomic-Resolution Kinked Structure of an Alkylporphyrin on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yiing; Panduwinata, Dwi; Sintic, Maxine; Sum, Tze Jing; Hush, Noel S; Crossley, Maxwell J; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-20

    The atomic structure of the chains of an alkyl porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetranonadecylporphyrin) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at the solid/liquid interface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and 1-phenyloctane is resolved using calibrated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory (DFT) image simulations, and ONIOM-based geometry optimizations. While atomic structures are often readily determined for porphyrin SAMs, the determination of the structure of alkyl-chain connections has not previously been possible. A graphical calibration procedure is introduced, allowing accurate observation of SAM lattice parameters, and, of the many possible atomic structures modeled, only the lowest-energy structure obtained was found to predict the observed lattice parameters and image topography. Hydrogen atoms are shown to provide the conduit for the tunneling current through the alkyl chains.

  5. STM observation of a box-shaped graphene nanostructure appeared after mechanical cleavage of pyrolytic graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Lapshin, Rostislav V

    2016-01-01

    A description is given of a three-dimensional box-shaped graphene (BSG) nanostructure formed/uncovered by mechanical cleavage of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The discovered nanostructure is a multilayer system of parallel hollow channels located along the surface and having quadrangular cross-section. The thickness of the channel walls/facets is approximately equal to 1 nm. The typical width of channel facets makes about 25 nm, the channel length is 390 nm and more. The investigation of the found nanostructure by means of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) allows us to draw a conclusion that it is possible to make spatial constructions of graphene similar to the discovered one by mechanical compression, bending, splitting, and shifting graphite surface layers. The distinctive features of such constructions are the following: simplicity of the preparation method, small contact area between graphene planes and a substrate, large surface area, nanometer cross-sectional sizes of the channels, lar...

  6. Characterization of a polychromatic neutron beam diffracted by pyrolytic graphite crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Byun, S H; Choi, H D

    2002-01-01

    The beam spectrum for polychromatic neutrons diffracted by pyrolytic graphite crystals was characterized. The theoretical beam spectrum was obtained using the diffraction model for a mosaic crystal. The lattice vibration effects were included in the calculation using the reported vibration amplitude of the crystal and the measured time-of-flight spectra in the thermal region. The calculated beam spectrum was compared with the results obtained in the absence of thermal motion. The lattice vibration effects became more important for the higher diffraction orders and a large decrease in the neutron flux induced by the vibrations was identified in the epithermal region. The validity of the beam spectrum was estimated by comparing with the effective quantities determined from prompt gamma-ray measurements and Cd-ratios measured both for 1/nu and non-1/nu nuclides.

  7. Modification of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces with highly charged ion (HCI) irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, Y. E-mail: ykoguchi@postman.riken.go.jp; Meguro, T.; Hida, A.; Takai, H.; Maeda, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Aoyagi, Y

    2003-05-01

    Slow Ar{sup 8+} irradiation and the following electron injection creates a non-conductive area to a depth of a few nanometers on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface (HOPG). The annealing of the sample in a hydrogen atmosphere stabilizes the Ar{sup 8+} impact area, which results in the field emission from the impact region. The property of the field emission is similar to that of diamond-like carbon (DLC), suggesting the possibility that sp{sup 3} hybridization occurs at the Ar{sup 8+} impact region. The work function estimated from the Fowler-Nordheim plot is much lower than non-treated HOPG and similar to a hydrogen-terminated DLC film.

  8. Physics of Ionized Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Howard R.; Smirnov, Boris M.

    2001-03-01

    A comprehensive textbook and reference for the study of the physics of ionized gases The intent of this book is to provide deep physical insight into the behavior of gases containing atoms and molecules from which one or more electrons have been ionized. The study of these so-called plasmas begins with an overview of plasmas as they are found in nature and created in the laboratory. This serves as a prelude to a comprehensive study of plasmas, beginning with low temperature and "ideal" plasmas and extending to radiation and particle transport phenomena, the response of plasmas to external fields, and an insightful treatment of plasma waves, plasma instabilities, nonlinear phenomena in plasmas, and the study of plasma interactions with surfaces. In all cases, the emphasis is on a clear and unified understanding of the basic physics that underlies all plasma phenomena. Thus, there are chapters on plasma behavior from the viewpoint of atomic and molecular physics, as well as on the macroscopic phenomena involved in physical kinetics of plasmas and the transport of radiation and of charged particles within plasmas. With this grounding in the fundamental physics of plasmas, the notoriously difficult subjects of nonlinear phenomena and of instabilities in plasmas are then treated with comprehensive clarity.

  9. Effect of the heating rate on the morphology of the pyrolytic char from hazelnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzade, H.A.; Serdar, Y. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Although biomass chars have a high potential for use in various applications, their performance is directly related to the chemical and the physical properties of the chars. The surface area, porosity, pore size distribution, and density are the physical properties that determine the suitability of the chars to be used. Hazelnut shells are touted as being an extremely appropriate feedstock for high quality pyrolytic char, but the working conditions under which char is obtained have significant influence on the char structure and its properties, such as the thermal reactivity. Therefore, effects of the various parameters on the char structure must be considered. In this context, the present study focused on the physical changes that occur in char as a result of different heating rates during the pyrolysis of hazelnut shells. The effects of the heating rate on the structure of the pyrolytic char obtained from ground hazelnut shells under six different heating rate conditions were investigated. The hazelnut shell was burned in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) under nitrogen flow. Non-isothermal heating was performed from ambient to 900 degrees C and held at this temperature until no further mass loss occurred. The changes in char morphology were studied with respect to the heating rate during charring. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used with each char sample to determine the effect of heating rate. The dominant inorganic phases found in hazelnut shells were found to survive in the char. It was concluded that the high lignin content found in the char played a critical role in the decomposition mechanism. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  10. Fixed-bed adsorption study of methylene blue onto pyrolytic tire char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrigianni, Vassiliki; Giannakas, Aris; Papadaki, Maria; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Konstantinou, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the adsorption efficiency of acid treated pyrolytic tire char to cationic methylene blue (MB) dye adsorption from aqueous solutions was investigated by fixed-bed adsorption column experiments. The effects of the initial dye concentration (10 - 40 mg L-1) and feed flow rate (50 - 150 mL min -1) with a fixed bed height (15 cm) were studied in order to determine the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system. The Adams-Bohart, Yoon-Nelson and Thomas model were applied to the adsorption of MB onto char at different operational conditions to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column. The results showed that the maximum adsorbed quantities decreased with increasing flow rate and increased with increasing initial MB concentration. Breakthrough time and exhaustion time increased with decreasing inlet dye concentration and flow rate. In contrast with Adams-Bohart model, Yoon-Nelson model followed by Thomas model were found more suitable to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of methylene blue by char. The correlation coefficient values R2 for both models at different operating conditions are higher than 0.9 and the low average relative error values provided very good fittings of experimental data at different operating conditions. Higher adsorption capacity of 3.85 mg g -1 was obtained at 15 cm of adsorbent bed height, flow rate of 100 mL min -1and initial MB concentration of 40 mg L-1. Although that activated carbons exhibited higher adsorption capacities in the literature, acid-treated pyrolytic tire char was found to be considerably efficient adsorbent for the removal of MB dye column taking into account the advantages of the simpler production process compared to activated carbons, as well as, the availability of waste tire feedstock and concurrent waste tire management.

  11. Investigations into the pyrolytic behaviour of coal/biomass blends using thermogravimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuthaluru, H.B. [Curtin Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Perth, WA (Australia)

    2004-04-01

    Investigations into the pyrolytic behaviour during co-pyrolysis of coal, biomass materials and coal/biomass blends prepared at different ratios (10:90, 20:80, 30:70 and 50:50) have been conducted using a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus. The coal sample selected was Collie sub-bituminous coal from Western Australia, while wood waste (WW) and wheat straw (WS) were used as biomass samples. Three thermal events were identified during the pyrolysis. The first two were dominated by the biomass pyrolysis, while the third was linked to the coal pyrolysis, which occurred at much higher temperatures. No interactions were seen between the coal and biomass during co-pyrolysis. The pyrolytic characteristics of the blends followed those of the parent fuels in an additive manner. Among the tested blends, 20:80 blends showed the lowest activation energies of 90.9 and 78.7 kJ mol{sup -1} for coal/WW and coal/WS blends respectively. The optimum blend ratio for pyrolysis of coal/WS was 50:50 with a high degradation rate in all the thermal events and a higher mass loss over the course of the co-pyrolysis compared to coal/WW blends examined. The reaction orders in these experiments were in the range of 0.21-1.60, thus having a significant effect on the overall reaction rate. Besides the pyrolysis of coal alone, the 50:50 coal/biomass blends had the highest reaction rate, ranging 1x10{sup 9}-2x10{sup 9} min{sup -1}. The experimental results may provide useful data for power generation industries for the development of co-firing options with biomass. (Author)

  12. Analysis of the anisotropy, stoichiometry and polytypes in pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E., E-mail: eddie.lopez@cinvestav.edu.mx [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zhang, H.; Shatwell, R.A. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor St., Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Guillermier, P. [AREVA Lyon, Rue Juliette Recamier, 69006 Lyon (France); Manara, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor St., Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have compared the values of anisotropy of pyrolytic carbon measured by Raman spectroscopy and 2MGEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of anisotropy depend on the sampling area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of diattenuation for SiC measured by 2MGEM were affected by the content of stacking faults. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman spectroscopy can be used as a semi-quantitative tool for the characterisation of excess carbon and silicon in SiC. - Abstract: Silicon carbide (SiC) and pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings in tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles were characterised by a combination of 2-modulator generalised ellipsometry microscopy (2-MGEM), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We compared the values of anisotropy obtained from 2-MGEM and Raman spectroscopy to investigate the effect of sampling area and microstructure. No linear correlation in anisotropy was found between these two techniques despite both sampling areas of 2-5 {mu}m. The largest deviations were observed for highly anisotropic samples with optical anisotropy factors (OPTAFs) above 1.1. For medium and low anisotropy samples (OPTAF < 1.1) the relationship is close to linear. The limited use of only the average value of diattenuation does not give an accurate representation of the characteristics of the coatings as significant areas can exist with considerably higher diattenuations that could increase the probability of failure under neutron irradiation. We also observe a change in the diattenuation of SiC due to the presence of stacking faults as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was also used to perform semiquantitative analysis of the Si and carbon excess in SiC in four TRISO particles.

  13. Pyrolysis of de-oiled seed cake of Jatropha Curcas and catalytic steam reforming of pyrolytic bio-oil to hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renny, Andrew; Santhosh, Viswanathan; Somkuwar, Nitin; Gokak, D T; Sharma, Pankaj; Bhargava, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the pyrolysis of de-oiled seed cake of Jatropha Curcas and catalytic steam reforming of pyrolytic bio-oil to hydrogen. As per literature, presence of heavy nitrogenous and oxygenated compounds leads to catalyst deactivation. Here, an attempt has been made to tune pyrolytic reactions to optimize the N and O content of the pyrolytic bio-oil. Bio-oil conversion and hydrogen yield decreased as reaction progressed, which attributes to temporary loss of catalytic activity by blockage of catalyst pores by carbon deposition. Further, retention of steam reforming activity after repetitive steam activation suggests long-term catalyst usage.

  14. Characterization of cadmium removal from aqueous solution by biochar produced from a giant Miscanthus at different pyrolytic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woong-Ki; Shim, Taeyong; Kim, Yong-Seong; Hyun, Seunghun; Ryu, Changkook; Park, Young-Kwon; Jung, Jinho

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of biochar for removing Cd from aqueous solution. Biochars were produced from a Miscanthus sacchariflorus via slow pyrolysis at 300, 400, 500 and 600°C. Higher pyrolytic temperature resulted in biochar with a higher aromatic structure and fewer polar functional groups. In particular, pH and surface area of biochar increased greatly at pyrolytic temperatures ≥ 500°C, which increased Cd sorption capacity up to 13.24 mgg(-1). The diffuse-controlled Cd removal was likely due to a surface sorption or a precipitation reaction depending on pH. A simulation with the visual MINTEQ program indicated that the precipitate was Cd(OH)2. In addition, biochar treatment significantly removed the acute toxicity of Cd toward Daphnia magna, resulting in increase of EC50 (50% effective concentration) value from 0.16 to 0.76 mgL(-1).

  15. Direct Electrochemistry of Hemoglobin in Layer-by-layer {PDDA/Hb}n Films Assembled on Pyrolytic Graphite Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Layer-by-layer {PDDA/Hb}n films were assembled by means of alternate adsorption of positively charged poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium) (PDDA) and negatively charged hemoglobin (Hb) at pH 9.2 from their aqueous solutions on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrodes. Film growth during adsorption cycles was demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy.Direct electrochemistry of Hb in {PDDA/Hb} n films on PG was studied.

  16. The pyrolytic-plasma method and the device for the utilization of hazardous waste containing organic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Opalińska, Teresa; Wnęk, Bartłomiej; Witowski, Artur; Juszczuk, Rafał; Majdak, Małgorzata; Bartusek, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the new method of waste processing. The waste, including hazardous waste, contain organic compounds. The method consists in two main processes: the pyrolysis of waste and the oxidation of the pyrolytic gas with a use of non-equilibrium plasma. The practical implementation of the method requires the design, construction and testing of the new device in large laboratory scale. The experiments were carried out for the two kinds of waste: polyethylene as a model waste and...

  17. Molecular characterization of fossil organic matter in Glyptostrobus europaeus remains from the Orawa basin (Poland). Comparison of pyrolytic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almendros, G.; Dorado, J.; Gonzalez-Vila, F.J.; Martin, F.; Sanz, J.; Alvarez-Ramis, C.; Stuchlik, L. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales

    1999-05-01

    Pyrolytic methods (standard Curie-point pyrolysis and pyrolysis in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), were used to analyze the organic composition of Glyptostrobus (Taxodiaceae) remains from the Miocene deposits of Lipnica Mala (Poland), consisting of branches with their leaves. The pyrolytic analysis revealed a series of aromatic compounds with a large proportion of guaiacyl-type lignin markers (including intact C{sub 3}-methoxyphenols), and small quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The alkyl compounds included fatty acid series where the C{sub 14}-C{sub 18} homologues dominated as well as additional amounts of alkanes and alkenes (maximum ca. C{sub 21}). The results suggest that lignin as well as protective epicuticular lipid polymers (including cutin and other long chain-based polyalkyl structures) selectively show the greatest degree of molecular preservation in the Glyptostrobus remains. The comparison between pyrolytic methods shows that the lignin-derived aromatic assemblages predominate in the chromatograms after conventional pyrolysis whereas thermochemolysis with TMAH leads to an `aliphatic enhancement`. This latter technique was found to be the best for analysis of the lipid signature in fossil samples with condensed polymethylene networks. 44 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Cf/C composites: correlation between CVI process parameters and Pyrolytic Carbon microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Burgio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI technique has been long used to produce carbon/carbon composites. The Pyrolytic Carbon (Py-C matrix infiltrated by CVI could have different microstructures, i.e. Rough Laminar (RL, Smooth Laminar (SL or Isotropic (ISO. These matrix microstructures, characterized by different properties, influence the mechanical behaviour of the obtained composites. Tailoring the process parameters, it is possible to direct the infiltration towards a specific Py-C type. However, the factors, influencing the production of a specific matrix microstructure, are numerous and interconnected, e.g. temperature, pressure, flow rates etc. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical phenomena involved in CVI process, up to now it has not been possible to obtain a general correlation between CVI process parameters and Py–C microstructure. This study is aimed at investigating the relationship between infiltration temperature and the microstructure of obtained Py-C, for a pilot - sized CVI/CVD reactor. Fixing the other process parameters and varying only the temperature, from 1100°C to 1300°C, the Py-C infiltration was performed on fibrous preforms. Polarized light microscopy, with quantitative measurements of average extinction angle (Ae, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the obtained Py-C microstructures

  19. Cf/C composites: correlation between CVI process parameters and Pyrolytic Carbon microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Burgio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI technique has been long used to produce carbon/carbon composites. The Pyrolytic Carbon (Py-C matrix infiltrated by CVI could have different microstructures, i.e. Rough Laminar (RL, Smooth Laminar (SL or Isotropic (ISO. These matrix microstructures, characterized by different properties, influence the mechanical behaviour of the obtained composites. Tailoring the process parameters, it is possible to direct the infiltration towards a specific Py-C type. However, the factors, influencing the production of a specific matrix microstructure, are numerous and interconnected, e.g. temperature, pressure, flow rates etc. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical phenomena involved in CVI process, up to now it has not been possible to obtain a general correlation between CVI process parameters and Py–C microstructure. This study is aimed at investigating the relationship between infiltration temperature and the microstructure of obtained Py-C, for a pilot - sized CVI/CVD reactor. Fixing the other process parameters and varying only the temperature, from 1100°C to 1300°C, the Py-C infiltration was performed on fibrous preforms. Polarized light microscopy, with quantitative measurements of average extinction angle (Ae, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the obtained Py-C microstructures.

  20. Material Based Structure Design: Numerical Analysis Thermodynamic Response of Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite /Al Sandwich Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxia; Yan, Shilin; Yu, Dingshan

    2016-06-01

    Amine-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based thermally conductive adhesive (TCA) was studied in the previous paper and applied here in thermal pyrolytic graphite (TPG)/Al radiator due to its high thermal conductivity, toughness and cohesiveness. In this paper, in an attempt to confirm the application of TCA to TPG/Al sandwich radiator, the thermodynamic response in TPG/Al sandwich composites associated with key material properties and structural design was investigated using finite element simulation with commercial available ANSYS software. The induced thermal stress in TCA layer is substantial due to the thermal expansion mismatch between Al plate and TPG. The maximum thermal stress is located near the edge of TCA layer with the von Mises stress value of 4.02 MPa and the shear stress value of 1.66 MPa. The reasonable adjustment of physical-mechanical properties including thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young,s modulus and the thickness of TCA layer, Al plate and TPG are beneficial for reducing the temperature of the top surface of the upper skin and their effects on the reduction of thermal structural response in some ways. These findings will highlight the structural optimization of TPG/Al radiator for future application.

  1. Nucleation and growth in electrodeposition of thin copper films on pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinaci, F.S.; Muller, R.H.

    1992-05-01

    Electrodeposition of Cu on graphite electrodes was studied, with emphasis on nucleation. Various ex-situ and in-situ methods were investigated for determining the number density of nuclei. Two direct methods were studied (scanning electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy); indirect determinations included Raman spectroscopy and analysis of potentiostatic current transients. Though some of the techniques correctly predicted the nucleation densities under special conditions, SEM was the most reliable tool. The large scatter in the data necessitated steps to minimize this effect. To electrodeposit Cu on graphite, a nucleation overpotential of 250 mV was measured with cyclic voltammetry; such a large overpotential does not occur on a Pt or on a Cu-covered graphite electrode. The deposition potential is the dominant parameter governing nucleation density. There is a sharp increase in the nucleation density with applied potential. Cu can be deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite only between the nucleation overpotential and the hydrogen evolution potential. To increase the Cu nucleation density, while avoiding excessive H evolution, a double pulse potential technique was used; nucleation densities on the order of 10{sup 10} nuclei/cm{sup 2} were achieved. The use of inhibitors (PVA, benzotriazole) was also investigated. Deposition on conducting polymer electrodes was also studied; initial results with polyaniline show promise. 57 figs, 6 tabs, refs. (DLC)

  2. Formation of Nanocones on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite by Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Improvement in hemocompatibility of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG by formation of nanostructured surface by oxygen plasma treatment is reported. We have showed that by appropriate fine tuning of plasma and discharge parameters we are able to create nanostructured surface which is densely covered with nanocones. The size of the nanocones strongly depended on treatment time. The optimal results in terms of material hemocompatibility were obtained after treatment with oxygen plasma for 15 s, when both the nanotopography and wettability were the most favorable, since marked reduction in adhesion and activation of platelets was observed on this surface. At prolonged treatment times, the rich surface topography was lost and thus also its antithrombogenic properties. Chemical composition of the surface was always more or less the same, regardless of its morphology and height of the nanocones. Namely, on all plasma treated samples, only a few atomic percent of oxygen was found, meaning that plasma caused mostly etching, leading to changes in the surface morphology. This indicates that the main preventing mechanism against platelets adhesion was the right surface morphology.

  3. Material Based Structure Design: Numerical Analysis Thermodynamic Response of Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite /Al Sandwich Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxia; Yan, Shilin; Yu, Dingshan

    2016-12-01

    Amine-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based thermally conductive adhesive (TCA) was studied in the previous paper and applied here in thermal pyrolytic graphite (TPG)/Al radiator due to its high thermal conductivity, toughness and cohesiveness. In this paper, in an attempt to confirm the application of TCA to TPG/Al sandwich radiator, the thermodynamic response in TPG/Al sandwich composites associated with key material properties and structural design was investigated using finite element simulation with commercial available ANSYS software. The induced thermal stress in TCA layer is substantial due to the thermal expansion mismatch between Al plate and TPG. The maximum thermal stress is located near the edge of TCA layer with the von Mises stress value of 4.02 MPa and the shear stress value of 1.66 MPa. The reasonable adjustment of physical-mechanical properties including thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young,s modulus and the thickness of TCA layer, Al plate and TPG are beneficial for reducing the temperature of the top surface of the upper skin and their effects on the reduction of thermal structural response in some ways. These findings will highlight the structural optimization of TPG/Al radiator for future application.

  4. Self-assembly of thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: hydrogen bond effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Liu, Yibiao; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Shuqi; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Wen, Yongqiang; Du, Hongwu; Zhang, Xueji

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, to elucidate the hydrogen bond effect on the assembly behavior, we studied the assembly structures of two carboxylic substituted thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by scanning tunneling microscopy. Here thiophene-2-carboxylic acid (TCA) and thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (TDA) were employed. TDA molecules spontaneously adsorb on the HOPG surface and self-organize into a two-dimensional (2D) assembly with well-defined structure. Two types of domain could be observed. Each TDA molecule appears as a round circle with two small faint dots and forms hydrogen bonds with neighbours. Besides monolayer structure, a bilayer structure of TDA adlayer on HOPG was also observed in this research. Remnant TDA molecules adsorb on the monolayer of TDA and bilayer structure is formed. In contrast to TDA, no ordered structure of TCA on HOPG can be observed. TCA molecules have high propensity to form dimers through H-bond between carboxylic groups. But TCA dimer is not stable enough for either adsorption or imaging. Our result provides a new example for understanding hydrogen effect on stabilizing and controlling two-dimensional assembly structure and is helpful for surface nanofabrication and development of electric nanodevices.

  5. Electrocatalytic Nitrate Reduction by a Cobalt Protoporphyrin Immobilized on a Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing; Birdja, Yuvraj Y; Koper, Marc T M

    2015-08-04

    A series of simple molecular catalysts, i.e., Co(III), Fe(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Rh(II) protoporphyrins (metal-PP), directly adsorbed on pyrolytic graphite have been utilized for catalyzing the electrochemical reduction of nitrate. These catalysts are studied by combining cyclic voltammetry with online electrochemical mass spectrometry (OLEMS) to monitor volatile products and online ion chromatography (IC) to detect ionic products in the aqueous electrolyte solution. Among all investigated porphyrins, the Co-based protoporphyrin shows the highest selectivity toward hydroxylamine (NH2OH), which made it the catalyst of primary interest in the article. The reactivity and selectivity of the immobilized Co-protoporphyrin depend significantly on pH, with more acidic conditions leading to higher reactivity and higher selectivity toward hydroxylamine over ammonia. Potential controlled electrolysis results show that the potential also greatly influences the selectivity: at pH 1, hydroxylamine is the main product around -0.5 V with approximately 100% selectivity, while hydroxylamine and ammonia are both formed at a more negative potential, -0.75 V. The mechanism of the reaction is discussed, invoking of the possibility of two pathways for hydroxylamine/ammonia formation: a sequential pathway in which hydroxylamine is produced as an intermediate, with ammonia subsequently formed through the reduction of NH2OH/NH3OH(+), and a parallel pathway in which the formation of hydroxylamine and ammonia is derived from a common intermediate.

  6. Comparative studies of the pyrolytic and kinetic characteristics of maize straw and the seaweed Ulva pertusa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naihao Ye

    Full Text Available Seaweed has attracted considerable attention as a potential biofuel feedstock. The pyrolytic and kinetic characteristics of maize straw and the seaweed Ulva pertusa were studied and compared using heating rates of 10, 30 and 50°C min(-1 under an inert atmosphere. The activation energy, and pre-exponential factors were calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS and Popescu methods. The kinetic mechanism was deduced by the Popescu method. The results indicate that there are three stages to the pyrolysis; dehydration, primary devolatilization and residual decomposition. There were significant differences in average activation energy, thermal stability, final residuals and reaction rates between the two materials. The primary devolatilization stage of U. pertusa can be described by the Avramic-Erofeev equation (n=3, whereas that of maize straw can be described by the Mampel Power Law (n=2. The average activation energy of maize straw and U. pertusa were 153.0 and 148.7 KJ mol(-1, respectively. The pyrolysis process of U.pertusa would be easier than maize straw. And co-firing of the two biomass may be require less external heat input and improve process stability. There were minor kinetic compensation effects between the pre-exponential factors and the activation energy.

  7. Kinetic analyses and pyrolytic behavior of Para grass (Urochloa mutica) for its bioenergy potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Sajjad; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Al Ayed, Omar S; Ye, Guangbin; Luo, Huibo; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Rashid, Umer; Arbi Nehdi, Imededdine; Qadir, Ghulam

    2017-01-01

    The biomass of Urochloa mutica was subjected to thermal degradation analyses to understand its pyrolytic behavior for bioenergy production. Thermal degradation experiments were performed at three different heating rates, 10, 30 and 50°Cmin(-1) using simultaneous thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetric analyzer, under an inert environment. The kinetic analyses were performed using isoconversional models of Kissenger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO). The high heating value was calculated as 15.04MJmol(-1). The activation energy (E) values were shown to be ranging from 103 through 233 kJmol(-1). Pre-exponential factors (A) indicated the reaction to follow first order kinetics. Gibbs free energy (ΔG) was measured to be ranging from 169 to 173kJmol(-1) and 168 to 172kJmol(-1), calculated by KAS and FWO methods, respectively. We have shown that Para grass biomass has considerable bioenergy potential comparable to established bioenergy crops such as switchgrass and miscanthus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of pyrolytic liquids from industrial sewage sludges in an induction-heating reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Chang, Jeng-Hung; Hsien, Kuo-Jung; Chang, Yuan-Ming

    2009-01-01

    With the application of induction-heating, the pyrolytic experiments have been carried out for three sewage sludges from the food processing factories in an externally heated fixed-bed reactor. The thermochemical characteristics of sludge samples were first analyzed. The results indicated that the calorific value had about 15 MJ/kg on an average, suggesting that it had a potential for biomass energy source. However, its nitrogen concentration was relatively high. From the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves, it showed that the pyrolysis reaction can be almost finished in the temperature range of 450-750 degrees C. The yields of resulting liquid and char products from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge were discussed for examining the effects of pyrolysis temperature (500-800 degrees C), heating rate (200-500 degrees C/min), and holding time (1-8 min). Overall, the variation of yield was not so significant in the experimental conditions for three sewage sludges. All results of the resulting liquid products analyzed by elemental analyzer, pH meter, Karl-Fischer moisture titrator and bomb calorimeter were in consistence with those analyses by FTIR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the pyrolysis liquid products contained large amounts of water (>73% by weight) mostly derived from the bound water in the biosludge feedstocks and the condensation reactions during the pyrolysis reaction, and fewer contents of oxygenated hydrocarbons composing of carbonyl and nitrogen-containing groups, resulting in low pH and low calorific values.

  9. Determination of methacrylic acid in food simulants by pyrolytic butylation-gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongping; Qiu, Ruofeng; Liu, Tingfei; Huang, Yilei; Zhu, Zuoyi; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-08

    An on-line pyrolytic butylation approach was proposed to determine methacrylic acid (MA) in food simulants by gas chromatography (GC) without an expensive pyrolyzer. MA in food simulants was converted into butyl methacrylate in the presence of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) without any pretreatment at 330°C in the injection-port, contributing to high GC signal response. The derivatizing conditions for the proposed method were optimized, namely the injection-port temperature, type and amount of the organic alkaline used for derivatization. A series of standard solutions of MA in the range of 1.0-50mg/kg were analyzed with correlation coefficient r≥0.9975. The limits of detection (LODs) were less than 0.15mg/kg for MA in four matrix simulants (distilled water, 3%w/v acetic acid, 10%v/v ethanol, and isooctane). Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for retention time, peak height and peak area were all less than 3.88%. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of MA migrating from plastic cup samples, with recoveries of added MA in the range of 96.5-123.0%. Direct injection of the simulants into the GC system after migration tests, without any pretreatment step, makes the developed method of great value for rapid screening analysis of samples in bulks.

  10. Electroanalytical and spectroscopic characterization of poly(o-phenylenediamine) grown on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giglio, Elvira; Losito, Ilario; Torsi, Luisa; Sabbatini, Luigia; Zambonin, Pier Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    The polymerization of ortho-phenylenediamine (o-PD) on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) at different pH (1,3,5,7) was investigated by electroanalytical and spectroscopic methods. Cyclic voltammetry was used both to polymerize o-PD and to study the electroactivity of the resulting poly(ortho-phenylenediamine) (PPD) film. A redox couple associated to the PPD electroactivity, deeply influenced by the pH adopted during polymerization, was recorded. A correlation between this feature and the electrochemistry shown by the oligomers of o-PD, generated in solution during the polymer synthesis, was also found. A comparison between the absorption spectra, in the visible region, of the soluble oligomers and of the PPD films was also performed, suggesting that changes in both the polymer and the oligomer structure occur and are highly related to the polymerization pH. In particular, a higher degree of conjugation is exhibited by the PPD films electrosynthesised at lower pH and this likely explains the higher conductivity as well as the higher electroactivity shown by the material obtained in these conditions.

  11. Evaluating the Surface Topography of Pyrolytic Carbon Finger Prostheses through Measurement of Various Roughness Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Naylor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The articulating surfaces of four different sizes of unused pyrolytic carbon proximal interphalangeal prostheses (PIP were evaluated though measuring several topographical parameters using a white light interferometer: average roughness (Sa; root mean-square roughness (Sq; skewness (Ssk; and kurtosis (Sku. The radii of the articulating surfaces were measured using a coordinate measuring machine, and were found to be: 2.5, 3.3, 4.2 and 4.7 mm for proximal, and 4.0, 5.1, 5.6 and 6.3 mm for medial components. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between the component radii and each roughness parameter. Sa, Sq and Ssk correlated negatively with radius (p = 0.001, 0.001, 0.023, whilst Sku correlated positively with radius (p = 0.03. Ergo, the surfaces with the largest radii possessed the better topographical characteristics: low roughness, negative skewness, high kurtosis. Conversely, the surfaces with the smallest radii had poorer topographical characteristics.

  12. Evaluating the Surface Topography of Pyrolytic Carbon Finger Prostheses through Measurement of Various Roughness Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Andrew; Talwalkar, Sumedh C; Trail, Ian A; Joyce, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The articulating surfaces of four different sizes of unused pyrolytic carbon proximal interphalangeal prostheses (PIP) were evaluated though measuring several topographical parameters using a white light interferometer: average roughness (Sa); root mean-square roughness (Sq); skewness (Ssk); and kurtosis (Sku). The radii of the articulating surfaces were measured using a coordinate measuring machine, and were found to be: 2.5, 3.3, 4.2 and 4.7 mm for proximal, and 4.0, 5.1, 5.6 and 6.3 mm for medial components. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between the component radii and each roughness parameter. Sa, Sq and Ssk correlated negatively with radius (p = 0.001, 0.001, 0.023), whilst Sku correlated positively with radius (p = 0.03). Ergo, the surfaces with the largest radii possessed the better topographical characteristics: low roughness, negative skewness, high kurtosis. Conversely, the surfaces with the smallest radii had poorer topographical characteristics.

  13. Laser induced periodic surface structures on pyrolytic carbon prosthetic heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepak, Bogusz D.; Łecka, Katarzyna M.; Płonek, Tomasz; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) can appear in different forms such as ripples, grooves or cones. Those highly periodic wavy surface features which are frequently smaller than incident light wavelength bring possibility of nanostructuring of many different materials. Furthermore, by changing laser parameters one can obtain wide spectrum of periodicities and geometries. The aim of this research was to determine possibility of nanostructuring pyrolytic carbon (PyC) heart valve leaflets using different irradiation conditions. The study was performed using two laser sources with different pulse duration (15 ps, 450 fs) as well as different wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm). Both low and high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed for each set of irradiation parameters. In case femtosecond laser pulses we obtained deep subwavelength ripple period which was even ten times smaller than applied wavelength. Obtained ripple period was ranging from 90 up to 860 nm. Raman spectra revealed the increase of disorder after laser irradiation which was comparable for both pico- and femtosecond laser.

  14. Exploring site-specific chemical interactions at surfaces: a case study on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-12-01

    A material’s ability to interact with approaching matter is governed by the structural and chemical nature of its surfaces. Tailoring surfaces to meet specific needs requires developing an understanding of the underlying fundamental principles that determine a surface’s reactivity. A particularly insightful case occurs when the surface site exhibiting the strongest attraction changes with distance. To study this issue, combined noncontact atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been carried out, where the evolution of the local chemical interaction with distance leads to a contrast reversal in the force channel. Using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surfaces and metallic probe tips as a model system, we find that at larger tip-sample distances, carbon atoms exhibit stronger attractions than hollow sites while upon further approach, hollow sites become energetically more favorable. For the tunneling current that is recorded at large tip-sample separations during acquisition of a constant-force image, the contrast is dominated by the changes in tip-sample distance required to hold the force constant (‘cross-talk’) at smaller separations the contrast turns into a convolution of this cross-talk and the local density of states. Analysis shows that the basic factors influencing the force channel contrast reversal are locally varying decay lengths and an onset of repulsive forces that occurs for distinct surface sites at different tip-sample distances. These findings highlight the importance of tip-sample distance when comparing the relative strength of site-specific chemical interactions.

  15. Pyrolytic Treatment and Fertility Enhancement of Soils Contaminated with Heavy Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidonish, Julia E; Zygourakis, Kyriacos; Masiello, Caroline A; Gao, Xiaodong; Mathieu, Jacques; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2016-03-01

    Pyrolysis of contaminated soils at 420 °C converted recalcitrant heavy hydrocarbons into "char" (a carbonaceous material similar to petroleum coke) and enhanced soil fertility. Pyrolytic treatment reduced total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) to below regulatory standards (typically hydrocarbons (PAHs) was not observed, with post-pyrolysis levels well below applicable standards. Plant growth studies showed a higher biomass production of Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa (Simpson black-seeded lettuce) (80-900% heavier) in pyrolyzed soils than in contaminated or incinerated soils. Elemental analysis showed that pyrolyzed soils contained more carbon than incinerated soils (1.4-3.2% versus 0.3-0.4%). The stark color differences between pyrolyzed and incinerated soils suggest that the carbonaceous material produced via pyrolysis was dispersed in the form of a layer coating the soil particles. Overall, these results suggest that soil pyrolysis could be a viable thermal treatment to quickly remediate soils impacted by weathered oil while improving soil fertility, potentially enhancing revegetation.

  16. Pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt as a high-performance anode for bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Hidalgo, Diana; Tommasi, Tonia; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-07-01

    Scale up of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) requires highly conductive, biocompatible and stable electrodes. Here we present pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt (C-SS felt) as a high-performance and scalable anode. The electrode is created by generating a carbon layer on stainless steel felt (SS felt) via a multi-step deposition process involving α-d-glucose impregnation, caramelization, and pyrolysis. Physicochemical characterizations of the surface elucidate that a thin (20±5μm) and homogenous layer of polycrystalline graphitic carbon was obtained on SS felt surface after modification. The carbon coating significantly increases the biocompatibility, enabling robust electroactive biofilm formation. The C-SS felt electrodes reach current densities (jmax) of 3.65±0.14mA/cm(2) within 7days of operation, which is 11 times higher than plain SS felt electrodes (0.30±0.04mA/cm(2)). The excellent biocompatibility, high specific surface area, high conductivity, good mechanical strength, and low cost make C-SS felt a promising electrode for BESs.

  17. Pyrolytic synthesis and characterization of N-doped carbon nanoflakes for electrochemical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savilov, S.V., E-mail: savilov@chem.msu.ru [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskie gory, 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry Of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky avenue, 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Arkhipova, E.A. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskie gory, 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry Of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky avenue, 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, A.S.; Maslakov, K.I [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskie gory, 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Shen, Z. [Nanyang Technological University, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Aldoshin, S.M.; Lunin, V.V. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskie gory, 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Carbon nanoflakes doped with nitrogen were produced by a pyrolytic technique. • Quarternary, pyrrolic and pyridinic types of nitrogen are confirmed by XPS. • Nitrogen content depends on precursor used and temperature processed. • Specific surface area values decrease with increasing of synthesis duration. • N-doped carbon nanoflakes may be suitable for electrochemical applications. - Abstract: Nitrogen doped carbon nanoflakes, which are very important for many electrochemical applications, were synthesized by pyrolysis of nitrogen containing organic compounds over metal oxide template. Acetonitrile, pyridine and butylamine, which are of different volatility were tested as N-containing precursors. Morphology, structure and chemical composition of the as-synthesized materials were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that materials are highly defective and consist of a few malformed graphene layers. X-ray photoelectron spectra reflect the dominant graphitic and pyridinic N-bonding configuration. It was also noted that specific surface area depends on the duration and temperature of the reaction. Increase in duration and temperature led to decrease of the specific surface area from 1000 to 160 m{sup 2}/g, 1170 to 210 m{sup 2}/g and 1180 to 480 m{sup 2}/g for acetonitrile, butylamine and pyridine precursors, respectively.

  18. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques of Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barskiy, Danila A; Coffey, Aaron M; Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Mikhaylov, Dmitry M; Goodson, Boyd M; Branca, Rosa T; Lu, George J; Shapiro, Mikhail G; Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Koptyug, Igor V; Salnikov, Oleg G; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I; Rosen, Matthew S; Barlow, Michael J; Safavi, Shahideh; Hall, Ian P; Schröder, Leif; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2017-01-18

    Nuclear spin polarization can be significantly increased through the process of hyperpolarization, leading to an increase in the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments by 4-8 orders of magnitude. Hyperpolarized gases, unlike liquids and solids, can often be readily separated and purified from the compounds used to mediate the hyperpolarization processes. These pure hyperpolarized gases enabled many novel MRI applications including the visualization of void spaces, imaging of lung function, and remote detection. Additionally, hyperpolarized gases can be dissolved in liquids and can be used as sensitive molecular probes and reporters. This Minireview covers the fundamentals of the preparation of hyperpolarized gases and focuses on selected applications of interest to biomedicine and materials science. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Shock instability in dissipative gases

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Sirmas, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves in thermally relaxing gases, such as ionizing, dissociating and vibrationally excited gases, can become unstable. To date, the mechanism controlling this instability has not been resolved. Previous accounts of the D'yakov-Kontorovich instability, and Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson behaviour could not predict the experimentally observed instability. To address the mechanism controlling the instability, we study the propagation of shock waves in a ...

  20. Pyrolytic acrylamide formation from purified wheat gluten and gluten-supplemented wheat bread rolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Achim; Weisz, Georg M; Schieber, Andreas; Carle, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed different acrylamide formation mechanisms, e. g. from carnosine (N-beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and aminopropionamide as additional precursors. The occurrence of acrylamide in food matrices devoid of common precursors such as meat supports an additional formation pathway. Gluten was recovered from wheat flour by water extraction. Starch, reducing sugars and amino acids were removed using alpha-amylase and NaCl solution and were completely absent in the purified gluten fraction. The gluten was dry heated at temperatures ranging from 160 to 240 degrees C for 8 to 12 min and analyzed for acrylamide and cinnamic amide using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Acrylamide could be detected up to 3997 microg/kg gluten dry weight. Cinnamic amide was detected and unambiguously identified in the gluten samples, thus confirming the proposed formation of acrylamide from proteins. After gluten addition to bread roll dough, protein pyrolysis to form acrylamide in the complex food matrix was assessed. Contents of asparagine and reducing sugars were diminished due to the addition of the gluten. In contrast to the expectation with respect to the well-established common formation mechanism of acrylamide, it increased from 53.4 to 63.9 microg/kg (+20%), which was in good correlation with the higher proportion of gluten. As demonstrated by the t-test, the increase in acrylamide was significant when comparing 0 and 15% gluten addition. Additionally, cinnamic amide could be found in crusts of bread rolls. Thus, evidence for pyrolytic formation of acrylamide from wheat gluten was provided.

  1. STM observation of a box-shaped graphene nanostructure appeared after mechanical cleavage of pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V., E-mail: rlapshin@gmail.com [Solid Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Physical Problems, Zelenograd, Moscow 124460 (Russian Federation); Department of Photosensitive Nano and Microsystems, Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology, Zelenograd, Moscow 124498 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A previously unknown 3D box-shaped graphene (BSG) nanostructure has been detected. • The nanostructure is a multilayer system of parallel nanochannels having quadrangular cross-section. • Typical width of a nanochannel facet makes 25 nm, typical wall/facet thickness is 1 nm. • A mechanism qualitatively explaining the nanostructure formation has been proposed. • Possible applications of the BSG nanostructure are briefly discussed. - Abstract: A description is given of a three-dimensional box-shaped graphene (BSG) nanostructure formed/uncovered by mechanical cleavage of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The discovered nanostructure is a multilayer system of parallel hollow channels located along the surface and having quadrangular cross-section. The thickness of the channel walls/facets is approximately equal to 1 nm. The typical width of channel facets makes about 25 nm, the channel length is 390 nm and more. The investigation of the found nanostructure by means of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) allows us to draw a conclusion that it is possible to make spatial constructions of graphene similar to the discovered one by mechanical compression, bending, splitting, and shifting graphite surface layers. The distinctive features of such constructions are the following: simplicity of the preparation method, small contact area between graphene planes and a substrate, large surface area, nanometer cross-sectional sizes of the channels, large aspect ratio. Potential fields of application include: ultra-sensitive detectors, high-performance catalytic cells, nanochannels for DNA manipulation, nanomechanical resonators, electron multiplication channels, high-capacity sorbents for hydrogen storage.

  2. Adsorption of anionic, cationic and disperse dyes with activated pyrolytic tire char

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duangkamol Danwanichakul

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Activated pyrolytic tire char was applied as adsorbents to remove dyes from contaminated water. The method of surface treatment with ethanol solution, HCl solution and then activation with NaOH solution was proposed. After activation at 750oC, the specific surface area (SSA of activated char (AC increased from 154.7 m2 /g to 228.9 m2 /g. The pore size increased slightly from 323.4 oA to 349.3 oA and iodine number increased from 95 mg/g to 137 mg/g. AC was then utilized in the adsorption of three dyes which were acid dye (AR131, basic dye (BR18 and disperse dye (DR167 in a shaker with a speed of 75 rpm at 26oC. The initial concentration was varied to be 10 – 50 mg/L. The kinetic results were more consistent with pseudo-second-order model. Considering the adsorption rate constant, k2, it was found that kinetics for acid dye (AR131 was slower than basic dye (BR18 while kinetics for disperse dye (DR167 did not follow specific pattern since it cannot be dispersed well in water without any dispersing agent. Regarding adsorption equilibrium when the initial concentration was between 10-50 mg/L, the adsorption percentages for acid dye (AR131, basic dye (BR18 and disperse dye (DR167 were 88.2 - 100%, 100%, and 26.9 – 50.7%, respectively. In addition, the adsorption isotherms for acid dye (AR131 and basic dye (BR18 followed the Langmuir equation, whereas, that for disperse dye (DR167 was better fit with the Freundlich equation.

  3. Characteristics of Pyrolytic Topping in Fluidized Bed for Different Volatile Coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, R.; Dong, L.; Xu, G. W.

    Coal is generally combusted or gasified directly to destroy completely the chemical structures, such as aromatic rings containing in volatile coals including bituminite and lignite. Coal topping refers to a process that extracts chemicals with aromatic rings from such volatile coals in advance of combustion or gasification and thereby takes advantage of the value of coal as a kind of chemical structure resource. CFB boiler is the coal utilization facility that can be easily retrofitted to implement coal topping. A critical issue for performing coal topping is the choice of the pyrolytic reactor that can be different types. The present study concerns fluidized bed reactor that has rarely been tested for use in coal topping. Two different types of coals, one being Xiaolongtan (XLT) lignite and the other Shanxi (SX) bituminous, were tested to clarify the yield and composition of pyrolysis liquid and gas under conditions simulating actual operations. The results showed that XLT lignite coals had the maximum tar yield in 823-873K and SX bituminite realized its highest tar yield in 873-923K. Overall, lignite produced lower tar yield than bituminous coal. The pyrolysis gas from lignite coals contained more CO and CO2 and less CH4, H2 and C2+C3 (C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8) components comparing to that from bituminous coal. TG-FTIR analysis of tars demonstrated that for different coals there are different amounts of typical chemical species. Using coal ash of CFB boiler, instead of quartz sand, as the fluidized particles decreased the yields of both tar and gas for all the tested coals. Besides, pyrolysis in a reaction atmosphere simulating the pyrolysis gas (instead of N2) resulted also in higher production of pyrolysis liquid.

  4. Large scale computational chemistry modeling of the oxidation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovathingal, Savio; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E; Srinivasan, Sriram Goverapet; van Duin, Adri C T

    2013-04-04

    Large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the oxidation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by hyperthermal atomic oxygen beam (5 eV). Simulations are performed using the ReaxFF classical reactive force field. We present here additional evidence that this method accurately reproduces ab initio derived energies relevant to HOPG oxidation. HOPG is modeled as multilayer graphene and etch-pit formation and evolution is directly simulated through a large number of sequential atomic oxygen collisions. The simulations predict that an oxygen coverage is first established that acts as a precursor to carbon-removal reactions, which ultimately etch wide but shallow pits, as observed in experiments. In quantitative agreement with experiment, the simulations predict the most abundant product species to be O2 (via recombination reactions), followed by CO2, with CO as the least abundant product species. Although recombination occurs all over the graphene sheet, the carbon-removal reactions occur only about the edges of the etch pit. Through isolated defect analysis on small graphene models as well as trajectory analysis performed directly on the predicted etch pit, the activation energies for the dominant reaction mechanisms leading to O2, CO2, and CO product species are determined to be 0.3, 0.52, and 0.67 eV, respectively. Overall, the qualitative and quantitative agreement between MD simulation and experiment is very promising. Thus, the MD simulation approach and C/H/O ReaxFF parametrization may be useful for simulating high-temperature gas interactions with graphitic materials where the microstructure is more complex than HOPG.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  6. Desulphurization of exhaust gases in chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, K.; Wischnewski, W.

    1981-01-01

    The sulfur content of exhaust gases can be reduced by: desulphurization of fuels; modification of processes; or treatment of resultant gases. In this paper a few selected examples from the chemical industry in the German Democratic Republic are presented. Using modified processes and treating the resultant gases, the sulphuric content of exhaust gases is effectively reduced. Methods to reduce the sulfur content of exhaust gases are described in the field of production of: sulphuric acid; viscose; fertilizers; and paraffin.

  7. Intensification of adsorption process by using the pyrolytic char from waste tires to remove chromium(Ⅵ) from wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jie; YANG Yong-rong

    2004-01-01

    Pyrolysis has the potential of transforming waste into valuable recyclable products. Pyrolytic char(PC) is one of the most important products from the pyrolysis of used tires. One of the most significant applications for pyrolytic char recovered is used for the removal of Cr(Ⅵ) in the wastewater effluent to control waste by waste. The surface chemistry properties of surface element distribution / concentration and chemical structure were examined for the pyrolytic char and the commercial activated carbon(CAC) respectively. The results showed that surfaces of PC possesses a large amount of ester and hydrocarbon graft, whereas there are mainly carbon functional components of C-OH, C=O and COOH on the surface of CAC. Therefore the surface electronegativity of PC is lower than that of CAC in the water. The repulsive interactions between the surfaces of PC and the negatively charged Cr(Ⅵ) ion are weaker than that of CAC, which results in an intensification of the adsorption process by the utilization of PC. The adsorption isotherms of Cr(Ⅵ) ion on the two kinds of carbons were determined experimentally. The larger adsorption amount on the PC in the case of Cr(Ⅵ) may be attributed mainly to its special surface micro-chemical environment. The mechanism of the removal Cr(Ⅵ) from aqueous solution was assumed to be the integration of adsorption and redox reaction. The adsorption was the rate-controlled step for Cr(Ⅵ) removal. The adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ) has been identified as pseudo-second- order kinetics. The rate constants of adsorption have been evaluated.

  8. Intensification of adsorption process by using the pyrolytic char from waste tires to remove chromium (VI) from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Yang, Yong-Rong

    2004-01-01

    Pyrolysis has the potential of transforming waste into valuable recyclable products. Pyrolytic char (PC) is one of the most important products from the pyrolysis of used tires. One of the most significant applications for pyrolytic char recovered is used for the removal of Cr(VI) in the wastewater effluent to control waste by waste. The surface chemistry properties of surface element distribution/concentration and chemical structure were examined for the pyrolytic char and the commercial activated carbon (CAC) respectively. The results showed that surfaces of PC possesses a large amount of ester and hydrocarbon graft, whereas there are mainly carbon functional components of C-OH, C=O and COOH on the surface of CAC. Therefore the surface electronegativity of PC is lower than that of CAC in the water. The repulsive interactions between the surfaces of PC and the negatively charged Cr(VI) ion are weaker than that of CAC, which results in an intensification of the adsorption process by the utilization of PC. The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) ion on the two kinds of carbons were determined experimentally. The larger adsorption amount on the PC in the case of Cr(VI) may be attributed mainly to its special surface micro-chemical environment. The mechanism of the removal Cr(VI) from aqueous solution was assumed to be the integration of adsorption and redox reaction. The adsorption was the rate-controlled step for Cr(VI) removal. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was identified as pseudo-second-order kinetics. The rate constants of adsorption were evaluated.

  9. Electrochemical Determination of Epinephrine with a Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode in the Presence of Ascorbic Acid and Dopamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu Hui LIU; Yan ZHANG; Guo Fang ZUO; Xiao Quan LU

    2006-01-01

    A method for determination of epinephrine(EP) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA)and dopamine (DA) with bare pyrolytic graphite electrodes has been described for the first time.In pH 7.0 phosphate buffer solution, the linear relationship was observed between the reduction peak current of EP and its concentration over the range from 1×10-4 to 5×10-7 mol/L, the related coefficient is 0.9992 (N=8).

  10. Influence of pyrolytic carbon black and pyrolytic oil made from used tires on the curing and (dynamic mechanical properties of natural rubber (NR/styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Karabork

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolytic carbon black (CBp and pyrolytic oil (Op made from used tires were used in natural rubber (NR/styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR blends. The effects of CBp and Op on the processing properties, the mechanical properties and the dynamic mechanical properties of the NR/SBR blends were investigated and compared with a control sample that was prepared with N550 and commercial process oil. It was found that the effect of CBp on the processing properties of the NR/SBR blends was similar to that of N550. With the increase of the CBp content, the curing properties of the NR/SBR blends changed little. The reinforcing effect of CBp was inferior to that of N550. With the increase of the CBp content, the tensile strength, tear strength and modulus at 100% elongation of the NR/SBR vulcanizates decreased significantly. Dynamic mechanical properties of the NR/SBR blends were also affected and all samples comprising CBp have a higher tan δ than control sample. It is suggested that the low surface area and high ash content of CBp strongly effects all of these property changes of the NR/SBR blends. The morphology and distribution of the carbon black particles are studied using a scanning electron microscope. It was also found that with the increase of the Op content, the properties of the NR/SBR blends were strongly affected due to the high sulfur content of Op, which produced a high crosslinking density.

  11. High temperature stability of onion-like carbon vs highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Latini

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG was determined in the interval 765-1030 K by the electromotive force (emf measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High. The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of [Formula: see text] jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of [dP/dT by the α/κ ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K(-1 and HOPG (8 Pa K(-1 where α and κ are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, ΔrH and ΔrS values are 95.8 kJ mol(-1 and 104.1 JK(-1 mol(-1, respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature.

  12. High temperature stability of onion-like carbon vs highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765-1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of [Formula: see text] jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of [dP/dT by the α/κ ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K(-1)) and HOPG (8 Pa K(-1)) where α and κ are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, ΔrH and ΔrS values are 95.8 kJ mol(-1) and 104.1 JK(-1) mol(-1), respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature.

  13. Explosion limits for combustible gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Min-ming; WU Guo-qing; HAO Ji-fei; DAI Xin-lian

    2009-01-01

    Combustible gases in coal mines are composed of methane, hydrogen, some multi-carbon alkane gases and other gases. Based on a numerical calculation, the explosion limits of combustible gases were studied, showing that these limits are related to the concentrations of different components in the mixture. With an increase of C4H10 and C6H14, the Lower ExplosionLimit (LEL) and Upper Explosion-Limit (UEL) of a combustible gas mixture will decrease clearly. For every 0.1% increase in C4H10 and C6H14, the LEL decreases by about 0.19% and the UEL by about 0.3%. The results also prove that, by increasing the amount of H2, the UEL of a combustible gas mixture will increase considerably. If the level of H2 increases by 0.1%, the UEL will increase by about 0.3%. However, H2 has only a small effect on the LEL of the combustible gas mixture. Our study provides a theoretical foundation for judging the explosion risk of an explosive gas mixture in mines.

  14. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  15. Imbalanced Fermi gases at unitarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, K.B.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2013-01-01

    We consider imbalanced Fermi gases with strong attractive interactions, for which Cooper-pair formation plays an important role. The two-component mixtures consist either of identical fermionic atoms in two different hyperfine states, or of two different atomic species both occupying only a single

  16. Bisolute sorption and thermodynamic behavior of organic pollutants to biomass-derived biochars at two pyrolytic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zaiming; Chen, Baoliang; Zhou, Dandan; Chen, Wenyuan

    2012-11-20

    The bisolute sorption and thermodynamic behavior of organic pollutants on low temperature biochars (LTB) at 300 °C and high temperature biochars (HTB) at 700 °C were determined to elucidate sorptive properties of biochar changed with pyrolytic temperatures. The structural characteristics and isotherms shape of the biochar were more dependent on the pyrolytic temperature than on the biomass feedstocks, which included orange peel, pine needle, and sugar cane bagasse. For LTB, the thermally altered organic matter colocalized with the carbonized matter, and the visible fine pores of the fixed carbons were plugged by the remaining volatile carbon. For HTB, most of the volatile matter was gone and the fixed matter was composed of fully carbonized adsorptive sites. Monolayer adsorption of 1-naphthol to HTB was dominant but was suppressed by phenol. In comparison, LTB displayed exceptional sorption behavior where partition and adsorption were concurrently promoted by a cosolute and elevated temperature. In addition to monolayer surface coverage, pore-filling mechanisms may contribute to the increase of adsorption fraction. Moreover, the entropy gain was a dominant force driving the partition and adsorption processes in LTB. Thus, the colocalizing partition phase and adsorptive sites in LTB are proposed to be in interencased states rather than in physical separation.

  17. Study of nanometric thin pyrolytic carbon films for explosive electron emission cathode in high-voltage planar diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baryshevsky, Vladimir; Belous, Nikolai; Gurinovich, Alexandra; Gurnevich, Evgeny [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Kuzhir, Polina, E-mail: polina.kuzhir@gmail.com [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Prospekt, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Maksimenko, Sergey [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Prospekt, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Molchanov, Pavel; Shuba, Mikhail [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Roddatis, Vladimir [CIC energiGUNE, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Minano, Alava (Spain); Institut für Materialphysik of Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Kaplas, Tommi; Svirko, Yuri [Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, Joensuu FI-80101 (Finland)

    2015-04-30

    We report on an experimental study of explosive electron emission properties of cathode made by nanometric thin pyrolytic carbon (PyC) films (2–150 nm) deposited on Cu substrate via methane-based chemical vapor deposition. High current density at level of 300 A/cm{sup 2} in 5 · 10{sup −5} Pa vacuum has been observed together with very stable explosive emission from the planar cathode. The Raman spectroscopy investigation proves that the PyC films remain the same after seven shots. According to the optical image analysis of the cathode before and after one and seven shots, we conclude that the most unusual and interesting feature of using the PyC films/Cu cathode for explosive emission is that the PyC layer on the top of the copper target prevents its evaporation and oxidation, which leads to higher emission stability compared to conventional graphitic/Cu cathodes, and therefore results in longer working life. - Highlights: • Explosive electron emission from pyrolytic carbon (PyC) cathode is reported. • We observe high current density, 300 A/cm{sup 2}, and stable emission parameters. • PyC integrity ensures a high application potential for high current electronics.

  18. Feasibility study: Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, W.A.; Grey, A.E.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M.; Haefner, D.R.

    1991-09-01

    This study presents a preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of selected conceptual processes for pyrolytic conversion of organic feedstocks or the decomposition/detoxification of hazardous wastes by coupling the process to the geopressured-geothermal resource. The report presents a detailed discussion of the resource and of each process selected for evaluation including the technical evaluation of each. A separate section presents the economic methodology used and the evaluation of the technically viable process. A final section presents conclusions and recommendations. Three separate processes were selected for evaluation. These are pyrolytic conversion of biomass to petroleum like fluids, wet air oxidation (WAO) at subcritical conditions for destruction of hazardous waste, and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) also for the destruction of hazardous waste. The scientific feasibility of all three processes has been previously established by various bench-scale and pilot-scale studies. For a variety of reasons detailed in the report the SCWO process is the only one deemed to be technically feasible, although the effects of the high solids content of the geothermal brine need further study. This technology shows tremendous promise for contributing to solving the nation's energy and hazardous waste problems. However, the current economic analysis suggests that it is uneconomical at this time. 50 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... expiration date stated by the gas supplier must be recorded. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the gases... a concentration of propane higher than what a gas supplier considers to be safe may be substituted... choice of diluent (zero air or purified nitrogen) between the calibration and span gases. If...

  20. Atmospheric Chemistry and Greenhouse Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehhalt, D.; Prather, M.; Dentener, F.; Derwent, R.; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Holland, E.; Isaksen, I.; Katima, J.; Kirchhoff, V.; Matson, P.; Midgley, P.; Wang, M.; Berntsen, T.; Bey, I.; Brasseur, G.; Buja, L.; Collins, W. J.; Daniel, J. S.; DeMore, W. B.; Derek, N.; Dickerson, R.; Etheridge, D.; Feichter, J.; Fraser, P.; Friedl, R.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Gauss, M.; Grenfell, L.; Grubler, Arnulf; Harris, N.; Hauglustaine, D.; Horowitz, L.; Jackman, C.; Jacob, D.; Jaegle, L.; Jain, Atul K.; Kanakidou, M.; Karlsdottir, S.; Ko, M.; Kurylo, M.; Lawrence, M.; Logan, J. A.; Manning, M.; Mauzerall, D.; McConnell, J.; Mickley, L. J.; Montzka, S.; Muller, J. F.; Olivier, J.; Pickering, K.; Pitari, G.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rogers, H.; Rognerud, B.; Smith, Steven J.; Solomon, S.; Staehelin, J.; Steele, P.; Stevenson, D. S.; Sundet, J.; Thompson, A.; van Weele, M.; von Kuhlmann, R.; Wang, Y.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Wigley, T. M.; Wild, O.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Yantosca, R.; Joos, Fortunat; McFarland, M.

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 4 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 2414.1 Introduction 2434.2 Trace Gases: Current Observations, Trends and Budgets 2484.3 Projections of Future Emissions 2664.4 Projections of Atmospheric Composition for the 21st Century 2674.5 Open Questions 2774.6 Overall Impact of Global Atmospheric Chemistry Change 279

  1. Global warming and greenhouse gases

    OpenAIRE

    Belić Dragoljub S.

    2006-01-01

    Global warming or Climate change refers to long-term fluctuations in temperature, precipitation, wind, and other elements of the Earth's climate system. Natural processes such as solar-irradiance variations, variations in the Earth's orbital parameters, and volcanic activity can produce variations in climate. The climate system can also be influenced by changes in the concentration of various gases in the atmosphere, which affect the Earth's absorption of radiation.

  2. Theoretical Insight into Shocked Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiding, Jeffery Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-29

    I present the results of statistical mechanical calculations on shocked molecular gases. This work provides insight into the general behavior of shock Hugoniots of gas phase molecular targets with varying initial pressures. The dissociation behavior of the molecules is emphasized. Impedance matching calculations are performed to determine the maximum degree of dissociation accessible for a given flyer velocity as a function of initial gas pressure.

  3. Fabrication and Electromagnetic Wave-Absorbing Property of Si3N4 Ceramics with Gradient Pyrolytic Carbon Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Gao, Mingjun

    2016-07-01

    A Si3N4 ceramic with gradient distribution of pyrolytic carbon (Gradient-PyC-Si3N4) was fabricated by a combined technique of precursor infiltration pyrolysis and directional oxidation. An electromagnetic wave could enter Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 with little reflection because of a weak impedance mismatch at its surface, and the electromagnetic wave entering Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 could propagate forward along the PyC changing belt and simultaneously be absorbed by PyC with little reflection. The electromagnetic reflectivity of the Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 with an absence of PyC could reach a low level of -12.1 dB, which means that about 94% of the incident energy is absorbed and so makes the Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 a promising electromagnetic absorbing material for covert action.

  4. Covalent Modification of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite with a Stable Organic Free Radical by Using Diazonium Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seber, Gonca; Rudnev, Alexander V; Droghetti, Andrea; Rungger, Ivan; Veciana, Jaume; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Rovira, Concepció; Crivillers, Núria

    2017-01-26

    A novel, persistent, electrochemically active perchlorinated triphenylmethyl (PTM) radical with a diazonium functionality has been covalently attached to highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by electrografting in a single-step process. Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM) and Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that PTM molecules had a higher tendency to covalently react at the HOPG step edges. The cross-section profiles from EC-STM images showed that there was current enhancement at the functionalized areas, which could be explained by redox-mediated electron tunneling through surface-confined redox-active molecules. Cyclic voltammetry clearly demonstrated that the intrinsic properties of the organic radical were preserved upon grafting and DFT calculations also revealed that the magnetic character of the PTM radical was preserved. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Optimisation and fabrication of a composite pyrolytic graphite monochromator for the Pelican instrument at the ANSTO OPAL reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, A. K.; Yu, D. H.

    2011-04-01

    The triple monochromator for the TOF neutron spectrometer Pelican at ANSTO has been fully optimised in terms of overall performance, including the determination of the thickness of the pyrolytic graphite crystals. A total of 24 composite crystals were designed and fabricated. The calculated optimum thickness of 1.3 mm and the length of 15 cm of the monochromator crystals, that are not available commercially, were obtained by cleaving and soldering with indium. An extensive characterisation of the crystals using X-ray and neutron diffraction was conducted before and after the cleaving and bonding processes. The results proved that no damage was introduced during fabrication and showed that the design goals were fully met. The measured peak reflectivity and rocking curve widths were indeed in an excellent agreement with theory. In addition to the superior efficiency of the triple monochromator achieved by this novel approach, the amount of the crystal material required could be reduced by 1/3.

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of pyrolytically coated graphite platforms submitted to simulated electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Frine [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Benzo, Zully [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Quintal, Manuelita [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Garaboto, Angel [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Albornoz, Alberto [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Brito, Joaquin L. [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: joabrito@ivic.ve

    2006-10-15

    The present work is part of an ongoing project aiming to a better understanding of the mechanisms of atomization on graphite furnace platforms used for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). It reports the study of unused pyrolytic graphite coated platforms of commercial origin, as well as platforms thermally or thermo-chemically treated under simulated ETAAS analysis conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the elements present at the surfaces of the platforms. New, unused platforms showed the presence of molybdenum, of unknown origin, in concentrations up to 1 at.%. Species in two different oxidations states (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 2+}) were detected by analyzing the Mo 3d spectral region with high resolution XPS. The analysis of the C 1s region demonstrated the presence of several signals, one of these at 283.3 eV related to the presence of Mo carbide. The O 1s region showed also various peaks, including a signal that can be attributed to the presence of MoO{sub 3}. Some carbon and oxygen signals were consistent with the presence of C=O and C-O- (probably C-OH) groups on the platforms surfaces. Upon thermal treatment up to 2900 deg. C, the intensity of the Mo signal decreased, but peaks due to Mo oxides (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 5+}) and carbide (Mo{sup 2+}) were still apparent. Thermo-chemical treatment with 3 vol.% HCl solutions and heating up to 2900 deg. C resulted in further diminution of the Mo signal, with complete disappearance of Mo carbide species. Depth profiling of unused platforms by Ar{sup +} ion etching at increasing time periods demonstrated that, upon removal of several layers of carbonaceous material, the Mo signal disappears suggesting that this contamination is present only at the surface of the pyrolytic graphite platform.

  7. Aluminum doped nickel oxide thin film with improved electrochromic performance from layered double hydroxides precursor in situ pyrolytic route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingjing; Lai, Lincong; Zhang, Ping; Li, Hailong; Qin, Yumei; Gao, Yuanchunxue; Luo, Lei; Lu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Electrochromic materials with unique performance arouse great interest on account of potential application values in smart window, low-power display, automobile anti-glare rearview mirror, and e-papers. In this paper, high-performing Al-doped NiO porous electrochromic film grown on ITO substrate has been prepared via a layered double hydroxides(LDHs) precursor in situ pyrolytic route. The Al3+ ions distributed homogenously within the NiO matrix can significantly influence the crystallinity of Ni-Al LDH and NiO:Al3+ films. The electrochromic performance of the films were evaluated by means of UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and chronoamperometry(CA) measurements. In addition, the ratio of Ni3+/Ni2+ also varies with Al content which can lead to different electrochemical performances. Among the as-prepared films, NiO film prepared from Ni-Al (19:1) LDH show the best electrochromic performance with a high transparency of 96%, large optical modulation range (58.4%), fast switching speed (bleaching/coloration times are 1.8/4.2 s, respectively) and excellent durability (30% decrease after 2000 cycles). The improved performance was owed to the synergy of large NiO film specific surface area and porous morphology, as well as Al doping stifled the formation of Ni3+ making bleached state more pure. This LDHs precursor pyrolytic method is simple, low-cost and environmental benign and is feasible for the preparation of NiO:Al and other Al-doped oxide thin film.

  8. Transformation, morphology, and dissolution of silicon and carbon in rice straw-derived biochars under different pyrolytic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; Chen, Baoliang; Zhu, Lizhong

    2014-03-18

    Biochars are increasingly recognized as environmentally friendly and cheap remediation agents for soil pollution. The roles of silicon in biochars and interactions between silicon and carbon have been neglected in the literature to date, while the transformation, morphology, and dissolution of silicon in Si-rich biochars remain largely unaddressed. In this study, Si-rich biochars derived from rice straw were prepared under 150-700 °C (named RS150-RS700). The transformation and morphology of carbon and silicon in biochar particles were monitored by FTIR, XRD, and SEM-EDX. With increasing pyrolytic temperature, silicon accumulated, and its speciation changed from amorphous to crystalline matter, while the organic matter evolved from aliphatic to aromatic. For rice straw biomass containing amorphous carbon and amorphous silicon, dehydration (silicon. At medium pyrolysis temperatures (250-350 °C), an intense cracking of carbon components occurred, and, thus, the silicon located in the inside tissue was exposed. At high pyrolysis temperatures (500-700 °C), the biochar became condensed due to the aromatization of carbon and crystallization of silicon. Correspondingly, the carbon release in water significantly decreased, while the silicon release somewhat decreased and then sharply increased with pyrolytic temperature. Along with SEM-EDX images of biochars before and after water washing, we proposed a structural relationship between carbon and silicon in biochars to explain the mutual protection between carbon and silicon under different pyrolysis temperatures, which contribute to the broader understanding of biochar chemistry and structure. The silicon dissolution kinetics suggests that high Si biochars could serve as a novel slow release source of biologically available Si in low Si agricultural soils.

  9. Kinetic approach to granular gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, A; Loreto, V; Marini Bettolo Marconi, U; Vulpiani, A

    1999-05-01

    We address the problem of the so-called "granular gases," i.e., gases of massive particles in rapid movement undergoing inelastic collisions. We introduce a class of models of driven granular gases for which the stationary state is the result of the balance between the dissipation and the random forces which inject energies. These models exhibit a genuine thermodynamic limit, i.e., at fixed density the mean values of kinetic energy and dissipated energy per particle are independent of the number N of particles, for large values of N. One has two regimes: when the typical relaxation time tau of the driving Brownian process is small compared with the mean collision time tau(c) the spatial density is nearly homogeneous and the velocity probability distribution is Gaussian. In the opposite limit tau>tau(c) one has strong spatial clustering, with a fractal distribution of particles, and the velocity probability distribution strongly deviates from the Gaussian one. Simulations performed in one and two dimensions under the Stosszahlansatz Boltzmann approximation confirm the scenario. Furthermore, we analyze the instabilities bringing to the spatial and the velocity clusterization. Firstly, in the framework of a mean-field model, we explain how the existence of the inelasticity can lead to a spatial clusterization; on the other hand, we discuss, in the framework of a Langevin dynamics treating the collisions in a mean-field way, how a non-Gaussian distribution of velocity can arise. The comparison between the numerical and the analytical results exhibits an excellent agreement.

  10. Mechanics of liquids and gases

    CERN Document Server

    Loitsyanskii, L G; Jones, W P

    1966-01-01

    Mechanics of Liquids and Gases, Second Edition is a 10-chapter text that covers significant revisions concerning the dynamics of an ideal gas, a viscous liquid and a viscous gas.After an expanded introduction to the fundamental properties and methods of the mechanics of fluids, this edition goes on dealing with the kinetics and general questions of dynamics. The next chapters describe the one-dimensional pipe flow of a gas with friction, the elementary theory of the shock tube; Riemann's theory of the wave propagation of finite intensity, and the theory of plane subsonic and supersonic flows.

  11. Capturing Gases in Carbon Honeycomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainyukova, Nina V.

    2017-04-01

    In our recent paper (Krainyukova and Zubarev in Phys Rev Lett 116:055501, 2016. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.055501) we reported the observation of an exceptionally stable honeycomb carbon allotrope obtained by deposition of vacuum-sublimated graphite. A family of structures can be built from absolutely dominant {sp}2-bonded carbon atoms, and may be considered as three-dimensional graphene. Such structures demonstrate high absorption capacity for gases and liquids. In this work we show that the formation of honeycomb structures is highly sensitive to the carbon evaporation temperature and deposition rates. Both parameters are controlled by the electric current flowing through thin carbon rods. Two distinctly different regimes were found. At lower electric currents almost pure honeycomb structures form owing to sublimation. At higher currents the surface-to-bulk rod melting is observed. In the latter case densification of the carbon structures and a large contribution of glassy graphite emerge. The experimental diffraction patterns from honeycomb structures filled with absorbed gases and analyzed by the advanced method are consistent with the proposed models for composites which are different for Ar, Kr and Xe atoms in carbon matrices.

  12. Cloud processing of soluble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, P.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Lind, J. A.; Orsi, G.; Preiss, M.; Maser, R.; Jaeschke, W.; Seyffer, E.; Helas, G.; Acker, K.; Wieprecht, W.; Möller, D.; Arends, B. G.; Mols, J. J.; Colvile, R. N.; Gallagher, M. W.; Beswick, K. M.; Hargreaves, K. J.; Storeton-West, R. L.; Sutton, M. A.

    Experimental data from the Great Dun Fell Cloud Experiment 1993 were used to investigate interactions between soluble gases and cloud droplets. Concentrations of H 2O 2, SO 2, CH 3COOOH, HCOOH, and HCHO were monitored at different sites within and downwind of a hill cap cloud and their temporal and spatial evolution during several cloud events was investigated. Significant differences were found between in-cloud and out-of-cloud concentrations, most of which could not be explained by simple dissolution into cloud droplets. Concentration patterns were analysed in relation to the chemistry of cloud droplets and the gas/liquid equilibrium. Soluble gases do not undergo similar behaviour: CH 3COOH simply dissolves in the aqueous phase and is outgassed upon cloud dissipation; instead, SO 2 is consumed by its reaction with H 2O 2. The behaviour of HCOOH is more complex because there is evidence for in-cloud chemical production. The formation of HCOOH interferes with the odd hydrogen cycle by enhancing the liquid-phase production of H 2O 2. The H 2O 2 concentration in cloud therefore results from the balance of consumption by oxidation of SO 2 in-cloud production, and the rate by which it is supplied to the system by entrainment of new air into the clouds.

  13. Capturing Gases in Carbon Honeycomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainyukova, Nina V.

    2016-12-01

    In our recent paper (Krainyukova and Zubarev in Phys Rev Lett 116:055501, 2016. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.055501) we reported the observation of an exceptionally stable honeycomb carbon allotrope obtained by deposition of vacuum-sublimated graphite. A family of structures can be built from absolutely dominant {sp}2 -bonded carbon atoms, and may be considered as three-dimensional graphene. Such structures demonstrate high absorption capacity for gases and liquids. In this work we show that the formation of honeycomb structures is highly sensitive to the carbon evaporation temperature and deposition rates. Both parameters are controlled by the electric current flowing through thin carbon rods. Two distinctly different regimes were found. At lower electric currents almost pure honeycomb structures form owing to sublimation. At higher currents the surface-to-bulk rod melting is observed. In the latter case densification of the carbon structures and a large contribution of glassy graphite emerge. The experimental diffraction patterns from honeycomb structures filled with absorbed gases and analyzed by the advanced method are consistent with the proposed models for composites which are different for Ar, Kr and Xe atoms in carbon matrices.

  14. Biological and functional evaluation of a novel pyrolytic carbon implant for the treatment of focal osteochondral defects in the medial femoral condyle: assessment in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Samantha L; Patron, Laura P; Lien, Joan C; Cook, Stephen D; Jones, Deryk G

    2016-12-01

    Osteochondral defects continue to be a clinical treatment challenge, and when left untreated, may cause pain and functional impairment. Pyrolytic carbon is a unique isotropic biomaterial used in heart valve and small joint replacements due to its excellent wear properties and biocompatibility with bone and articular cartilage. Therefore, a proposed solution is to utilize a focal pyrolytic carbon hemiarthroplasty implant as an alternative resurfacing treatment strategy for isolated cartilage lesions. A canine model (n = 9) was used to evaluate the in vivo histologic response and function of a pyrolytic carbon implant replacing a full-thickness osteochondral defect in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) of the knee. The gross appearance and histologic results were compared to an identical cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy implant placed in a defect in the contralateral MFC and evaluated up to 52 weeks. Extensive bone incorporation to the stem portion was observed for both implant types. The total mean histologic score for the cartilage of the MFC surrounding the pyrolytic carbon implants was significantly improved compared to that of the Co-Cr alloy implants at all evaluation periods (p implants were similar to those of Co-Cr alloy implants at 24 weeks. At 24 weeks, the mean total histologic score for Co-Cr alloy implants was 11.6 ± 0.7 (0-16 range point; 16 = normal appearance), while at 52 weeks, the mean total score for the pyrolytic carbon implants was 11.7 ± 1.3. Mean total histologic score of opposing medial tibia cartilage for the pyrolytic carbon implants was superior to that of the Co-Cr alloy group at all evaluation periods and significantly improved over the Co-Cr alloy implant group at 24 weeks (p = 0.001) and 52 weeks (p implant for reconstruction of a focal cartilage defect demonstrated effective implant fixation and superior in vivo response compared to an identical Co-Cr alloy implant.

  15. New perspectives for noble gases in oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschbach, Werner

    2016-08-01

    Conditions prevailing in regions of deep water formation imprint their signature in the concentrations of dissolved noble gases, which are conserved in the deep ocean. Such "recharge conditions" including temperature, salinity, and interactions with sea ice are important in view of ocean-atmosphere CO2 partitioning. Noble gases, especially the temperature sensitive Kr and Xe, are well-established tracers to reconstruct groundwater recharge conditions. In contrast, tracer oceanography has traditionally focused on He isotopes and the light noble gases Ne and Ar, which could be analyzed at the required high precision. Recent developments of analytical and data interpretation methods now provide fresh perspectives for noble gases in oceanography.

  16. Instability in Shocked Granular Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  17. Instability in shocked granular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmas, Nick; Falle, Sam; Radulescu, Matei

    2014-05-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  18. Heavy fuel oil pyrolysis and combustion: kinetics and evolved gases investigated by TGA-FTIR

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2017-08-24

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) obtained from crude oil distillation is a widely used fuel in marine engines and power generation technologies. In the present study, the pyrolysis and combustion of a Saudi Arabian HFO in nitrogen and in air, respectively, were investigated using non-isothermal thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. TG and DTG (differential thermo-gravimetry) were used for the kinetic analysis and to study the mass loss characteristics due to the thermal degradation of HFO at temperatures up to 1000°C and at various heating rates of 5, 10 and 20°C/min, in air and N2 atmospheres. FTIR analysis was then performed to study the composition of the evolved gases. The TG/DTG curves during HFO combustion show the presence of three distinct stages: the low temperature oxidation (LTO); fuel decomposition (FD); and high temperature oxidation (HTO) stages. The TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO pyrolysis show the presence of two devolatilization stages similar to that seen in the LTO stage of HFO combustion. Apart from this, the TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO combustion and pyrolysis differ significantly. Kinetic analysis was also performed using the distributed activation energy model, and the kinetic parameter (E) was determined for the different stages of HFO combustion and pyrolysis processes, yielding a good agreement with the measured TG profiles. FTIR analysis showed the signal of CO2 as approximately 50 times more compared to the other pollutant gases under combustion conditions. Under pyrolytic conditions, the signal intensity of alkane functional groups was the highest followed by alkenes. The TGA-FTIR results provide new insights into the overall HFO combustion processes, which can be used to improve combustor designs and control emissions.

  19. Aluminum doped nickel oxide thin film with improved electrochromic performance from layered double hydroxides precursor in situ pyrolytic route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jingjing; Lai, Lincong; Zhang, Ping; Li, Hailong; Qin, Yumei; Gao, Yuanchunxue; Luo, Lei; Lu, Jun, E-mail: lujun@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2016-09-15

    Electrochromic materials with unique performance arouse great interest on account of potential application values in smart window, low-power display, automobile anti-glare rearview mirror, and e-papers. In this paper, high-performing Al-doped NiO porous electrochromic film grown on ITO substrate has been prepared via a layered double hydroxides(LDHs) precursor in situ pyrolytic route. The Al{sup 3+} ions distributed homogenously within the NiO matrix can significantly influence the crystallinity of Ni-Al LDH and NiO:Al{sup 3+} films. The electrochromic performance of the films were evaluated by means of UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and chronoamperometry(CA) measurements. In addition, the ratio of Ni{sup 3+}/Ni{sup 2+} also varies with Al content which can lead to different electrochemical performances. Among the as-prepared films, NiO film prepared from Ni-Al (19:1) LDH show the best electrochromic performance with a high transparency of 96%, large optical modulation range (58.4%), fast switching speed (bleaching/coloration times are 1.8/4.2 s, respectively) and excellent durability (30% decrease after 2000 cycles). The improved performance was owed to the synergy of large NiO film specific surface area and porous morphology, as well as Al doping stifled the formation of Ni{sup 3+} making bleached state more pure. This LDHs precursor pyrolytic method is simple, low-cost and environmental benign and is feasible for the preparation of NiO:Al and other Al-doped oxide thin film. - Graphical abstract: The ratio of Ni{sup 3+}/Ni{sup 2+} varies with Al content which can lead to different electrochemical performances. Among the as-prepared films, NiO film prepared from Ni-Al (19:1) LDH show the best electrochromic performance with a high transparency of 96%, large optical modulation range, fast switching speed and excellent durability. Display Omitted.

  20. 生物质快速热裂解炭的分析及活化研究%Characterization and Activation of Pyrolytic Char from Fast Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹倩倩; 王树荣

    2013-01-01

    采用化学(KOH)方法对两种具有代表性的生物质原料(花梨木和稻壳)的快速热裂解固体产物-热解炭进行了活化,并采用氮吸附、X射线衍射(XRD)、傅里叶红外光谱分析(FTIR)和扫描电镜(SEM)技术测试了热解炭的结构特性、表面特性以及物理化学性质.结果表明,这两种热解炭经过活化后可以获得许多优良的性质,固定碳含量增加,灰分含量减少.同时,活化后BET比表面积迅速增大,超过1100m2/g,而且热解炭的石墨化程度都有所加深.热解炭通过活化过程可以实现其高品质利用,有利于生物质热裂解技术的工业化发展.%The pyrolytic chars from fast pyrolysis of rosewood and rice husk have been activated with KOH solvent. The texture and structure, surface properties and physico-chemical properties of the pyrolytic chars have been characterized by N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy ( FTIR) and Scanning electron microscope ( SEM). Compared with the original pyrolytic chars, the activated chars had higher fixed carbon content and lower ash content. The BET surface area increased beyond 1100m /g after activation. Moreover,the activated chars had higher graphitization degree. Through this activation process, high grade utilization of pyrolytic char will be achieved, as will benefit the industrialization of biomass fast pyrolysis technology.

  1. Significance of the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products on the properties of activated carbons from phosphoric acid activation of lignocellulosic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Songlin; Yang, Jianxiao; Cai, Xuan [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037 (China); Liu, Junli [Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, CAF, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2009-07-15

    Two series of activated carbons derived from China fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) wood impregnated with phosphoric acid were prepared in a cylindrical container that was kept in a closed state covered with a lid (the covered case) or in an open state. The effects of the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products of starting materials on the properties of activated carbon were investigated in the process of phosphoric acid activation. Elemental analysis and SEM observation showed that both activating in the covered case and increasing the mass of starting material used favored the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products. An investigation of N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms revealed that the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products significantly enhanced mesopore development in the final carbons, especially pores with a size range from 2.5 to 30 nm, with little influence on micropores, and therefore produced a large increase in the adsorption capacity to Vitamin B12 (with a molecular size of 2.09 nm). Activated carbons with highly developed mesopores could be obtained in the covered case. The carbonization mechanism of volatiles was discussed and two different carbonization pathways (in solid and gas phases) were proposed during phosphoric acid activation. (author)

  2. Specific heats of degenerate ideal gases

    OpenAIRE

    Caruso, Francisco; Oguri, Vitor; Silveira, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    From arguments based on Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and Pauli's exclusion principle, the molar specific heats of degenerate ideal gases at low temperatures are estimated, giving rise to values consistent with the Nerst-Planck Principle (third law of Thermodynamics). The Bose-Einstein condensation phenomenon based on the behavior of specific heat of massive and non-relativistic boson gases is also presented.

  3. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  4. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... stated by the gas supplier for each calibration gas. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the gases is... purified synthetic air which contains a concentration of propane higher than what a gas supplier considers... manufacturer must be consistent in the choice of diluent (zero air or purified nitrogen) between...

  5. Thermalization of Gases: A First Principles Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Previous approaches of emergent thermalization for condensed matter based on typical wavefunctions are extended to generate an intrinsically quantum theory of gases. Gases are fundamentally quantum objects at all temperatures, by virtue of rapid delocalization of their constituents. When there is a sufficiently broad spread in the energy of eigenstates, a well-defined temperature is shown to arise by photon production when the samples are optically thick. This produces a highly accurate approximation to the Planck distribution so that thermalization arises from the initial data as a consequence of purely quantum and unitary dynamics. These results are used as a foil for some common hydrodynamic theory of ultracold gases. It is suggested here that strong history dependence typically remains in these gases and so limits the validity of thermodynamics in their description. These problems are even more profound in the extension of hydrodynamics to such gases when they are optically thin, even when their internal ...

  6. Thermal Behavior and Kinetics of Raw/Pyrolytic Wood and Coal Blends during Co-combustion Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian DING; Qing-cai LIU; Li-jun JIANG; Guo-qing LIU; Shan REN; Jian YANG; Lu YAO; Fei MENG

    2016-01-01

    The thermal properties of raw wood (RW)biomass,corresponding pyrolytic wood (PW)biomass,and their blends with anthracite coal (AC)were evaluated under combustion conditions with a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)method.The blending ratios of the biomass with AC ranging from 0 to 100 mass% were taken into consider-ation to investigate the thermal behavior and kinetics of these blends during their co-combustion.For blends with dif-ferent ratios of the RW to AC and 100% AC (100 AC),two distinct mass loss peaks related to the release or com-bustion process of the volatiles and the combustion of the char were noted.The addition of a higher ratio of RW or PW into AC can improve the combustion process of the blends.The thermal behavior of the RW/AC or PW/AC blends could not be characterized by a simple linear correlation of their pure material thermal behavior.With the RW/PW addition ratios varying from 25 mass% to 80 mass%,the apparent activation energy of the blends gradually decreased from 48.46 to 34.93 kJ/mol and from 82.74 to 37.81 kJ/mol for the RW/AC and PW/AC blends,re-spectively,with high correlation coefficient (R2 )values ranging from 0.995 6 to 0.998 4.

  7. Performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack with thermally conductive pyrolytic graphite sheets for thermal management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Chien-Heng [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101 (China)

    2009-04-15

    This work experimentally investigates the effects of the pyrolytic graphite sheets (PGS) on the performance and thermal management of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. These PGS with the features of light weight and high thermal conductivity serve as heat spreaders in the fuel cell stack for the first time to reduce the volume and weight of cooling systems, and homogenizes the temperature in the reaction areas. A PEMFC stack with an active area of 100 cm{sup 2} and 10 cells in series is constructed and used in this research. Five PGS of thickness 0.1 mm are cut into the shape of flow channels and bound to the central five cathode gas channel plates. Four thermocouples are embedded on the cathode gas channel plates to estimate the temperature variation in the stack. It is shown that the maximum power of the stack increase more than 15% with PGS attached. PGS improve the stack performance and alleviate the flooding problem at low cathode flow rates significantly. Results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of application of PGS to the thermal management of a small-to-medium-sized fuel cell stack. (author)

  8. Axial Ligand Effects on the Structures of Self-Assembled Gallium-Porphyrin Monolayers on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, Judith M; Iverson, Cameron P; Lau, Wing-Yeung; Hopkins, Michael D

    2016-01-19

    Monolayers of five-coordinate gallium octaethylporphyrin complexes (Ga(OEP)X; X = Cl, Br, I, O3SCF3, CCPh) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were studied at the solid-liquid (1-phenyloctane) interface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to probe the dependence of their properties on the nature of the axial X ligand. Density functional theory calculations of the gas-phase structures of the free molecules reveal that the gallium atom is positioned above the plane of the porphyrin macrocycle, with this pyramidal distortion increasing in magnitude according to X = O3SCF3 (displacement = 0.35 Å) monolayers are sensitive to the nature of the axial ligand: the monolayers of Ga(OEP)(O3SCF3) and Ga(OEP)(CCPh) exhibit damage during the STM experiment upon repeated scanning and upon toggling the sign of the bias potential, but monolayers of Ga(OEP)Cl, Ga(OEP)Br, and Ga(OEP)I do not. A second important ligand-influenced property is that Ga(OEP)I forms bilayer structures, whereas the other Ga(OEP)X compounds form monolayers exclusively under identical conditions. The top layer of the Ga(OEP)I bilayer is oriented with the iodo ligand directed away from the surface, like the bottom layer, but the molecules pack in a square, lower-density geometry. The comparatively large polarizability of the iodo ligand is suggested to be important in stabilizing the bilayer structure.

  9. Electrochemical modification of a pyrolytic graphite sheet for improved negative electrode performance in the vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Humayun; Gyan, Isaiah O.; Francis Cheng, I.

    2017-02-01

    The vanadium redox flow battery is a promising technology for buffering renewable energies. It is recognized that negative electrode is the limitation in this device where there are problems of slow heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) of V3+/2+ and parasitic H2 evolution. Any methods aimed at addressing one of these barriers must assess the effects on the other. We examine electrochemical enhancement of a common commercially available material. Treatment of Panasonic pyrolytic graphite sheets is through oxidation at 2.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl for 1 min in 1 M H2SO4. This increases the standard HET rate for V3+/2+ from 3.2 × 10-7 to 1 × 10-3 cm/s, one of the highest in literature and shifts voltammetric reductive peak potential from -1.0 V to -0.65 V in 50 mM V3+ in 1 M H2SO4. Infrared analysis of the surfaces indicates formation of Csbnd OH, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd O functionalities. These groups catalyze HET with V3+/2+ as hypothesized by Skyllas-Kasacos. Also of significance is that electrode modification decreases the fraction of the current directed towards H2 evolution. This proportion decreases by two orders of a magnitude from 12% to 0.1% as measured at the respective voltammetric peak potentials of -1.0 V (pristine) and -0.65 V (modified).

  10. Influence of ZSM-5 zeolite on the pyrolytic intermediates from the co-pyrolysis of pubescens and LDPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Wenwu [Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Hu Changwei, E-mail: gchem@scu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Yang Yu; Tong Dongmei; Li Guiying; Zhu Liangfang [Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2010-05-15

    The catalytic reforming of the pyrolytic intermediates from the co-pyrolysis of pubescens and LDPE over the parent and desilicated zeolite ZSM-5 (DeZSM-5) was investigated. The results showed that the parent HZSM-5 exhibited high aromatization activity in the co-pyrolysis, whereas DeZSM-5 exhibited high alkanisation activity. On the other hand, the total relative content of phenolic compounds in aqua obtained by co-pyrolysis catalyzed by both parent HZSM-5 and DeZSM-5 was rather high (60-65%) compared to the thermal co-pyrolysis (26.94%). From the analysis of NH{sub 3}-TPD for ZSM-5, it might be proposed that the aromatization was favored mainly by strong acid sites and the alkanisation was favored chiefly by weak acid sites in catalyst ZSM-5. In addition, the formation of phenolic compounds was mainly related to the interactions between the intermediates from the co-pyrolysis over ZSM-5.

  11. The pyrolytic-plasma method and the device for the utilization of hazardous waste containing organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalińska, Teresa; Wnęk, Bartłomiej; Witowski, Artur; Juszczuk, Rafał; Majdak, Małgorzata; Bartusek, Stanilav

    2016-11-15

    This paper is focused on the new method of waste processing. The waste, including hazardous waste, contain organic compounds. The method consists in two main processes: the pyrolysis of waste and the oxidation of the pyrolytic gas with a use of non-equilibrium plasma. The practical implementation of the method requires the design, construction and testing of the new device in large laboratory scale. The experiments were carried out for the two kinds of waste: polyethylene as a model waste and the electronic waste as a real waste. The process of polyethylene decomposition showed that the operation of the device is correct because 99.74% of carbon moles contained in the PE samples was detected in the gas after the process. Thus, the PE samples practically were pyrolyzed completely to hydrocarbons, which were completely oxidized in the plasma reactor. It turned out that the device is useful for decomposition of the electronic waste. The conditions in the plasma reactor during the oxidation process of the pyrolysis products did not promote the formation of PCDD/Fs despite the presence of the oxidizing conditions. An important parameter determining the efficiency of the oxidation of the pyrolysis products is gas temperature in the plasma reactor.

  12. Insight into STM image contrast of n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane molecules on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Miao; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Ke; Yu, Ai-Fang; Hao, Yan-Zhong; Xie, Si-Shen; Sun, Jie-Lin

    2011-02-01

    Two-dimensional ordered patterns of n-tetradecane (n-C14H30) and n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) molecules at liquid/graphite interface have been directly imaged using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) under ambient conditions. STM images reveal that the two different kinds of molecules self-organize into ordered lamellar structures in which alkane chains of the molecules extend along one of three equivalent lattice axes of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) basal plane. For n-C14H30 molecules, the molecular axes are observed to tilt by 60° with respect to inter-lamellar trough lines and the carbon backbones of the alkane chains are perpendicular to the HOPG basal plane in an all-trans conformation. However, for n-C16H34 molecules, the molecular axes are perpendicular to lamellar borders (90°) and the planes of the all-trans carbon skeletons are parallel to the graphite basal plane. The results clearly indicate that outmost hydrogen atoms of the alkane chains dominate atom-scaled features of the STM images. That is, in the case of long-chain alkane molecules, topographic effects dominantly determine STM image contrast of the methylene regions of the alkane chains that are adsorbed on HOPG.

  13. Tritium permeation behavior through pyrolytic carbon in tritium production using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor for fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ushida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Under tritium production method using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor loaded Li compound, Li compound has to be coated by ceramic materials in order to suppress the spreading of tritium to the whole reactor. Pyrolytic carbon (PyC is a candidate of the coating material because of its high resistance for gas permeation. In this study, hydrogen permeation experiments using a PyC-coated isotropic graphite tube were conducted and hydrogen diffusivity, solubility and permeability were evaluated. Tritium permeation behavior through PyC-coated Li compound particles was simulated by using obtained data. Hydrogen permeation flux through PyC in a steady state is proportional to the hydrogen pressure and is larger than that through Al2O3 which is also candidate coating material. However, total tritium leak within the supposed reactor operation period through the PyC-coated Li compound particles is lower than that through the Al2O3-coated ones because the hydrogen absorption capacity in PyC is considerably larger than that in Al2O3.

  14. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  15. Greenhouse Trace Gases in Deadwood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Kristofer; Bueno de Mesquita, Cliff; Oberle, Brad; Maynard, Dan; Bettigole, Charles; Crowther, Thomas; Duguid, Marlyse; Steven, Blaire; Zanne, Amy; Lapin, Marc; Ashton, Mark; Oliver, Chad; Lee, Xuhui; Bradford, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Deadwood, long recognized as playing an important role in carbon cycling in forest ecosystems, is more recently drawing attention for its potential role in the cycling of other greenhouse trace gases. We report data from four independent studies measuring internal gas concentrations in deadwood in in three Quercus dominated upland forest systems in the Northeastern and Central United States. Mean methane concentrations in deadwood were 23 times atmospheric levels, indicating a lower bound, mean radial wood surface area flux of ~6 x 10-4 μmol CH4 m-2 s-1. Site, decay class, diameter, and species were all highly significant predictors of methane abundance in deadwood, and log diameter and decay stage interacted as important controls limiting methane concentrations in the smallest and most decayed logs. Nitrous oxide concentrations were negatively correlated with methane and on average ~25% lower than ambient, indicating net consumption of nitrous oxide. These data suggest nonstructural carbohydrates fuel archaeal methanogens and confirm the potential for widespread in situ methanogenesis in both living and deadwood. Applying this understanding to estimate methane emissions from microbial activity in living trees implies a potential global flux of 65.6±12.0 Tg CH4 yr-1, more than 20 times greater than currently considered.

  16. A kinetic approach to granular gases

    OpenAIRE

    Puglisi, A.; Loreto, V.; Marconi, U. Marini Bettolo; Vulpiani, A.

    1998-01-01

    We address the problem of the so-called ``granular gases'', i.e. gases of massive particles in rapid movement undergoing inelastic collisions. We introduce a class of models of driven granular gases for which the stationary state is the result of the balance between the dissipation and the random forces which inject energies. These models exhibit a genuine thermodynamic limit, i.e. at fixed density the mean values of kinetic energy and dissipated energy per particle are independent of the num...

  17. Phase space methods for degenerate quantum gases

    CERN Document Server

    Dalton, Bryan J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental progress has enabled cold atomic gases to be studied at nano-kelvin temperatures, creating new states of matter where quantum degeneracy occurs - Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases. Such quantum states are of macroscopic dimensions. This book presents the phase space theory approach for treating the physics of degenerate quantum gases, an approach already widely used in quantum optics. However, degenerate quantum gases involve massive bosonic and fermionic atoms, not massless photons. The book begins with a review of Fock states for systems of identical atoms, where large numbers of atoms occupy the various single particle states or modes. First, separate modes are considered, and here the quantum density operator is represented by a phase space distribution function of phase space variables which replace mode annihilation, creation operators, the dynamical equation for the density operator determines a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution function, and measurable...

  18. Optical anisotropy in GaSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyhan, A.; Karabulut, O.; Akinoglu, B.G.; Aslan, B.; Turan, R. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-09-01

    Optical anisotropy of the layer semiconductor GaSe has been studied by photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The PL spectra are dominated by two closely positioned emission bands resulting from the free exciton and the bound exciton connected direct band edge of GaSe. Photoluminescence and transmission spectra of GaSe crystals have been measured for two cases in which the propagation vector k is perpendicular (k perpendicular to c) and parallel to the c-axis (k//c). Peak position of the PL emission band and the onset of the transmission have been found to be significantly different for these two cases. This observed anisotropy is related to anisotropic band structure and the selection rules for the optical absorption in layered GaSe. FTIR transmission spectrum is in good agreement with PL results. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  20. Noble Gases in the Lunar Regolith

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹永廖; 徐琳; 欧阳自远

    2003-01-01

    The most fundamental character of lunar soil is its high concentrations of solar-windimplanted dements,and the concentrations and behavior of the noble gases He,Ne,Ar,and Xe,which provide unique and extensive information about a broad range of fundamental problems. In this paper,the authors studied the forming mechanism of lunar regolith,and proposed that most of the noble gases in lunar regolith come from the solar wind. Meteoroid bombardment controls the maturity of lunar soil,with the degree of maturation decreasing with grain size; the concentrations of the noble gases would be of slight variation with the depth of lunar soil but tend to decrease with grain size. In addition,the concentrations of noble gases in lunar soil also show a close relationship with its mineral and chemical compositions. The utilization prospects of the noble gas s He in lunar regolith will be further discussed.

  1. The effect of pyrolytic carbon black prepared from junked tires on the properties of ethylene-propylene-diene copolymers (EPDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolytic carbon black (PCB made from used tires was used in ethylene-propylene-diene copolymers (EPDM. The microstructure of PCB was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. PCB was compounded with EPDM to prepare EPDM vulcanizates. The effects of PCB on the processing properties of EPDM compounds and the mechanical properties of vulcanizates were investigated and compared with other traditional fillers such as semi-reinforcing furnace black (N774, light calcium carbonate (CaCO3 and thermal black (N990. At the same time, the rheological behavior of EPDM compounds filled with different fillers was characterized by capillary rheometrics. The SEM photos showed that the particle shape was quiet different from that of CaCO3 and N990, it was similar to that of N774. The primary particle size was smaller than that of N774, but the aggregate size of PCB was larger than that of N774. The effect of PCB on the processing properties of EPDM compounds was similar to that of other fillers. Among the four fillers, PCB imparted EPDM compounds with higher Mooney viscosity. With the increase of filler content, the scorch time and optimum curing time of EPDM compounds changed little. The reinforcing effect of PCB was similar to that of N990, but inferior to that of N774. With the increase of PCB content, tensile strength, tear strength, and modulus at 100% elongation of EPDM vulcanizates increased significantly. When EPDM was filled with 50 phr PCB, the tear strength of EPDM vulcanizates increased by 3 times, compared with that of EPDM gum vulcanizates. The appearance of EPDM extrudate filled with PCB was coarser than that of other fillers.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of the wettability of multilayer graphene using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Ali; Wu, Yanbin; Wang, Michael C; Aluru, Narayana R; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Nam, SungWoo

    2014-11-04

    We report the intrinsic water contact angle (WCA) of multilayer graphene, explore different methods of cleaning multilayer graphene, and evaluate the efficiency of those methods on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. Highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was used as a model material system to study the wettability of the multilayer graphene surface by WCA measurements. A WCA value of 45° ± 3° was measured for a clean HOPG surface, which can serve as the intrinsic WCA for multilayer graphene. A 1 min plasma treatment (100 W) decreased the WCA to 6°, owing to the creation of surface defects and functionalization by oxygen-containing groups. Molecular dynamics simulations of water droplets on the HOPG surface with or without the oxygen-containing defect sites confirmed the experimental results. Heat treatment at near atmospheric pressure and wet chemical cleaning methods using hydrofluoric acid and chloroform did not change the WCA significantly. Low-pressure, high-temperature annealing under argon and hydrogen reduced the WCA to 54°, close to the intrinsic WCA of HOPG. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy did not show any significant change for the HOPG surface after this treatment, confirming low-pressure, high-temperature annealing as an effective technique to clean multilayer graphene without damaging the surface. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated the existence of hydrocarbon species on the surface of the HOPG sample that was exposed to air for surfaces after the different cleaning techniques were performed to correlate the WCA to the surface chemistry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results revealed that the WCA value changed drastically, depending on the amounts of oxygen-containing and hydrocarbon-containing groups on the surface.

  3. Characteristics of Waste Plastics Pyrolytic Oil and Its Applications as Alternative Fuel on Four Cylinder Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosal Nugroho Pratama

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Waste plastics recycling using pyrolysis method is not only able to decrease a number of environment pollutant but also able to produce economical and high quality hydrocarbon products. Two experiments were conducted to completely study Waste Plastic Pyrolytic Oil (WPPO characteristics and its applications.  First experiment investigated oil characteristics derived from pyrolysis process in two stages batch reactors: pyrolysis and catalytic reforming reactor, at maximum temperature 500oC and 450oC respectively. Waste Polyethylene (PE, Polypropylene (PP, Polystyrene (PS, Polyethylene Terepthalate (PET and others were used as raw material. Nitrogen flow rate at 0.8 l/minutes was used to increase oil weight percentage. Indonesian natural zeolite was used as catalyst. Then, second experiment was carried out on Diesel Engine Test Bed (DETB used blending of WPPO and Biodiesel fuel with a volume ratio of 1:9. This experiment was specifically conducted to study how much potency of blending of WPPO and biodiesel in diesel engine. The result of first experiment showed that the highest weight percentage of WPPO derived from mixture of PE waste (50%wt, PP waste (40%wt and PS waste (10%wt is 45.13%wt. The more weight percentage of PE in feedstock effected on the less weight percentage of WPPO, the more percentage of C12-C20 content in WPPO and the higher calorific value of WPPO. Characteristics of WPPO such as, Specific Gravity, Flash point, Pour Point, Kinematic Viscosity, Calorific value and percentage of C12-C20 showed interesting result that WPPO could be developed as alternative fuel on diesel fuel blending due to the proximity of their characteristics. Performance of diesel engine using blending of WPPO and biodiesel on second experiment gave good result so the WPPO will have great potency to be valuable alternative liquid fuel in future, especially on stationary diesel engine and transportation engine application.

  4. Nano-level monitoring of Mn(2+) ion by fabrication of coated pyrolytic graphite electrode based on isonicotinohydrazide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, Manoj Kumar; Singh, A K; Jain, A K

    2015-05-01

    The two ionophores N'(N',N‴E,N',N‴E)-N',N‴-((((oxybis(ethane-2,1-diyl))bis(oxy)) bis(2,1-phenylene))bis(methanylylidene))di(isonicotinohydrazide) (I1) and (N',N‴E,N',N‴E)-N',N‴-(((propane-1,3-diylbis(oxy))bis(2,1-phenylene))bis(methanylylidene))di(isonicotinohydrazide) (I2) were synthesised and investigated as neutral carrier in the fabrication of Mn(2+) ion selective sensor. Several membranes were prepared by incorporating different plasticizers and anionic excluders and their effect on potentiometric response was studied. The best analytical performance was obtained with the electrode having a membrane of composition of I2: PVC: o-NPOE: NaTPB in the ratio of 6:34:58:2 (w/w, mg). Comparative studies of coated graphite electrode (CGE) and coated pyrolytic graphite electrode (CPGE) based on I2 reveal the superiority of CPGE. The CPGE exhibits wide working concentration range of 1.23×10(-8)-1.0×10(-1) mol L(-1) and a detection limit down to 4.78×10(-9) mol L(-1) with a Nernstian slope of 29.5±0.4 mV decade(-1) of activity. The sensor performs satisfactorily over a wide pH range (3.5-9.0) and exhibited a quick response time (9s). The sensor can work satisfactorily in water-acetonitrile and water-methanol mixtures. It can tolerate 30% acetonitrile and 20% methanol content in the mixtures. The sensor could be used for a period of four months without any significant divergence in performance. The sensor reflects its utility in the quantification of Mn(2+) ion in real samples and has been successfully employed as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Mn(2+) ion with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA).

  5. Discrimination of abiogenic and biogenic alkane gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI JinXing; MI JingKui; LI ZhiSheng; HU AnPing; YANG Chun; ZHOU QingHua; SHUAI YanHua; ZHANG Ying; MA ChengHua; ZOU CaiNeng; ZHANG ShuiChang; LI Jian; NI YunYan; HU GuoYi; LUO Xia; TAO ShiZhen; ZHU GuangYou

    2008-01-01

    We have combined the analytical data of the carbon isotope distribution pattern, R/Ra and cliche values of abiogenic and biogenic (referring to the therrnogenic and bacterial or microbial) alkane gases in China with those of alkane gases from USA, Russia, Germany, Australia and other countries. Four discrimination criteria are derived from this comparative study: 1) Carbon isotopic composition is generally greater than -30‰ for abiogenic methane and less than -30‰ for biogenic methane; 2)Abiogenic alkane gases have a carbon isotopic reversal trend (Δ13c1>Δ13c2>Δ13c3>Δ13c4) with Δ13c1>-30‰ in general; 3) Gases with R/Ra>0.5 and Δ13c1- Δ13c2>0 are of abiogenic origin; 4) Gases (methane) with CH4/3He≤106 are of abiogenic origin, whereas gases with CH4/3He≥1011 are of biogenic origin.

  6. Discrimination of abiogenic and biogenic alkane gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We have combined the analytical data of the carbon isotope distribution pattern, R/Ra and CH4/3He values of abiogenic and biogenic (referring to the thermogenic and bacterial or microbial) alkane gases in China with those of alkane gases from USA, Russia, Germany, Australia and other countries. Four discrimination criteria are derived from this comparative study: 1) Carbon isotopic composition is generally greater than -30‰ for abiogenic methane and less than -30‰ for biogenic methane; 2) Abiogenic alkane gases have a carbon isotopic reversal trend (δ 13C1> δ 13C2> δ 13C3> δ 13C4) with δ 13C1>-30‰ in general; 3) Gases with R/Ra >0.5 and δ 13C11 δ 13C2>0 are of abiogenic origin; 4) Gases (meth- ane) with CH4/3He≤106 are of abiogenic origin, whereas gases with CH4/3He≥1011 are of biogenic origin.

  7. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86.514-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases...

  8. 40 CFR 86.114-94 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.114-94 Section 86.114-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED...-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.114-94 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for the...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1214-85 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1214-85 Section 86.1214-85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1214-85 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for...

  10. Broader perspectives for comparing different greenhouse gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Martin; Reisinger, Andy

    2011-05-28

    Over the last 20 years, different greenhouse gases have been compared, in the context of climate change, primarily through the concept of global warming potentials (GWPs). This considers the climate forcing caused by pulse emissions and integrated over a fixed time horizon. Recent studies have shown that uncertainties in GWP values are significantly larger than previously thought and, while past literature in this area has raised alternative means of comparison, there is not yet any clear alternative. We propose that a broader framework for comparing greenhouse gases has become necessary and that this cannot be addressed by using simple fixed exchange rates. From a policy perspective, the framework needs to be clearly aligned with the goal of climate stabilization, and we show that comparisons between gases can be better addressed in this context by the forcing equivalence index (FEI). From a science perspective, a framework for comparing greenhouse gases should also consider the full range of processes that affect atmospheric composition and how these may alter for climate stabilization at different levels. We cover a basis for a broader approach to comparing greenhouse gases by summarizing the uncertainties in GWPs, linking those to uncertainties in the FEIs consistent with stabilization, and then to a framework for addressing uncertainties in the corresponding biogeochemical processes.

  11. Photodeposition of Gold, Platinum, or Silver onto Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles at Steps of Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taing, James

    The photodeposition of gold, platinum, or silver nanoparticles selectively onto isolated titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles created metal/TiO2 photocatalysts and heterogeneous catalysts, and validated the photocatalytic property of the semiconductor. The isolated and ordered TiO2 nanoparticles permitted clear observations of the stability, and changes in morphology, of the particles in various experimental conditions. The fabrication of TiO2 nanoparticles at the steps of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), utilizing physical vapor deposition, required heating the graphite substrate to a minimum of 800 °C. The production of a photocurrent, and plating of gold nanoparticles, confirmed the photocatalytic property of the TiO2 nanoparticles on HOPG when utilized as a photoelectrode in a two half-cell setup. Employing sodium chloride (1.0 M) as an electrolyte resulted in an increase/decrease of the photocurrent with the addition of gold cations to the half-cell without/with the TiO2 nanoparticles. A poor distribution of gold nanoparticles, roughly 40-45 nm wide, deposited around few of the TiO2 nanoparticles. A lower concentration of sodium chloride (0.1 M) resulted in a coalescence of Au nanoparticles, roughly 10 nm, around many TiO2 nanoparticles. Using sodium nitrate as an electrolyte resulted in a rapid decay in the photocurrent and a growth of an unidentified material on the TiO2 nanoparticles. The unidentified material hindered the reduction of gold cations introduced midway through the experiment. With gold cations present at the onset of the experiment, disperse gold nanoparticles (˜5-10 nm) deposited around the TiO2 nanoparticles. In the absence of additional electrolyte, many disperse gold nanoparticles less than 5 nm deposited onto the TiO2 nanoparticles. More platinum than gold selectively deposited onto the TiO2 nanoparticles. On the contrary, less silver selectively deposited onto the TiO2 nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic

  12. Methanol production from fermentor off-gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, B. E.; Moreira, A. R.

    The off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation facility are composed mainly of CO2 and H2. Such a gas stream is an ideal candidate as a feed to a methanol synthesis plant utilizing modern technology recently developed and known as the CDH-methanol process. A detailed economic analysis for the incremental cost of a methanol synthesis plant utilizing the off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation indicates a profitable rate of return of 25 to 30% under the most likely production conditions. Bench scale studies at different fermentor mixing rates indicate that the volume of gases released during the fermentation is a strong function of the agitation rate and point to a potential interaction between the volume of H2 evolved and the levels of butanol present in the final fermented broth. Such interaction may require establishing optimum operating conditions for an integrated butanol fermentation methanol synthesis plant.

  13. Absorption of Soluble Gases by Atmospheric Nanoaerosols

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, Tov; Krasovitov, Boris; Lushnikov, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    We investigate mass transfer during absorption of atmospheric trace soluble gases by a single droplet whose size is comparable to the molecular mean free path in air at normal conditions. It is assumed that the trace reactant diffuses to the droplet surface and then reacts with the substances inside the droplet according to the first order rate law. Our analysis applies a flux-matching theory of transport processes in gases and assumes constant thermophysical properties of the gases and liquids. We derive an integral equation of Volterra type for the transient molecular flux density to a liquid droplet and solve it numerically. Numerical calculations are performed for absorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2), dinitrogen trioxide (N2O3) and chlorine (Cl2) by liquid nanoaerosols accompanied by chemical dissociation reaction. It is shown that during gas absorption by nanoaerosols the kinetic effects play significant role, and neglecting kinetic effects leads to significant overestimation of the soluble gas flux into a...

  14. GREENHOUSE GASES AND MEANS OF PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Stojanović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The greenhouse effect can be defined as the consequence of increased heating of the Earth's surface, as well as the lower atmosphere by carbon dioxide, water vapor, and other trace amounts gases. It is well-known that human industrial activities have released large amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, about 900 billion tons of carbon dioxide, and it is estimated that up to 450 billion are still in the atmosphere. In comparison to greenhouse gases water vapor is one of the greatest contributors to the greenhouse effect on Earth. Many projects, as does the PURGE project, have tendences to build on the already conducted research and to quantify the positive and negative impacts on health and wellbeing of the population with greenhouse gas reduction strategies that are curently being implemented and should be increasingly applied in various sectors and urban areas, having offices in Europe, China and India.

  15. Dark lump excitations in superfluid Fermi gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yan-Xia; Duan Wen-Shan

    2012-01-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear properties of two-dimensional matter-wave pulses in disk-shaped superfluid Fermi gases.A Kadomtsev Petviashvili I (KPI) solitary wave has been realized for superfluid Fermi gases in the limited cases of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) regime,Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) regime,and unitarity regime.Onelump solution as well as one-line soliton solutions for the KPI equation are obtained,and two-line soliton solutions with the same amplitude are also studied in the limited cases.The dependence of the lump propagating velocity and the sound speed of two-dimensional superfluid Fermi gases on the interaction parameter are investigated for the limited cases of BEC and unitarity.

  16. Theoretical Study on Gas—phase Pyrolytic Reactions of N—Ethyl,Isopropyl and N—t—Butyl Substituted 2—Aminopyrazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪三国; 陈丽萍

    2003-01-01

    Density functional theory(DFT)and ab initio methods were used to study gas-phase pyrolytic reaction mechanisms of N-ethyl,N-isopropyl and N-t-butyl substituted 2-aminopyrazine at B3LYP/6-31G* and MP2/6-31G*,respectively,Single-point energies of all optimized molecular geometries were calculated at B3LYP/6-311 G(2d,p)level.Results show that the pyrolytic reactions which were caused by the migration of atom H(17) via a six-member ring transiton state.The activation energies which were verified by vibrational analysis and correlated with zero-point energies along the reaction channel atB3LYP/6-3110 G(2d,p)level were 252.02kJ·mol-1(N-ethyl substituted),235.92kJ·mol-1(N-isopropyl substituted)and 234.27kJ·mol-1(N-t-butyl substituted),respectively.The results were in good agreement with available experimental data.

  17. Electrocatalytic activity of 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone/multi-walled carbon nanotubes immobilized on edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode for NADH oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassia Silva Luz, Rita de [Institute of Chemistry, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: rcsluz@iqm.unicamp.br; Damos, Flavio Santos [Institute of Chemistry, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Tanaka, Auro Atsushi [Center of Science and Technology, UFMA, Avenida dos Portugueses s/n, 65085-040, Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Gushikem, Yoshitaka [Institute of Chemistry, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-05-30

    This work reports the electrocatalytic activity of 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TCBQ)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) immobilized on an edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) were used to confirms the presence of chloro after the nanotube modification with 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone. The surface charge transfer constant, k{sub s}, and the charge transfer coefficient for the modified electrode, {alpha}, were estimated as 98.5 ({+-}0.6) s{sup -1} and 0.5, respectively. With this modified electrode the oxidation potential of the NADH was shifted about 300 mV toward a less positive value, presenting a peak current much higher than those measured on an unmodified edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPPG). Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode (RDE) experiments indicated that the NADH oxidation reaction involves 2 electrons and a heterogenous rate constant (k{sub obs}) of 3.1 x 10{sup 5} mol{sup -1} l s{sup -1}. The detection limit, repeatability, long-term stability, time of response and linear response range were also investigated.

  18. Nanoclusters and Microparticles in Gases and Vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    2012-01-01

    Research of processes involving Nanoclusters and Microparticleshas been developing fastin many fields of rescent research, in particular in materials science. To stay at the cutting edge of this development, a sound understanding of the processes is needed. In this work, several processes involving small particles are described, such as transport processes in gases, charging of small particles in gases, chemical processes, atom attachment and quenching of excited atomic particles on surfaces, nucleation, coagulation, coalescence and growth processes for particles and aggregates. This work pres

  19. Blackbody Radiation in Optically Thick Gases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the claim that optically thick gases can emit as blackbodies is refuted. The belief that such behavior exists results from an improper consideration of heat transfer and reflection. When heat is injected into a gas, the energy is primarily redistributed into translational degrees of freedom and is not used to drive emission. The average kinetic energy of the particles in the system simply increases and the temperature rises. In this respect, it is well-know that the emissivity of a gas can drop with increasing temperature. Once reflection and translation are properly considered, it is simple to understand why gases can never emit as blackbodies.

  20. Investigations into electrical discharges in gases

    CERN Document Server

    Klyarfel'D, B N

    2013-01-01

    Investigations into Electrical Discharges in Gases is a compilation of scientific articles that covers the advances in the investigation of the fundamental processes occurring in electrical discharges in gases and vapors. The book details the different aspects of the whole life cycle of an arc, which include the initiation of a discharge, its transition into an arc, the lateral spread of the arc column, and the recovery of electric strength after extinction of an arc. The text also discusses the methods for the dynamic measurement of vapor density in the vicinity of electrical discharges, alon

  1. Greenhouse gases and the metallurgical process industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupis, C.H.P.

    1999-10-01

    The present lecture offers a brief review of the greenhouse effect, the sources of greenhouse gases, the potential effect of these gases on global warming, the response of the international community, and the probable cost of national compliance. The specific emissions of the metallurgical process industry, particularly those of the steel and aluminum sectors, are then examined. The potential applications of life-cycle assessments and of an input-output model in programs of emissions' abatement are investigated, and, finally, a few remarks on some implications for education are presented.

  2. Composition of gases vented from a condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, R.N.

    1980-08-01

    Designers of systems that involve condensers often need to predict the amount of process vapor that accompanies the noncondensable gases that are vented from the condensers. An approximation is given that appears to provide, in many cases, reasonably accurate values for the mole ratio of process vapor to noncondensable gases in the vented mixture. The approximation is particularly applicable to flash and direct-contact power systems for geothermal brines and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). More regorous relationships are available for exceptional cases.

  3. Itinerant Ferromagnetism in Ultracold Fermi Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Itinerant ferromagnetism in cold Fermi gases with repulsive interactions is studied applying the Jastrow-Slater approximation generalized to finite polarization and temperature. For two components at zero temperature a second order transition is found at akF ≃ 0.90 compatible with QMC. Thermodyna......Itinerant ferromagnetism in cold Fermi gases with repulsive interactions is studied applying the Jastrow-Slater approximation generalized to finite polarization and temperature. For two components at zero temperature a second order transition is found at akF ≃ 0.90 compatible with QMC...

  4. Gases and vacua handbook of vacuum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, A H

    2013-01-01

    Handbook of Vacuum Physics, Volume 1: Gases and Vacua presents three major topics, which are the fourth to sixth parts of this volume. These topics are the remarks on units of physical quantities; kinetic theory of gases and gaseous flow; and theory of vacuum diffusion pumps. The first topic aims to present concisely the significance of units of physical quantities, catering the need and interest of those who take measurements and make calculations in different fields of vacuum sciences. The technique and applications of this particular topic are also provided. The second main topic focuses sp

  5. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  6. Origins of geothermal gases at Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Gas emissions at the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) reflect open-system mixing of gas species originating from diverse rock types, magmas, and crustal fluids, all combined in varying proportions at different thermal areas. Gases are not necessarily in chemical equilibrium with the waters through which they vent, especially in acid sulfate terrain where bubbles stream through stagnant acid water. Gases in adjacent thermal areas often can be differentiated by isotopic and gas ratios, and cannot be tied to one another solely by shallow processes such as boiling-induced fractionation of a parent liquid. Instead, they inherit unique gas ratios (e.g., CH4/He) from the dominant rock reservoirs where they originate, some of which underlie the Quaternary volcanic rocks. Steam/gas ratios (essentially H2O/CO2) of Yellowstone fumaroles correlate with Ar/He and N2/CO2, strongly suggesting that H2O/CO2 is controlled by addition of steam boiled from water rich in atmospheric gases. Moreover, H2O/CO2 varies systematically with geographic location, such that boiling is more enhanced in some areas than others. The δ13C and 3He/CO2 of gases reflect a dominant mantle origin for CO2 in Yellowstone gas. The mantle signature is most evident at Mud Volcano, which hosts gases with the lowest H2O/CO2, lowest CH4 concentrations and highest He isotope ratios (~16Ra), consistent with either a young subsurface intrusion or less input of crustal and meteoric gas than any other location at Yellowstone. Across the YPVF, He isotope ratios (3He/4He) inversely vary with He concentrations, and reflect varied amounts of long- stored, radiogenic He added to the magmatic endmember within the crust. Similarly, addition of CH4 from organic-rich sediments is common in the eastern thermal areas at Yellowstone. Overall, Yellowstone gases reflect addition of deep, high-temperature magmatic gas (CO2-rich), lower-temperatures crustal gases (4He- and CH4-bearing), and those gases (N2, Ne, Ar) added

  7. Thermodynamic property of gases in the sonoluminescing bubble

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Yu; LI Guiqin; ZHOU Tieying

    2001-01-01

    With the theory of statistical physics dealing with chemical reaction (the law of mass action), the different thermodynamic property of noble gases (mono-atomic gases) in a small bubble and diatomic gases in a small bubble semi-quantitatively are analyzed. As bubbles of the mono-atomic and the diatomic gases are compressed, shock waves are produced in both bubbles. Though shock wave leads to sharp increase of pressure and temperature of gases in the bubble, diatomic gas will excitated vibrations and dissociate themselves to mono-atomic gas,these processes will consume many accumulated heat energy and block the further increase of the temperature. Therefore, compare with the mono-atomic gases in the bubble, there will be no enough charged particles ionized to flash for diatomic gases in the bubble, this may be the reason why a bubble of diatomic gases has no single bubble sonoluminescence while a bubble of noble gases has.

  8. Field theory for trapped atomic gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this course we give a selfcontained introduction to the quantum field theory for trapped atomic gases, using functional methods throughout. We consider both equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena. In the equilibrium case, we first derive the appropriate Hartree—Fock theory for the properties of

  9. Escape of atmospheric gases from the Moon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Da Dao-an; Yang Ya-tian

    2005-12-01

    The escape rate of atmospheric molecules on the Moon is calculated.Based on the assumption that the rates of emission and escape of gases attain equilibrium, the ratio of molecular number densities during day and night, 0/0, can be explained. The plausible emission rate of helium and radioactive elements present in the Moon has also been calculated.

  10. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ppm CO2, ≤ 0.1 ppm NO) (Oxygen content between 18-21 percent vol.) (c) Calibration and span gases. (1... of the NO content); (v) CO2 and purified nitrogen. (3) The true concentration of a span gas must be... approval of the Administrator. (f) Hydrocarbon analyzer burner air. The concentration of oxygen for...

  11. Deviations from Fick's law in Lorentz gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowe, C.P.; Frenkel, D.; Hoef, M.A. van der

    1997-01-01

    We have calculated the self-dynamic structure factorF(k,t) for tagged particle motion in hopping Lorentz gases. We find evidence that, even at long times, the probability distribution function for the displacement of the particles is highly non-Gaussian. At very small values of the wave vector this

  12. Decoherence and damping in ideal gases

    OpenAIRE

    Polonyi, Janos

    2010-01-01

    The particle and current densities are shown to display damping and undergo decoherence in ideal quantum gases. The damping is read off from the equations of motion reminiscent of the Navier-Stokes equations and shows some formal similarity with Landau damping. The decoherence leads to consistent density and current histories with characteristic length and time scales given by the ideal gas.

  13. Deviations from Fick's law in Lorentz gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowe, C.P.; Frenkel, D.; Hoef, M.A. van der

    1997-01-01

    We have calculated the self-dynamic structure factorF(k,t) for tagged particle motion in hopping Lorentz gases. We find evidence that, even at long times, the probability distribution function for the displacement of the particles is highly non-Gaussian. At very small values of the wave vector this

  14. Eco gases for future particle gas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kjølbro, Jógvan Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    Due to global regulations of non environmental refrigerants, some of the gas mixtures used in gas detectors at CERN has to be replaced. This report is a review that summarises and predicts some properties that are important when selecting new gases to operate in the gas detectors.

  15. Field theory for trapped atomic gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this course we give a selfcontained introduction to the quantum field theory for trapped atomic gases, using functional methods throughout. We consider both equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena. In the equilibrium case, we first derive the appropriate Hartree-Fock theory for the properties of

  16. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical...

  17. The Chemistry of the noble gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernick, Cedric L. [Agonne National Laboratory

    1967-01-01

    This booklet discusses the 6 noble gases: helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon. Until 1962, it was believed that these 6 elements were not able to form chemical compounds. Hence they were called "noble" because they didn't mingle with the common masses of elements.

  18. Mitigation of greenhouse gases from agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schils, R.L.M.; Ellis, J. L.; de Klein, C. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Models are widely used to simulate the emission of greenhouse gases (GHG). They help to identify knowledge gaps, estimate total emissions for inventories, develop mitigation options and policies, raise awareness and encourage adoption. These models vary in scale, scope and methodological approach...

  19. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  20. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  1. Tested Demonstrations: Diffusion of Gases--Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Provided are procedures and list of materials needed to demonstrate that the pressure inside a container with a porous surface can be changed due to the rate of diffusion of low molecular weight gases. Typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  2. Reducing the Livestock related green house gases emission

    OpenAIRE

    Indira, D; G Srividya

    2012-01-01

    Cattle rearing generate more global warming green house gases than driving cars. These green house gases leads to changes in the climate. This climate change affects the livestock, man and natural environment continuously. For this reason it is important for livestock farmers to find the ways which minimize these gases emission. In this article the causes of climate change and effects, measures to be taken by farmers and their efficiency in reducing green house gases emission were reviewed br...

  3. Molecular orientation of copper phthalocyanine thin films on different monolayers of fullerene on SiO{sub 2} or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chenggong; Wang, Congcong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Liu, Xiaoliang [Institute for Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials (ISUPAM), Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Xu, Xumei; Li, Youzhen [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Xie, Fangyan [Instrumental Analysis Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Gao, Yongli [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Institute for Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials (ISUPAM), Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2015-03-23

    The interface electronic structures of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) have been studied using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy as different monolayers of C{sub 60} were inserted between CuPc and a SiO{sub 2} or highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate. The results show that CuPc has standing up configuration with one monolayer of C{sub 60} insertion on SiO{sub 2} while lying down on HOPG, indicating that the insertion layer propagates the CuPc-substrate interaction. Meanwhile, CuPc on more than one monolayers of C{sub 60} on different substrates show that the substrate orientation effect quickly vanished. Our study elucidates intriguing molecular interactions that manipulate molecular orientation and donor-acceptor energy level alignment.

  4. Scale-invariant nonlinear optics in gases

    CERN Document Server

    Heyl, C M; Miranda, M; Louisy, M; Kovacs, K; Tosa, V; Balogh, E; Varjú, K; L'Huillier, A; Couairon, A; Arnold, C L

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear optical methods are becoming ubiquitous in many areas of modern photonics. They are, however, often limited to a certain range of input parameters, such as pulse energy and average power, since restrictions arise from, for example, parasitic nonlinear effects, damage problems and geometrical considerations. Here, we show that many nonlinear optics phenomena in gaseous media are scale-invariant if spatial coordinates, gas density and laser pulse energy are scaled appropriately. We develop a general scaling model for (3+1)-dimensional wave equations, demonstrating the invariant scaling of nonlinear pulse propagation in gases. Our model is numerically applied to high-order harmonic generation and filamentation as well as experimentally verified using the example of pulse post-compression via filamentation. Our results provide a simple recipe for up-or downscaling of nonlinear processes in gases with numerous applications in many areas of science.

  5. Detecting Friedel oscillations in ultracold Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Keno; Hueck, Klaus; Luick, Niclas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2017-09-01

    Investigating Friedel oscillations in ultracold gases would complement the studies performed on solid state samples with scanning-tunneling microscopes. In atomic quantum gases interactions and external potentials can be tuned freely and the inherently slower dynamics allow to access non-equilibrium dynamics following a potential or interaction quench. Here, we examine how Friedel oscillations can be observed in current ultracold gas experiments under realistic conditions. To this aim we numerically calculate the amplitude of the Friedel oscillations which are induced by a potential barrier in a 1D Fermi gas and compare it to the expected atomic and photonic shot noise in a density measurement. We find that to detect Friedel oscillations the signal from several thousand one-dimensional systems has to be averaged. However, as up to 100 parallel one-dimensional systems can be prepared in a single run with present experiments, averaging over about 100 images is sufficient.

  6. Learning the Critical Points for Addition in Matematika GASING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, Johannes Hamonangan; Wiyanti, Wiwik; Wakhyuningsih, Nur Safitri; Godjali, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We propose learning Matematika GASING to help students better understand the addition material. Matematika GASING is a way of learning mathematics in an easy, fun and enjoyable fashion. GASING is short for GAmpang, aSyIk, and menyenaNGkan (Bahasa Indonesia for easy, fun and enjoyable). It was originally developed by Prof. Yohanes Surya at the…

  7. 40 CFR 600.108-78 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 600.108-78 Section 600.108-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL... Model Year Automobiles-Test Procedures § 600.108-78 Analytical gases. The analytical gases for all...

  8. 40 CFR 86.1314-94 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1314-94 Section 86.1314-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... § 86.1314-94 Analytical gases. (a) Gases for the CO and CO2 analyzers shall be single blends of CO...

  9. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  10. Chemistry and Toxicity of Tear Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Malhotra

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a historical background on the use of tear gases in war and civilian riot control activity. The classification of chemical compounds used as irritants, and their structure - activity relationship established through different studies has been examined. A review of toxic effects which is different from irritancy of Adamsite, w- chloroacetophenone (CN, o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS and Dibenz (b,f, [1, 4] - oxazepine (CR has been presented.

  11. Global Reactive Gases in the MACC project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    In preparation for the planned atmospheric service component of the European Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative, the EU FP7 project Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) developed a preoperational data assimilation and modelling system for monitoring and forecasting of reactive gases, greenhouse gases and aerosols. The project is coordinated by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and the system is built on ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) which has been coupled to the chemistry transport models MOZART-3 and TM5. In order to provide daily forecasts of up to 96 hours for global reactive gases, various satellite retrieval products for ozone (total column and profile data), CO, NO2, CH2O and SO2 are either actively assimilated or passively monitored. The MACC system is routinely evaluated with in-situ data from ground-based stations, ozone sondes and aircraft measurements, and with independent satellite retrievals. Global MACC reactive gases forecasts are used in the planning and analysis of large international field campaigns and to provide dynamical chemical boundary conditions to regional air quality models worldwide. Several case studies of outstanding air pollution events have been performed, and they demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of chemical data assimilation based on current satellite data products. Besides the regular analyses and forecasts of the tropospheric chemical composition, the MACC system is also used to monitor the evolution of stratospheric ozone. A comprehensive reanalysis simulation from 2003 to 2010 provides new insights into the interannual variability of the atmospheric chemical composition.

  12. Paschen's law studies in cold gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarczyk, R.; Chu, P.; Dugger, C.; Elliott, S. R.; Rielage, K.; Xu, W.

    2017-06-01

    The break-through voltage behavior over small gaps has been investigated for differing gap distances, gas pressures, and gas temperatures in nitrogen, neon, argon and xenon gases. A deviation from Paschen's law at micro gap distances has been found. At lower temperatures, a significant shift of the curve relative to the results at room temperature was observed. This behavior can be explained by combining Paschen's law and the ideal gas law.

  13. On high energy tails in inelastic gases

    OpenAIRE

    Lambiotte, R.; Brenig, L.; Salazar, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    We study the formation of high energy tails in a one-dimensional kinetic model for granular gases, the so-called Inelastic Maxwell Model. We introduce a time- discretized version of the stochastic process, and show that continuous time implies larger fluctuations of the particles energies. This is due to a statistical relation between the number of inelastic collisions undergone by a particle and its average energy. This feature is responsible for the high energy tails in the model, as shown ...

  14. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-12-30

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  15. Toxicity of Pyrolysis Gases from Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, Carlos J.; Kosola, Kay L.; Solis, Alida N.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Parker, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acryltonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions; carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  16. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeki Matsunaga

    2015-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence o...

  17. Noble Gases in the Chelyabinsk Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Makiko K.; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Mikouchi, Takashi; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fell in Russia on February 15, 2013 and was classified as LL5 chondrite. The diameter before it entered the atmosphere has been estimated to be about 20 m [1]. Up to now, numerous fragments weighing much greater than 100 kg in total have been collected. In this study, all noble gases were measured for 13 fragments to investigate the exposure history of the Chelyabinsk meteorite and the thermal history of its parent asteroid.

  18. Gases in Sea Ice 1975 - 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    work through 1973 (under separate cover)- dynamics of the exchange of CO 2 in the arctic and subarcticreino0....... ... 0 1 1. INTRODUCTION The ONR has...winter months. In spring j thermally induced physical processes may suddenly release the contained gases. Mycological blooms, which are likely to occur...million or more by volume per year in the arctic atmosphere as well as in the I tropics and the Antarctic. The rate of increase of CO2 in the

  19. Kinetic theory of nonideal gases and nonideal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Klimontovich, Yu L

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic Theory of Nonideal Gases and Nonideal Plasmas presents the fundamental aspects of the kinetic theory of gases and plasmas. The book consists of three parts, which attempts to present some of the ideas, methods and applications in the study of the kinetic processes in nonideal gases and plasmas. The first part focuses on the classical kinetic theory of nonideal gases. The second part discusses the classical kinetic theory of fully ionized plasmas. The last part is devoted to the quantum kinetic theory of nonideal gases and plasmas. A concluding chapter is included, which presents a shor

  20. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  1. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    2014-01-01

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L→V), and liquid-commensurate (L→CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L→V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  2. Diffusive retention of atmospheric gases in chert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, E.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Schaller, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Throughout Earth's history, the volatile contents (N2, CO2, Ar) of both deep and shallow terrestrial reservoirs has been dynamic. Volatiles are important chemical constituents because they play a significant role in regulating Earth's climate, mediating the evolution of complex life, and controlling the properties of minerals and rocks. Estimating levels of atmospheric volatiles in the deep geological past requires interrogation of materials that have acquired and retained a chemical memory from that time. Cherts have the potential to trap atmospheric components during formation and later release those gases for analysis in the laboratory. However, cherts have been underexploited in this regard, partly because their ability to retain a record of volatile components has not been adequately evaluated. Before cherts can be reliably used as indicators of past levels of major atmospheric gases, it is crucial that we understand the diffusive retentiveness of these cryptocrystalline silica phases. As the first step toward quantifying the diffusivity and solubility of carbon dioxide and nitrogen in chert, we have performed 1-atmosphere diffusive-uptake experiments at temperatures up to 450°C. Depth profiles of in-diffusing gases are measured by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) to help us understand the molecular-scale transport of volatiles and thus the validity of using chert-bound volatiles to record information about Earth history. Data collected to date suggest that at least some cherts are ideal storage containers and can retain volatiles for a geologically long time. In addition to these diffusion experiments, preliminary online-crush fast-scan measurements using a quadrupole mass spectrometer indicate that atmospheric volatiles are released upon crushing various chert samples. By coupling such volatile-release measurements made by mass spectrometry with diffusion experiments, we are uniquely able to address the storage and fidelity of volatiles bound in crustal

  3. Gases and vacua handbook of vacuum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, A H

    2013-01-01

    Handbook of Vacuum Physics, Volume 1: Gases and Vacua provides information on the many aspects of vacuum technology, from material on the quantum theoretical aspects of the complex semi-conductors used for thermionic and photo-electric emission to data on the performance of commercially available pumps, gauges, and high-vacuum materials. The handbook satisfies the need of workers using vacuum apparatuses or works on the diverse applications of high-vacuum technology in research and industry. The book is a compilation of long articles prepared by experts in vacuum technology. Sufficient theoret

  4. Cristais de gases raros nos metais

    OpenAIRE

    Cendotec, Cendotec; CENDOTEC - São Paulo

    1989-01-01

    Durante a fissão, o aumento de volume do combustível no caroço dos reatores nucleares deve-se ao acúmulo de bolhas de gases raros encerrados nos produtos de fissão do urânio. Agora, uma equipe de pesquisadores franceses demonstrou que essas bolhas, supostamente gasosas, eram na verdade sólidos cristalinos quando o bombardeio de íons nos materiais se realizava em temperatura ambiente, e que a elevação da temperatura provoca uma transformação sólido/líquido, perfeitamente reversível. Descobrira...

  5. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Matsunaga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  6. Longitudinal Viscous Flow in Granular Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Andres

    2008-01-01

    The flow characterized by a linear longitudinal velocity field $u_x(x,t)=a(t)x$, where $a(t)={a_0}/({1+a_0t})$, a uniform density $n(t)\\propto a(t)$, and a uniform temperature $T(t)$ is analyzed for dilute granular gases by means of a BGK-like model kinetic equation in $d$ dimensions. For a given value of the coefficient of normal restitution $\\alpha$, the relevant control parameter of the problem is the reduced deformation rate $a^*(t)=a(t)/\

  7. Imprisonment dynamics of resonance radiation in gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Y, E-mail: kosarev_nikolai@mail.ru [Institute of Computational Modeling, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-28

    Imprisonment of resonant radiation in gases on the basis of the numerical solution of the rate balance equation for the excited atoms and the transfer resonant radiation equation is investigated. Calculations of the escape factor for the slab, cylinder and sphere at Doppler and Lorentz forms of absorption and scattering profiles are executed. Calculation results of the escape factor for the cylinder and slab are compared with Holsten's asymptotical solutions. The numerical data for time dependence of a spectrum, the intensity of resonant radiation and the spatial distribution of the excited atomic concentration in a regime of afterglow are also considered.

  8. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Beattie, W.H.

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (approx. 2 ppM) present in commercial Xe and ppM levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  9. Positron scattering from noble gases future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A C L; Caradonna, P; Makochekanwa, C; Slaughter, D S; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Mitroy, J, E-mail: acj107@rsphysse.anu.edu.a [Faculty of Education Health and Science, Charles Darwin University, NT (Australia)

    2009-11-01

    Recent results for positron scattering from noble gases over an energy range from 0.5 to 60eV are presented. Measurements include the grand total ({sigma}{sub GT}), Ps formation ({sigma}{sub Ps}) and Grand total - Ps formation (({sigma}{sub GT}-P{sub s}) cross sections. Some preliminary DCS results will also be presented. Work on a formulation of modified effective range theory (MERT) is being undertaken to determine the value of the scattering length which may be useful for identifying a bound state. Plans for experiments on metal atoms will be outlined.

  10. Bragg spectroscopy of strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingham, M. G.; Fenech, K.; Peppler, T.; Hoinka, S.; Dyke, P.; Hannaford, P.; Vale, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    This article provides an overview of recent developments and emerging topics in the study of two-component Fermi gases using Bragg spectroscopy. Bragg scattering is achieved by exposing a gas to two intersecting laser beams with a slight frequency difference and measuring the momentum transferred to the atoms. By varying the Bragg laser detuning, it is possible to measure either the density or spin response functions which characterize the basic excitations present in the gas. Specifically, one can measure properties such as the dynamic and static structure factors, Tan's universal contact parameter and observe signatures for the onset of pair condensation locally within a gas.

  11. Mean free path in soccer and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzuriaga, J, E-mail: luzuriag@cab.cnea.gov.a [Centro Atomico Bariloche - CNEA, Instituto Balseiro UNC (8400), Bariloche (Argentina)

    2010-09-15

    The trajectories of the molecules in an ideal gas and of the ball in a soccer game are compared. The great difference between these motions and some similarities are discussed. This example could be suitable for discussing many concepts in kinetic theory in a way that can be pictured by students for getting a more intuitive understanding. It could be suitable for an introductory course in vacuum techniques or undergraduate courses in kinetic theory of gases. Without going into the slightly harder quantitative results, the analysis presented might be used for introducing some ideas of kinetic theory qualitatively to high school students.

  12. Microstructure of a pyrolytic carbon coating on a nuclear graphite substrate IG-110%沉积在核石墨IG-110基体上的热解炭涂层微观结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯尚蕾; 杨迎国; 白朔; 许力; 杨新梅; 夏汇浩; 周兴泰

    2015-01-01

    采用化学气相沉积技术,以甲烷作为碳源,在核石墨IG-110基体上制备层状热解炭涂层。利用偏光显微镜、扫描电子显微镜( SEM)、透射电子显微镜( TEM)以及同步辐射掠入射X 射线衍射( GI-XRD)研究热解炭涂层的微观结构和生长特性。结果表明,热解炭涂层具有大锥体、小锥体和再生锥体三种生长锥微观结构,热解炭片层间结合紧密,生长锥间结合密实。热解炭涂层存在光滑层和再生层两种织构,每种织构都含有两种晶面间距不同的相结构,平滑层主要含有低石墨化度相,而再生层主要含有高石墨化度相。热解炭涂层致密的微观结构和仅存在的纳米级别的微孔使其可以作为气体阻隔涂层。%The molten salt reactor ( MSR) is one of the six Generation IV reactors that is being reexamined today, owing to its unique fuel cycle capabilities and safety characteristics. IG-110 nuclear graphite a candidate material for constructing a MSR. However, the existence of large pores at its surface is a big problem due to the impregnation of molten salts and the diffusion of fission product gases into the graphite through the pores. A pyrolytic carbon ( PyC) coating can act as a barrier coating on the nuclear graphite. Investigation of the microstructure and growth characteristics of PyC is very important for an understanding of the relationship between microstructure and performance. In this study, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction were used to study the microstructure and growth characteristics of the PyC coating. Results show that the PyC coating shows three growth cones ( a large cone, a smaller one and a regenerative cone) and exhibits a wave-like layered structure. The resulting structure is fairly dense. There are two kinds of textures in the PyC coating:smooth laminar and regenerative

  13. 废轮胎热解炭黑的表面修饰及其在平版印刷油墨中的应用%Surface Modification of Pyrolytic Carbon Black from Waste Tires and Its Use as Pigment for Offset Printing Ink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周洁; 王靖岱; 任晓红; 阳永荣; 蒋斌波

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis has the potential of transforming waste into valuable products. Pyrolytic carbon black (PCB) is one of the most important products resulting from the pyrolysis of used tires. One of the most significant applications of modified pyrolytic carbon black is its use as pigment for offset printing ink to obtain high added values.Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) results show that a large quantity of inorganic matters and carbonaceous deposit are removed by treating the pyrolytic carbon black with nitric acid solution. Plenty of active sites originally occupied by inorganic ash and coke are recovered. The surface energy of pyrolytic carbon black (TWPC) modified by titanate-coupling agent-especially the specific interaction γsPs determined by the specific probe molecule, toluene-shows the strong interaction between the TWPC and the synthetic resins. The offset printing ink performance confirms the IGC prediction. And TWPC has the great potential of applications in printing ink industry as pigment.

  14. Validation of aerosols, reactive gases and greenhouse gases in the CAMS forecasts, analyses and reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Henk; Basart, Sara; Blechschmidt, Anne; Chabrillat, Simon; Clark, Hannah; Cuevas, Emilio; Engelen, Richard; Kapsomenakis, John; Katragkou, Eleni; Mantzius Hansen, Kaj; Niemeijer, Sander; Ramonet, Michel; Schulz, Michael; Sudarchikova, Natalia; Wagner, Annette; Warneke, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The Atmosphere Monitoring Service of the European Copernicus Programme (CAMS) is an operational service providing analyses, reanalyses and daily forecasts of aerosols, reactive gases and greenhouse gases on a global scale, and air quality forecasts and reanalyses on a regional scale. CAMS is based on the systems developed during the European MACC I-II-III (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) research projects. In CAMS data assimilation techniques are applied to combine in-situ and remote sensing observations with global and European-scale models of atmospheric reactive gases, aerosols and greenhouse gases. The global component is based on the Integrated Forecast System of the ECMWF, and the regional component on an ensemble of 7 European air quality models. CAMS is implemented by ECMWF, and the transition from MACC to CAMS is currently being implemented (2015-2016). CAMS has a dedicated validation activity, a partnership of 13 institutes co-ordinated by KNMI, to document the quality of the atmospheric composition products. In our contribution we discuss this validation activity, including the measurement data sets, validation requirements, the operational aspects, the upgrade procedure, the validation reports and scoring methods, and the model configurations and assimilation systems validated. Of special concern are the forecasts of high pollution concentration events (fires, dust storms, air pollution events, volcano ash and SO2). A few interesting validation results will be shown.

  15. Study of electron transport in hydrocarbon gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, H. [Tomakomai National College of Technology, Tomakomai 059-1275 (Japan); Date, H. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-04-07

    The drift velocity and the effective ionization coefficient of electrons in the organic gases, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}, have been measured over relatively wide ranges of density-reduced electric fields (E/N) at room temperature (around 300 K). The drift velocity was measured, based on the arrival-time spectra of electrons by using a double-shutter drift tube over the E/N range from 300 to 2800 Td, and the effective ionization coefficient (α − η) was determined by the steady-state Townsend method from 150 to 3000 Td. Whenever possible, these parameters were compared with those available in the literature. It has been shown that the swarm parameters for these gases have specific tendencies, depending on their molecular configurations.

  16. Instabilities in inductive discharges in reactive gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabert, Pascal

    2002-10-01

    High-density inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are routinely used for etching in the microelectronics industry. Since there is a substantial voltage across the non-resonant inductive coil, a fraction of the discharge power is deposited capacitively. The real inductive discharge can therefore exist in two different modes: the capacitive mode (E mode), for low power, and the inductive mode (H mode), for high power. As the power is increased, transitions from capacitive to inductive modes (E-H transitions) are observed. Tuszewski (Journal of Applied Physics, 1996) found that when operating with reactive gases containing negative ions the transition can be unstable, and a wide range of powers exist where the discharge oscillates between higher and lower electron density states. Later, Lieberman and co-workers (Lieberman et al., Applied Physics Letters 1999, and Chabert et al. Plasma Sources Sci. and Technol. 2001) proposed a model of this instability, based on particle and energy balance, showing the crucial role of negative ions in the instability process. This paper will present recent experimental and theoretical work in this area. Oscillations in the unsaturated radical (CF and CF2 in a CF4 inductive discharge) concentrations were measured during the instability by time-resolved laser induced fluorescence, showing that neutral species dynamics can be significant. On the theoretical side, conditions for the stability of inductive discharges with electronegative gases were derived from the model.

  17. An installation for vapor conversion of gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, I.; Tabata, K.

    1983-01-28

    An installation is proposed for converting a mixture of hydrocarbon gases with steam in the presence of nickel, platinum, lead and cobalt catalysts (Kt) on a carrier of Si0/sub 2/, A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/, Ti0/sub 2/ and so on. The reaction tower (RK1) for conversion is made of an inorganic, heat resistant ceramic material (for instance, A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/ ceramic), heaters are located inside the walls of the reaction tower, while on the outside the reaction conversion tower is equipped with an external tubular housing made of heat resistant materials or of inorganic heat resistant ceramic material. Here, there is a space between the external walls of the reaction conversion tower and the walls of the housing along the entire circumference of the reaction conversion tower which serves for preheating of the hydrocarbon gas and the steam before their input into the reaction conversion tower. The installation is designed for conversion of natural gas, C/sub 3/H/sub 8/ and other hydrocarbon gases and of liquid hydrocarbons (Uv) into synthesis gas. The design provides for even heating of the catalyst during reforming. The use of ceramic materials for the reaction conversion tower prevents sedimentation of coke on the walls of the reaction tower.

  18. Reducing the Livestock related green house gases emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Indira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cattle rearing generate more global warming green house gases than driving cars. These green house gases leads to changes in the climate. This climate change affects the livestock, man and natural environment continuously. For this reason it is important for livestock farmers to find the ways which minimize these gases emission. In this article the causes of climate change and effects, measures to be taken by farmers and their efficiency in reducing green house gases emission were reviewed briefly to make the farmers and students aware of the reduction of global warming green house gases and measures to be taken for reducing these gases. [Vet. World 2012; 5(4.000: 244-247

  19. Co-pyrolysis behaviour and kinetic of two typical solid wastes in China and characterisation of activated carbon prepared from pyrolytic char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuhui; Niu, Ruxuan; Wang, Xiaona; Wang, Qunhui; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Sun, Xiaohong

    2014-11-01

    This is the first study on the co-pyrolysis of spent substrate of Pleurotus ostreatus and coal tar pitch, and the activated carbon prepared from the pyrolytic char. Thermogravimetry (TG) analysis was carried out taking spent substrate, coal tar pitch and spent substrate-coal tar pitch mixture. The activation energies of pyrolysis reactions were obtained via the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose methods. The kinetic models were determined by the master-plots method. The activated carbons were characterised by N2-adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Experimental results demonstrated a synergistic effect happened during co-pyrolysis, which was characterised by a decreased maximum decomposition rate and an enhanced char yield. The average activation energies of the pyrolysis reactions of spent substrate, coal tar pitch and the mixture were 115.94, 72.92 and 94.38 kJ mol(-1) for the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa method, and 112.17, 65.62 and 89.91 kJ mol(-1) for the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose method. The reaction model functions were f(α) = (1-α)(3.42), (1-α)(1.72) and (1-α)(3.07) for spent substrate, coal tar pitch and the mixture, respectively. The mixture char-derived activated carbon had a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area up to 1337 m(2) g(-1) and a total pore volume of 0.680 cm(3) g(-1). Mixing spent substrate with coal tar pitch led to the creation of more micropores and a higher surface area compared with the single spent substrate and coal tar pitch char. Also, the mixture char-derived activated carbon had a higher proportion of aromatic stacking. This study provides a reference for the utilisation of spent substrate and coal tar pitch via co-pyrolysis, and their pyrolytic char as a promising precursor of activated carbon.

  20. Relativistic Quantum Thermodynamics of Ideal Gases in 2 Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Blas, H.; Pimentel, B. M.; Tomazelli, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    In this work we study the behavior of relativistic ideal Bose and Fermi gases in two space dimensions. Making use of polylogarithm functions we derive a closed and unified expression for their densities. It is shown that both type of gases are essentially inequivalent, and only in the non-relativistic limit the spinless and equal mass Bose and Fermi gases are equivalent as known in the literature.

  1. Relativistic quantum thermodynamics of ideal gases in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blas, H; Pimentel, B M; Tomazelli, J L

    1999-11-01

    In this work we study the behavior of relativistic ideal Bose and Fermi gases in two space dimensions. Making use of polylogarithm functions we derive a closed and unified expression for their densities. It is shown that both type of gases are essentially inequivalent, and only in the non-relativistic limit the spinless and equal mass Bose and Fermi gases are equivalent as known in the literature.

  2. Method for the removal of dust from exhaust gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritzmann, H.; Wohlfarth, J.P.

    1976-11-02

    A stream of raw material is passed through a preheater to a furnace and a stream of exhaust gases from the furnace is passed through the preheater to preheat the raw material. Dust is electrostatically precipitated from the exhaust gases leaving the preheater, and the temperature of such exhaust gases is controllably raised to improve the efficiency of the dust removal by bypassing a controlled proportion of at least one of the streams around at least a portion of the preheater.

  3. Plant for the production of activated carbon and electric power from the gases originated in gasification processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganan, J.; Turegano, J.P.; Calama, G. [Area de Engenharia. Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestao. Instituto Politecnico de Portalegre, Lugar da Abadesa, Apartado 148, 7301 Portalegre Codex (Portugal); Roman, S.; Al-Kassir, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Energetica, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, 06071 (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    The development of the countries involves a high energy demand; however, the energetic resources used by the moment are not renewable. Events like the energetic crisis of 1973, the continuous geopolitic clashes in energetic resource-rich areas, and the global environmental deterioration as a consequence of the industrial activity taking place in last century, make obvious the need of searching new sources of energy [1]. One of these sources is the obtainment of energy from biomass exploitation. The use of this raw material involves advantages in the emission of low quantities of contaminants to the atmosphere and its renewable character. Until now, the main drawback of this source is its lack of viability when trying to obtain electric power from biomass, due to the use of systems composed of a boiler and a steam turbine (which offer low operative flexibility), which are not rentable in such a competitive market as it is, currently, the energetic one. Nowadays, the use of internal combustion engines, combined with biomass gasifiers, allows rapid connection-disconnection of the plant (aproximately of five minutes), which confers a big flexibility to the system and, as a consequence, a better exploitation of the plant in maximum energetic consumption hours. It also has the advantage of establishing a co-generation system since the gases are generated at a high temperature, 800 {sup o}C [2]. With this view, the aim of this work has focused in the re-design of a gasification plant for the production of activated carbons, from biomassic residues, for the energetic exploitation of the combustible gases produced during the pyrolytic process (H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}), since these gases are currently burnt in a torch in the plant. The idea of designing the activated carbon production plant arose from the need of managing the biomass residues (olive wastes) generated by the firm Euroliva-Azeites e Oleos Alimentares SA

  4. Fractionated (Martian) Noble Gases — EFA, Experiments and Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Barnes, G.; Bridges, J. C.; Bullock, M. A.; Chavez, C. L.; Filiberto, J.; Herrmann, S.; Hicks, L. J.; Kelley, S. P.; Miller, M. A.; Moore, J. M.; Ott, U.; Smith, H. D.; Steer, E. D.; Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    Noble gases are tracers for physical processes, including adsorption, dissolution and secondary mineral formation. We examine the Martian fractionated atmosphere through literature, terrestrial analogs and experiments.

  5. Generation and release of radioactive gases in LLW disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, M.S. [Harvard School Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Simonson, S.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The atmospheric release of radioactive gases from a generic engineered LLW disposal facility and its radiological impacts were examined. To quantify the generation of radioactive gases, detailed characterization of source inventory for carbon-14, tritium, iodine-129, krypton-85, and radon-222, was performed in terms of their activity concentrations; their distribution within different waste classes, waste forms and containers; and their subsequent availability for release in volatile or gaseous form. The generation of gases was investigated for the processes of microbial activity, radiolysis, and corrosion of waste containers and metallic components in wastes. The release of radionuclides within these gases to the atmosphere was analyzed under the influence of atmospheric pressure changes.

  6. Particle number counting statistics in ideal Bose gases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christoph Weiss; Martin Wilkens

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the exact particle number counting statistics of degenerate ideal Bose gases in the microcanonical, canonical, and grand-canonical ensemble, respectively, for various trapping potentials...

  7. Isotopic compositional Characteristics of Terrigenous Natural Gases in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈平; 徐永昌

    1993-01-01

    The C and H isotopic compositions of the methane in more than 160 gas samples from 10 basins in China are presented in this paper.The natural gases are classified as four types: biogenic gas ,bio-thermocatalytic transitional gas, gas associated with condensate oil ,and coal-type gas. The isotopic compositions of these gases closely related to the depositional basins, the types of organic matter,the stages of thermal evolution and the genetic characteristics of different gas reservoirs.Studies of the C and H isotopic compositions of terrigenous natural gases will provide valua-ble information on the prospecting and development of natural gases of different genetic types.

  8. Properties of gases, liquids, and solutions principles and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Warren P

    2013-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume ll-Part A: Properties of Gases, Liquids, and Solutions ponders on high frequency sound waves in gases, liquids, and solids that have been proven as effective tools in examining the molecular, domain wall, and other types of motions. The selection first offers information on the transmission of sound waves in gases at very low pressures and the phenomenological theory of the relaxation phenomena in gases. Topics include free molecule propagation, phenomenological thermodynamics of irreversible processes, and simultaneous multiple relaxation pro

  9. Veracruz State Preliminary Greenhouse Gases Emissions Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh Rodriguez, C.; Rodriquez Viqueira, L.; Guzman Rojas, S.

    2007-05-01

    At recent years, the international organisms such as United Nations, has discussed that the temperature has increased slightly and the pattern of precipitations has changed in different parts of the world, which cause either extreme droughts or floods and that the extreme events have increased. These are some of the risks of global climate change because of the increase of gas concentration in the atmosphere such as carbon dioxides, nitrogen oxides and methane - which increase the greenhouse effect. Facing the consequences that could emerge because of the global temperature grown, there is a genuine necessity in different sectors of reduction the greenhouse gases and reduced the adverse impacts of climate change. To solve that, many worldwide conventions have been realized (Rio de Janeiro, Kyoto, Montreal) where different countries have established political compromises to stabilize their emissions of greenhouse gases. The mitigation and adaptation policies merge as a response to the effects that the global climate change could have, on the humans as well as the environment. That is the reason to provide the analysis of the areas and geographic zones of the country that present major vulnerability to the climate change. The development of an inventory of emissions that identifies and quantifies the principal sources of greenhouse gases of a country, and also of a region is basic to any study about climate change, also to develop specific political programs that allow to preserve and even improve a quality of the atmospheric environment, and maybe to incorporate to international mechanisms such as the emissions market. To estimate emissions in a systematic and consistent way on a regional, national and international level is a requirement to evaluate the feasibility and the cost-benefit of instrumented possible mitigation strategies and to adopt politics and technologies to reduce emissions. Mexico has two national inventories of emissions, 1990 and 1995, now it is

  10. Genetic classification of natural gases in the Bozhong Depression, Bohai Bay, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Youjun; WEN Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    The geochemical characteristics of natural gases discovered in the Bozhong Depression are systematically described in this paper. The natural gases are composed mainly of hydrocarbon gases. Natural gases occurring in the Paleogene and older reservoirs are wet gases, whereas those in the Neogene reservoirs are dry gases. Methane and ethane in the gases are significantly different in carbon isotopic composition. The methane carbon isotopic composition of the gases in structure BZ28-1 and the ethane carbon isotopic composition of the gases in structure QHD30-1 are characterized by the heaviest values, respectively. The natural gases are in the mature to highly mature stages. The hydrocarbon gases are of organic origin and can be classified as oil-type gases, coal-derived gases and mixed gases with the third one accounting for the major portion.

  11. Peltier cooling of fermionic quantum gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Ch; Georges, A; Kollath, C

    2014-11-14

    We propose a cooling scheme for fermionic quantum gases, based on the principles of the Peltier thermoelectric effect and energy filtering. The system to be cooled is connected to another harmonically trapped gas acting as a reservoir. The cooling is achieved by two simultaneous processes: (i) the system is evaporatively cooled, and (ii) cold fermions from deep below the Fermi surface of the reservoir are injected below the Fermi level of the system, in order to fill the "holes" in the energy distribution. This is achieved by a suitable energy dependence of the transmission coefficient connecting the system to the reservoir. The two processes can be viewed as simultaneous evaporative cooling of particles and holes. We show that both a significantly lower entropy per particle and faster cooling rate can be achieved in this way than by using only evaporative cooling.

  12. Peltier Cooling of Fermionic Quantum Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Ch.; Georges, A.; Kollath, C.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a cooling scheme for fermionic quantum gases, based on the principles of the Peltier thermoelectric effect and energy filtering. The system to be cooled is connected to another harmonically trapped gas acting as a reservoir. The cooling is achieved by two simultaneous processes: (i) the system is evaporatively cooled, and (ii) cold fermions from deep below the Fermi surface of the reservoir are injected below the Fermi level of the system, in order to fill the "holes" in the energy distribution. This is achieved by a suitable energy dependence of the transmission coefficient connecting the system to the reservoir. The two processes can be viewed as simultaneous evaporative cooling of particles and holes. We show that both a significantly lower entropy per particle and faster cooling rate can be achieved in this way than by using only evaporative cooling.

  13. Effective dynamics of strongly dissipative Rydberg gases

    CERN Document Server

    Marcuzzi, M; Olmos, B; Lesanovsky, I

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of interacting Rydberg gases in the limit of strong noise and dissipation. Starting from a description in terms of a Markovian quantum master equation we derive effective equations of motion that govern the dynamics on a "coarse-grained" timescale where fast dissipative degrees of freedom have been adiabatically eliminated. Specifically, we consider two scenarios which are of relevance for current theoretical and experimental studies --- Rydberg atoms in a two-level (spin) approximation subject to strong dephasing noise as well as Rydberg atoms under so-called electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) conditions and fast radiative decay. In the former case we find that the effective dynamics is described by classical rate equations up to second order in an appropriate perturbative expansion. This drastically reduces the computational complexity of numerical simulations in comparison to the full quantum master equation. When accounting for the fourth order correction in this e...

  14. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

  15. Numerical computations of explosions in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chushkin, P. I.; Shurshalov, L. V.

    The development and the present-day state of the problem on numerical computations of explosions in gases are reviewed. In the first part, different one-dimensional cases are discussed: point explosion with counterpressure, blast-like expansion of volumes filled with a compressed hot gas, blast of charges of condensed explosive, explosion processes in real high-temperature air, in combustible detonating media and under action of other physical-chemical factors. In the second part devoted to two-dimensional flows, we consider explosion in the non-homogeneous atmosphere, blast of asymmetric charges, detonation in gas, explosion modelling of some cosmic phenomena (solar flares, the Tunguska meteorite). The survey includes about 110 works beginning with the first publications on the subject.

  16. Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

    2012-03-29

    Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

  17. Anode wire aging tests with selected gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadyk, J.; Wise, J.; Hess, D.; Williams, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1990-04-01

    As a continuation of earlier wire aging investigations, additional candidates for wire chamber gas and wire have been tested. These include the gases: argon/ethane, HRS gas, dimethyl ether, carbon dioxide/ethane, and carbon tetrafluoride/isobutane. Wires used were: gold- plated tungsten, Stablohm, Nicotin, and Stainless Steel. Measurements were made of the effects upon wire aging of impurities from plumbing materials or contamination from various types of oil. Attempts were made to induce wire aging by adding measured amounts of oxygen and halogen (methyl chloride) with negative results. In this paper, the possible role of electronegativity in the wire aging process is discussed, and measurements of electronegativity are made with several single carbon Freons, using both an electron capture detector and a wire chamber operating with dimethyl ether.

  18. Explorative analysis of microbes, colloids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbeck, Lotta; Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2008-08-15

    The overall objectives of the hydrogeochemical description for Forsmark are to establish a detailed understanding of the hydrogeochemical conditions at the site and to develop models that fulfil the needs identified by the safety assessment groups during the site investigation phase. Issues of concern to safety assessment are radionuclide transport and technical barrier behaviour, both of which are dependent on the chemistry of groundwater and pore water and their evolution with time. In this report, part of the final hydrogeochemical evaluation work of the site investigation at the Forsmark site, is presented. The work was conducted by SKB's hydrogeochemical project group, ChemNet, which consists of independent consultants and Univ. researchers with expertise in geochemistry, hydrochemistry, hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on 2.2 data and complementary 2.3 data, was carried out during September 2006 to December 2007. This report focuses on microbiology, colloids and gases: - Microbes (Chapter 1): Several methods must be used to characterize active microbial communities in groundwater. Microbial parameters of interest are the total number of cells (TNC) and the presence of various metabolic groups of microorganisms. Different microbial groups influence the environment in different ways, depending on what metabolic group is dominant. Typically, the following redox couples are utilized by bacteria in granitic groundwater: H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}-/N{sub 2}, Mn2+/Mn(IV), Fe2+/Fe(III), S2-/SO{sub 4}2-, CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}COOH/CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}/H+. The data will indicate the activity of specific microbial populations at particular sites and how they may affect the geochemistry. - Colloids (Chapter 2): Particles in the size range from 1 to 1x10-3 mum are regarded as colloids. Their small size prohibits them from settling, which gives them the

  19. Performance test of PPAC in different gases

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Meng; Zhan Wen Long; Xiao Guo Qing; Xu Hu Shan; Mao Rui Shi; Hu Zheng Guo; Chen Zhi Qiang; Sun Zhi Yu; Li Jia Xing; Wang Wu Sheng; Chen Li Xin; Li Chen; Bai Jie; Zhang Xia; Zhang Jin Xia; Li Cun Fan

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimension position sensitive parallel-plate avalanche (PPAC) detector has been developed for RIBLL. The detector consists of one anode and two cathodes. In each cathode a resistance chain is used to readout position signals. The detector has been tested in different operating gases with an alpha source. When the detector is at 7 mb flowing rate of isobutane and + 500 V on anode, the position resolution of 0.76 mm is obtained. For 7 mb C sub 3 F sub 8 and +595 V on anode, the position resolution is 0.64 mm. The efficiencies are around 99.1% in the cases of C sub 3 F sub 8 and isobutane

  20. Experimental measurement of dispersion coefficients for gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Delgado, E. [National University at Comahue (Brazil); Da Franca Correa, A.C. [State Univ. of Campinas (Brazil)

    2001-06-01

    A series of experiments were conducted on dispersion, a phenomenon by which molecules of two miscible fluids diffuse into one another when they come into contact with each other. Both longitudinal and transverse diffusion is a result of forced flow. Longitudinal dispersion occurs in the direction of flow, while transverse dispersion occurs perpendicular to the direction of flow. This study focused on measuring longitudinal dispersion coefficients on natural gas displaced by an inert gas (nitrogen) at very low pressure. The experiments were carried out at two different pressure ranges on unconsolidated porous media at a Gas Plant Laboratory near Neuquen, Argentina. Two different types of porous media were used, a plastic hose and a metallic slim tube. They were each filled twice with both natural and synthetic sand grains. The study provided a better understanding of how gases behave at low pressures. 4 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  1. Photon Bubble Turbulence in Cold Atomic Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, João D; Ferreira, António V; Terças, Hugo; Kaiser, Robin; Mendonça, José T

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent radiation flow is ubiquitous in many physical systems where light-matter interaction becomes relevant. Photon bubbling, in particular, has been identified as the main source of turbulent radiation transport in many astrophysical objects, such as stars and accretion disks. This mechanism takes place when radiation trapping in optically dense media becomes unstable, leading to the energy dissipation from the larger to the smaller bubbles. Here, we report on the observation of photon bubble turbulence in cold atomic gases in the presence of multiple scattering of light. The instability is theoretically explained by a fluid description for the atom density coupled to a diffusive transport equation for the photons, which is known to be accurate in the multiple scattering regime investigated here. We determine the power spectrum of the atom density fluctuations, which displays an unusual $\\sim k^{-4}$ scaling, and entails a complex underlying turbulent dynamics resulting from the formation of dynamical bu...

  2. Blow up Analysis for Anomalous Granular Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Rey, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We investigate in this article the long-time behaviour of the solutions to the energy-dependent, spatially-homogeneous, inelastic Boltzmann equation for hard spheres. This model describes a diluted gas composed of hard spheres under statistical description, that dissipates energy during collisions. We assume that the gas is "anomalous", in the sense that the energy dissipation increases when the temperature decreases. This allows the gas to cool down in finite time. We study the existence, uniqueness and attractiveness of blow up profiles for this model and the cooling law associated, generalizing the classical Haff's Law for granular gases. To this end, we give some new estimates about the third order moment of the inelastic Boltzmann equation with drift term and we introduce new strongly "non-linear" self-similar variables

  3. A New Perspective on Classical Ideal Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ideal-gas barometric and pressure laws are derived from the Democritian concept of independent corpuscles moving in vacuum, plus a principle of simplicity, namely that these laws are independent of the kinetic part of the Hamiltonian. A single corpuscle in contact with a heat bath in a cylinder and submitted to a constant force (weight is considered. The paper importantly supplements a previously published paper: First, the stability of ideal gases is established. Second, we show that when walls separate the cylinder into parts and are later removed, the entropy is unaffected. We obtain full agreement with Landsberg’s and others’ (1994 classical thermodynamic result for the entropy of a column of gas submitted to gravity.

  4. Conversion of fuel-oil in gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payamaras, Jahangir; Payamara, Aria [Shahed University, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], Email: jahangirpayamara@yahoo.com

    2011-07-01

    Refining heavy petroleum requires significant amounts of energy, up to 4800 MJ/t. This energy is traditionally provided by petroleum with up to 18% of it being burnt down for heat support, resulting in the emission of large amounts of greenhouse gases. Currently research is focused on developing other energy sources such as solar energy to power refineries. The aim of this paper is to study the pyrolysis and gasification processes of fuel-oil in a solar furnace. This study was carried out over a temperature range of 500 to 1000 degrees celsius and with the use of a concentrator for solar radiation. Results showed that 65% of fuel-oil is converted at pyrolysis and 84% at gasification and that the gaseous products are 20% hydrogen and 40% olefin; the processes reached 67% power efficiency. This study presented the use of solar energy to power heavy oil refineries.

  5. Desulfurization kinetics of coal combustion gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Bragança

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Desulfurization of the gases from coal combustion was studied, using limestone (marble as the sorbent in a fluidized-bed reactor. The kinetic parameter, k, was measured by analyzing the reduction in SO2 emissions in relation to time when a batch of limestone was introduced directly into the combustor chamber. The influence of sorbent composition and particle size was also studied. The CaO content in the limestone was more important than the MgO content. Sorbent particle size showed a strong influence on the reaction time and efficiency of desulfurization. The results of this work prove that marble type is very important in the choice of sorbent for a desulfurization process. A magnesian limestone showed a better performance than a dolomite. Therefore, the magnesian limestone is more efficient for a shorter particle residence time, which is characteristic of the bubbling fluidized bed.

  6. Desulfurization kinetics of coal combustion gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braganca, S.R.; Jablonski, A.; Castellan, J.L. [Universidade Federal Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2003-06-01

    Desulfurization of the gases from coal combustion was studied, using limestone (marble) as the sorbent in a fluidized-bed reactor. The kinetic parameter, k, was measured by analyzing the reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions in relation to time when a batch of limestone was introduced directly into the combustor chamber. The influence of sorbent composition and particle size was also studied. The CaO content in the limestone was more important than the MgO content. Sorbent particle size showed a strong influence on the reaction time and efficiency of desulfurization. The results of this work prove that marble type is very important in the choice of sorbent for a desulfurization process. A magnesian limestone showed a better performance than a dolomite. Therefore, the magnesian limestone is more efficient for a shorter particle residence time, which is characteristic of the bubbling fluidized bed.

  7. Gender and Boyle's law of gases

    CERN Document Server

    Potter, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Gender and Boyle''s Law of GasesElizabeth PotterRe-examines the assumptions and experimental evidence behind Boyle''s Law.Boyle''s Law, which describes the relation between the pressure and volume of a gas, was worked out by Robert Boyle in the mid-1600s. His experiments are still considered examples of good scientific work and continue to be studied along with their historical and intellectual contexts by philosophers, historians, and sociologists. Now there is controversy over whether Boyle''s work was based only on experimental evidence or whether it was influenced by the politics and religious controversies of the time, including especially class and gender politics.Elizabeth Potter argues that even good science is sometimes influenced by such issues, and she shows that the work leading to the Gas Law, while certainly based on physical evidenc...

  8. An installation for steam conversion of gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-01-28

    An installation is proposed for steam conversion of a hydrocarbon gas in order to produce an inorganic gas which chiefly consists of H2 and CO in which the line for feeding the hydrocarbon gas has a steam generator which has a microcapillary structure made of sponge metal, inorganic heat resistant fibers of glass, Si02, Al203 or carbon, inorganic heat resistant fibers twisted into a fiber or a cord of multipore ceramic material; the installation is equipped with a heater which regulates the water temperature, in which the steam generator is submerged. The installation is designed for converting natural gas, C3H8, other hydrocarbon gases and vapors of liquid hydrocarbons (Uv) into H2 and CO. The design and disposition of the steam generator simplify the design of the device, eliminating the pump for feeding the steam and the device for premixing of the steam and hydrocarbon gas.

  9. Sir William Ramsay and the noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Alwyn G

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Ramsay was one of the world's leading scientists at the end of the 19th century, and in a spectacular period of research between 1894 and 1898, he discovered five new elements. These were the noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon; they added a whole new group to the Periodic Table of the elements, and provided the keystone to our understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, and the way those electrons bind the atoms together into molecules. For this work he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904, the first such prize to come to a British subject. He was also a man of great charm, a good linguist, and a composer and performer of music, poetry and song. This review will trace his career, describe his character and give and account of the chemistry which led to the award of the Nobel Prize.

  10. Electrochemical sensor monitoring of volcanic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Freshwater, Ray; Oppenheimer, Clive; Saffell, John; Jones, Rod; Griffiths, Paul; Braban, Christine; Mead, Iqbal

    2010-05-01

    Advances in instrumentation have fuelled a recent growth of interest in using portable sensor systems for environmental monitoring of pollution. Developments in wireless technology are enabling such systems to operate remotely and autonomously, generating a wealth of environmental data. We report here on the application of miniature Alphasense electrochemical sensors to the detection and characterisation of gases in volcanic plumes. A highly portable sensor system was developed to operate an array of 6 low cost electrochemical sensors to detect CO, H2, HCl, SO2, H2S and NO2 at 1 Hz. A miniature pump draws air over all sensors simultaneously (i.e. sensors arranged in parallel). The sensor output in these campaigns was logged on PDAs for real-time viewing, and later download (with a view to future data-streaming). The instrument was deployed at a number of volcanoes and was subject to extremely harsh conditions including highly acidic environments, low (Antarctic) temperatures, and transport over rough terrain. Analysis methods are demonstrated that consider calibration, cross-sensitivities of the sensors to multiple gases, differing sensor response times, temperature dependence, and background sensor drift with time. The analysis is applied to a range of plume field-measurements to extract gas concentrations ranging from 100's ppmv to sub-ppmv and to characterise the individual volcano emissions. Applications of similar sensor systems for real-time long-term monitoring of volcanic emissions (which may indicate and ultimately predict eruptive behavior), and UAV and balloon-borne plume sampling are now already being realised. This work focused on demonstrating the application of electrochemical sensors to monitoring of environmental pollution from volcanoes. Other applications for similar sensors include the near-source monitoring of industrial emissions, and of pollutant levels enhanced by traffic emissions in the urban environment.

  11. Single-Walled-Carbon-Nanotube-Modified Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode Used as a Simple Sensor for the Determination of Salbutamol in Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra N. Goyal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A fast and sensitive voltammetric method has been proposed for the determination of salbutamol at single-walled-carbon-nanotube-modified edge-plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (SWNT/EPPGE in human urine. The electrochemical response of salbutamol was determined by square wave voltammetry (SWV in phosphate buffer solution (PBS at physiological pH 7.2. The modified electrode showed improved voltammetric response towards the oxidation of salbutamol, and a well-defined anodic peak was observed at ~600 mV with enhanced peak current in comparison to the bare electrode. Linear calibration plot using SWNT/EPPGE was obtained in the concentration range of 50 to 2500 ngml-1 with sensitivity and detection limit of 2.15 nA/ngml-1 and 4.31 ngml-1, respectively. The developed method has been successfully applied for the determination of salbutamol in commercial preparations and human body fluids. Fast analysis of salbutamol in human urine makes the proposed method of great interest for doping control purposes at the site of competitive games.

  12. Electronic and geometric properties of Au nanoparticles on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Salido, Ignacio; Lim, Dong Chan; Dietsche, Rainer; Bertram, Nils; Kim, Young Dok

    2006-01-26

    Au nanoparticles grown on mildly sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) surfaces were studied using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The results were compared with those of Ag nanoparticles on the same substrate. By varying the defect densities of HOPG and the Au coverages, one can create Au nanoparticles in various sizes. At high Au coverages, the structures of the Au films significantly deviate from the ideal truncated octahedral form: the existence of many steps between different Au atomic layers can be observed, most likely due to a high activation barrier of the diffusion of Au atoms across the step edges. This implies that the particle growth at room temperature is strongly limited by kinetic factors. Hexagonal shapes of Au structures could be identified, indicating preferential growth of Au nanostructures along the (111) direction normal to the surface. In the case of Au, XPS studies reveal a weaker core level shift with decreasing particle size compared to the 3d level in similarly sized Ag particles. Also taking into account the Auger analysis of the Ag particles, the core level shifts of the metal nanoparticles on HOPG can be understood in terms of the metal/substrate charge transfer. Ag is (partially) positively charged, whereas Au negatively charged on HOPG. It is demonstrated that XPS can be a useful tool to study metal-support interactions, which plays an important role for heterogeneous catalysis, for example.

  13. The theory of cyclic voltammetry of electrochemically heterogeneous surfaces: comparison of different models for surface geometry and applications to highly ordered pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kristopher R; Lawrence, Nathan S; Hartshorne, R Seth; Compton, Richard G

    2012-05-28

    The cyclic voltammetry at electrodes composed of multiple electroactive materials, where zones of one highly active material are distributed over a substrate of a second, less active material, is investigated by simulation. The two materials are assumed to differ in terms of their electrochemical rate constants towards any given redox couple. For a one-electron oxidation or reduction, the effect on voltammetry of the size and relative surface coverages of the zones as well as the rate constant of the slower zone are considered for systems where it is much slower than the rate constant of the faster zones. The occurrence of split peak cyclic voltammetry where two peaks are observed in the forward sweep, is studied in terms of the diffusional effects present in the system. A number of surface geometries are compared: specifically the more active zones are modelled as long, thin bands, as steps in the surface, as discs, and as rings (similar to a partially blocked electrode). Similar voltammetry for the band, step and ring models is seen but the disc geometry shows significant differences. Finally, the simulation technique is applied to the modelling of highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface and experimental conditions under which it may be possible to observe split peak voltammetry are predicted.

  14. WMO WDCGG data catalogue. GAW data. Volume IV - Greenhouse gases and other atmospheric gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The fourth issue of the data catalogue gives information on measurement methods, instruments, and data handling procedures for recording data on greenhouse gases at the observation stations submitting data to the WDCGG up to December 2000. Chapter 1 gives details of the observation stations; Chapter 2, the data index, is prepared to give notice of the data. Chapter 3 contains detail of the observation programme: category and location, date when observation started, instrument manufacturers, characteristics of instrument system calibration methods, and data selection procedures. It gives references on the observation programme at each station. Gases measured are: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorocarbons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, tetrachloromethane, trichloroethane, trichloromethane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen monoxide, nitrogen oxides, odd nitrogen, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), organic peroxides, hydrogen peroxide, and isotopes ({sup 13}C). 3 apps.

  15. Structure of velocity distributions in shock waves in granular gases with extension to molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilquin, A.; Boudet, J. F.; Kellay, H.

    2016-08-01

    Velocity distributions in normal shock waves obtained in dilute granular flows are studied. These distributions cannot be described by a simple functional shape and are believed to be bimodal. Our results show that these distributions are not strictly bimodal but a trimodal distribution is shown to be sufficient. The usual Mott-Smith bimodal description of these distributions, developed for molecular gases, and based on the coexistence of two subpopulations (a supersonic and a subsonic population) in the shock front, can be modified by adding a third subpopulation. Our experiments show that this additional population results from collisions between the supersonic and subsonic subpopulations. We propose a simple approach incorporating the role of this third intermediate population to model the measured probability distributions and apply it to granular shocks as well as shocks in molecular gases.

  16. Structure of velocity distributions in shock waves in granular gases with extension to molecular gases

    OpenAIRE

    Vilquin, A.; Boudet, J. F.; Kellay, H.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Velocity distributions in normal shock waves obtained in dilute granular flows are studied. These distributions cannot be described by a simple functional shape and are believed to be bimodal. Our results show that these distributions are not strictly bimodal but a trimodal distribution is shown to be sufficient. The usual Mott-Smith bimodal description of these distributions, developed for molecular gases, and based on the coexistence of two subpopulations (a superson...

  17. Method for purifying flue gases and other gases. Verfahren zum Reinigen von Rauchgasen und anderen Abgasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelter, H.; Gresch, H.; Igelbuescher, H.

    1987-02-26

    A suggestion is made for the improvement of the scrubbing procedure for power plant off-gases outlined in the main patent 25 32 373. The process provides for the addition of chlorine ions, carbonic acids and Ca-compounds. The suggestion for improvement made here is the addition of iron compounds, preferably iron-III chloride; this should lead to a reduction in calcium sulphite content to below 0.3%.

  18. Identification of marine natural gases with different origin sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Kinetic experiments of gas generation for typical samples of marine gas precursors including low-maturity kerogen,residual kerogen and oil as well as dispersed liquid hydrocarbon(DLH)in source rocks were performed by closed system,and the evolution trends of molecular and isotopic compositions of natural gases from different precursors against the maturity(R0%)at laboratory conditions were analyzed.Several diagrams of gas origin were calibrated by using the experimental data.A diagram based on the ratio of normal and isomerous butane and pentane(i/nC4-i/nC5)was proposed and used to identify the origins of the typical marine natural gases in the Sichuan Basin and the Tarim Basin, China.And the maturities of natural gases were estimated by using the statistical relationships between the gaseous molecular carbon isotopic data and maturities(δ13C-R 0 %)with different origins.The results indicate that the molecular and isotopic compositions of simulated gases from different precursors are different from each other.For example,the dryness index of the oil-cracking gas is the lowest;the dryness indices of gases from DLH and kerogen in closed system are almost the same;and the dryness index of gases from residual kerogen is extremely high,indicating that the kerogen gases are very dry;the contents of non-hydrocarbon gases in kerogen-cracking gases are far higher than those in oil-cracking and DLH-cracking gases.The molecular carbon isotopes of oil-cracking gases are the lightest,those of kerogen in closed system and GLH-cracking gases are the second lightest,and those of cracking gases from residual kerogen are the heaviest.The calibration results indicate that the diagrams of ln(C1/C2)-ln(C2/C3)andδ13C2-δ13C3-ln(C2/C3)can discriminate primary and secondary cracking gases,but cannot be used to identify gas origin sources,while the diagram of i/nC4-i/nC5 can differentiate the gases from different precursors.The application results of these diagrams show that gas mixtures

  19. A Simple Experiment to Demonstrate the Effects of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, C. F.

    2007-01-01

    The role of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere is the subject of considerable discussion and debate. Global warming is well-documented, as is the continually increasing amount of greenhouse gases that human activity puts in the air. Is there a relationship between the two? The simple experiment described in this paper provides a good demonstration…

  20. A Simple Experiment to Demonstrate the Effects of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, C. F.

    2007-01-01

    The role of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere is the subject of considerable discussion and debate. Global warming is well-documented, as is the continually increasing amount of greenhouse gases that human activity puts in the air. Is there a relationship between the two? The simple experiment described in this paper provides a good demonstration…

  1. 40 CFR 86.214-94 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.214-94 Section 86.214-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.214-94 Analytical gases. The provisions of §...

  2. 49 CFR 229.43 - Exhaust and battery gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exhaust and battery gases. 229.43 Section 229.43... § 229.43 Exhaust and battery gases. (a) Products of combustion shall be released entirely outside the... conditions. (b) Battery containers shall be vented and batteries kept from gassing excessively. ...

  3. Problem of nature of inert gases in lunar surface material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levskiy, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    The origin of isotopes of inert gases in lunar surface material was investigated from the standpoint of the isotopic two-component status of inert gases in the solar system. Helium and neon represent the solar wind component, while krypton and xenon are planetary gases. Type A gases are trapped by the material of the regolith in the early stages of the existence of the solar system and were brought to the lunar surface together with dust. The material of the regolith therefore cannot be considered as the product of the erosion of the crystalline rocks of the moon and in this sense are extralunar. The regolith material containing type A gases must be identified with the high temperature minerals of the carbonaceous chondrites.

  4. Deep Inelastic Scattering on Ultracold Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    We discuss Bragg scattering on both Bose and Fermi gases with strong short-range interactions in the deep inelastic regime of large wave vector transfer q , where the dynamic structure factor is dominated by a resonance near the free-particle energy ℏω =ɛq=ℏ2q2/2 m . Using a systematic short-distance expansion, the structure factor at high momentum is shown to exhibit a nontrivial dependence on frequency characterized by two separate scaling regimes. First, for frequencies that differ from the single-particle energy by terms of order O (q ) (i.e., small deviations compared to the single-particle energy), the dynamic structure factor is described by the impulse approximation of Hohenberg and Platzman. Second, deviations of order O (q2) (i.e., of the same order or larger than the single-particle energy) are described by the operator product expansion, with a universal crossover connecting both regimes. The scaling is consistent with the leading asymptotics for a number of sum rules in the large momentum limit. Furthermore, we derive an exact expression for the shift and width of the single-particle peak at large momentum due to interactions, thus extending a result by Beliaev [J. Exp. Theor. Phys. 7, 299 (1958)] for the low-density Bose gas to arbitrary values of the scattering length a . The shift exhibits a maximum around q a ≃1 , which is connected with a maximum in the static structure factor due to strong short-range correlations. For Bose gases with moderate interaction strengths, the theoretically predicted shift is consistent with the value observed by Papp et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 135301 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.135301]. Finally, we develop a diagrammatic theory for the dynamic structure factor which accounts for the correlations beyond Bogoliubov theory. It covers the full range of momenta and frequencies and provides an explicit example for the emergence of asymptotic scaling at large momentum.

  5. DNS of turbulent flows of dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, L.; Cinnella, P.; Gloerfelt, X.; Grasso, F.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of dense gas effects on compressible turbulence is investigated by means of numerical simulations of the decay of compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence (CHIT) and of supersonic turbulent flows through a plane channel (TCF). For both configurations, a parametric study on the Mach and Reynolds numbers is carried out. The dense gas considered in these parametric studies is PP11, a heavy fluorocarbon. The results are systematically compared to those obtained for a diatomic perfect gas (air). In our computations, the thermodynamic behaviour of the dense gases is modelled by means of the Martin-Hou equation of state. For CHIT cases, initial turbulent Mach numbers up to 1 are analyzed using mesh resolutions up to 5123. For TCF, bulk Mach numbers up to 3 and bulk Reynolds numbers up to 12000 are investigated. Average profiles of the thermodynamic quantities exhibit significant differences with respect to perfect-gas solutions for both of the configurations. For high-Mach CHIT, compressible structures are modified with respect to air, with weaker eddy shocklets and stronger expansions. In TCF, the velocity profiles of dense gas flows are much less sensitive to the Mach number and collapse reasonably well in the logarithmic region without any special need for compressible scalings, unlike the case of air, and the overall flow behaviour is midway between that of a variable-property liquid and that of a gas.

  6. Universal Nonequilibrium Properties of Dissipative Rydberg Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Matteo; Levi, Emanuele; Diehl, Sebastian; Garrahan, Juan P.; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the out-of-equilibrium behavior of a dissipative gas of Rydberg atoms that features a dynamical transition between two stationary states characterized by different excitation densities. We determine the structure and properties of the phase diagram and identify the universality class of the transition, both for the statics and the dynamics. We show that the proper dynamical order parameter is in fact not the excitation density and find evidence that the dynamical transition is in the "model A " universality class; i.e., it features a nontrivial Z2 symmetry and a dynamics with nonconserved order parameter. This sheds light on some relevant and observable aspects of dynamical transitions in Rydberg gases. In particular it permits a quantitative understanding of a recent experiment [C. Carr, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 113901 (2013)] which observed bistable behavior as well as power-law scaling of the relaxation time. The latter emerges not due to critical slowing down in the vicinity of a second order transition, but from the nonequilibrium dynamics near a so-called spinodal line.

  7. Deep inelastic scattering on ultracold gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the dynamic structure factor of both Bose and Fermi gases with strong short-range interactions, focussing on the deep inelastic regime of large wave vector transfer $q$. Here, the dynamic structure factor is dominated by a resonance at the free-particle energy $\\hbar \\omega = \\varepsilon_{\\bf q} = \\hbar^2 q^2/2m$ and is described in terms of scaling functions. We show that the high-momentum structure has a rich scaling behavior characterized by two separate scaling regions: first, for frequencies that differ from the single-particle energy by terms of order ${\\cal O}(q)$ (i.e., small deviations compared to the single-particle energy), the dynamic structure factor is described by the impulse approximation (IA) of Hohenberg and Platzman. Second, deviations of order ${\\cal O}(q^2)$ (i.e., of the same order or larger than the single-particle energy) are described by the operator product expansion (OPE), with a universal cross-over connecting both regimes. We use the full asymptotic form to derive vario...

  8. Efimov correlations in strongly interacting Bose gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Barth, Marcus

    A series of recent hallmark experiments have demonstrated that Bose gases can be created in the strongly interacting unitary limit in the non-degenerate high-temperature regime. These systems display the three-body Efimov effect, which poses a theoretical challenge to compute observables including these relevant three-body correlations. In this talk, I shall present our results for the virial coefficients, the contact parameters, and the momentum distribution of a strongly interacting three-dimensional Bose gas obtained by means of a virial expansion up to third order in the fugacity, which takes into account three-body correlations exactly. Our results characterize the non-degenerate regime of the interacting Bose gas, where the thermal wavelength is smaller than the interparticle spacing but the scattering length may be arbitrarily large. In addition, we provide a calculation of the momentum distribution at unitarity, which displays a universal high-momentum tail with a log-periodic momentum dependence - a direct signature of Efimov physics. In particular, we provide a quantitative description of the momentum distribution at high momentum as measured by the JILA group [Makotyn et al., Nat. Phys. 10, 116 (2014)]. Our results allow the spectroscopy of Efimov states at unitarity.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of vibrated granular gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, Alain; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2002-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of monodisperse or bidisperse inelastic granular gases driven by vibrating walls, in two dimensions (without gravity). Because of the energy injection at the boundaries, a situation often met experimentally, density and temperature fields display heterogeneous profiles in the direction perpendicular to the walls. A general equation of state for an arbitrary mixture of fluidized inelastic hard spheres is derived and successfully tested against numerical data. Single-particle velocity distribution functions with non-Gaussian features are also obtained, and the influence of various parameters (inelasticity coefficients, density, etc.) are analyzed. The validity of a recently proposed random restitution coefficient model is assessed through the study of projected collisions onto the direction perpendicular to that of energy injection. For the binary mixture, the nonequipartition of translational kinetic energy is studied and compared both to experimental data and to the case of homogeneous energy injection ("stochastic thermostat"). The rescaled velocity distribution functions are found to be very similar for both species.

  10. Collision Statistics of Driven Polydisperse Granular Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-Yuan; ZHANG Duan-Ming; LI Zhong-Ming; YANG Feng-Xia; GUO Xin-Ping

    2008-01-01

    We present a dynamicai model of two-dimensional polydisperse granular gases with fractal size distribution, in which the disks are subject to inelastic mutual collisions and driven by standard white noise. The inhomogeneity of the disk size distribution can be measured by a fractal dimension df. By Monte Carlo simulations, we have mainly investigated the effect of the inhomogeneity on the statistical properties of the system in the same inelasticity case. Some novel results are found that the average energy of the system decays exponentiaUy with a tendency to achieve a stable asymptotic value, and the system finally reaches a nonequilibrium steady state after a long evolution time. Furthermore, the inhomogeneity has great influence on the steady-state statisticai properties. With the increase of the fractal dimension df, the distributions of path lengths and free times between collisions deviate more obviously from expected theoretical forms for elastic spheres and have an overpopulation of short distances and time bins. The collision rate increases with df, but it is independent of time. Meanwhile, the velocity distribution deviates more strongly from the Gaussian one, but does not demonstrate any apparent universal behavior.

  11. Transport of Greenhouse Gases in Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, E.; Khalil, A. K.; Shearer, M.; Rosenstiel, T.

    2009-12-01

    Emissions of greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) have been measured in cultivated and natural regions, quantifying overall emissions for croplands, wetlands, and forests. However, segregation between soil and plant emissions is less clear, and the dynamics behind each respective emission type differs. Better defined plant transport mechanisms will yield more accurate determination of greenhouse gas flux, contributing to a comprehensive theory quantifying greenhouse gas emissions globally. While the mechanisms of CH4 and N2O emissions from rice have not been fully identified, for trees these mechanisms are virtually unknown. CH4 and N2O emissions from several species of tree (Alnus rubra, Populus trichocarpa, Thuja plicata, Fraxinus latifolia) native to the Pacific Northwest have been measured. To identify mechanisms of gas transport, correlation of emissions and stomatal conductance, transpiration, and photosynthesis has been tested. A synthesis between plant physiological data and emissions is sought to elucidate the role plant physiology plays in the production and transport of CH4 and N2O. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER64515.

  12. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    2005-11-01

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors—who were among the pioneers in the domain— the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution ɛ —a central quantity governing the

  13. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  14. Femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: a green route for large-scale production of porous graphene and graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Paola; Hu, Anming; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Duley, Walter W; Zhou, Norman Y

    2014-02-21

    Porous graphene (PG) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are attracting attention due to their potential applications in photovoltaics, catalysis, and bio-related fields. We present a novel way for mass production of these promising materials. The femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is employed for their synthesis. Porous graphene (PG) layers were found to float at the water-air interface, while graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were dispersed in the solution. The sheets consist of one to six stacked layers of spongy graphene, which form an irregular 3D porous structure that displays pores with an average size of 15-20 nm. Several characterization techniques have confirmed the porous nature of the collected layers. The analyses of the aqueous solution confirmed the presence of GQDs with dimensions of about 2-5 nm. It is found that the formation of both PG and GQDs depends on the fs-laser ablation energy. At laser fluences less than 12 J cm(-2), no evidence of either PG or GQDs is detected. However, polyynes with six and eight carbon atoms per chain are found in the solution. For laser energies in the 20-30 J cm(-2) range, these polyynes disappeared, while PG and GQDs were found at the water-air interface and in the solution, respectively. The origin of these materials can be explained based on the mechanisms for water breakdown and coal gasification. The absence of PG and GQDs, after the laser ablation of HOPG in liquid nitrogen, confirms the proposed mechanisms.

  15. 微波裂解制生物油技术研究进展%Production of Pyrolytic Oils Using Microwave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴爽; 王鑫

    2012-01-01

    The production of pyrolytic oils using microwave,including the mechanism,the influence of parameters,analysis of product distribution and pyrolysis reactors are reviewed. Their application and developing trend were pointed out. The researches in recent literatures are mainly concerned with the combination of the microwave and catalytic cracking processing. Some continuous microwave reactors,such as vacuum piston flow reactor and rotative microwave reactor,was developed and used instead of the bench microwave reactor. The overall understanding of the technologies using microwave in biomass pyrolysis reaction would provide a further industrial development in the field of biomass to liquid fuel.%综述了微波热解作用机制、影响因素、产物分布分析、微波热解反应器以及生物质微波裂解制油技术研究现状和发展趋势.相比于传统热解,微波裂解生物油含有较少的杂质.生物质微波裂解最新发展多采用微波热解和催化裂解相结合的技术路线,热解装置以真空平推流和旋转锥等快速连续微波反应器代替间歇式微波炉.通过对生物质微波裂解技术的充分了解,有助于推动生物质制油产业化发展.

  16. Greenhouse effect gases (GEI) by energy consumption; Gases efecto invernadero (GEI) por consumo de energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz Ledo C, Ramon; Bazan N, Gerardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the calculation methodology of greenhouse effect gases (GEI) emissions that are produced by the power sector in Mexico, as well as to discuss its possible impact in the subject of climatic change and the possible mitigating actions to lower the amount of emissions that can be taken and, therefore, the possible climate changes. In Mexico GEI inventories have been made since 1991, year in which the National Inventory of Gases with Greenhouse Effect was obtained for year 1988. The GEI include carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (NO) and volatile organic carbides that are not methane (NMVOC) and are secondary products and harmful that are obtained from the processes that turn fuels into energy (combustion). The main sources of GEI are: fixed sources (industries, residences, commerce, public services and energy transformation, such as power generation); movable sources (that include all type of transport that uses fuel). The fuels that, by their volume and efficiency, generate more emissions of GEI are crude oil, natural gas and solid biomass (firewood-cane bagasse). Any effort to reduce these emissions is very important and remarkable if it affects the consumption of these fuels. [Spanish] El proposito de este articulo es presentar la metodologia de calculo de las emisiones de los gases con efecto invernadero (GEI) que son producidos por el sector energetico en Mexico, asi como discutir su posible impacto en las cuestiones de cambio climatico y las posibles acciones de mitigacion que se pueden realizar para abatir la cantidad de emisiones y, por ende, los posibles cambios de clima. En Mexico se han realizado inventarios de GEI desde 1991, ano en que se obtuvo el Inventario Nacional de Gases con Efecto Invernadero para el ano de 1988. Los GEI comprenden al dioxido de carbono (CO2), monoxido de carbono (CO), oxidos de nitrogeno (NOx), metano (CH4), oxido nitroso (N2O) y

  17. Effects of traces of molecular gases (hydrogen, nitrogen) in glow discharges in noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, E. B. M.; Smid, P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2008-07-01

    The "Grimm" type of low pressure glow discharge source, introduced some forty years ago, has proved to be a versatile analytical source. A flat sample is used as the cathode and placed about 0.2mm away from the end of a hollow tubular anode leading to an obstructed discharge. When the source was first developed, it was used for the direct analysis of solid metallic samples by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), normally with argon as the plasma gas; it was soon found that, using suitable electrical parameters, the cathode material was sputtered uniformly from a circular crater of diameter equal to that of the tubular anode, so that the technique could be used for compositional depth profile analysis (CDPA). Over the years the capability and applications of the technique have steadily increased. The use of rf powered discharges now permits the analysis of non-conducting layers and samples; improved instrumental design now allows CDPA of ever thinner layers (e.g. resolution of layers 5 nm thick in multilayer stacks is possible). For the original bulk material application, pre-sputtering could be used to remove any surface contamination but for CDPA, analysis must start immediately the discharge is ignited, so that any surface contamination can introduce molecular gases into the plasma gas and have significant analytical consequences, especially for very thin layers; in addition, many types of samples now analysed contain molecular gases as components (either as occluded gas, or e.g. as a nitride or oxide), and this gas enters the discharge when the sample is sputtered. It is therefore important to investigate the effect of such foreign gases on the discharge, in particular on the spectral intensities and hence the analytical results. The presentation will concentrate mainly on the effect of hydrogen in argon discharges, in the concentration range 0-2 % v/v but other gas mixtures (e.g. Ar/N_2, Ne/H_2) will be considered for comparison. In general, the introduction of

  18. Local Instruction Theory on Division in Mathematics GASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rully Charitas Indra Prahmana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Several studies on learning mathematics for rural area's student indicate that students have difficulty in understanding the concept of division operation. Students are more likely to be introduced by the use of the formula without involving the concept itself and learning division separate the concrete situation of learning process. This underlies the researcher to design division operation learning in the Mathematics of GASING (Math GASING, which always starts from concrete to abstract level. The research method used is a design research which describes how the Math GASING make a real contribution of students understanding in the concept of division operation.

  19. Fluoride gases damages on agricultural and ornamental plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, V.; Padalino, O.

    1968-01-01

    Reports are presented concerning fluoride gases from a brick furnace, damaging agricultural and ornamental plants: Prunus armeniaca L. var. Reale d'Imola, Vitis vinifera L. var. Cardinal, Gladiolus spp., Pinus pinea L., Iris germanica L., that are particularly sensitive to these gases. There are descriptions of the morphological alterations and the authors have proven the presence of fluoride in the chemically analyzed samples. There is a list of plants found near the brick furnace that have been classified as (I) highly sensitive; (II) moderately sensitive; (III) very little sensitivity; (IV) immune to fluoride gases. 10 references, 9 figures.

  20. Fe distribution in GaSe and InSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalyuk, Z.D.; Feichuk, P.I.; Shcherbak, L.P.; Zbykovskaya, N.I.

    1985-06-01

    In this paper, the authors use tagged atoms to determine the effective coefficients of Fe distribution in GaSe and InSe during crystallization of a doped melt by the Bridgman method. The distribution of Fe in GaSe and InSe was studied with the aid of Fe tagged with the radiosotopes VVFe + VZFe. Doping of the material was combined with the processes of synthesis and crystallization. Equations are presented for the calculation of the real impurity distribution in GaSe and InSe crystals.

  1. Biogenic gases in tropical floodplain river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victória Ramos Ballester

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the distribution of biogenic gases in the floodplain of the Mogi-Guaçu River (São Paulo, Brazil enabled the establishment of a "redox hierarchy", in which the main channel was the most oxidizing environment, followed by Diogo Lake, with Infernão Lake having the most reducing conditions of the subsystems evaluated. Diogo Lake exported about 853.4 g C.m-2.year-1, of which, 14.6% was generated from methanogenesis and 36.7% by aerobic respiration. For Infernão Lake, these values were 2016 g C.m-2.year-1, 1.8 % and 41.5 %, respectively. Carbon export by these systems was predominantly in the form of CO2, which was responsible for the release of 728.78 g C.m-2.year-1 at Diogo Lake and 1979.72 g C.m-2. year-1 at Infernão Lake. Such patterns may result from the nature of the hydrological conditions, the action of the hydroperiod, and morphological characteristics of the environment.A análise da distribuição de gases biogênicos na planície de inundação do Rio Mogi Guaçu (São Paulo, Brasil possibilitou o estabelecimento de um gradiente redox para os sistemas aquáticos avaliados, em que o canal principal do rio apresentou-se como o ambiente mais oxidado, seguido da Lagoa do Diogo, e a Lagoa do Infernão apresentando as condições mais redutoras entre os ambientes em questão. A Lagoa do Diogo exporta um total de 853,4 g C.m-2.ano-1, do qual 14,6% é produzido pela metanogênese e 36,7% pela respiração aeróbia. Para a Lagoa do Infernão estes valores foram respectivamente de 2.016 g C.m-2.ano-1, 1,8% e de 41,5%. A exportação de carbono por estes sistemas é realizada, predominantemente na forma de CO2, nos valores de 728,78 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Diogo e 1.979,72 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Infernão. Estes padrões parecem estar relacionados com a natureza das condições hidrológicas, com a ação do hidroperíodo e com as características morfológicas do ambiente.

  2. Thermal maps of gases in heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarenwattananon, Nanette N.; Glöggler, Stefan; Otto, Trenton; Melkonian, Arek; Morris, William; Burt, Scott R.; Yaghi, Omar M.; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2013-10-01

    More than 85 per cent of all chemical industry products are made using catalysts, the overwhelming majority of which are heterogeneous catalysts that function at the gas-solid interface. Consequently, much effort is invested in optimizing the design of catalytic reactors, usually by modelling the coupling between heat transfer, fluid dynamics and surface reaction kinetics. The complexity involved requires a calibration of model approximations against experimental observations, with temperature maps being particularly valuable because temperature control is often essential for optimal operation and because temperature gradients contain information about the energetics of a reaction. However, it is challenging to probe the behaviour of a gas inside a reactor without disturbing its flow, particularly when trying also to map the physical parameters and gradients that dictate heat and mass flow and catalytic efficiency. Although optical techniques and sensors have been used for that purpose, the former perform poorly in opaque media and the latter perturb the flow. NMR thermometry can measure temperature non-invasively, but traditional approaches applied to gases produce signals that depend only weakly on temperature are rapidly attenuated by diffusion or require contrast agents that may interfere with reactions. Here we present a new NMR thermometry technique that circumvents these problems by exploiting the inverse relationship between NMR linewidths and temperature caused by motional averaging in a weak magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate the concept by non-invasively mapping gas temperatures during the hydrogenation of propylene in reactors packed with metal nanoparticles and metal-organic framework catalysts, with measurement errors of less than four per cent of the absolute temperature. These results establish our technique as a non-invasive tool for locating hot and cold spots in catalyst-packed gas-solid reactors, with unprecedented capabilities for testing

  3. High order harmonic generation in rare gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, Kimberly Susan [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The process of high order harmonic generation in atomic gases has shown great promise as a method of generating extremely short wavelength radiation, extending far into the extreme ultraviolet (XUV). The process is conceptually simple. A very intense laser pulse (I ~1013-1014 W/cm2) is focused into a dense (~1017 particles/cm3) atomic medium, causing the atoms to become polarized. These atomic dipoles are then coherently driven by the laser field and begin to radiate at odd harmonics of the laser field. This dissertation is a study of both the physical mechanism of harmonic generation as well as its development as a source of coherent XUV radiation. Recently, a semiclassical theory has been proposed which provides a simple, intuitive description of harmonic generation. In this picture the process is treated in two steps. The atom ionizes via tunneling after which its classical motion in the laser field is studied. Electron trajectories which return to the vicinity of the nucleus may recombine and emit a harmonic photon, while those which do not return will ionize. An experiment was performed to test the validity of this model wherein the trajectory of the electron as it orbits the nucleus or ion core is perturbed by driving the process with elliptically, rather than linearly, polarized laser radiation. The semiclassical theory predicts a rapid turn-off of harmonic production as the ellipticity of the driving field is increased. This decrease in harmonic production is observed experimentally and a simple quantum mechanical theory is used to model the data. The second major focus of this work was on development of the harmonic "source". A series of experiments were performed examining the spatial profiles of the harmonics. The quality of the spatial profile is crucial if the harmonics are to be used as the source for experiments, particularly if they must be refocused.

  4. Nonlinear Transport In Gases, Traps And Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuvakov, M.; Marjanovic, S.

    2010-07-01

    We will present our numerical study of three different charge transport processes and we will compare properties, specially the nonlinearity, of these processes. First process is electron transport in gases in swarm regime. We used well tested Monte Carlo techique to investigate kinetic phenomena such as negative diferencial conductivity (NDC) or negative apsolute mobility (NAM). We explain these phenomena analysing the spatial profiles of the swarm and collision events. In the second part we will apply the same technique on positron transport to obtain the same level of understanding of positron transport as has been achieved for electrons. The influence of positronium formation, non-conservative process, is much larger than any comparable effects in electron transport due to attachment and/or ionisation. As a result several new phenomena have been observed, such as NDC for the bulk drift velocity. Additionaly, the same Monte Carlo technique is used for modeling and optimisation of Surko like positron traps in different geometries and field configurations. Third process we studied is the charge transport under voltage bias via single-electron tunnelings through the junctions between metallic particles on nanoparticle films. We show how the regular nanoparticle array and topologically inhomogeneous nanonetworks affect the charge transport. We find long-range correlations in the time series of charge fluctuation at individual nanoparticles and of flow along the junctions within the network. These correlations explain the occurrence of a large non-linearity in the simulated and experimentally measured current-voltage characteristics and non-Gaussian fluctuations of the current at the electrode.

  5. Thermal maps of gases in heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarenwattananon, Nanette N; Glöggler, Stefan; Otto, Trenton; Melkonian, Arek; Morris, William; Burt, Scott R; Yaghi, Omar M; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2013-10-24

    More than 85 per cent of all chemical industry products are made using catalysts, the overwhelming majority of which are heterogeneous catalysts that function at the gas-solid interface. Consequently, much effort is invested in optimizing the design of catalytic reactors, usually by modelling the coupling between heat transfer, fluid dynamics and surface reaction kinetics. The complexity involved requires a calibration of model approximations against experimental observations, with temperature maps being particularly valuable because temperature control is often essential for optimal operation and because temperature gradients contain information about the energetics of a reaction. However, it is challenging to probe the behaviour of a gas inside a reactor without disturbing its flow, particularly when trying also to map the physical parameters and gradients that dictate heat and mass flow and catalytic efficiency. Although optical techniques and sensors have been used for that purpose, the former perform poorly in opaque media and the latter perturb the flow. NMR thermometry can measure temperature non-invasively, but traditional approaches applied to gases produce signals that depend only weakly on temperature are rapidly attenuated by diffusion or require contrast agents that may interfere with reactions. Here we present a new NMR thermometry technique that circumvents these problems by exploiting the inverse relationship between NMR linewidths and temperature caused by motional averaging in a weak magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate the concept by non-invasively mapping gas temperatures during the hydrogenation of propylene in reactors packed with metal nanoparticles and metal-organic framework catalysts, with measurement errors of less than four per cent of the absolute temperature. These results establish our technique as a non-invasive tool for locating hot and cold spots in catalyst-packed gas-solid reactors, with unprecedented capabilities for testing

  6. Temporal dynamics of Bose-condensed gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo Martinez, Mauricio

    2014-03-19

    We perform a detailed quantum dynamical study of non-equilibrium trapped, interacting Bose-condensed gases. We investigate Josephson oscillations between interacting Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a finite size double-well trap and the non-trivial time evolution of a coherent state placed at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice. For the Josephson oscillations three time scales appear. We find that Josephson junction can sustain multiple undamped oscillations up to a characteristic time scale τ{sub c} without exciting atoms out of the condensates. Beyond the characteristic time scale τ{sub c} the dynamics of the junction are governed by fast, non-condensed particles assisted Josephson tunnelling as well as the collisions between non-condensed particles. In the non-condensed particles dominated regime we observe strong damping of the oscillations due to inelastic collisions, equilibrating the system leading to an effective loss of details of the initial conditions. In addition, we predict that an initially self-trapped BEC state will be destroyed by these fast dynamics. The time evolution of a coherent state released at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice shows a ballistic expansion with a decreasing expansion velocity for increasing two-body interactions strength and particle number. Additionally, we predict that if the two-body interactions strength exceeds a certain value, a forerunner splits up from the expanding coherent state. We also observe that this system, which is prepared far from equilibrium, can evolve to a quasistationary non-equilibrium state.

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Fracture Toughness of Pyrolytic Carbon in Prosthetic Heart Valve%人工心瓣热解炭断裂韧性有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建辉; 邢兴

    2012-01-01

    This article used ANSYS to conduct simulation analysis of compact tension and 3 points bending test for the isotropic pyrolytic carbon and pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite composite material used in heart valve prosthesis, calculated the plane strain fracture toughness KIC and compared the calculated results with the results of related experiments, then analyzed the effectiveness of the method that used ANSYS to calculate KIC as well as the influence of the thickness ratio of the coating and substrate and crack tip radius for the KIC of pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite composite material. Results showed that the KIC of the pure pyrolytic carbon and graphite material were respectively 1. 176 MPa √m and 1. 415 MPa √m, which were close to the results of related experiments, verifying the accuracy of using ANSYS to calculate KIC ; the KIC of composite material of pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite reduced with the increase of thickness ratio for the coating and substrate. The fracture toughness of composite material was better than that of pure pyrolytic carbon or graphite composite material when the thickness ratio of coating and substrate was on the low side; pyrolitic carbon-coated graphite had a limit notch root radius p0, which was about 5 μm, when the notch root radius p >p0, the measured value of KIC was proportional to p1/2 , and when p < po, the measured value of KIC was in line with the value of samples with sharp crack.%利用有限元分析软件ANSYS,对人工心瓣各向同性热解炭和热解炭包覆石墨复合材料进行紧凑拉伸以及三点弯曲实验仿真分析,计算材料的平面应变断裂韧性KIC,并将计算结果与相关实验结果进行对比,分析利用ANSYS计算KIC方法的有效性,以及涂层与基体厚度比、裂纹尖端半径对热解炭包覆石墨复合材料KIC值的影响.结果表明,纯热解炭和石墨材料的ANSYS计算KIC值分别为1.176 MPa√m以及1.415 MPa√m,与相关实验结果接近,验证

  8. Desulfurization of chemical waste gases and flue gases with economic utilization of air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, K.; Wischnewski, W.

    1983-09-01

    The technological state of recovery of sulfur dioxide from waste and flue gases in the GDR is discussed. Two examples of plants are presented: a pyrosulfuric acid plant in Coswig, recovering sulfur dioxide from gases by absorption with sodium hydroxide, followed by catalytic oxidation to sulfur trioxide, and a plant for waste sulfuric acid recovery from paraffin refining, where the diluted waste acid is sprayed into a furnace and recovered by an ammonium-sulfite-bisulfite solution from the combustion gas (with 4 to 10% sulfur dioxide content). Investment and operation costs as well as profits of both plants are given. Methods employed for power plant flue gas desulfurization in major industrial countries are further assessed: about 90% of these methods uses wet flue gas scrubbing with lime. In the USA flue gas from 25,000 MW of power plant capacity is desulfurized. In the USSR, a 35,000 m/sup 3//h trial plant at Severo-Donetzk is operating using lime, alkali and magnesite. At the 150 MW Dorogobush power plant in the USSR a desulfurization plant using a cyclic ammonia process is under construction.

  9. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.G.; Liu, D.K.

    1992-11-17

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorus preferably in a wet scrubber. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50 C is attractive. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2], alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, 100% of the by-products created are usable, and close to 100% of the NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] can be removed in an economic fashion. 9 figs.

  10. Quantum gases finite temperature and non-equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Szymanska, Marzena; Davis, Matthew; Gardiner, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The 1995 observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapours spawned the field of ultracold, degenerate quantum gases. Unprecedented developments in experimental design and precision control have led to quantum gases becoming the preferred playground for designer quantum many-body systems. This self-contained volume provides a broad overview of the principal theoretical techniques applied to non-equilibrium and finite temperature quantum gases. Covering Bose-Einstein condensates, degenerate Fermi gases, and the more recently realised exciton-polariton condensates, it fills a gap by linking between different methods with origins in condensed matter physics, quantum field theory, quantum optics, atomic physics, and statistical mechanics. Thematically organised chapters on different methodologies, contributed by key researchers using a unified notation, provide the first integrated view of the relative merits of individual approaches, aided by pertinent introductory chapters and the guidance of ed...

  11. Non-CO2 greenhouse gases and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, S A; Dlugokencky, E J; Butler, J H

    2011-08-03

    Earth's climate is warming as a result of anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO(2)) from fossil fuel combustion. Anthropogenic emissions of non-CO(2) greenhouse gases, such as methane, nitrous oxide and ozone-depleting substances (largely from sources other than fossil fuels), also contribute significantly to warming. Some non-CO(2) greenhouse gases have much shorter lifetimes than CO(2), so reducing their emissions offers an additional opportunity to lessen future climate change. Although it is clear that sustainably reducing the warming influence of greenhouse gases will be possible only with substantial cuts in emissions of CO(2), reducing non-CO(2) greenhouse gas emissions would be a relatively quick way of contributing to this goal.

  12. Measurement of Trace Gases in the Atmosphere of Venus Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes to develop small, lightweight, low power instrumentation for the in situ balloon-borne measurement of several trace gases of importance...

  13. Laser-aided diagnostics of plasmas and gases

    CERN Document Server

    Muraoka, K

    2000-01-01

    Updated and expanded from the original Japanese edition, Laser-Aided Diagnostics of Gases and Plasmas takes a unique approach in treating laser-aided diagnostics. The book unifies the subject by joining applications instead of describing each application as a totally separate system. In taking this approach, it highlights the relative strengths of each method and shows how they can complement each other in the study of gases and plasmas.The first part of the book presents a general introduction to the laser-aided study of gases and plasmas, including the various principles and hardware needed for each method, while the second part describes the applications of each general system in detail.Beneficial to a wide spectrum of academic and industrial researchers, this book provides a solid examination of the various options and methods available when involved in the analysis and diagnostics of gases and plasmas.

  14. Molecular model for solubility of gases in flexible polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Ole; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    We propose a model for a priori prediction of the solubility of gases in flexible polymers. The model is based on the concept of ideal solubility of gases in liquids. According to this concept, the mole fraction of gases in liquids is given by Raoult's law with the total pressure and the vapor...... pressure of the gas, where the latter may have to be extrapolated. However, instead of considering each polymer molecule as a rigid structure, we estimate the effective number of degrees of freedom from an equivalent freely jointed bead-rod model for the flexible polymer. In this model, we associate...... the length of the rods with the molecular weight corresponding to a Kuhn step. The model provides a tool for crude estimation of the gas solubility on the basis of only the monomer unit of the polymer and properties of the gas. A comparison with the solubility data for several gases in poly...

  15. LOCAL INSTRUCTION THEORY ON DIVISION IN MATHEMATICS GASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rully Charitas Indra Prahmana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies on learning mathematics for rural area's student indicate that students have difficulty in understanding the concept of division operation. Students are more likely to be introduced by the use of the formula without involving the concept itself and learning division separate the concrete situation of learning process. This underlies the researcher to design division operation learning in the Mathematics of GASING (Math GASING, which always starts from concrete to abstract level. The research method used is a design research which describes how the Math GASING make a real contribution of students understanding in the concept of division operation. Keywords: Division Operation, Design Research, Math GASING, Rural Area’s Student DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.5.1.1445.17-26

  16. Process of cleaning phthalic and maleic anhydrides from gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovich, L.B.; Karbainov, A.D.; Morozkina, N.A.; Smokotin, N.E.; Syskin, V.A.

    1981-01-02

    A process is described for cleaning phthalic and maleic anhydrides from gases by oxidation of them at elevated temperature on a catalyst, being characterized by the fact that with the aim of simultaneously cleaning 1,4-naphthoquinone from the gases and simplifying the process, a vanadium slag of the following composition is used as the catalyst: (wt%) MnO 8-9, U/sub 2/O/sub 5/ 13-19, Tio 9-10 A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ 1-4, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ 7-9, phosphorus 0.05-0.1, SiO/sub 2/ 15-25, CaO 1.0-2.0, Mgo 0.5-1.5; FeO the remainder. The process can be used for catalytic cleaning from gases of organic substances, for example waste gases from phthalic anhydride production.

  17. Inventory of Greenhouse Gases Emissions from Gasoline and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akorede

    Man-made emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) have ... agriculture in Nigeria due to climate change is the reduction ... contributed significantly to the choking air in cities like ...... review with time, utilization and enforcement of emissions.

  18. Multiple carriers of Q noble gases in primitive meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Avice, Guillaume; Estrade, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The main carrier of primordial heavy noble gases in chondrites is thought to be an organic phase, known as phase Q, whose precise characterization has resisted decades of investigation. Indirect techniques have revealed that phase Q might be composed of two subphases, one of them associated with sulfide. Here we provide experimental evidence that noble gases trapped within meteoritic sulfides present chemically and thermally driven behavior patterns that are similar to Q gases. We therefore suggest that phase Q is likely composed of two subcomponents: carbonaceous phases and sulfides. In situ decay of iodine at concentration levels consistent with those reported for meteoritic sulfides can reproduce the 129Xe excess observed for Q gases relative to fractionated solar wind. We suggest that the Q-bearing sulfides formed at high temperature and could have recorded the conditions that prevailed in the chondrule-forming region(s).

  19. THE USE OF BIOFILTERS FOR DEODORISATION OF THE NOXIOUS GASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Wierzbińska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the methods of deodorization of noxious gases is biofiltration. This method consists of pollutants biodegradation by using micro-organisms, what leads to the formation of nontoxic and innoxious compounds. In comparison with conventional techniques, bio-filtration requires lower investments and exploitation costs, moreover it is nature friendly. This technique is still developing. Scientists have carried out research on the optimization of biofiltration process, biofilters and selecting parameters of purified gases or improving the method of efficiency. However, industrial application of biofilters is still difficult for many reasons. In this paper we present the mechanism of biofiltration process, the parameters and conditions which have to be fulfilled by purified gases, installation structure for gases biofiltration, application field of this method and specific example of exploited biofilters, including practical operational guidelines.

  20. Multiple carriers of Q noble gases in primitive meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocchi, Yves; Estrade, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The main carrier of primordial heavy noble gases in chondrites is thought to be an organic phase, known as phase Q, whose precise characterization has resisted decades of investigation. Indirect techniques have revealed that phase Q might be composed of two subphases, one of them associated with sulfide. Here we provide experimental evidence that noble gases trapped within meteoritic sulfides present chemically- and thermally-driven behavior patterns that are similar to Q-gases. We therefore suggest that phase Q is likely composed of two subcomponents: carbonaceous phases and sulfides. In situ decay of iodine at concentrations levels consistent with those reported for meteoritic sulfides can reproduce the 129Xe excess observed for Q-gases relative to fractionated Solar Wind. We suggest that the Q-bearing sulfides formed at high temperature and could have recorded the conditions that prevailed in the chondrule-forming region(s).

  1. Trace Gases, CO2, Climate, and the Greenhouse Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II

    1988-01-01

    Reports carbon dioxide and other trace gases can be the cause of the Greenhouse Effect. Discusses some effects of the temperature change and suggests some solutions. Included are several diagrams, graphs, and a table. (YP)

  2. Trace Gases, CO2, Climate, and the Greenhouse Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II

    1988-01-01

    Reports carbon dioxide and other trace gases can be the cause of the Greenhouse Effect. Discusses some effects of the temperature change and suggests some solutions. Included are several diagrams, graphs, and a table. (YP)

  3. The control of volume flow heating gases oh coke plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostúr Karol

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with mixture and coke gases volume quantity determination for coke battery in term of their optimal redistribution at single blocks in consideration of accurate observance of corresponding technological temperature.

  4. Learning the Critical Points for Addition in Matematika GASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Hamonangan Siregar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose learning Matematika GASING to help students better understand the addition material. Matematika GASING is a way of learning mathematics in an easy, fun and enjoyable fashion. GASING is short for GAmpang, aSyIk, and menyenaNGkan (Bahasa Indonesia for easy, fun and enjoyable. It was originally developed by Prof. Yohanes Surya at the Surya Institute in Indonesia to improve the mathematics education in Indonesia. In Matematika GASING, there is a step called “the critical point” that needs to be mastered for each topic. The focus of our research is the critical point for addition, that is addition of two numbers between 1 − 10 with a sum less than 20. The subject is a matriculation class at STKIP Surya and the research method used is Classroom Action Research. The statistics obtained is described using Qualitative Descriptive Statistics.

  5. 2D self-assembly of phenylene-vinylene tectons at the liquid-highly oriented pyrolytic graphite interface: from chain length effects to anisotropic guest-host dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, A.; Bocheux, A.; Charra, F.; Mathevet, F.; Kreher, D.; Attias, A.-J.

    2017-01-01

    Here we report the synthesis and characterization of a series of new phenylene-vinylene tectons. The study by scanning tunneling microscopy of their supramolecular self-assembly at the interface between a phenyloctane solution and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite demonstrates that variation of concentration and length of alkyl chains led to the formation of different networks, a compact one and a nanoporous one, with a fine control of the lattice parameters. The study of guest-host properties of the nanoporous network revealed a selectivity toward guest compounds according to their shape and size. Moreover, the statistical analysis of pore-to-pore guest dynamics evidences an anisotropic diffusion process.

  6. Self-assembly of 50 bp poly(dA)·poly(dT) DNA on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite via atomic force microscopy observation and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Nii, Ryosuke; Akamatsu, Shingo; Kakizaki, Toshiya; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2013-08-28

    This study has investigated the formation patterns resulting from the self-assembly of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), using both experimental and molecular dynamics approaches. Under optimized conditions based on pretreatment of HOPG surface and specific solution concentrations, DNA is found to self-assemble to form various patterned networks. The associated self-assembly mechanism is elucidated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and fractal dimension analysis. The results of this work demonstrate an effective technique allowing the formation of arrays of negatively charged biomacromolecules on negatively charged HOPG surfaces.

  7. 高温熔融钢渣热闷热平衡分析及余热回收利用%Analysis of heat balance and waste heat recovery and utilization for the high temperature molten slag by pyrolytic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宇; 陈媛; 张天有; 张健; 韩自博; 刘银梅

    2014-01-01

    对钢渣热闷过程中的热量平衡进行了分析和计算,提出了余热回收方案,并对经济效益进行了分析,为钢渣余热回收的进一步研究和实践打下了基础。%The heat balance during the steel slag self -slaking process by pyrolytic was analyzed and calculated.Put forward the waste heat recovery scheme and analyzed the economic benefits .It lays a solid basis for the further research and practice of steel slag waste heat recovery .

  8. Abiogenic hydrocarbons in commercial gases from the Songliao Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the kinetic fractionation, composition and distribution characteristics of carbon and hydrogen isotopes for various alkane gases formed in different environments, by different mecha- nisms and from different sources in nature. It is demonstrated that the biodegradation or thermode- gradation of complex high-molecule sedimentary organic material can form microbial gas or thermogenic gas. The δ 13C1 value ranges from -110‰ to -50‰ for microbial gases but from -50‰ to -35‰ (even heavier) for thermogenic gases. Controlled by the kinetic isotope fractionation, both microbial and thermogenic gases have δ 13C and δ D values characterized by normal distribution, i.e. δ 13C1< δ 13C2< δ 13C3< δ 13C4 and δ DCH4< δ DC2H6< δ DC3H8<δ DC4H10, and by a positive correlation between the δ 13C and δ D values. Simple carbonbearing molecules (CH4, CO and CO2) can form abiogenic alkane gases via polymerization in the abiological chemical process in nature, with δ 13C1 heavier than -30‰. Moreover, controlled by the kinetic isotope fractionation, abiogenic alkane gases are characterized by a reverse distribution of δ 13C values and a normal trend of δ D values, namely δ 13C1> δ 13C2> δ 13C3> δ 13C4 and δ DCH4<δ DC2H6< δ DC3H8< δ DC4H10. The δ 13C values and δ D values are negatively correlated. Natural gases from 26 commercial gas wells distributed in the Xujiaweizi and Yingshan-Miaotaizi faulted depressions in the Songliao Basin, China, show δ13C1 values ranging from -30.5‰ to -16.7‰ with a very narrow δ D range between -203‰―-196‰. These gases are characterized by a reverse distribution of δ 13C values but a normal distribution of δ D values, and a negative correlation between their δ 13C and δ D values, indicating an abiological origin. The present study has revealed that abiogenic hydrocarbons not only exist in nature but also can make significant contribution to commercial gas reserviors. It is estimated that

  9. Low-mature gases and their resource potentiality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yongchang; WANG Xiaofeng; SHI Baoguang

    2009-01-01

    In the 80's of last century, based on the advances in natural gas exploration practice, the concepts of bio-thermocatalytic transitional-zone gas and early thermogenetic gas were proposed, and the lower limit Ro values for the formation and accumulation of thermogenetic natural gases of industrial importance have been extended to 0.3%-0.4%. In accordance with the two-stage model established on the basis of carbon isotope fractionation involved in the formation of coal-type natural gases, the upper limit Ro values of lowly evolved natural gases should be set at 0.8%-1.0%. This is the concept of low-mature gas which is commonly accepted at the present time. The Urengoy super-large gas field in western Siberian Basin is a typical example of low-mature gas field, where low-mature gas reserves account for 20% of the globally proven natural gas reserves, and this fully indicates the importance of this kind of resources. The proven reserves of natural gases in the Turpan-Hami Basin of China are approximate to 1000×108 m3, and the thermal evolution indices of source rocks are Ro=0.4%-0.8%. The δ13C1 values of methane are mainly within the range of -44‰- -39‰ (corresponding to Ro=0.6%-0.8%), and those of ethane are mainly within the range of -29‰- -26‰, indicating that these natural gases should be designated to the coal-type low-mature gases. The light hydrocarbon evolution indices of natural gases also provide strong evidence suggesting that they are the coal-type low-mature gases. If so, low-mature gas in the Turpan-Hami Basin has been accumulated to such an extent as to be equivalent to the total reserves of three large-sized gas fields, and their existence is of great significance in the study and exploration of China's low-mature gases. If it is evidenced that the source rocks of low-mature gases are related mainly to coal measures, China's abundant lowly evolved coal series resources will provide a huge resource potentiality for the generation of low

  10. High-resolution spectroscopy of gases for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    High-resolution spectroscopy of gases is a powerful technique which has various fundamental and practical applications: in situ simultaneous measurements of gas temperature and gas composition, radiative transfer modeling, validation of existing and developing of new databases and etc. Existing...... to, for example, atmospheric research, combustion and gasification. Some high-temperature, high-resolution IR/UV absorption/transmission measurements gases (e.g. CO2, SO2, SO3 and phenol) are presented....

  11. The Extension of the RAINS Model to Greenhouse Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Klaassen, G.; AMANN, M; Berglund, C; J. Cofala; Hoeglund-Isaksson, L.; Heyes, C.; MECHLER R.; Tohka, A.; W. Schoepp; Winiwarter, W.

    2004-01-01

    Many of the traditional air pollutants and greenhouse gases have common sources, offering a cost-effective potential for simultaneous improvements for both traditional air pollution problems as well as climate change. A methodology has been developed to extend the RAINS integrated assessment model to explore synergies and trade-offs between the control of greenhouse gases and air pollution. With this extension, the RAINS model allows now the assessment of emission control costs for the six gr...

  12. Fe distribution in GaSe and InSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalyuk, Z.D.; Fejchuk, P.I.; Shcherbak, L.P.; Zbykovskaya, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    Radiometry was used to determine the effective coefficients of Fe distribution in GaSe and InSe during planar crystallization of melt with 5 x 10/sup 17/-6 x 10/sup 19/ at/cm/sup 3/ initial impurity concentration; concentration dependence of these cofficients was established. Equations for calculation of the real impurity distribution in GaSe and InSe crystals are presented.

  13. [The general analytical methods for gases dissolved in liquids: sonoluminescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiu-Shuai; Liu, Yan

    2009-10-01

    How to analyze the gases dissolved in water or organic liquids is a challenging problem in analytical chemistry. Till the present time, only the dissolved oxygen in water can be analyzed by chemical and instrumental methods, while other gases, e. g. CO2, N2, CH4, Ar, He, Ke, still can not be analyzed by chemical or instrumental methods. The present paper gives a review on using sonoluminescence for gas analysis in water or organic liquids.

  14. Three Toxic Gases Meet in the Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Decreau

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The rationale of the study was two-fold : (i develop a functional synthetic model of the Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO active site, (ii use it as a convenient tool to understand or predict the outcome of the reaction of CcO with ligands (physiologically relevant gases and other ligands. At physiological pH and potential, the model catalyzes the 4-electron reduction of oxygen. This model was immobilized on self-assembled-monolayer (SAM modified electrode. During catalytic oxygen reduction, electron delivery through SAMs is rate limiting, similar to the situation in CcO. This model contains all three redox-active components in CcO’s active site, which are required to minimize the production of partially-reduced-oxygen-species (PROS: Fe¬-heme (heme a3 in a myoglobin-like model fitted with a proximal imidazole ligand, and a distal tris-imidazole Copper (CuB complex, where one imidazole is cross-linked to a phenol (mimicking Tyr244. This functional CcO model demonstrates how CcO itself might tolerate the hormone NO (which diffuses through the mitochondria. It is proposed that CuB delivers superoxide to NO bound to Fe-heme forming peroxynitrite, then nitrate that diffuses away. Another toxic gas, H2S, has exceptional biological effects: at ~80 ppm, H2S induces a state similar to hibernation in mice, lowering the animal's temperature and slowing respiration. Using our functional CcO model, we have demonstrated that at the same concentration range H2S can reversibly inhibit catalytic oxygen reduction. Such a reversible catalytic process on the model was also demonstrated with an organic compound, tetrazole (TZ. Following studies showed that TZ reversibly inhibits respiration in isolated mitochondria, and induces deactivation of platelets, a mitochondria-rich key component of blood coagulation. Hence, this program is a rare example illustrating the use of a functional model to understand and predict physiologically important reactions at the active site

  15. Excitation of gases with positive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sercel, P.C.; Bashkin, S.; Anderson, J.A.; Thiede, D.A.; Bruch, R.F.; DeWitt, D.; Fuelling, S.

    1988-04-01

    The aurora borealis presents problems the solutions to which depend partly on knowing the cross sections for the excitation of states in atmospheric gases by the impact of energetic protons and electrons. We have begun a study of the excitation processes induced in N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ by energetic incident positive ions (H/sup +/, H/sub 2//sup +/, H/sub 3//sup +/). The particles, accelerated with a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, enter a differentially pumped gas cell in which the pressure can be varied up to 80 mTorr and held constant to 0.1 mTorr at each setting. Light generated in the cell is observed at 90/sup 0/ to the particle beam. The light is reflected by a mirror system so as to enter the input slit of a 1-m, air, Czerny-Turner spectrometer. The 1200 l/mm grating is blazed at 500 nm. A cooled 9659B photomultiplier tube detects the light which appears at the exit slit, and transmits intensity information to a 4000-channel multiscaler. The incident beam is received on an insulated plate, and the collected charge provides a signal which advances both the grating angle and the channel in the multiscaler. Using a line width of 0.03 to 0.1 nm, we have obtained spectra from 360 to 750 nm. Many transitions have been identified, most from N/sub 2//sup +/ O/sub 2//sup -/, but some from neutral molecules and monatomic emitters. Data have been taken as a function of pressure and type of incident particle for a particle velocity corresponding to 500 keV protons. There is no discernible difference in relative yield for the different bombarding species. The line intensities all appear to be linear with pressure over the range we used. We will describe our results and discuss our approach to making cross-section measurements. Possible extensions of the experiments into different directions will also be mentioned.

  16. GREENHOUSE GASES REDUCTION THROUGH WASTE MANAGEMENT IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Anić Vučinić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The climate change policy is one of the key factors in the achievement of sustainable development in the Republic of Croatia. Control and mitigation of green house gases is correlated with all economy activities. Waste management is one of the main tasks of environmental protection in Croatia. The Waste Management Strategy of the Republic of Croatia and the Waste Management Plan in the Republic of Croatia define the concept of waste management hierarchy and direct and indirect measures as criteria for sustainable waste management establishment. The main constituent of this system is avoiding and minimizing waste, as well as increasing the recycling and recovery level of waste and land fill gas, which also represent green house gases mitigation measures. The Waste Management Plan consists of several direct and indirect measures for green house gases emission reduction and their implementation also affects the green house gases emissions. The contribution of the methane emission from land fills amounts to about 2% of the total green house gases emissions in Croatia. The climate change control and mitigation measures as an integral part of waste management sector strategies represent the measures of achieving the national objectives to wards green house gases emission reduction which Croatia has accepted in the frame work of the Kyoto Protocol.

  17. Studies of noble gases in meteorites and in the earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    The isotopic and elemental abundances of noble gases in the solar system are investigated, using simple mixing models and mass-spectrometric measurements of the noble gases in meteorites and terrestrial rocks and minerals. Primordial neon is modeled by two isotopically distinct components from the interstellar gas and dust. Neon from the gas dominates solar neon, which contains about ten times more /sup 20/Ne than /sup 22/Ne. Neon in meteorites consists of galactic cosmic ray spallation neon and at least two primordial components, neon-E and neon-S. Neon was measured in several meteorites to investigate these end-members. Ca,Al-rich inclusions from the Allende meteorite were examined for correlation between neon-E and oxygen or magnesium isotopic anomalies. Measurements were made to determine the noble gas contents of various terrestrial rocks and minerals, and to investigate the cycling of noble gases between different terrestrial reservoirs. Juvenile and atmospheric gases have been measured in the glassy rims of mid-ocean ridge (MOR) pillow basalts. Evidence is presented that three samples contain excess radiogenic /sup 129/Xe and fission xenon, in addition to the excess radiogenic /sup 40/Ar found in all samples. The Skaergaard data demonstrate that atmospheric noble gases dissolved in ground water can be transferred into crustal rocks. Subduction of oceanic crust altered by seawater can transport atmospheric noble gases into the upper mantle.

  18. Electron beam treatment of simulated marine diesel exhaust gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licki Janusz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The exhaust gases from marine diesel engines contain high SO2 and NOx concentration. The applicability of the electron beam flue gas treatment technology for purification of marine diesel exhaust gases containing high SO2 and NOx concentration gases was the main goal of this paper. The study was performed in the laboratory plant with NOx concentration up to 1700 ppmv and SO2 concentration up to 1000 ppmv. Such high NOx and SO2 concentrations were observed in the exhaust gases from marine high-power diesel engines fuelled with different heavy fuel oils. In the first part of study the simulated exhaust gases were irradiated by the electron beam from accelerator. The simultaneous removal of SO2 and NOx were obtained and their removal efficiencies strongly depend on irradiation dose and inlet NOx concentration. For NOx concentrations above 800 ppmv low removal efficiencies were obtained even if applied high doses. In the second part of study the irradiated gases were directed to the seawater scrubber for further purification. The scrubbing process enhances removal efficiencies of both pollutants. The SO2 removal efficiencies above 98.5% were obtained with irradiation dose greater than 5.3 kGy. For inlet NOx concentrations of 1700 ppmv the NOx removal efficiency about 51% was obtained with dose greater than 8.8 kGy. Methods for further increase of NOx removal efficiency are presented in the paper.

  19. GaSe oxidation in air: from bulk to monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Mahfujur; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Monecke, Manuel; Lopez-Rivera, Santos A.; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) van derWaals semiconductors have been the subject of intense research due to their low dimensionality and tunable optoelectronic properties. However, the stability of these materials in air is one of the important issues that needs to be clarified, especially for technological applications. Here the time evolution of GaSe oxidation from monolayer to bulk is investigated by Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence emission, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Raman spectroscopy study reveals that GaSe monolayers become oxidized almost immediately after exposure to air. However, the oxidation is a self-limiting process taking roughly 5 h to penetrate up to 3 layers of GaSe. After oxidation, GaSe single-layers decompose into amorphous Se which has a strong Raman cross section under red excitation. The present study provides a clear picture of the stability of GaSe in air and will guide future research of GaSe from single- to few-layers for the appropriate development of novel technological applications for this promising 2D material.

  20. Use of gases in dairy manufacturing: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Bhaskar Mani; Truong, Tuyen; Bansal, Nidhi; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2017-06-13

    Use of gases (air, carbon dioxide and nitrogen) has been practiced in the manufacture of dairy products (i.e., ice cream, whipped cream and butter) to improve their texture, mouthfeel and shelf-life extension. Many attempts have also been made to incorporate other gases such as hydrogen, nitrous oxide, argon, xenon, and helium into the dairy systems for various product functionalities such as whipping, foaming, texture, aroma enhancement, and therapeutic properties. The gases can be dissolved in aqueous and fat phases or remain in the form of bubbles stabilized by protein or fat particles. The gas addition or infusion processes are typically simple and have been used commercially. This review focuses on the use of various gases in relation to their individually physical properties along with their specific roles in manufacturing and controlling quality of dairy products. It also recaps on how gases are included in the dairy systems. The information is important in understanding of addition of specific gas(es) into food systems, particularly dairy products, that potentially provide intervention opportunities for modifying and/or creating innovative food structures and functionalities.

  1. Processes for separating the noble fission gases xenon and krypton from waste gases from nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrich, E.; Hufner, R.; Weirich, F.

    1983-08-23

    A process is claimed for separating the noble fission gases xenon and krypton from a prepurified waste gas from a nuclear plant. The prepurified waste gas is brought into contact with liquid Cl/sub 2/CF/sub 2/ as an absorption agent in a first column at an operating pressure which is less than or equal to normal pressure, whereby Xe, Kr, N/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ are absorbed by the agent. Subsequently, the liquid absorption agent containing the absorbed gases is heated to substantially the boiling temperature of Cl/sub 2/CF/sub 2/ at the operating pressure for vaporizing part of the liquid absorption agent and desorbing the absorbed Kr, N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ to thereby separate the Kr and Xe from one another. The desorbed Kr, N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ gases are separated from the vaporized absorption agent. The liquid absorption agent which has not been vaporized is treated to recover Xe, N/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/. Waste gas containing Kr, N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ from the head of the first column is brought into contact with liquid Cl/sub 2/CF/sub 2/ as an absorption agent in a second column, at an operating pressure which is less than or equal to normal pressure, whereby Kr, N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ are absorbed. Subsequently, the liquid absorption agent in the second column containing the absorbed Kr, N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ is heated substantially the boiling temperature of the Cl/sub 2/CF/sub 2/ at the operating pressure for vaporizing part of the liquid absorption agent and desorbing the absorbed N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. The liquid Cl/sub 2/CF/sub 2/ which has not been vaporized is treated to recover KR. An apparatus is provided for performing the process.

  2. WMO WDCGG data report. GAW data. Volume IV - greenhouse gases and other atmospheric gases. WDCGG No. 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The report contains data on the concentrations of greenhouse gases and related gases in the atmosphere and the oceans. This report contains monthly and annual mean values collected from January 1998 to October 2000 on global, regional and local scales, together with information on observation stations. Gases include: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen monoxide, sulphur dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, tetrachloroethane, trichloroethane and trichloromethane. Trends in concentrations and growth rates presented mainly in graphical form for observation stations around the world. Tables list concentrations of gases, over periods covered at all reporting stations with average growth rates per year and also regression equations of trends. Geographical locations of observation stations are also listed.

  3. Study of the heterointerfaces InSe on GaSe and GaSe on InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargues, D.; Brahim-Otsmane, L.; Eddrief, M.; Sébenne, C.; Balkanski, M.

    1993-03-01

    InSe and GaSe thin films are grown on freshly cleaved (00.1) substrates of GaSe and InSe, respectively, by molecular beam epitaxy. They are studied in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). From the attenuation curves of the XPS substrate core level peaks, the quasi layer-by-layer growth is shown during the first stages of deposition in agreement with RHEED results. But both interfaces are not totally symmetrical. For InSe on GaSe(00.1), the sharpness of the interface is shown and the conditions of growth are well established. For GaSe on InSe(00.1), the sharpness of the interface can also be suggested although it is less clear; this is related to the growth conditions.

  4. 热解型绝热材料烧蚀过程数值仿真%Research on Numerical Simulation for Ablation of Pyrolytic Insulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周源; 黄志勇; 王斌

    2015-01-01

    绝热层的热防护性能直接影响了固体火箭发动机工作的安全性和可靠性。热解型绝热材料在传热烧蚀过程中形成了碳化层—热解面—基体层的物理结构。通过建立热化学烧蚀计算模型和绝热层传热计算模型对传热烧蚀过程进行了计算分析。考虑到烧蚀过程中绝热层边界的移动,根据预测—校正格式对模型进行离散,对绝热层的烧蚀过程及传热过程进行了耦合计算。计算结果表明,绝热层的热解速率比烧蚀速率大很多,绝热材料的热解潜热对绝热层的热防护能力具有很大影响。%The thermal protection ability of insulator has great influence on the safety and reliability of SRM. During the progress of heat-transfer and ablation,the pyrolytic insulator changes into the physical structure with carbonization-layer,pyrolysis-side and insulator-layer. The thermal behavior and ablation of insulator were calculated and analyzed by the thermo-chemistry ablation model and heat-transfer calculation model. In consideration of the fact that the boundary of insulator is moving during the ablation,the models were discredited with predicted-correction method. Insulator ablation and temperature field were coupling calculated. The results show that the rate of pyrolysis is higher than the rate of ablation and the latent heat of pyrolysis has great influence on thermal protection ability of insulator.

  5. Geochemical study on oil-cracked gases and kerogencracked gases (I)——Experimental simulation and products analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Eight types of samples:crude oil,chloroform bitumen A,oil fractions(saturated hydrocarbon,aromatic hydrocarbon,resin and asphaltene) ,source rock and kerogen,have been pyrolyzed in laboratory. The products have also been systematically analyzed. The results indicate that gaseous hydrocarbons yields for different types of samples at various temperatures are different,especially for different fractions of crude oil. There is difference for molecular compositions. The C2/C3 ratios of cracking gases in different types of samples have positive relationships with C2/iC4 as well as pyrolysis temperatures. Moreover,the ratios of C2/C3 and C2/iC4 are about 2 and 10,respectively,at the temperature of 500℃― 550℃. However,when the temperature is higher than 500℃,the ratios of C1/C2,C1/C3 and dryness index for gases cracking from source rock and kerogen are higher than those from oil and bitumen,indicating an important different feature between oil-cracked gases and kerogen-cracked gases at the high or over-mature stage. The ratios of C1/C2,C1/C3 vary more than 10% at 500℃―800℃. In this paper,experimental results can provide important academic foundation and useful geochemical parameters for distinguishing of oil-cracked gases and kerogen-cracked gases.

  6. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases and production of phosphoric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Liu, David K.

    1992-01-01

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorous preferably in a wet scrubber. The addition of yellow phosphorous in the system induces the production of O.sub.3 which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO.sub.2. The resulting NO.sub.2 dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO.sub.2 under appropriate conditions. In a 20 acfm system, yellow phosphorous is oxidized to yield P.sub.2 O.sub.5 which picks up water to form H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 mists and can be collected as a valuable product. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, better than 90% of SO.sub.2 and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained.

  7. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small

  8. Radiative forcings for 28 potential Archean greenhouse gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Byrne

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite reduced insolation in the late Archean, evidence suggests a warm climate which was likely sustained by a stronger greenhouse effect, the so-called Faint Young Sun Problem (FYSP. CO2 and CH4 are generally thought to be the mainstays of this enhanced greenhouse, though many other gases have been proposed. We present high accuracy radiative forcings for CO2, CH4 and 26 other gases, performing the radiative transfer calculations at line-by-line resolution and using HITRAN 2012 line data for background pressures of 0.5, 1, and 2 bar. For CO2 to resolve the FYSP alone, 0.21 bar is needed with 0.5 bar of atmospheric pressure, 0.13 bar with 1 bar of atmospheric pressures, or 0.07 bar with 2 bar of atmospheric pressure. For CH4, we find that near-infrared absorption is much stronger than previously thought, arising from updates to the HITRAN database. CH4 radiative forcing peaks at 10.3, 9, or 8.3 W m−2 for background pressures of 0.5, 1 or 2 bar, likely limiting the utility of CH4 for warming the Archean. For the other 26 HITRAN gases, radiative forcings of up to a few to 10 W m−2 are obtained from concentrations of 0.1–1 ppmv for many gases. We further calculate the reduction of radiative forcing due to gas overlap for the 20 strongest gases. We recommend the forcings provided here be used both as a first reference for which gases are likely good greenhouse gases, and as a standard set of calculations for validation of radiative forcing calculations for the Archean.

  9. 40 CFR 52.22 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing the pollutant greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... actions addressing the pollutant greenhouse gases (GHGs). 52.22 Section 52.22 Protection of Environment... greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) means the air pollutant as defined in § 86.1818-12(a) of this chapter as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: Carbon dioxide,...

  10. Abiogenic hydrocarbons in commercial gases from the Songliao Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XianBin; WANG LianSheng; LIU ChunXue; YAN Hong; LI LiWu; ZHOU XiaoFeng; WANG YongLi; YANG Hui; WANG Guang; GUO ZhanQian; TUO JinCai; GUO HongYan; LI ZhenXi; ZHUO ShengGuang; JIANG HongLiang; ZENG LongWei; ZHANG MingJie

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the kinetic fractionation, composition and distribution characteristics of carbon and hydrogen isotopes for various alkane gases formed in different environments, by different mecha-nisms and from different sources in nature. It is demonstrated that the biodegradation or thermode-gradation of complex high-molecule sedimentary organic material can form microbial gas or ther-mogenic gas. The δ13C1 value ranges from -110‰ to -50‰ for microbial gases but from -51‰ to -35‰ (even heavier) for thermogenic gases. Controlled by the kinetic isotope fractionation, both microbial and thermogenic gases have δ13C and δD values characterized by normal distribution, i.e. δ13C1 δ13C2> δ13C3> δ13C4 and δDCH4<δDC2H6< δDC3H8< δDC4H10. The δ13C values and δD values are negatively correlated. Natural gases from 26 commercial gas wells distributed in the Xujiaweizi and Yingshan-Miaotaizi faulted de-pressions in the Songliao Basin, China, show δ13C1 values ranging from -30.5‰. to -16.7‰, with a very narrow δD range between -203‰--196‰. These gases are characterized by a reverse distribution of δ13C values but a normal distribution of δD values, and a negative correlation between their δ13C and δD values, indicating an abiological origin. The present study has revealed that abiogenic hydrocar-bons not only exist in nature but also can make significant contribution to commercial gas reserviors. It is estimated that the reserve volume of alkane gases with abiogenic characteristics in these 26 gas wells in the Songliao Basin is over 500×108 m3, The prospecting practice in the Songliao Basin has demonstrated that abiogenic alkane gases are of a promising resource, and it provides an example for the investigation of and search for abiogenic commercial natural gases worldwide.

  11. Role of metabolic gases in bubble formation during hypobaric exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, P P; Conkin, J; Powell, M R; Waligora, J M; Chhikara, R S

    1998-03-01

    Our hypothesis is that metabolic gases play a role in the initial explosive growth phase of bubble formation during hypobaric exposures. Models that account for optimal internal tensions of dissolved gases to predict the probability of occurrence of venous gas emboli were statistically fitted to 426 hypobaric exposures from National Aeronautics and Space Administration tests. The presence of venous gas emboli in the pulmonary artery was detected with an ultrasound Doppler detector. The model fit and parameter estimation were done by using the statistical method of maximum likelihood. The analysis results were as follows. 1) For the model without an input of noninert dissolved gas tissue tension, the log likelihood (in absolute value) was 255.01. 2) When an additional parameter was added to the model to account for the dissolved noninert gas tissue tension, the log likelihood was 251.70. The significance of the additional parameter was established based on the likelihood ratio test (P bubble formation was 19. 1 kPa (143 mmHg). 4) The additional gas tissue tension, supposedly due to noninert gases, did not show an exponential decay as a function of time during denitrogenation, but it remained constant. 5) The positive sign for this parameter term in the model is characteristic of an outward radial pressure of gases in the bubble. This analysis suggests that dissolved gases other than N2 in tissues may facilitate the initial explosive bubble-growth phase.

  12. LEARNING THE CRITICAL POINTS FOR ADDITION IN MATEMATIKA GASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Hamonangan Siregar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose learning Matematika GASING to help students better understand the addition material. Matematika GASING is a way of learning mathematics in an easy, fun and enjoyable fashion. GASING is short for GAmpang, aSyIk, and menyenaNGkan (Bahasa Indonesia for easy, fun and enjoyable. It was originally developed by Prof. Yohanes Surya at the Surya Institute in Indonesia to improve the mathematics education in Indonesia. In Matematika GASING, there is a step called “the critical point” that needs to be mastered for each topic. The focus of our research is the critical point for addition, that is addition of two numbers between 1 − 10 with a sum less than 20. The subject is a matriculation class at STKIP Surya and the research method used is Classroom Action Research. The statistics obtained is described using Qualitative Descriptive Statistics.Keyword: Matematika GASING, Addition, Critical Points, Classroom Action Research. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.5.2.1500.160-169

  13. Noble gases recycled into the mantle through cold subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smye, Andrew J.; Jackson, Colin R. M.; Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Hesse, Marc A.; Parman, Steve W.; Shuster, David L.; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2017-08-01

    Subduction of hydrous and carbonated oceanic lithosphere replenishes the mantle volatile inventory. Substantial uncertainties exist on the magnitudes of the recycled volatile fluxes and it is unclear whether Earth surface reservoirs are undergoing net-loss or net-gain of H2O and CO2. Here, we use noble gases as tracers for deep volatile cycling. Specifically, we construct and apply a kinetic model to estimate the effect of subduction zone metamorphism on the elemental composition of noble gases in amphibole - a common constituent of altered oceanic crust. We show that progressive dehydration of the slab leads to the extraction of noble gases, linking noble gas recycling to H2O. Noble gases are strongly fractionated within hot subduction zones, whereas minimal fractionation occurs along colder subduction geotherms. In the context of our modelling, this implies that the mantle heavy noble gas inventory is dominated by the injection of noble gases through cold subduction zones. For cold subduction zones, we estimate a present-day bulk recycling efficiency, past the depth of amphibole breakdown, of 5-35% and 60-80% for 36Ar and H2O bound within oceanic crust, respectively. Given that hotter subduction dominates over geologic history, this result highlights the importance of cooler subduction zones in regassing the mantle and in affecting the modern volatile budget of Earth's interior.

  14. Oil cracking to gases: Kinetic modeling and geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Hui; WANG Zhaoming; XIAO Zhongyao; LI Xianqing; XIAO Xianming

    2006-01-01

    ATriassic oil sample from LN14 of Tarim Basin was pyrolyzed using the sealed gold tubes at 200-620℃ under a constant pressure of 50 MPa.The gaseous and residual soluble hydrocarbons were analyzed. The results show that the cracking of oil to gas can be divided into two distinct stages: the primary generation of total C1-5 gases from liquid oil characterized by the dominance of C2-5 hydrocarbons and the secondary or further cracking of C2-5gases to methane and carbon-rich matters leading to the progressive dryness of gases. Based on the experimental data, the kinetic parameters were determined for the primary generation and secondary cracking of oil cracking gases and extrapolated to geological conditions to predict the thermal stability and cracking extent of crude oil. Finally, an evolution model for the thermal destruction of crude oil was proposed and its implications to the migration and accumulation of oil cracking gases were discussed.

  15. Looking into individual coffee beans during the roasting process: direct micro-probe sampling on-line photo-ionisation mass spectrometric analysis of coffee roasting gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz-Schünemann, Romy; Streibel, Thorsten; Ehlert, Sven; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    A micro-probe (μ-probe) gas sampling device for on-line analysis of gases evolving in confined, small objects by single-photon ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SPI-TOFMS) was developed. The technique is applied for the first time in a feasibility study to record the formation of volatile and flavour compounds during the roasting process within (inside) or in the direct vicinity (outside) of individual coffee beans. A real-time on-line analysis of evolving volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC and SVOC) as they are formed under the mild pyrolytic conditions of the roasting process was performed. The soft-ionisation mass spectra depict a molecular ion signature, which is well corresponding with the existing knowledge of coffee roasting and evolving compounds. Additionally, thereby it is possible to discriminate between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta). The recognized differences in the roasting gas profiles reflect the differences in the precursor composition of the coffee cultivars very well. Furthermore, a well-known set of marker compounds for Arabica and Robusta, namely the lipids kahweol and cafestol (detected in their dehydrated form at m/z 296 and m/z 298, respectively) were observed. If the variation in time of different compounds is observed, distinctly different evolution behaviours were detected. Here, phenol (m/z 94) and caffeine (m/z 194) are exemplary chosen, whereas phenol shows very sharp emission peaks, caffeine do not have this highly transient behaviour. Finally, the changes of the chemical signature as a function of the roasting time, the influence of sampling position (inside, outside) and cultivar (Arabica, Robusta) is investigated by multivariate statistics (PCA). In summary, this pilot study demonstrates the high potential of the measurement technique to enhance the fundamental knowledge of the formation processes of volatile and semi-volatile flavour compounds inside the individual coffee bean.

  16. Biotransformation of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in stack gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, R.; Puligadda, R. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Bishop, D.F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Nation`s large supply of high sulfur coal and increasingly stringent emission regulation led to priority development of advanced innovative processes for treating pollutants in flue gases from coal combustion. The principal pollutants in flue gases, sulfur oxides (SO{sub 2},SO{sub 3}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) cause acid rain. Thus, the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Program is funding projects to commercialize technologies that minimize emission of sulfur and nitrogen oxides at power plants. This report describes the controlled use of bioconversion processes to remove the oxides from flue gas. Two bioreactor experiments were conducted to investigate the removal of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide from stack gases.

  17. “Hard probes” of strongly-interacting atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Yusuke [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    We investigate properties of an energetic atom propagating through strongly interacting atomic gases. The operator product expansion is used to systematically compute a quasiparticle energy and its scattering rate both in a spin-1/2 Fermi gas and in a spinless Bose gas. Reasonable agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo simulations even at a relatively small momentum k/kF > 1.5 indicates that our large-momentum expansions are valid in a wide range of momentum. We also study a differential scattering rate when a probe atom is shot into atomic gases. Because the number density and current density of the target atomic gas contribute to the forward scattering only, its contact density (measure of short-range pair correlation) gives the leading contribution to the backward scattering. Therefore, such an experiment can be used to measure the contact density and thus provides a new local probe of strongly interacting atomic gases.

  18. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

  19. Turnover and transport of greenhouse gases in a Danish wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Juncher

    2011-01-01

    net N2O dynamics. Similarly, plant-mediated gas transport by the subsurface aerating macrophyte Phalaris arundinacea played a major part in regulating and facilitating emissions of greenhouse gases across the soil-atmosphere interface. It is concluded that the spatiotemporal distribution of dominating......Natural wetlands act as both sources and sinks of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from the soil to the atmosphere. Production and consumption of these gases in the soil are controlled by a series of highly dynamic and interrelated processes...... in these drivers, thereby influencing the net emission or uptake of greenhouse gas. In this PhD thesis the complex aspects in the exchange of N2O across the soil-atmosphere is investigated with special focus on the spatiotemporal variations in drivers for N2O production and consumption in the soil...

  20. Sampling and analysis methods for geothermal fluids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.C.

    1978-07-01

    The sampling procedures for geothermal fluids and gases include: sampling hot springs, fumaroles, etc.; sampling condensed brine and entrained gases; sampling steam-lines; low pressure separator systems; high pressure separator systems; two-phase sampling; downhole samplers; and miscellaneous methods. The recommended analytical methods compiled here cover physical properties, dissolved solids, and dissolved and entrained gases. The sequences of methods listed for each parameter are: wet chemical, gravimetric, colorimetric, electrode, atomic absorption, flame emission, x-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, ion exchange chromatography, spark source mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, and emission spectrometry. Material on correction of brine component concentrations for steam loss during flashing is presented. (MHR)

  1. Hydrodynamics of Normal Atomic Gases with Spin-orbit Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yan-Hua; Yu, Zhenhua

    2015-10-20

    Successful realization of spin-orbit coupling in atomic gases by the NIST scheme opens the prospect of studying the effects of spin-orbit coupling on many-body physics in an unprecedentedly controllable way. Here we derive the linearized hydrodynamic equations for the normal atomic gases of the spin-orbit coupling by the NIST scheme with zero detuning. We show that the hydrodynamics of the system crucially depends on the momentum susceptibilities which can be modified by the spin-orbit coupling. We reveal the effects of the spin-orbit coupling on the sound velocities and the dipole mode frequency of the gases by applying our formalism to the ideal Fermi gas. We also discuss the generalization of our results to other situations.

  2. Global warming description using Daisyworld model with greenhouse gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Susana L D; Savi, Marcelo A; Viola, Flavio M; Leiroz, Albino J K

    2014-11-01

    Daisyworld is an archetypal model of the earth that is able to describe the global regulation that can emerge from the interaction between life and environment. This article proposes a model based on the original Daisyworld considering greenhouse gases emission and absorption, allowing the description of the global warming phenomenon. Global and local analyses are discussed evaluating the influence of greenhouse gases in the planet dynamics. Numerical simulations are carried out showing the general qualitative behavior of the Daisyworld for different scenarios that includes solar luminosity variations and greenhouse gases effect. Nonlinear dynamics perspective is of concern discussing a way that helps the comprehension of the global warming phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Total cross sections for ultracold neutrons scattered from gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seestrom, S. J.; Adamek, E. R.; Barlow, D.; Blatnik, M.; Broussard, L. J.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Fox, W.; Hoffbauer, M.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M.; Medina, J.; Morley, D. J.; Morris, C. L.; Pattie, R. W.; Ramsey, J.; Roberts, A.; Salvat, D. J.; Saunders, A.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Slaughter, B. A.; Walstrom, P. L.; Wang, Z.; Wexler, J.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.; Vanderwerp, J.; Zeck, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    We have followed up on our previous measurements of upscattering of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) from a series of gases by making measurements of total cross sections on the following gases hydrogen, ethane, methane, isobutene, n -butane, ethylene, water vapor, propane, neopentane, isopropyl alcohol, and 3He . The values of these cross sections are important for estimating the loss rate of trapped neutrons due to residual gas and are relevant to neutron lifetime measurements using UCNs. The effects of the UCN velocity and path-length distributions were accounted for in the analysis using a Monte Carlo transport code. Results are compared to our previous measurements and with the known absorption cross section for 3He scaled to our UCN energy. We find that the total cross sections for the hydrocarbon gases are reasonably described by a function linear in the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule.

  4. A route to ultrathin quantum gases at polar perovskite heterointerfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2012-09-07

    Oxide interfaces are attracting interest in recent years due to special functionalities of two-dimensional quantum gases. However, with typical thicknesses of at least 10-12 Å the gases still extend considerably in the third dimension, which compromises the size of quantum effects. To overcome this limitation, we propose incorporation of highly electronegative cations, such as Ag. By ab initio calculations, we demonstrate the formation of a mobile two-dimensional hole gas in AgNbO 3/SrTiO 3 that is confined to an ultrathin slab of only 5.6 Å thickness. Electronegative cations therefore are a promising way to enhance the quantum nature of hole gases. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Energetic Utilisation of Pyrolysis Gases in IC Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktória Barbara Kovács

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of alternative energy sources like pyrolysis gases as a source ofrenewable energy for combined heat and power generation could provide an effective andalternative way to fulfil remarkable part of the increasing energy demand of the humanpopulation as a possible solution of decentralized power generation. Therefore the role ofutilization of pyrolysis gases rapidly grows in Europe and all around the world. Theenergetic utilization of these low heating value renewable gaseous fuels is not fully workedout yet because their combustion characteristics significantly differ from natural gas, andthis way they are not usable or their utilization is limited in devices with conventionalbuild-up. At the Department of Energy Engineering of BME the IC Engine utilization ofpyrolysis gases was investigated. The power, efficiency, consumption and exhaust emissionwere measured and indication was made to determine the pressure and heat release in thecylinder at different engine parameters.

  6. Increasing chemical efficiency by mixing different buffer gases on COIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuMingxiu; Sang Fengting; ChenFang; FangBenjie; JinYuqi

    2011-01-01

    To improve the output power and chemical efficiency,a new method is put forward,which requires no notable change in the configurations and uses different gases as buffer gas.Some experiments are done on chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) with an 11.7 cm gain length.When N2,Ar and CO2 are used as the primary and secondary buffer gases,change of the average molecular weight promotes the mixing between the primary and secondary gases.Experimental results confirm the possibility of improving the chemical efficiency.When N2 is used as the primary gas and Ar as the secondary gas,the highest output power and chemical efficiency are obtained as 3.09 kW and 30.2%.

  7. Multisensor system for toxic gases detection generated on indoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, C. M.; Monsalve, P. A. G.; Mosquera, C. J.

    2016-11-01

    This work describes a wireless multisensory system for different toxic gases detection generated on indoor environments (i.e., Underground coal mines, etc.). The artificial multisensory system proposed in this study was developed through a set of six chemical gas sensors (MQ) of low cost with overlapping sensitivities to detect hazardous gases in the air. A statistical parameter was implemented to the data set and two pattern recognition methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) were used for feature selection. The toxic gases categories were classified with a Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) in order to validate the results previously obtained. The tests were carried out to verify feasibility of the application through a wireless communication model which allowed to monitor and store the information of the sensor signals for the appropriate analysis. The success rate in the measures discrimination was 100%, using an artificial neural network where leave-one-out was used as cross validation method.

  8. Novel System for Continuous Measurements of Dissolved Gases in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, D. S.; Liem, J.; Owano, T. G.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of dissolved gases in lakes, rivers and oceans may be used to quantify underwater greenhouse gas generation, air-surface exchange, and pollution migration. Studies involving quantification of dissolved gases typically require obtaining water samples (from streams, lakes, or ocean water) and transporting them to a laboratory, where they are degased. The gases obtained are then generally measured using gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for concentrations and isotope ratios, respectively. This conventional, off-line, discrete-sample methodology is time consuming and labor intensive, and thus severely inhibits detailed spatial and temporal mapping of dissolved gases. In this work, we describe the commercial development of a new portable membrane-based gas extraction system (18.75" x 18.88" x 10.69", 16 kg, 85 watts) that interfaces directly to our cavity enhanced laser absorption based (or Off-Axis ICOS) gas analyzers to continuously and quickly measure concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved gases. By accurately controlling the water flow rate through the membrane contactor, gas pressure on the outside and water pressure on the inside of the membrane, the system can generate precise and highly reproducible results. Furthermore, the gas-phase mole fractions (parts per million, ppm) may be converted into dissolved gas concentrations (nM), by accurately measuring the gas flow rates in and out of the extraction system. We will present detailed laboratory test data that quantifies the performance (linearity, precision, and dynamic range) of the system for measurements of the concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved greenhouse gases (methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide) continuously and in real time.

  9. Heat transfer of suspended carbon nanotube yarn to gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yukiko; Kita, Koji; Takei, Kuniharu; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the pressure dependence of heat transfer to ambient gases for a suspended carbon nanotube yarn. The heat transport of the yarn including the heat exchange with surrounding gases is investigated using a simple one-dimensional heat transport model under Joule heating of the yarn. It is revealed that the effective diameter of the yarn for heat exchange is much smaller than the geometrical diameter of the yarn. This smaller effective diameter for heat exchange should contribute to realizing higher sensitivity and sensing over a wider range of pressures for heat-exchange-type vacuum gauges and flow sensors.

  10. Impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the ozonosphere including aerosol physics is used to examine the role of the greenhouse gases CO2 , CH4 , and N2 O in the future long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer, in particular in its recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges of chlorine and bromine compounds into the atmosphere. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1980 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 2001. The processes, which determine the influence of anthropogenic growth of atmospheric abundance of the greenhouse gases on the dynamics of recovery of the Earth's ozone layer, have been studied in details. Expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by increases of greenhouse gases, most importantly CO2 , essentially influences the ozone layer by two ways: through temperature dependencies of the gas phase reaction rates and through enhancement of polar ozone depletion via increased PSC formation. The model calculations show that a weakness in efficiencies of all gas phase catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction due to cooling of the stratosphere is a dominant mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer in Antarctic as well as at the lower latitudes. This mechanism leads to a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery here because of the greenhouse gases growth. On the contrary, the mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone through PSC modification begins to be more effective in Arctic in comparison with the gas phase mechanism in springs after about 2020, which leads to retard the expected recovery of the

  11. Assessing the impact on global climate from general anesthetic gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads P. Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Although present in the atmosphere with a combined concentration approximately 100,000 times lower than carbon dioxide (i.e., the principal anthropogenic driver of climate change), halogenated organic compounds are responsible for a warming effect of approximately 10% to 15% of the total...... regarding the impact of anesthetic gas release on the environment, with particular focus on its contribution to the radiative forcing of climate change....... anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate, as measured relative to the start of the industrial era (approximately 1750). The family of anesthetic gases includes several halogenated organic compounds that are strong greenhouse gases. In this short report, we provide an overview of the state of knowledge...

  12. Greenhouse effect of trace gases, 1970-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacis, A.; Hansen, J.; Lee, P.; Lebedeff, S.; Mitchell, T.

    1981-01-01

    Increased abundances were measured for several trace atmospheric gases in the decade 1970-1980. The equilibrium greenhouse warming for the measured increments of CH4, chlorofluorocarbons and N2O is between 50% and 100% of the equilibrium warming for the measured increase of atmospheric CO2 during the same 10 years. The combined warming of CO2 and trace gases should exceed natural global temperature variability in the 1980's and cause the global mean temperature to rise above the maximum of the late 1930's.

  13. High-resolution spectroscopy of gases for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    High-resolution spectroscopy of gases is a powerful technique which has various fundamental and practical applications: in situ simultaneous measurements of gas temperature and gas composition, radiative transfer modeling, validation of existing and developing of new databases and etc. Existing...... for analysis of complex experimental data and further development of the databases. High-temperature gas cell facilities available at DTU Chemical Engineering are presented and described. The gas cells and high-resolution spectrometers allow us to perform high-quality reference measurements of gases relevant...

  14. Physics of ultracold Fermi gases revealed by spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törmä, Päivi

    2016-04-01

    This article provides a brief review of how various spectroscopies have been used to investitage many-body quantum phenomena in the context of ultracold Fermi gases. In particular, work done with RF spectroscopy, Bragg spectroscopy and lattice modulation spectroscopy is considered. The theoretical basis of these spectroscopies, namely linear response theory in the many-body quantum physics context is briefly presented. Experiments related to the BCS-BEC crossover, imbalanced Fermi gases, polarons, possible pseudogap and Fermi liquid behaviour and measuring the contact are discussed. Remaining open problems and goals in the field are sketched from the perspective how spectroscopies could contribute.

  15. Improved Traps for Removing Gases From Coolant Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, John; Ritchie, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Two documents discuss improvements in traps for removing noncondensable gases (e.g., air) from heat-transfer liquids (e.g., water) in spacecraft cooling systems. Noncondensable gases must be removed because they can interfere with operation. A typical trap includes a cylindrical hydrophobic membrane inside a cylindrical hydrophilic membrane, all surrounded by an outer cylindrical impermeable shell. The input mixture of gas bubbles and liquid flows into the annular volume between the membranes. Bubbles pass into the central hollow of the hydrophobic membrane and are vented. The liquid flows outward through the hydrophilic membrane and is recirculated.

  16. Generation of VUV/XUV coherent radiation in molecular gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢晓波; 王鹏谦; 操传顺; 孙陶亨

    2000-01-01

    Tunable coherent radiation of wavelength between 92 nm and 122 nm has been produced in molecular gases of N2, CO, H2 and CH4 by resonant and nonresonant third harmonic generation. Factors with respect to the frequency conversion efficiency, including the line strength of the nonlinear susceptibility, the density of the media and the phase-matching, are discussed. By analyzing the characteristics of the four-wave mixing spectra in molecular gases, some physical parameters and the population of the energy levels are obtained. This indicates that nonlinear optical frequency conversion process provides a useful method to study the structure and spectra of molecules.

  17. Distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples depends on implantation energy, fluence, diffusion, radiation damage and erosion. It is known that at least the lighter rare gases are fractionated after implantation, but the redistribution processes, which mainly drive the losses, are not well understood. Some information about this one can get by looking at the concentration profiles of solar wind implanted He-4 measured by the Gas Ion Probe in single lunar grains. The observed profiles were divided in three groups. These groups are illustrated and briefly discussed.

  18. The role of atmospheric gases in global warming

    OpenAIRE

    Tuckett, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this opening chapter of this book is to explain in simple terms what the greenhouse effect is, what its origins are, and what the properties of greenhouse gases are. I will restrict this chapter to an explanation of the physical chemistry of greenhouse gases and the greenhouse effect, and not delve too much into the politics of ‘what should or should not be done’. However, one simple message to convey at the onset is that the greenhouse effect is not just about concentration le...

  19. Greenhouse effect of trace gases, 1970-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacis, A.; Hansen, J.; Lee, P.; Lebedeff, S.; Mitchell, T.

    1981-01-01

    Increased abundances were measured for several trace atmospheric gases in the decade 1970-1980. The equilibrium greenhouse warming for the measured increments of CH4, chlorofluorocarbons and N2O is between 50% and 100% of the equilibrium warming for the measured increase of atmospheric CO2 during the same 10 years. The combined warming of CO2 and trace gases should exceed natural global temperature variability in the 1980's and cause the global mean temperature to rise above the maximum of the late 1930's.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of electrons in dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Wade; Boyle, Greg; Cocks, Daniel; Buckman, Stephen; White, Ron

    2014-10-01

    We implement a Monte-Carlo simulation modelling the transport of electrons and positrons in dense gases and liquids, by using a dynamic structure factor that allows us to construct structure-modified effective cross sections. These account for the coherent effects caused by interactions with the relatively dense medium. The dynamic structure factor also allows us to model thermal gases in the same manner, without needing to directly sample the velocities of the neutral particles. We present the results of a series of Monte Carlo simulations that verify and apply this new technique, and make comparisons with macroscopic predictions and Boltzmann equation solutions. Financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  1. Hydrophobic Catalysts For Removal Of NOx From Flue Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.; Voecks, Gerald E.

    1995-01-01

    Improved catalysts for removal of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) from combustion flue gases formulated as composites of vanadium pentoxide in carbon molecular sieves. Promotes highly efficient selective catalytic reduction of NOx at relatively low temperatures while not being adversely affected by presence of water vapor and sulfur oxide gases in flue gas. Apparatus utilizing catalyst of this type easily integrated into exhaust stream of power plant to remove nitrogen oxides, generated in combustion of fossil fuels and contribute to formation of acid rain and photochemical smog.

  2. Simultaneous analysis of noble gases, sulfur hexafluoride, and other dissolved gases in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennwald, Matthias S; Hofer, Markus; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-08-06

    We developed an analytical method for the simultaneous measurement of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, SF6, N2, and O2 concentrations in a single water sample. The gases are extracted from the water using a head space technique and are transferred into a vacuum system for purification and separation into different fractions using a series of cold traps. Helium is analyzed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). The remaining gas species are analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for analysis of Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, and O2 and an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) for SF6 analysis. Standard errors of the gas concentrations are approximately 8% for He and 2-5% for the remaining gas species. The method can be extended to also measure concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Tests of the method in Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) showed that dissolved gas concentrations agree with measurements from other methods and concentrations of air saturated water. In a small artificial pond, we observed systematic gas supersaturations, which seem to be linked to adsorption of solar irradiation in the pond and to water circulation through a gravel bed.

  3. Greenhouse gases study in Amazonia; Estudo de gases de efeito estufa na Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amelio, Monica Tais Siqueira

    2006-07-01

    The Amazon plays an important role on the global carbon cycle, as changing as carbon storage, since Amazon Basin is the biggest area of tropical forest, around 50% of global. Natural's process, deforestation, and use land are CO{sub 2} sources. The Amazon forest is a significant source of N{sub 2}O by soil process, and CH{sub 4} by anaerobic process like flooded areas, rice cultures, and others sources. This project is part of the LBA project (Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia), and this project is 'Vertical profiles of carbon dioxide and other trace gas species over the Amazon basin using small aircraft'. Since December 2000 vertical profiles of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6} have been measured above central Amazonia. The local sampling was over Tapajos National Forest, a primary forest in Para State, where had a CO{sub 2} flux tower and an east impact area with sources like animals, rice cultivation, biomass burning, etc, to compare the influence of an impact area and a preserved area in the profiles. The Reserva Biologica de Cuieiras, at Amazon State, is the other studied place, where there already exists a CO{sub 2} flux tower, and an east preserved area at this State, to compare with the Cuieiras. The sampling has been carried out on vertical profile from 1000 ft up to 12000 ft using a semi-automated sampling package developed at GMD/NOAA and a small aircraft. The analysis uses the MAGICC system (Multiple Analysis of Gases Influence Climate Change) which is installed at the Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratory (LQA) in IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares). The results showed that all gases studied, except H{sub 2} gas, has been following the global trend. At the Para State, for the studied years, the Amazonian Forest performed as small CO{sub 2} sink. To compare Wet and Dry Seasons, subtracted the Ascension concentration values in the period to remove the global influence. So that

  4. Permeation of single gases in thin zeolite MFI membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Keizer, K.; Verweij, H.

    1998-01-01

    The permeation of a series of gases with widely different Lennard-Jones kinetic diameters and sorption properties is investigated as a function of feed pressure (up to 100 kPa) and temperature (298-473 K) with two different methods. The membrane system studied consists of an MFI (silicalite) top-lay

  5. Spectrum of spin waves in cold polarized gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, T. L., E-mail: phdocandreeva@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The spin dynamics of cold polarized gases are investigated using the Boltzmann equation. The dispersion relation for spin waves (transverse component of the magnetic moment) and the spin diffusion coefficient of the longitudinal component of the magnetic moment are calculated without using fitting parameters. The spin wave frequency and the diffusion coefficient for rubidium atoms are estimated numerically.

  6. Soil and litter exchange of reactive trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil and litter play an important role in the exchange of trace gases between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. - The exchange of ammonia between vegetation and the atmosphere is highly influenced by soil and litter emissions especially in managed ecosystems (grassla...

  7. EOSN: A TOUGH2 module for noble gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-03-07

    We developed a new fluid property module for TOUGH2, called EOSN, to simulate transport of noble gases in the subsurface. Currently, users may select any of five different noble gases as well as CO2, two at a time. For the three gas components (air and two user-specified noble gases) in EOSN, the Henry's coefficients and the diffusivities in the gas phase are no longer assumed constants, but are temperature dependent. We used the Crovetto et al. (1982) model to estimate Henry's coefficients, and the Reid et al. (1987) correlations to calculate gas phase diffusivities. The new module requires users to provide names of the selected noble gases, which properties are provided internally. There are options for users to specify any (non-zero) molecular weights and half-lives for the gas components. We provide two examples to show applications of TOUGH2IEOSN. While temperature effects are relatively insignificant for one example problem where advection is dominant, they cause almost an order of magnitude difference for the other case where diffusion becomes a dominant process and temperature variations are relatively large. It appears that thermodynamic effects on gas diffusivities and Henry's coefficients can be important for low-permeability porous media and zones with large temperature variations.

  8. Thermodynamic characteristics of Fermi gases in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipovetskii, S.S.; Olesik, A.A.; Sekerzhitskii, V.S.

    1987-11-01

    Within the framework of statistical thermodynamics of equilibrium systems, general expressions are obtained for the chemical potential, pressure, and magnetic susceptibility for degenerate ideal nonrelativistic electron, proton, and neutron gases in magnetic fields, which exert no pronounced influence on the anomalous magnetic moments of the fermions.

  9. Organic microporous materials and their interactions with different gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepodd, T.J.; Miller, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Chemistry Dept.; Lagasse, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Processing Dept.

    1997-04-01

    This work explored the interactions of various organic microporous materials with different gases. The authors were attempting to make substances that could separate gases through differential adsorption or store gases at reduced pressures. They synthesized xerogels that were highly crosslinked, allowing relatively large amounts of micro- and mesopores within the organic polymers. The monomers were polymerized in a solvent which was removed forming xerogels. Then exhaustive drying was performed to yield the tested microporous materials. The xerogels were exposed to four gases to observe their gas adsorption affinities (methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and isobutane). For each microporous polymer the authors measured BET surface area, nitrogen isotherm, bulk density, pycnometric density, and equilibrium gas adsorption. Pore volume and pore size distribution were also calculated for some samples. Adsorption characteristics paralleled, but were not directly proportional to surface area or pore size distribution changes. Changes in adsorption magnitude and selectivity have been made through various formulations and derivatization. Increasing polarity showed increased affinities towards carbon dioxide, slightly increased affinities towards isobutane, and unchanged affinities towards methane and hydrogen. These materials could adsorb significant amounts of gas; about half the amount of some commercial carbons. Considering the minimal processing involved in their synthesis, these materials could be cost effective replacements for carbons in low-cost applications where high adsorption efficiencies are not a priority.

  10. The Global Atmosphere Watch reactive gases measurement network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G. Schultz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long-term observations of reactive gases in the troposphere are important for understanding trace gas cycles and the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere, assessing impacts of emission changes, verifying numerical model simulations, and quantifying the interactions between short-lived compounds and climate change. The World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW program coordinates a global network of surface stations some of which have measured reactive gases for more than 40 years. Gas species included under this umbrella are ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs. There are many challenges involved in setting-up and maintaining such a network over many decades and to ensure that data are of high quality, regularly updated and made easily accessible to users. This overview describes the GAW surface station network of reactive gases, its unique quality management framework, and discusses the data that are available from the central archive. Highlights of data use from the published literature are reviewed, and a brief outlook into the future of GAW is given. This manuscript constitutes the overview of a special feature on GAW reactive gases observations with individual papers reporting on research and data analysis of particular substances being covered by the program.

  11. New frontiers for quantum gases of polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Steven A.; Covey, Jacob P.; Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Jin, Deborah S.; Ye, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Compared to atoms, molecules possess additional degrees of freedom that can be exploited in fundamental tests, ultracold chemistry, and engineering new quantum phases in many-body systems. Here, we review the recent progress in creating and manipulating ultracold bialkali molecules to study quantum gases of polar molecules.

  12. Green-Kubo Representation of the Viscosity of Granular Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-13

    Green-Kubo representation of the viscosity of granular gases J. Javier Brey Área de Física Teórica, Universidad de Sevilla. Apartado de Correos 1065...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Área de Física Teórica, Universidad de Sevilla. Apartado de Correos

  13. Combined use of coal mine gases for efficient energy generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postrzednik Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are two basic types of coal mine gases: gas from demethanation of coal deposits, and ventilation gas; containing combustible ingredients (mainly methane, CH4. Effective use of these gases is an important technical and ecological issue (greenhouse gas emissions, mainly due to the presence of methane in these gases. Serious difficulties in this area (e.g. using them as the fuel for internal combustion (IC engine occur mainly in relation to the ventilation gas, whereas the gas from demethanation of coal deposits can be used directly as the fuel for internal combustion engines. The proposed solution of this problem shows that the simple mixing of these two gases (without supplying of oxygen from ambient air is the effective way to producing the gaseous combustible mixture, which can be used for the fueling of internal combustion gas engines. To evaluate the energy usefulness of this way produced combustible mixture the process indicator has been proposed, which expresses the share of the chemical energy supplied with the ventilation gas, in the whole chemical energy of the produced fuel combustible mixture. It was also established how (e.g., by appropriate choice of the mixed gas streams can be achieved significantly higher values of the characteristic process indicator, while retaining full energy usefulness of the gained gaseous mixture to power combustion engines.

  14. Predicted Abundances of Carbon Compounds in Volcanic Gases on Io

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, L; Schaefer, Laura

    2004-01-01

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of carbon in volcanic gases on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K), pressure (10^-8 to 10^+2 bars), and composition ranges (bulk O/S atomic ratios \\~0 to 3), which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (1760 K, 0.01 bar, O/S ~ 1.5). Bulk C/S atomic ratios ranging from 10^-6 to 10^-1 in volcanic gases are used with a nominal value of 10^-3 based upon upper limits from Voyager for carbon in the Loki plume on Io. Carbon monoxide and CO2 are the two major carbon gases under all conditions studied. Carbonyl sulfide and CS2 are orders of magnitude less abundant. Consideration of different loss processes (photolysis, condensation, kinetic reactions in the plume) indicates that photolysis is probably the major loss process for all gases. Both CO and CO2 should be observable in volcanic plumes and in Io's atmosphere at abundances of several hundred parts per million by volume for a bulk C/S ratio of 10^-3.

  15. An overview on non-CO2 greenhouse gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulles, T.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Non-CO2 greenhouse gases, included in the Kyoto Protocol, are methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hexafluorocarbons (HFC), perfluorinated compounds (PFC) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). Together they account for about 25% of the present global greenhouse gas emissions. Reductions in emissions of the

  16. Iatrogenic greenhouse gases: the role of anaesthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoigwe, Chika E; Sanchez Franco, Luis C; Forrest, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of health-care activity to climate change is not negligible and is increasing. Anaesthetic greenhouse gases, in particular the fluranes, have a much more potent global warming capacity, volume for volume, than carbon dioxide, but their emissions remain completely unregulated.

  17. Quantum statistics of ideal gases in confined space

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Wu-Sheng; Xie, Mi

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of boundary and connectivity on ideal gases in two-dimensional confined space and three-dimensional tubes are discussed in detail based on the analytical result. The implication of such effects on the mesoscopic system is also revealed.

  18. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  19. Discovery Mondays - Gases: more to them than meets the eye!

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    We generally tend to think that if a space is empty there is nothing in it. However, did you know that at the Earth's surface there are 25 million million million (1018) molecules of gas in every cubic centimetre of atmosphere? CERN uses a lot of gas to operate its experiments. Above a few of the helium tanks for the LHC. At CERN, gases are put to multiple uses. Gases are used to protect, to cool and also to detect particles... Suffice to say that gases play a vital role at CERN. Why does the air supply to the accelerator tunnel 100 metres below the surface have to be treated and what treatment techniques are used? What are the different types of apparatus that enable you to breathe in confined spaces? How are gases used as a detection medium in the particle detectors? What is Brownian motion? To find out the answers, step on the gas to join us for the next Discovery Monday! This Discovery Monday will be taking place as part of the World Year of Physics, as its theme is closely associated with one of the ...

  20. Development of proportional counters using photosensitive gases and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-10-01

    An introduction to the history and to the principle of operation of wire chambers using photosensitive gases and liquids is presented. Their use as light sensors coupled to Gas Scintillation Proportional Counters and BaF/sub 2/, as well as their use in Cherenkov Ring imaging, is discussed in some detail. 42 references, 21 figures.

  1. Noble Gases in the Hamlet Meteorite (LL4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, S.; Sabe, Y.; Shiraishi, T.; Matsuda, J.

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed noble gases in a bulk sample and an HF-HCl residue of Hamlet (LL4). The Xe composition of the residue shows that no diamond is contained in the residue. The 20Ne/22Ne ratio of Hamlet Ne-Q has been determined to be 11.0 ± 0.5.

  2. Remote sensing atmospheric trace gases with infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ira; Tratt, David M.; Realmuto, Vincent J.; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Burrows, John P.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric pollution affects human health, food production, and ecosystem sustainability, causing environmental and climate change. Species of concern include nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide (SO2 ), and the greenhouse gases (GHG) methane (CH4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO2 ). Trace gas remote sensing can provide source detection, attribution, monitoring, hazard alerts, and air quality evaluation.

  3. Use of low temperature blowers for recirculation of hot gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, H.C.; Forooque, M.

    1982-08-19

    An apparatus is described for maintaining motors at low operating temperatures during recirculation of hot gases in fuel cell operations and chemical processes such as fluidized bed coal gasification. The apparatus includes a means for separating the hot process gas from the motor using a secondary lower temperature gas, thereby minimizing the temperature increase of the motor and associated accessories.

  4. On the convergence of cluster expansions for polymer gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, R.; Bissacot, R.; Procacci, A.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the different convergence criteria available for cluster expansions of polymer gases subjected to hard-core exclusions, with emphasis on polymers defined as finite subsets of a countable set (e.g. contour expansions and more generally high- and lowtemperature expansions). In order of incr

  5. Lieb-Thirring Bounds for Interacting Bose Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholm, Douglas; Portmann, Fabian; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2015-01-01

    We study interacting Bose gases and prove lower bounds for the kinetic plus interaction energy of a many-body wave function in terms of its particle density. These general estimates are then applied to various types of interactions, including hard sphere (in 3D) and hard disk (in 2D) as well as a...

  6. Dry cleaning aluminum cell gases from Söderberg cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doheim, M. A.; Shafey, H. M.; Abdellatif, A. A.; Ahmed, M. S.

    2000-02-01

    This article describes dry cleaning gases from vertical Söderberg cells via a two-step process involving the combustion of tars and CO followed by the chemisorption of HF on smelter-grade alumina. Both steps take place in fluidized-bed reactors. Studied parameters include distributor design, fluidizing velocity, bed temperature, and bed height.

  7. Comparison of natural gases accumulated in Oligocene strata with hydrous pyrolysis gases from Menilite Shales of the Polish Outer Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarba, M.J.; Curtis, John B.; Lewan, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the molecular and isotopic compositions of gases generated from different kerogen types (i.e., Types I/II, II, IIS and III) in Menilite Shales by sequential hydrous pyrolysis experiments. The experiments were designed to simulate gas generation from source rocks at pre-oil-cracking thermal maturities. Initially, rock samples were heated in the presence of liquid water at 330 ??C for 72 h to simulate early gas generation dominated by the overall reaction of kerogen decomposition to bitumen. Generated gas and oil were quantitatively collected at the completion of the experiments and the reactor with its rock and water was resealed and heated at 355 ??C for 72 h. This condition simulates late petroleum generation in which the dominant overall reaction is bitumen decomposition to oil. This final heating equates to a cumulative thermal maturity of 1.6% Rr, which represents pre-oil-cracking conditions. In addition to the generated gases from these two experiments being characterized individually, they are also summed to characterize a cumulative gas product. These results are compared with natural gases produced from sandstone reservoirs within or directly overlying the Menilite Shales. The experimentally generated gases show no molecular compositions that are distinct for the different kerogen types, but on a total organic carbon (TOC) basis, oil prone kerogens (i.e., Types I/II, II and IIS) generate more hydrocarbon gas than gas prone Type III kerogen. Although the proportionality of methane to ethane in the experimental gases is lower than that observed in the natural gases, the proportionality of ethane to propane and i-butane to n-butane are similar to those observed for the natural gases. ??13C values of the experimentally generated methane, ethane and propane show distinctions among the kerogen types. This distinction is related to the ??13C of the original kerogen, with 13C enriched kerogen generating more 13C enriched hydrocarbon gases than

  8. Low carbon fuel and chemical production from waste gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, S.; Liew, F.M.; Daniell, J.; Koepke, M. [LanzaTech, Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand)

    2012-07-01

    LanzaTech has developed a gas fermentation platform for the production of alter native transport fuels and commodity chemicals from carbon monoxide, hydrogen and carbon dioxide containing gases. LanzaTech technology uses these gases in place of sugars as the carbon and energy source for fermentation thereby allowing a broad spectrum of resources to be considered as an input for product synthesis. At the core of the Lanzatech process is a proprietary microbe capable of using gases as the only carbon and energy input for product synthesis. To harness this capability for the manufacture of a diverse range of commercially valuable products, the company has developed a robust synthetic biology platform to enable a variety of novel molecules to be synthesised via gas fermentation. LanzaTech initially focused on the fermentation of industrial waste gases for fuel ethanol production. The company has been operating pilot plant that uses direct feeds of steel making off gas for ethanol production for over 24 months. This platform technology has been further successfully demonstrated using a broad range of gas inputs including gasified biomass and reformed natural gas. LanzaTech has developed the fermentation, engineering and control systems necessary to efficiently convert gases to valuable products. A precommercial demonstration scale unit processing steel mill waste gases was commissioned in China during the 2{sup nd} quarter of 2012. Subsequent scale-up of this facility is projected for the 2013 and will represent the first world scale non-food based low carbon ethanol project. More recently LanzaTech has developed proprietary microbial catalysts capable of converting carbon dioxide in the presence of hydrogen directly to value added chemicals, where-in CO{sub 2} is the sole source of carbon for product synthesis. Integrating the LanzaTech technology into a number of industrial facilities, such as steel mills, oil refineries and other industries that emit Carbon bearing

  9. Greenhouse gases and recovery of the Earth's ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyominov, I. G.; Zadorozhny, A. M.

    A numerical two-dimension zonally average interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the atmosphere is used for investigation the role of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, and N2O in the recovery of the Earth's ozone layer after reduction of anthropogenic discharges in the atmosphere of chlorine and bromine compounds. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds of types I and II. The scenarios of future changes of the greenhouse gases and chlorine and bromine species are taken from Climate Change 1995. The calculations show that expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by the increasing of the greenhouse gases, particularly CO2, enhances the ozone concentration in the stratosphere due to a weakness of the efficiencies of all catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction caused by temperature dependencies of photochemical reactions. The result of this effect is a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges in the atmosphere of chlorine and bromine species. On the other hand, the cooling of the stratosphere intensifies a formation of the polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere in the Polar Regions. Heterogeneous reactions on the polar stratospheric clouds, which are the key processes in the destruction of the ozone layer at the high latitudes, lead to more intensive ozone depletion here, which causes a delay of the ozone layer recovery. The calculations show that this effect is weaker than the first one so that the global ozone will recover faster under conditions of continuing anthropogenic growth of the greenhouse gases. The model predicts in this case that the annual average global ozone will reach its undisturbed level of 1980 by about 2040. If the growth of the

  10. Design of a multifunctional and portable detector for indoor gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Wang, Yutian; Li, Taishan

    2003-09-01

    With the increase of the living standards of city dwellers, home decoration has been more and more popular these years. Different kinds of material have come into people's home, which brings about beauties to the house as well as some bad effect. Because of differences in manufacturing techniques and quality, much of the material will emit poisonous gases more or less. Even if you have selected the qualified product, the toal amount of gases in you houses may not be guaranteed because of the simple reason that more than one kind of material are applied. Living in the complex environment for a long time will eventually have a bad effect on one's health. In addition the fear of the harm to be done will exert great impact psychologically. In another aspect, the coal-gas in the house-hood for cooking is also explosive and poisonous. In conclusion, the research on the indoor hazardous gases measurement and alarm device is of much economic and practical importance. The device is portable and versatile. We use rechargeable battery as the power supply. The device can detect the density of gases at the ppb level for the emission of the material and the measured value can be shown on the display. As for coal gas it can detect the percentage of LEL and make sound of alarm. We use two kinds of gas-sensors in the device, with catalytic combustion principal for coal gas detection and the PID method for the gas emissions of the decoration material. UV will destroy harmful material (such as: ammonia, dimethylamine, methyl-sulfhydrate, benzene etc.) into positive or negative ions. The sensor detects the electric charges of ionized gases and converts them into electric current signals. It is then amplified and changed into digits by amplifier and A/D. The digit signal is processed by micro-controller system of the device.

  11. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  12. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  13. Nanoindentation experiment and finite element simulation for isotropic pyrolytic graphite%各向同性热解石墨的纳米压痕试验与有限元仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明海; 王虎军; 孙磊; 刘中海

    2011-01-01

    The load-displacement curves of isotropic pyrolytic graphite were obtained through nanoin-dentation experimentAccording to the theory of olive and pharr the hardness and the young modulus were calculated to obtain performance of main materials.Then a numerical model for the nanoindentation experiment was set up by finite element method.Through comparing the load-displacement curve fitted by finite element with the actual curve obtained from nanoindentation experiment,relative correlation was achievedFinally plastic property of isotropic pyrolytic graphite was got,which prove the feasibility of finite element simulation at the same time.%通过对各向同性热解石墨进行了纳米压痕试验,得到了其材料的载荷-位移曲线.并根据Olive和Pharr理论算出了其硬度与弹性模量值,得到了主要的材料性能.在纳米压痕试验的基础上,通过有限元单元法建立了纳米压痕试验的数值模型,通过比较有限元所拟合的载荷一位移曲线和实际纳米压痕试验所得到的曲线,进行相应的修正,最后得到了该材料的塑性性能,也证明了有限元仿真的可行性.

  14. Determination of Pyrolytic Products of Extract of Raisin by Py-GC-MS%热裂解气相色谱-质谱法测定葡萄干提取物的热裂解产物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国玲

    2012-01-01

    50g葡萄干用70%乙醇溶液300mL在80℃回流提取3h,提取两次,过滤提取物.滤液减压浓缩至干。残渣用5200裂解仪在400℃,50℃.600℃,800℃下处理,在各裂解温度下得到的裂解产物导入仪器进行气相色谱质谱分析。结果表明:主要裂解产物是糠醛、呋喃甲醇、5-甲基糠醛、5-羟甲基-2呋喃甲醛、2,3-二氢-3,5二羟基6-甲基-4H-吡喃酮,这些裂解产物是赋予卷烟具有独特香味和较好口感的重要物质。%50 g of raisin were exlracted twice by refluxing with 300 mI. of 70% ethanol at 80℃ for 3 h. The extracts wgre filtered and the filtrate was evaporated to dryness under reduced pressure. The residue was lrealed whh Pyroprohc 5200 at 400 C, 500℃, 600℃ and 800℃, the pyrolytic products obtained al eaeh of lhe pyrolylie tempuratures were introduced into the instrument and analyzed by (GC-MS. It was shown that the main pyrolytic products obtained were furfural, 2-furanmethanol, 5 mcthyl 2-furancarboxaldehyde, 5 hydroxymethyl 2 furancarboxaldehyde, and 2, 3-dihydro-3, 5 dihydroxy6methyl.-4H-pyran-4one. These pyrolysates are the important substances to make cigarettes to have distinctive fragrance and better taste.

  15. 烟草中一种糖苷的分离鉴定及其热解产物%Isolation and Identification of a New Glycoside in Tobacco and Analysis of its Pyrolytic Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周容; 冯广林; 李东亮; 李国友; 戴亚; 袁月

    2013-01-01

    通过95%乙醇提取,常压和高压制备色谱分离,从红花大金元烟叶中提取分离得到化合物Ⅰ,利用质谱和核磁共振技术鉴定了化合物Ⅰ的结构,并在氦气中进行了热裂解-GC/MS分析.结果表明:①化合物Ⅰ为(E)-N-[(4-羟基-3-甲氧基)苯乙基]-3-[(3-甲氧基-4-β-D-吡喃葡萄糖)苯基]丙烯酰胺;②化合物Ⅰ的热解产物主要是4-乙烯基愈创木酚、愈创木酚、香兰素、对甲基苯酚、2,3-二氢苯并呋喃、4-烯丙基苯酚和3-乙基苯酚.%A new glycoside,(E)-N-[(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy)-phenethyl]-3-[(3-methoxy-4-O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)phenyl]acrylamide (Ⅰ),was isolated from leaves of flue-cured tobacco cv."Hongda" through extraction with 95% ethanol,preparation at normal and high pressure and separation with chromatography.The molecular structure of compound (Ⅰ) was identified with HRESI-MS and NMR.Compound (Ⅰ) was pyrolyzed in He atmosphere and its pyrolytic products were analyzed by GC/MS.The results showed that the separated product was compound (Ⅰ),and its major pyrolytic products were 4-vinylguaiacol,guaiacol,vanillin,p-cresol,2,3-dihydrobenzofuran,4-allylphenol,and m-ethylphenol.

  16. Emissions, activity data, and emission factors of fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-Gases) in Germany 1995-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Winfried [Oeko-Recherche, Buero fuer Umweltforschung und -beratung GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    Before the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on Climate Protection, the fluorinated greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs, and SF6 (F-gases) aroused little public attention. Since then, the standards on surveying and reporting on national emissions have been rising constantly. Amongst others, the annual reporting to the UNFCCC secretariat makes detailed declarations on use and emissions of F-gases necessary, which have to be filled in specified formats for submission (Common Reporting Format = CRF). The scientific basis has been set out by the UNFCCC guidelines on reporting, in accordance with the instructions laid down in IPCC good practice guidance. Additionally, in Germany the Centralised System of Emissions (ZSE) shall provide a suitable tool to satisfy any quality needs of both activity data and emission factors. From 1995 onwards, activity data and emissions of each individual application sector shall be presented in a comprehensible and transparent way. Therefore, the way of data collection as well as the estimation methods applied must be well documented. Moreover, data has to be prepared for appropriate importation into ZSE. It is the objective of this study to provide the transparency demanded within 40 national application sectors of F-gases, for the period between 1995 and 2002. - Firstly, all the activity data as well as the emissions related to them are presented and commented. This applies to manufacturing of products, F-gases banked in operating systems, and decommissioning. - Secondly, the methodologies applied to calculate the emissions are described and all sources of information are revealed, e.g. literature, names of experts from the manufacturing industry, users, trade, and academia. - Thirdly, reliability and safety of data are discussed. - Fourthly, possible deviations from the IPCC default values are stated and given reasons for. Wherever this intensive reviewing of 40 sectors through eight years of reporting uncovers gaps or inconsistencies in previous reports

  17. Noble gases, K, U, Th, and Pb in native gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engster, O.; Niedermann, S.; Thalmann, C.; Frei, R.; Kramers, J.; KräHenbühl, U.; Liu, Y. Z.; Hofmann, B.; Boer, R. H.; Reimold, W. U.; Bruno, L.

    1995-12-01

    We present determinations of the noble gas and Pb isotopic abundances and of K, Th, and U concentrations of native gold. Our results demonstrate that gold is an excellent carrier for crustal volatiles, but direct dating of gold using the U, Th-4He, 40K-40Ar, and U fission Xe methods was not successful for various reasons. The main significance of this work is the great sensitivity of gold for trapped gases as well as for gases that were produced in situ which gives the prospects of using gold and its fluid and solid inclusions for the study of paleogas composition. Numerous nuclear effects characterize the noble gas inventory of placer gold from Switzerland and Italy, vein gold from Italy, South Africa, and Venezuela, and lode gold from South Africa. The degassing patterns obtained by mass spectrometry show a low-temperature release of volatiles around 500°C from fluid inclusions mainly in vein gold and a high-temperature release from solid inclusions and the gold itself. The low-temperature volatiles represent species that were trapped when the gold crystallized. We investigated the following trapped species: the isotopes of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Pb, and the abundances of K, U, Th, H2O, and CO2. The crustal gases trapped by gold comprise 3He from 6Li(n,α)3H → β- → 3He, 4He and 40Ar from the U, Th, and K decay, and Xe from 238U fission. We observe 4He/40Ar = 3.9 for the radiogenic trapped gases of tertiary gold and a ratio of 1.4 for Archean gold. These ratios are consistent with the production ratios from U and K at the respective times and demonstrate that gold can be used as a sampler of ancient atmospheric gases. The concentrations of U and Th range from a few parts per billion to a few parts per million, and those of K and Pb range up to some tens of parts per million. The antiquity of trapped Pb is indicated by the Pb-Pb model age of about 3000 Ma for the lead extracted from vein gold and quartz of the Lily gold mine (South Africa). Gold also

  18. An introduction to the Boltzmann equation and transport processes in gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kremer, Gilberto M; Colton, David

    2010-01-01

    This book covers classical kinetic theory of gases, presenting basic principles in a self-contained framework and from a more rigorous approach based on the Boltzmann equation. Uses methods in kinetic theory for determining the transport coefficients of gases.

  19. System for trapping and storing gases for subsequent chemical reduction to solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, John S [San Jose, CA; Ognibene, Ted J [Oakland, CA; Bench, Graham S [Livermore, CA; Peaslee, Graham F [Holland, MI

    2009-11-03

    A system for quantitatively reducing oxide gases. A pre-selected amount of zinc is provided in a vial. A tube is provided in the vial. The zinc and the tube are separated. A pre-selected amount of a catalyst is provided in the tube. Oxide gases are injected into the vial. The vial, tube, zinc, catalyst, and the oxide gases are cryogenically cooled. At least a portion of the vial, tube, zinc, catalyst, and oxide gases are heated.

  20. Permeability of Gases in Polymer Materials; Permeabilite des gaz dans les materiaux polymeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klopffer, M.H.

    2001-06-01

    Content: transport properties of gases in polymers: bibliographic review. Transport properties of gases in polymers: experimental methods. Permeability, diffusion and solubility of gases in polyethylene, polyamide 11 and poly(vinylidene fluoride). Analysis of a few one-dimensional non-linear diffusion models of gas in polymers: identification by experimental data. Mathematical modelling of the permeation of gases in polymers. Simulation of temperature and pressure influence on transport coefficients of CO{sub 2} in PVDF. (author)

  1. Properties of heavy rare-gases adlayers on graphene substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Lucas; Vitiello, Silvio A.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated several properties of heavy rare-gases, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe and Rn, adsorbed on graphene substrates in a range of temperature near their melting transition and at some of the representative densities. We have determined radial distribution functions and spacial distributions of the rare-gases adlayers using molecular dynamics simulations. We gathered evidences that Ne and Kr adlayers form commensurate solids. The specific heat and the melting temperature of the adlayers were calculated. At the conditions that our simulations were performed, we find indications supporting a continuous melting of the adlayers. We estimated the nearest neighbor distance of the adatoms, and we determined their average distance to the substrate. We briefly comment on the wetting behavior of the system.

  2. Review of pseudogaps in strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich J.

    2017-10-01

    A central challenge in modern condensed matter physics is developing the tools for understanding nontrivial yet unordered states of matter. One important idea to emerge in this context is that of a ‘pseudogap’: the fact that under appropriate circumstances the normal state displays a suppression of the single particle spectral density near the Fermi level, reminiscent of the gaps seen in ordered states of matter. While these concepts arose in a solid state context, they are now being explored in cold gases. This article reviews the current experimental and theoretical understanding of the normal state of strongly interacting Fermi gases, with particular focus on the phenomonology which is traditionally associated with the pseudogap.

  3. Flash pryolysis of biomass with reactive and nonreactive gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, M. S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P. T.

    1982-10-01

    Studies were done on the flash pyrolysis of Douglas Fir wood in the presence of reactive and nonreactive gases including hydrogen, methane, and helium. Pyrolysis and gasification of the wood particles was done in one step, without catalysts. Almost complete (98%) gasification of the carbon in Douglas fir wood was achieved at 10000C and 500-psi hydrogen pressure. The reaction products were methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon monoxide, BTX, and water. Flash hydropyrolysis produced a large yield of hydrocarbon gases (up to 78% C) comprising methane and ethane. High yields of ethylene (up to 21% C) and BTX (up to 12% C) were obtained via methane pyrolysis of fir wood; a free radical mechanism is proposed to explain the enhanced yield of ethylene in a methane atmosphere.

  4. Thermodynamics of ultracold Bose gases at a dimensional crossover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouvie, Ralf; Vogler, Andreas; Guarrera, Vera; Ott, Herwig

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the thermodynamics of ultracold Bose gases in the crossover from a three-dimensional to a one-dimensional regime. In our experiment, we use a focused electron-beam to probe in situ atomic density distributions with high temporal and spatial resolution. Starting with a Bose-Einstein-Condensate in a single beam optical dipole trap we can create one-dimensional systems by loading the atoms in a two-dimensional blue-detuned optical lattice. With increasing strength of the lattices we go from a three-dimensional into a one-dimensional system. Furthermore we tune the interaction strengths of the one-dimensional quantum-gases from weak (quasi-condensate) to strong (Tonks-Girardeau). By measuring the density profiles and applying an inverse Abel-Transformation we extract the equation of states of these systems and characterize the crossover from the three-dimensional to the one-dimensional regime.

  5. Exploring the Kibble-Zurek mechanism with homogeneous Bose gases

    CERN Document Server

    Beugnon, J

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-equilibrium phenomena is a subject of considerable interest in many fields of physics. Ultracold quantum gases, which are extremely clean, well-isolated and highly controllable systems, offer ideal platforms to investigate this topic. The recent progress in tailoring trapping potentials now allows the experimental production of homogeneous samples in custom geometries, which is a key advance for studies of the emergence of coherence in interacting quantum systems. Here we review recent experiments in which temperature quenches have been performed across the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) phase transition in an annular geometry and in homogeneous 3D and quasi-2D gases. Combined, these experiments give a comprehensive picture of the Kibble-Zurek (KZ) scenario through complementary measurements of correlation functions and topological defects density. They also allow the measurement of KZ scaling laws, the direct confirmation of the "freeze-out" hypothesis that underlies the KZ theory, and the extractio...

  6. Analytical calculation of adiabatic processes in real gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarskaja, I. B.; Belousov, V. S.; Filippov, P. S.

    2016-10-01

    The impact of gases nonideality in the compression and expansion processes on the specific heat ratio and the heat capacity is analyzed. The specific heat ratio variation leads to temperature variation during compression in the compressor and expansion in the turbine and, consequently, the gas turbine cycle efficiency factor variation. It is also essential to consider the gases nonideality in the compression and expansion processes in the compression processes in compressor. Generally it is assumed during calculations that the heat capacities depend only on temperature, in this case the reference data presented by various authors differs markedly. In the real processes the heat capacity and the specific heat ratio depend on temperature and within the particular temperatures and pressures range depend on pressure. Consequently, the operating fluid nonideality in the gas turbine cycle should be considered.

  7. Apparatus for hot-gas desulfurization of fuel gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for removing sulfur values from a hot fuel gas stream in a fdized bed contactor containing particulate sorbent material by employing a riser tube regeneration arrangement. Sulfur-laden sorbent is continuously removed from the fluidized bed through a stand pipe to the riser tube and is rapidly regenerated in the riser tube during transport of the sorbent therethrough by employing an oxygen-containing sorbent regenerating gas stream. The riser tube extends from a location below the fluidized bed to an elevation above the fluidized bed where a gas-solid separating mechanism is utilized to separate the regenerated particulate sorbent from the regeneration gases and reaction gases so that the regenerated sorbent can be returned to the fluidized bed for reuse.

  8. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, I.; Huppert, M.; Wörner, H. J., E-mail: hwoerner@ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Brown, M. A. [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bokhoven, J. A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Laboratory for Catalysis and Sustainable Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  9. Comparing and contrasting nuclei and cold atomic gases

    CERN Document Server

    Zinner, N T; 10.1088/0954-3899/40/5/053101

    2013-01-01

    The experimental revolution in ultracold atomic gas physics over the past decades have brought tremendous amounts of new insight to the world of degenerate quantum systems. Here we compare and constrast the developments of cold atomic gases with the physics of nuclei since many concepts, techniques, and nomenclatures are common to both fields. However, nuclei are finite systems with interactions that are typically much more complicated than those of ultracold atomic gases. The simularities and differences must therefore be carefully addressed for a meaningful comparison and to facilitate fruitful crossdisciplinary activity. Universal results from atomic physics should have impact in certain limits of the nuclear domain. In particular, with advances in the trapping of few-body atomic systems we expect a more direct exchange of ideas and results.

  10. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (10.1021/es401698p. [4] Mächler et al. (2012) Environ. Sci. Technol., 47, 7060-7066. [5] Huxol et al. Environ. Sci. Technol., in revision.

  11. Solar Noble Gases from ACFER 111 Metal Etched in Vacuo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroni, A.; Begemann, F.

    1992-07-01

    Regolith grains dissolved by stepwise etching release a mixture of near-surface implanted Solar Wind gases (SW) and a deeper- sited, isotopically heavier component attributed to Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) (1,2,3). In all regolith materials examined so far the elemental abundance ratios in both components are distinctly different from the canonical solar values (4). The differences are generally explained to be owing to diffusive elemental fractionation although there is no strong evidence that upon their implantation the composition of the gases was indeed solar. In contrast, the solar noble gases present in the H3-H6 chondritic regolith breccia Acfer 111 appear to be nearly unfractionated and thus offer a unique chance for more accurate analyses. A magnetic fraction of Acfer 111 matrix, consisting of approx. 80% metal and 20% silicates, was etched with a 60 g/mol aqueous solution of HNO3 in a high-vacuum extraction line similar to that in (1). The gases released were drawn off in steps and analyzed; the experiment was stopped when ~97% of the metal and ~50% of the silicates were dissolved. As etching proceeds, the isotopic composition of the released gases changes in a pattern similar to that observed previously in other regolithic materials. The isotopic composition of solar neon decreases from ^20Ne/^22Ne=13.1 in the first step to ^20Ne/^22Ne=11.6, which can be interpreted as a change of the mixing ratio of SW (^20Ne/^22Ne=13.7) and SEP (^20Ne/^22Ne=11.3) neon. The isotopic compositions of solar He, Ar, and Kr are consistent with their also being mixtures of SW and SEP having compositions reported previously (2,3), although our data are compromised to some extent by the presence of planetary gases extracted from the silicates and, in the first steps, by atmospheric contamination probably present in terrestrial weathering products (mostly rust). The elemental composition of noble gases released from Acfer 111 was distinct from previous experiments: The (^4He

  12. Global measurement of greenhouse gases and related air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, John P. [Institute of Environmental Physics and Remote Sensing, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the feedbacks within the earth atmosphere system, which determine the magnitude of global climate change, global measurement is required of greenhouse constituents at adequate spatial and temporal sampling scale. One of the holy grails of Earth Observation is the measurements of tropospheric constituents from space. In this context the determination of the loading of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, CO{sub 2}, and Methane, CH{sub 4}, in the boundary layer and lower troposphere at a precision capable of testing our understanding of their sources and sinks is challenging. SCIAMACHY (the Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY), which flies aboard ENVISAT is the first Earth Observation instrument to attempt this. It is the forerunner of the missions OCO (Orbiting Carbon Observatory), from NASA and GOSAT, Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite, from JAXA. This presentation discusses the measurements of natural and anthropogenic greenhouse constituents and related pollutants from space.

  13. Integrated sampling and analytical approach for common groundwater dissolved gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeish, Kimberley; Ryan, M Cathryn; Chu, Angus

    2007-12-15

    A novel passive gas diffusion sampler (PGDS) combines sampling, storage and direct injection into a single gas chromatograph (GC). The sampler has a 4.5 mL internal volume when deployed, is easy to operate, and eliminates sample-partitioning. The associated GC method analyzes for a large, dynamic sampling range from a single, small volume injection. Dissolved gases were separated on parallel Rt-Molsieve 5A and Rt-Q-PLOT columns and eluted solutes were quantified using a pulse discharge helium ionization detector (PD-HID). The combined sampling and analytical method appears to be less prone to systematic bias than conventional sampling and headspace partitioning and analysis. Total dissolved gas pressure used in tandem with the PGDS improved the accuracy of dissolved gas concentrations. The incorporation of routine measurements of dissolved biogeochemical and permanent gases into groundwater investigations will provide increased insight into chemical and biological processes in groundwater and improve chemical mass balance accuracy.

  14. [Quantitative analysis of transformer oil dissolved gases using FTIR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, An-xin; Tang, Xiao-jun; Wang, Er-zhen; Zhang, Zhong-hua; Liu, Jun-hua

    2013-09-01

    For the defects of requiring carrier gas and regular calibration, and low safety using chromatography to on line monitor transformer dissolved gases, it was attempted to establish a dissolved gas analysis system based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Taking into account the small amount of characteristic gases, many components, detection limit and safety requirements and the difficulty of degasser to put an end to the presence of interference gas, the quantitative analysis model was established based on sparse partial least squares, piecewise section correction and feature variable extraction algorithm using improvement TR regularization. With the characteristic gas of CH4, C2H6, C2H6, and CO2, the results show that using FTIR meets DGA requirements with the spectrum wave number resolution of 1 cm(-1) and optical path of 10 cm.

  15. Dissolution of multicomponent bubbles. [gases in glass melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, M. C.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of an isolated, stationary, multicomponent gas bubble in a glassmelt containing several dissolved gases is considered. The relevant mass-transport equations are formulated and calculations are performed for the case of two diffusing gases using a quasi-stationary model and a numerical solution of the exact mass-transfer equations. The results obtained from these two approaches are compared. The factors which govern the dissolution or growth of a bubble are thermodynamic and kinetic in origin. The tendency of a bubble to grow or shrink at long times is controlled by departure from overall equilibrium, whereas the short-time bubble dynamics may be dominated by kinetic effects. As a result of the existence of these dual influences, maxima and/or minima occur in the functional dependence of the bubble radius on time.

  16. 75 FR 14081 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Minor Harmonizing Changes to the General Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 98 RIN 2060-AQ15 Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Minor Harmonizing Changes to... greenhouse gas suppliers (subpart OO): (A) All producers of industrial greenhouse gases. (B) Importers of industrial greenhouse gases with annual bulk imports of N2O, fluorinated GHG, and CO2 that in combination...

  17. 40 CFR 71.13 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing Greenhouse Gases (GHGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... actions addressing Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) 71.13 Section 71.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 71.13 Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) means the air pollutant as defined in § 86.1818-12(a) of this chapter...

  18. 75 FR 70254 - PSD and Title V Permitting Guidance for Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... AGENCY PSD and Title V Permitting Guidance for Greenhouse Gases AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... the EPA has posted its guidance titled, ``PSD and Title V Permitting Guidance for Greenhouse Gases... for Greenhouse Gases.'' This document has been determined to be an EPA Significant Guidance...

  19. 75 FR 17331 - Public Hearings for the Mandatory Reporting Rule for Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... 2060-AP99, AP88, AQ00 Public Hearings for the Mandatory Reporting Rule for Greenhouse Gases AGENCY... two public hearings to be held for proposed rules related to mandatory reporting of greenhouse gases... Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases rule, published on October 30, 2009 by requiring reporting...

  20. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  1. 21 CFR 201.161 - Carbon dioxide and certain other gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. 201.161... (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Other Exemptions § 201.161 Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. (a) Carbon dioxide, cyclopropane, ethylene, helium, and nitrous oxide gases intended for drug use...

  2. Vortex line in spin-orbit coupled atomic Fermi gases

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 85, 013622 (2012) Vortex line in spin-orbit coupled atomic Fermi gases M. Iskin Department of Physics, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, TR-34450 Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey (Received 1 December 2011; published 17 January 2012) It has recently been shown that the spin-orbit coupling gives rise to topologically nontrivial and thermodynamically stable gapless superfluid phases when the pseudospin populations of an atomic Fermi gas are imbalanced, with the ...

  3. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics in one-dimensional bose gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldovin, F.; Cappellaro, A.; Orlandini, E.; Salasnich, L.

    2016-06-01

    We study cold dilute gases made of bosonic atoms, showing that in the mean-field one-dimensional regime they support stable out-of-equilibrium states. Starting from the 3D Boltzmann-Vlasov equation with contact interaction, we derive an effective 1D Landau-Vlasov equation under the condition of a strong transverse harmonic confinement. We investigate the existence of out-of-equilibrium states, obtaining stability criteria similar to those of classical plasmas.

  4. Occupational exposure to anaesthetic gases and high-frequency audiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgianni, Concetto; Gangemi, Silvia; Tanzariello, Maria Giuseppina; Barresi, Gaetano; Miceli, Ludovica; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Spatari, Giovanna

    2015-09-01

    Occupational exposure to anaestethic gases has been suggested to induce auditory damages. The aim of this study is to investigate high-frequency audiometric responses in subjects exposed to anaesthetic gases, in order to highlight the possible effects on auditory system. The study was performed on a sample of 30 medical specialists of Messina University Anaesthesia and Intensive care. We have used tonal audiometry as well as high-frequency one. We have compared the responses with those obtained in a similar control group not exposed to anaesthetic gases. Results were compared statistically. Results show a strong correlation (p = 0.000) between left and right ear responses to all the audiometric tests. The exposed and the control group run though the standard audiometry analysis plays different audiometric responses up only to higher frequencies (2000 HZ p = 0.009 and 4000 Hz p = 0.04); in high-frequency audiometry, as all other frequencies, the attention is drew to the fact that the sample groups distinguish themselves in a significantly statistic way (10,000 Hz p = 0.025, 12,000 Hz p = 0.008, 14,000 Hz p = 0.026, 16,000 Hz p = 0.08). The highest values are the ones related to exposed subjects both in standard (2000 Hz p = 0.01, 4000 Hz p = 0.02) and in high-frequency audiometry (10,000 Hz p = 0.011, 12,000 Hz p = 0.004, 14,000 Hz p = 0.012, 16,000 Hz p = 0.004). Results, even if preliminary and referred to a low-range sample, show an involvement of the anatomic structure responsible for the perception of high-frequency audiometric responses in subjects exposed to anaesthetic gases. © The Author(s) 2012.

  5. Special filter samples of Hanford process effluent gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldat, J.K.

    1957-01-22

    This document contains information on special filter samples of Hanford Process Effluent Gases. The filters are identified by code numbers only. Included in this paper are tables explaining the sample code numbers, sampling locations, and process conditions during sampling. Also included, is a copy of the monthly and quarterly average results for Regional Monitoring's routine stack program for the fourth quarter of 1956.

  6. The Kolmogorov-Sinai Entropy for Dilute Gases in Equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Van Beijeren, H; Posch, H A; Dellago, C; Dellago, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    We use the kinetic theory of gases to compute the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy per particle for a dilute gas in equilibrium. For an equilibrium system, the KS entropy, h_KS is the sum of all of the positive Lyapunov exponents characterizing the chaotic behavior of the gas. We compute h_KS/N, where N is the number of particles in the gas. This quantity has a density expansion of the form h_KS/N = a\

  7. Remote monitoring of volcanic gases using passive Fourier transform spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, S.P.; Goff, F.; Counce, D.; Schmidt, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Siebe, C.; Delgado, H. [Univ. Nactional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan (Mexico)

    1999-06-01

    Volcanic gases provide important insights on the internal workings of volcanoes and changes in their composition and total flux can warn of impending changes in a volcano`s eruptive state. In addition, volcanoes are important contributors to the earth`s atmosphere, and understanding this volcanic contribution is crucial for unraveling the effect of anthropogenic gases on the global climate. Studies of volcanic gases have long relied upon direct in situ sampling, which requires volcanologists to work on-site within a volcanic crater. In recent years, spectroscopic techniques have increasingly been employed to obtain information on volcanic gases from greater distances and thus at reduced risk. These techniques have included UV correlation spectroscopy (Cospec) for SO{sub 2} monitoring, the most widely-used technique, and infrared spectroscopy in a variety of configurations, both open- and closed-path. Francis et al. have demonstrated good results using the sun as the IR source. This solar occultation technique is quite useful, but puts rather strong restrictions on the location of instrument and is thus best suited to more accessible volcanoes. In order to maximize the flexibility and range of FTIR measurements at volcanoes, work over the last few years has emphasized techniques which utilize the strong radiance contrast between the volcanic gas plume and the sky. The authors have successfully employed these techniques at several volcanoes, including the White Island and Ruapehu volcanoes in New Zealand, the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii, and Mt. Etna in Italy. But Popocatepetl (5452 m), the recently re-awakened volcano 70 km southeast of downtown Mexico City, has provided perhaps the best examples to date of the usefulness of these techniques.

  8. Existence of solitary waves in dipolar quantum gases

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2011-02-01

    We study a nonlinear Schrdinger equation arising in the mean field description of dipolar quantum gases. Under the assumption of sufficiently strong dipolar interactions, the existence of standing waves, and hence solitons, is proved together with some of their properties. This gives a rigorous argument for the possible existence of solitary waves in BoseEinstein condensates, which originate solely due to the dipolar interaction between the particles. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonergodic dynamics of force-free granular gases

    OpenAIRE

    Bodrova, Anna; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We study analytically and by event-driven molecular dynamics simulations the nonergodic and aging properties of force-free cooling granular gases with both constant and velocity-dependent (viscoelastic) restitution coefficient $\\varepsilon$ for particle pair collisions. We compare the granular gas dynamics with an effective single particle stochastic model based on an underdamped Langevin equation with time dependent diffusivity. We find that both models share the same behavior of the ensembl...

  10. The method of determination of mercury adsorption from flue gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budzyń Stanisław

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For several recent years Faculty of Energy and Fuels of the AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow conduct intensive studies on the occurrence of mercury contained in thermal and coking coals, as well as on the possible reduction of fossil-fuel mercury emissions. This research focuses, among others, on application of sorbents for removal of mercury from flue gases. In this paper we present the methodology for testing mercury adsorption using various types of sorbents, in laboratory conditions. Our model assumes burning a coal sample, with a specific mercury content, in a strictly determined time period and temperature conditions, oxygen or air flow rates, and the flow of flue gases through sorbent in a specific temperature. It was developed for particular projects concerning the possibilities of applying different sorbents to remove mercury from flue gases. Test stand itself is composed of a vertical pipe furnace inside which a quartz tube was mounted for sample burning purposes. At the furnace outlet, there is a heated glass vessel with a sorbent sample through which flue gases are passing. Furnace allows burning at a defined temperature. The exhaust gas flow path is heated to prevent condensation of the mercury vapor prior to contact with a sorbent. The sorbent container is positioned in the heating element, with controlled and stabilized temperature, which allows for testing mercury sorption in various temperatures. Determination of mercury content is determined before (coal and sorbent, as well as after the process (sorbent and ash. The mercury balance is calculated based on the Hg content determination results. This testing method allows to study sorbent efficiency, depending on sorption temperature, sorbent grain size, and flue-gas rates.

  11. Supercritical hydrogenation and acid-catalysed reactions "without gases".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jason R; Poliakoff, Martyn

    2004-07-07

    The high temperature catalytic decomposition of HCO2H and HCO2Et are used to generate the high pressure H2 and the supercritical fluids needed for micro-scale hydrogenation of organic compounds; our approach overcomes the problems and limitations of handling high pressure gases on a small-scale and opens the way to the widespread use of continuous supercritical reactions in the laboratory.

  12. Greenhouse effect of chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Lacis, Andrew; Prather, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made of the radiative (greenhouse) forcing of the climate system due to changes of atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases. It is found that CFCs, defined to include chlorofluorocarbons, chlorocarbons, and fluorocarbons, now provide about one-quater of current annual increases in anthropogenic greenhouse climate forcing. If the growth rates of CFC production in the early 1970s had continued to the present, current annual growth of climate forcing due to CFCs would exceed that due to CO2.

  13. Properties of strongly dipolar Bose gases beyond the Born approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Ołdziejewski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    Strongly dipolar Bose gases can form liquid droplets stabilized by quantum fluctuations. In theoretical description of this phenomenon, low energy scattering amplitude is utilized as an effective potential. We show that for magnetic atoms corrections with respect to Born approximation arise, and derive modified pseudopotential using realistic interaction model. We discuss the resulting changes in collective mode frequencies and droplet stability diagram. Our results are relevant for recent experiments with erbium and dysprosium atoms.

  14. THE ROLE OF BUFFER GASES IN OPTOAOOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas III, L.J.; Kelly, M.J.; Amer, N.M.

    1977-11-01

    The dependence of an acoustically resonant optoacoustic signal on the molecular weight, and thermodynamic and transport properties of the buffer gas is reported. Our results show that careful selection of such gases can significantly increase the sensitivity and flexibility of optoacoustic spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that such thermodynamic quantities as {gamma} ({triple_bond} C{sub p}/C{sub v}) and sound velocity can now be measured readily and accurately. Other potential applications are suggested.

  15. Greenhouse effect of chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Lacis, Andrew; Prather, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made of the radiative (greenhouse) forcing of the climate system due to changes of atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases. It is found that CFCs, defined to include chlorofluorocarbons, chlorocarbons, and fluorocarbons, now provide about one-quater of current annual increases in anthropogenic greenhouse climate forcing. If the growth rates of CFC production in the early 1970s had continued to the present, current annual growth of climate forcing due to CFCs would exceed that due to CO2.

  16. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from some synthetic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Huttlinger, N. V.

    1978-01-01

    Nine samples of synthetic polymers were evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. The materials were polyoxymethylene, polyethylene (five samples), polypropylene, polymethyl methacrylate, and polystyrene. Of the five polyethylene samples, three contained known levels of chlorine. These test results were combined with earlier data to provide a comparison of 25 samples of synthetic polymers. Polyoxymethylene appeared to exhibit the greatest toxicity, and polystyrene the least toxicity, under these particular test conditions

  17. Self-organization in cold atomic gases: a synchronization perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesio, E; Robb, G R M; Oppo, G-L; Gomes, P M; Ackemann, T; Labeyrie, G; Kaiser, R; Firth, W J

    2014-10-28

    We study non-equilibrium spatial self-organization in cold atomic gases, where long-range spatial order spontaneously emerges from fluctuations in the plane transverse to the propagation axis of a single optical beam. The self-organization process can be interpreted as a synchronization transition in a fully connected network of fictitious oscillators, and described in terms of the Kuramoto model. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Metastability of Bose and Fermi gases on the upper branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClair, André; Roditi, Itzhak; Squires, Joshua

    2016-12-01

    We study three-dimensional Bose and Fermi gases in the upper branch, a phase defined by the absence of bound states in the repulsive interaction regime, within an approximation that considers only two-body interactions. Employing a formalism based on the S matrix, we derive useful analytic expressions that hold on the upper branch in the weak coupling limit. We determine upper branch phase diagrams for both bosons and fermions with techniques valid for arbitrary positive scattering length.

  19. Ultrapure Gases — From the Production Plant to the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simgen, H.; Zuzel, G.

    2007-03-01

    Radioactive noble gas isotopes are a potential source of background in low-level physics experiments, since they are present in the atmosphere and also in widely used gases produced from the atmosphere. We have studied the 39Ar, 85Kr and 222Rn contamination of commercially available nitrogen using low background proportional counters and a rare gas mass spectrometer. It was found that air separation plants are very effective in removing traces of radioactive noble gases and that the available purity can be significantly higher than commercial specifications. On the other hand the gas handling processes which are necessary to deliver gases from the production plant to the customer are a possible source of re-contaminations and determine in most cases the achievable purity. By simulating these processes under realistic conditions we have establish together with the Italian company `SOL group' a well controlled delivery path which can hold the purity. For the short-lived 222Rn the initial contamination is less critical, because it decays away. Instead the emanation rate of the cryogenic tank was found to determine the achievable purity, since it permanently delivers new 222Rn.

  20. Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

  1. All-optical production of 6Li quantum gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchianti, A.; Seman, J. A.; Valtolina, G.; Morales, A.; Inguscio, M.; Zaccanti, M.; Roati, G.

    2015-03-01

    We report efficient production of quantum gases of 6Li using a sub-Doppler cooling scheme based on the D1 transition. After loading in a standard magneto-optical trap, an atomic sample of 109 atoms is cooled at a temperature of 40 μK by a bichromatic D1 gray-molasses. More than 2×107 atoms are then transferred into a high-intensity optical dipole trap, where a two-spin state mixture is evaporatively cooled down to quantum degeneracy. We observe that D1 cooling remains effective in the deep trapping potential, allowing an effective increase of the atomic phase-space density before starting the evaporation. In a total experimental cycle of 11 s, we produce weakly-interacting degenerate Fermi gases of 7×105 atoms at T/TF molecules. We further describe a simple and compact optical system both for high-resolution imaging and for imprinting a thin optical barrier on the atomic cloud; this represents a first step towards the study of quantum tunneling in strongly interacting superfluid Fermi gases.

  2. Determination of sulfur gases from Velenje coal stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozinc, J.; Treeby, M.; Zupancic-Kralj, L. [ERICo Velenje, Velenje (Slovenia)

    2004-07-01

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) were detected at the Velenje coal stockpile. The gases were collected in a sampling tent placed on the stockpile. Several sampling and measuring techniques were tested for their determination. For direct analysis and solid phase micro extraction (SPME) the gases were pumped from the tent into Tedlar bags, while for cryogenic trapping the gas was pumped through a cryo-trap from the tent. The analyses were performed by gas chromatographs, equipped with a flame photometric detector (FPD) and a mass selective detector (MSD). It was found that direct gas analysis by GC-MSD is the method of choice for determination of the gases in the ppbv concentration level. DMS was rarely quantified, while concentrations of COS and CS{sub 2} were temperature dependant. It was confirmed that oxygen was necessary for the formation of COS and CS{sub 2}. The source of COS and CS{sub 2} is probably oxidation of pyrite in coal, which was determined by X-ray spectroscopy.

  3. Greenhouse gases mitigation options and strategies for Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mwandosya, M.J.; Meena, H.E.

    1996-12-31

    Tanzania became a party to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UN FCCC) when she ratified the Convention in March, 1996. Now that Tanzania and other developing countries are Parties to the UN FCCC, compliance with its provisions is mandatory. The legal requirements therefore provide a basis for their participation in climate change studies and policy formulation. All parties to the Convention are required by Article 4.1 of the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) to develop, periodically update, publish, and make available national inventories of anthropogenic emissions and removal of greenhouse gases that are not controlled by the Montreal Protocol. This study on possible options for the mitigation of greenhouse gases in Tanzania is a preliminary effort towards the fulfilment of the obligation. In order to fulfil their obligations under the UN FCCC and have a meaningful mitigation assessment, identification and quantification of anthropogenic sources of atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases in the country was undertaken. In this respect, the study of anthropogenic emissions by source and removals by sink of GHGs in Tanzania was done with the main objective of increasing the quantity and quality of base-line data available in order to further scientific understanding of the relationship of greenhouse gas emissions to climate change. Furthermore, the study facilitated identification of national policy and technological options that could reduce the level of emissions in the country.

  4. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report is the fifth annual update, covering national emissions over the period 1989--1995, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1996. The estimates contained in this report have been revised from those in last year`s report. Emissions estimates for carbon dioxide are reported in metric tons of carbon; estimates for other gases are reported in metric tons of gas. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapter 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Five appendixes are included with this report. 216 refs., 11 figs., 38 tabs.

  5. Inhalation gases or gaseous mediators as neuroprotectants for cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Harrison, Joanne C; Nair, Shiva M; Sammut, Ivan A

    2013-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While recombinant tissue plasminogen activator can be administered to produce thrombolysis and restore blood flow to the ischaemic brain, therapeutic benefit is only achieved in a fraction of the subset of patients eligible for fibrinolytic intervention. Neuroprotective therapies attempting to restrict the extent of brain injury following cerebral ischaemia have not been successfully translated into the clinic despite overwhelming pre-clinical evidence of neuroprotection. Therefore, an adequate treatment for the majority of acute ischaemic stroke patients remains elusive. In the stroke literature, the use of therapeutic gases has received relatively little attention. Gases such as hyperbaric and normobaric oxygen, xenon, hydrogen, helium and argon all possess biological effects that have shown to be neuroprotective in pre-clinical models of ischaemic stroke. There are significant advantages to using gases including their relative abundance, low cost and feasibility for administration, all of which make them ideal candidates for a translational therapy for stroke. In addition, modulating cellular gaseous mediators including nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulphide may be an attractive option for ischaemic stroke therapy. Inhalation of these gaseous mediators can also produce neuroprotection, but this strategy remains to be confirmed as a viable therapy for ischaemic stroke. This review highlights the neuroprotective potential of therapeutic gas therapy and modulation of gaseous mediators for ischaemic stroke. The therapeutic advantages of gaseous therapy offer new promising directions in breaking the translational barrier for ischaemic stroke.

  6. [Quantitative spectrum analysis of characteristic gases of spontaneous combustion coal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yun-Tao; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Luo, Hai-Zhu; Sun, Yong

    2011-09-01

    Aimed at the characteristics of spontaneous combustion gas such as a variety of gases, lou limit of detection, and critical requirement of safety, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis is presented to analyze characteristic gases of spontaneous combustion In this paper, analysis method is introduced at first by combing characteristics of absorption spectra of analyte and analysis requirement. Parameter setting method, sample preparation, feature variable abstract and analysis model building are taken into consideration. The methods of sample preparation, feature abstraction and analysis model are introduced in detail. And then, eleven kinds of gases were tested with Tensor 27 spectrometer. CH4, C2H6, C3H8, iC4H10, nC4H10, C2 H4, C3 H6, C3 H2, SF6, CO and CO2 were included. The optical path length was 10 cm while the spectra resolution was set as 1 cm(-1). The testing results show that the detection limit of all analytes is less than 2 x 10(-6). All the detection limits fit the measurement requirement of spontaneous combustion gas, which means that FTIR may be an ideal instrument and the analysis method used in this paper is competent for spontaneous combustion gas measurement on line.

  7. Discovery Mondays - Gases: more to them than meets the eye!

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    CERN uses a lot of gas to operate its experiments. Above a few of the helium tanks for the LHC. We generally tend to think that if a space is empty there is nothing in it. However, did you know that at the Earth's surface there are 25 million million million (1018) molecules of gas in every cubic centimetre of atmosphere? At CERN, gases are put to multiple uses. They are used to protect, to cool and also to detect particles... Suffice it to say that gases play a vital role at CERN. Why does the air supply to the accelerator tunnel 100 metres below the surface have to be treated and what treatment techniques are used? What are the different types of apparatus that enable you to breathe in confined spaces? How are gases used as a detection medium in the particle detectors? How are vacuums made? To find out the answers, step on the gas and join us for the next Discovery Monday! This Discovery Monday will be taking place as part of the World Year of Physics, as its theme is closely associated with one of the ...

  8. Biological sweetening of energy gases mimics in biotrickling filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, Marc; Baeza, Juan A; Gamisans, Xavier; Casas, Carles; Lafuente, Javier; Deshusses, Marc A; Gabriel, David

    2008-03-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide from waste and energy-rich gases is required, not only because of environmental health and safety reasons, but also because of operational reasons if such gases have to be used for energy generation. A biotrickling filter for the removal of ultra-high concentrations of H2S from oxygen-poor gases is proposed and studied in this work. Two laboratory-scale biotrickling filters were used to study the startup period and to determine the long-term performance of the gas sweetening process. The inlet H2S concentration ranged from 900 to 12000ppmv and two different packing materials were investigated. There was no toxicity effect observed even at a the highest H2S concentration, and maximum elimination capacities of 280 and 250g H2Sm(-3)h(-1) were obtained at gas contact times of 167 and 180s, respectively. Elemental sulfur and sulfate were found to be the most abundant end-products of the biological oxidation of sulfide when operated under microaerophilic conditions. The biotrickling filter was able to quickly recover its nominal performance after different load increases and system shutdowns simulating field operation. The results reported here show that biotreatment can be an interesting alternative to conventional gas sweetening systems normally used for such applications.

  9. Temperature dependence of sorption of gases by coals and charcoals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurovs, Richard; Day, Stuart; Weir, Steve; Duffy, Greg (CSIRO Energy Technology PO Box 330 Newcastle 2300 Australia)

    2008-02-01

    Modelling the sorption properties of coals for carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions is necessary for accurate prediction of the sequestering ability of coals in seams. We present recent data for sorption curves of three dry Argonne Premium coals, for carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen at two different temperatures at pressures up to 15 MPa. The sorption capacity of coals tends to decrease with increasing temperature. An investigation into literature values for sorption of nitrogen and methane by charcoal also show sorption capacities that decrease dramatically with increasing temperature. This is inconsistent with expectations from Langmuir models of coal sorption, which predict a sorption capacity that is independent of temperature. We have successfully fitted the isotherms using a modified Dubinin-Radushkevich equation that uses gas density rather than pressure. A simple pore-filling model that assumes there is a maximum pore width that can be filled in supercritical conditions and that this maximum pore width decreases with increasing temperature, can explain this temperature dependence of sorption capacity. It can also explain why different supercritical gases give apparently different surface sorption capacities on the same material. The calculated heat of sorption for these gases on these coals is similar to those found for these gases on activated carbon. (author)

  10. Latitudinal distribution of trace gases from biomass burning emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridder, Theo; Warneke, Thorsten [Institut fuer Umweltphysik, Universitaet Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Gerbig, Christoph; Jordan, Armin; Rothe, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biogeochemie, Hans-Knoell-Str. 10, 07745 Jena (Germany); Schrems, Otto [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Am Handelshafen 12, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    We study the latitudinal distribution of trace gases in the atmosphere with ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) Spectrometry and in situ measurements. Our measurements have been performed during several ship cruises on the Atlantic (55 N - 30 S) between the years 1995 and 2005 on board of the research vessel Polarstern. Here we report on the latitudinal variability of trace gases originating from biomass burning emissions. We analyze the distribution of these gases for recent cruises and compare it to the results from former trips. Thereby we concentrate on the distribution of carbon monoxide (CO), which is a suitable tracer for biomass burning. We compare our data to in situ measurements, which have been accomplished during some of our cruises. In situ measurements have been performed by flask sampling and were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In addition we studied the backward trajectories of air masses to reveal the origin of enhanced trace gas concentrations due to biomass burning emissions.

  11. Grüneisen parameter for gases and superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Mariano; Menegasso, Paulo; Paupitz, Ricardo; Seridonio, Antonio; Lagos, Roberto E.

    2016-09-01

    The Grüneisen ratio (Γ), i.e. the ratio of the thermal expansivity to the specific heat at constant pressure, quantifies the degree of anharmonicity of the potential governing the physical properties of a system. While Γ has been intensively explored in solid state physics, very little is known about its behavior for gases. This is most likely due to the difficulties posed in carrying out both thermal expansion and specific heat measurements in gases with high accuracy as a function of pressure and temperature. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge a comprehensive discussion about the peculiarities of the Grüneisen ratio is still lacking in the literature. Here we report on a detailed and comprehensive overview of the Grüneisen ratio. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of Γ for gases. The main findings of this work are: (i) for the van der Waals gas Γ depends only on the co-volume b due to interaction effects, it is smaller than that for the ideal gas (Γ = 2/3) and diverges upon approaching the critical volume; (ii) for the Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal boson gas, assuming the transition as first-order, Γ diverges upon approaching a critical volume, similarly to the van der Waals gas; (iii) for 4He at the superfluid transition Γ shows a singular behavior. Our results reveal that Γ can be used as an appropriate experimental tool to explore pressure-induced critical points.

  12. Spectral backbone of excitation transport in ultracold Rydberg gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholak, Torsten; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    The spectral structure underlying excitonic energy transfer in ultracold Rydberg gases is studied numerically, in the framework of random matrix theory, and via self-consistent diagrammatic techniques. Rydberg gases are made up of randomly distributed, highly polarizable atoms that interact via strong dipolar forces. Dynamics in such a system is fundamentally different from cases in which the interactions are of short range, and is ultimately determined by the spectral and eigenvector structure. In the energy levels' spacing statistics, we find evidence for a critical energy that separates delocalized eigenstates from states that are localized at pairs or clusters of atoms separated by less than the typical nearest-neighbor distance. We argue that the dipole blockade effect in Rydberg gases can be leveraged to manipulate this transition across a wide range: As the blockade radius increases, the relative weight of localized states is reduced. At the same time, the spectral statistics, in particular, the density of states and the nearest-neighbor level-spacing statistics, exhibits a transition from approximately a 1-stable Lévy to a Gaussian orthogonal ensemble. Deviations from random matrix statistics are shown to stem from correlations between interatomic interaction strengths that lead to an asymmetry of the spectral density and profoundly affect localization properties. We discuss approximations to the self-consistent Matsubara-Toyozawa locator expansion that incorporate these effects.

  13. Structure of Inert Gases Adsorbed in MCM-41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dylan; Sokol, Paul

    One-dimensional quantum liquids of 3He or 4He have generated recent interest for investigation in the Luttinger liquid model. Unfortunately, current studies lack a clear demonstration of definitively one-dimensional behavior. We propose using the templated, porous material, MCM-41, as a host for an atomic Luttinger liquid. In general, the pores of MCM-41 are too wide to provide a strictly one-dimensional environment, so we investigate preplating these pores with inert gases to effectively reduce their diameter. We present the results of studies of the structure of inert gases in MCM-41. Nitrogen sorption isotherms were used to characterize the sample. Then, using inert gases as adsorbates, we determined the minimum effective pore diameter that can be achieved in our sample before capillary condensation takes over. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed on the ideally preplated sample to investigate the structure of the adsorbates in the nanopores. The XRD measurements are compared to simulations of core-shell cylinder model scattering, and the validity of the model is assessed. The prospects for creating a definitively one-dimensional channel for the application of studying the structure and dynamics of helium confined in one dimension are discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DGE-1069091.

  14. Biosignature Gases in H2-Dominated Atmospheres on Rocky Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S; Hu, R

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) Super Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H2-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H2 atmospheres and habitable surface temperatures, by using a model atmosphere with photochemistry, and biomass estimate framework for evaluating the plausibilty of a range of biosignature gas candidates. We find that photochemically produced H atoms are the most abundant reactive species in H2 atmospheres. In atmospheres with high CO2 levels, atomic O is the major destructive species for some molecules. In sun-Earth-like UV radiation environments, H (and in some cases O) will rapidly destroy nearly all biosignature gases of interest. The lower UV fluxes from UV quiet M stars would produce a lower concentration of H (or O) for the same scenario, enabling some biosignature gases to accumulate. The favorability of low-UV radiation environments to in an H2 atmosphere is closely analogous to the case of oxidized atmosp...

  15. Transport of dissolved gases through unsaturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryshev, B. S.

    2017-06-01

    The natural porous media (e.g. soil, sand, peat etc.) usually are partially saturated by groundwater. The saturation of soil depends on hydrostatic pressure which is linearly increased with depth. Often some gases (e.g. nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, methane etc.) are dissolved into the groundwater. The solubility of gases is very small because of that two assumptions is applied: I. The concentration of gas is equal to solubility, II. Solubility depends only on pressure (for isothermal systems). In this way some part of dissolved gas transfers from the solution to the bubble phase. The gas bubbles are immovably trapped in a porous matrix by surface-tension forces and the dominant mechanism of transport of gas mass becomes the diffusion of gas molecules through the liquid. If the value of water content is small then the transport of gas becomes slow and gas accumulates into bubble phase. The presence of bubble phase additionally decreases the water content and slows down the transport. As result the significant mass of gas should be accumulated into the massif of porous media. We derive the transport equations and find the solution which is demonstrated the accumulation of gases. The influence of saturation, porosity and filtration velocity to accumulation process is investigated and discussed.

  16. Energy–pressure relation for low-dimensional gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mancarella

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A particularly simple relation of proportionality between internal energy and pressure holds for scale-invariant thermodynamic systems (with Hamiltonians homogeneous functions of the coordinates, including classical and quantum – Bose and Fermi – ideal gases. One can quantify the deviation from such a relation by introducing the internal energy shift as the difference between the internal energy of the system and the corresponding value for scale-invariant (including ideal gases. After discussing some general thermodynamic properties associated with the scale-invariance, we provide criteria for which the internal energy shift density of an imperfect (classical or quantum gas is a bounded function of temperature. We then study the internal energy shift and deviations from the energy–pressure proportionality in low-dimensional models of gases interpolating between the ideal Bose and the ideal Fermi gases, focusing on the Lieb–Liniger model in 1d and on the anyonic gas in 2d. In 1d the internal energy shift is determined from the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz integral equations and an explicit relation for it is given at high temperature. Our results show that the internal energy shift is positive, it vanishes in the two limits of zero and infinite coupling (respectively the ideal Bose and the Tonks–Girardeau gas and it has a maximum at a finite, temperature-depending, value of the coupling. Remarkably, at fixed coupling the energy shift density saturates to a finite value for infinite temperature. In 2d we consider systems of Abelian anyons and non-Abelian Chern–Simons particles: as it can be seen also directly from a study of the virial coefficients, in the usually considered hard-core limit the internal energy shift vanishes and the energy is just proportional to the pressure, with the proportionality constant being simply the area of the system. Soft-core boundary conditions at coincident points for the two-body wavefunction introduce

  17. Avoidance of fluorinated greenhouse gases. Possibilities of an early exit; Fluorierte Treibhausgase vermeiden. Wege zum Ausstieg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becken, Katja; Graaf, Daniel de; Elsner, Cornelia; Hoffmann, Gabriele; Krueger, Franziska; Martens, Kerstin; Plehn, Wolfgang; Sartorius, Rolf

    2010-11-15

    In comparison to carbon dioxide, fluorinated greenhouse gases are more harmful up to a factor of 24,000. Today the amount of fluorinated greenhouse gases of the world-wide emissions of climatic harmful gases amounts 2 % and increases to 6 % in the year 2050. The authors of the contribution under consideration report on possibilities for the avoidance of the emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases. The characteristics and ecological effects of fluorinated gases as well as the development of the emission in Germany are presented. Subsequently, the applications of fluorinated hydrocarbons are described.

  18. Donor lung assessment using selective pulmonary vein gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Joseph; Sreekanth, Sowmyashree; Kossar, Alex; Raza, Kashif; Lederer, David J; Robbins, Hilary; Shah, Lori; Sonett, Joshua R; Arcasoy, Selim; D'Ovidio, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Standard donor lung assessment relies on imaging, challenge gases and subjective interpretation of bronchoscopic findings, palpation and visual assessment. Central gases may not accurately represent true quality of the lungs. We report our experience using selective pulmonary vein gases to corroborate the subjective judgement. Starting, January 2012, donor lungs have been assessed by intraoperative bronchoscopy, palpation and visual judgement of lung collapse upon temporary disconnection from ventilator, central gases from the aorta and selective pulmonary vein gases. Partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) <300 mmHg on FiO2 of 1.0 was considered low. The results of the chest X-ray and last pO2 in the intensive care unit were also collected. Post-transplant primary graft dysfunction and survival were monitored. To date, 259 consecutive brain-dead donors have been assessed and 157 transplants performed. Last pO2 in the intensive care unit was poorly correlated with intraoperative central pO2 (Spearman's rank correlation rs = 0.29). Right inferior pulmonary vein pO2 was associated (Mann-Whitney, P < 0.001) with findings at bronchoscopy [clean: median pO2 443 mmHg (25th-75th percentile range 349-512) and purulent: 264 mmHg (178-408)]; palpation [good: 463 mmHg (401-517) and poor: 264 mmHg (158-434)] and visual assessment of lung collapse [good lung collapse: 429 mmHg (320-501) and poor lung collapse: 205 mmHg (118-348)]. Left inferior pulmonary pO2 was associated (P < 0.001) with findings at bronchoscopy [clean: 419 mmHg (371-504) and purulent: 254 mmHg (206-367)]; palpation [good: 444 mmHg (400-517) and poor 282 mmHg (211-419)] and visual assessment of lung collapse [good: 420 mmHg (349-496) and poor: 246 mmHg (129-330)]. At 72 h, pulmonary graft dysfunction 2 was in 21/157 (13%) and pulmonary graft dysfunction 3 in 17/157 (11%). Ninety-day and 1-year mortalities were 6/157 (4%) and 13/157 (8%), respectively. Selective pulmonary vein gases provide corroborative objective

  19. Kinetic Theory Estimates for the Kolmogorov-Sinai Entropy, and the Largest Lyapunov Exponents for Dilute, Hard-Ball Gases and for Dilute, Random Lorentz Gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijeren, H. van; Zon, R. van; Dorfman, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetic theory of gases provides methods for calculating Lyapunov exponents and other quantities, such as Kolmogorov-Sinai entropies, that characterize the chaotic behavior of hard-ball gases. Here we illustrate the use of these methods for calculating the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, and the

  20. Adsorption Characteristics of Activated Carbon Derived from Pyrolytic Tire Char for Malachite Green%废轮胎活性炭对孔雀石绿的吸附性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 张强年; 刘双喜; 朱坦

    2012-01-01

    Activated carbon produced from pyrolytic tire char in an industrial scale was investigated its potential ability to adsorb Malachite Green (MG) by a batch method.The effect of operation parameters,such as contact time,pH,adsorbent dosage,initial concentration,temperature,ionic strength and metal ion on the adsorption were investigated to provide more information about the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC).It has shown that APTC is a potential adsorbent for MG removal.The results show that higher initial MG solution,higher initial solution pH (pH>7.0) and higher temperature are fit for the adsorption,while higher ionic strength and the presence of metal ions are unfavorable for the adsorption process.%以工业规模的废轮胎热解炭黑为原料,经过水蒸汽活化制备废轮胎活性炭,采用间歇实验法考察了废轮胎活性炭对三苯甲烷类染料孔雀石绿的吸附性能.系统考察了操作因素如接触时间、溶液pH、吸附剂用量、孔雀石绿初始浓度、离子强度、重金属离子以及温度等对吸附过程以及吸附性能的影响.结果表明,废轮胎活性炭是孔雀石绿的有效吸附剂,其吸附容量高于文献报道的相关吸附剂.吸附过程在240 min内达到平衡,与相关吸附剂的平衡时间一致;孔雀石绿初始浓度高、较高的初始溶液pH值以及升高吸附温度有利于废轮胎活性炭对孔雀石绿的吸附;而较高的溶液离子强度以及重金属离子的存在不利于孔雀石绿的吸附.