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Sample records for pyrolytic carbon

  1. Pyrolytic 3D Carbon Microelectrodes for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Caviglia, Claudia; Amato, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the fabrication and characterization of suspended three-dimensional (3D) pyrolytic carbon microelectrodes for electrochemical applications. For this purpose, an optimized process with multiple steps of UV photolithography with the negative tone photoresist SU-8 followed by pyro...

  2. Suspended 3D pyrolytic carbon microelectrodes for electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Caviglia, Claudia; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    2017-01-01

    Carbon microelectrodes have a wide range of applications because of their unique material properties and biocompatibility. This work presents the fabrication and characterization of suspended pyrolytic carbon microstructures serving as three-dimensional (3D) carbon microelectrodes for electrochem...

  3. Microstructure of carbon fiber preform and distribution of pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建勋; 黄伯云

    2004-01-01

    The carbon/carbon composites were made by chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) with needled felt preform. The distribution of the pyrolytic carbon in the carbon fiber preform was studied by polarized light microscope(PLM) and scanning electronic microscope(SEM). The experimental results indicate that the amount of pyrolytic carbon deposited on the surface of chopped carbon fiber is more than that on the surface of long carbon fiber. The reason is the different porosity between the layer of chopped carbon fiber and long carbon fiber. The carbon precursor gas which passes through the part of chopped carbon fibers decomposes and deposits on the surface of chopped carbon fiber. The pyrolytic carbon on the surface of long carbon fibers is produced by the carbon precursor gas diffusing from the chopped fiber and the Z-d fiber. Uniform pore distribution and porosity in preform are necessary for producing C/C composites with high properties.

  4. Optical Properties of Pyrolytic Carbon Films Versus Graphite and Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovbeshko, Galyna I; Romanyuk, Volodymyr R; Pidgirnyi, Denys V; Cherepanov, Vsevolod V; Andreev, Eugene O; Levin, Vadim M; Kuzhir, Polina P; Kaplas, Tommi; Svirko, Yuri P

    2015-12-01

    We report a comparative study of optical properties of 5-20 nm thick pyrolytic carbon (PyC) films, graphite, and graphene. The complex dielectric permittivity of PyC is obtained by measuring polarization-sensitive reflectance and transmittance spectra of the PyC films deposited on silica substrate. The Lorentz-Drude model describes well the general features of the optical properties of PyC from 360 to 1100 nm. By comparing the obtained results with literature data for graphene and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, we found that in the visible spectral range, the effective dielectric permittivity of the ultrathin PyC films are comparable with those of graphite and graphene.

  5. Pyrolytic 3D Carbon Microelectrodes for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Caviglia, Claudia; Amato, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    electrochemical activity, chemical stability, and ease in surface functionalization [1]. The most common carbon microfabrication techniques (i.e. screen printing) produce two-dimensional (2D) electrodes, which limit the detection sensitivity. Hence several 3D microfabrication techniques have been explored......This work presents the fabrication and characterization of multi-layered three-dimensional (3D) pyrolysed carbon microelectrodes for electrochemical applications. For this purpose, an optimized UV photolithography and pyrolysis process with the negative tone photoresist SU-8 has been developed...... carbon [2]. This process enables fabrication of 2D and 3D electrodes with possibility for tailoring ad-hoc designs and unique sensitivities for specific applications. Due to this, pyrolysed carbon is becoming increasingly attractive for numerous applications, such as novel sensors and scaffolds for cell...

  6. Pyrolytic 3D Carbon Microelectrodes for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Caviglia, Claudia; Amato, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    ,” Chem. Rev., vol. 108, no. 7, pp. 2646–2687, 2008. [2] R. Martinez-Duarte, “SU-8 Photolithography as a Toolbox for Carbon MEMS,” Micromachines, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 766–782, 2014. [3] L. Amato, A. Heiskanen, C. Caviglia, F. Shah, K. Zéór, M. Skolimowski, M. Madou, L. Gammelgaard, R. Hansen, E. G. Seiz...

  7. Pyrolytic carbon film deposit as an electrochemical interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hadi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A pyrolytic carbon (PC film was grown on planar substrate (graphite rods by chemical vapor deposition from gaseous feed of methane using a vertical hot-wall deposition reactor. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the surface structure. The PC film was also characterized by cyclic voltammetry technique to evaluate the background current, stability and the electrochemical response using ascorbic acid, Co(phen32+/3+ and Fe(CN6 3-/4- redox couplesand compared to glassy carbon (GC electrode. High degree of electrochemical activity and the enhanced signal to background (S/B ratio demonstrated that the PC film might be an attractive electrode material for electroanalytical measurements.

  8. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and diffusion of silver in pyrolytic carbon coatings

    OpenAIRE

    CANCINO TREJOA F.; SÁENZ PADILLA M.; LOPEZ HONORATO Eddie; CARVAJAL NUNEZ URSULA; BOSHOVEN Jacobus; Somers, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that TRISO (tristructural isotropic) coated nuclear fuel particles are capable of retaining fission products up to 1600 ºC, however above this temperature fission products can diffuse through the pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings that act as the containment barriers in this fuel. Despite decades of research and development, little is known on the origin of this fuel temperature limit. Since pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings are an integral part of the safety of ...

  9. Glass-like carbon, pyrolytic graphite or nanostructured carbon for electrochemical sensing of bismuth ion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Milikić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Different carbon electrodes were explored for application in electroanalysis, namely for sensing of bismuth ion as model analyte. Carbon materials tested included glassy carbon, basal and edge plane pyrolytic graphite, as well as nanostructured carbonized polyaniline prepared in the presence of 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Bismuth ion was chosen as model analyte as protocol for its detection and quantifications is still to be determined. Herein, anodic stripping voltammetry was used with study of effect of several parameters such as scan rate and deposition time. Electrode based on carbonized polyaniline showed the highest activity for bismuth ion sensing in terms of the highest current densities recorded both in a laboratory and in real sample, while basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode gave the lowest limit of detection.

  10. GROWTH CHARACTERS AND MODEL OF PYROLYTIC CARBON IN CHEMICAL VAPOR INFILTRATION PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI) processes are the essential techniques for fabrication of high performance carbon-carbon composites. Based on the polarized light and scanning electron analysis, the authors study the micro-morphology and texture characteristics of pyrolytic carbon deposited in CVI process, as well as the growth behavior of pyrolytic carbon. The research shows that Rough Laminar (RL) texture has the hierarchical and self-similar structural features, which reflects the stage-growth and self-similar behavior during the growth course of pyrolytic carbon. According to the two growth features, a laminated growth model of pyrolytic carbon is proposed with the concept of Cone-Growth Units (CGU). The laminated growth model can provide a fine description for the growth course of RL pyrolytic carbon. The model indicates that formation, developing and combination of local high-order structures (such as CGU structures) are the essential factors for the growth of RL texture. Smooth Laminar (SL) texture and ISO carbon come into being with long-range orderliness and isotropy structure respectively, which no local high-orderliness intermediate involves in.

  11. Pyrolytic-carbon coating in carbon nanotube foams for better performance in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nanfei; Yildiz, Ozkan; Pan, Qin; Zhu, Jiadeng; Zhang, Xiangwu; Bradford, Philip D.; Gao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the wide-spread adoption of supercapacitors has been hindered by their inferior energy density to that of batteries. Here we report the use of our pyrolytic-carbon-coated carbon nanotube foams as lightweight, compressible, porous, and highly conductive current collectors in supercapacitors, which are infiltrated with chemically-reduced graphene oxide and later compressed via mechanical and capillary forces to generate the active electrodes. The pyrolytic carbon coatings, introduced by chemical vapor infiltration, wrap around the CNT junctions and increase the surface roughness. When active materials are infiltrated, the pyrolytic-carbon coatings help prevent the π-stacking, enlarge the accessible surface area, and increase the electrical conductivity of the scaffold. Our best-performing device offers 48% and 57% higher gravimetric energy and power density, 14% and 23% higher volumetric energy and power density, respectively, and two times higher knee frequency, than the device with commercial current collectors, while the "true-performance metrics" are strictly followed in our measurements. We have further clarified the solution resistance, charge transfer resistance/capacitance, double-layer capacitance, and Warburg resistance in our system via comprehensive impedance analysis, which will shed light on the design and optimization of similar systems.

  12. A study on biocompatibility and bactericidal properties of pyrolytic carbon by silver ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H.Q. [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074 (China); Liu, T. [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074 (China); Liu, X. [Tianjin Urinary Surgery Institute, Tianjin 300211 (China); Gu, H.Q. [Tianjin Urinary Surgery Institute, Tianjin 300211 (China); Zhao, J. [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074 (China)]. E-mail: jiezhao1943@126.com

    2007-02-15

    The biocompatibility and bactericidal properties of Ag{sup +}-implanted pyrolytic carbon were investigated by means of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria and some biocompatible experiments. The pyrolytic carbon samples were implanted by silver ions with the dose ranging from 5 x 10{sup 14} to 5 x 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} at an energy of 70 keV. The silver distribution in pyrolytic carbon was characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The results show that the bactericidal rate for both S. aureus and E. coli increase with the ion dose when the silver ion dose is under the saturated dose of 5 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The bactericidal rate is over 97% when the ion dose exceeds that value. In comparison with the reference sample, Ag{sup +}-implanted pyrolytic carbon shows a good biocompatibility and without biotoxication by means of cytotoxicity, hemolysis and platelet tests. RBS analyses show that silver atoms penetrate into the sample surface and form a silver-rich surface region which plays an important role in killing bacteria. When the ion dose is not exceed 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, the structure of Ag{sup +}-implanted pyrolytic carbon is kept unchanged maintaining the original biocompatibility.

  13. Structural and Compositional Characterization of Fungus-Derived Pyrolytic Carbon Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Campbell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three distinctive pyrolytic carbon structures, derived from three specific tissues of Agaricus bisporus mushroom, were studied and characterized. The three structures discovered within the stalk, cap, and cap skin tissues were found to contain unique microarchitectures, which were preserved upon anoxic carbonization. Experiments also revealed the formation of salt pockets and deposits within each microarchitecture, leading to a potential natural hard-template method for porous carbon structures.

  14. Pyrolytic carbon black composite and method of making the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Bi, Zhonghe

    2016-09-13

    A method of recovering carbon black includes the step of providing a carbonaceous source material containing carbon black. The carbonaceous source material is contacted with a sulfonation bath to produce a sulfonated material. The sulfonated material is pyrolyzed to produce a carbon black containing product comprising a glassy carbon matrix phase having carbon black dispersed therein. A method of making a battery electrode is also disclosed.

  15. Nanomechanical Pyrolytic Carbon Resonators: Novel Fabrication Method and Characterization of Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, Maksymilian; Larsen, Frederik K.; Larsen, Peter E.; Schmid, Silvan; Boisen, Anja; Keller, Stephan S.

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanomechanical string resonators, which essentially are highly stressed bridges, are of particular interest for micro- and nanomechanical sensing because they exhibit resonant behavior with exceptionally high quality factors. Here, we fabricated and characterized nanomechanical pyrolytic carbon resonators (strings and cantilevers) obtained through pyrolysis of photoresist precursors. The developed fabrication process consists of only three processing steps: photolithography, dry etching and pyrolysis. Two different fabrication strategies with two different photoresists, namely SU-8 2005 (negative) and AZ 5214e (positive), were compared. The resonant behavior of the pyrolytic resonators was characterized at room temperature and in high vacuum using a laser Doppler vibrometer. The experimental data was used to estimate the Young’s modulus of pyrolytic carbon and the tensile stress in the string resonators. The Young’s moduli were calculated to be 74 ± 8 GPa with SU-8 and 115 ± 8 GPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The tensile stress in the string resonators was 33 ± 7 MPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The string resonators displayed maximal quality factor values of up to 3000 for 525-µm-long structures. PMID:27428980

  16. Nanomechanical Pyrolytic Carbon Resonators: Novel Fabrication Method and Characterization of Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksymilian Kurek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanomechanical string resonators, which essentially are highly stressed bridges, are of particular interest for micro- and nanomechanical sensing because they exhibit resonant behavior with exceptionally high quality factors. Here, we fabricated and characterized nanomechanical pyrolytic carbon resonators (strings and cantilevers obtained through pyrolysis of photoresist precursors. The developed fabrication process consists of only three processing steps: photolithography, dry etching and pyrolysis. Two different fabrication strategies with two different photoresists, namely SU-8 2005 (negative and AZ 5214e (positive, were compared. The resonant behavior of the pyrolytic resonators was characterized at room temperature and in high vacuum using a laser Doppler vibrometer. The experimental data was used to estimate the Young’s modulus of pyrolytic carbon and the tensile stress in the string resonators. The Young’s moduli were calculated to be 74 ± 8 GPa with SU-8 and 115 ± 8 GPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The tensile stress in the string resonators was 33 ± 7 MPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The string resonators displayed maximal quality factor values of up to 3000 for 525-µm-long structures.

  17. Pyrolytic carbon microelectrodes for impedance based cell sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Yasmin Mohamed; Caviglia, Claudia; Hemanth, Suhith

    2016-01-01

    Electrically conductive glass-like carbon structures can be obtained from a polymer template through a pyrolysis process. These structures can be used as electrodes for bio sensing applications such as electrochemical evaluation of cell adhesion and proliferation. This study focuses on the optimi...... to decrease the resistivity of the resulting carbon material and improve the performance in cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Finally, EIS was used to monitor adhesion and proliferation of HeLa cells....

  18. Structure and mechanical properties of pyrolytic carbon produced by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Meadows, P.J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.Xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Pyrolytic carbon was deposited on spherical particles using a multi-spout fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition reactor to fabricate TRISO fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Modern techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation supported by porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to analyze the particle coatings directly. Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were given special attention due to their capacity to provide information on the internal structure of pyrolytic carbon and its mechanical properties without the necessity of complex sample preparation. The results obtained were used to study the relationship deposition conditions-microstructure-mechanical properties in more detail. Increasing the deposition temperature reduced the density and Young's modulus as porosity and in-plane disorder of carbon domains increased. There was also a change from a laminar microstructure of PyC to that containing more spherical particles. It appeared that anisotropy, domain size and level of graphitization (examined by Raman and TEM) had a strong influence on the mechanical properties. Clear differences were observed between acetylene and the acetylene/propylene mixture as precursor gases.

  19. Thermal conductivity mapping of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings on simulated fuel particles by time-domain thermoreflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Chiritescu, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Cahill, David G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Thermal conductivity of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings on spherical particles has been mapped using time-domain thermoreflectance. The thermal conductivities measured for pyrolytic carbon ranged between 3.4 and 13.5 W/m K. The effect of porosity, pore-size distribution, anisotropy, in-plane disorder and domain sizes is discussed. A thermal conductivity of 168 W/m K was obtained for SiC. Mapping of the thermal conductivity of coated fuel particles provides useful data for modeling fuel performance during the operation of nuclear reactors.

  20. Analysis of the anisotropy, stoichiometry and polytypes in pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E., E-mail: eddie.lopez@cinvestav.edu.mx [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zhang, H.; Shatwell, R.A. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor St., Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Guillermier, P. [AREVA Lyon, Rue Juliette Recamier, 69006 Lyon (France); Manara, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor St., Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have compared the values of anisotropy of pyrolytic carbon measured by Raman spectroscopy and 2MGEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of anisotropy depend on the sampling area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of diattenuation for SiC measured by 2MGEM were affected by the content of stacking faults. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman spectroscopy can be used as a semi-quantitative tool for the characterisation of excess carbon and silicon in SiC. - Abstract: Silicon carbide (SiC) and pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings in tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles were characterised by a combination of 2-modulator generalised ellipsometry microscopy (2-MGEM), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We compared the values of anisotropy obtained from 2-MGEM and Raman spectroscopy to investigate the effect of sampling area and microstructure. No linear correlation in anisotropy was found between these two techniques despite both sampling areas of 2-5 {mu}m. The largest deviations were observed for highly anisotropic samples with optical anisotropy factors (OPTAFs) above 1.1. For medium and low anisotropy samples (OPTAF < 1.1) the relationship is close to linear. The limited use of only the average value of diattenuation does not give an accurate representation of the characteristics of the coatings as significant areas can exist with considerably higher diattenuations that could increase the probability of failure under neutron irradiation. We also observe a change in the diattenuation of SiC due to the presence of stacking faults as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was also used to perform semiquantitative analysis of the Si and carbon excess in SiC in four TRISO particles.

  1. Structure-property relations for silicon nitride matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Olivier, C.; Veyret, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Si3N4 matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon (SiC) fibers, were studied using tensile testing and transmission electron microscopy. Three types of samples were evaluated all with a nominal coating thickness of 200 nm. The composites were densified by hot pressing at

  2. Structure-property relations for silicon nitride matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Olivier, C.; Veyret, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Si3N4 matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon (SiC) fibers, were studied using tensile testing and transmission electron microscopy. Three types of samples were evaluated all with a nominal coating thickness of 200 nm. The composites were densified by hot pressing at

  3. Pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt as a high-performance anode for bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Hidalgo, Diana; Tommasi, Tonia; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-07-01

    Scale up of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) requires highly conductive, biocompatible and stable electrodes. Here we present pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt (C-SS felt) as a high-performance and scalable anode. The electrode is created by generating a carbon layer on stainless steel felt (SS felt) via a multi-step deposition process involving α-d-glucose impregnation, caramelization, and pyrolysis. Physicochemical characterizations of the surface elucidate that a thin (20±5μm) and homogenous layer of polycrystalline graphitic carbon was obtained on SS felt surface after modification. The carbon coating significantly increases the biocompatibility, enabling robust electroactive biofilm formation. The C-SS felt electrodes reach current densities (jmax) of 3.65±0.14mA/cm(2) within 7days of operation, which is 11 times higher than plain SS felt electrodes (0.30±0.04mA/cm(2)). The excellent biocompatibility, high specific surface area, high conductivity, good mechanical strength, and low cost make C-SS felt a promising electrode for BESs.

  4. Cf/C composites: correlation between CVI process parameters and Pyrolytic Carbon microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Burgio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI technique has been long used to produce carbon/carbon composites. The Pyrolytic Carbon (Py-C matrix infiltrated by CVI could have different microstructures, i.e. Rough Laminar (RL, Smooth Laminar (SL or Isotropic (ISO. These matrix microstructures, characterized by different properties, influence the mechanical behaviour of the obtained composites. Tailoring the process parameters, it is possible to direct the infiltration towards a specific Py-C type. However, the factors, influencing the production of a specific matrix microstructure, are numerous and interconnected, e.g. temperature, pressure, flow rates etc. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical phenomena involved in CVI process, up to now it has not been possible to obtain a general correlation between CVI process parameters and Py–C microstructure. This study is aimed at investigating the relationship between infiltration temperature and the microstructure of obtained Py-C, for a pilot - sized CVI/CVD reactor. Fixing the other process parameters and varying only the temperature, from 1100°C to 1300°C, the Py-C infiltration was performed on fibrous preforms. Polarized light microscopy, with quantitative measurements of average extinction angle (Ae, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the obtained Py-C microstructures

  5. Cf/C composites: correlation between CVI process parameters and Pyrolytic Carbon microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Burgio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI technique has been long used to produce carbon/carbon composites. The Pyrolytic Carbon (Py-C matrix infiltrated by CVI could have different microstructures, i.e. Rough Laminar (RL, Smooth Laminar (SL or Isotropic (ISO. These matrix microstructures, characterized by different properties, influence the mechanical behaviour of the obtained composites. Tailoring the process parameters, it is possible to direct the infiltration towards a specific Py-C type. However, the factors, influencing the production of a specific matrix microstructure, are numerous and interconnected, e.g. temperature, pressure, flow rates etc. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical phenomena involved in CVI process, up to now it has not been possible to obtain a general correlation between CVI process parameters and Py–C microstructure. This study is aimed at investigating the relationship between infiltration temperature and the microstructure of obtained Py-C, for a pilot - sized CVI/CVD reactor. Fixing the other process parameters and varying only the temperature, from 1100°C to 1300°C, the Py-C infiltration was performed on fibrous preforms. Polarized light microscopy, with quantitative measurements of average extinction angle (Ae, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the obtained Py-C microstructures.

  6. Pyrolytic synthesis and characterization of N-doped carbon nanoflakes for electrochemical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savilov, S.V., E-mail: savilov@chem.msu.ru [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskie gory, 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry Of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky avenue, 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Arkhipova, E.A. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskie gory, 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry Of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky avenue, 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, A.S.; Maslakov, K.I [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskie gory, 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Shen, Z. [Nanyang Technological University, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Aldoshin, S.M.; Lunin, V.V. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskie gory, 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Carbon nanoflakes doped with nitrogen were produced by a pyrolytic technique. • Quarternary, pyrrolic and pyridinic types of nitrogen are confirmed by XPS. • Nitrogen content depends on precursor used and temperature processed. • Specific surface area values decrease with increasing of synthesis duration. • N-doped carbon nanoflakes may be suitable for electrochemical applications. - Abstract: Nitrogen doped carbon nanoflakes, which are very important for many electrochemical applications, were synthesized by pyrolysis of nitrogen containing organic compounds over metal oxide template. Acetonitrile, pyridine and butylamine, which are of different volatility were tested as N-containing precursors. Morphology, structure and chemical composition of the as-synthesized materials were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that materials are highly defective and consist of a few malformed graphene layers. X-ray photoelectron spectra reflect the dominant graphitic and pyridinic N-bonding configuration. It was also noted that specific surface area depends on the duration and temperature of the reaction. Increase in duration and temperature led to decrease of the specific surface area from 1000 to 160 m{sup 2}/g, 1170 to 210 m{sup 2}/g and 1180 to 480 m{sup 2}/g for acetonitrile, butylamine and pyridine precursors, respectively.

  7. Evaluating the Surface Topography of Pyrolytic Carbon Finger Prostheses through Measurement of Various Roughness Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Naylor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The articulating surfaces of four different sizes of unused pyrolytic carbon proximal interphalangeal prostheses (PIP were evaluated though measuring several topographical parameters using a white light interferometer: average roughness (Sa; root mean-square roughness (Sq; skewness (Ssk; and kurtosis (Sku. The radii of the articulating surfaces were measured using a coordinate measuring machine, and were found to be: 2.5, 3.3, 4.2 and 4.7 mm for proximal, and 4.0, 5.1, 5.6 and 6.3 mm for medial components. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between the component radii and each roughness parameter. Sa, Sq and Ssk correlated negatively with radius (p = 0.001, 0.001, 0.023, whilst Sku correlated positively with radius (p = 0.03. Ergo, the surfaces with the largest radii possessed the better topographical characteristics: low roughness, negative skewness, high kurtosis. Conversely, the surfaces with the smallest radii had poorer topographical characteristics.

  8. Evaluating the Surface Topography of Pyrolytic Carbon Finger Prostheses through Measurement of Various Roughness Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Andrew; Talwalkar, Sumedh C; Trail, Ian A; Joyce, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The articulating surfaces of four different sizes of unused pyrolytic carbon proximal interphalangeal prostheses (PIP) were evaluated though measuring several topographical parameters using a white light interferometer: average roughness (Sa); root mean-square roughness (Sq); skewness (Ssk); and kurtosis (Sku). The radii of the articulating surfaces were measured using a coordinate measuring machine, and were found to be: 2.5, 3.3, 4.2 and 4.7 mm for proximal, and 4.0, 5.1, 5.6 and 6.3 mm for medial components. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between the component radii and each roughness parameter. Sa, Sq and Ssk correlated negatively with radius (p = 0.001, 0.001, 0.023), whilst Sku correlated positively with radius (p = 0.03). Ergo, the surfaces with the largest radii possessed the better topographical characteristics: low roughness, negative skewness, high kurtosis. Conversely, the surfaces with the smallest radii had poorer topographical characteristics.

  9. Laser induced periodic surface structures on pyrolytic carbon prosthetic heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepak, Bogusz D.; Łecka, Katarzyna M.; Płonek, Tomasz; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) can appear in different forms such as ripples, grooves or cones. Those highly periodic wavy surface features which are frequently smaller than incident light wavelength bring possibility of nanostructuring of many different materials. Furthermore, by changing laser parameters one can obtain wide spectrum of periodicities and geometries. The aim of this research was to determine possibility of nanostructuring pyrolytic carbon (PyC) heart valve leaflets using different irradiation conditions. The study was performed using two laser sources with different pulse duration (15 ps, 450 fs) as well as different wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm). Both low and high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed for each set of irradiation parameters. In case femtosecond laser pulses we obtained deep subwavelength ripple period which was even ten times smaller than applied wavelength. Obtained ripple period was ranging from 90 up to 860 nm. Raman spectra revealed the increase of disorder after laser irradiation which was comparable for both pico- and femtosecond laser.

  10. Significance of the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products on the properties of activated carbons from phosphoric acid activation of lignocellulosic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Songlin; Yang, Jianxiao; Cai, Xuan [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037 (China); Liu, Junli [Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, CAF, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2009-07-15

    Two series of activated carbons derived from China fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) wood impregnated with phosphoric acid were prepared in a cylindrical container that was kept in a closed state covered with a lid (the covered case) or in an open state. The effects of the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products of starting materials on the properties of activated carbon were investigated in the process of phosphoric acid activation. Elemental analysis and SEM observation showed that both activating in the covered case and increasing the mass of starting material used favored the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products. An investigation of N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms revealed that the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products significantly enhanced mesopore development in the final carbons, especially pores with a size range from 2.5 to 30 nm, with little influence on micropores, and therefore produced a large increase in the adsorption capacity to Vitamin B12 (with a molecular size of 2.09 nm). Activated carbons with highly developed mesopores could be obtained in the covered case. The carbonization mechanism of volatiles was discussed and two different carbonization pathways (in solid and gas phases) were proposed during phosphoric acid activation. (author)

  11. High temperature stability of onion-like carbon vs highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Latini

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG was determined in the interval 765-1030 K by the electromotive force (emf measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High. The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of [Formula: see text] jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of [dP/dT by the α/κ ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K(-1 and HOPG (8 Pa K(-1 where α and κ are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, ΔrH and ΔrS values are 95.8 kJ mol(-1 and 104.1 JK(-1 mol(-1, respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature.

  12. High temperature stability of onion-like carbon vs highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765-1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of [Formula: see text] jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of [dP/dT by the α/κ ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K(-1)) and HOPG (8 Pa K(-1)) where α and κ are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, ΔrH and ΔrS values are 95.8 kJ mol(-1) and 104.1 JK(-1) mol(-1), respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature.

  13. Transformation, morphology, and dissolution of silicon and carbon in rice straw-derived biochars under different pyrolytic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; Chen, Baoliang; Zhu, Lizhong

    2014-03-18

    Biochars are increasingly recognized as environmentally friendly and cheap remediation agents for soil pollution. The roles of silicon in biochars and interactions between silicon and carbon have been neglected in the literature to date, while the transformation, morphology, and dissolution of silicon in Si-rich biochars remain largely unaddressed. In this study, Si-rich biochars derived from rice straw were prepared under 150-700 °C (named RS150-RS700). The transformation and morphology of carbon and silicon in biochar particles were monitored by FTIR, XRD, and SEM-EDX. With increasing pyrolytic temperature, silicon accumulated, and its speciation changed from amorphous to crystalline matter, while the organic matter evolved from aliphatic to aromatic. For rice straw biomass containing amorphous carbon and amorphous silicon, dehydration (silicon. At medium pyrolysis temperatures (250-350 °C), an intense cracking of carbon components occurred, and, thus, the silicon located in the inside tissue was exposed. At high pyrolysis temperatures (500-700 °C), the biochar became condensed due to the aromatization of carbon and crystallization of silicon. Correspondingly, the carbon release in water significantly decreased, while the silicon release somewhat decreased and then sharply increased with pyrolytic temperature. Along with SEM-EDX images of biochars before and after water washing, we proposed a structural relationship between carbon and silicon in biochars to explain the mutual protection between carbon and silicon under different pyrolysis temperatures, which contribute to the broader understanding of biochar chemistry and structure. The silicon dissolution kinetics suggests that high Si biochars could serve as a novel slow release source of biologically available Si in low Si agricultural soils.

  14. Study of nanometric thin pyrolytic carbon films for explosive electron emission cathode in high-voltage planar diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baryshevsky, Vladimir; Belous, Nikolai; Gurinovich, Alexandra; Gurnevich, Evgeny [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Kuzhir, Polina, E-mail: polina.kuzhir@gmail.com [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Prospekt, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Maksimenko, Sergey [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Prospekt, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Molchanov, Pavel; Shuba, Mikhail [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Roddatis, Vladimir [CIC energiGUNE, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Minano, Alava (Spain); Institut für Materialphysik of Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Kaplas, Tommi; Svirko, Yuri [Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, Joensuu FI-80101 (Finland)

    2015-04-30

    We report on an experimental study of explosive electron emission properties of cathode made by nanometric thin pyrolytic carbon (PyC) films (2–150 nm) deposited on Cu substrate via methane-based chemical vapor deposition. High current density at level of 300 A/cm{sup 2} in 5 · 10{sup −5} Pa vacuum has been observed together with very stable explosive emission from the planar cathode. The Raman spectroscopy investigation proves that the PyC films remain the same after seven shots. According to the optical image analysis of the cathode before and after one and seven shots, we conclude that the most unusual and interesting feature of using the PyC films/Cu cathode for explosive emission is that the PyC layer on the top of the copper target prevents its evaporation and oxidation, which leads to higher emission stability compared to conventional graphitic/Cu cathodes, and therefore results in longer working life. - Highlights: • Explosive electron emission from pyrolytic carbon (PyC) cathode is reported. • We observe high current density, 300 A/cm{sup 2}, and stable emission parameters. • PyC integrity ensures a high application potential for high current electronics.

  15. Fabrication and Electromagnetic Wave-Absorbing Property of Si3N4 Ceramics with Gradient Pyrolytic Carbon Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Gao, Mingjun

    2016-07-01

    A Si3N4 ceramic with gradient distribution of pyrolytic carbon (Gradient-PyC-Si3N4) was fabricated by a combined technique of precursor infiltration pyrolysis and directional oxidation. An electromagnetic wave could enter Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 with little reflection because of a weak impedance mismatch at its surface, and the electromagnetic wave entering Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 could propagate forward along the PyC changing belt and simultaneously be absorbed by PyC with little reflection. The electromagnetic reflectivity of the Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 with an absence of PyC could reach a low level of -12.1 dB, which means that about 94% of the incident energy is absorbed and so makes the Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 a promising electromagnetic absorbing material for covert action.

  16. Influence of pyrolytic carbon black and pyrolytic oil made from used tires on the curing and (dynamic mechanical properties of natural rubber (NR/styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Karabork

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolytic carbon black (CBp and pyrolytic oil (Op made from used tires were used in natural rubber (NR/styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR blends. The effects of CBp and Op on the processing properties, the mechanical properties and the dynamic mechanical properties of the NR/SBR blends were investigated and compared with a control sample that was prepared with N550 and commercial process oil. It was found that the effect of CBp on the processing properties of the NR/SBR blends was similar to that of N550. With the increase of the CBp content, the curing properties of the NR/SBR blends changed little. The reinforcing effect of CBp was inferior to that of N550. With the increase of the CBp content, the tensile strength, tear strength and modulus at 100% elongation of the NR/SBR vulcanizates decreased significantly. Dynamic mechanical properties of the NR/SBR blends were also affected and all samples comprising CBp have a higher tan δ than control sample. It is suggested that the low surface area and high ash content of CBp strongly effects all of these property changes of the NR/SBR blends. The morphology and distribution of the carbon black particles are studied using a scanning electron microscope. It was also found that with the increase of the Op content, the properties of the NR/SBR blends were strongly affected due to the high sulfur content of Op, which produced a high crosslinking density.

  17. Biological and functional evaluation of a novel pyrolytic carbon implant for the treatment of focal osteochondral defects in the medial femoral condyle: assessment in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Samantha L; Patron, Laura P; Lien, Joan C; Cook, Stephen D; Jones, Deryk G

    2016-12-01

    Osteochondral defects continue to be a clinical treatment challenge, and when left untreated, may cause pain and functional impairment. Pyrolytic carbon is a unique isotropic biomaterial used in heart valve and small joint replacements due to its excellent wear properties and biocompatibility with bone and articular cartilage. Therefore, a proposed solution is to utilize a focal pyrolytic carbon hemiarthroplasty implant as an alternative resurfacing treatment strategy for isolated cartilage lesions. A canine model (n = 9) was used to evaluate the in vivo histologic response and function of a pyrolytic carbon implant replacing a full-thickness osteochondral defect in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) of the knee. The gross appearance and histologic results were compared to an identical cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy implant placed in a defect in the contralateral MFC and evaluated up to 52 weeks. Extensive bone incorporation to the stem portion was observed for both implant types. The total mean histologic score for the cartilage of the MFC surrounding the pyrolytic carbon implants was significantly improved compared to that of the Co-Cr alloy implants at all evaluation periods (p implants were similar to those of Co-Cr alloy implants at 24 weeks. At 24 weeks, the mean total histologic score for Co-Cr alloy implants was 11.6 ± 0.7 (0-16 range point; 16 = normal appearance), while at 52 weeks, the mean total score for the pyrolytic carbon implants was 11.7 ± 1.3. Mean total histologic score of opposing medial tibia cartilage for the pyrolytic carbon implants was superior to that of the Co-Cr alloy group at all evaluation periods and significantly improved over the Co-Cr alloy implant group at 24 weeks (p = 0.001) and 52 weeks (p implant for reconstruction of a focal cartilage defect demonstrated effective implant fixation and superior in vivo response compared to an identical Co-Cr alloy implant.

  18. Tritium permeation behavior through pyrolytic carbon in tritium production using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor for fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ushida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Under tritium production method using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor loaded Li compound, Li compound has to be coated by ceramic materials in order to suppress the spreading of tritium to the whole reactor. Pyrolytic carbon (PyC is a candidate of the coating material because of its high resistance for gas permeation. In this study, hydrogen permeation experiments using a PyC-coated isotropic graphite tube were conducted and hydrogen diffusivity, solubility and permeability were evaluated. Tritium permeation behavior through PyC-coated Li compound particles was simulated by using obtained data. Hydrogen permeation flux through PyC in a steady state is proportional to the hydrogen pressure and is larger than that through Al2O3 which is also candidate coating material. However, total tritium leak within the supposed reactor operation period through the PyC-coated Li compound particles is lower than that through the Al2O3-coated ones because the hydrogen absorption capacity in PyC is considerably larger than that in Al2O3.

  19. The effect of pyrolytic carbon black prepared from junked tires on the properties of ethylene-propylene-diene copolymers (EPDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolytic carbon black (PCB made from used tires was used in ethylene-propylene-diene copolymers (EPDM. The microstructure of PCB was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. PCB was compounded with EPDM to prepare EPDM vulcanizates. The effects of PCB on the processing properties of EPDM compounds and the mechanical properties of vulcanizates were investigated and compared with other traditional fillers such as semi-reinforcing furnace black (N774, light calcium carbonate (CaCO3 and thermal black (N990. At the same time, the rheological behavior of EPDM compounds filled with different fillers was characterized by capillary rheometrics. The SEM photos showed that the particle shape was quiet different from that of CaCO3 and N990, it was similar to that of N774. The primary particle size was smaller than that of N774, but the aggregate size of PCB was larger than that of N774. The effect of PCB on the processing properties of EPDM compounds was similar to that of other fillers. Among the four fillers, PCB imparted EPDM compounds with higher Mooney viscosity. With the increase of filler content, the scorch time and optimum curing time of EPDM compounds changed little. The reinforcing effect of PCB was similar to that of N990, but inferior to that of N774. With the increase of PCB content, tensile strength, tear strength, and modulus at 100% elongation of EPDM vulcanizates increased significantly. When EPDM was filled with 50 phr PCB, the tear strength of EPDM vulcanizates increased by 3 times, compared with that of EPDM gum vulcanizates. The appearance of EPDM extrudate filled with PCB was coarser than that of other fillers.

  20. Properties of pyrolytic chars and activated carbons derived from pilot-scale pyrolysis of used tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S Q; Yao, Q; Wen, S E; Chi, Y; Yan, J H

    2005-09-01

    Used tires were pyrolyzed in a pilot-scale quasi-inert rotary kiln. Influences of variables, such as time, temperature, and agent flow, on the activation of obtained char were subsequently investigated in a laboratory-scale fixed bed. Mesoporous pores are found to be dominant in the pore structures of raw char. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surfaces of activated chars increased linearly with carbon burnoff. The carbon burnoff of tire char achieved by carbon dioxide (CO2) under otherwise identical conditions was on average 75% of that achieved by steam, but their BET surfaces are almost the same. The proper activation greatly improved the aqueous adsorption of raw char, especially for small molecular adsorbates, for example, phenol from 6 to 51 mg/g. With increasing burnoff, phenol adsorption exhibited a first-stage linear increase followed by a rapid drop after 30% burnoff. Similarly, iodine adsorption first increased linearly, but it held as the burnoff exceeded 40%, which implied that the reduction of iodine adsorption due to decreasing micropores was partially made up by increasing mesopores. Both raw chars and activated chars showed appreciable adsorption capacity of methylene-blue comparable with that of commercial carbons. Thus, tire-derived activated carbons can be used as an excellent mesoporous adsorbent for larger molecular species.

  1. The influence of the atomic structure of basal planes on interplanar distance in pyrolytic carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgardt, N. I.; Prihodko, A. S.; Seibt, M.

    2016-12-01

    The atomic structure of carbon materials is studied using the example of pyrocarbon and boronrich pyrocarbon by means of the method of reconstruction of the wave function in transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that the digital processing of the phase distributions of these functions allows us to find the average distance between the basal planes. Using the method of molecular dynamics for the formation of the test structures and obtaining for them the calculated phase distributions, the effect of depletion of the basal planes of the carbon atoms on the interplanar distance in the pyrocarbon materials is quantified.

  2. Nitrite electrochemical sensor based on prussian blue/single-walled carbon nanotubes modified pyrolytic graphite electrode

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available that single-walled carbon nanotubes-Prussian blue hybrid (SWCNT-PB) modified electrode demonstrated greater sensitivity and catalysis towards nitrite compared to PB or a SWCNT modified electrode. The current response of the electrode was reduced...

  3. Pyrolytic deposition of nanostructured titanium carbide coatings on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremlev, K. V.; Ob"edkov, A. M.; Ketkov, S. Yu.; Kaverin, B. S.; Semenov, N. M.; Gusev, S. A.; Tatarskii, D. A.; Yunin, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured titanium carbide coatings have been deposited on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the MOCVD method with bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium dichloride precursor. The obtained TiC/MWCNT hybrid materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is established that a TiC coating deposits onto the MWCNT surface with the formation of a core-shell (MWSNT-TiC) type structure.

  4. Electrocatalytic activity of 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone/multi-walled carbon nanotubes immobilized on edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode for NADH oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassia Silva Luz, Rita de [Institute of Chemistry, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: rcsluz@iqm.unicamp.br; Damos, Flavio Santos [Institute of Chemistry, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Tanaka, Auro Atsushi [Center of Science and Technology, UFMA, Avenida dos Portugueses s/n, 65085-040, Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Gushikem, Yoshitaka [Institute of Chemistry, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-05-30

    This work reports the electrocatalytic activity of 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TCBQ)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) immobilized on an edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) were used to confirms the presence of chloro after the nanotube modification with 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone. The surface charge transfer constant, k{sub s}, and the charge transfer coefficient for the modified electrode, {alpha}, were estimated as 98.5 ({+-}0.6) s{sup -1} and 0.5, respectively. With this modified electrode the oxidation potential of the NADH was shifted about 300 mV toward a less positive value, presenting a peak current much higher than those measured on an unmodified edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPPG). Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode (RDE) experiments indicated that the NADH oxidation reaction involves 2 electrons and a heterogenous rate constant (k{sub obs}) of 3.1 x 10{sup 5} mol{sup -1} l s{sup -1}. The detection limit, repeatability, long-term stability, time of response and linear response range were also investigated.

  5. PYROLYTIC CARBIDE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    and injector design changes were made to improve the quality of the carbide produced. Niobium carbide and tantalum carbide coated nozzles are described...Additional data for pyrolytic niobium carbide and hafnium carbide is also presented. (Author)

  6. Co-pyrolysis behaviour and kinetic of two typical solid wastes in China and characterisation of activated carbon prepared from pyrolytic char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuhui; Niu, Ruxuan; Wang, Xiaona; Wang, Qunhui; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Sun, Xiaohong

    2014-11-01

    This is the first study on the co-pyrolysis of spent substrate of Pleurotus ostreatus and coal tar pitch, and the activated carbon prepared from the pyrolytic char. Thermogravimetry (TG) analysis was carried out taking spent substrate, coal tar pitch and spent substrate-coal tar pitch mixture. The activation energies of pyrolysis reactions were obtained via the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose methods. The kinetic models were determined by the master-plots method. The activated carbons were characterised by N2-adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Experimental results demonstrated a synergistic effect happened during co-pyrolysis, which was characterised by a decreased maximum decomposition rate and an enhanced char yield. The average activation energies of the pyrolysis reactions of spent substrate, coal tar pitch and the mixture were 115.94, 72.92 and 94.38 kJ mol(-1) for the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa method, and 112.17, 65.62 and 89.91 kJ mol(-1) for the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose method. The reaction model functions were f(α) = (1-α)(3.42), (1-α)(1.72) and (1-α)(3.07) for spent substrate, coal tar pitch and the mixture, respectively. The mixture char-derived activated carbon had a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area up to 1337 m(2) g(-1) and a total pore volume of 0.680 cm(3) g(-1). Mixing spent substrate with coal tar pitch led to the creation of more micropores and a higher surface area compared with the single spent substrate and coal tar pitch char. Also, the mixture char-derived activated carbon had a higher proportion of aromatic stacking. This study provides a reference for the utilisation of spent substrate and coal tar pitch via co-pyrolysis, and their pyrolytic char as a promising precursor of activated carbon.

  7. 废轮胎热解炭黑的表面修饰及其在平版印刷油墨中的应用%Surface Modification of Pyrolytic Carbon Black from Waste Tires and Its Use as Pigment for Offset Printing Ink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周洁; 王靖岱; 任晓红; 阳永荣; 蒋斌波

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis has the potential of transforming waste into valuable products. Pyrolytic carbon black (PCB) is one of the most important products resulting from the pyrolysis of used tires. One of the most significant applications of modified pyrolytic carbon black is its use as pigment for offset printing ink to obtain high added values.Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) results show that a large quantity of inorganic matters and carbonaceous deposit are removed by treating the pyrolytic carbon black with nitric acid solution. Plenty of active sites originally occupied by inorganic ash and coke are recovered. The surface energy of pyrolytic carbon black (TWPC) modified by titanate-coupling agent-especially the specific interaction γsPs determined by the specific probe molecule, toluene-shows the strong interaction between the TWPC and the synthetic resins. The offset printing ink performance confirms the IGC prediction. And TWPC has the great potential of applications in printing ink industry as pigment.

  8. Single-Walled-Carbon-Nanotube-Modified Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode Used as a Simple Sensor for the Determination of Salbutamol in Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra N. Goyal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A fast and sensitive voltammetric method has been proposed for the determination of salbutamol at single-walled-carbon-nanotube-modified edge-plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (SWNT/EPPGE in human urine. The electrochemical response of salbutamol was determined by square wave voltammetry (SWV in phosphate buffer solution (PBS at physiological pH 7.2. The modified electrode showed improved voltammetric response towards the oxidation of salbutamol, and a well-defined anodic peak was observed at ~600 mV with enhanced peak current in comparison to the bare electrode. Linear calibration plot using SWNT/EPPGE was obtained in the concentration range of 50 to 2500 ngml-1 with sensitivity and detection limit of 2.15 nA/ngml-1 and 4.31 ngml-1, respectively. The developed method has been successfully applied for the determination of salbutamol in commercial preparations and human body fluids. Fast analysis of salbutamol in human urine makes the proposed method of great interest for doping control purposes at the site of competitive games.

  9. Finite Element Analysis of Fracture Toughness of Pyrolytic Carbon in Prosthetic Heart Valve%人工心瓣热解炭断裂韧性有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建辉; 邢兴

    2012-01-01

    This article used ANSYS to conduct simulation analysis of compact tension and 3 points bending test for the isotropic pyrolytic carbon and pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite composite material used in heart valve prosthesis, calculated the plane strain fracture toughness KIC and compared the calculated results with the results of related experiments, then analyzed the effectiveness of the method that used ANSYS to calculate KIC as well as the influence of the thickness ratio of the coating and substrate and crack tip radius for the KIC of pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite composite material. Results showed that the KIC of the pure pyrolytic carbon and graphite material were respectively 1. 176 MPa √m and 1. 415 MPa √m, which were close to the results of related experiments, verifying the accuracy of using ANSYS to calculate KIC ; the KIC of composite material of pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite reduced with the increase of thickness ratio for the coating and substrate. The fracture toughness of composite material was better than that of pure pyrolytic carbon or graphite composite material when the thickness ratio of coating and substrate was on the low side; pyrolitic carbon-coated graphite had a limit notch root radius p0, which was about 5 μm, when the notch root radius p >p0, the measured value of KIC was proportional to p1/2 , and when p < po, the measured value of KIC was in line with the value of samples with sharp crack.%利用有限元分析软件ANSYS,对人工心瓣各向同性热解炭和热解炭包覆石墨复合材料进行紧凑拉伸以及三点弯曲实验仿真分析,计算材料的平面应变断裂韧性KIC,并将计算结果与相关实验结果进行对比,分析利用ANSYS计算KIC方法的有效性,以及涂层与基体厚度比、裂纹尖端半径对热解炭包覆石墨复合材料KIC值的影响.结果表明,纯热解炭和石墨材料的ANSYS计算KIC值分别为1.176 MPa√m以及1.415 MPa√m,与相关实验结果接近,验证

  10. Carbon nanotube embedded poly 1,5-diaminonapthalene modified pyrolytic graphite sensor for the determination of sulfacetamide in pharmaceutical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Saurabh K; Choubey, Pravir K; Agrawal, Bharati; Goyal, Rajendra N

    2014-01-01

    An electrochemically conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) embedded poly 1,5-diaminonapthalene (DAN) modified sensor has been developed for the determination of sulfacetamide (SFA). The surface morphology of the modified sensor has been characterized by FE-SEM, which revealed good dispersion of the carbon nanotube in polymer matrix. SFA was quantified using square wave voltammetry in phosphate buffer of pH 7.2, which acted as supporting electrolyte during analysis. The modified sensor exhibited an effective catalytic response towards the oxidation of SFA with excellent reproducibility and stability. The peak current of SFA was found to be linear in the concentration range of 0.005-1.5 mM and detection limit and sensitivity of 0.11 μM (S/N=3) and 23.977 µA mM(-1), respectively were observed. The analytical utility of method was checked by determining the SFA in various pharmacological dosage forms. The results obtained from the voltammetry were validated by comparing the results with those obtained from HPLC. The proposed method is sensitive, simple, rapid and reliable and is useful for the routine analysis of SFA in pharmaceutical laboratories.

  11. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  12. 预制体结构和热解碳组织对二维碳/碳复合材料热物理性能影响%Effects of Preform and Pyrolytic Carbon Structure on Thermophysical Properties of 2D Carbon/Carbon Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗瑞盈; 程永宏

    2004-01-01

    Four kinds of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites, including the needled carbon fiber felt/the pyrolytic carbon (two different pyrolytic carbon microstructures), the chopped carbon fiber/the resin + pyrolytic carbon (PyrC), and the carbon cloth/PyrC, named as the composites 1#, 4#, 2#, and 3#, are prepared respectively. Effects of the preform and pyrolytic carbon structure on the thermophysical properties of 2D C/C composites are studied. The C/C composites possess low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). In a range of some temperatures, the negative expansion emerges in x-y direction for four C/C composites. From 0 to 900℃, the CTE is small and almost linear with the temperatures. The C/C composites have high thermal conductivities (TCs). As a function of temperature, TCs of the C/C composites are varied with the structures of preform and pyrc as well as the direction of heat transfer. In x-y and z direction, TCs differ greatly and that in x-y direction (25.6-174 W/m·K) is several times larger than that in z direction(3.5-50 W/m·K).%制备了针刺毡、短纤维树脂模压、碳布叠层3种预制体,其碳纤维体积含量均为40%.采用化学气相沉积工艺制备了4种C/C复合材料: 针刺毡+粗糙体热解碳(具有两种定向热解碳组织)、短纤维+树脂和热解碳、碳布+光滑体热解碳复合材料,对其进行2500℃保温2h的高温热处理.在0~900℃,研究了预制体结构和热解碳组织对二维C/C复合材料的热膨胀系数、比热容、热扩散率、导热系数等热物理性能影响.研究发现:预制体和热解碳结构对C/C复合材料热物理性能有强烈影响.0~900℃,4种材料的热膨胀系数都非常小,与温度近似的成线性关系,且几乎具有相同的斜率,在一定条件下,其值呈现负热膨胀性质;0~900℃,4种材料都有高的导热系数,但作为温度的函数,其值随预制体结构、热解碳组织和传热方向而变化, x-y向的导热系数(25.6~174W

  13. Adsorption Characteristics of Activated Carbon Derived from Pyrolytic Tire Char for Malachite Green%废轮胎活性炭对孔雀石绿的吸附性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 张强年; 刘双喜; 朱坦

    2012-01-01

    Activated carbon produced from pyrolytic tire char in an industrial scale was investigated its potential ability to adsorb Malachite Green (MG) by a batch method.The effect of operation parameters,such as contact time,pH,adsorbent dosage,initial concentration,temperature,ionic strength and metal ion on the adsorption were investigated to provide more information about the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC).It has shown that APTC is a potential adsorbent for MG removal.The results show that higher initial MG solution,higher initial solution pH (pH>7.0) and higher temperature are fit for the adsorption,while higher ionic strength and the presence of metal ions are unfavorable for the adsorption process.%以工业规模的废轮胎热解炭黑为原料,经过水蒸汽活化制备废轮胎活性炭,采用间歇实验法考察了废轮胎活性炭对三苯甲烷类染料孔雀石绿的吸附性能.系统考察了操作因素如接触时间、溶液pH、吸附剂用量、孔雀石绿初始浓度、离子强度、重金属离子以及温度等对吸附过程以及吸附性能的影响.结果表明,废轮胎活性炭是孔雀石绿的有效吸附剂,其吸附容量高于文献报道的相关吸附剂.吸附过程在240 min内达到平衡,与相关吸附剂的平衡时间一致;孔雀石绿初始浓度高、较高的初始溶液pH值以及升高吸附温度有利于废轮胎活性炭对孔雀石绿的吸附;而较高的溶液离子强度以及重金属离子的存在不利于孔雀石绿的吸附.

  14. 工程轮胎裂解炭黑的表征与应用%Characterization and Application of Pyrolytic Carbon Black made from Waste Truck Tires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔慧君; 杜爱华

    2015-01-01

    研究了工程轮胎裂解炭黑(CBp)的基本性质、微观结构及表面性质,考察了2种不同形态的 CBp 对丁苯橡胶混炼胶门尼粘度、硫化特性以及物理机械性能的影响,并与传统炭黑 N330和硅灰石粉(HQ)进行了比较。结果表明,粉料和粒料的 CBp 化学组成主要有 C、O、S、Si、Zn 和 Ca 等元素。与炭黑 N330相比,两种CBp 的吸碘值、DBP 吸油值和加热减量均较低,而灰分含量高很多。SEM 显示,2种 CBp 的粒子聚集体尺寸基本相同,比炭黑 N330大,粒料 CBp 的排列较紧密。红外光谱分析表明,CBp 与炭黑 N330的表面基团基本相同。分别填充粉料 CBp 和粒料 CBp 的 SBR 混炼胶门尼粘度明显增大,且后者大于前者。含 CBp 的混炼胶t 1 0和 t 90均缩短,且后者小于前者,两者均小于炭黑 N330和硅灰石填充的混炼胶。随着 2种 CBp 用量的增大,SBR 硫化胶的耐磨性、拉伸强度、撕裂强度和300%定伸应力均明显提高;粒料 CBp 填充的硫化胶性能优于粉料 CBp 硫化胶,两者性能均介于炭黑 N330和硅灰石填充的硫化胶之间。%The fundamental quality,micro-structure and surface groups of pyrolysis carbon black (CBp)made from waste truck tires were studied,and the effects of 2 kinds of CBp having different forms on Mooney viscosity,curing characteristics and mechanical properties of styrene-butadiene rub-ber were investigated,and they were compared with other fillers(carbon black N330 and HQ).The results showed that the chemical compositions of 2 kinds of CBp were C,O,S,Si,Zn and Ca.The i-odine adsorption value,DBP adsorption value,and heating loss of 2 kinds of CBp were lower than those of carbon black N330,and the ash content was higher than the later.SEM showed the aggre-gate size of 2 kinds of CBp particle were the same,but both larger than that of carbon black N330,and the arrangement of granules CBp was close together.FTIR showed that both CBp and carbon black N330 had

  15. Preparation of the alkaline lignin pyrolytic based carbon quantum dots/TiO 2 composite photocatalyst%碱木质素基碳量子点/TiO2复合光催化剂的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 佟国宾; 王梦茹; 田甜; 曾阳; 王思纯

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduced the method of preparing carbon quantum dots ( CQDs) by alkaline lignin pyrolyt⁃ic carbon. The carbon quantum dots were prepared by acid reflux method. Carbon quantum dots/TiO2 composite photo⁃catalyst were prepared by using blending method which combined carbon quantum dots and TiO2 together. Phenol was used as pollutant model for the visible light catalytic activity. Hydrosoluble carbon quantum dots were prepared by using acid reflux method from lignin pyrolytic carbon. SEM, TEM, FT-IR and fluorescence spectrophotometer were used to characterize the particle size distribution, structure and fluorescence properties. The results showed that the carbon quan⁃tum dots were uniform spheres in size with a diameter of 1�5-2�5 nm. FT-IR analysis showed that the surface of carbon quantum dots contained—OH functional groups. Emission spectra around 400-600 nm with a peak at 442 nm were ob⁃served upon excitation at 355 nm. A peak centered at 355 nm in the excitation spectrum was present with an emission wavelength of 442 nm. Photoluminescence spectra also showed that the maximum emission and intensity had a direct re⁃lationship with the excitation wavelength. The fluorescence spectrum analysis showed that when the excitation wavelength was changed, the emission wavelength was red⁃shifted, and the product had a good response in the visible region. With the increase of pH at specific excitation wavelength, the peak of the carbon quantum dots showed a decreasing trend. When pH>7, the spectrum of the spectrum was blue⁃shifted. The CQDs/TiO2 system was found to be an effective photo⁃catalyst, and the CQDs on the surface of TiO2 acted as a photosensitizer. They had the wide spectral response range of TiO2 in the UV region, in addition to spectral response in the visible⁃light region. CQDs/TiO2 composite photocatalyst showed excellent catalytic activity with the phenol degradation percentage of 91%.%以碱木质素热解炭为

  16. Adsorption of Pb(II by Activated Pyrolytic Char from Used Tire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Ping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a renewable resource, the pyrolytic char derived from used tire has promising adsorption capacities owing to its similar structure and properties with active carbon. The purification and activation of the pyrolytic char from used tire, as well as the application of this material in the adsorption of Pb(II in water is conducted. The influences on the adsorption capacity by temperature and pH value are investigated and discussed; the adsorption thermodynamics and kinetics are also studied. The results show that the pyrolytic char from used tire has remarkable adsorption capacity for Pb(II, and the adsorption is an endothermic process complying with the Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption kinetics is a pseudo second-order reaction.

  17. Microstructure of a pyrolytic carbon coating on a nuclear graphite substrate IG-110%沉积在核石墨IG-110基体上的热解炭涂层微观结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯尚蕾; 杨迎国; 白朔; 许力; 杨新梅; 夏汇浩; 周兴泰

    2015-01-01

    采用化学气相沉积技术,以甲烷作为碳源,在核石墨IG-110基体上制备层状热解炭涂层。利用偏光显微镜、扫描电子显微镜( SEM)、透射电子显微镜( TEM)以及同步辐射掠入射X 射线衍射( GI-XRD)研究热解炭涂层的微观结构和生长特性。结果表明,热解炭涂层具有大锥体、小锥体和再生锥体三种生长锥微观结构,热解炭片层间结合紧密,生长锥间结合密实。热解炭涂层存在光滑层和再生层两种织构,每种织构都含有两种晶面间距不同的相结构,平滑层主要含有低石墨化度相,而再生层主要含有高石墨化度相。热解炭涂层致密的微观结构和仅存在的纳米级别的微孔使其可以作为气体阻隔涂层。%The molten salt reactor ( MSR) is one of the six Generation IV reactors that is being reexamined today, owing to its unique fuel cycle capabilities and safety characteristics. IG-110 nuclear graphite a candidate material for constructing a MSR. However, the existence of large pores at its surface is a big problem due to the impregnation of molten salts and the diffusion of fission product gases into the graphite through the pores. A pyrolytic carbon ( PyC) coating can act as a barrier coating on the nuclear graphite. Investigation of the microstructure and growth characteristics of PyC is very important for an understanding of the relationship between microstructure and performance. In this study, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction were used to study the microstructure and growth characteristics of the PyC coating. Results show that the PyC coating shows three growth cones ( a large cone, a smaller one and a regenerative cone) and exhibits a wave-like layered structure. The resulting structure is fairly dense. There are two kinds of textures in the PyC coating:smooth laminar and regenerative

  18. Pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb

    phosphoric acids) and organic acids (formic and acetic acids) followed by analytical pyrolysis on a micropyrolyzer/GC/MS/FID system. It was found that sulfuric and phosphoric acids are very effective in passivating the AAEM thereby increasing the yield of anhydrosugars. An excellent correlation was discovered between the amount of acid required to obtain the maximum yield of anhydrosugars and the amount of AAEM contained in the biomass feedstock. In the micro-scale studies, up to 56% of the cellulose contained in the biomass was converted into anhydrosugars which is close to the 57% conversion obtained from pure cellulose pyrolysis. It is known that LG polymerization and subsequent charring occur at temperatures above 275°C depending on the vapor pressure of LG in the gas stream. A study of pyrolysis of acid-infused biomass feedstocks at various temperatures revealed that LG recovery is best at lower temperatures than the conventional pyrolysis temperature range of 450-500°C. Pyrolysis of acid-infused biomass failed in a continuous fluidized bed reactor due to clogging of the bed. The feedstock formed vitreous material along with the fluidizing sand that was formed from poor pyrolysis of lignin. However, more investigation of this phenomenon is a subject for future work. Pyrolysis experiments on an auger type reactor were successful in producing bio-oils with unprecedented amounts of sugars. Though there was increase in charring when compared to the control feedstock, pyrolysis of red oak infused with 0.4 wt% of sulfuric acid produced bio-oil with 18wt% of sugars. One of the four fractions of bio-oil collected contained most of the sugars, which shows significant potential for separating the sugars from bio-oil using simple means. This work points towards a new pathway for making advanced biofuels viz. upgrading pyrolytic sugars from biomass that could compete with enzymatic sugars from biomass.

  19. Production of clean pyrolytic sugars for fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rover, Marjorie R; Johnston, Patrick A; Jin, Tao; Smith, Ryan G; Brown, Robert C; Jarboe, Laura

    2014-06-01

    This study explores the separate recovery of sugars and phenolic oligomers produced during fast pyrolysis with the effective removal of contaminants from the separated pyrolytic sugars to produce a substrate suitable for fermentation without hydrolysis. The first two stages from a unique recovery system capture "heavy ends", mostly water-soluble sugars and water-insoluble phenolic oligomers. The differences in water solubility can be exploited to recover a sugar-rich aqueous phase and a phenolic-rich raffinate. Over 93 wt % of the sugars is removed in two water washes. These sugars contain contaminants such as low-molecular-weight acids, furans, and phenols that could inhibit successful fermentation. Detoxification methods were used to remove these contaminants from pyrolytic sugars. The optimal candidate is NaOH overliming, which results in maximum growth measurements with the use of ethanol-producing Escherichia coli.

  20. Pyrolysis of de-oiled seed cake of Jatropha Curcas and catalytic steam reforming of pyrolytic bio-oil to hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renny, Andrew; Santhosh, Viswanathan; Somkuwar, Nitin; Gokak, D T; Sharma, Pankaj; Bhargava, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the pyrolysis of de-oiled seed cake of Jatropha Curcas and catalytic steam reforming of pyrolytic bio-oil to hydrogen. As per literature, presence of heavy nitrogenous and oxygenated compounds leads to catalyst deactivation. Here, an attempt has been made to tune pyrolytic reactions to optimize the N and O content of the pyrolytic bio-oil. Bio-oil conversion and hydrogen yield decreased as reaction progressed, which attributes to temporary loss of catalytic activity by blockage of catalyst pores by carbon deposition. Further, retention of steam reforming activity after repetitive steam activation suggests long-term catalyst usage.

  1. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  2. Characterization of the pyrolytic solid derived from used disposable diapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Taek-Keun; Shinogi, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper confirms through physical and chemical analyses the possibility to reuse the solid pyrolytic residue derived from used disposable diapers (UDD), heated at different temperatures ranging from 500, 700 and 900 degrees C as a soil amendment. With an increasing pyrolytic temperature, the pH, electrical conductivity, available P2O5, exchangeable K+ and cation exchange capacity tended to increase; however, total-N and exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ decreased. The pyrolytic diaper solid produced at 500 degrees C had a high volatile matter (60.22%) and low ash content (19.10%), which can negatively affect crop growth and productivity when added to soil. Heavy metal concentrations were less than the maximum allowable limits according to Japan standards. The surface of the pyrolytic diaper solid was coarse, porous and heterogeneous with higher temperatures. Hydrogen-containing functional groups, such as OH, C-H, N-H and CH2, decreased with increasing pyrolytic temperature. Based on these results, we concluded that the pyrolytic product derived from UDD at higher temperatures offers a potentially effective soil amendment option.

  3. Laser sputtering of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite at 248 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnovich, Douglas J.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of excimer laser pulses with a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) target has been studied. HOPG, a close approximation to single crystal graphite, was irradiated along a freshly cleaved basal plane in vacuum by pulses from a KrF excimer laser. The energy fluence was varied between 300-700 mJ/cm2, resulting in material removal rates of plasma effects are minimized. Time-of-flight distributions of the neutral carbon atoms and small carbon clusters were measured and inverted to obtain translational energy flux distributions and relative sputtering yields as a function of fluence. The translational energy distributions are remarkably close to Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions over most of the fluence range studied. However, the mean translational energies are far too high to reconcile with a simple thermal vaporization model. For example, the mean translational energy of C3, the most abundant species, increases from 1.1 eV at 305 mJ/cm2 to 31.7 eV at 715 mJ/cm2. Explanations are considered for this curious mix of thermal and non-thermal behavior. At the high end of our fluence range, the mean translational energies of C1, C2, C3 converge to a 1:2:3 ratio, indicating that the velocity distributions are almost identical. This particular result can be interpreted as a gas dynamic effect. Prolonged sputtering of the same target spot results in a falloff in the sputtering yield and the mean translational energies, but little change in the cluster size distribution. These effects are related to impurity induced topography formation on the target surface.

  4. Pyrolytic catalysis on activated carbon als technological option for teh production of diesel and gasoline production from biogenic waste fats; Pyrolytische Katalyse an Aktivkohlen als Verfahrensoption zur Herstellung von Diesel- und Benzinkomponenten aus biogenen Altfetten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danzig, J.; Fastabend, A.; Heil, V.; Meller, K.; Menne, A.; Unger, C.; Rossow, S.; Wozniak, K.

    2007-10-15

    This study deals with the conversion of biogenous waste fats into gasoline- and diesel-like hydrocarbon mixtures. The waste fats are converted by a thermo-chemical process at 400 C to 500 C over activated carbon. Lab-scale investigations covered the influences of the type and residence time of the activated carbon, the reaction temperature and the fat/activated carbon-ratio. The aim was to gain high amounts of liquid product with a high amount of either gasoline- or diesel-fraction components. The experiments show that all of the investigated parameters have an important impact upon the product yields. Many of the correlations are strongly nonlinear and exhibit minima or maxima within the tested ranges. While reaching liquid product yields of up to 66% of the theoretical maximum, we were able to create diesel- as well as gasoline-optimised products. Comparing our product to commercially available DIN EN 590 diesel fuel reveals a remarkable conformity of both liquids. In order to perform further long-term experiments concerning the lifetime of the catalyst and to optimise the product separation, a small technical scale-plant is just being built. (orig.)

  5. Edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrodes in electroanalysis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Craig E; Compton, Richard G

    2005-11-01

    The recent development, behavior and scope of edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrodes in electroanalysis are overviewed. Similarities to, and advantages, over multi-walled CNT modified electrodes are noted and the wide scope of applications, ranging through gas sensing, stripping voltammetry and biosensing, illustrated.

  6. Flame Retardant and Pyrolytic Behaviors of Polyamide 6/Montmorillonite Nanocomposite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-guo; OU Yu-xiang; WU Jun-hao

    2005-01-01

    Na+-montmorillonite(Na+-MMT) was converted to organic montmorillonite(OMMT) using modifier which was synthesized at authors' laboratory. PA6/OMMT nanocomposite was prepared via in situ intercalative polymerization. The limiting oxygen index (LOI), UL 94V flame retardancy and thermal stability of PA6/OMMT using thermal gravity analysis (TGA) were measured. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) technique was used to analyze the pyrolytic residuum and the cone calorimeter (CONE) was applied to determine a number of combustion parameters which were closely related to fire safety, including heat release rate, mass loss rate, effective combustion heat, total heat release, specific extinction area and the time of ignition. In addition, the elemental composition of the surface pyrolytic residuum and the corresponding X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data were obtained, and the morphology of the residuum from CONE measurement was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  7. Friction and wear of metals in contact with pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with gold, iron, and tantalum single crystals sliding on prismatic and basal orientations of pyrolytic graphite in various environments, including vacuum, oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen, and hydrogen bromide. Surfaces were examined in the clean state and with various adsorbates present on the graphite surfaces. Auger and LEED spectroscopy, SEM, and EDXA were used to characterize the graphite surfaces. Results indicate that the prismatic and basal orientations do not contain nor do they chemisorb oxygen, water vapor, acetylene, or hydrogen bromide. All three metals exhibited higher friction on the prismatic than on the basal orientation and these metals transferred to the atomically clean prismatic orientation of pyrolytic graphite. No metal transfer to the graphite was observed in the presence of adsorbates at 760 torr. Ion bombardment of the graphite surface with nitrogen ions resulted in the adherence of nitrogen to the surface.

  8. Thermal Performance of an Annealed Pyrolytic Graphite Solar Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Hornacek, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    A solar collector having the combined properties of high solar absorptance, low infrared emittance, and high thermal conductivity is needed for applications where solar energy is to be absorbed and transported for use in minisatellites. Such a solar collector may be used with a low temperature differential heat engine to provide power or with a thermal bus for thermal switching applications. One concept being considered for the solar collector is an Al2O3 cermet coating applied to a thermal conductivity enhanced polished aluminum substrate. The cermet coating provides high solar absorptance and the polished aluminum provides low infrared emittance. Annealed pyrolytic graphite embedded in the aluminum substrate provides enhanced thermal conductivity. The as-measured thermal performance of an annealed pyrolytic graphite thermal conductivity enhanced polished aluminum solar collector, coated with a cermet coating, will be presented.

  9. Fuel properties of bituminous coal and pyrolytic oil mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Hazlin; Sharuddin, Munawar Zaman; Daud, Ahmad Rafizan Mohamad; Syed-Hassan, Syed Shatir A.

    2014-10-01

    Investigation on the thermal decomposition kinetics of coal-biooil slurry (CBS) fuel prepared at different ratios (100:0,70:30,60:40,0:100) was conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The materials consisted of Clermont bituminous coal (Australia) and bio-oil (also known as pyrolytic oil) from the source of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) that was thermally converted by means of pyrolysis. Thermal decomposition of CBS fuel was performed in an inert atmosphere (50mL/min nitrogen) under non-isothermal conditions from room temperature to 1000°C at heating rate of 10°C/min. The apparent activation energy (Ea.) and pre-exponential factor (A) were calculated from the experimental results by using an Arrhenius-type kinetic model which first-order decomposition reaction was assumed. All kinetic parameters were tabulated based on the TG data obtained from the experiment. It was found that, the CBS fuel has higher reactivity than Clermont coal fuel during pyrolysis process, as the addition of pyrolytic oil will reduce the Ea values of the fuel. The thermal profiles of the mixtures showed potential trends that followed the characteristics of an ideal slurry fuel where high degradation rate is desirable. Among the mixture, the optimum fuel was found at the ratio of 60:40 of pyrolytic oil/coal mixtures with highest degradation rate. These findings may contribute to the development of a slurry fuel to be used in the vast existing conventional power plants.

  10. Electron spectra line shape analysis of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and nanocrystalline diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Beata; Zemek, Josef; Houdkova, Jana; Kromka, Alexander; Józwik, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) methods were applied in investigating samples of nanocrystalline diamond and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite of various C sp(2)/sp(3) ratios, crystallinity conditions and grain sizes. The composition at the surface was estimated from the XPS. The C sp(2)/sp(3) ratio was evaluated from the width of the XAES first derivative C KLL spectra and from fitting of XPS C 1s spectra into components. The pattern recognition (PR) method applied for analyzing the spectra line shapes exhibited high accuracy in distinguishing different carbon materials. The PR method was found to be a potentially useful approach for identification, especially important for technological applications in fields of materials engineering and for controlling the chemical reaction products during synthesis.

  11. Modification of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces with highly charged ion (HCI) irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, Y. E-mail: ykoguchi@postman.riken.go.jp; Meguro, T.; Hida, A.; Takai, H.; Maeda, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Aoyagi, Y

    2003-05-01

    Slow Ar{sup 8+} irradiation and the following electron injection creates a non-conductive area to a depth of a few nanometers on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface (HOPG). The annealing of the sample in a hydrogen atmosphere stabilizes the Ar{sup 8+} impact area, which results in the field emission from the impact region. The property of the field emission is similar to that of diamond-like carbon (DLC), suggesting the possibility that sp{sup 3} hybridization occurs at the Ar{sup 8+} impact region. The work function estimated from the Fowler-Nordheim plot is much lower than non-treated HOPG and similar to a hydrogen-terminated DLC film.

  12. Bisolute sorption and thermodynamic behavior of organic pollutants to biomass-derived biochars at two pyrolytic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zaiming; Chen, Baoliang; Zhou, Dandan; Chen, Wenyuan

    2012-11-20

    The bisolute sorption and thermodynamic behavior of organic pollutants on low temperature biochars (LTB) at 300 °C and high temperature biochars (HTB) at 700 °C were determined to elucidate sorptive properties of biochar changed with pyrolytic temperatures. The structural characteristics and isotherms shape of the biochar were more dependent on the pyrolytic temperature than on the biomass feedstocks, which included orange peel, pine needle, and sugar cane bagasse. For LTB, the thermally altered organic matter colocalized with the carbonized matter, and the visible fine pores of the fixed carbons were plugged by the remaining volatile carbon. For HTB, most of the volatile matter was gone and the fixed matter was composed of fully carbonized adsorptive sites. Monolayer adsorption of 1-naphthol to HTB was dominant but was suppressed by phenol. In comparison, LTB displayed exceptional sorption behavior where partition and adsorption were concurrently promoted by a cosolute and elevated temperature. In addition to monolayer surface coverage, pore-filling mechanisms may contribute to the increase of adsorption fraction. Moreover, the entropy gain was a dominant force driving the partition and adsorption processes in LTB. Thus, the colocalizing partition phase and adsorptive sites in LTB are proposed to be in interencased states rather than in physical separation.

  13. Fixed-bed adsorption study of methylene blue onto pyrolytic tire char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrigianni, Vassiliki; Giannakas, Aris; Papadaki, Maria; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Konstantinou, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the adsorption efficiency of acid treated pyrolytic tire char to cationic methylene blue (MB) dye adsorption from aqueous solutions was investigated by fixed-bed adsorption column experiments. The effects of the initial dye concentration (10 - 40 mg L-1) and feed flow rate (50 - 150 mL min -1) with a fixed bed height (15 cm) were studied in order to determine the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system. The Adams-Bohart, Yoon-Nelson and Thomas model were applied to the adsorption of MB onto char at different operational conditions to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column. The results showed that the maximum adsorbed quantities decreased with increasing flow rate and increased with increasing initial MB concentration. Breakthrough time and exhaustion time increased with decreasing inlet dye concentration and flow rate. In contrast with Adams-Bohart model, Yoon-Nelson model followed by Thomas model were found more suitable to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of methylene blue by char. The correlation coefficient values R2 for both models at different operating conditions are higher than 0.9 and the low average relative error values provided very good fittings of experimental data at different operating conditions. Higher adsorption capacity of 3.85 mg g -1 was obtained at 15 cm of adsorbent bed height, flow rate of 100 mL min -1and initial MB concentration of 40 mg L-1. Although that activated carbons exhibited higher adsorption capacities in the literature, acid-treated pyrolytic tire char was found to be considerably efficient adsorbent for the removal of MB dye column taking into account the advantages of the simpler production process compared to activated carbons, as well as, the availability of waste tire feedstock and concurrent waste tire management.

  14. Intensification of adsorption process by using the pyrolytic char from waste tires to remove chromium(Ⅵ) from wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jie; YANG Yong-rong

    2004-01-01

    Pyrolysis has the potential of transforming waste into valuable recyclable products. Pyrolytic char(PC) is one of the most important products from the pyrolysis of used tires. One of the most significant applications for pyrolytic char recovered is used for the removal of Cr(Ⅵ) in the wastewater effluent to control waste by waste. The surface chemistry properties of surface element distribution / concentration and chemical structure were examined for the pyrolytic char and the commercial activated carbon(CAC) respectively. The results showed that surfaces of PC possesses a large amount of ester and hydrocarbon graft, whereas there are mainly carbon functional components of C-OH, C=O and COOH on the surface of CAC. Therefore the surface electronegativity of PC is lower than that of CAC in the water. The repulsive interactions between the surfaces of PC and the negatively charged Cr(Ⅵ) ion are weaker than that of CAC, which results in an intensification of the adsorption process by the utilization of PC. The adsorption isotherms of Cr(Ⅵ) ion on the two kinds of carbons were determined experimentally. The larger adsorption amount on the PC in the case of Cr(Ⅵ) may be attributed mainly to its special surface micro-chemical environment. The mechanism of the removal Cr(Ⅵ) from aqueous solution was assumed to be the integration of adsorption and redox reaction. The adsorption was the rate-controlled step for Cr(Ⅵ) removal. The adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ) has been identified as pseudo-second- order kinetics. The rate constants of adsorption have been evaluated.

  15. Intensification of adsorption process by using the pyrolytic char from waste tires to remove chromium (VI) from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Yang, Yong-Rong

    2004-01-01

    Pyrolysis has the potential of transforming waste into valuable recyclable products. Pyrolytic char (PC) is one of the most important products from the pyrolysis of used tires. One of the most significant applications for pyrolytic char recovered is used for the removal of Cr(VI) in the wastewater effluent to control waste by waste. The surface chemistry properties of surface element distribution/concentration and chemical structure were examined for the pyrolytic char and the commercial activated carbon (CAC) respectively. The results showed that surfaces of PC possesses a large amount of ester and hydrocarbon graft, whereas there are mainly carbon functional components of C-OH, C=O and COOH on the surface of CAC. Therefore the surface electronegativity of PC is lower than that of CAC in the water. The repulsive interactions between the surfaces of PC and the negatively charged Cr(VI) ion are weaker than that of CAC, which results in an intensification of the adsorption process by the utilization of PC. The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) ion on the two kinds of carbons were determined experimentally. The larger adsorption amount on the PC in the case of Cr(VI) may be attributed mainly to its special surface micro-chemical environment. The mechanism of the removal Cr(VI) from aqueous solution was assumed to be the integration of adsorption and redox reaction. The adsorption was the rate-controlled step for Cr(VI) removal. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was identified as pseudo-second-order kinetics. The rate constants of adsorption were evaluated.

  16. The batch pyrolysis of tyre waste - fuel properties of the derived pyrolytic oil and overall plant economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P.T.; Besler, S.; Taylor, D.T. (Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Fuel and Energy)

    1993-01-01

    Pyrolysis of scrap tyres is currently receiving renewed attention, since the derived oils may be used directly as fuels or added to petroleum refinery feedstocks; they may also be an important source of refined chemicals. The derived gases are also useful as fuel and the solid char has the potential to be used either as smokeless fuel, carbon black or activated carbon. In this paper, halved and whole scrap tyres were pyrolysed in a commercial two tonne per day batch pyrolysis unit at furnace temperatures from 700 to 950[sup o]C. The proportion of derived products was dependent on pyrolysis conditions, with a maximum yield of 30 per cent oil. The fuel properties of the derived oils, including calorific value, flash point, carbon residue, viscosity, sulphur content, etc., were analysed and compared to refined petroleum products. In addition, the benzene, xylene, toluene, limonene and styrene concentration of the oils was determined to assess the potential of the oils as a source of chemical feedstocks. The oils were also analysed in terms of their chemical composition via liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and molecular mass range. The pyrolytic oils derived from tyres showed properties that were dependent on pyrolytic conditions and showed fuel properties comparable to those of petroleum products. (Author)

  17. Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D.J.; Armstrong, P.S.; Panitz, J.K.G.

    1998-03-17

    A solid electrolytic capacitor is described having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects. 2 figs.

  18. Aromatics extraction from pyrolytic sugars using ionic liquid to enhance sugar fermentability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Luque-Moreno, L.C.; Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Rehmann, L.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Schuur, B.

    2016-01-01

    Fermentative bioethanol production from pyrolytic sugars was improved via aromatics removal by liquid–liquid extraction. As solvents, the ionic liquid (IL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium dicyanamide (P666,14[N(CN)2]) and ethyl acetate (EA) were compared. Two pyrolytic sugar solutions were created fro

  19. Homogeneous Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Composites Prepared by Catalyzed Carbonization Approach at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjiang Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize carbon nanotube (CNT/carbon composite using catalyzed carbonization of CNT/Epoxy Resin composite at a fairly low temperature of about 400∘C. The microstructure of the composite is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results indicate that CNTs and pyrolytic carbon blend well with each other. Pyrolytic carbon mainly stays in an amorphous state, with some of it forming crystalline structures. The catalyst has the effect of eliminating the interstices in the composites. Remarkable increases in thermal and electrical conductivity are also reported.

  20. Friction and transfer behavior of pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with various metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with pyrolytic boron nitride in sliding contact with itself and various metals. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor transfer of pyrolytic boron nitride to metals and metals to pyrolytic boron nitride. Results indicate that the friction coefficient for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with metals can be related to the chemical activity of the metals and more particularly to the d valence bond character of the metal. Transfer was found to occur to all metals except silver and gold and the amount of transfer was less in the presence than in the absence of metal oxide. Friction was less for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with a metal in air than in vacuum.

  1. Low temperature transport properties of pyrolytic graphite sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sachiko; Miyafuji, Daisuke; Fujii, Takenori; Matsui, Tomohiro; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    We have made thermal and electrical transport measurements of uncompressed pyrolytic graphite sheet (uPGS), a mass-produced thin graphite sheet with various thicknesses between 10 and 100 μ m, at temperatures between 2 and 300 K. Compared to exfoliated graphite sheets like Grafoil, uPGS has much higher conductivities by an order of magnitude because of its high crystallinity confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. This material is advantageous as a thermal link of light weight in a wide temperature range particularly above 60 K where the thermal conductivity is much higher than common thermal conductors such as copper and aluminum alloys. We also found a general relationship between thermal and electrical conductivities in graphite-based materials which have highly anisotropic conductivities. This would be useful to estimate thermal conductance of a cryogenic part made of these materials from its electrical conductance more easily measurable at low temperature.

  2. Xanthine Biosensor Based on Didodecyldimethylammonium Bromide Modified Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG,Ji-Lin(唐纪琳); HAN,Xiao-Jun(韩晓军); HUANG,Wei-Min(黄卫民); WANG,Er-Kang(汪尔康)

    2002-01-01

    The vesicle of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB)which contained tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) was mixed with xanthine oxidase, and the mixture was cast on the pyrolytic graphite electrode. The lipid films were used to supply a biological environment resembling biomembrane on the surface of the electrode. TTF was used as a mediator because of its high electron-transfer efficiency. A novel xanthine biosensor based on cast DDAB film was developed. The effects of pH and operating potential were explored for optimum analytical performance by using the amperometric method. The response time of the biosensor was less than 10 s. The detection limit of the biosensor was 3.2 × 10-7 mol/L and the liner range was from 4 × 10-7 mol/L to 2.4 × 10-6 mol/L.

  3. Pyrolytic characteristics of burning residue of fire-retardant wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Guangjie; LUO Wensheng; Furuno T; REN Qiang; MA Erni

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the pyrolytic characteristics of the burning residue of fire-retardant wood,a multifunctional fire-resistance test oven aimed at simulating the course of a fire was used to burn fire-retardant wood and untreated wood.Samples at different distances from the combustion surface were obtained and a thennogravimetric analysis (TG) was applied to test the pyrolytic process of the burning residue in an atmosphere of nitrogen.The results showed that:1) there was little difference between fireretardant wood and its residue in the initial temperature of thermal degradation.The initial temperature of thermal degradation of the combustion layer in untreated wood was higher than that in the no burning wood sample;2) the temperature of the flame retardant in fire-retardant wood was 200℃ in the differential thermogravimetry (DTG).The peak belonging to the flame retardant tended to dissipate during the time of burning;3) for the burning residue of fire-retardant wood,the peak belonging to hemicellulose near 230℃ in the DTG disappeared and there was a gentle shoulder from 210 to 240℃;4) the temperature of the main peaks of the fireretardant wood and its burning residue in DTG was 100℃ lower than that of the untreated wood and its burning residue.The rate of weight loss also decreased sharply;5) the residual weight of fire-retardant wood at 600~C clearly increased compared with that of untreated wood.Residual weight of the burning residue increased markedly as the heating temperature increased when burning;6) there was a considerable difference with respect to the thermal degradation temperature of the no burning sample and the burning residue between fire-retardant wood and untreated wood.

  4. Pyrolytic transformation from polydihydrosilane to hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Takashi, E-mail: mtakashi@jaist.ac.jp [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Matsuki, Yasuo [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Yokkaichi Research Center, JSR Corporation, 100 Kawajiri-cho, Yokkaichi, Mie, 510-8552 (Japan); Shimoda, Tatsuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 (Japan)

    2012-08-31

    The fabrication of thin film silicon devices based on solution processes rather than on conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest since cost reductions may result. Using a solution process, we coated substrates with polydihydrosilane solution and studied the pyrolytic transformation of the material into hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). From thermal gravimetry and differential thermal analysis data a significant reduction in weight of the material and a construction of Si-Si bonds are concluded for the pyrolysis temperature T{sub p} = 270 to 360 Degree-Sign C. The appearance of amorphous silicon phonon bands in Raman spectra for films prepared at T{sub p} {>=} 330 Degree-Sign C suggests the construction of a three-dimensional amorphous silicon network. Films prepared at T{sub p} {>=} 360 Degree-Sign C exhibit a hydrogen content near 10 at.% and an optical gap near 1.6 eV similar to device-grade vacuum processed a-Si:H. However, the infrared microstructure factor, the spin density, and the photosensitivity require significant improvements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We fabricate hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films by a solution process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The a-Si:H films are prepared by pyrolytic transformation in polysilane solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate basic properties in relation to the pyrolysis temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman spectra, hydrogen content, and optical gap are similar to device-grade a-Si:H. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure factor, spin density, and photoconductivity show poor quality.

  5. 生物质快速热裂解炭的分析及活化研究%Characterization and Activation of Pyrolytic Char from Fast Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹倩倩; 王树荣

    2013-01-01

    采用化学(KOH)方法对两种具有代表性的生物质原料(花梨木和稻壳)的快速热裂解固体产物-热解炭进行了活化,并采用氮吸附、X射线衍射(XRD)、傅里叶红外光谱分析(FTIR)和扫描电镜(SEM)技术测试了热解炭的结构特性、表面特性以及物理化学性质.结果表明,这两种热解炭经过活化后可以获得许多优良的性质,固定碳含量增加,灰分含量减少.同时,活化后BET比表面积迅速增大,超过1100m2/g,而且热解炭的石墨化程度都有所加深.热解炭通过活化过程可以实现其高品质利用,有利于生物质热裂解技术的工业化发展.%The pyrolytic chars from fast pyrolysis of rosewood and rice husk have been activated with KOH solvent. The texture and structure, surface properties and physico-chemical properties of the pyrolytic chars have been characterized by N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy ( FTIR) and Scanning electron microscope ( SEM). Compared with the original pyrolytic chars, the activated chars had higher fixed carbon content and lower ash content. The BET surface area increased beyond 1100m /g after activation. Moreover,the activated chars had higher graphitization degree. Through this activation process, high grade utilization of pyrolytic char will be achieved, as will benefit the industrialization of biomass fast pyrolysis technology.

  6. Performance evaluation of household pyrolytic stove: Effect of outer air holes condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradana, Yano Surya; Prasetya, Agus

    2017-03-01

    Renewable energy is the future energy for the substitution of the depleting fossil fuels. In Indonesia, biomass is one of promising renewable energy due to its abundant availability. Biomass can be converted into energy by thermochemical process, such as pyrolysis. In the implementation, pyrolysis can be applied in household cookstove, called pyrolytic stove. Pyrolytic stove will be proposed for people still cooking over an open biomass fire. This paper studied the pyrolysis of Indonesian teak using household pyrolytic stove. The effect of outer air holes on the performance of household pyrolytic stove was investigated. The increasing of cross section area of outer air holes effected on the higher of biomass combustion releasing energy for pyrolysis and cooking. Furthermore, the optimum outer air holes condition in the stove was fully open with the minimum of char product and the maximum of energy recovered for cooking.

  7. Determination of Micro U, Np, Pu by Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Pre-diffraction EDXRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Based on the prototype of Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Pre-Diffraction EDXRF, a new device was constructed after optimizing of hardware including high voltage supplier, detector, sample bracket, and software of data processing.

  8. Material Based Structure Design: Numerical Analysis Thermodynamic Response of Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite /Al Sandwich Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxia; Yan, Shilin; Yu, Dingshan

    2016-06-01

    Amine-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based thermally conductive adhesive (TCA) was studied in the previous paper and applied here in thermal pyrolytic graphite (TPG)/Al radiator due to its high thermal conductivity, toughness and cohesiveness. In this paper, in an attempt to confirm the application of TCA to TPG/Al sandwich radiator, the thermodynamic response in TPG/Al sandwich composites associated with key material properties and structural design was investigated using finite element simulation with commercial available ANSYS software. The induced thermal stress in TCA layer is substantial due to the thermal expansion mismatch between Al plate and TPG. The maximum thermal stress is located near the edge of TCA layer with the von Mises stress value of 4.02 MPa and the shear stress value of 1.66 MPa. The reasonable adjustment of physical-mechanical properties including thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young,s modulus and the thickness of TCA layer, Al plate and TPG are beneficial for reducing the temperature of the top surface of the upper skin and their effects on the reduction of thermal structural response in some ways. These findings will highlight the structural optimization of TPG/Al radiator for future application.

  9. Material Based Structure Design: Numerical Analysis Thermodynamic Response of Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite /Al Sandwich Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxia; Yan, Shilin; Yu, Dingshan

    2016-12-01

    Amine-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based thermally conductive adhesive (TCA) was studied in the previous paper and applied here in thermal pyrolytic graphite (TPG)/Al radiator due to its high thermal conductivity, toughness and cohesiveness. In this paper, in an attempt to confirm the application of TCA to TPG/Al sandwich radiator, the thermodynamic response in TPG/Al sandwich composites associated with key material properties and structural design was investigated using finite element simulation with commercial available ANSYS software. The induced thermal stress in TCA layer is substantial due to the thermal expansion mismatch between Al plate and TPG. The maximum thermal stress is located near the edge of TCA layer with the von Mises stress value of 4.02 MPa and the shear stress value of 1.66 MPa. The reasonable adjustment of physical-mechanical properties including thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young,s modulus and the thickness of TCA layer, Al plate and TPG are beneficial for reducing the temperature of the top surface of the upper skin and their effects on the reduction of thermal structural response in some ways. These findings will highlight the structural optimization of TPG/Al radiator for future application.

  10. Exploring site-specific chemical interactions at surfaces: a case study on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-12-01

    A material’s ability to interact with approaching matter is governed by the structural and chemical nature of its surfaces. Tailoring surfaces to meet specific needs requires developing an understanding of the underlying fundamental principles that determine a surface’s reactivity. A particularly insightful case occurs when the surface site exhibiting the strongest attraction changes with distance. To study this issue, combined noncontact atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been carried out, where the evolution of the local chemical interaction with distance leads to a contrast reversal in the force channel. Using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surfaces and metallic probe tips as a model system, we find that at larger tip-sample distances, carbon atoms exhibit stronger attractions than hollow sites while upon further approach, hollow sites become energetically more favorable. For the tunneling current that is recorded at large tip-sample separations during acquisition of a constant-force image, the contrast is dominated by the changes in tip-sample distance required to hold the force constant (‘cross-talk’) at smaller separations the contrast turns into a convolution of this cross-talk and the local density of states. Analysis shows that the basic factors influencing the force channel contrast reversal are locally varying decay lengths and an onset of repulsive forces that occurs for distinct surface sites at different tip-sample distances. These findings highlight the importance of tip-sample distance when comparing the relative strength of site-specific chemical interactions.

  11. Pyrolytic Treatment and Fertility Enhancement of Soils Contaminated with Heavy Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidonish, Julia E; Zygourakis, Kyriacos; Masiello, Caroline A; Gao, Xiaodong; Mathieu, Jacques; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2016-03-01

    Pyrolysis of contaminated soils at 420 °C converted recalcitrant heavy hydrocarbons into "char" (a carbonaceous material similar to petroleum coke) and enhanced soil fertility. Pyrolytic treatment reduced total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) to below regulatory standards (typically hydrocarbons (PAHs) was not observed, with post-pyrolysis levels well below applicable standards. Plant growth studies showed a higher biomass production of Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa (Simpson black-seeded lettuce) (80-900% heavier) in pyrolyzed soils than in contaminated or incinerated soils. Elemental analysis showed that pyrolyzed soils contained more carbon than incinerated soils (1.4-3.2% versus 0.3-0.4%). The stark color differences between pyrolyzed and incinerated soils suggest that the carbonaceous material produced via pyrolysis was dispersed in the form of a layer coating the soil particles. Overall, these results suggest that soil pyrolysis could be a viable thermal treatment to quickly remediate soils impacted by weathered oil while improving soil fertility, potentially enhancing revegetation.

  12. Chemical and Pyrolytic Thermogravimetric Characterization of Nigerian Bituminous Coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyakuma Bemgba Bevan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of new coal deposits in Nigeria presents solutions for nation’s energy crises and prospects for socioeconomic growth and sustainable development. Furthermore, the quest for sustainable energy to limit global warming, climate change, and environmental degradation has necessitated the exploration of alternatives using cleaner technologies such as coal pyrolysis. However, a lack of comprehensive data on physico-chemical and thermal properties of Nigerian coals has greatly limited their utilization. Therefore, the physico-chemical properties, rank (classification, and thermal decomposition profiles of two Nigerian bituminous coals – Afuze (AFZ and Shankodi-Jangwa (SKJ – were examined in this study. The results indicate that the coals contain high proportions of C, H, N, S, O and a sufficiently high heating value (HHV for energy conversion. The coal classification revealed that the Afuze (AFZ coal possesses a higher rank, maturity, and coal properties compared to the Shankodi-Jangwa (SKJ coal. A thermal analysis demonstrated that coal pyrolysis in both cases occurred in three stages; drying (30-200 °C, devolatilization (200-600 °C, and char decomposition (600-1000 °C. The results also indicated that pyrolysis at 1000 °C is not sufficient for complete pyrolysis. In general, the thermochemical and pyrolytic fuel properties indicate that the coal from both places can potentially be utilized for future clean energy applications.

  13. X-ray diffraction properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, A.K.; Munkholm, A.; Brennan, S. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The x-ray diffraction properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were studied for x-ray energies ranging from 4 to 60 keV. In particular, the secondary extinction thickness was determined by recording the peak and integrated reflectivity as a function of depth below the surface. The results showed that for the high quality material investigated a thickness of 200 to 300 {micro}m was sufficient to get 80% of the maximum reflectivity that is obtained for a very thick plate. Primary extinction was important for low energy and still persisted at higher energies. Inhomogeneities of the mosaic structure were observed, too, that make this material not a truly ideal mosaic monochromator crystal. However, quite high peak reflectivities between 35% and 58% were measured at FWHM of 0.25 to 0.45 degrees. A 200 {micro}m thick plate was then prepared and glued on a bending device to manufacture a monochromator or analyzer with variable curvature that works from flat down to a minimum bending radius of 10 cm. The successful tests of this device confirmed that HOPG plates much thinner than those commonly used as x-ray monochromators and analyzers still have high efficiency and can be curved to achieve dynamical focusing.

  14. Neutron transmission measurements of poly and pyrolytic graphite crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, M.; Abbas, Y.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Ashry, A.; Kilany, M.; Kenawy, M. A.

    The total neutron cross-section measurements of polycrystalline graphite have been carried out in a neutron wavelength from 0.04 to 0.78 nm. This work also presents the neutron transmission measurements of pyrolytic graphite (PG) crystal in a neutron wavelength band from 0.03 to 0.50 nm, at different orientations of the PG crystal with regard to the beam direction. The measurements were performed using three time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers installed in front of three of the ET-RR-1 reactor horizontal channels. The average value of the coherent scattering amplitude for polycrystalline graphite was calculated and found to be bcoh = (6.61 ± 0.07) fm. The behaviour of neutron transmission through the PG crystal, while oriented at different angles with regard to the beam direction, shows dips at neutron wavelengths corresponding to the reflections from (hkl) planes of hexagonal graphite structure. The positions of the observed dips are found to be in good agreement with the calculated ones. It was also found that a 40 mm thick PG crystal is quite enough to reduce the second-order contamination of the neutron beam from 2.81 to 0.04, assuming that the incident neutrons have a Maxwell distribution with neutron gas temperature 330 K.

  15. Large scale computational chemistry modeling of the oxidation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovathingal, Savio; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E; Srinivasan, Sriram Goverapet; van Duin, Adri C T

    2013-04-04

    Large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the oxidation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by hyperthermal atomic oxygen beam (5 eV). Simulations are performed using the ReaxFF classical reactive force field. We present here additional evidence that this method accurately reproduces ab initio derived energies relevant to HOPG oxidation. HOPG is modeled as multilayer graphene and etch-pit formation and evolution is directly simulated through a large number of sequential atomic oxygen collisions. The simulations predict that an oxygen coverage is first established that acts as a precursor to carbon-removal reactions, which ultimately etch wide but shallow pits, as observed in experiments. In quantitative agreement with experiment, the simulations predict the most abundant product species to be O2 (via recombination reactions), followed by CO2, with CO as the least abundant product species. Although recombination occurs all over the graphene sheet, the carbon-removal reactions occur only about the edges of the etch pit. Through isolated defect analysis on small graphene models as well as trajectory analysis performed directly on the predicted etch pit, the activation energies for the dominant reaction mechanisms leading to O2, CO2, and CO product species are determined to be 0.3, 0.52, and 0.67 eV, respectively. Overall, the qualitative and quantitative agreement between MD simulation and experiment is very promising. Thus, the MD simulation approach and C/H/O ReaxFF parametrization may be useful for simulating high-temperature gas interactions with graphitic materials where the microstructure is more complex than HOPG.

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of pyrolytically coated graphite platforms submitted to simulated electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Frine [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Benzo, Zully [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Quintal, Manuelita [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Garaboto, Angel [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Albornoz, Alberto [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Brito, Joaquin L. [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: joabrito@ivic.ve

    2006-10-15

    The present work is part of an ongoing project aiming to a better understanding of the mechanisms of atomization on graphite furnace platforms used for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). It reports the study of unused pyrolytic graphite coated platforms of commercial origin, as well as platforms thermally or thermo-chemically treated under simulated ETAAS analysis conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the elements present at the surfaces of the platforms. New, unused platforms showed the presence of molybdenum, of unknown origin, in concentrations up to 1 at.%. Species in two different oxidations states (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 2+}) were detected by analyzing the Mo 3d spectral region with high resolution XPS. The analysis of the C 1s region demonstrated the presence of several signals, one of these at 283.3 eV related to the presence of Mo carbide. The O 1s region showed also various peaks, including a signal that can be attributed to the presence of MoO{sub 3}. Some carbon and oxygen signals were consistent with the presence of C=O and C-O- (probably C-OH) groups on the platforms surfaces. Upon thermal treatment up to 2900 deg. C, the intensity of the Mo signal decreased, but peaks due to Mo oxides (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 5+}) and carbide (Mo{sup 2+}) were still apparent. Thermo-chemical treatment with 3 vol.% HCl solutions and heating up to 2900 deg. C resulted in further diminution of the Mo signal, with complete disappearance of Mo carbide species. Depth profiling of unused platforms by Ar{sup +} ion etching at increasing time periods demonstrated that, upon removal of several layers of carbonaceous material, the Mo signal disappears suggesting that this contamination is present only at the surface of the pyrolytic graphite platform.

  17. Spray pyrolytic deposition of ZnO thin layers composed of low dimensional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaid Bushiri, M.; Agouram, S.; Reig, C.; Martínez-Tomás, M. C.; Jimenez, J.; Hortelano, V.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.

    ZnO nanolayers composed of fine nanostructures have been successively grown by spray pyrolytic deposition at 300 ∘C over amorphous glass substrates. As deposited samples were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), showing a granular morphology with grain size in the limit of the microscope resolution. CL measurement shows a broad near band edge (3.4 eV) emission of ZnO in the UV region and the defect level emissions in the green region of the spectrum. The use of intermittent spray pyrolytic deposition is shown as an alternative to increase the homogeneity of the samples when temperatures near to the precursor pyrolytic decomposition is selected, long depositions times are involved, and low thermal conductive substrates are used. We have focused on one of these low thermal conductive substrates, glass, on which spheroid shaped microstructures and inhomogeneities appear.

  18. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and methane at an immobilized cobalt protoporphyrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, J.; Kortlever, R.; Kas, Recep; Mul, Guido; Koper, M.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide and water into useful products is a major challenge in facilitating a closed carbon cycle. Here we report a cobalt protoporphyrin immobilized on a pyrolytic graphite electrode that reduces carbon dioxide in an aqueous acidic solution at relatively low

  19. Using pyrolytic acid leaching as a pretreatment step in a biomass fast pyrolysis plant: process design and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Ham, van der A.G.J.; Berg, van den H.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Removing alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEMs) from biomass, with pyrolytic acids, before pyrolysis leads to increased organic oil and sugar yields. These pyrolytic acids are produced and concentrated within the pyrolysis process itself. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate under which condi

  20. Insight into STM image contrast of n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane molecules on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Miao; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Ke; Yu, Ai-Fang; Hao, Yan-Zhong; Xie, Si-Shen; Sun, Jie-Lin

    2011-02-01

    Two-dimensional ordered patterns of n-tetradecane (n-C14H30) and n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) molecules at liquid/graphite interface have been directly imaged using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) under ambient conditions. STM images reveal that the two different kinds of molecules self-organize into ordered lamellar structures in which alkane chains of the molecules extend along one of three equivalent lattice axes of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) basal plane. For n-C14H30 molecules, the molecular axes are observed to tilt by 60° with respect to inter-lamellar trough lines and the carbon backbones of the alkane chains are perpendicular to the HOPG basal plane in an all-trans conformation. However, for n-C16H34 molecules, the molecular axes are perpendicular to lamellar borders (90°) and the planes of the all-trans carbon skeletons are parallel to the graphite basal plane. The results clearly indicate that outmost hydrogen atoms of the alkane chains dominate atom-scaled features of the STM images. That is, in the case of long-chain alkane molecules, topographic effects dominantly determine STM image contrast of the methylene regions of the alkane chains that are adsorbed on HOPG.

  1. Electrocatalytic oxidation of diethylaminoethanethiol and hydrazine at single-walled carbon nanotubes modified with prussian blue nanoparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, edged plane pyrolytic graphite electrode EPPGE was modified with functionalised single-walled carbon nanotubes and Prussian blue nanoparticles (PB). The modified electrode was characterised by techniques such as TEM, FTIR, XPS, EDX...

  2. Pyrolytic Behavior of Citric Acid%柠檬酸的热解特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周顺; 徐迎波; 王程辉; 田振峰

    2011-01-01

    The pyrolytic behavior of citric acid was investigated by thermogravimetric system coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectrometer ( TG-FTIR). The TG curves, DTG curves, and relative contents of pyrolytic gas phase products of citric acid in oxygen of different concentrations were determined and compared. The formation rules of gas phase products and pyrolytic mechanism of citric acid were explored. The results showed that: 1) The main pyrolytic gas phase products of citric acid included C02, H20, CO, anhydride and ketone compounds, in which CO2 was the major, while CO was the minor, H20 emerged first, while anhydride the last. 2) There might exist two pyrolytic pathways, in one of the pathways citric acid was dehydrated and then decarbonated to form anhydride, and in the other to form ketones mainly by decarbonation. At the initial pyrolytic stage, both pathways coexisted, increasing oxygen concentration would benefit the formation of ketones. While at higher temperature, anhydride formation dominated.%使用热失重/傅里叶变换红外联用( TG-FTIR)技术研究了柠檬酸的热裂解特性,测定并比较了不同氧气浓度下柠檬酸的热重(TG)和微商热重(DTG)曲线,以及柠檬酸热解气相产物相对含量和生成规律,探讨了柠檬酸可能的热解机制.结果表明:①柠檬酸的热解气相产物主要有CO2,CO,H2O,酸酐和酮类物质.CO2是气相产物中相对含量最高的物质,CO最低;水最早出现在气相产物中,酸酐是最后存在于气相产物中的物质;②柠檬酸可能有2种主要热解途径:先脱水后脱CO2的酸酐生成模式和主要脱CO2的酮生成模式.在热解初期,2种模式同时发生,氧气浓度的增加有利于酮的生成.在较高温度下,主要以酸酐生成模式为主.

  3. The pyrolytic-plasma method and the device for the utilization of hazardous waste containing organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalińska, Teresa; Wnęk, Bartłomiej; Witowski, Artur; Juszczuk, Rafał; Majdak, Małgorzata; Bartusek, Stanilav

    2016-11-15

    This paper is focused on the new method of waste processing. The waste, including hazardous waste, contain organic compounds. The method consists in two main processes: the pyrolysis of waste and the oxidation of the pyrolytic gas with a use of non-equilibrium plasma. The practical implementation of the method requires the design, construction and testing of the new device in large laboratory scale. The experiments were carried out for the two kinds of waste: polyethylene as a model waste and the electronic waste as a real waste. The process of polyethylene decomposition showed that the operation of the device is correct because 99.74% of carbon moles contained in the PE samples was detected in the gas after the process. Thus, the PE samples practically were pyrolyzed completely to hydrocarbons, which were completely oxidized in the plasma reactor. It turned out that the device is useful for decomposition of the electronic waste. The conditions in the plasma reactor during the oxidation process of the pyrolysis products did not promote the formation of PCDD/Fs despite the presence of the oxidizing conditions. An important parameter determining the efficiency of the oxidation of the pyrolysis products is gas temperature in the plasma reactor.

  4. Densification mechanism of chemical vapor infiltration technology for carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-xun; XIONG Xiang; HUANG Qi-zhong; YI Mao-zhong; HUANG Bai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites were fabricated using pressure-gradient chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) technology with propane (C3H6) as the carbon precursor gas and nitrogen (N2) as the carrier gas. The chemical process of deposition of pyrolytic carbon was deduced by analyzing the component of molecules in gas phase and observing the microstructure of deposition carbon. The results show that the process of deposition starts from the breakdown of C-C single bond of propene (C3H6), and forms two kinds of active groups in the heterogeneous gas phase reaction. Afterwards, these active groups form many stable bigger molecules and deposit on carbon fiber surface. At the same time, hydrogen atoms of the bigger molecules absorbed on carbon fiber surface are eliminated and the solid pyrolytic carbon matrix is formed in the heterogeneous reaction process.

  5. Pyrolytic characteristics and kinetics of the marine green tide macroalgae, Enteromorpha prolifera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hui; YAN Huaxiao; LIU Ming; ZHANG Congwang; QIN Song

    2011-01-01

    The marine macroalgae Enteromorpha prolifera was one of the main algal genera that occurred in the widespread green tides in Qingdao,China,during the summers of 2007,2008 and 2010.It is thus a plentiful source of biomass and could be used as a biofuel.In this study,the pyrolytic characteristics and kinetics of E.prolifera were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)method.Cornstalk and sawdust were used as comparisons.Pyrolytic characteristics were studied using TG-DTG (thermogravimetry-derivative thermogravimetry) curves.Three stages in the pyrolytic process were determined:dehydration,dramatic weight loss and slow weight loss.E.prolifera was pyrolyzed at a lower initial temperature than the two terrestrial biomass forms.The apparent activation energy values for the three types of biomass were calculated and the mechanism functions were determined using 16 different mechanism functions,frequently used in thermal kinetics analysis.Activation energy values varied with mechanism function and the range of activation energy values for E.prolifera,cornstalk,and sawdust were 25-50 kJ/mol,60-90 kJ/mol and 120-155 kJ/mol,respectively.This indicates that E.prolifera has low thermal stability for pyrolysis and good combustion chaxacteristics.

  6. The Pyrolytic Profile of Lyophilized and Deep-Frozen Compact Part of the Human Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Lodowska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bone grafts are used in the treatment of nonunion of fractures, bone tumors and in arthroplasty. Tissues preserved by lyophilization or deep freezing are used as implants nowadays. Lyophilized grafts are utilized in the therapy of birth defects and bone benign tumors, while deep-frozen ones are applied in orthopedics. The aim of the study was to compare the pyrolytic pattern, as an indirect means of the analysis of organic composition of deep-frozen and lyophilized compact part of the human bone. Methods. Samples of preserved bone tissue were subjected to thermolysis and tetrahydroammonium-hydroxide- (TMAH- associated thermochemolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. Results. Derivatives of benzene, pyridine, pyrrole, phenol, sulfur compounds, nitriles, saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, and fatty acids (C12–C20 were identified in the pyrolytic pattern. The pyrolyzates were the most abundant in derivatives of pyrrole and nitriles originated from proteins. The predominant product in pyrolytic pattern of the investigated bone was pyrrolo[1,2-α]piperazine-3,6-dione derived from collagen. The content of this compound significantly differentiated the lyophilized graft from the deep-frozen one. Oleic and palmitic acid were predominant among fatty acids of the investigated samples. The deep-frozen implants were characterized by higher percentage of long-chain fatty acids than lyophilized grafts.

  7. Aromatics extraction from pyrolytic sugars using ionic liquid to enhance sugar fermentability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohua; Luque-Moreno, Luis C; Oudenhoven, Stijn R G; Rehmann, Lars; Kersten, Sascha R A; Schuur, Boelo

    2016-09-01

    Fermentative bioethanol production from pyrolytic sugars was improved via aromatics removal by liquid-liquid extraction. As solvents, the ionic liquid (IL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium dicyanamide (P666,14[N(CN)2]) and ethyl acetate (EA) were compared. Two pyrolytic sugar solutions were created from acid-leached and untreated pinewood, with levoglucosan contents (most abundant sugar) of 29.0% and 8.3% (w/w), respectively. In a single stage extraction, 70% of the aromatics were effectively removed by P666,14[N(CN)2] and 50% by EA, while no levoglucosan was extracted. The IL was regenerated by vacuum evaporation (100mbar) at 220°C, followed by extraction of aromatics from fresh pyrolytic sugar solutions. Regenerated IL extracted aromatics with similar extraction efficiency as the fresh IL, and the purified sugar fraction from pretreated pinewood was hydrolyzed to glucose and fermented to ethanol, yielding 0.46g ethanol/(g glucose), close to the theoretical maximum yield.

  8. Carbon Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    electrodes, high temperature molds, rocket nozzles and exit cones, tires , ink, nuclear reactors and fuel particles, filters, prosthetics, batteries and...carbon would be highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is formed by depositing one atom at a time on a surface utilizing the pyrolysis of a...Moreover, it is well known that during pyrolysis , mesophase converts into a matrix that is very anisotropic. The formation of onion-like “sheaths

  9. Pyrolytic Waste Plastic Oil and Its Diesel Blend: Fuel Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, M.; Al-Mamun, M. R.; Hasan, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The authors introduced waste plastic pyrolysis oil (WPPO) as an alternative fuel characterized in detail and compared with conventional diesel. High density polyethylene, HDPE, was pyrolyzed in a self-designed stainless steel laboratory reactor to produce useful fuel products. HDPE waste was completely pyrolyzed at 330–490°C for 2-3 hours to obtain solid residue, liquid fuel oil, and flammable gaseous hydrocarbon products. Comparison of the fuel properties to the petrodiesel fuel standards ASTM D 975 and EN 590 revealed that the synthetic product was within all specifications. Notably, the fuel properties included a kinematic viscosity (40°C) of 1.98 cSt, density of 0.75 gm/cc, sulphur content of 0.25 (wt%), and carbon residue of 0.5 (wt%), and high calorific value represented significant enhancements over those of conventional petroleum diesel fuel. PMID:27433168

  10. Pyrolytic Waste Plastic Oil and Its Diesel Blend: Fuel Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. H. Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors introduced waste plastic pyrolysis oil (WPPO as an alternative fuel characterized in detail and compared with conventional diesel. High density polyethylene, HDPE, was pyrolyzed in a self-designed stainless steel laboratory reactor to produce useful fuel products. HDPE waste was completely pyrolyzed at 330–490°C for 2-3 hours to obtain solid residue, liquid fuel oil, and flammable gaseous hydrocarbon products. Comparison of the fuel properties to the petrodiesel fuel standards ASTM D 975 and EN 590 revealed that the synthetic product was within all specifications. Notably, the fuel properties included a kinematic viscosity (40°C of 1.98 cSt, density of 0.75 gm/cc, sulphur content of 0.25 (wt%, and carbon residue of 0.5 (wt%, and high calorific value represented significant enhancements over those of conventional petroleum diesel fuel.

  11. Densification and microstructure of carbon/carbon composites prepared by chemical vapor infiltration using ethanol as precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber felts with uniform initial bulk density of 0.47 g·cm-3 was investigated at the ethanol partial pressures of 5-20 kPa,as well as the temperatures of 1050,1100,1150 and 1200°C.Ethanol,diluted by nitrogen,was employed as the precursor of pyrolytic carbon.Polarized light microscopy(PLM),scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to study the texture of pyrolytic carbon deposited at various temperatures.A change from medium-to high-textured pyrolytic carbon was observed in the sample infiltrated at 1050°C.Whereas,homogeneous high-textured pyrolytic carbons were deposited at the temperatures of 1100,1150 and 1200°C.Extinction angles of 19°-21° were determined for different regions in the samples densified at the temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1200°C.Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surface after bending test indicated that the prepared carbon/carbon composite samples exhibited a pseudo-plastic fracture behavior.In addition,fracture behavior of the carbon/carbon samples was obviously effected by their infiltration temperature.The fracture mode of C/C composites was transformed from shearing failure to tensile breakage with increasing infiltration temperature. Results of this study show that ethanol is a promising carbon source to synthesize carbon/carbon composites with homogeneously high-textured pyrolytic carbon over a wide range of temperatures(from 1100 to 1200°C).

  12. High temperature SU-8 pyrolysis for fabrication of carbon electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Yasmin Mohamed; Caviglia, Claudia; Hemanth, Suhith

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present the investigation of the pyrolysis parameters at high temperature (1100 °C) for the fabrication of two-dimensional pyrolytic carbon electrodes. The electrodes were fabricated by pyrolysis of lithographically patterned negative epoxy based photoresist SU-8. A central...... composite experimental design was used to identify the influence of dwell time at the highest pyrolysis temperature and heating rate on electrical, electrochemical and structural properties of the pyrolytic carbon: Van der Pauw sheet resistance measurements, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance...... spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the pyrolytic carbon. The results show that the temperature increase from 900 °C to 1100 °C improves the electrical and electrochemical properties. At 1100 °C, longer dwell time leads to lower resistivity, while the variation of the pyrolysis...

  13. The microwave adsorption behavior and microwave-assisted heteroatoms doping of graphene-based nano-carbon materials

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Pei; Hu, Gang; Gao, Yongjun; Li, Wenjing; Yao, Siyu; Liu, Zongyuan; Ma, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Microwave-assisted heating method is used to treat graphite oxide (GO), pyrolytic graphene oxide (PGO) and hydrogen-reduced pyrolytic graphene oxide (HPGO). Pure or doped graphene are prepared in the time of minutes and a thermal deoxygenization reduction mechanism is proposed to understand their microwave adsorption behaviors. These carbon materials are excellent catalysts in the reduction of nitrobenzene. The defects are believed to play an important role in the catalytic performance.

  14. Effect of acoustic, deformation on radiation-induced luminescence of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Kardashev, B K; Plaksin, O A; Stepanov, V A; Stepanov, P A; Chernov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the ultrasound oscillations with the frequency of approximately 100 kHz on the radiation-induced luminescence on the pyrolytic boron nitride, originating by the protons irradiation (the energy of 8 MeV, the flux of 1.6 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm s), is studied. The impact of the ultrasound oscillations manifests itself by high deformation amplitudes (approximately 10 sup - sup 4), when the nonlinear, amplitude-dependent ultrasound absorption is observed. The obtained data are explained by the change in the kinetics of recrystallization, induced by irradiation, whereby the disappearance (radiation annealing) of the small angle boundaries occurs

  15. Mass spectrometric characterization of a pyrolytic radical source using femtosecond ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H.M.; Beaud, P.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P.; Tzannis, A.P.; Gerber, T. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Radicals play, as reactive species, an important role in the chemistry of combustion. In contrast to atmospheric flames where spectra are congested due to high vibrational and rotational excitation, experiments in the cold environment of a molecular beam (MB) yield clean spectra that can be easily attributed to one species by Resonantly Enhanced Multi Photon Ionization (REMP). A pyrolytic radical source has been set up. To characterize the efficiency of the source `soft` ionization with femto second pulses is applied which results in less fragmentation, simplifying the interpretation of the mass spectrum. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  16. Specific heat of pristine and brominated graphite fibers, composites and HOPG. [Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Chen; Maciag, Carolyn

    1987-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to obtain specific heat values of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers and brominated P-100/epoxy composite as well as pristine and brominated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) for comparison. Based on the experimental results obtained, specific heat values are calculated for several different temperatures, with a standard deviation estimated at 1.4 percent of the average values. The data presented here are useful in designing heat transfer devices (such as airplane de-icing heaters) from bromine fibers.

  17. Pyrolytic carbon coating for cytocompatibility of titanium oxide nanoparticles: a promising candidate for medical applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behzadi, S.; Imani, M.; Yousefi, M.; Galinetto, P.; Simchi, A.; Amiri, H.; Stroeve, P.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles for biomedical use must be cytocompatible with the biological environment that they are exposed to. Current research has focused on the surface functionalization of nanoparticles by using proteins, polymers, thiols and other organic compounds. Here we show that inorganic nanoparticles

  18. Effect of Interface Modified by Graphene on the Mechanical and Frictional Properties of Carbon/Graphene/Carbon Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Yang; Ruiying Luo; Zhenhua Hou

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we developed an interface modified by graphene to simultaneously improve the mechanical and frictional properties of carbon/graphene/carbon (C/G/C) composite. Results indicated that the C/G/C composite exhibits remarkably improved interfacial bonding mode, static and dynamic mechanical performance, thermal conductivity, and frictional properties in comparison with those of the C/C composite. The weight contents of carbon fibers, graphene and pyrolytic carbon are 31.6, 0.3 and 68...

  19. Decomposition mechanism of melamine borate in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffendahl, Carmen; Duquesne, Sophie; Fontaine, Gaëlle; Bourbigot, Serge, E-mail: serge.bourbigot@ensc-lille.fr

    2014-08-20

    Highlights: • Decomposition of melamine borate in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions was investigated. • With increasing temperature, orthoboric acid forms boron oxide releasing water. • Melamine decomposes evolving melamine, ammonia and other fragments. • Boron oxide is transformed into boron nitride and boron nitride-oxide structures through presence of ammonia. - Abstract: Decomposition mechanism of melamine borate (MB) in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions is investigated in the condensed and gas phases using solid state NMR ({sup 13}C and {sup 11}B), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pyrolysis-gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (py-GCMS) and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (TGA–FTIR). It is evidenced that orthoboric acid dehydrates to metaboric and then to boron oxide. The melamine is partially sublimated. At the same time, melamine condensates, i.e., melem and melon are formed. Melon is only formed in thermo-oxidative conditions. At higher temperature, melem and melon decompose releasing ammonia which reacts with the boron oxide to form boron nitride (BN) and BNO structures.

  20. DETERMINATION OF WATER CONTENT IN PYROLYTIC TARS USING COULOMETRIC KARL-FISHER TITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Jílková

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid organic fraction of pyrolytic tar has a high energy value which makes possible its utilization as an energy source. However, before utilization, it is crucial to remove water from the liquid fraction. The presence of water reduces the energy value of pyrolytic tars. Water separation from the organic tar fraction is a complex process, since an emulsion can be readily formed. Therefore, after phase separation, it is important to know the residual water content in the organic phase and whether it is necessary to further dry it. The results presented in this manuscript focus on a water determination in liquid products from coal and biomass pyrolysis by a coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is often used for a water content determination in gaseous, liquid and solid samples. However, to date, this titration method has not been used for a water determination in tars. A new water determination method, which has been tested on different types of tar, has been developed. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is suitable for tar samples with a water content not greater than 5 wt. %. The obtained experimental results indicate that the new introduced method can be used with a very good repeatability for a water content determination in tars.

  1. Absence of field anisotropy in the intrinsic ferromagnetic signals of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestar, A. [Laboratorio de Fisica y Sistemas Pequenos y Nanotecnologia, CSIC, Serano 144, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, Linnestrasse 5, Universitaet Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Setzer, A. [Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, Linnestrasse 5, Universitaet Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Esquinazi, P., E-mail: esquin@physik.uni-leipzig.d [Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, Linnestrasse 5, Universitaet Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Garcia, N. [Laboratorio de Fisica y Sistemas Pequenos y Nanotecnologia, CSIC, Serano 144, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    We have measured the magnetization of bulk samples of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at magnetic fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the graphene layers. Within experimental error the intrinsic ferromagnetic signals of the samples show similar magnetic moments at saturation for the two magnetic field directions, in contrast to recently published data (J. Cervenka et al., Nat. Phys. 5 (2009) 840). To check that the SQUID device provides correctly the small ferromagnetic signals obtained after subtracting the 100 times larger diamagnetic background, we have prepared a sample with a superconducting Pb-film deposited on one of the HOPG surfaces. We show that the field dependence of the measured magnetic moment and after the background subtraction is highly reliable even in the sub-{mu} emu range providing the real magnetic properties of the embedded small ferromagnetic and superconducting signals. - Research highlights: > We have measured the magnetization of bulk samples of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at magnetic fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the graphene layers. > Within experimental error the intrinsic ferromagnetic signals of the samples show similar magnetic moments at saturation for the two magnetic field directions. > The absence of magnetic anisotropy of the intrinsic ferromagnetic order found in HOPG samples contrasts recently published data by Cervenka et al., Nat Phys 5, 840 (2009).

  2. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  3. Nitrogen: Unraveling the Secret to Stable Carbon-Supported Pt-Alloy Electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    electrolyte fuel cells, state-of-the-art elec- trocatalysts made from high surface area carbon materials decorated with a precious-metal nanoparticle phase o...carbon-matrix materials utilized in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including Pt-based cath- odes...the doping of various forms of carbon including but not limited to graphene sheets, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, carbon nanotubes, carbon

  4. Nucleation and aggregative growth of palladium nanoparticles on carbon electrodes: Experiment and kinetic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Yang-Rae; Lai, Stanley C.S.; McKelvey, Kim; Zhang, Guohui; Perry, David; Miller, Thomas S.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of the electrochemical nucleation and growth of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) on carbon electrodes have been investigated using a microscale meniscus cell on both highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and a carbon-coated transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid

  5. One_dimensional chains of gold clusters on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of gold nanoclusters on thesurface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in ultrahigh vacuum. Studies of ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy revealed that the size distribution of gold clusters was very narrow and quasi-one-dimensional chains of gold nanoclusters of approximately 2 nm diameter were produced after being annealed at 74℃. Unlike the results obtained by previous workers, these chains of gold clusters were not formed along steps on the substrate surface, and some of them could even go across monoatomic steps. The orientation of chains of gold clusters was also dependent on the size of gold nanoclusters. These results suggest the viability of a new route to the creation of ordered nanoscale structures.

  6. Atomic force microscopy study of anion intercalation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliata, D.; Haering, P.; Haas, O.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H. [University of Berne (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, we studied highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in perchloric acid, as a model to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation in graphite. Aim of the work is the local and time dependent investigation of dimensional changes of the host material during electrochemical intercalation processes on the nanometer scale. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, as in-situ tool of analysis during intercalation and expulsion of perchloric anions into the HOPG electrodes. According to the AFM measurements, the HOPG interlayer spacing increases by 32% when perchloric anions intercalate, in agreement with the formation of stage IV of graphite intercalation compounds. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  7. Pyrolytic characteristics of biodiesel prepared from lipids accumulated in diatom cells with growth regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Feng, Jia; Ge, Tingting; Yang, Weijuan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic compositions of lipids accumulated in two diatoms Chaetoceros gracilis and Nitzschia closterium cultured with nitrogen and silicon deprivation were studied. It was found that short-chain fatty acids (C14-C16) content was much higher than long-chain fatty acids (C18-C20) content in lipids of two diatoms. The pyrolytic characteristics of biodiesel made from two diatoms and two plant seeds were compared by thermogravimetric analysis. The highest activation energy of 46.68 kJ mol(-1) and the minimum solid residue of 25.18% were obtained in the pyrolysis of biodiesel made from C. gracilis cells, which were cultured with 0.5 mmol L(-1) of nitrogen (no silicon) and accumulated the minimum polyunsaturated fatty acid (C20:5). The pyrolysis residue percentage of C. gracilis biodiesel was lower than that of N. closterium biodiesel and higher than those of plant (Cormus wilsoniana and Pistacia chinensis) biodiesels.

  8. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of a fuel-cell electrocatalyst deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucernak, A.R.; Chowdhury, P.B.; Wilde, C.P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemistry; Kelsall, G.H. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Huxley School; Zhu, Y.Y.; Williams, D.E. [University College London, (United Kingdom). Department of Chemistry

    2000-07-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been examined on a platinum electrocatalysts (Johnson Matthey HSA platinum black) dispersed onto a flat highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrode using an atomic force microscope (AFM) modified to perform scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). For both STM and SECM experiments the same Pt/Ir tips produced by electrochemical etching of Pt/Ir wire followed by coating with varnish have been used. The coating process leaves only the very end of the tip exposed. Positioning the SECM tip 42 nm from one of the particles allows monitoring of hydrogen evolution from that particle as a function of substrate potential. In a separate experiment the substrate has been polarized at a potential at which hydrogen evolution occurs and the SECM tip rastered over the surface to obtain images of the local concentration of hydrogen. This map indicates the activity of hydrogen production as a function of position. (author)

  9. Mass spectroscopic analysis of a plume induced by laser ablation of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Chae, H B; Lee, I H; Park, S M

    1998-01-01

    The laser ablation of a pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) target was investigated by time-of- flight quadrupole mass spectroscopy. According to the laser-correlated ion mass spectra, B sup + and B sub 2 sup + ions were produced, but neither N sup + , N sub 2 sup + , or BN sup + ions were observed at laser fluences below 1 J/cm sup 2. Instead, neutral N sub 2 molecules were found to be formed. The mean velocities and kinetic energies of the B sup + ions were obtained by time-of-flight analysis. Also, reactive laser ablation under a N sub 2 atmosphere was attempted by using a pulsed valve synchronized with the laser pulse.

  10. Standard specification for pyrolytic and vacuum deposition coatings on flat glass

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers the optical and aesthetic quality requirements for coatings applied to glass for use in building glazing. 1.2 The coatings covered are applied to the glass using either pyrolytic or vacuum (sputtering) deposition methods and are typically applied to control solar heat gain, energy performance, comfort level, and condensation and enhance the aesthetic of the building. 1.3 This specification addresses blemishes related to the coating only. It does not address glass blemishes, applied ceramic frits, and organic films. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard.

  11. Electrocrystallization of Monodisperse Nanocrystal Copper on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄令; LEE,Eun-Sung; KIM,Kwang-Bum

    2005-01-01

    Mechanism of copper electrocrystallization on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode from a solution of 1 mmol/L CuSO4 and 1.0 mol/L H2SO4 has been studied using cyclic voltammogram and chronoamperometry. The results show that in copper electrodeposition the charge-transfer step is fast and the rate of growth is controlled by the rate of mass transfer of copper ions to the growing centers. Reduction of Cu(Ⅱ) ions did not undergo underpotential deposition. The initial deposition kinetics of Cu electrocrystallization corresponds to a model including progressive nucleation and diffusion controlled growth. Copper nanocrystals with size of 75.6 nm and relative standard deviation of 9% can be obtained by modulation potential electrodeposition.

  12. Atomic-Resolution Kinked Structure of an Alkylporphyrin on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yiing; Panduwinata, Dwi; Sintic, Maxine; Sum, Tze Jing; Hush, Noel S; Crossley, Maxwell J; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-20

    The atomic structure of the chains of an alkyl porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetranonadecylporphyrin) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at the solid/liquid interface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and 1-phenyloctane is resolved using calibrated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory (DFT) image simulations, and ONIOM-based geometry optimizations. While atomic structures are often readily determined for porphyrin SAMs, the determination of the structure of alkyl-chain connections has not previously been possible. A graphical calibration procedure is introduced, allowing accurate observation of SAM lattice parameters, and, of the many possible atomic structures modeled, only the lowest-energy structure obtained was found to predict the observed lattice parameters and image topography. Hydrogen atoms are shown to provide the conduit for the tunneling current through the alkyl chains.

  13. STM observation of a box-shaped graphene nanostructure appeared after mechanical cleavage of pyrolytic graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Lapshin, Rostislav V

    2016-01-01

    A description is given of a three-dimensional box-shaped graphene (BSG) nanostructure formed/uncovered by mechanical cleavage of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The discovered nanostructure is a multilayer system of parallel hollow channels located along the surface and having quadrangular cross-section. The thickness of the channel walls/facets is approximately equal to 1 nm. The typical width of channel facets makes about 25 nm, the channel length is 390 nm and more. The investigation of the found nanostructure by means of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) allows us to draw a conclusion that it is possible to make spatial constructions of graphene similar to the discovered one by mechanical compression, bending, splitting, and shifting graphite surface layers. The distinctive features of such constructions are the following: simplicity of the preparation method, small contact area between graphene planes and a substrate, large surface area, nanometer cross-sectional sizes of the channels, lar...

  14. Characterization of a polychromatic neutron beam diffracted by pyrolytic graphite crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Byun, S H; Choi, H D

    2002-01-01

    The beam spectrum for polychromatic neutrons diffracted by pyrolytic graphite crystals was characterized. The theoretical beam spectrum was obtained using the diffraction model for a mosaic crystal. The lattice vibration effects were included in the calculation using the reported vibration amplitude of the crystal and the measured time-of-flight spectra in the thermal region. The calculated beam spectrum was compared with the results obtained in the absence of thermal motion. The lattice vibration effects became more important for the higher diffraction orders and a large decrease in the neutron flux induced by the vibrations was identified in the epithermal region. The validity of the beam spectrum was estimated by comparing with the effective quantities determined from prompt gamma-ray measurements and Cd-ratios measured both for 1/nu and non-1/nu nuclides.

  15. Effect of the heating rate on the morphology of the pyrolytic char from hazelnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzade, H.A.; Serdar, Y. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Although biomass chars have a high potential for use in various applications, their performance is directly related to the chemical and the physical properties of the chars. The surface area, porosity, pore size distribution, and density are the physical properties that determine the suitability of the chars to be used. Hazelnut shells are touted as being an extremely appropriate feedstock for high quality pyrolytic char, but the working conditions under which char is obtained have significant influence on the char structure and its properties, such as the thermal reactivity. Therefore, effects of the various parameters on the char structure must be considered. In this context, the present study focused on the physical changes that occur in char as a result of different heating rates during the pyrolysis of hazelnut shells. The effects of the heating rate on the structure of the pyrolytic char obtained from ground hazelnut shells under six different heating rate conditions were investigated. The hazelnut shell was burned in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) under nitrogen flow. Non-isothermal heating was performed from ambient to 900 degrees C and held at this temperature until no further mass loss occurred. The changes in char morphology were studied with respect to the heating rate during charring. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used with each char sample to determine the effect of heating rate. The dominant inorganic phases found in hazelnut shells were found to survive in the char. It was concluded that the high lignin content found in the char played a critical role in the decomposition mechanism. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  16. Investigations into the pyrolytic behaviour of coal/biomass blends using thermogravimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuthaluru, H.B. [Curtin Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Perth, WA (Australia)

    2004-04-01

    Investigations into the pyrolytic behaviour during co-pyrolysis of coal, biomass materials and coal/biomass blends prepared at different ratios (10:90, 20:80, 30:70 and 50:50) have been conducted using a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus. The coal sample selected was Collie sub-bituminous coal from Western Australia, while wood waste (WW) and wheat straw (WS) were used as biomass samples. Three thermal events were identified during the pyrolysis. The first two were dominated by the biomass pyrolysis, while the third was linked to the coal pyrolysis, which occurred at much higher temperatures. No interactions were seen between the coal and biomass during co-pyrolysis. The pyrolytic characteristics of the blends followed those of the parent fuels in an additive manner. Among the tested blends, 20:80 blends showed the lowest activation energies of 90.9 and 78.7 kJ mol{sup -1} for coal/WW and coal/WS blends respectively. The optimum blend ratio for pyrolysis of coal/WS was 50:50 with a high degradation rate in all the thermal events and a higher mass loss over the course of the co-pyrolysis compared to coal/WW blends examined. The reaction orders in these experiments were in the range of 0.21-1.60, thus having a significant effect on the overall reaction rate. Besides the pyrolysis of coal alone, the 50:50 coal/biomass blends had the highest reaction rate, ranging 1x10{sup 9}-2x10{sup 9} min{sup -1}. The experimental results may provide useful data for power generation industries for the development of co-firing options with biomass. (Author)

  17. Characterization of cadmium removal from aqueous solution by biochar produced from a giant Miscanthus at different pyrolytic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woong-Ki; Shim, Taeyong; Kim, Yong-Seong; Hyun, Seunghun; Ryu, Changkook; Park, Young-Kwon; Jung, Jinho

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of biochar for removing Cd from aqueous solution. Biochars were produced from a Miscanthus sacchariflorus via slow pyrolysis at 300, 400, 500 and 600°C. Higher pyrolytic temperature resulted in biochar with a higher aromatic structure and fewer polar functional groups. In particular, pH and surface area of biochar increased greatly at pyrolytic temperatures ≥ 500°C, which increased Cd sorption capacity up to 13.24 mgg(-1). The diffuse-controlled Cd removal was likely due to a surface sorption or a precipitation reaction depending on pH. A simulation with the visual MINTEQ program indicated that the precipitate was Cd(OH)2. In addition, biochar treatment significantly removed the acute toxicity of Cd toward Daphnia magna, resulting in increase of EC50 (50% effective concentration) value from 0.16 to 0.76 mgL(-1).

  18. Direct Electrochemistry of Hemoglobin in Layer-by-layer {PDDA/Hb}n Films Assembled on Pyrolytic Graphite Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Layer-by-layer {PDDA/Hb}n films were assembled by means of alternate adsorption of positively charged poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium) (PDDA) and negatively charged hemoglobin (Hb) at pH 9.2 from their aqueous solutions on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrodes. Film growth during adsorption cycles was demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy.Direct electrochemistry of Hb in {PDDA/Hb} n films on PG was studied.

  19. The pyrolytic-plasma method and the device for the utilization of hazardous waste containing organic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Opalińska, Teresa; Wnęk, Bartłomiej; Witowski, Artur; Juszczuk, Rafał; Majdak, Małgorzata; Bartusek, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the new method of waste processing. The waste, including hazardous waste, contain organic compounds. The method consists in two main processes: the pyrolysis of waste and the oxidation of the pyrolytic gas with a use of non-equilibrium plasma. The practical implementation of the method requires the design, construction and testing of the new device in large laboratory scale. The experiments were carried out for the two kinds of waste: polyethylene as a model waste and...

  20. Molecular characterization of fossil organic matter in Glyptostrobus europaeus remains from the Orawa basin (Poland). Comparison of pyrolytic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almendros, G.; Dorado, J.; Gonzalez-Vila, F.J.; Martin, F.; Sanz, J.; Alvarez-Ramis, C.; Stuchlik, L. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales

    1999-05-01

    Pyrolytic methods (standard Curie-point pyrolysis and pyrolysis in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), were used to analyze the organic composition of Glyptostrobus (Taxodiaceae) remains from the Miocene deposits of Lipnica Mala (Poland), consisting of branches with their leaves. The pyrolytic analysis revealed a series of aromatic compounds with a large proportion of guaiacyl-type lignin markers (including intact C{sub 3}-methoxyphenols), and small quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The alkyl compounds included fatty acid series where the C{sub 14}-C{sub 18} homologues dominated as well as additional amounts of alkanes and alkenes (maximum ca. C{sub 21}). The results suggest that lignin as well as protective epicuticular lipid polymers (including cutin and other long chain-based polyalkyl structures) selectively show the greatest degree of molecular preservation in the Glyptostrobus remains. The comparison between pyrolytic methods shows that the lignin-derived aromatic assemblages predominate in the chromatograms after conventional pyrolysis whereas thermochemolysis with TMAH leads to an `aliphatic enhancement`. This latter technique was found to be the best for analysis of the lipid signature in fossil samples with condensed polymethylene networks. 44 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Nucleation and growth in electrodeposition of thin copper films on pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinaci, F.S.; Muller, R.H.

    1992-05-01

    Electrodeposition of Cu on graphite electrodes was studied, with emphasis on nucleation. Various ex-situ and in-situ methods were investigated for determining the number density of nuclei. Two direct methods were studied (scanning electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy); indirect determinations included Raman spectroscopy and analysis of potentiostatic current transients. Though some of the techniques correctly predicted the nucleation densities under special conditions, SEM was the most reliable tool. The large scatter in the data necessitated steps to minimize this effect. To electrodeposit Cu on graphite, a nucleation overpotential of 250 mV was measured with cyclic voltammetry; such a large overpotential does not occur on a Pt or on a Cu-covered graphite electrode. The deposition potential is the dominant parameter governing nucleation density. There is a sharp increase in the nucleation density with applied potential. Cu can be deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite only between the nucleation overpotential and the hydrogen evolution potential. To increase the Cu nucleation density, while avoiding excessive H evolution, a double pulse potential technique was used; nucleation densities on the order of 10{sup 10} nuclei/cm{sup 2} were achieved. The use of inhibitors (PVA, benzotriazole) was also investigated. Deposition on conducting polymer electrodes was also studied; initial results with polyaniline show promise. 57 figs, 6 tabs, refs. (DLC)

  2. Formation of Nanocones on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite by Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Improvement in hemocompatibility of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG by formation of nanostructured surface by oxygen plasma treatment is reported. We have showed that by appropriate fine tuning of plasma and discharge parameters we are able to create nanostructured surface which is densely covered with nanocones. The size of the nanocones strongly depended on treatment time. The optimal results in terms of material hemocompatibility were obtained after treatment with oxygen plasma for 15 s, when both the nanotopography and wettability were the most favorable, since marked reduction in adhesion and activation of platelets was observed on this surface. At prolonged treatment times, the rich surface topography was lost and thus also its antithrombogenic properties. Chemical composition of the surface was always more or less the same, regardless of its morphology and height of the nanocones. Namely, on all plasma treated samples, only a few atomic percent of oxygen was found, meaning that plasma caused mostly etching, leading to changes in the surface morphology. This indicates that the main preventing mechanism against platelets adhesion was the right surface morphology.

  3. Self-assembly of thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: hydrogen bond effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Liu, Yibiao; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Shuqi; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Wen, Yongqiang; Du, Hongwu; Zhang, Xueji

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, to elucidate the hydrogen bond effect on the assembly behavior, we studied the assembly structures of two carboxylic substituted thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by scanning tunneling microscopy. Here thiophene-2-carboxylic acid (TCA) and thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (TDA) were employed. TDA molecules spontaneously adsorb on the HOPG surface and self-organize into a two-dimensional (2D) assembly with well-defined structure. Two types of domain could be observed. Each TDA molecule appears as a round circle with two small faint dots and forms hydrogen bonds with neighbours. Besides monolayer structure, a bilayer structure of TDA adlayer on HOPG was also observed in this research. Remnant TDA molecules adsorb on the monolayer of TDA and bilayer structure is formed. In contrast to TDA, no ordered structure of TCA on HOPG can be observed. TCA molecules have high propensity to form dimers through H-bond between carboxylic groups. But TCA dimer is not stable enough for either adsorption or imaging. Our result provides a new example for understanding hydrogen effect on stabilizing and controlling two-dimensional assembly structure and is helpful for surface nanofabrication and development of electric nanodevices.

  4. Electrocatalytic Nitrate Reduction by a Cobalt Protoporphyrin Immobilized on a Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing; Birdja, Yuvraj Y; Koper, Marc T M

    2015-08-04

    A series of simple molecular catalysts, i.e., Co(III), Fe(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Rh(II) protoporphyrins (metal-PP), directly adsorbed on pyrolytic graphite have been utilized for catalyzing the electrochemical reduction of nitrate. These catalysts are studied by combining cyclic voltammetry with online electrochemical mass spectrometry (OLEMS) to monitor volatile products and online ion chromatography (IC) to detect ionic products in the aqueous electrolyte solution. Among all investigated porphyrins, the Co-based protoporphyrin shows the highest selectivity toward hydroxylamine (NH2OH), which made it the catalyst of primary interest in the article. The reactivity and selectivity of the immobilized Co-protoporphyrin depend significantly on pH, with more acidic conditions leading to higher reactivity and higher selectivity toward hydroxylamine over ammonia. Potential controlled electrolysis results show that the potential also greatly influences the selectivity: at pH 1, hydroxylamine is the main product around -0.5 V with approximately 100% selectivity, while hydroxylamine and ammonia are both formed at a more negative potential, -0.75 V. The mechanism of the reaction is discussed, invoking of the possibility of two pathways for hydroxylamine/ammonia formation: a sequential pathway in which hydroxylamine is produced as an intermediate, with ammonia subsequently formed through the reduction of NH2OH/NH3OH(+), and a parallel pathway in which the formation of hydroxylamine and ammonia is derived from a common intermediate.

  5. Comparative studies of the pyrolytic and kinetic characteristics of maize straw and the seaweed Ulva pertusa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naihao Ye

    Full Text Available Seaweed has attracted considerable attention as a potential biofuel feedstock. The pyrolytic and kinetic characteristics of maize straw and the seaweed Ulva pertusa were studied and compared using heating rates of 10, 30 and 50°C min(-1 under an inert atmosphere. The activation energy, and pre-exponential factors were calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS and Popescu methods. The kinetic mechanism was deduced by the Popescu method. The results indicate that there are three stages to the pyrolysis; dehydration, primary devolatilization and residual decomposition. There were significant differences in average activation energy, thermal stability, final residuals and reaction rates between the two materials. The primary devolatilization stage of U. pertusa can be described by the Avramic-Erofeev equation (n=3, whereas that of maize straw can be described by the Mampel Power Law (n=2. The average activation energy of maize straw and U. pertusa were 153.0 and 148.7 KJ mol(-1, respectively. The pyrolysis process of U.pertusa would be easier than maize straw. And co-firing of the two biomass may be require less external heat input and improve process stability. There were minor kinetic compensation effects between the pre-exponential factors and the activation energy.

  6. Kinetic analyses and pyrolytic behavior of Para grass (Urochloa mutica) for its bioenergy potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Sajjad; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Al Ayed, Omar S; Ye, Guangbin; Luo, Huibo; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Rashid, Umer; Arbi Nehdi, Imededdine; Qadir, Ghulam

    2017-01-01

    The biomass of Urochloa mutica was subjected to thermal degradation analyses to understand its pyrolytic behavior for bioenergy production. Thermal degradation experiments were performed at three different heating rates, 10, 30 and 50°Cmin(-1) using simultaneous thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetric analyzer, under an inert environment. The kinetic analyses were performed using isoconversional models of Kissenger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO). The high heating value was calculated as 15.04MJmol(-1). The activation energy (E) values were shown to be ranging from 103 through 233 kJmol(-1). Pre-exponential factors (A) indicated the reaction to follow first order kinetics. Gibbs free energy (ΔG) was measured to be ranging from 169 to 173kJmol(-1) and 168 to 172kJmol(-1), calculated by KAS and FWO methods, respectively. We have shown that Para grass biomass has considerable bioenergy potential comparable to established bioenergy crops such as switchgrass and miscanthus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of pyrolytic liquids from industrial sewage sludges in an induction-heating reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Chang, Jeng-Hung; Hsien, Kuo-Jung; Chang, Yuan-Ming

    2009-01-01

    With the application of induction-heating, the pyrolytic experiments have been carried out for three sewage sludges from the food processing factories in an externally heated fixed-bed reactor. The thermochemical characteristics of sludge samples were first analyzed. The results indicated that the calorific value had about 15 MJ/kg on an average, suggesting that it had a potential for biomass energy source. However, its nitrogen concentration was relatively high. From the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves, it showed that the pyrolysis reaction can be almost finished in the temperature range of 450-750 degrees C. The yields of resulting liquid and char products from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge were discussed for examining the effects of pyrolysis temperature (500-800 degrees C), heating rate (200-500 degrees C/min), and holding time (1-8 min). Overall, the variation of yield was not so significant in the experimental conditions for three sewage sludges. All results of the resulting liquid products analyzed by elemental analyzer, pH meter, Karl-Fischer moisture titrator and bomb calorimeter were in consistence with those analyses by FTIR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the pyrolysis liquid products contained large amounts of water (>73% by weight) mostly derived from the bound water in the biosludge feedstocks and the condensation reactions during the pyrolysis reaction, and fewer contents of oxygenated hydrocarbons composing of carbonyl and nitrogen-containing groups, resulting in low pH and low calorific values.

  8. Determination of methacrylic acid in food simulants by pyrolytic butylation-gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongping; Qiu, Ruofeng; Liu, Tingfei; Huang, Yilei; Zhu, Zuoyi; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-08

    An on-line pyrolytic butylation approach was proposed to determine methacrylic acid (MA) in food simulants by gas chromatography (GC) without an expensive pyrolyzer. MA in food simulants was converted into butyl methacrylate in the presence of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) without any pretreatment at 330°C in the injection-port, contributing to high GC signal response. The derivatizing conditions for the proposed method were optimized, namely the injection-port temperature, type and amount of the organic alkaline used for derivatization. A series of standard solutions of MA in the range of 1.0-50mg/kg were analyzed with correlation coefficient r≥0.9975. The limits of detection (LODs) were less than 0.15mg/kg for MA in four matrix simulants (distilled water, 3%w/v acetic acid, 10%v/v ethanol, and isooctane). Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for retention time, peak height and peak area were all less than 3.88%. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of MA migrating from plastic cup samples, with recoveries of added MA in the range of 96.5-123.0%. Direct injection of the simulants into the GC system after migration tests, without any pretreatment step, makes the developed method of great value for rapid screening analysis of samples in bulks.

  9. Electroanalytical and spectroscopic characterization of poly(o-phenylenediamine) grown on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giglio, Elvira; Losito, Ilario; Torsi, Luisa; Sabbatini, Luigia; Zambonin, Pier Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    The polymerization of ortho-phenylenediamine (o-PD) on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) at different pH (1,3,5,7) was investigated by electroanalytical and spectroscopic methods. Cyclic voltammetry was used both to polymerize o-PD and to study the electroactivity of the resulting poly(ortho-phenylenediamine) (PPD) film. A redox couple associated to the PPD electroactivity, deeply influenced by the pH adopted during polymerization, was recorded. A correlation between this feature and the electrochemistry shown by the oligomers of o-PD, generated in solution during the polymer synthesis, was also found. A comparison between the absorption spectra, in the visible region, of the soluble oligomers and of the PPD films was also performed, suggesting that changes in both the polymer and the oligomer structure occur and are highly related to the polymerization pH. In particular, a higher degree of conjugation is exhibited by the PPD films electrosynthesised at lower pH and this likely explains the higher conductivity as well as the higher electroactivity shown by the material obtained in these conditions.

  10. Preparation of ZrC nano-particles reinforced amorphous carbon composite coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Xiong, X.; Huang, B. Y.; Li, G. D.; Zhang, H. B.; Xiao, P.; Chen, Z. K.; Zheng, X. L.

    2009-05-01

    To eliminate cracks caused by thermal expansion mismatch between ZrC coating and carbon-carbon composites, a kind of ZrC/C composite coating was designed as an interlayer. The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a method to achieve co-deposition of ZrC and C from ZrCl 4-C 3H 6-H 2-Ar source. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl 4) powder carrier was especially made to control accurately the flow rate. The microstructure of ZrC/C composite coating was studied using analytical techniques. ZrC/C coating shows same morphology as pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows ZrC grains with size of 10-50 nm embed in turbostratic carbon. The formation mechanism is that the growth of ZrC crystals was inhibited by surrounding pyrolytic carbon and kept as nano-particles. Fracture morphologies imply good combination between coating and substrate. The ZrC crystals have stoichiometric proportion near 1, with good crystalline but no clear preferred orientation while pyrolytic carbon is amorphous. The heating-up oxidation of ZrC/C coating shows 11.58 wt.% loss. It can be calculated that the coating consists of 74.04 wt.% ZrC and 25.96 wt.% pyrolytic carbon. The average density of the composite coating is 5.892 g/cm 3 by Archimedes' principle.

  11. Recent development of carbon electrode materials and their bioanalytical and environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Shuyun; Luque, Rafael; Han, Shuang; Hu, Lianzhe; Xu, Guobao

    2016-02-07

    Carbon materials have been extensively investigated due to their diversity, favorable properties, and active applications including electroanalytical chemistry. This critical review discusses new synthetic methods, novel carbon materials, new properties and electroanalytical applications of carbon materials particularly related to the preparation as well as bioanalytical and environmental applications of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes, various carbon films (e.g. pyrolyzed carbon films, boron-doped diamond films and diamond-like carbon films) and screen printing carbon electrodes. Future perspectives in the field have also been discussed (366 references).

  12. Pyrolytic acrylamide formation from purified wheat gluten and gluten-supplemented wheat bread rolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Achim; Weisz, Georg M; Schieber, Andreas; Carle, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed different acrylamide formation mechanisms, e. g. from carnosine (N-beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and aminopropionamide as additional precursors. The occurrence of acrylamide in food matrices devoid of common precursors such as meat supports an additional formation pathway. Gluten was recovered from wheat flour by water extraction. Starch, reducing sugars and amino acids were removed using alpha-amylase and NaCl solution and were completely absent in the purified gluten fraction. The gluten was dry heated at temperatures ranging from 160 to 240 degrees C for 8 to 12 min and analyzed for acrylamide and cinnamic amide using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Acrylamide could be detected up to 3997 microg/kg gluten dry weight. Cinnamic amide was detected and unambiguously identified in the gluten samples, thus confirming the proposed formation of acrylamide from proteins. After gluten addition to bread roll dough, protein pyrolysis to form acrylamide in the complex food matrix was assessed. Contents of asparagine and reducing sugars were diminished due to the addition of the gluten. In contrast to the expectation with respect to the well-established common formation mechanism of acrylamide, it increased from 53.4 to 63.9 microg/kg (+20%), which was in good correlation with the higher proportion of gluten. As demonstrated by the t-test, the increase in acrylamide was significant when comparing 0 and 15% gluten addition. Additionally, cinnamic amide could be found in crusts of bread rolls. Thus, evidence for pyrolytic formation of acrylamide from wheat gluten was provided.

  13. STM observation of a box-shaped graphene nanostructure appeared after mechanical cleavage of pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V., E-mail: rlapshin@gmail.com [Solid Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Physical Problems, Zelenograd, Moscow 124460 (Russian Federation); Department of Photosensitive Nano and Microsystems, Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology, Zelenograd, Moscow 124498 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A previously unknown 3D box-shaped graphene (BSG) nanostructure has been detected. • The nanostructure is a multilayer system of parallel nanochannels having quadrangular cross-section. • Typical width of a nanochannel facet makes 25 nm, typical wall/facet thickness is 1 nm. • A mechanism qualitatively explaining the nanostructure formation has been proposed. • Possible applications of the BSG nanostructure are briefly discussed. - Abstract: A description is given of a three-dimensional box-shaped graphene (BSG) nanostructure formed/uncovered by mechanical cleavage of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The discovered nanostructure is a multilayer system of parallel hollow channels located along the surface and having quadrangular cross-section. The thickness of the channel walls/facets is approximately equal to 1 nm. The typical width of channel facets makes about 25 nm, the channel length is 390 nm and more. The investigation of the found nanostructure by means of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) allows us to draw a conclusion that it is possible to make spatial constructions of graphene similar to the discovered one by mechanical compression, bending, splitting, and shifting graphite surface layers. The distinctive features of such constructions are the following: simplicity of the preparation method, small contact area between graphene planes and a substrate, large surface area, nanometer cross-sectional sizes of the channels, large aspect ratio. Potential fields of application include: ultra-sensitive detectors, high-performance catalytic cells, nanochannels for DNA manipulation, nanomechanical resonators, electron multiplication channels, high-capacity sorbents for hydrogen storage.

  14. Adsorption of anionic, cationic and disperse dyes with activated pyrolytic tire char

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duangkamol Danwanichakul

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Activated pyrolytic tire char was applied as adsorbents to remove dyes from contaminated water. The method of surface treatment with ethanol solution, HCl solution and then activation with NaOH solution was proposed. After activation at 750oC, the specific surface area (SSA of activated char (AC increased from 154.7 m2 /g to 228.9 m2 /g. The pore size increased slightly from 323.4 oA to 349.3 oA and iodine number increased from 95 mg/g to 137 mg/g. AC was then utilized in the adsorption of three dyes which were acid dye (AR131, basic dye (BR18 and disperse dye (DR167 in a shaker with a speed of 75 rpm at 26oC. The initial concentration was varied to be 10 – 50 mg/L. The kinetic results were more consistent with pseudo-second-order model. Considering the adsorption rate constant, k2, it was found that kinetics for acid dye (AR131 was slower than basic dye (BR18 while kinetics for disperse dye (DR167 did not follow specific pattern since it cannot be dispersed well in water without any dispersing agent. Regarding adsorption equilibrium when the initial concentration was between 10-50 mg/L, the adsorption percentages for acid dye (AR131, basic dye (BR18 and disperse dye (DR167 were 88.2 - 100%, 100%, and 26.9 – 50.7%, respectively. In addition, the adsorption isotherms for acid dye (AR131 and basic dye (BR18 followed the Langmuir equation, whereas, that for disperse dye (DR167 was better fit with the Freundlich equation.

  15. Characteristics of Pyrolytic Topping in Fluidized Bed for Different Volatile Coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, R.; Dong, L.; Xu, G. W.

    Coal is generally combusted or gasified directly to destroy completely the chemical structures, such as aromatic rings containing in volatile coals including bituminite and lignite. Coal topping refers to a process that extracts chemicals with aromatic rings from such volatile coals in advance of combustion or gasification and thereby takes advantage of the value of coal as a kind of chemical structure resource. CFB boiler is the coal utilization facility that can be easily retrofitted to implement coal topping. A critical issue for performing coal topping is the choice of the pyrolytic reactor that can be different types. The present study concerns fluidized bed reactor that has rarely been tested for use in coal topping. Two different types of coals, one being Xiaolongtan (XLT) lignite and the other Shanxi (SX) bituminous, were tested to clarify the yield and composition of pyrolysis liquid and gas under conditions simulating actual operations. The results showed that XLT lignite coals had the maximum tar yield in 823-873K and SX bituminite realized its highest tar yield in 873-923K. Overall, lignite produced lower tar yield than bituminous coal. The pyrolysis gas from lignite coals contained more CO and CO2 and less CH4, H2 and C2+C3 (C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8) components comparing to that from bituminous coal. TG-FTIR analysis of tars demonstrated that for different coals there are different amounts of typical chemical species. Using coal ash of CFB boiler, instead of quartz sand, as the fluidized particles decreased the yields of both tar and gas for all the tested coals. Besides, pyrolysis in a reaction atmosphere simulating the pyrolysis gas (instead of N2) resulted also in higher production of pyrolysis liquid.

  16. Electrocatalytic detection of dopamine at single-walled carbon nanotubes–iron (III) oxide nanoparticles platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical sensors using edge-plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPPGEs) modified with singlewall carbon nanotubes–iron (III) oxide (SWCNT/Fe2O3) nanoparticles for the sensitive detection of dopamine (DA) are described for the first time...

  17. Electrochemical Determination of Epinephrine with a Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode in the Presence of Ascorbic Acid and Dopamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu Hui LIU; Yan ZHANG; Guo Fang ZUO; Xiao Quan LU

    2006-01-01

    A method for determination of epinephrine(EP) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA)and dopamine (DA) with bare pyrolytic graphite electrodes has been described for the first time.In pH 7.0 phosphate buffer solution, the linear relationship was observed between the reduction peak current of EP and its concentration over the range from 1×10-4 to 5×10-7 mol/L, the related coefficient is 0.9992 (N=8).

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: a green route for large-scale production of porous graphene and graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Paola; Hu, Anming; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Duley, Walter W; Zhou, Norman Y

    2014-02-21

    Porous graphene (PG) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are attracting attention due to their potential applications in photovoltaics, catalysis, and bio-related fields. We present a novel way for mass production of these promising materials. The femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is employed for their synthesis. Porous graphene (PG) layers were found to float at the water-air interface, while graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were dispersed in the solution. The sheets consist of one to six stacked layers of spongy graphene, which form an irregular 3D porous structure that displays pores with an average size of 15-20 nm. Several characterization techniques have confirmed the porous nature of the collected layers. The analyses of the aqueous solution confirmed the presence of GQDs with dimensions of about 2-5 nm. It is found that the formation of both PG and GQDs depends on the fs-laser ablation energy. At laser fluences less than 12 J cm(-2), no evidence of either PG or GQDs is detected. However, polyynes with six and eight carbon atoms per chain are found in the solution. For laser energies in the 20-30 J cm(-2) range, these polyynes disappeared, while PG and GQDs were found at the water-air interface and in the solution, respectively. The origin of these materials can be explained based on the mechanisms for water breakdown and coal gasification. The absence of PG and GQDs, after the laser ablation of HOPG in liquid nitrogen, confirms the proposed mechanisms.

  19. Feasibility study: Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, W.A.; Grey, A.E.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M.; Haefner, D.R.

    1991-09-01

    This study presents a preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of selected conceptual processes for pyrolytic conversion of organic feedstocks or the decomposition/detoxification of hazardous wastes by coupling the process to the geopressured-geothermal resource. The report presents a detailed discussion of the resource and of each process selected for evaluation including the technical evaluation of each. A separate section presents the economic methodology used and the evaluation of the technically viable process. A final section presents conclusions and recommendations. Three separate processes were selected for evaluation. These are pyrolytic conversion of biomass to petroleum like fluids, wet air oxidation (WAO) at subcritical conditions for destruction of hazardous waste, and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) also for the destruction of hazardous waste. The scientific feasibility of all three processes has been previously established by various bench-scale and pilot-scale studies. For a variety of reasons detailed in the report the SCWO process is the only one deemed to be technically feasible, although the effects of the high solids content of the geothermal brine need further study. This technology shows tremendous promise for contributing to solving the nation's energy and hazardous waste problems. However, the current economic analysis suggests that it is uneconomical at this time. 50 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Covalent Modification of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite with a Stable Organic Free Radical by Using Diazonium Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seber, Gonca; Rudnev, Alexander V; Droghetti, Andrea; Rungger, Ivan; Veciana, Jaume; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Rovira, Concepció; Crivillers, Núria

    2017-01-26

    A novel, persistent, electrochemically active perchlorinated triphenylmethyl (PTM) radical with a diazonium functionality has been covalently attached to highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by electrografting in a single-step process. Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM) and Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that PTM molecules had a higher tendency to covalently react at the HOPG step edges. The cross-section profiles from EC-STM images showed that there was current enhancement at the functionalized areas, which could be explained by redox-mediated electron tunneling through surface-confined redox-active molecules. Cyclic voltammetry clearly demonstrated that the intrinsic properties of the organic radical were preserved upon grafting and DFT calculations also revealed that the magnetic character of the PTM radical was preserved. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Optimisation and fabrication of a composite pyrolytic graphite monochromator for the Pelican instrument at the ANSTO OPAL reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, A. K.; Yu, D. H.

    2011-04-01

    The triple monochromator for the TOF neutron spectrometer Pelican at ANSTO has been fully optimised in terms of overall performance, including the determination of the thickness of the pyrolytic graphite crystals. A total of 24 composite crystals were designed and fabricated. The calculated optimum thickness of 1.3 mm and the length of 15 cm of the monochromator crystals, that are not available commercially, were obtained by cleaving and soldering with indium. An extensive characterisation of the crystals using X-ray and neutron diffraction was conducted before and after the cleaving and bonding processes. The results proved that no damage was introduced during fabrication and showed that the design goals were fully met. The measured peak reflectivity and rocking curve widths were indeed in an excellent agreement with theory. In addition to the superior efficiency of the triple monochromator achieved by this novel approach, the amount of the crystal material required could be reduced by 1/3.

  2. Aluminum doped nickel oxide thin film with improved electrochromic performance from layered double hydroxides precursor in situ pyrolytic route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingjing; Lai, Lincong; Zhang, Ping; Li, Hailong; Qin, Yumei; Gao, Yuanchunxue; Luo, Lei; Lu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Electrochromic materials with unique performance arouse great interest on account of potential application values in smart window, low-power display, automobile anti-glare rearview mirror, and e-papers. In this paper, high-performing Al-doped NiO porous electrochromic film grown on ITO substrate has been prepared via a layered double hydroxides(LDHs) precursor in situ pyrolytic route. The Al3+ ions distributed homogenously within the NiO matrix can significantly influence the crystallinity of Ni-Al LDH and NiO:Al3+ films. The electrochromic performance of the films were evaluated by means of UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and chronoamperometry(CA) measurements. In addition, the ratio of Ni3+/Ni2+ also varies with Al content which can lead to different electrochemical performances. Among the as-prepared films, NiO film prepared from Ni-Al (19:1) LDH show the best electrochromic performance with a high transparency of 96%, large optical modulation range (58.4%), fast switching speed (bleaching/coloration times are 1.8/4.2 s, respectively) and excellent durability (30% decrease after 2000 cycles). The improved performance was owed to the synergy of large NiO film specific surface area and porous morphology, as well as Al doping stifled the formation of Ni3+ making bleached state more pure. This LDHs precursor pyrolytic method is simple, low-cost and environmental benign and is feasible for the preparation of NiO:Al and other Al-doped oxide thin film.

  3. 热解型绝热材料烧蚀过程数值仿真%Research on Numerical Simulation for Ablation of Pyrolytic Insulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周源; 黄志勇; 王斌

    2015-01-01

    绝热层的热防护性能直接影响了固体火箭发动机工作的安全性和可靠性。热解型绝热材料在传热烧蚀过程中形成了碳化层—热解面—基体层的物理结构。通过建立热化学烧蚀计算模型和绝热层传热计算模型对传热烧蚀过程进行了计算分析。考虑到烧蚀过程中绝热层边界的移动,根据预测—校正格式对模型进行离散,对绝热层的烧蚀过程及传热过程进行了耦合计算。计算结果表明,绝热层的热解速率比烧蚀速率大很多,绝热材料的热解潜热对绝热层的热防护能力具有很大影响。%The thermal protection ability of insulator has great influence on the safety and reliability of SRM. During the progress of heat-transfer and ablation,the pyrolytic insulator changes into the physical structure with carbonization-layer,pyrolysis-side and insulator-layer. The thermal behavior and ablation of insulator were calculated and analyzed by the thermo-chemistry ablation model and heat-transfer calculation model. In consideration of the fact that the boundary of insulator is moving during the ablation,the models were discredited with predicted-correction method. Insulator ablation and temperature field were coupling calculated. The results show that the rate of pyrolysis is higher than the rate of ablation and the latent heat of pyrolysis has great influence on thermal protection ability of insulator.

  4. Potential for the use of pyrolytic tar from bagasse in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, L.E.B. [Oriente Univ., Chemical Engineering Faculty, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Cortez, L.A.B. [State Univ. of Campinas, Agricultural Engineering Faculty, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    1997-12-01

    Tar from pyrolyzed bagasse was characterized according to its main structural features. Its solubility in NaOH solutions results in an alkaline tar solution (ATS) that exhibits surface active properties. The prepared ATS was successfully used as a foam flotation agent in copper mining, as a foaming agent in foam concrete formation, and as a fluidization agent for Portland cement manufacture. The potentialities of by-products of conventional pyrolysis and carbonization processed are stressed. (Author)

  5. Dual Functions of Carbon in Li(sub4)Ti(sub5)O(sub12)/C Microspheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wen, L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ) batteries. Li(sub4)Ti(sub5)O(sub12)/C microspheres were prepared by assembling the nano-Li(sub4)Ti(sub5)O(sub12) (50–300 nm) with pitch derived pyrolytic carbon. It was found that the coated carbon in Li(sub4)Ti(sub5)O(sub12)/C microspheres can effectively...

  6. Aluminum doped nickel oxide thin film with improved electrochromic performance from layered double hydroxides precursor in situ pyrolytic route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jingjing; Lai, Lincong; Zhang, Ping; Li, Hailong; Qin, Yumei; Gao, Yuanchunxue; Luo, Lei; Lu, Jun, E-mail: lujun@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2016-09-15

    Electrochromic materials with unique performance arouse great interest on account of potential application values in smart window, low-power display, automobile anti-glare rearview mirror, and e-papers. In this paper, high-performing Al-doped NiO porous electrochromic film grown on ITO substrate has been prepared via a layered double hydroxides(LDHs) precursor in situ pyrolytic route. The Al{sup 3+} ions distributed homogenously within the NiO matrix can significantly influence the crystallinity of Ni-Al LDH and NiO:Al{sup 3+} films. The electrochromic performance of the films were evaluated by means of UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and chronoamperometry(CA) measurements. In addition, the ratio of Ni{sup 3+}/Ni{sup 2+} also varies with Al content which can lead to different electrochemical performances. Among the as-prepared films, NiO film prepared from Ni-Al (19:1) LDH show the best electrochromic performance with a high transparency of 96%, large optical modulation range (58.4%), fast switching speed (bleaching/coloration times are 1.8/4.2 s, respectively) and excellent durability (30% decrease after 2000 cycles). The improved performance was owed to the synergy of large NiO film specific surface area and porous morphology, as well as Al doping stifled the formation of Ni{sup 3+} making bleached state more pure. This LDHs precursor pyrolytic method is simple, low-cost and environmental benign and is feasible for the preparation of NiO:Al and other Al-doped oxide thin film. - Graphical abstract: The ratio of Ni{sup 3+}/Ni{sup 2+} varies with Al content which can lead to different electrochemical performances. Among the as-prepared films, NiO film prepared from Ni-Al (19:1) LDH show the best electrochromic performance with a high transparency of 96%, large optical modulation range, fast switching speed and excellent durability. Display Omitted.

  7. Phases formed during rapid quenching of liquid carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharin, A. Yu.; Dozhdikov, V. S.; Dubinchuk, V. T.; Kirillin, A. V.; Lysenko, I. Yu.; Turchaninov, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsed laser action upon a sample of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in a gasostat filled with helium at a pressure above that corresponding to the triple point of carbon, followed by rapid quenching of the liquid phase at a rate of about 106 K/s leads to the formation of a crater with a periodic spatial structure at the surface. The composition and structure of nongraphite carbon phases in the near-surface region of the crater have been studied using the Raman scattering spectroscopy, electron microdiffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. It is established that rapidly quenched carbon possesses predominantly a hybrid structure of glassy carbon formed as a result of the high-temperature treatment, with inclusions of crystalline carbyne, chaoite, and a hybrid cubic phase of ultradense carbon (C8). The hybrid phases of glassy carbon and C8 had not been reported until now as possible products of solidification of liquid carbon.

  8. Biochar potential evaluation of palm oil wastes through slow pyrolysis: Thermochemical characterization and pyrolytic kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xin Jiat; Lee, Lai Yee; Gan, Suyin; Thangalazhy-Gopakumar, Suchithra; Ng, Hoon Kiat

    2017-03-22

    This research investigated the potential of palm kernel shell (PKS), empty fruit bunch (EFB) and palm oil sludge (POS), abundantly available agricultural wastes, as feedstock for biochar production by slow pyrolysis (50mLmin(-1) N2 at 500°C). Various characterization tests were performed to establish the thermochemical properties of the feedstocks and obtained biochars. PKS and EFB had higher lignin, volatiles, carbon and HHV, and lower ash than POS. The thermochemical conversion had enhanced the biofuel quality of PKS-char and EFB-char exhibiting increased HHV (26.18-27.50MJkg(-1)) and fixed carbon (53.78-59.92%), and decreased moisture (1.03-2.26%). The kinetics of pyrolysis were evaluated by thermogravimetry at different heating rates (10-40°C). The activation energies determined by Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa models were similar, and comparable with literature data. The findings implied that PKS and EFB are very promising sources for biochars synthesis, and the obtained chars possessed significant biofuel potential.

  9. Low-energy and chemical-free activation of pyrolytic tire char and its adsorption characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Augustine; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2009-06-01

    It is generally known that the solid char obtained from pyrolysis of scrap rubber tires can be used as an adsorbent for several applications such as wastewater treatment. In this study, scrap tires were first pyrolyzed under nitrogen (N2) or carbon dioxide (CO2) gas under various temperatures to produce char. The char was activated in situ by post-pyrolysis oxygenation (PPO) at different temperature ranges as soon as the pyrolysis process was completed. Elemental and spectroscopic analyses showed significant zinc content in the char after PPO. Batch-mode removal of aqueous copper (Cu) using the chars revealed that, for N2 and CO2, the optimum condition for pyrolysis was at 550 degrees C and for activation was from 550 to 250 degrees C. Although CO2-pyrolyzed char had lower Cu and lead (Pb) removal than N2-pyrolyzed char, it had higher char yields. For both N2- and CO2-pyrolyzed char, activation with PPO improved their heavy metal removal efficiencies significantly compared with unactivated char. PPO chars had much faster removal rates and higher Cu removal compared with both pyrolyzed, unactivated char and commercial activated carbons.

  10. Thermal Behavior and Kinetics of Raw/Pyrolytic Wood and Coal Blends during Co-combustion Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian DING; Qing-cai LIU; Li-jun JIANG; Guo-qing LIU; Shan REN; Jian YANG; Lu YAO; Fei MENG

    2016-01-01

    The thermal properties of raw wood (RW)biomass,corresponding pyrolytic wood (PW)biomass,and their blends with anthracite coal (AC)were evaluated under combustion conditions with a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)method.The blending ratios of the biomass with AC ranging from 0 to 100 mass% were taken into consider-ation to investigate the thermal behavior and kinetics of these blends during their co-combustion.For blends with dif-ferent ratios of the RW to AC and 100% AC (100 AC),two distinct mass loss peaks related to the release or com-bustion process of the volatiles and the combustion of the char were noted.The addition of a higher ratio of RW or PW into AC can improve the combustion process of the blends.The thermal behavior of the RW/AC or PW/AC blends could not be characterized by a simple linear correlation of their pure material thermal behavior.With the RW/PW addition ratios varying from 25 mass% to 80 mass%,the apparent activation energy of the blends gradually decreased from 48.46 to 34.93 kJ/mol and from 82.74 to 37.81 kJ/mol for the RW/AC and PW/AC blends,re-spectively,with high correlation coefficient (R2 )values ranging from 0.995 6 to 0.998 4.

  11. Performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack with thermally conductive pyrolytic graphite sheets for thermal management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Chien-Heng [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101 (China)

    2009-04-15

    This work experimentally investigates the effects of the pyrolytic graphite sheets (PGS) on the performance and thermal management of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. These PGS with the features of light weight and high thermal conductivity serve as heat spreaders in the fuel cell stack for the first time to reduce the volume and weight of cooling systems, and homogenizes the temperature in the reaction areas. A PEMFC stack with an active area of 100 cm{sup 2} and 10 cells in series is constructed and used in this research. Five PGS of thickness 0.1 mm are cut into the shape of flow channels and bound to the central five cathode gas channel plates. Four thermocouples are embedded on the cathode gas channel plates to estimate the temperature variation in the stack. It is shown that the maximum power of the stack increase more than 15% with PGS attached. PGS improve the stack performance and alleviate the flooding problem at low cathode flow rates significantly. Results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of application of PGS to the thermal management of a small-to-medium-sized fuel cell stack. (author)

  12. Axial Ligand Effects on the Structures of Self-Assembled Gallium-Porphyrin Monolayers on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, Judith M; Iverson, Cameron P; Lau, Wing-Yeung; Hopkins, Michael D

    2016-01-19

    Monolayers of five-coordinate gallium octaethylporphyrin complexes (Ga(OEP)X; X = Cl, Br, I, O3SCF3, CCPh) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were studied at the solid-liquid (1-phenyloctane) interface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to probe the dependence of their properties on the nature of the axial X ligand. Density functional theory calculations of the gas-phase structures of the free molecules reveal that the gallium atom is positioned above the plane of the porphyrin macrocycle, with this pyramidal distortion increasing in magnitude according to X = O3SCF3 (displacement = 0.35 Å) monolayers are sensitive to the nature of the axial ligand: the monolayers of Ga(OEP)(O3SCF3) and Ga(OEP)(CCPh) exhibit damage during the STM experiment upon repeated scanning and upon toggling the sign of the bias potential, but monolayers of Ga(OEP)Cl, Ga(OEP)Br, and Ga(OEP)I do not. A second important ligand-influenced property is that Ga(OEP)I forms bilayer structures, whereas the other Ga(OEP)X compounds form monolayers exclusively under identical conditions. The top layer of the Ga(OEP)I bilayer is oriented with the iodo ligand directed away from the surface, like the bottom layer, but the molecules pack in a square, lower-density geometry. The comparatively large polarizability of the iodo ligand is suggested to be important in stabilizing the bilayer structure.

  13. Electrochemical modification of a pyrolytic graphite sheet for improved negative electrode performance in the vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Humayun; Gyan, Isaiah O.; Francis Cheng, I.

    2017-02-01

    The vanadium redox flow battery is a promising technology for buffering renewable energies. It is recognized that negative electrode is the limitation in this device where there are problems of slow heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) of V3+/2+ and parasitic H2 evolution. Any methods aimed at addressing one of these barriers must assess the effects on the other. We examine electrochemical enhancement of a common commercially available material. Treatment of Panasonic pyrolytic graphite sheets is through oxidation at 2.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl for 1 min in 1 M H2SO4. This increases the standard HET rate for V3+/2+ from 3.2 × 10-7 to 1 × 10-3 cm/s, one of the highest in literature and shifts voltammetric reductive peak potential from -1.0 V to -0.65 V in 50 mM V3+ in 1 M H2SO4. Infrared analysis of the surfaces indicates formation of Csbnd OH, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd O functionalities. These groups catalyze HET with V3+/2+ as hypothesized by Skyllas-Kasacos. Also of significance is that electrode modification decreases the fraction of the current directed towards H2 evolution. This proportion decreases by two orders of a magnitude from 12% to 0.1% as measured at the respective voltammetric peak potentials of -1.0 V (pristine) and -0.65 V (modified).

  14. Influence of ZSM-5 zeolite on the pyrolytic intermediates from the co-pyrolysis of pubescens and LDPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Wenwu [Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Hu Changwei, E-mail: gchem@scu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Yang Yu; Tong Dongmei; Li Guiying; Zhu Liangfang [Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2010-05-15

    The catalytic reforming of the pyrolytic intermediates from the co-pyrolysis of pubescens and LDPE over the parent and desilicated zeolite ZSM-5 (DeZSM-5) was investigated. The results showed that the parent HZSM-5 exhibited high aromatization activity in the co-pyrolysis, whereas DeZSM-5 exhibited high alkanisation activity. On the other hand, the total relative content of phenolic compounds in aqua obtained by co-pyrolysis catalyzed by both parent HZSM-5 and DeZSM-5 was rather high (60-65%) compared to the thermal co-pyrolysis (26.94%). From the analysis of NH{sub 3}-TPD for ZSM-5, it might be proposed that the aromatization was favored mainly by strong acid sites and the alkanisation was favored chiefly by weak acid sites in catalyst ZSM-5. In addition, the formation of phenolic compounds was mainly related to the interactions between the intermediates from the co-pyrolysis over ZSM-5.

  15. Analysis of the Formation of Multi-Layer Carbon Nanotubes in the Process of Mechanical Activation of the Pyrolysis Products of Vegetable Raw Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, V. P.; Filatenkov, A. E.; Yagofarov, V. U.; Gulevskii, D. A.; Kuryavyi, V. G.; Mansurov, Yu N.

    2016-04-01

    The carbon nanotubes are formed by pyrolytic and mechanochemical technology. Amorphous carbon is produced at 950°C and then subjected to mechanochemical treatment in a planetary mill for 1-46 h. Analysis ofinfluence of duration of mechanical activation of amorphous carbon on the morphology of moldable multilayer carbon nanotubes. It is demonstrated that prolonged mechanical activation of carbon composite in a vario-planetary mill promotes to formation of aggregates and amorphous carbon and to loss of thermal stability of nanotubeswith furtherconduct of vacuum annealing.

  16. Biocatalytic anode for glucose oxidation utilizing carbon nanotubes for direct electron transfer with glucose oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaze, Abhay; Hussain, Nighat; Tang, Chi [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3060 (United States); Leech, Donal [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Rusling, James [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3060 (United States); Department of Cell Biology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06032 (United States); School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2009-10-15

    Covalently linked layers of glucose oxidase, single-wall carbon nanotubes and poly-L-lysine on pyrolytic graphite resulted in a stable biofuel cell anode featuring direct electron transfer from the enzyme. Catalytic response observed upon addition of glucose was due to electrochemical oxidation of FADH{sub 2} under aerobic conditions. The electrode potential depended on glucose concentration. This system has essential attributes of an anode in a mediator-free biocatalytic fuel cell. (author)

  17. Pyrolytic conversion of lipid feeds for bio-chemical and bio-fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, K.D.; Kirkwood, K.M.; Bressler, D.C. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences

    2009-07-01

    The production of renewable fuels and chemicals through pyrolysis of lipid feedstock was investigated with particular focus on the effect of unsaturation on thermal cracking behaviour and product distribution. The feasibility of producing deoxygenated liquid hydrocarbons for renewable fuel and chemical applications was studied using oleic acid and linoleic acid as unsaturated model free fatty acids. These were pyrolyzed in 15 mL batch micro-reactors under a nitrogen atmosphere. The analyzed products were compared to previous work investigating pyrolysis of a fully saturated free fatty acid, stearic acids, as well as fatty acids hydrolyzed from animal fats and vegetable oils. The primary reaction in oleic acid pyrolysis was decarboxylation to heptadecene and carbon dioxide, which is consistent with stearic acid pyrolysis. Some hydrogen addition was indicated by the presence of n-heptacecane. Cracking at the double bond was found to be a dominant reaction because only the C9 and lower alkane/alkenes were present in notable concentrations. In addition, the C10-C20 alkanes/alkenes were not easily distinguishable from other compounds that were found to be alkane isomers. The product mixture was highly influenced by reaction temperatures (350-500 degrees C) and time (0.5-8 hours). Lower temperatures and shorter reaction times resulted in low acid conversion. Although higher temperatures and longer reaction times increased conversion, they eventually caused degeneration into aromatic compounds. Pyrolysis of fatty acids from hydrolyzed beef tallow, poultry tallow and canola oil yielded a similar series of alkanes and alkenes where the product distribution was consistent with an additive effect of the constituent saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

  18. Comparative effects of pyrolytic products of fiber reinforced plastic and wood shavings on the respiratory variables in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Deb, Utsab; Gautam, Anshoo; Vijayaraghavan, R; Ratna, Debdatta; Chakraborty, B C

    2010-08-01

    Comparative inhalation toxicity studies of pyrolytic products (smoke) from synthetic polymer, fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) and teak wood shavings were carried out in male Swiss albino mice. The breathing pattern and the respiratory variables were monitored using a computer program that recognizes the modifications of the respiratory pattern. Exposure to the smoke from both the polymers caused a concentration dependent decrease in normal breathing and an increase in sensory irritation measure. The acute lethal concentration 50 values for a 15 min static inhalation exposure to the smoke from FRP and teak wood shavings were found to be > 200.00 and 62.99 g/m(3), respectively. Hence the inhalation toxicity of smoke from FRP sample on a mass basis is approximately one-third that of the smoke from teak wood. The concentration of smoke causing 50% respiratory depression of the exposed animals were found to be 6.877 and 0.106 g/m(3) for FRP and teak wood samples, respectively. Thus the sensory irritancy of the smoke from FRP sample is approximately 65 times lesser than the smoke from teak wood. The higher sensory irritancy potential of wood smoke as compared to FRP smoke may be caused by a greater number of submicron particles (size range of 2 micron and less) and greater percentage of gases present in wood smoke as compared to FRP smoke. Thus in case of accidental fires, synthetic polymers like FRP may be a safer choice for structural parts and interiors than the natural wood.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of the wettability of multilayer graphene using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Ali; Wu, Yanbin; Wang, Michael C; Aluru, Narayana R; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Nam, SungWoo

    2014-11-04

    We report the intrinsic water contact angle (WCA) of multilayer graphene, explore different methods of cleaning multilayer graphene, and evaluate the efficiency of those methods on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. Highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was used as a model material system to study the wettability of the multilayer graphene surface by WCA measurements. A WCA value of 45° ± 3° was measured for a clean HOPG surface, which can serve as the intrinsic WCA for multilayer graphene. A 1 min plasma treatment (100 W) decreased the WCA to 6°, owing to the creation of surface defects and functionalization by oxygen-containing groups. Molecular dynamics simulations of water droplets on the HOPG surface with or without the oxygen-containing defect sites confirmed the experimental results. Heat treatment at near atmospheric pressure and wet chemical cleaning methods using hydrofluoric acid and chloroform did not change the WCA significantly. Low-pressure, high-temperature annealing under argon and hydrogen reduced the WCA to 54°, close to the intrinsic WCA of HOPG. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy did not show any significant change for the HOPG surface after this treatment, confirming low-pressure, high-temperature annealing as an effective technique to clean multilayer graphene without damaging the surface. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated the existence of hydrocarbon species on the surface of the HOPG sample that was exposed to air for surfaces after the different cleaning techniques were performed to correlate the WCA to the surface chemistry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results revealed that the WCA value changed drastically, depending on the amounts of oxygen-containing and hydrocarbon-containing groups on the surface.

  20. Characteristics of Waste Plastics Pyrolytic Oil and Its Applications as Alternative Fuel on Four Cylinder Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosal Nugroho Pratama

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Waste plastics recycling using pyrolysis method is not only able to decrease a number of environment pollutant but also able to produce economical and high quality hydrocarbon products. Two experiments were conducted to completely study Waste Plastic Pyrolytic Oil (WPPO characteristics and its applications.  First experiment investigated oil characteristics derived from pyrolysis process in two stages batch reactors: pyrolysis and catalytic reforming reactor, at maximum temperature 500oC and 450oC respectively. Waste Polyethylene (PE, Polypropylene (PP, Polystyrene (PS, Polyethylene Terepthalate (PET and others were used as raw material. Nitrogen flow rate at 0.8 l/minutes was used to increase oil weight percentage. Indonesian natural zeolite was used as catalyst. Then, second experiment was carried out on Diesel Engine Test Bed (DETB used blending of WPPO and Biodiesel fuel with a volume ratio of 1:9. This experiment was specifically conducted to study how much potency of blending of WPPO and biodiesel in diesel engine. The result of first experiment showed that the highest weight percentage of WPPO derived from mixture of PE waste (50%wt, PP waste (40%wt and PS waste (10%wt is 45.13%wt. The more weight percentage of PE in feedstock effected on the less weight percentage of WPPO, the more percentage of C12-C20 content in WPPO and the higher calorific value of WPPO. Characteristics of WPPO such as, Specific Gravity, Flash point, Pour Point, Kinematic Viscosity, Calorific value and percentage of C12-C20 showed interesting result that WPPO could be developed as alternative fuel on diesel fuel blending due to the proximity of their characteristics. Performance of diesel engine using blending of WPPO and biodiesel on second experiment gave good result so the WPPO will have great potency to be valuable alternative liquid fuel in future, especially on stationary diesel engine and transportation engine application.

  1. Nano-level monitoring of Mn(2+) ion by fabrication of coated pyrolytic graphite electrode based on isonicotinohydrazide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, Manoj Kumar; Singh, A K; Jain, A K

    2015-05-01

    The two ionophores N'(N',N‴E,N',N‴E)-N',N‴-((((oxybis(ethane-2,1-diyl))bis(oxy)) bis(2,1-phenylene))bis(methanylylidene))di(isonicotinohydrazide) (I1) and (N',N‴E,N',N‴E)-N',N‴-(((propane-1,3-diylbis(oxy))bis(2,1-phenylene))bis(methanylylidene))di(isonicotinohydrazide) (I2) were synthesised and investigated as neutral carrier in the fabrication of Mn(2+) ion selective sensor. Several membranes were prepared by incorporating different plasticizers and anionic excluders and their effect on potentiometric response was studied. The best analytical performance was obtained with the electrode having a membrane of composition of I2: PVC: o-NPOE: NaTPB in the ratio of 6:34:58:2 (w/w, mg). Comparative studies of coated graphite electrode (CGE) and coated pyrolytic graphite electrode (CPGE) based on I2 reveal the superiority of CPGE. The CPGE exhibits wide working concentration range of 1.23×10(-8)-1.0×10(-1) mol L(-1) and a detection limit down to 4.78×10(-9) mol L(-1) with a Nernstian slope of 29.5±0.4 mV decade(-1) of activity. The sensor performs satisfactorily over a wide pH range (3.5-9.0) and exhibited a quick response time (9s). The sensor can work satisfactorily in water-acetonitrile and water-methanol mixtures. It can tolerate 30% acetonitrile and 20% methanol content in the mixtures. The sensor could be used for a period of four months without any significant divergence in performance. The sensor reflects its utility in the quantification of Mn(2+) ion in real samples and has been successfully employed as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Mn(2+) ion with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA).

  2. Photodeposition of Gold, Platinum, or Silver onto Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles at Steps of Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taing, James

    The photodeposition of gold, platinum, or silver nanoparticles selectively onto isolated titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles created metal/TiO2 photocatalysts and heterogeneous catalysts, and validated the photocatalytic property of the semiconductor. The isolated and ordered TiO2 nanoparticles permitted clear observations of the stability, and changes in morphology, of the particles in various experimental conditions. The fabrication of TiO2 nanoparticles at the steps of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), utilizing physical vapor deposition, required heating the graphite substrate to a minimum of 800 °C. The production of a photocurrent, and plating of gold nanoparticles, confirmed the photocatalytic property of the TiO2 nanoparticles on HOPG when utilized as a photoelectrode in a two half-cell setup. Employing sodium chloride (1.0 M) as an electrolyte resulted in an increase/decrease of the photocurrent with the addition of gold cations to the half-cell without/with the TiO2 nanoparticles. A poor distribution of gold nanoparticles, roughly 40-45 nm wide, deposited around few of the TiO2 nanoparticles. A lower concentration of sodium chloride (0.1 M) resulted in a coalescence of Au nanoparticles, roughly 10 nm, around many TiO2 nanoparticles. Using sodium nitrate as an electrolyte resulted in a rapid decay in the photocurrent and a growth of an unidentified material on the TiO2 nanoparticles. The unidentified material hindered the reduction of gold cations introduced midway through the experiment. With gold cations present at the onset of the experiment, disperse gold nanoparticles (˜5-10 nm) deposited around the TiO2 nanoparticles. In the absence of additional electrolyte, many disperse gold nanoparticles less than 5 nm deposited onto the TiO2 nanoparticles. More platinum than gold selectively deposited onto the TiO2 nanoparticles. On the contrary, less silver selectively deposited onto the TiO2 nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic

  3. Improvement in electrochemical capacitance of activated carbon from scrap tires by nitric acid treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Zhao, Ping-Ping; Dong, Xiao-Ting; Zhang, Cui; Liu, Shuang-Xi

    2014-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) obtained from the industrial pyrolytic tire char is treated by concentrated nitric acid (AC-HNO3) and then used as the electrode material for supercapacitors. Surface properties and electrochemical capacitances of AC and ACHNO3 are studied. It is found that the morphology and the porous texture for AC and AC-HNO3 have little difference, while the oxygen content increases and functional groups change after the acid treatment. Electrochemical results demonstrate that the AC-HNO3 electrode displays higher specific capacitance, better stability and cycling performance, and lower equivalent series resistance, indicating that AC obtained from the industrial pyrolytic tire char treated by concentrated nitric acid is applicable for supercapacitors.

  4. Theoretical Study on Gas—phase Pyrolytic Reactions of N—Ethyl,Isopropyl and N—t—Butyl Substituted 2—Aminopyrazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪三国; 陈丽萍

    2003-01-01

    Density functional theory(DFT)and ab initio methods were used to study gas-phase pyrolytic reaction mechanisms of N-ethyl,N-isopropyl and N-t-butyl substituted 2-aminopyrazine at B3LYP/6-31G* and MP2/6-31G*,respectively,Single-point energies of all optimized molecular geometries were calculated at B3LYP/6-311 G(2d,p)level.Results show that the pyrolytic reactions which were caused by the migration of atom H(17) via a six-member ring transiton state.The activation energies which were verified by vibrational analysis and correlated with zero-point energies along the reaction channel atB3LYP/6-3110 G(2d,p)level were 252.02kJ·mol-1(N-ethyl substituted),235.92kJ·mol-1(N-isopropyl substituted)and 234.27kJ·mol-1(N-t-butyl substituted),respectively.The results were in good agreement with available experimental data.

  5. Electrocatalysis of chemically synthesized noble metal nanoparticles on carbon electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs), such as platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) NPs are promising catalysts for dioxygen reduction and oxidation of molecules such as formic acid and ethanol in fuel cells. Carbon nanomaterials are ideal supporting materials for electrochemical catalysts due to their good...... microscopy (AFM) which have proved to be highly efficient techniques to map the in situ structures of selfassembled molecular monolayers at molecular or sub-molecular resolution. Electrocatalysis of the Pd NPs immobilized on atomically flat, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) will be investigated...

  6. Method and device for secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertsching, Alan Kevin; Trantor, Troy Joseph; Ebner, Matthias Anthony; Norby, Brad Curtis

    2016-04-05

    A method and device for producing secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon. A substrate comprising carbon is provided. A precursor is intercalated between carbon in the substrate. The precursor intercalated in the substrate is irradiated until at least a portion of the precursor, preferably a majority of the precursor, is transmutated into tritium and bonds with carbon of the substrate forming bonded tritium. The resulting bonded tritium, tritium bonded with carbon, produces electrons via beta decay. The substrate is preferably a substrate from the list of substrates consisting of highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite, carbon fibers, carbon nanotunes, buckministerfullerenes, and combinations thereof. The precursor is preferably boron-10, more preferably lithium-6. Preferably, thermal neutrons are used to irradiate the precursor. The resulting bonded tritium is preferably used to generate electricity either directly or indirectly.

  7. Preparation of iron oxide-impregnated spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composite and its photocatalytic removal of methylene blue in the presence of oxalic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadirova, Zukhra C; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Katsumata, Ken-Ichi; Isobe, Toshihiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Akira; Sharipov, Khasan; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composites (GAC-Fe) with different iron oxide contents (Fe mass% = 0.6-10) were prepared by a pore volume impregnation method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2-adsorption results confirm the presence of amorphous iron oxide, pyrolytic carbon, and graphitized globular carbon nanoparticles covered with amorphous carbon in the CAG-Fe. The rate of photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under UV light in the presence of oxalic acid correlates with porosity of the prepared materials. The total MB removal includes the combination of adsorption and photodegradation without the addition of H2O2. The results of total organic carbon (TOC) analysis reveal that the decolorization of MB in aqueous solution containing oxalic acid corresponds to the decomposition of organic compounds to CO2 and H2O.

  8. Epitaxial Growth of Aligned and Continuous Carbon Nanofibers from Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Wenbin; Liu, Peng; Luo, Shu; Wei, Haoming; Yang, Guangzhi; Yang, Junhe; Cui, Jie; Yu, Richeng; Zhang, Lina; Wang, Jiaping; Li, Qunqing; Zhou, Weiya; Zhao, Weisheng; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2017-02-28

    Exploiting the superior properties of nanomaterials at macroscopic scale is a key issue of nanoscience. Different from the integration strategy, "additive synthesis" of macroscopic structures from nanomaterial templates may be a promising choice. In this paper, we report the epitaxial growth of aligned, continuous, and catalyst-free carbon nanofiber thin films from carbon nanotube films. The fabrication process includes thickening of continuous carbon nanotube films by gas-phase pyrolytic carbon deposition and further graphitization of the carbon layer by high-temperature treatment. As-fabricated nanofibers in the film have an "annual ring" cross-section, with a carbon nanotube core and a graphitic periphery, indicating the templated growth mechanism. The absence of a distinct interface between the carbon nanotube template and the graphitic periphery further implies the epitaxial growth mechanism of the fiber. The mechanically robust thin film with tunable fiber diameters from tens of nanometers to several micrometers possesses low density, high electrical conductivity, and high thermal conductivity. Further extension of this fabrication method to enhance carbon nanotube yarns is also demonstrated, resulting in yarns with ∼4-fold increased tensile strength and ∼10-fold increased Young's modulus. The aligned and continuous features of the films together with their outstanding physical and chemical properties would certainly promote the large-scale applications of carbon nanofibers.

  9. Electrocatalytic properties of prussian blue nanoparticles supported on poly(m-aminobenzenesulphonic acid)-functionalised single-walled carbon nanotubes towards the detection of dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekunle, Abolanle S; Farah, Abdullahi M; Pillay, Jeseelan; Ozoemena, Kenneth I; Mamba, Bhekie B; Agboola, Bolade O

    2012-06-15

    Edged plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPPGE) was modified with and without Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles and polyaminobenzene sulphonated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTPABS) using the chemical deposition method. The electrodes were characterised using microscopy, spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. Results showed that edged plane pyrolytic graphite-single-walled carbon nanotubes-prussian blue (EPPGE-SWCNT-PB) electrode gave the best dopamine (DA) current response, which increases with increasing PB layers. The catalytic rate constant of 1.69 × 10(5)mol(-1)cm(3)s(-1), Tafel value of 112 mV dec(-1), and limit of detection of DA (2.8 nM) were obtained. Dopamine could be simultaneously detected with ascorbic acid. The electrode was found to be electrochemically stable, reusable and can be used for the analysis of DA in real drug samples.

  10. Simple Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes from Ethanol using an Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikrajuddin Abdullah

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes of diameter (20–100 nm are synthesized by pyrolyzing a sprayed solution of Fe(C5H52 and C2H5OH in an Ar atmosphere at relatively low temperatures (around 800 oC. The tubular structures consist of highly crystalline nested graphene cylinders (<200 concentric tubes. Tube diameter can be controlled by varying the furnace temperature, carrier gas flow rate and the Fe:C ratio within the precursor solution. This low cost route for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes is advantageous due the low pyrolytic temperature, safety, processable in atmospheric pressure, and scalable.

  11. SiC fibers with controllable thickness of carbon layer prepared directly by preceramic polymer pyrolysis routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Tianjiao, E-mail: tjhu617@gmail.com [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Li Xiaodong; Li Gongyi [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Wang Yingde; Wang Jun [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2011-05-25

    Continuous SiC fibers with different thickness of carbon layer were prepared through three preceramic polymer pyrolysis routes. To make the carbon layer thickness controllable, a simple improvement by using a ceramic bushing was adopted to retard the deposition of the pyrolytic carbons. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis reveals that the carbon layer thickness varies from less than 5 nm to 40 nm. The specific resistivity of the fibers increases by 5 orders of magnitude as the carbon layer thickness decreases. All of the fibers exhibit a tensile strength of around 1.8 GPa which is independent of the carbon layer thickness. The formation process of the carbon layer is discussed in three steps: the decomposition, the carbonization and the deposition. The as-received fibers have a potential application as the reinforcement of functional materials.

  12. Molecular orientation of copper phthalocyanine thin films on different monolayers of fullerene on SiO{sub 2} or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chenggong; Wang, Congcong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Liu, Xiaoliang [Institute for Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials (ISUPAM), Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Xu, Xumei; Li, Youzhen [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Xie, Fangyan [Instrumental Analysis Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Gao, Yongli [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Institute for Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials (ISUPAM), Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2015-03-23

    The interface electronic structures of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) have been studied using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy as different monolayers of C{sub 60} were inserted between CuPc and a SiO{sub 2} or highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate. The results show that CuPc has standing up configuration with one monolayer of C{sub 60} insertion on SiO{sub 2} while lying down on HOPG, indicating that the insertion layer propagates the CuPc-substrate interaction. Meanwhile, CuPc on more than one monolayers of C{sub 60} on different substrates show that the substrate orientation effect quickly vanished. Our study elucidates intriguing molecular interactions that manipulate molecular orientation and donor-acceptor energy level alignment.

  13. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and methane at an immobilized cobalt protoporphyrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing; Kortlever, Ruud; Kas, Recep; Birdja, Yuvraj Y.; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Kwon, Youngkook; Ledezma-Yanez, Isis; Schouten, Klaas Jan P.; Mul, Guido; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide and water into useful products is a major challenge in facilitating a closed carbon cycle. Here we report a cobalt protoporphyrin immobilized on a pyrolytic graphite electrode that reduces carbon dioxide in an aqueous acidic solution at relatively low overpotential (0.5 V), with an efficiency and selectivity comparable to the best porphyrin-based electrocatalyst in the literature. While carbon monoxide is the main reduction product, we also observe methane as by-product. The results of our detailed pH-dependent studies are explained consistently by a mechanism in which carbon dioxide is activated by the cobalt protoporphyrin through the stabilization of a radical intermediate, which acts as Brønsted base. The basic character of this intermediate explains how the carbon dioxide reduction circumvents a concerted proton–electron transfer mechanism, in contrast to hydrogen evolution. Our results and their mechanistic interpretations suggest strategies for designing improved catalysts. PMID:26324108

  14. Effect of the addition of carbon black and carbon nanotubes on the structure and oxidation resistance of pyrolysed phenolic carbons%添加炭黑和碳纳米管对酚醛树脂热解炭的结构及抗氧化性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁峰; 李楠; 李轩科; 鄢文

    2012-01-01

    Carbon black (CB) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used as additives in phenolic resin.The effects of the additives and heat treatment temperature on the oxidation resistance and structure of carbon from the pyrolysed phenolic resin were investigated by differential scanning calorimetric.analysis,X-ray diffraction,scanning electron microscopy,and mercury intrusion porosimetry.It was observed that both CNTs and CB improved the graphitization degree and oxidation resistance of the pyrolytic carbons.The graphitization degree of carbons containing CNTs was higher than that of those with CB,but the oxidation resistance of the former was lower due to the higher porosity in the microstructure.An increase in the heat treatment temperature also resulted in an improvement in the graphitization degree and oxidation resistance of the carbons.

  15. Single wall carbon nanotubes and their electrical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized and purified. A water colloid of SWCNTs was prepared and used to assemble SWCNTs onto a gold film surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images showed that short SWCNTs stood on gold film surfaces. Using STM tips made of SWCNTs, a crystal grain image of a gold thin film and an atomic resolution image of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were successfully obtained. The electrical properties of short SWCNTs, which stood on the surface of gold film, were measured using STM. That SWCNTs stand on gold thin films is a promising technique for studying structures and properties of carbon nanotubes, as well as assembling and fabricating high-intensity coherent electron sources, field emission flat panel display, tips for scanning probe microscopes, new nanoelectronic devices, etc.

  16. Coating of carbon fibers -- The strength of the fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmer, T. [Alusingen GmbH, Singen (Germany); Peterlik, H.; Kromp, K. [Univ. Wien, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik

    1995-01-01

    The 6k carbon fiber Torayca T800H was coated with pyrolytic carbon by a CVD process. Fiber bundles were tested and evaluated. By this procedure, the whole distribution of the failure probability with respect to the fiber strength is obtained in a single experiment. The 50% strength of the fiber bundle, i.e., the strength at which 50% of the fibers in the bundle are broken, is inversely proportional to the square root of the thickness of the coating. By relating the strength to the defect size according to linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), the probability density function of the defects was derived. It is Weibull-shaped for the uncoated fiber and shows an increasing bimodal shape for the increasing coating thicknesses.

  17. Hollow carbon nanobubbles: monocrystalline MOF nanobubbles and their pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xiangfen; Zhao, Yanyi; Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Malgras, Victor; Kim, Jeonghun; Kim, Jung Ho; Wang, Shaobin; Liu, Jian; Jiang, Ji-Sen; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hu, Ming

    2017-05-01

    While bulk-sized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) face limits to their utilization in various research fields such as energy storage applications, nanoarchitectonics is believed to be a possible solution. It is highly challenging to realize MOF nanobubbles with monocrystalline frameworks. By a spatially controlled etching approach, here, we can achieve the synthesis of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) nanobubbles with a uniform size of less than 100 nm. Interestingly, the ZIF-8 nanobubbles possess a monocrystalline nanoshell with a thickness of around 10 nm. Under optimal pyrolytic conditions, the ZIF-8 nanobubbles can be converted into hollow carbon nanobubbles while keeping their original shapes. The structure of the nanobubble enhances the fast Na(+)/K(+) ion intercalation performance. Such remarkable improvement cannot be realized by conventional MOFs or their derived carbons.

  18. Electronic and geometric properties of Au nanoparticles on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Salido, Ignacio; Lim, Dong Chan; Dietsche, Rainer; Bertram, Nils; Kim, Young Dok

    2006-01-26

    Au nanoparticles grown on mildly sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) surfaces were studied using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The results were compared with those of Ag nanoparticles on the same substrate. By varying the defect densities of HOPG and the Au coverages, one can create Au nanoparticles in various sizes. At high Au coverages, the structures of the Au films significantly deviate from the ideal truncated octahedral form: the existence of many steps between different Au atomic layers can be observed, most likely due to a high activation barrier of the diffusion of Au atoms across the step edges. This implies that the particle growth at room temperature is strongly limited by kinetic factors. Hexagonal shapes of Au structures could be identified, indicating preferential growth of Au nanostructures along the (111) direction normal to the surface. In the case of Au, XPS studies reveal a weaker core level shift with decreasing particle size compared to the 3d level in similarly sized Ag particles. Also taking into account the Auger analysis of the Ag particles, the core level shifts of the metal nanoparticles on HOPG can be understood in terms of the metal/substrate charge transfer. Ag is (partially) positively charged, whereas Au negatively charged on HOPG. It is demonstrated that XPS can be a useful tool to study metal-support interactions, which plays an important role for heterogeneous catalysis, for example.

  19. The theory of cyclic voltammetry of electrochemically heterogeneous surfaces: comparison of different models for surface geometry and applications to highly ordered pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kristopher R; Lawrence, Nathan S; Hartshorne, R Seth; Compton, Richard G

    2012-05-28

    The cyclic voltammetry at electrodes composed of multiple electroactive materials, where zones of one highly active material are distributed over a substrate of a second, less active material, is investigated by simulation. The two materials are assumed to differ in terms of their electrochemical rate constants towards any given redox couple. For a one-electron oxidation or reduction, the effect on voltammetry of the size and relative surface coverages of the zones as well as the rate constant of the slower zone are considered for systems where it is much slower than the rate constant of the faster zones. The occurrence of split peak cyclic voltammetry where two peaks are observed in the forward sweep, is studied in terms of the diffusional effects present in the system. A number of surface geometries are compared: specifically the more active zones are modelled as long, thin bands, as steps in the surface, as discs, and as rings (similar to a partially blocked electrode). Similar voltammetry for the band, step and ring models is seen but the disc geometry shows significant differences. Finally, the simulation technique is applied to the modelling of highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface and experimental conditions under which it may be possible to observe split peak voltammetry are predicted.

  20. Lightning Damage of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Laminates with Interlayers Modified by Nickel-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qi; Wan, Guoshun; Xu, Yongzheng; Guo, Yunli; Du, Tianxiang; Yi, Xiaosu; Jia, Yuxi

    2017-02-01

    The numerical model of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with electrically modified interlayers subjected to lightning strike is constructed through finite element simulation, in which both intra-laminar and inter-laminar lightning damages are considered by means of coupled electrical-thermal-pyrolytic analysis method. Then the lightning damage extents including the damage volume and maximum damage depth are investigated. The results reveal that the simulated lightning damages could be qualitatively compared to the experimental counterparts of CFRP laminates with interlayers modified by nickel-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWCNTs). With higher electrical conductivity of modified interlayer and more amount of modified interlayers, both damage volume and maximum damage depth are reduced. This work provides an effective guidance to the anti-lightning optimization of CFRP laminates.

  1. Carbon treated commercial aluminium alloys as anodes for aluminium-air batteries in sodium chloride electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, M.; Herranz, D.; Chacón, J.; Fatás, E.; Ocón, P.

    2016-09-01

    An easy treatment based in carbon layer deposition into aluminium alloys is presented to enhance the performance of Al-air primary batteries with neutral pH electrolyte. The jellification of aluminate in the anode surface is described and avoided by the carbon covering. Treated commercial Al alloys namely Al1085 and Al7475 are tested as anodes achieving specific capacities above 1.2 Ah g-1vs 0.5 Ah g-1 without carbon covering. The influence of the binder proportion in the treatment as well as different carbonaceous materials, Carbon Black, Graphene and Pyrolytic Graphite are evaluated as candidates for the covering. Current densities of 1-10 mA cm-2 are measured and the influence of the alloy explored. A final battery design of 4 cells in series is presented for discharges with a voltage plateau of 2 V and 1 Wh g-1 energy density.

  2. Microstructural study of oxidation of carbon-rich amorphous boron carbide coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin ZENG; Zu-de FENG; Si-wei LI; Yong-sheng LIU

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-rich amorphous boron carbide (BxC) coatings were annealed at 400℃, 700℃, 1000℃ and 1200℃ for 2 h in air atmosphere. The microstructure and composition of the as-deposited and annealed coat-ings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectro-scopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). All of the post-anneal characterizations demonstrated the ability of carbon-rich BxC coatings to protect the graphite substrate against oxidation. Different oxidation modes of the coatings were found at low temperature (400℃), moderate temperature (700℃) and high temper-ature (1000℃ and 1200℃). Finally, the feasibility of the application of carbon-rich BxC instead of pyrolytic car-bon (PyC) as a fiber/matrix interlayer in ceramics-matrix composites (CMCs) is discussed here.

  3. Optimizing pyrolysis of resin carbon for anode of lithium ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolytic resin carbon anode for lithoum ion batteries was prepared from thermosetting phenolic resin.Pyrolysis of the primary phenolic resin and the dewatered one was studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. Structures and characteristics of the carbon materials were determined by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmer-Teller surface area analysis and electrochemical measurements. With the increase of pyrolyzing temperature and soaking time,the resin carbon material has larger crystallite sizes of Lc and La, lower specific surface area, smaller irreversible capacity and higher initial coulombic efficiency. The pyrolyzing temperature and soaking time are optimized to be 1050℃ and 2 h. The resin carbon anode obtained under the optimum conditions shows good electrochemical performances with reversible capacity of 387 mA · h/g and initial coulombic efficiency of 69.1%.

  4. Microwave pyrolysis of oily sludge with activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Rong

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to explore catalytic microwave pyrolysis of crude oil storage tank sludge for fuels using granular activated carbon (GAC) as a catalyst. The effect of GAC loading on the yield of pyrolysis products was also investigated. Heating rate of oily sludge and yield of microwave pyrolysis products such as oil and fuel gas was found to depend on the ratio of GAC to oily sludge. The optimal GAC loading was found to be 10%, while much smaller and larger feed sizes adversely influenced production. During oily sludge pyrolysis, a maximum oil yield of 77.5% was achieved. Pyrolytic oils with high concentrations of diesel oil and gasoline (about 70 wt% in the pyrolytic oil) were obtained. The leaching of heavy metals, such as Cr, As and Pb, was also suppressed in the solid residue after pyrolysis. This technique provides advantages such as harmless treatment of oily sludge and substantial reduction in the consumption of energy, time and cost.

  5. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  6. Microbial conversion of pyrolytic products to biofuels: a novel and sustainable approach toward second-generation biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Zia Ul; Zhisheng, Yu; Hassan, El Barbary; Dongdong, Chang; Hongxun, Zhang

    2015-12-01

    This review highlights the potential of the pyrolysis-based biofuels production, bio-ethanol in particular, and lipid in general as an alternative and sustainable solution for the rising environmental concerns and rapidly depleting natural fuel resources. Levoglucosan (1,6-anhydrous-β-D-glucopyranose) is the major anhydrosugar compound resulting from the degradation of cellulose during the fast pyrolysis process of biomass and thus the most attractive fermentation substrate in the bio-oil. The challenges for pyrolysis-based biorefineries are the inefficient detoxification strategies, and the lack of naturally available efficient and suitable fermentation organisms that could ferment the levoglucosan directly into bio-ethanol. In case of indirect fermentation, acid hydrolysis is used to convert levoglucosan into glucose and subsequently to ethanol and lipids via fermentation biocatalysts, however the presence of fermentation inhibitors poses a big hurdle to successful fermentation relative to pure glucose. Among the detoxification strategies studied so far, over-liming, extraction with solvents like (n-butanol, ethyl acetate), and activated carbon seem very promising, but still further research is required for the optimization of existing detoxification strategies as well as developing new ones. In order to make the pyrolysis-based biofuel production a more efficient as well as cost-effective process, direct fermentation of pyrolysis oil-associated fermentable sugars, especially levoglucosan is highlly desirable. This can be achieved either by expanding the search to identify naturally available direct levoglusoan utilizers or modify the existing fermentation biocatalysts (yeasts and bacteria) with direct levoglucosan pathway coupled with tolerance engineering could significantly improve the overall performance of these microorganisms.

  7. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of black carbon (BC) in PM 10 aerosols from residential area of suburban Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masao; Kumata, Hidetoshi; Koike, Yasuyo; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Uchida, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Kitao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    The AMS technique was applied to analyse black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), and previously reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 aerosols from a residential area, suburban Tokyo, to determine natural abundance of radiocarbon ( 14C), an ideal tracer to distinguish fossil fuel ( 14C-free) from modern biomass combustion sources of pyrolytic products. The 14C concentrations in BC, isolated using the CTO-375 method, were 42% and 30% pMC (in terms of percent Modern Carbon: pMC) in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C concentrations in BC were also compared with those of compound-class specific 14C content of PAHs previously reported for the same samples: they were 45% and 33% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C signals of BC were identical to those of high molecular weight (MW ⩾ 226, 5-6 rings) PAHs. The resemblance between 14C signals of BC and PAHs can be referred as a 'certificate' for the validity of the BC isolation method employed in this study. Also, it suggests that 14C-BC approach can be a surrogate for PAHs specific 14C analyses to monitor seasonal source variation of combustion-derived pyrolytic products. On the other hand, 14C contents of total organic carbon in 2004 were 61% and 42% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. This is likely attributed to higher contribution of plant activity in summer.

  8. 微波裂解制生物油技术研究进展%Production of Pyrolytic Oils Using Microwave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴爽; 王鑫

    2012-01-01

    The production of pyrolytic oils using microwave,including the mechanism,the influence of parameters,analysis of product distribution and pyrolysis reactors are reviewed. Their application and developing trend were pointed out. The researches in recent literatures are mainly concerned with the combination of the microwave and catalytic cracking processing. Some continuous microwave reactors,such as vacuum piston flow reactor and rotative microwave reactor,was developed and used instead of the bench microwave reactor. The overall understanding of the technologies using microwave in biomass pyrolysis reaction would provide a further industrial development in the field of biomass to liquid fuel.%综述了微波热解作用机制、影响因素、产物分布分析、微波热解反应器以及生物质微波裂解制油技术研究现状和发展趋势.相比于传统热解,微波裂解生物油含有较少的杂质.生物质微波裂解最新发展多采用微波热解和催化裂解相结合的技术路线,热解装置以真空平推流和旋转锥等快速连续微波反应器代替间歇式微波炉.通过对生物质微波裂解技术的充分了解,有助于推动生物质制油产业化发展.

  9. Studies to Enhance Superconductivity in Thin Film Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Benjamin; Brunke, Lyle; Burke, Jack; Vier, David; Steckl, Andrew; Haugan, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    With research in the area of superconductivity growing, it is no surprise that new efforts are being made to induce superconductivity or increase transition temperatures (Tc) in carbon given its many allotropic forms. Promising results have been published for boron doping in diamond films, and phosphorus doping in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) films show hints of superconductivity.. Following these examples in the literature, we have begun studies to explore superconductivity in thin film carbon samples doped with different elements. Carbon thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on amorphous SiO2/Si and single-crystal substrates. Doping is achieved by depositing from (C1-xMx) single-targets with M = B4C and BN, and also by ion implantation into pure-carbon films. Previous research had indicated that Boron in HOPG did not elicit superconducting properties, but we aim to explore that also in thin film carbon and see if there needs to be a higher doping in the sample if trends were able to be seen in diamond films. Higher onset temperatures, Tc , and current densities, Jc, are hoped to be achieved with doping of the thin film carbon with different elements.

  10. In situ electron spectroscopic identification of carbon species deposited by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samano, E.C.; Gamietea, A.; Cota, L. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada; Soto, G. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada]|[Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico). Programa de Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales

    1997-05-01

    Thin carbon films were grown on Si (111) substrates by ablating a graphite target utilizing an excimer pulsed laser in a UHV Riber {copyright} LDM-32 system. Two kinds of films were produced, a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) type and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) type. A relationship of the films microstructure with laser power density and substrate conditions was observed. The HOPG films were homogeneous but the DLC films were heterogeneous, as shown by micrographs. The thin films are monitored and analyzed in situ during the first stages of the deposition process. The monitoring was done by RHEED and the characterization by several surface spectroscopic techniques, AES, XPS and EELS. The formation of a SiC interface was observed for both films due to the reaction of the first carbon species with the substrate surface.

  11. 2D self-assembly of phenylene-vinylene tectons at the liquid-highly oriented pyrolytic graphite interface: from chain length effects to anisotropic guest-host dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, A.; Bocheux, A.; Charra, F.; Mathevet, F.; Kreher, D.; Attias, A.-J.

    2017-01-01

    Here we report the synthesis and characterization of a series of new phenylene-vinylene tectons. The study by scanning tunneling microscopy of their supramolecular self-assembly at the interface between a phenyloctane solution and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite demonstrates that variation of concentration and length of alkyl chains led to the formation of different networks, a compact one and a nanoporous one, with a fine control of the lattice parameters. The study of guest-host properties of the nanoporous network revealed a selectivity toward guest compounds according to their shape and size. Moreover, the statistical analysis of pore-to-pore guest dynamics evidences an anisotropic diffusion process.

  12. Self-assembly of 50 bp poly(dA)·poly(dT) DNA on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite via atomic force microscopy observation and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Nii, Ryosuke; Akamatsu, Shingo; Kakizaki, Toshiya; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2013-08-28

    This study has investigated the formation patterns resulting from the self-assembly of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), using both experimental and molecular dynamics approaches. Under optimized conditions based on pretreatment of HOPG surface and specific solution concentrations, DNA is found to self-assemble to form various patterned networks. The associated self-assembly mechanism is elucidated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and fractal dimension analysis. The results of this work demonstrate an effective technique allowing the formation of arrays of negatively charged biomacromolecules on negatively charged HOPG surfaces.

  13. 高温熔融钢渣热闷热平衡分析及余热回收利用%Analysis of heat balance and waste heat recovery and utilization for the high temperature molten slag by pyrolytic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宇; 陈媛; 张天有; 张健; 韩自博; 刘银梅

    2014-01-01

    对钢渣热闷过程中的热量平衡进行了分析和计算,提出了余热回收方案,并对经济效益进行了分析,为钢渣余热回收的进一步研究和实践打下了基础。%The heat balance during the steel slag self -slaking process by pyrolytic was analyzed and calculated.Put forward the waste heat recovery scheme and analyzed the economic benefits .It lays a solid basis for the further research and practice of steel slag waste heat recovery .

  14. Control of physical properties of carbon nanofibers obtained from coaxial electrospinning of PMMA and PAN with adjustable inner/outer nozzle-ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaerkitcha, Navaporn; Chuangchote, Surawut; Sagawa, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Hollow carbon nanofibers (HCNFs) were prepared by electrospinning method with several coaxial nozzles, in which the level of the inner nozzle-end is adjustable. Core/shell nanofibers were prepared from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a pyrolytic core and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a carbon shell with three types of normal (viz. inner and outer nozzle-ends are balanced in the same level), inward, and outward coaxial nozzles. The influence of the applied voltage on these three types of coaxial nozzles was studied. Specific surface area, pore size diameter, crystallinity, and degree of graphitization of the hollow and mesoporous structures of carbon nanofibers obtained after carbonization of the as spun PMMA/PAN nanofibers were characterized by BET analyses, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy in addition to the conductivity measurements. It was found that specific surface area, crystallinity, and graphitization degree of the HCNFs affect the electrical conductivity of the carbon nanofibers.

  15. Carbon Coatings with Low Secondary Electron Yield

    CERN Document Server

    Taborelli, M; Costa Pinto, P; Calatroni, S; Chiggiato, P; Edwards, P; Letant-Delrieux, D; Lucas, S; Neupert, H; Vollenberg, W; Yin-Vallgren, C

    2013-01-01

    Carbon thin films for electron cloud mitigation and anti-multipacting applications have been prepared by dc magnetron sputtering in both neon and argon discharge gases and by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) using acetylene. The thin films have been characterized using Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) measurements, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). For more than 100 carbon thin films prepared by sputtering the average maximum SEY is 0.98+/-0.07 after air transfer. The density of the films is lower than the density of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), a fact which partially explains their lower SEY. XPS shows that magnetron sputtered samples exhibit mainly sp2 type bonds. The intensity on the high binding energy side of C1s is found to be related to the value of the SEY. Instead the initial surface concentration of oxygen has no influence on the resulting SEY, when it is below 16%. The thin films produced by P...

  16. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  17. Electronic structure of multi-walled carbon fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doore, Keith; Cook, Matthew; Clausen, Eric; Lukashev, Pavel V.; Kidd, Tim E.; Stollenwerk, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    Despite an enormous amount of research on carbon based nanostructures, relatively little is known about the electronic structure of multi-walled carbon fullerenes, also known as carbon onions. In part, this is due to the very high computational expense involved in estimating electronic structure of large molecules. At the same time, experimentally, the exact crystal structure of the carbon onion is usually unknown, and therefore one relies on qualitative arguments only. In this work we present the results of a computational study on a series of multi-walled fullerenes and compare their electronic structures to experimental data. Experimentally, the carbon onions were fabricated using ultrasonic agitation of isopropanol alcohol and deposited onto the surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite using a drop cast method. Scanning tunneling microscopy images indicate that the carbon onions produced using this technique are ellipsoidal with dimensions on the order of 10 nm. The majority of differential tunneling spectra acquired on individual carbon onions are similar to that of graphite with the addition of molecular-like peaks, indicating that these particles span the transition between molecules and bulk crystals. A smaller, yet sizable number exhibited a semiconducting gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) levels. These results are compared with the electronic structure of different carbon onion configurations calculated using first-principles. Similar to the experimental results, the majority of these configurations are metallic with a minority behaving as semiconductors. Analysis of the configurations investigated here reveals that each carbon onion exhibiting an energy band gap consisted only of non-metallic fullerene layers, indicating that the interlayer interaction is not significant enough to affect the total density of states in these structures.

  18. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  19. Diamond-like carbon formation for various positions by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)]. E-mail: ssyap@mmu.edu.my; Tou, Teck-Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2005-07-30

    Pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite target was carried out by an Nd-YAG laser with {lambda} = 1064 nm and fluence in the range of 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The plume was produced by focusing the laser beam and rastering over a 6.5 mm x 6.5 mm area on the graphite target. The substrates were placed at two positions: on-axis position facing the target and off-axis position in the target plane with 2 mm offset from the ablation site. Diamond-like carbon was formed on the substrates at both positions and on the ablated area as detected by Raman spectroscopy. Rough and granular surface was observed for the samples placed in the target plane and smooth diamond-like carbon films for the samples placed facing the target as observed by SEM and optical microscopy.

  20. Suspended HOPG nanosheets for HOPG nanoresonator engineering and new carbon nanostructure synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, F [Laboratory for Integrated Micro Mechatronic Systems/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Debray, A [Canon Research Center, Canon Incorporated, 3-30-2 Shimomaruko, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 146-8501 (Japan); Martin, P [Laboratory for Integrated Micro Mechatronic Systems/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Fujita, H [Laboratory for Integrated Micro Mechatronic Systems/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Kawakatsu, H [Laboratory for Integrated Micro Mechatronic Systems/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2006-10-28

    Suspended highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) nanosheets (10-300 nm thick) were created by direct mechanical cleavage of a bulk HOPG crystal onto silicon micropillars and microtracks. We show that suspended HOPG nanosheets can be used to engineer HOPG nanoresonators such as membranes, bridges, and cantilevers as thin as 28 carbon atom layers. We measured by Doppler laser heterodyne interferometry that the discrete vibration modes of an HOPG nanosheet membrane and the resonance frequency of a FIB-created HOPG microcantilever lie in the MHz frequency regime. Moreover, a new carbon nanostructure, named 'nanolace', was synthesized by focused ion beam (FIB) sputtering of suspended HOPG nanosheets. Graphite nanosheets suspended on micropillars were eroded by a FIB to create self-oriented pseudo-periodical ripples. Additional sputtering and subsequent milling of these ripples led to the formation of honeycomb-like shaped nanolaces suspended and linked by ribbons.

  1. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from demineralized tyre char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocha, S.; Prasad, Guddu R.; Joshi, Parth.; Zala, Ranjitsingh S.; Gokhale, Siddharth S.; Manocha, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon is the most adsorbing material for industrial waste water treatment. For wider applications, the main consideration is to manufacture activated carbon from low cost precursors, which are easily available and cost effective. One such source is scrap tyres. Recently much effort has been devoted to the thermal degradation of tyres into gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons and solid char residue, all of which have the potential to be processed into valuable products. As for solid residue, char can be used either as low-grade reinforcing filler or as activated carbon. The product recovered by a typical pyrolysis of tyres are usually, 33-38 wt% pyrolytic char, 38-55 wt% oil and 10-30 wt% solid fractions. In the present work activated carbon was prepared from pyrolyzed tyre char (PC). Demineralization involves the dissolution of metal into acids i.e. HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4 and in base i.e. NaOH. Different concentration of acid and base were used. Sodium hydroxide showed maximum amount of metal oxide removal. Further the concentration of sodium hydroxide was varied from 1N to 6N. As the concentration of acid are increased demineralization increases. 6N Sodium hydroxide is found to be more effective demineralising agent of tyre char.

  2. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  3. Lanthanum-catalysed synthesis of microporous 3D graphene-like carbons in a zeolite template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungsoo; Lee, Taekyoung; Kwon, Yonghyun; Seo, Yongbeom; Song, Jongchan; Park, Jung Ki; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jeong Young; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cho, Sung June; Ryoo, Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional graphene architectures with periodic nanopores—reminiscent of zeolite frameworks—are of topical interest because of the possibility of combining the characteristics of graphene with a three-dimensional porous structure. Lately, the synthesis of such carbons has been approached by using zeolites as templates and small hydrocarbon molecules that can enter the narrow pore apertures. However, pyrolytic carbonization of the hydrocarbons (a necessary step in generating pure carbon) requires high temperatures and results in non-selective carbon deposition outside the pores. Here, we demonstrate that lanthanum ions embedded in zeolite pores can lower the temperature required for the carbonization of ethylene or acetylene. In this way, a graphene-like carbon structure can be selectively formed inside the zeolite template, without carbon being deposited at the external surfaces. X-ray diffraction data from zeolite single crystals after carbonization indicate that electron densities corresponding to carbon atoms are generated along the walls of the zeolite pores. After the zeolite template is removed, the carbon framework exhibits an electrical conductivity that is two orders of magnitude higher than that of amorphous mesoporous carbon. Lanthanum catalysis allows a carbon framework to form in zeolite pores with diameters of less than 1 nanometre; as such, microporous carbon nanostructures can be reproduced with various topologies corresponding to different zeolite pore sizes and shapes. We demonstrate carbon synthesis for large-pore zeolites (FAU, EMT and beta), a one-dimensional medium-pore zeolite (LTL), and even small-pore zeolites (MFI and LTA). The catalytic effect is a common feature of lanthanum, yttrium and calcium, which are all carbide-forming metal elements. We also show that the synthesis can be readily scaled up, which will be important for practical applications such as the production of lithium-ion batteries and zeolite-like catalyst

  4. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  5. Nanoindentation experiment and finite element simulation for isotropic pyrolytic graphite%各向同性热解石墨的纳米压痕试验与有限元仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明海; 王虎军; 孙磊; 刘中海

    2011-01-01

    The load-displacement curves of isotropic pyrolytic graphite were obtained through nanoin-dentation experimentAccording to the theory of olive and pharr the hardness and the young modulus were calculated to obtain performance of main materials.Then a numerical model for the nanoindentation experiment was set up by finite element method.Through comparing the load-displacement curve fitted by finite element with the actual curve obtained from nanoindentation experiment,relative correlation was achievedFinally plastic property of isotropic pyrolytic graphite was got,which prove the feasibility of finite element simulation at the same time.%通过对各向同性热解石墨进行了纳米压痕试验,得到了其材料的载荷-位移曲线.并根据Olive和Pharr理论算出了其硬度与弹性模量值,得到了主要的材料性能.在纳米压痕试验的基础上,通过有限元单元法建立了纳米压痕试验的数值模型,通过比较有限元所拟合的载荷一位移曲线和实际纳米压痕试验所得到的曲线,进行相应的修正,最后得到了该材料的塑性性能,也证明了有限元仿真的可行性.

  6. Determination of Pyrolytic Products of Extract of Raisin by Py-GC-MS%热裂解气相色谱-质谱法测定葡萄干提取物的热裂解产物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国玲

    2012-01-01

    50g葡萄干用70%乙醇溶液300mL在80℃回流提取3h,提取两次,过滤提取物.滤液减压浓缩至干。残渣用5200裂解仪在400℃,50℃.600℃,800℃下处理,在各裂解温度下得到的裂解产物导入仪器进行气相色谱质谱分析。结果表明:主要裂解产物是糠醛、呋喃甲醇、5-甲基糠醛、5-羟甲基-2呋喃甲醛、2,3-二氢-3,5二羟基6-甲基-4H-吡喃酮,这些裂解产物是赋予卷烟具有独特香味和较好口感的重要物质。%50 g of raisin were exlracted twice by refluxing with 300 mI. of 70% ethanol at 80℃ for 3 h. The extracts wgre filtered and the filtrate was evaporated to dryness under reduced pressure. The residue was lrealed whh Pyroprohc 5200 at 400 C, 500℃, 600℃ and 800℃, the pyrolytic products obtained al eaeh of lhe pyrolylie tempuratures were introduced into the instrument and analyzed by (GC-MS. It was shown that the main pyrolytic products obtained were furfural, 2-furanmethanol, 5 mcthyl 2-furancarboxaldehyde, 5 hydroxymethyl 2 furancarboxaldehyde, and 2, 3-dihydro-3, 5 dihydroxy6methyl.-4H-pyran-4one. These pyrolysates are the important substances to make cigarettes to have distinctive fragrance and better taste.

  7. 烟草中一种糖苷的分离鉴定及其热解产物%Isolation and Identification of a New Glycoside in Tobacco and Analysis of its Pyrolytic Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周容; 冯广林; 李东亮; 李国友; 戴亚; 袁月

    2013-01-01

    通过95%乙醇提取,常压和高压制备色谱分离,从红花大金元烟叶中提取分离得到化合物Ⅰ,利用质谱和核磁共振技术鉴定了化合物Ⅰ的结构,并在氦气中进行了热裂解-GC/MS分析.结果表明:①化合物Ⅰ为(E)-N-[(4-羟基-3-甲氧基)苯乙基]-3-[(3-甲氧基-4-β-D-吡喃葡萄糖)苯基]丙烯酰胺;②化合物Ⅰ的热解产物主要是4-乙烯基愈创木酚、愈创木酚、香兰素、对甲基苯酚、2,3-二氢苯并呋喃、4-烯丙基苯酚和3-乙基苯酚.%A new glycoside,(E)-N-[(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy)-phenethyl]-3-[(3-methoxy-4-O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)phenyl]acrylamide (Ⅰ),was isolated from leaves of flue-cured tobacco cv."Hongda" through extraction with 95% ethanol,preparation at normal and high pressure and separation with chromatography.The molecular structure of compound (Ⅰ) was identified with HRESI-MS and NMR.Compound (Ⅰ) was pyrolyzed in He atmosphere and its pyrolytic products were analyzed by GC/MS.The results showed that the separated product was compound (Ⅰ),and its major pyrolytic products were 4-vinylguaiacol,guaiacol,vanillin,p-cresol,2,3-dihydrobenzofuran,4-allylphenol,and m-ethylphenol.

  8. Torrefaction and HZSM-5 catalyst combination improving pyrolytic products of cedarwood%烘焙与HZSM-5催化剂联用改善柏木热解产物品质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张杨; 梅艳阳; 杨晴; 杨海平; 刘捷; 陈汉平

    2015-01-01

    of torrefaction and catalytic pyrolysis on characteristics of pyrolytic products of cedarwood have been investigated. Pretreament of cedarwood via torrefaction was performed in a tube furnace at varying reaction temperature(200, 230, 260, 290℃) with a residence time of 30min. The torrefied cedarwood were characterized by elemental analysis and proximate analysis. The results showed that increasing torrefaction temperature caused the increase of carbon content from 48.16% to 54.3%, the oxygen content decreased from 44.33%to 35.65%. And the torrefied cedarwood product has a brown/black color, reduced volatile content and increased energy density:21.25 MJ/kg (after 30 min reaction time at 290℃) versus 18.13MJ/kg for untreated cedarwood. Then the torrefied cedarwood were subsequently catalytically fast pyrolyzed over HZSM-5 in a vertical tubular reactor at 550℃ with a residence time of 30 min. The gas products of pyrolysis were analyzed by chromatograph(GC), and liquid products were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Torrefaction caused deacetylation and decomposition of hemicellulose, cleavage of ester linkages and demethoxylation of lignin. And the experimental results show that after coupled torrefaction and catalytic pyrolysis, increasing the torrefaction temperature caused the coke yield decreased; the content of CO in gas product decreased from 53.69% to 40.84%, the content of H2 and CO2 increased by 43.1%and 35.04%respectively, and the content of CH4 had no obvious change. As for liquid products, with the increasing of torrefaction temperature, the content of acid significantly deceased, aromatic yield increased , and enrichment of phenols. The result indicated that the couple effects between torrefaction and catalytic pyrolysis are very important for upgrading of bio-oil. However, severe torrefaction can lead the coke yield increased and aromatic yield reduced. So the optimal torrefaction condition of cedarwood is 230-260℃.

  9. 由低品位菱镁矿制备高纯碳酸镁的研究%Preparation of High-purity Magnesium Carbonate from Low-grade Magnesite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆彩云; 陈敏; 李月圆; 孙中强; 于景坤

    2011-01-01

    以低品位菱镁矿为原料,经轻烧、消化,在不同条件下进行碳酸化,将消化料浆转化为碳酸氢镁进入液相而制得重镁水,采用活性炭为吸附剂脱除钙、铁等杂质,并研究了不同添加剂对重镁水热解产物形貌的影响.研究表明,随着碳酸化温度升高,氧化镁的收得率降低;随着碳酸化时间的延长,氧化镁的收得率增加;随CO2气体流量的增大,氧化镁的收得率稍有增加,但增加幅度很小.XRD分析表明重镁水热解产物的主要成分是3MgCO3·Mg(oH)2·3H2O和MgCO3·3H2O.经过提纯处理后,热解产物纯度很高,CaO含量小于0.04%,TFe含量小于0.02%.SEM分析表明,无添加剂时,热解产物为片状;加入酸性添加剂磷酸二氢钾时,热解产物为花瓣状;加入碱性添加剂碳酸铵时,热解产物为球状;加入可溶性镁盐时,热解产物为晶须状.%Mg (HCO3 )2 solution was prepared by light burning, hydration, and carbonation treatment at different condition with low-grade magnesite as raw material, then impurities were removed by using activated carbon as adsorbent. The effect of different additives on the morphology of pyrolytic products from Mg ( HCO3 ) 2 solution was studied.Results showed that the yield rate of the caustic calcined magnesia was significantly reduced as the hydrous carbonation temperature increased, while the carbonation time was extended, the yield rate of the caustic calcined magnesia was increased. It increased a little with the increase of CO2 flow rate. The XRD result showed that the main components of Mg( HCO3)2 pyrolytic products were 3MgCO3 · Mg(OH)2 · 3H20 and MgCO3 · 3H20, containing less impurities, for example, content of CaO was lower than 0.04% and TFe was lower than O. 02%. SEM results showed that the morphology of magnesium carbonate was highly dependent on the preparation conditions. A flake-like pyrolytic product was obtained without any additive. Petal-shaped pyrolytic product was prepared

  10. Copper-encapsulated vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Chapla, Rachel; Carroll, Murphy; Nowak, Joshua; McCord, Marian; Bradford, Philip D

    2013-11-13

    A new procedure is described for the fabrication of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) that are decorated, and even completely encapsulated, by a dense network of copper nanoparticles. The process involves the conformal deposition of pyrolytic carbon (Py-C) to stabilize the aligned carbon-nanotube structure during processing. The stabilized arrays are mildly functionalized using oxygen plasma treatment to improve wettability, and they are then infiltrated with an aqueous, supersaturated Cu salt solution. Once dried, the salt forms a stabilizing crystal network throughout the array. After calcination and H2 reduction, Cu nanoparticles are left decorating the CNT surfaces. Studies were carried out to determine the optimal processing parameters to maximize Cu content in the composite. These included the duration of Py-C deposition and system process pressure as well as the implementation of subsequent and multiple Cu salt solution infiltrations. The optimized procedure yielded a nanoscale hybrid material where the anisotropic alignment from the VACNT array was preserved, and the mass of the stabilized arrays was increased by over 24-fold because of the addition of Cu. The procedure has been adapted for other Cu salts and can also be used for other metal salts altogether, including Ni, Co, Fe, and Ag. The resulting composite is ideally suited for application in thermal management devices because of its low density, mechanical integrity, and potentially high thermal conductivity. Additionally, further processing of the material via pressing and sintering can yield consolidated, dense bulk composites.

  11. Initial development and performance evaluation of a process for formation of dense carbon by pyrolysis of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, G. P.; Cusick, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The three steps in pyrolytic carbon formation are: (1) gaseous hydrocarbon polymerization and aromatic formation; (2) gas-phase condensation and surface adsorption/impingement of polyaromatic hydrocarbon; and (3) final dehydration to carbon. The structure of the carbon in the various stages of formation is examined. The apparatuses and experimental procedures for the pyrolysis of methane in a 60 cm long quartz reactor tube at temperatures ranging from 1400-1600 K are described. The percentage of carbon converted and its density are calculated and tabularly presented. The results reveal that dense carbon formation is maximized and soot eliminated by this procedure. It is observed that conversion efficiency depends on the composition of the inlet gas and conversion increases with increasing temperature. Based on the experimental data a three-man carbon reactor subsystem (CRS) is developed; the functions of the Sabatier Methanation Reactor, two carbon formation reactors and fluid handling components of the CRS are analyzed. The CRS forms 16 kg of carbon at a rate of 0.8 kg/day for 20 days in a two percent volume density quartz wool packing at temperature of 1500-1600 K.

  12. Characterization of Au Irradiated Glassy Polymeric Carbon at 2,000°C for Nuclear Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abunaemeh, M.; Seif, M.; Batra, A.; Elsamadicy, A.; Yang, Y.; Wang, L.; Muntele, C.; Ila, D.

    The TRISO fuel has been used in some of the Generation IV nuclear reactor designs [1]. It consists of a fuel kernel of UOx coated with several layers of materials with different functions. Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the materials in the layers. In this study we investigate the possibility of using Glassy Polymeric Carbon (GPC) as an alternative to PyC. In this work, we are comparing the changes in physical and microstructure properties of GPC after exposure to irradiation fluence of 5 MeV Au equivalent to a 1 displacement per atom (dpa) for GPC prepared at 2,000°C. The GPC material is manufactured and tested at the Center for Irradiation Materials (CIM) at Alabama A&M University using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and stopping range of ions in matter (SRIM) software.

  13. Utilization of acetic acid-rich pyrolytic bio-oil by microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: reducing bio-oil toxicity and enhancing algal toxicity tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yi; Zhao, Xuefei; Chi, Zhanyou; Rover, Marjorie; Johnston, Patrick; Brown, Robert; Jarboe, Laura; Wen, Zhiyou

    2013-04-01

    This work was to utilize acetic acid contained in bio-oil for growth and lipid production of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The acetic acid-rich bio-oil fraction derived from fast pyrolysis of softwood contained 26% (w/w) acetic acid, formic acid, methanol, furfural, acetol, and phenolics as identified compounds, and 13% (w/w) unidentified compounds. Among those identified compounds, phenolics were most inhibitory to algal growth, followed by furfural and acetol. To enhance the fermentability of the bio-oil fraction, activated carbon was used to reduce the toxicity of the bio-oil, while metabolic evolution was used to enhance the toxicity tolerance of the microalgae. Combining activated carbon treatment and using evolved algal strain resulted in significant algal growth improvement. The results collectively showed that fast pyrolysis-fermentation process was a viable approach for converting biomass into fuels and chemicals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy of Irradiation Effect in Three Carbon Allotropes Induced by Low Energy B Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yun-Chong; JIN Yun-Fan; YAO Cun-Feng; ZHANG Chong-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Irradiation effect in three carbon allotropes C6o, diamond and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) induced by 170 keV B ions, mainly including the process of the damage creation, is investigated by means of Rarnan spectroscopy technique. The differences on irradiation sensitivity and structural stability for C6o, HOPG and diamond are compared. The analysis results indicate that C6o is the most sensitive for B ions irradiation, diamond is the second one and the structure of HOPG is the most stable under B ion irradiation. The damage cross sections σ of C6o, diamond and HOPG deduced from the Raman spectra are 7.78 × 10-15, 6.38 × 10-15 and 1.31 × 10-15 cm-2, respectively.

  15. Residual stresses in boron/tungsten and boron/carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Longitudinal residual stress distribution is determined for 102-micron diam B/W and B/C fibers. The 102-micron diam B/W fibers are deposited on a 12.7-micron diam tungsten wire resistively heated in a BCl3-H2 reactor. The 102-micron diam B/C fibers are made by deposition of boron on a pyrolytic graphite-coated carbon fiber. The longitudinal residual stress distribution is calculated from measurements of the change in length of the fiber produced by removal of the surface through electropolishing. It is found that for both types of fibers, the residual stress vary from a compressive stress at the surface to a tensile stress in the boron near the core. Closer to the core and in the core, significant differences in the residual stresses are observed for the B/W and B/C fibers.

  16. Application of activated carbon derived from scrap tires for adsorption of Rhodamine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Liu, Shuangxi; Zhu, Tan

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon derived from solid hazardous waste scrap tires was evaluated as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal. The adsorption process with respect to operating parameters was investigated to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC) for Rhodamine B (RhB). Systematic research including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic studies was performed. The results showed that APTC was a potential adsorbent for RhB with a higher adsorption capacity than most adsorbents. Solution pH and temperature exert significant influence while ionic strength showed little effect on the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data obey Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed intra-particle diffusion model with more than one process affecting the adsorption process. Thermodynamic study confirmed that the adsorption was a physisorption process with spontaneous, endothermic and random characteristics.

  17. Carbon-based air electrodes carrying MnO 2 in zinc-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zidong; Huang, Wenzhang; Zhang, Shengtao; Tan, Jun

    Catalysts prepared from the carbon black impregnated with manganous nitrate solution and then heated at temperature from 270°C to 450°C were investigated. It was found that the impregnated catalysts heated at temperature of 340°C exhibited the best catalytic activity for oxygen reduction in alkaline electrolyte. It was also found that the XRD spectra of pyrolytic MnO 2 from manganous nitrate over 340°C were different from those below 340°C. The enhanced catalysis of air electrodes was ascribed to the formation of MnO 2 crystal with d-value of 2.72 Å as the impregnated-catalysts was heated at temperature of 340°C. The other factors in preparation of air electrodes were also discussed.

  18. A high performance silicon/carbon composite anode with carbon nanofiber for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Q.; Hanai, K.; Ichikawa, T.; Hirano, A.; Imanishi, N.; Takeda, Y.; Yamamoto, O.

    The electrochemical performance of a composite of nano-Si powder and a pyrolytic carbon of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with carbon nanofiber (CNF) was examined as an anode for lithium-ion batteries. CNF was incorporated into the composite by two methods; direct mixing of CNF with the nano-Si powder coated with carbon produced by pyrolysis of PVC (referred to as Si/C/CNF-1) and mixing of CNF, nano-Si powder, and PVC with subsequent firing (referred to as Si/C/CNF-2). The external Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of Si/C/CNF-1 was comparable to that of Si/C/CNF-2. The micropore BET surface area of Si/C/CNF-2 (73.86 m 2 g -1) was extremely higher than that of Si/C/CNF-1 (0.74 m 2 g -1). The composites prepared by both methods exhibited high capacity and excellent cycling stability for lithium insertion and extraction. A capacity of more than 900 mA h g -1 was maintained after 30 cycles. The coulombic efficiency of the first cycle for Si/C/CNF-1 was as low as 53%, compared with 73% for Si/C/CNF-2. Impedance analysis of cells containing these anode materials suggested that the charge transfer resistance for Si/C/CNF-1 was not changed by cycling, but that Si/C/CNF-2 had high charge transfer resistance after cycling. A composite electrode prepared by mixing Si/C/CNF-2 and CNF exhibited a high reversible capacity at high rate, excellent cycling performance, and a high coulombic efficiency during the first lithium insertion and extraction cycles.

  19. Bio-Derived, Binderless, Hierarchically Porous Carbon Anodes for Li-ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brennan; Ionescu, Robert; Favors, Zachary; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Ozkan, Mihrimah

    2015-09-29

    Here we explore the electrochemical performance of pyrolyzed skins from the species A. bisporus, also known as the Portobello mushroom, as free-standing, binder-free, and current collector-free Li-ion battery anodes. At temperatures above 900 °C, the biomass-derived carbon nanoribbon-like architectures undergo unique processes to become hierarchically porous. During heat-treatment, the oxygen and heteroatom-rich organics and potassium compounds naturally present in the mushroom skins play a mutual role in creating inner void spaces throughout the resulting carbon nanoribbons, which is a process analogous to KOH-activation of carbon materials seen in literature. The pores formed in the pyrolytic carbon nanoribbons range in size from sub-nanometer to tens of nanometers, making the nanoribbons micro, meso, and macroporous. Detailed studies were conducted on the carbon nanoribbons using SEM and TEM to study morphology, as well as XRD and EDS to study composition. The self-supporting nanoribbon anodes demonstrate significant capacity increase as they undergo additional charge/discharge cycles. After a pyrolysis temperature of 1100 °C, the pristine anodes achieve over 260 mAh/g after 700 cycles and a Coulombic efficiency of 101.1%, without the use of harmful solvents or chemical activation agents.

  20. Bio-Derived, Binderless, Hierarchically Porous Carbon Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brennan; Ionescu, Robert; Favors, Zachary; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Ozkan, Mihrimah

    2015-09-01

    Here we explore the electrochemical performance of pyrolyzed skins from the species A. bisporus, also known as the Portobello mushroom, as free-standing, binder-free, and current collector-free Li-ion battery anodes. At temperatures above 900 °C, the biomass-derived carbon nanoribbon-like architectures undergo unique processes to become hierarchically porous. During heat-treatment, the oxygen and heteroatom-rich organics and potassium compounds naturally present in the mushroom skins play a mutual role in creating inner void spaces throughout the resulting carbon nanoribbons, which is a process analogous to KOH-activation of carbon materials seen in literature. The pores formed in the pyrolytic carbon nanoribbons range in size from sub-nanometer to tens of nanometers, making the nanoribbons micro, meso, and macroporous. Detailed studies were conducted on the carbon nanoribbons using SEM and TEM to study morphology, as well as XRD and EDS to study composition. The self-supporting nanoribbon anodes demonstrate significant capacity increase as they undergo additional charge/discharge cycles. After a pyrolysis temperature of 1100 °C, the pristine anodes achieve over 260 mAh/g after 700 cycles and a Coulombic efficiency of 101.1%, without the use of harmful solvents or chemical activation agents.

  1. Analytical applications of glassy carbon electrodes modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes dispersed in polyethylenimine as detectors in flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Arribas, Alberto; Bermejo, Esperanza; Chicharro, Manuel; Zapardiel, Antonio; Luque, Guillermina L; Ferreyra, Nancy F; Rivas, Gustavo A

    2007-07-23

    This work reports the advantages of using glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) dispersed in polyethylenimine (PEI) as detectors in flow injection and capillary electrophoresis. The presence of the dispersion of CNT in PEI at the electrode surface allows the highly sensitive and reproducible determination of hydrogen peroxide, different neurotransmitters (dopamine (D) and its metabolite dopac, epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE)), phenolic compounds (phenol (P), 3-chlorophenol (3-CP) and 2,3-dichlorophenol (2,3CP)) and herbicides (amitrol). Sensitivities enhancements of 150 and 140 folds compared to GCE were observed for hydrogen peroxide and amitrol, respectively. One of the most remarkable properties of the resulting electrode is the antifouling effect of the CNT/PEI layer. No passivation was observed either for successive additions (30) or continuous flow (for 30 min) of the compounds under investigation, even dopac or phenol. A critical comparison of the amperometric and voltammetric signal of these different analytes at bare- and PEI-modified glassy carbon electrodes and pyrolytic graphite electrodes is also included, demonstrating that the superior performance of CNT is mainly due to their unique electrochemical properties. Glassy carbon electrodes modified with CNT-PEI dispersion also show an excellent performance as amperometric detector in the electrophoretic separation of phenolic compounds and neurotransmitters making possible highly sensitive and reproducible determinations.

  2. Cu and Cd Adsorption on Carbon Aerogel and Xerogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotet L. C.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogel (CA and xerogel (CX were proposed as new carbon adsorbent materials for Cu and Cd ions from contaminated water (synthetic water samples. These materials were prepared by a sol-gel process that involves a polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde in Na2CO3 catalysis, followed by a drying step, either in supercritical conditions of CO2 to aerogel obtaining or in normal conditions to xerogel obtaining, and a pyrolytic step. Nitrogen adsorption, AFM, SEM, TEM and XRD were used for morpho-structural adsorbent investigation. Cu and Cd ions adsorption experiments were carried out in batch conditions under magnetic stirring. Adsorbent quantity and grain size influence over the adsorption efficiency were considered. Adsorption results expressed as adsorption capacities showed that prepared CA is a better adsorbent than CX. Adsorption capacities up to 14.2 mg g-1 and 8.5 mg g-1 were obtained for Cd2+ and Cu2+ adsorption on CA, respectively.

  3. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  4. X-ray natural linear dichroism of graphitic materials across the carbon K-edge: Correction for perturbing high-order harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansing, C.; Mertins, H. C.; Gaupp, A.; Sokolov, A.; Gilbert, M. C.; Wahab, H.; Timmers, H.

    2016-05-01

    Reflectivity measurements on graphitic materials such as graphene at energies across the carbon K-edge are frustrated by significant intensity loss due to adventitious carbon on beamline mirrors. Such intensity reduction enhances effects due to perturbing high-order harmonics in the beam. These effects distort the actual structure of the reflectance curve. In order to overcome this limitation, a correction technique has been developed and demonstrated first with measurements for highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. The same approach may be applied to other graphitic materials such as graphene and it may be used with other synchrotron beamlines. The fraction of high-order harmonics was determined by passing the incident beam through a 87 nm thin silicon nitride absorber that can be well modeled. Using the corrected measurements the x-ray natural linear dichroism of the sample has been determined.

  5. Thermo-mechanical characterisation of low density carbon foams and composite materials for the ATLAS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Isaac, Bonad

    As a result of the need to increase the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN-Geneva by 2020, the ATLAS detector requires an upgraded inner tracker. Up- grading the ATLAS experiment is essential due to higher radiation levels and high particle occupancies. The design of this improved inner tracker detector involves development of silicon sensors and their support structures. These support structures need to have well un- derstood thermal properties and be dimensionally stable in order to allow efficient cooling of the silicon and accurate track reconstruction. The work presented in this thesis is an in- vestigation which aims to qualitatively characterise the thermal and mechanical properties of the materials involved in the design of the inner tracker of the ATLAS upgrade. These materials are silicon carbide foam (SiC foam), low density carbon foams such as PocoFoam and Allcomp foam, Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite (TPG), carbon/carbon and Carbon Fibre Re- inforced Polymer (CFRP). The work involve...

  6. Investigation of reinforcement of the modified carbon black from wasted tires by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jie; YANG Yong-rong; REN Xiao-hong; STAPF Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis has the potential of transforming waste into recyclable products. Pyrolytic carbon black (PCB) is one of the most important products from the pyrolysis of used tires. Techniques for surface modifications of PCB have been developed. One of the most significant applications for modified PCB is to reinforce the rubber matrix to obtain high added values. The transverse relaxation and the chain dynamics of vulcanized rubber networks with PCB and modified PCB were studied and compared with those of the commercial carbon blacks using selective 1H transverse relaxation (T2) experiments and dipolar correlation effect (DCE) experiments on the stimulated echo. Demineralization and coupling agent modification not only intensified the interactions between the modified PCB and the neighboring polyisoprene chains, but also increased the chemical cross-link density of the vulcanized rubber with modified PCB. The mechanical testing of the rubbers with different kinds of carbon blacks showed that the maximum strain of the rubber with modified PCB was improved greatly. The mechanical testing results confirmed the conclusion obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). PCB modified by the demineralization and NDZ-105 titanate coupling agent could be used to replace the commercial semi-reinforcing carbon black.

  7. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of black carbon (BC) in PM{sub 10} aerosols from residential area of suburban Tokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Masao, E-mail: uchidama@nies.go.j [AMS Facility (NIES-TERRA), Environmental Chemistry Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Kumata, Hidetoshi; Koike, Yasuyo; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Uchida, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Kitao [School of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo (Japan); Shibata, Yasuyuki [AMS Facility (NIES-TERRA), Environmental Chemistry Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    The AMS technique was applied to analyse black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), and previously reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM{sub 10} aerosols from a residential area, suburban Tokyo, to determine natural abundance of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), an ideal tracer to distinguish fossil fuel ({sup 14}C-free) from modern biomass combustion sources of pyrolytic products. The {sup 14}C concentrations in BC, isolated using the CTO-375 method, were 42% and 30% pMC (in terms of percent Modern Carbon: pMC) in summer and winter, respectively. The {sup 14}C concentrations in BC were also compared with those of compound-class specific {sup 14}C content of PAHs previously reported for the same samples: they were 45% and 33% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. The {sup 14}C signals of BC were identical to those of high molecular weight (MW >= 226, 5-6 rings) PAHs. The resemblance between {sup 14}C signals of BC and PAHs can be referred as a 'certificate' for the validity of the BC isolation method employed in this study. Also, it suggests that {sup 14}C-BC approach can be a surrogate for PAHs specific {sup 14}C analyses to monitor seasonal source variation of combustion-derived pyrolytic products. On the other hand, {sup 14}C contents of total organic carbon in 2004 were 61% and 42% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. This is likely attributed to higher contribution of plant activity in summer.

  8. Sorption of four hydrophobic organic contaminants by biochars derived from maize straw, wood dust and swine manure at different pyrolytic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziying; Han, Lanfang; Sun, Ke; Jin, Jie; Ro, Kyoung S; Libra, Judy A; Liu, Xitao; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-02-01

    Sorption behavior of acetochlor (ACE), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), 17α-Ethynyl estradiol (EE2) and phenanthrene (PHE) with biochars produced from three feedstocks (maize straw (MABs), pine wood dust (WDBs) and swine manure (SWBs)) at seven heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) was evaluated. The bulk polarity of these biochars declined with increasing HTT while the aromaticity and CO2-surface area (CO2-SA) rose. The surface OC contents of biochars were generally higher than bulk OC contents. The organic carbon (OC)-normalized CO2-SA (CO2-SA/OC) of biochars significantly correlated with the sorption coefficients (n and logK(oc)), suggesting that pore filling could dominate the sorption of tested sorbates. SWBs had higher logK(oc) values compared to MABs and WDBs, due to their higher ash contents. Additionally, the logK(oc) values for MABs was relatively greater than that for WDBs at low HTTs (≤400 °C), probably resulting from the higher CO2-SA/OC, ash contents and aromaticity of MABs. Surface polarity and the aliphatic C may dominate the sorption of WDBs obtained at relatively low HTTs (≤400 °C), while aromatic C affects the sorption of biochars at high HTTs. Results of this work aid to deepen our understanding of the sorption mechanisms, which is pivotal to wise utilization of biochars as sorbents for hazardous organic compounds.

  9. Effect of Interface Modified by Graphene on the Mechanical and Frictional Properties of Carbon/Graphene/Carbon Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we developed an interface modified by graphene to simultaneously improve the mechanical and frictional properties of carbon/graphene/carbon (C/G/C composite. Results indicated that the C/G/C composite exhibits remarkably improved interfacial bonding mode, static and dynamic mechanical performance, thermal conductivity, and frictional properties in comparison with those of the C/C composite. The weight contents of carbon fibers, graphene and pyrolytic carbon are 31.6, 0.3 and 68.1 wt %, respectively. The matrix of the C/G/C composite was mainly composed of rough laminar (RL pyrocarbon. The average hardness by nanoindentation of the C/G/C and C/C composite matrices were 0.473 and 0.751 GPa, respectively. The flexural strength (three point bending, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS, interfacial debonding strength (IDS, internal friction and storage modulus of the C/C composite were 106, 10.3, 7.6, 0.038 and 12.7 GPa, respectively. Those properties of the C/G/C composite increased by 76.4%, 44.6%, 168.4% and 22.8%, respectively, and their internal friction decreased by 42.1% in comparison with those of the C/C composite. Owing to the lower hardness of the matrix, improved fiber/matrix interface bonding strength, and self-lubricating properties of graphene, a complete friction film was easily formed on the friction surface of the modified composite. Compared with the C/C composite, the C/G/C composite exhibited stable friction coefficients and lower wear losses at simulating air-plane normal landing (NL and rejected take-off (RTO. The method appears to be a competitive approach to improve the mechanical and frictional properties of C/C composites simultaneously.

  10. Carbonate aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  11. Formation and composition of adsorbates on hydrophobic carbon surfaces from aqueous laccase-maltodextrin mixture suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrales Ureña, Yendry Regina, E-mail: yendry386@hotmail.com [UNESP São Paulo State University, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo Carrijo Coube, 14-01, Bauru, São Paulo (Brazil); Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha [UNESP São Paulo State University, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo Carrijo Coube, 14-01, Bauru, São Paulo (Brazil); Szardenings, Michael [Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI, Perlickstrasse 1, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gätjen, Linda; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Rischka, Klaus [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Less than 10 nm layer formed on carbon based materials composed by laccase and maltodextrin. • Improvement of the wettability of carbon based materials. • A protein-polysaccharide biofilm layer formation at solid liquid interface. • Stable layers formed under buffer and water rinsing. - Abstract: A robust procedure for the surface bio-functionalization of carbon surfaces was developed. It consists on the modification of carbon materials in contact with an aqueous suspension of the enzyme laccase from Trametes versicolor and the lyophilization agent maltodextrin, with the pH value adjusted close to the isoelectric point of the enzyme. We report in-situ investigations applying Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) for carbon-coated sensor surfaces and, moreover, ex-situ measurements with static contact angle measurements, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) for smooth Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) substrates, for contact times between the enzyme formulation and the carbon material surface ranging from 20 s to 24 h. QCM-D studies reveals the formation of rigid layer of biomaterial, a few nanometers thin, which shows a strongly improved wettability of the substrate surface upon contact angle measurements. Following spectroscopic characterization, these layers are composed of mixtures of laccase and maltodextrin. The formation of these adsorbates is attributed to attractive interactions between laccase, the maltodextrin-based lyophilization agent and the hydrophobic carbon surfaces; a short-term contact between the aqueous laccase mixture suspension and HOPG surfaces is shown to merely result in de-wetting patterns influencing the results of contact angle measurements. The new enzyme-based surface modification of carbon-based materials is suggested to be applicable for the improvement of not only the wettability of low energy substrate surfaces with fluid formulations like coatings

  12. 利用废轮胎热解炭制取活性炭的试验研究%Conversion of pyrolytic chars from used tires to activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志霄; 池涌; 严建华; 文世恩; 岑可法

    2004-01-01

    热解炭是废轮胎热解的重要产物之一.以CO2气体作为活化剂对废轮胎热解炭制取活性炭的活化温度为820~950℃,活化时间为60~360 min.在试验条件下,活化温度越高,活化时间越长,活性炭烧失率越大,比表面积也越大.制得的活性炭具有与商业活性炭相似的中、大孔隙分布,而微孔则不发达,因此孔容积小于商业活性炭.在950℃,240 min条件下得到中等比表面积(306 m2/g)的活性炭.针对碘、苯酚和亚甲基蓝三种物质考察了活性炭的液相吸附特性.热解炭和活性炭对亚甲基蓝和苯酚具有良好的吸附性,而碘吸附值则与商业活性炭尚有较大差距.

  13. A comparison of the higher order harmonic components derived from large-amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetry of myoglobin and heme in DDAB films at a pyrolytic graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Bond, Alan M

    2010-04-06

    A debate as to whether heme remains bound or is released in myoglobin molecules incorporated into a didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) film adhered to a pyrolytic graphite electrode has prompted a comparison of their electrochemistry by the highly sensitive large-amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetric method. The accessibility of third, fourth, and higher harmonic components that are devoid of background current and the enhanced resolution relative to that available in dc voltammetry have allowed a detailed comparison of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) and Fe(II)/Fe(I) redox processes of myoglobin and heme molecules to be undertaken as a function of buffer composition and pH and in the presence and absence of NaBr in the buffer and/or film. Under most conditions examined, only very subtle differences, in the Fe(III)/Fe(II) process were found, implying this process cannot be used to indicate the intactness or otherwise of myoglobin in myoglobin-DDAB films. In contrast, higher order ac harmonics obtained from myoglobin-DDAB and heme-DDAB films reveal pH dependent differences with respect to the Fe(II)/Fe(I) couple. Analysis of the ac harmonics, and with the hypothesis that the Fe(II)/Fe(I) process reflects the myoglobin state, suggests that the majority of the iron heme is released from myoglobin-DDAB (pH 5.0, no NaBr) films in contact with pH 5.0 (0.1 M sodium acetate) buffer solution devoid of or containing NaBr. However, myoglobin films prepared with pH 5.0 buffer containing NaBr shows significant difference in the higher harmonic shapes and midpoint potentials in the Fe(II)/Fe(I) process relative to the case when heme molecules are used, although as noted in other studies, a significant fraction of the Mb is rendered electroinactive in the presence of NaBr. The voltammetric responses of myoglobin and heme-DDAB (pH 5.0) films in contact with pH 7.0 (0.1 M) phosphate buffer solution also exhibit significant differences in the Fe(II)/Fe(I) redox couple in the higher

  14. Evaluation of levels of defect sites present in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes using capacitive and faradaic current components derived simultaneously from large-amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetric experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Bond, Alan M

    2009-01-15

    The level of edge plane defect sites present in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrodes has been evaluated via analysis of dc, ac fundamental, and higher-order ac harmonics available from a single large-amplitude Fourier transformed (FT) ac voltammetric experiment. Deliberate introduction of a low level of edge plane defect was achieved by polishing, with a higher level being introduced via electrochemical pretreatment. Kinetics regimes associated with fast electron transfer on the edge plane defect sites and slow electron transfer on the basal plane surface are resolved under ac conditions when using the surface-sensitive [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) redox probe. However, because of their insensitivity to slow electron transfer, higher-order ac faradaic harmonics almost exclusively detect only the much faster processes that emanate from edge plane defect sites. Thus, detection of fourth- and higher-order ac Faradaic harmonic components that are devoid of background capacitive current is possible at freshly cleaved HOPG in the region near the reversible potential for the [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) process. Under these circumstances, dc cyclic voltammograms exhibit only reduction and oxidation peaks separated by more than 1 V. The fundamental ac harmonic provides detailed information on the capacitive current, which increases with the level of edge plane defect sites. Apparent charge transfer rate constants also can be derived from peak-to-peak separations obtained from the dc aperiodic component. Estimates of the percentage of edge plane defect sites based on ac higher harmonics, capacitance, and dc aperiodic component that are available from a single experiment have been compared. The edge plane defect levels deduced from capacitance (fundamental harmonic ac component) and higher harmonic Faradaic currents are considered to be more reliable than estimations based on apparent rate constants derived from the dc aperiodic component or conventional dc cyclic voltammogram.

  15. Fabrication of novel coated pyrolytic graphite electrodes for the selective nano-level monitoring of Cd²⁺ ions in biological and environmental samples using polymeric membrane of newly synthesized macrocycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, Manoj Kumar; Singh, A K; Jain, A K; Upadhyay, Anjali; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Udai P; Narang, Shikha

    2015-02-20

    Novel 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol unit based macrocyclic ionophore 5,11,17-trithia-1,3,7,9,13,15,19,20,21-nonaazatetracyclo[14.2.1.1(4,7).1(10,13)]henicosa-4(20),10(21),16(19)-triene-6,12,18-trithione (M1), was synthesized and characterized. Preliminary studies on M1 have showed that it has more the affinity toward Cd(2+) ion. Thus, the macrocyclic ionophore (M1) was used as electroactive material in the fabrication of PVC-membrane electrodes such as polymeric membrane electrode (PME), coated graphite electrode (CGE) and coated pyrolytic graphite electrode (CPGE) were prepared and its performance characteristic were compared with. The electroanalytical studies performed on PME, CGE and CPGE revealed that CPGE having membrane composition M1:PVC:1-CN:NaTPB in the ratio of 7:37:54:2 exhibits the best potentiometric characteristics in terms of detection limit of 7.58×10(-9) mol L(-1), Nernstian slope of 29.6 mV decade(-1) of activity. The sensor was found to be independent of pH in the range 2.5-8.5. The sensor showed a fast response time of 10s and could be used over a period of 4 months without any significant divergence in its potentiometric characteristics. The sensor has been employed for monitoring of the Cd(2+) ion in real samples and also used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Cd(2+) ion with EDTA.

  16. Adhesive force measurement between HOPG and zinc oxide as an indicator for interfacial bonding of carbon fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brendan A; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-07-22

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires have recently been utilized as an interphase to increase the interfacial strength of carbon fiber composites. It was shown that the interaction between the carbon fiber and the ZnO nanowires was a critical parameter in adhesion; however, fiber based testing techniques are dominated by local defects and cannot be used to effectively study the bonding interaction directly. Here, the strength of the interface between ZnO and graphitic carbon is directly measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using oxygen plasma treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and an AFM tip coated with ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is used to compare the surface chemistry of HOPG and carbon fiber and to quantify the presence of various oxygen functional groups. An indirect measurement of the interfacial strength is then performed through single fiber fragmentation testing (SFF) on functionalized carbon fibers coated with ZnO nanowires to validate the AFM measurements. The SFF and AFM methods showed the same correlation, demonstrating the capacity of the AFM method to study the interfacial properties in composite materials. Additionally, the chemical interactions between oxygen functional groups and the ionic structure of ZnO suggest that intermolecular forces at the interface are responsible for the strong interface.

  17. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    How does a corporation know it emits carbon? Acquiring such knowledge starts with the classification of environmentally relevant consumption information. This paper visits the corporate location at which this underlying element for their knowledge is assembled to give rise to carbon emissions. Us...

  18. Carbon photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed. (optical elements of laser devices)

  19. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor adsorption capacities. On activation, these exhibit increased adsorption volumes of 0.5–0.8 cm3 /gm and surface areas of 700–1800 m2 /gm depending on activation conditions, whether physical or chemical. Former carbons possess mixed pore size distribution while chemically activated carbons predominantly possess micropores. Thus, these carbons can be used for adsorption of wide distributions of molecules from gas to liquid. The molecular adsorption within the pores is due to single layer or multilayer molecule deposition at the pore walls and hence results in different types of adsorption isotherm. On the other hand, activated carbon fibres with controlled microporous structure and surface area in the range of 2500 m2 /gm can be developed by controlled pyrolysis and physical activation of amorphous carbon fibres. Active carbon fibres with unmatchable pore structure and surface characteristics are present and futuristic porous materials for a number of applications from pollution control to energy storage.

  20. C@CdS/埃洛石纳米管复合光催化剂一步热解法的制备及光降解性能%Preparation of C@CdS/Halloysite Nanotube Composite Photocatalyst Using One-Step Pyrolytic Method and Its Photodegradation Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢伟男; 倪良; 颜学升; 刘馨琳; 罗莹莹; 逯子扬; 闫永胜; 霍鹏伟

    2014-01-01

    A novel photocatalyst, C@CdS/hal oysite nanotubes (HNTs), was synthesized using a facile and effective pyrolytic method. The as-prepared photocatalyst was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface area measurements, and X-ray energy dispersive, ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance, Fourier-transform infrared, specific surface area, and Raman spectroscopies. The photocatalytic activity of the sample was evaluated by the degradation of tetracycline (TC) under visible-light irradiation. The influence of different pyrolysis temperatures on the photocatalytic degradation of TC was investigated. The optimal pyrolysis temperature was found to be 400 °C. The photodegradation rate reached 86%in 60 min under visible-light irradiation. In addition, benefiting from the common effects of carbon, CdS, and HNTs, the photocatalyst exhibited good chemical stability. After being laid aside for one year, the photocatalytic efficiency was unaffected and the photocatalyst retained its high catalytic activity after three catalytic cycles. Based on our experimental results, the preparation mechanism and degradation of the intermediate product of TC are discussed.%通过一步热解法合成了一种新的复合光催化剂C@CdS/埃洛石纳米管(HNTs)。用扫描电镜(SEM), X射线能谱(EDS),透射电镜(TEM), X射线衍射(XRD),紫外-可见漫反射光谱(UV-Vis DRS),傅里叶变换红外(FT-IR)光谱,比表面积和拉曼光谱(RS)对材料进行表征。利用可见光下降解四环素探究了C@CdS/HNTs的光催化活性。结果表明,所制备的不同热解温度的样品中,400°C热解温度下的样品降解四环素效果最好,可见光照射60 min降解率能达到86%。此外,得益于碳层、CdS和HNTs的共同作用,光催化剂展示了很好的稳定性。放置一年对催化活性没有任何影响,并且经过三次循环实验,光催化剂活性没有很大

  1. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures is disclosed. The improvement consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat.No. 4,909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially, the carbon fabric of tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar, or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U"-channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  2. Electronic structure of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes studied using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzhezinskaya, M. M.; Muradyan, V. E.; Vinogradov, N. A.; Preobrajenski, A. B.; Gudat, W.; Vinogradov, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the results of combined investigation of the chemical bond formation in fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different fluorine contents (10-55wt%) and reference compounds (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals and “white” graphite fluoride) using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy at C1s and F1s thresholds. Measurements were performed at BESSY II (Berlin, Germany) and MAX-laboratory (Lund, Sweden). The analysis of the soft x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra points to the formation of covalent chemical bonding between fluorine and carbon atoms in the fluorinated nanotubes. It was established that within the probing depth (˜15nm) of carbon nanotubes, the process of fluorination runs uniformly and does not depend on the fluorine concentration. In this case, fluorine atoms interact with MWCNTs through the covalent attachment of fluorine atoms to graphene layers of the graphite skeleton (phase 1) and this bonding is accompanied by a change in the hybridization of the 2s and 2p valence electron states of the carbon atom from the trigonal (sp2) to tetrahedral (sp3) hybridization and by a large electron transfer between carbon an fluorine atoms. In the MWCNT near-surface region the second fluorine-carbon phase with weak electron transfer is formed; it is located mainly within two or three upper graphene monolayers, and its contribution becomes much poorer as the probing depth of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (F-MWCNTs) increases. The defluorination process of F-MWCNTs on thermal annealing has been investigated. The conclusion has been made that F-MWCNT defluorination without destruction of graphene layers is possible.

  3. Wetting Properties of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebel, Jennah; Moos, Gunnar; Fasel, Roman; Hertel, Tobias; Ertl, Gerhard

    2001-03-01

    We present a comparative study of the ad-- and desorption kinetics of inert gases (CH_4, Xe, SF_6) and polar molecules (H_2O, MeOH, EthOH) from single--wall carbon nanotube samples and from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Binding energies and sticking coefficients have been determined under ultra-high vacuum conditions as a function of adsorbate coverage using thermal desorption spectroscopy. At coverages below one mono-layer binding energies of inert gases are found to be substantially higher on tube samples than on HOPG which --- in combination with molecular mechanics calculations --- allows us to identify the preferred low coverage adsorption site. The results indicate that all inert gases studied here should wet nanotube and HOPG surfaces. However, as intermolecular forces within the more polar solvents increase there is a marked change in the wetting behavior of HOPG. In contrast to expectations we find that the wetting properties of SWNT samples cannot be directly related to those of graphite. The origin of this peculiar behavior can be interpreted using our data on ad-- and desorption kinetics in combination with macroscopic contact angle measurements.

  4. Pore structure and growth kinetics in carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, S.

    1978-04-01

    Pore structure of glassy carbon (GC) and pyrolytic graphite (PG) have been investigated. GC is one of the most impervious of solids finding applications in prosthetic devices and fuel cells while PG is used extensively in the aerospace industry. One third of the microstructure of GC consists of closed pores inaccessible to fluids. The microstructure of this material has been characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution electron microscopy. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been used to measure the angstrom sized pores and to follow the evolution of pore surface area as a function of heat treatment temperature (HTT) and heat treatment time (HTt) at constant temperature. From these measurements an analysis of the surface area kinetics was made to find out if rate processes are involved and to locate graphitization occurring at pore surfaces. PG on the other hand has been found to have larger sized pores that comprise five percent of its volume. In addition to being closed these pores are oriented. Some pore models are proposed for PG and the existing scattering theory from oriented ellipsoids is modified to include the proposed shapes.

  5. 烘焙对生物质热解产物特性的影响%Effect of torrefaction on characteristics of pyrolytic products of biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晴; 梅艳阳; 郝宏蒙; 杨海平; 王贤华; 陈汉平

    2013-01-01

    (GC), and liquid products were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Karl Fischer moisture tester. The research results showed that increasing torrefaction temperature resulted in the increase of the carbon content of torrefied biomass from 46.07%to 62.63%. However, the hydrogen and oxygen contents decreased from 7.06% to 5.26% and 41.26% to 24.84%, respectively. With the increase of torrefaction temperature, the cotton stalk gradually converted to charcoal. The highest calorific value was 24.85 MJ/kg when torrefaction was performed at 290℃. The solid yield of pyrolysis was decrease sharply with elevated torrefaction temperature, which was in contrary to the liquid yield, while gas yield had no obvious change. As for pyrolysis of gases, the content of H2 and CH4 increased with elevated torrefaction temperature, and the yield of H2 increased by 77.4%, the content of CO decreased from 48% to 34%, the yield of CO2 had no obvious change. However, the total content of combustible gases increased. As for liquid production, with the increasing torrefaction temperature, the yield of liquid was decreased by 3.4%, 17.6%, 25.0%, 42.8%compared to the raw biomass. Water and acetic acid content in bio-oil decreased greatly while the quantity of polycyclic aromatic compounds increased, which indicated that torrefaction could improve the quality of bio-oil, and provide process optimization for subsequent fast pyrolysis.

  6. Carbon cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    A satellite launched in early August as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth could dramatically increase understanding of how carbon cycles through the Earth's biosphere and living organisms and how this process influences global climate. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) will measure the color of the oceans with a radiometer to determine the concentration of chlorophyll found in oceanic phytoplankton. The single-celled plants, at the base of food chains around the world, remove carbon dioxide from seawater through photosynthesis, which allows oceans to absorb more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

  7. Estudo voltamétrico do complexo de cobre(II com o ligante vermelho de alizarina S, adsorvido na superfície do eletrodo de grafite pirolítico Voltammetric study of complex of copper (II with alizarin red S ligand, absorbed on surface of pyrolytic graphite electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor E. Mouchrek Filho

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The alizarin red S (ARS has been used as a spectrophotometric reagent of several metals for a long time. Now this alizarin has been used as modifier agent of electrodes, for voltammetric analyses. In this work cyclic voltammetry experiments was accomplished on closed circuit, with the objective of studying the voltammetric behavior of alizarin red S adsorbed and of its copper complex, on the surface of the pyrolytic graphite electrode. These studies showed that ARS strongly adsorbs on the surface of this electrode. This adsorption was used to immobilize ions copper(II from the solution.

  8. Nanoscale Electrochemistry of sp(2) Carbon Materials: From Graphite and Graphene to Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Patrick R; Güell, Aleix G; Zhang, Guohui

    2016-09-20

    Carbon materials have a long history of use as electrodes in electrochemistry, from (bio)electroanalysis to applications in energy technologies, such as batteries and fuel cells. With the advent of new forms of nanocarbon, particularly, carbon nanotubes and graphene, carbon electrode materials have taken on even greater significance for electrochemical studies, both in their own right and as components and supports in an array of functional composites. With the increasing prominence of carbon nanomaterials in electrochemistry comes a need to critically evaluate the experimental framework from which a microscopic understanding of electrochemical processes is best developed. This Account advocates the use of emerging electrochemical imaging techniques and confined electrochemical cell formats that have considerable potential to reveal major new perspectives on the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon materials, with unprecedented detail and spatial resolution. These techniques allow particular features on a surface to be targeted and models of structure-activity to be developed and tested on a wide range of length scales and time scales. When high resolution electrochemical imaging data are combined with information from other microscopy and spectroscopy techniques applied to the same area of an electrode surface, in a correlative-electrochemical microscopy approach, highly resolved and unambiguous pictures of electrode activity are revealed that provide new views of the electrochemical properties of carbon materials. With a focus on major sp(2) carbon materials, graphite, graphene, and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), this Account summarizes recent advances that have changed understanding of interfacial electrochemistry at carbon electrodes including: (i) Unequivocal evidence for the high activity of the basal surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is at least as active as noble metal electrodes (e.g., platinum) for outer

  9. Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiated by the first single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT transistors [1,2], and reinvigorated with the isolation of graphene [3], the field of carbon-based nanoscale electronic devices and components (Carbon Nanoelectronics for short has developed at a blistering pace [4]. Comprising a vast number of scientists and engineers that span materials science, physics, chemistry, and electronics, this field seeks to provide an evolutionary transition path to address the fundamental scaling limitations of silicon CMOS [5]. Concurrently, researchers are actively investigating the use of carbon nanomaterials in applications including back-end interconnects, high-speed optoelectronic applications [6], spin-transport [7], spin tunnel barrier [8], flexible electronics, and many more.

  10. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  11. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  12. Formation and composition of adsorbates on hydrophobic carbon surfaces from aqueous laccase-maltodextrin mixture suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales Ureña, Yendry Regina; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha; Szardenings, Michael; Gätjen, Linda; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Rischka, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    A robust procedure for the surface bio-functionalization of carbon surfaces was developed. It consists on the modification of carbon materials in contact with an aqueous suspension of the enzyme laccase from Trametes versicolor and the lyophilization agent maltodextrin, with the pH value adjusted close to the isoelectric point of the enzyme. We report in-situ investigations applying Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) for carbon-coated sensor surfaces and, moreover, ex-situ measurements with static contact angle measurements, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) for smooth Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) substrates, for contact times between the enzyme formulation and the carbon material surface ranging from 20 s to 24 h. QCM-D studies reveals the formation of rigid layer of biomaterial, a few nanometers thin, which shows a strongly improved wettability of the substrate surface upon contact angle measurements. Following spectroscopic characterization, these layers are composed of mixtures of laccase and maltodextrin. The formation of these adsorbates is attributed to attractive interactions between laccase, the maltodextrin-based lyophilization agent and the hydrophobic carbon surfaces; a short-term contact between the aqueous laccase mixture suspension and HOPG surfaces is shown to merely result in de-wetting patterns influencing the results of contact angle measurements. The new enzyme-based surface modification of carbon-based materials is suggested to be applicable for the improvement of not only the wettability of low energy substrate surfaces with fluid formulations like coatings or adhesives, but also their adhesion in contact with hardened polymers.

  13. A novel thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process for carbon-carbon composites%炭/炭复合材料新型热梯度制备工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shameel; Farhan; 李克智; 郭领军

    2007-01-01

    Solid cylindrical carbon-carbon composites were processed using conventional thermal gradient chemical cause of the difference in thermal conductivities. The hottest portion (900-1 200 ℃ ) was along the inserted carbon fibers, where the pyrolytic reaction of natural gas occurred. The densification radially moved outwards and ultimately a density of 1. 778 g/cm3 was obtained after67h. The process parameters such as the electric power of the furnace, electrical resistance of the sample, densification time, and the position of the deposition layer were studied. A densified sample having a volume fraction of carbon fibers of 10% was tested for ablation and erosion. The microstructure of the pyrolytic carbon matrix of the as-prepared sample was investigated by polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscoPY.%对传统的热梯度化学气相渗透工艺进行了改进.把高热导率(55W/(m·℃))的48k炭纤维束穿入针刺炭毡预制体中心.利用炭纤维束和炭毡预制体热导率(0.15W/(m·℃))的差异,在预制体内部产生热梯度.在900℃~1200℃下,天然气首先在预制体中心的48k炭纤维处热解,致密化沿径向由中心向外部推进,67 h后材料的密度达1.778 g/cm3.研究了炉内输入电压、电阻、致密化时间、沉积层位置等工艺参数对材料性能的影响.通过偏光显微镜和扫描电子显微镜研究了基体热解碳的微观结构,并对炭纤维体积含量为10%的炭/炭试样进行了烧蚀性能测试.

  14. Electrocatalytic Detection of Amitrole on the Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube – Iron (II tetra-aminophthalocyanine Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tebello Nyokong

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that iron(II tetra-aminophthalocyanine complex electropolymerized onto a multi-walled carbon nanotube-modified basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode greatly enhanced the electrocatalytic detetion of amitrole (a toxic herbicide, resulting in a very low detection limit (0.5 nM and excellent sensitivity of 8.80±0.44 μA/nM, compared to any known work reported so far. The electrocatalytic detection of amitrole at this electrode occurred at less positive potential (~0.3 V vs Ag|ACl and also revealed a typical coupled chemical reaction. The mechanism for this response is proposed. The electrode gave satisfactory selectivity to amitrole in the presence of other potential interfering pesticides in aqueous solutions.

  15. Sustainable biomass-derived hydrothermal carbons for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falco, Camillo

    2012-01-15

    investigated processing conditions. These evidences were indicative of a different HTC conversion mechanism for cellulose, involving reactions that are commonly observed during pyrolytic processes. The evolution of glucose-derived HTC carbon chemical structure upon pyrolysis was also investigated. These studies revealed that upon heat treatment (Investigated temperatures 350 - 900 C) the furan-based structure was progressively converted into highly curved aromatic pre-graphenic domains. This thermal degradation process was observed to produce an increasingly more hydrophobic surface and considerable microporosity within the HTC carbon structure. In order to introduce porosity in the HTC carbons derived from lignocellulosic biomass, KOH chemical activation was investigated as an HTC post-synthesis functionalisation step. These studies demonstrated that HTC carbons are excellent precursors for the production of highly microporous activated carbons (ACs) and that the porosity development upon KOH chemical activation is dependent on the chemical structure of the HTC carbon, tuned by employing different HTC temperatures. Preliminary testing of the ACs for CO{sub 2} capture or high pressure CH{sub 4} storage yielded very promising results, since the measured uptakes of both adsorbates (i.e. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) were comparable to top-performing and commercially available adsorbents, usually employed for these end-applications. The combined use of HTC and KOH chemical activation was also employed to produce highly microporous N-doped ACs from microalgae. The hydrothermal treatment of the microalgae substrate was observed to cause the depletion of the protein and carbohydrate fractions and the near complete loss (i.e. 90%) of the microalgae N-content, as liquid hydrolysis/degradation products. The obtained carbonaceous product showed a predominantly aliphatic character indicating the presence of alkyl chains presumably derived from the lipid fractions. Addition of glucose to the

  16. Sustainable biomass-derived hydrothermal carbons for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falco, Camillo

    2012-01-15

    investigated processing conditions. These evidences were indicative of a different HTC conversion mechanism for cellulose, involving reactions that are commonly observed during pyrolytic processes. The evolution of glucose-derived HTC carbon chemical structure upon pyrolysis was also investigated. These studies revealed that upon heat treatment (Investigated temperatures 350 - 900 C) the furan-based structure was progressively converted into highly curved aromatic pre-graphenic domains. This thermal degradation process was observed to produce an increasingly more hydrophobic surface and considerable microporosity within the HTC carbon structure. In order to introduce porosity in the HTC carbons derived from lignocellulosic biomass, KOH chemical activation was investigated as an HTC post-synthesis functionalisation step. These studies demonstrated that HTC carbons are excellent precursors for the production of highly microporous activated carbons (ACs) and that the porosity development upon KOH chemical activation is dependent on the chemical structure of the HTC carbon, tuned by employing different HTC temperatures. Preliminary testing of the ACs for CO{sub 2} capture or high pressure CH{sub 4} storage yielded very promising results, since the measured uptakes of both adsorbates (i.e. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) were comparable to top-performing and commercially available adsorbents, usually employed for these end-applications. The combined use of HTC and KOH chemical activation was also employed to produce highly microporous N-doped ACs from microalgae. The hydrothermal treatment of the microalgae substrate was observed to cause the depletion of the protein and carbohydrate fractions and the near complete loss (i.e. 90%) of the microalgae N-content, as liquid hydrolysis/degradation products. The obtained carbonaceous product showed a predominantly aliphatic character indicating the presence of alkyl chains presumably derived from the lipid fractions. Addition of glucose to the

  17. Carbon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  18. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Peregrines innovation will reduce the required input power, increase a coolers systems margin for a giving cooling load and reduce vibration accordingly for...

  19. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Peregrine's innovation will reduce the required input power, increase a coolers systems margin for a giving cooling load and reduce vibration accordingly for...

  20. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or stomach conditions.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking calcium carbonate, call your doctor.

  1. Fabrication of a novel magnetic carbon nanocomposite adsorbent via pyrolysis of sugar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dong-Wan; Lee, Jechan; Ok, Yong Sik; Kwon, Eilhann E; Song, Hocheol

    2016-11-01

    A new-fashioned fabrication recipe for a magnetic carbon nanocomposite (Fe3O4@C) via pyrolysis of sugar with magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles was developed for the practical environmental application as an adsorbent. In order to synthesize Fe3O4@C, the thermal degradation of sugar was firstly investigated via thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) to explore the optimal pyrolytic conditions for fabricating Fe3O4@C. This study laid a great emphasis on the physicochemical characterization of pyrogenic Fe3O4@C through various analytical techniques, which experimentally validated that Fe3O4@C retained thin graphitic carbon layers containing carboxyl groups on the surface with the point of zero charge (pHpzc) of 7.5. Based on adsorption tests of methylene blue (MB), it was found the optimal mass ratio of sugar to Fe3O4 was 0.15 with pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C. The adsorption capacity of Fe3O4@C for MB was 52.6 mg g(-1) and MB adsorption showed a strong pH dependence, which implies an active role of electrostatic interactions in the adsorption process. In regeneration experiments, Fe3O4@C retained 84% of its initial adsorption capacity after completing four consecutive adsorption cycles.

  2. Structural, electronic and photovoltaic characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown directly on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Camilli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have taken advantage of the native surface roughness and the iron content of AISI-316 stainless steel to grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by chemical vapour deposition without the addition of an external catalyst. The structural and electronic properties of the synthesized carbon nanostructures have been investigated by a range of electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The results show the good quality and the high graphitization degree of the synthesized MWCNTs. Through energy-loss spectroscopy we found that the electronic properties of these nanostructures are markedly different from those of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG. Notably, a broadening of the π-plasmon peak in the case of MWCNTs is evident. In addition, a photocurrent was measured when MWCNTs were airbrushed onto a silicon substrate. External quantum efficiency (EQE and photocurrent values were reported both in planar and in top-down geometry of the device. Marked differences in the line shapes and intensities were found for the two configurations, suggesting that two different mechanisms of photocurrent generation and charge collection are in operation. From this comparison, we are able to conclude that the silicon substrate plays an important role in the production of electron–hole pairs.

  3. Structural Modifications And Mechanical Degradation Of Ion Irradiated Glassy Polymer Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abunaemeh, Malek; Seif, Mohamed; Elsamadicy, Abdalla; Muntele, Claudiu; Ila, Daryush

    2011-06-01

    The TRISO fuel has been used in some of the Generation IV nuclear reactor designs. It consists of a fuel kernel of UOx coated with several layers of materials with different functions. Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the materials in the layers. In this study we investigate the possibility of using Glassy Polymeric Carbon (GPC) as an alternative to PyC. GPC is used for artificial heart valves, heat-exchangers, and other high-tech products developed for the space and medical industries. This lightweight material can maintain dimensional and chemical stability in adverse environment and very high temperatures (up to 3000 °C). In this work, we are comparing the changes in physical and microstructure properties of GPC after exposure to irradiation fluence of 5 MeV Ag equivalent to a 1 displacement per atom (dpa) at samples prepared at 1000, 1500 and 2000 °C. The GPC material is manufactured and tested at the Center for Irradiation Materials (CIM) at Alabama A&M University. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were used for analysis.

  4. Target-plane deposition of diamond-like carbon in pulsed laser ablation of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, S.S. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Tou, T.Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.my

    2007-10-15

    In pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at 10{sup -6} Torr, diamond-like carbon (DLC) are deposited at laser wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm on substrates placed in the target-plane. These target-plane samples are found to contain varying sp{sup 3} content and composed of nanostructures of 40-200 nm in size depending on the laser wavelength and laser fluence. The material and origin of sp{sup 3} in the target-plane samples is closely correlated to that in the laser-modified HOPG surface layer, and hardly from the backward deposition of ablated carbon plume. The surface morphology of the target-plane samples shows the columnar growth and with a tendency for agglomeration between nanograins, in particular for long laser wavelength at 1064 nm. It is also proposed that DLC formation mechanism at the laser-ablated HOPG is possibly via the laser-induced subsurface melting and resolidification.

  5. Direct Electron Transfer of Catalase at a Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode Modified with DNA%过氧化氢酶在DNA修饰的热解石墨电极上的直接电子转移

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荣志江; 田燕妮

    2005-01-01

    The direct voltammetry and electrocatalytic properties of catalase (Cat) in single-stranded or doublestranded (ss-or ds-) calf thymus DNA films cast on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrodes were investigated. CatDNA film electrodes showed a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible cyclic voltammetry peaks. The formal -0. 209 V with dsDNA and -0. 223 V with ssDNA, respectively. The electron transfer between catalase and PG electrodes was greatly facilitated in the DNA films. At a dsDNA/PG electrode,reduction and oxidation electrontransfer rate constant values of ks, red= 13.5 s-1 and ks ,ox= 13.3 s-1 were obtained. At the ssDNA/PG electrode,the values were ks, red = 21. 0 s-1 and ks, ox = 33. 0 s 1, respectively. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that catalase retained a near native conformation in DNA films at medium pH. We further investigated the responding with pH,Scanrate and H2O2. Obtaining a series valued information.%通过将单、双螺旋的小牛胸腺DNA膜修饰在热解石墨电极上,研究了过氧化氢酶的直接伏安和电催化性质.结果表明过氧化氢酶(Cat)-DNA膜上显示出一对很好的几乎可逆的循环伏安峰,在50 mmol·L,pH为7.0磷酸缓冲溶液中,扫描速度为0.1 V·s-1情况下,单、双螺旋DNA膜上,其式电位分别为-0.223 V和-0.209V,其还原和氧化电子传递速率常数值分别为ks,red=21.0 s-1;ks,ox=33.0 s-1和ks,Red=13.5 s-1;ks,ox=13.3 s-1.在pH为3.81~7.72的范围内,Fe(Ⅲ)/Fe(Ⅱ)电对的还原电位随pH呈线性变化,表明一电子的转移伴有一质子的耦合.另外从紫外可见吸收光谱可见,在中性pH条件下,过氧化氢酶在DNA膜中保持了原有的结构不变.此外,我们还研究得到在DNA膜中过氧化氢酶保持了对过氧化氢的催化活性,并提出了可能的催化机制.

  6. Research on Pyrolytic Decomposition and Pattern Evolution of the Pyrolysate of Ammoniam Paramolybdate%仲钼酸铵热分解过程及其形貌演变的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅小明; 刘照文

    2011-01-01

    通过TG-DSC和SEM对仲钼酸铵在空气中热分解过程进行分析,结果表明:仲钼酸铵在空气中的热分解过程经历了3个阶段:室温至222.6℃之间仲钼酸铵失去结晶水;从222.6~240.7℃之间仲钼酸铵热分解了部分氨根离子;从240.7~248.7℃之间氨根离子完全分解,同时有亚稳态的氧化钼生成.从248.7~322.5℃之间亚稳态的氧化钼发生相变生成了稳态的三氧化钼.与此同时,仲钼酸铵在热分解温度300℃以下时,其热分解产物的形貌几乎没有太大的变化;在300℃以上时,其热分解产物的形貌由原来不规则的块体向不规则的片状转变,最后转变为了较规则的片状三氧化钼.这主要是由于随着热分解温度的进一步升高,热分解产物之间的相互作用、迁移和重组加剧,以及在高温下三氧化钼的挥发与沉积所致.%The pyrolysates of ammonium paramolybdate were investigated by TG-DSC and SEM. The results showed that there were three stages in the process of the pyrolytic decomposition of ammonium paramolybdate in the air. Firstly, crystal water in ammonium paramolybdate was lost from room temperature to 222. 6℃. Secondly, partial ammonia ion in ammonium paramolybdate was decomposed from 222. 6 to 240. 7 ℃. Thirdly, the residual ammonia ion was decomposed entirely and metastable molybdenum oxide was formed from 240.7 to 248.7 ℃., and metastable molybdenum oxide was turned into molybdic oxide from 248. 7 to 322. 5 ℃. At the same time, the pattern of pyrolysates of ammonium paramolybdate was changed hardly below 300 ℃. But, its pattern was changed into irregular flake above 300 ℃ , and relatively regular flake MoO3 was obtained at last. The main reason was that the pyrolysates of ammonium paramolybdate were interacted, migrated and recombined with the increase of temperature, and MoO3 was volatilized and deposited under high temperature.

  7. Binding of carbon coated nano-silicon in graphene sheets by wet ball-milling and pyrolysis as high performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Hu, Renzong; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Jiangwen; Zhu, Min

    2016-06-01

    A novel approach has been developed to prepare silicon@carbon/graphene sheets (Si@C/G) composite with a unique structure, in which carbon coated Si nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in a matrix of graphene sheets, to enhance the cycleability and electronic conductivity of Si-based anodes for Li-ion batteries. In this study, Si nanoparticles and expanded graphite (EG) are treated by combining high-energy wet ball-milling in sucrose solution with subsequent pyrolysis treatment to produce this Si@C/G composite. To achieve better overall electrochemical performance, the carbon content of the composites is also studied systematically. The as-designed Si30@C40/G30 (Si:C:G = 30:40:30, by weight) composite exhibits a high Li-storage capacity of 1259 mAh g-1 at a current density of 0.2 A g-1 in the first cycle. Further, a stable cycleability with 99.1/88.2% capacity retention from initial reversible charge capacity can be achieved over 100/300 cycles, showing great promise for batteries applications. This good electrochemical performance can be attributed to the uniform coating and binding effect of pyrolytic carbon as well as the network of graphene sheets, which increase the electronic conductivity and Li+ diffusion in the composite, and effectively accommodated the volume change of Si nanoparticles during the Li+ alloying and dealloying processes.

  8. Pyrolysis as a way to close a CFRC life cycle: Carbon fibers recovery and their use as feedstock for a new composite production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Loris; Benelli, Tiziana; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Leonardi, Chiara; Zattini, Giorgio; Minak, Giangiacomo; Dolcini, Enrico; Tosi, Cristian; Montanari, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Pyrolysis is shown to be an efficient method for recycling carbon fiber composites in the form of both uncured prepregs scraps or as cured end-of-life objects. The pyrolytic process leads to different products in three physical states of matter. The gaseous fraction, called syngas, can be used as energy feedstock in the process itself. The oil fraction can be used as fuel or chemical feedstock. The solid residue contains substantially unharmed carbon fibers that can be isolated and recovered for the production of new composite materials, thus closing the life cycle of the composite in a "cradle to cradle" approach. All the pyrolysis outputs were thoroughly analyzed and characterized in terms of composition for oil and gas fraction and surface characteristics of the fibers. In particular, it is of paramount importance to correlate the aspect and properties of the fibers obtained with different composite feedstock and operational conditions, that can be significantly different, with the reinforcing performance in the newly produced Recycled Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers. Present results have been obtained on a pyrolysis pilot plant that offers the possibility of treating up to 70kg of materials, thus leading to a significant amount of products to be tested in the further composites production, focused mainly on chopped carbon fiber reinforcement.

  9. Direct radiative effect due to brownness in organic carbon aerosols generated from biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, T. D.; Sahu, S. K.; Tiwari, M.; Pandit, G. G.

    2016-12-01

    We report the enhancement in the direct radiative effect due the presence of Brown carbon (BrC) as a part of organic carbon aerosols. The optical properties of organic carbon aerosols generated from pyrolytic combustion of mango tree wood (Magnifera Indica) and dung cake at different temperatures were considered. Mie codes were used to calculate absorption and scattering coefficients coupled with experimentally derived imaginary complex refractive index. The direct radiative effect (DRE) for sampled organic carbon aerosols was estimated using a wavelength dependent radiative transfer equation. The BrC DRE was estimated taking virtually non absorbing organic aerosols as reference. The BrC DRE from wood and dung cake was compared at different combustion temperatures and conditions. The BrC contributed positively to the direct top of the atmosphere radiative effect. Dung cake generated BrC aerosols were found to be strongly light absorbing as compared to BrC from wood combustion. It was noted that radiative effects of BrC from wood depended on its generation temperature and conditions. For BrC aerosols from dung cake such strong dependence was not observed. The average BrC aerosol DRE values were 1.53±0.76 W g-1 and 17.84±6.45 W g-1 for wood and dung cake respectively. The DRE contribution of BrC aerosols came mainly (67-90%) from visible light absorption though they exhibited strong absorption in shorter wavelengths of the UV-visible spectrum.

  10. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    This thesis is divided into two parts. In Part I, we examine the properties of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride. We begin with an introduction to the theory of elastic sheets, where the stretching and bending modes are considered in detail. The coupling between stretching and bending modes is thought to play a crucial role in the thermodynamic stability of atomically-thin 2D sheets such as graphene. In Chapter 2, we begin by looking at the fabrication of suspended, atomically thin sheets of graphene. We then study their mechanical resonances which are read via an optical transduction technique. The frequency of the resonators was found to depend on their temperature, as was their quality factor. We conclude by offering some interpretations of the data in terms of the stretching and bending modes of graphene. In Chapter 3, we look briefly at the fabrication of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the structure of the sheets using transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively). We then show a technique by which one can make sheets suspended over a trench with adjustable supports. Finally, DC measurements of the resistivity of the sheets in the temperature range 600 -- 1400 C are presented. In Chapter 4, we study the folding of few-layer graphene oxide, graphene and boron nitride into 3D aerogel monoliths. The properties of graphene oxide are first considered, after which the structure of graphene and boron nitride aerogels is examined using TEM and SEM. Some models for their structure are proposed. In Part II, we look at synthesis techniques for boron nitride (BN). In Chapter 5, we study the conversion of carbon structures of boron nitride via the application of carbothermal reduction of boron oxide followed by nitridation. We apply the conversion to a wide variety of morphologies, including aerogels, carbon fibers and nanotubes, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In the latter chapters, we look at the

  11. Study of Interface Adhesive Properties of Wurtzite Materials for Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan Vera, Magdian Ulises

    Recently, the use of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires as an interphase in composite materials has been demonstrated to increase the interfacial shear strength between carbon fiber and an epoxy matrix. In this research work, the strong adhesion between ZnO and carbon fiber is investigated to elucidate the interactions at the interface that result in high interfacial strength. First, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to calculate the adhesive energy between bare carbon and ZnO. Since the carbon fiber surface has oxygen functional groups, these were modeled and MD simulations showed the preference of ketones to strongly interact with ZnO, however, this was not observed in the case of hydroxyls and carboxylic acid. It was also found that the ketone molecules ability to change orientation facilitated the interactions with the ZnO surface. Experimentally, the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to measure the adhesive energy between ZnO and carbon through a liftoff test by employing highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate and a ZnO covered AFM tip. Oxygen functionalization of the HOPG surface shows the increase of adhesive energy. Additionally, the surface of ZnO was modified to hold a negative charge, which demonstrated an increase in the adhesive energy. This increase in adhesion resulted from increased induction forces given the relatively high polarizability of HOPG and the preservation of the charge on ZnO surface. It was found that the additional negative charge can be preserved on the ZnO surface because there is an energy barrier since carbon and ZnO form a Schottky contact. Other materials with the same ionic properties of ZnO but with higher polarizability also demonstrated good adhesion to carbon. This result substantiates that their induced interaction can be facilitated not only by the polarizability of carbon but by any of the materials at the interface. The versatility to modify the magnitude of the induced interaction between

  12. Carbonic inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Kerkhof, Alfons; Thiéry, Régis

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the phase relations in carbonic fluid inclusions with pure, binary and ternary mixtures of the system CO 2-CH 4-N 2, compositions, which are frequently found in geological materials. Phase transitions involving liquid, gas and solid phases in the temperature range between -192°C and 31°C are discussed and presented in phase diagrams ( PT, TX and VX projections). These diagrams can be applied for the interpretation of microthermometry data in order to determine fluid composition and molar volume (or density).

  13. Trading forest carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Carbon turnover in forests is discussed as it relates to carbon sequestration. Scient...

  14. Ambient concentrations and insights on organic and elemental carbon dynamics in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro dos Santos, Djacinto A.; Brito, Joel F.; Godoy, José Marcus; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-11-01

    The São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) is a megacity with about 20 million people and about 8 million vehicles, most of which are fueled with a significant fraction of ethanol - making it a unique case worldwide. This study presents organic and elemental carbon measurements using thermal-optical analysis from quartz filters collected in four sampling sites within the SPMA. Overall Organic Carbon (OC) concentration was comparable at all sites, where Street Canyon had the highest concentration (3.37 μg m-3) and Park site the lowest (2.65 μg m-3). Elemental Carbon (EC), emitted as result of incomplete combustion, has been significantly higher at the Street Canyon site (6.11 μg m-3) in contrast to all other three sites, ranging from 2.25 μg m-3 (Downtown) to 1.50 μg m-3 (Park). For all sampling sites, the average OC:EC ratio are found on the lower bound (urban site. An approach for apportionment between primary and secondary organic carbon based on primary OC:EC ratio was evaluated. The secondary OC was estimated to be 30-40% of total OC concentrations throughout the various sampling sites. The organic carbon dynamics has been further studied using each of the thermally-derived organic carbon fractions. Each of these has been studied regarding their correlation with EC and the correlation between different sites. The analyses have identified that the OC3 and OC4, i.e., the carbon fraction which evolves from the filter at temperatures above 450 °C, presents a regional behavior, with high correlation among all sites. Conversely, OC1, the first fraction to evolve, has depicted a more local characteristic. Furthermore, the fraction of OC which becomes char during the temperature increase under inert atmosphere (the Pyrolytic Carbon-PC) has been the only fraction not to present a significant correlation with EC. Since that EC is assumed to be a primary emission marker, it indicates that PC is not significant in traffic emissions. This study provided innovative

  15. Absorbing materials of thin film for photovoltaic structures prepared by the process of pyrolytic spraying; Materiales absorbedores en pelicula delgada para estructuras fotovoltaicas preparados por el proceso de rocio pirolitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calixto Rodriguez, Manuela

    2006-11-15

    In this thesis work thin semiconducting films were grown with the following compounds: In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, Ag{sub 2}S, AgInS{sub 2}, SnS{sub 2} and SnS with the pyrolytic spray technique. The structural, optical and electrical proposals of these films were analyzed to determine the set of deposit parameters in which are obtained the physical properties for the applications of the same in photovoltaic structures. It was found that the molar relation in solution of the departing compounds and the deposit temperature are the same dominant parameters in the process of growing the films. For the deposit of thin films of Indio acetate were used and N, N-dimetil tiourea as precursory compounds of In and S, respectively. Polycrystalline films were obtained from the compound In{sub 2}S{sub 3} using underlying temperatures, Ts, between 400 and 450 degrees Celsius, and Indio acetate solutions and N, N-dimetil tiourea with molar relations (In:S) of 1:8 and 1:1. The energy breach, Eg, of these films varies from 2.04 to 2.67 eV, and the value of the conductivity in the darkness, D varies from 10-7 to 1(cm)-1 in function of the molar relation in solution. It was found that the deposited films using a molar relation of In:S=1:8 are of intrinsic nature independently of Ts, while the ones deposited using a molar relations of In:S=1:1 and Ts 400 degrees Celsius posses type-n conductivity. Using the molar relation of I:S=1:1 and Ts=500 degrees Celsius the compound polycrystalline of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is obtained whose optical and electrical properties are Eg {approx} 3 eV and D=11 (cm)-1, with electrical conductivity type-n. The deposited films using a molar relation of In:S=1:1 and Ts=450 degrees Celsius are the ones that keep the appropriate characteristics for their use as type-n material in photovoltaic structures (Eg=2eV and D=1?-1 com-1). [Spanish] En este trabajo de tesis se crecieron peliculas delgadas semiconductoras de los compuestos: In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, Ag{sub 2}S, Ag

  16. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  17. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  18. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and smokers. Carbon monoxide can harm a fetus (unborn baby still in the womb). Symptoms of carbon ... symptoms Outlook (Prognosis) Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause death. For those who survive, recovery is slow. How ...

  19. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept

  20. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  1. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  2. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  3. Development of tensile test method for high-density coal under carbonization; Kojuten mitsudo sekitan no netsukan hippari shikenho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, A.; Ueki, M.; Aoki, H.; Miura, T. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kato, K.; Fukuda, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    Since it is expected that the consumption of non-caking and slightly caking coals will increase and that particulates will have to be controlled with more severity, lumping in hot conditions is being studied as a next-generation technology for coke production. For the study of the augmentation of coke strength, the strength of the material has to be measured while it is in the semi-coke temperature zone. To fulfill the purpose, a method of tensile test is developed for densely packed coal in the carbonization process, which is applicable to non-caking and slightly caking coals. It is found that tensile strength and Young`s modulus increase in proportion to a rise in the ultimate carbonization temperature or in the heating rate. Attention is then paid to the maximum carbonization temperature and the heating rate, and a pyrolytic decomposition model is used for the calculation of the reaction rate, amount of hydrogen generated, porosity, amount of tar generated, and the rate of metaplast formation are calculated, and the results are used for the study of the mechanism of the appearance of strength . The amount of liquid tar increases as the amount of gaseous tar or the emission rate of metaplast increases. Graphitization (tightening by baking) advances with a rise in the reaction rate or in the amount of hydrogen generation. As for the macrostructure, coal particles are bonded together by liquid tar, and then the bondage is tightened by baking. 22 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Self-assembly of cobalt-centered metal organic framework and multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrids as a highly active and corrosion-resistant bifunctional oxygen catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yiyun; Li, Xinzhe; Li, Feng; Lin, Xiaoqing; Tian, Min; Long, Xuefeng; An, Xingcai; Fu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) derived carbonaceous materials have emerged as promising bifunctional oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. But previous attempts to overcome the poor electrical conductivity of MOFs hybrids involve a harsh high-template pyrolytic process to in situ form carbon, which suffer from extremely complex operation and inevitable carbon corrosion at high positive potentials when OER is operated. Herein, a self-assembly approach is presented to synthesize a non-precious metal-based, high active and strong durable Co-MOF@CNTs bifunctional catalyst for OER and ORR. CNTs not only improve the transportation of the electrons but also can sustain the harsh oxidative environment of OER without carbon corrosion. Meanwhile, the unique 3D hierarchical structure offers a large surface area and stable anchoring sites for active centers and CNTs, which enables the superior durability of hybrid. Moreover, a synergistic catalysis of Co(II), organic ligands and CNTs will enhance the bifunctional electrocatalytic performance. Impressively, the hybrid exhibits comparable OER and ORR catalytic activity to RuO2 and 20 wt% Pt/C catalysts and superior stability. This facile and versatile strategy to fabricating MOF-based hybrids may be extended to other electrode materials for fuel cell and water splitting applications.

  5. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  6. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  7. Carbon Nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Polina; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2017-03-01

    This chapter describes the formation and properties of one nanometer thick carbon nanomembranes (CNMs), made by electron induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The cross-linked SAMs are robust enough to be released from the surface and placed on solid support or over holes as free-standing membranes. Annealing at 1000K transforms CNMs into graphene accompanied by a change of mechanical stiffness and electrical resistance. The developed fabrication approach is scalable and provides molecular level control over thickness and homogeneity of the produced CNMs. The mechanisms of electron-induced cross-linking process are discussed in details. A variety of polyaromatic thiols: oligophenyls as well as small and extended condensed polycyclic hydrocarbons have been successfully employed, demonstrating that the structural and functional properties of the resulting nanomembranes are strongly determined by the structure of molecular monolayers. The mechanical properties of CNMs (Young's modulus, tensile strength and prestress) are characterized by bulge testing. The interpretation of the bulge test data relates the Young's modulus to the properties of single molecules and to the structure of the pristine SAMs. The gas transport through the CNM is measured onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - thin film composite membrane. The established relationship of permeance and molecular size determines the molecular sieving mechanism of permeation through this ultrathin sheet.

  8. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  9. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  10. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  11. Permafrost-carbon complexities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, J.E.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2013-01-01

    The thawing and decomposition of carbon stored in permafrost generates greenhouse gases that could further intensify global warming. Currently, most of the thawed carbon is assumed to be converted to greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and carbon decomposition is thought

  12. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  13. Electroanalysis with carbon paste electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Svancara, Ivan; Walcarius, Alain; Vytras, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Electrochemistry and Electroanalysis with Carbon Paste-Based ElectrodesHistorical Survey and GlossaryField in Publication Activities and LiteratureCarbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesCarbon Paste as the Binary MixtureClassification of Carbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesConstruction of Carbon Paste HoldersCarbon Paste as the Electrode MaterialPhysicochemical Properties of Carbon PastesElectrochemical Characteristics of Carbon PastesTesting of Unmodified CPEsIntera

  14. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  15. Mesoporous carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  16. Hierarchically porous carbon membranes containing designed nanochannel architectures obtained by pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Falk, E-mail: muench@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Seidl, Tim; Rauber, Markus [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Material Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Peter, Benedikt; Brötz, Joachim [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Krause, Markus; Trautmann, Christina [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Material Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Roth, Christina [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustraße 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Katusic, Stipan [Evonik Industries AG, Rodenbacher Chaussee 4, 63457 Hanau (Germany); Ensinger, Wolfgang [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Well-defined, porous carbon monoliths are highly promising materials for electrochemical applications, separation, purification and catalysis. In this work, we present an approach allowing to transfer the remarkable degree of synthetic control given by the ion-track etching technology to the fabrication of carbon membranes with porosity structured on multiple length scales. The carbonization and pore formation processes were examined with Raman, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, while model experiments demonstrated the viability of the carbon membranes as catalyst support and pollutant adsorbent. Using ion-track etching, specifically designed, continuous channel-shaped pores were introduced into polyimide foils with precise control over channel diameter, orientation, density and interconnection. At a pyrolysis temperature of 950 °C, the artificially created channels shrunk in size, but their shape was preserved, while the polymer was transformed to microporous, amorphous carbon. Channel diameters ranging from ∼10 to several 100 nm could be achieved. The channels also gave access to previously closed micropore volume. Substantial surface increase was realized, as it was shown by introducing a network consisting of 1.4 × 10{sup 10} channels per cm{sup 2} of 30 nm diameter, which more than tripled the mass-normalized surface of the pyrolytic carbon from 205 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} to 732 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. At a pyrolysis temperature of 3000 °C, membranes consisting of highly ordered graphite were obtained. In this case, the channel shape was severely altered, resulting in a pronounced conical geometry in which the channel diameter quickly decreased with increasing distance to the membrane surface. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide yields porous carbon membranes. • Hierarchic porosity: continuous nanochannels embedded in a microporous carbon matrix.

  17. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Liping Chang; Kechang Xie

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on a raw activated carbon A and three modified activated carbon samples B, C, and D at temperatures ranging from 303 to 333 K and the thermodynamics of adsorption have been investigated using a vacuum adsorption apparatus in order to obtain more information about the effect of CO2 on removal of organic sulfur-containing compounds in industrial gases. The active ingredients impregnated in the carbon samples show significant influence on the adsorption for CO2 and its volumes adsorbed on modified carbon samples B, C, and D are all larger than that on the raw carbon sample A. On the other hand, the physical parameters such as surface area, pore volume, and micropore volume of carbon samples show no influence on the adsorbed amount of CO2. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation was the best model for fitting the adsorption data on carbon samples A and B, while the Freundlich equation was the best fit for the adsorption on carbon samples C and D. The isosteric heats of adsorption on carbon samples A, B, C, and D derived from the adsorption isotherms using the Clapeyron equation decreased slightly increasing surface loading. The heat of adsorption lay between 10.5 and 28.4 kJ/mol, with the carbon sample D having the highest value at all surface coverages that were studied. The observed entropy change associated with the adsorption for the carbon samples A, B, and C (above the surface coverage of 7 ml/g) was lower than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption. However, it was higher than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption but lower than the theoretical value for localized adsorption for carbon sample D.

  18. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F [Oakland, CA

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  19. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kalpana; Srivastava, Anchal; Srivastava, O N

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes play a fundamental role in the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their unique properties and high potential for applications. In this article, the different synthesis methods of carbon nanotubes (both multi-walled and single-walled) are reviewed. From the industrial point of view, the chemical vapor deposition method has shown advantages over laser vaporization and electric arc discharge methods. This article also presents recent work in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes with ordered architectures. Special carbon nanotube configurations, such as nanocoils, nanohorns, bamboo-shaped and carbon cylinder made up from carbon nanotubes are also discussed.

  20. Metallic carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.L.; Crespi, V.H.; Louie, S.G.S.; Zettl, A.K.

    1999-11-30

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  1. Fabrication, characterization, and functionalization of dual carbon electrodes as probes for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kim; Nadappuram, Binoy Paulose; Actis, Paolo; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Korchev, Yuri E; Matsue, Tomokazu; Robinson, Colin; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-08-01

    Dual carbon electrodes (DCEs) are quickly, easily, and cheaply fabricated by depositing pyrolytic carbon into a quartz theta nanopipet. The size of DCEs can be controlled by adjusting the pulling parameters used to make the nanopipet. When operated in generation/collection (G/C) mode, the small separation between the electrodes leads to reasonable collection efficiencies of ca. 30%. A three-dimensional finite element method (FEM) simulation is developed to predict the current response of these electrodes as a means of estimating the probe geometry. Voltammetric measurements at individual electrodes combined with generation/collection measurements provide a reasonable guide to the electrode size. DCEs are employed in a scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) configuration, and their use for both approach curves and imaging is considered. G/C approach curve measurements are shown to be particularly sensitive to the nature of the substrate, with insulating surfaces leading to enhanced collection efficiencies, whereas conducting surfaces lead to a decrease of collection efficiency. As a proof-of-concept, DCEs are further used to locally generate an artificial electron acceptor and to follow the flux of this species and its reduced form during photosynthesis at isolated thylakoid membranes. In addition, 2-dimensional images of a single thylakoid membrane are reported and analyzed to demonstrate the high sensitivity of G/C measurements to localized surface processes. It is finally shown that individual nanometer-size electrodes can be functionalized through the selective deposition of platinum on one of the two electrodes in a DCE while leaving the other one unmodified. This provides an indication of the future versatility of this type of probe for nanoscale measurements and imaging.

  2. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn; Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process--carbonation--has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr-1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr-1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

  3. Reconstructing historical changes in combustion patterns by means of black carbon and PAH evaluation in dated sediments from Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauad, Cristiane R.; Wagener, Angela de L. R.; Farias, Cassia de O.; Carreira, Renato S.; Godoy, Jose M.; Scofield, Arthur de L., E-mail: angela@puc-rio.b [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (LABMAM/PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica. Lab. de Estudos Marinhos e Ambientais; Ruiz, Naira M. S.; Menezes, Sonia M.C. de [Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento Leopoldo A. Miguez de Melo (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Crisogono [Laboratory of Geomicrobiology, ETH/Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    The accumulation history of combustion products from the metropolitan area around Guanabara Bay was evaluated using black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as indicators. BC concentration varied between 0.23 and 0.51%, with an increasing mass accumulation tendency over the last 118 years, whereas a decrease in the values of the ratio BC/organic carbon was observed in the upper sediment layers, probably reflecting the enhancement of bay's eutrophication process in the last 30 years. Higher concentrations of pyrolytic PAH were observed between 1925 and 1976, being consistent with the subsequent deforestation, urbanization, and industrialization that occurred in the Guanabara basin in the period. These PAHs were best characterized by the BFl/(BFl+BePy) diagnostic ratio. The data obtained allowed the characterization of the main events that influenced the combustion patterns in the region: burning of biomass and fossil fuel, economic crisis of 1970 and 1990 and the introduction of ethanol in the Brazilian energetic matrix. (author)

  4. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  5. Biomass Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Biomass carbon includes carbon stored in above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root) as well as in standing and down dead...

  6. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  7. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  8. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  9. Preparing to Capture Carbon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel P. Schrag

    2007-01-01

    .... Scientific and economic challenges still exist, but none are serious enough to suggest that carbon capture and storage will not work at the scale required to offset trillions of tons of carbon...

  10. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  11. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  12. 密度梯度碳/碳复合材料的制备及性能%Preparation and Properties of Density Gradient Carbon/Carbon Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈强; 张守阳

    2011-01-01

    采用强制流动热梯度化学气相渗透法在1000~1250℃制备了密度梯度碳/碳复合材料;借助三点弯曲试验和激光闪烁法测定了复合材料的弯曲性能与导热系数,用偏光显微镜及扫描电子显微镜观察了基体热解碳的组织结构及断口形貌。结果表明:该复合材料上层的最大密度为1.65g·cm^-3,下层的最小密度为1.10g·cm^-3,具有明显的密度梯度;复合材料的密度越大,抗弯强度越高;其导热系数也随密度的增加而增大;沉积温度是影响基体热解碳组织的主要因素,高温有利于粗糙层热解碳的生成,而低温有利于光滑层热解碳的生成。%Density gradient carbon/carbon composites were infiltrated using forced flow thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration in the range of 1 000- 1 250℃. Flexural strength and thermal conductivity were determined by 3 point bending test and laser flashing method. Mierostructure of deposited pyrolytic carbon and morphology of fracture surface were observed by polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that maximal density of upper part of the composites was 1.65 g · cm^-3 , while miniumum density of bottom part was 1. 10 g ·em^-3 , and obvions density gradient was found. Flexural strength and coefficient of thermal conductivity increased with the increase of density of the composites. The deposition temperature had a great impact on the mierostrueture of the pyolytic carbon. A higher temperature was favourable for the formation of rough layer hydrocarbon, while a lower temperature was favourable for the formation of smooth layer hydrocarbon.

  13. CARBON MONOXIDE TREATMENT GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide is the leading cause of unintentional poisoning-related death in Slovenia. It is an odorless, colorless gas that usually remains undetectable until exposures result in injury or death. Exposure to carbon monoxide is most commonly accompanied by headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, confusion, drowsiness, fatigue and collapse. Carbon monoxide poisoning management includes normobaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric-oxygen treatments reduce the risk of cognitive sequelae after carbon monoxide poisoning. 

  14. SILICA SURFACED CARBON FIBERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    carbon fibers . Several economical and simple processes were developed for obtaining research quantities of silica surfaced carbon filaments. Vat dipping processes were utilized to deposit an oxide such as silica onto the surface and into the micropores of available carbon or graphite base fibers. High performance composite materials were prepared with the surface treated carbon fibers and various resin matrices. The ablative characteristics of these composites were very promising and exhibited fewer limitations than either silica or...treated

  15. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M.S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Laan-Luijkx, van der Ingrid T.; Werf, van der Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project futur

  16. Carbon sequestration on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Christopher S.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, carbon sequestration in geologic units plays an important role in the carbon cycle, scrubbing CO_2 from the atmosphere for long-term storage. While carbonate is identified in low abundances within the dust and soils of Mars, at

  17. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  18. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  19. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  20. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Peters, G. P.; Manning, A. C.; Boden, T. A.; Tans, P. P.; Houghton, R. A.; Keeling, R. F.; Alin, S.; Andrews, O. D.; Anthoni, P.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Currie, K.; Delire, C.; Doney, S. C.; Friedlingstein, P.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Haverd, V.; Hoppema, M.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Körtzinger, A.; Landschützer, P.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lienert, S.; Lombardozzi, D.; Melton, J. R.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Monteiro, P. M. S.; Munro, D. R.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.-I.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Omar, A. M.; Ono, T.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rödenbeck, C.; Salisbury, J.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Skjelvan, I.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tian, H.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Walker, A. P.; Wiltshire, A. J.; Zaehle, S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project futur

  1. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  2. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    exothermic than that of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). This suggests that enthalpy of crystallization in carbonate systems is ionic-size controlled, which may have significant implications in a wide variety of conditions, including geological sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide.......Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  3. Mechanical behavior of carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozak, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A general background, test plan, and some results of preliminary examinations of a carbon-carbon composite material are presented with emphasis on mechanical testing and inspection techniques. Experience with testing and evaluation was gained through tests of a low modulus carbon-carbon material, K-Karb C. The properties examined are the density - 1.55 g/cc; four point flexure strength in the warp - 137 MPa (19,800 psi) and the fill - 95.1 MPa (13,800 psi,) directions; and the warp interlaminar shear strength - 14.5 MPa (2100 psi). Radiographic evaluation revealed thickness variations and the thinner areas of the composite were scrapped. The ultrasonic C-scan showed attenuation variations, but these did not correspond to any of the physical and mechanical properties measured. Based on these initial tests and a survey of the literature, a plan has been devised to examine the effect of stress on the oxidation behavior, and the strength degradation of coated carbon-carbon composites. This plan will focus on static fatigue tests in the four point flexure mode in an elevated temperature, oxidizing environment.

  4. Catalysts in syntheses of carbon and carbon precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Mochida, Isao; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Qiao, Wenming

    2006-01-01

    Carbon materials have been applied in different fields because of their unique performances. Naturally, the physical and chemical structures of carbon precursors and carbon materials decide their properties and applications. Catalysts play a very important role in the synthesis of carbon precursors and carbon materials by controlling the molecular and compositional chemistry at the transformation of organic substrates into carbon through carbonaceous intermediates. Carbon materials of high pe...

  5. Carbon nanotube-ceramic nanocomposites: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael David

    Ceramic materials are widely used in modern society for a variety of applications including fuel cell electrolytes, bio-medical implants, and jet turbines. However, ceramics are inherently brittle making them excellent candidates for mechanical reinforcement. In this work, the feasibility of dispersing multi-walled carbon nanotubes into a silicon carbide matrix for mechanical property enhancement is explored. Prior to dispersing, nanotubes were purified using an optimized, three step methodology that incorporates oxidative treatment, acid sonication, and thermal annealing rendering near-superhydrophobic behavior in synthesized thin films. Alkyl functionalized nanotube dispersability was characterized in various solvents. Dispersability was contingent on fostering polar interactions between the functionalized nanotubes and solvent despite the purely dispersive nature of the aliphatic chains. Interpretation of these results yielded values of 45.6 +/- 1.2, 0.78 +/- 0.04, and 2 4 +/- 0.9 mJ/m2 for the Lifshitz-van der Waals, electron acceptor and electron donor surface energy components respectively. Aqueous nanotube dispersions were prepared using a number of surfactants to examine surfactant concentration and pH effects on nanotube dispersability. Increasing surfactant concentrations resulted in a solubility plateau, which was independent of the surfactant's critical micelle concentration. Deviations from neutral pH demonstrated negligible influence on non-ionic surfactant adsorption while, ionic surfactants showed substantial pH dependent behavior. These results were explained in the context of nanotube surface ionization and Debye length variation. Successful MWNT dispersion into a silicon carbide based matrix is reported by in-situ ceramic formation using two routes; sol-gel chemistry and pre-ceramic polymeric precursor workup. For the former, nanotube dispersion was assisted by PluronicRTM surfactants. Pyrolytic treatment and consolidation of formed powders

  6. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  7. Animating the Carbon Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the biogeochemical processes reg- ulating carbon cycling is central to mitigating atmospheric CO2 emissions. The role of living organisms has been accounted for, but the focus has traditionally been on contributions of plants and microbes. We develop the case that fully ‘‘animating’’ the carbon cycle requires broader consideration of the functional role of animals in mediating biogeochemical processes and quanti- fication of their effects on carbon storage and exchange among ter...

  8. Carbon emissions Inventory Games

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Emadi, Eiman Ali

    2016-01-01

    Carbon emissions reduction has been the center of attention in many organizations during the past few decades. Many international entities developed rules and regulations to monitor and control carbon emissions especially under supply chain context. Furthermore, researchers investigated techniques and methods on how reduce carbon emissions under operational adjustment which can be done by cooperation or coordination. The main contribution of this thesis is to measure to what extend cooperatio...

  9. Graphitic Carbons and Biosignatures

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, S.; Papineau, D

    2014-01-01

    The unambiguous identification of graphitic carbons as remains of life in ancient rocks is challenging because fossilized biogenic molecules are inevitably altered and degraded during diagenesis and metamorphism of the host rocks. Yet, recent studies have highlighted the possible preservation of biosignatures carried by some of the oldest graphitic carbons. Laboratory simulations are increasingly being used to better constrain the transformations of organic molecules into graphitic carbons in...

  10. The carbon dioxide cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Titus, T.N.

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal CO2 cycle on Mars refers to the exchange of carbon dioxide between dry ice in the seasonal polar caps and gaseous carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This review focuses on breakthroughs in understanding the process involving seasonal carbon dioxide phase changes that have occurred as a result of observations by Mars Global Surveyor. ?? 2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon Dioxide Absorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-05-17

    carbondioxide content of the solution was then determined. A gas mixture containing 2.6% carbon dioxide and 97.4% nitrogen was prepared in the...which carbon dioxide is removed by heat0 Since this step is usually carried out by "steam stripping ", that is, contacting the solution at its boiling...required to produce the steam required for stripping the carbon dioxide from the s olution. The method ueed in this investigation for determining the

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE REDUCTION SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARBON DIOXIDE , *SPACE FLIGHT, RESPIRATION, REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), RESPIRATION, AEROSPACE MEDICINE, ELECTROLYSIS, INSTRUMENTATION, ELECTROLYTES, VOLTAGE, MANNED, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, NICKEL.

  13. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  14. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  15. Macroscale cobalt-MOFs derived metallic Co nanoparticles embedded in N-doped porous carbon layers as efficient oxygen electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai-Sheng; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Rongrong; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Huijun; Wang, Guozhong

    2017-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) materials have aroused great research interest in different areas owing to their unique properties, such as high surface area, various composition, well-organized framework and controllable porous structure. Controllable fabrication of MOFs materials at macro-scale may be more promising for their large-scale practical applications. Here we report the synthesis of macro-scale Co-MOFs crystals using 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) linker in the presence of Co2+, triethylamine (TEA) and nonanoic acid by a facile solvothermal reaction. Further, the as-fabricated Co-MOFs as precursor was pyrolytically treated at different temperatures in N2 atmosphere to obtain metallic Co nanoparticles embedded in N-doped porous carbon layers (denoted as Co@NPC). The results demonstrate that the Co-MOFs derived sample obtained at 900 °C (Co@NPC-900) shows a porous structure (including micropore and mesopore) with a surface area of 110.8 m2 g-1 and an N doping level of 1.62 at.% resulted from TEA in the pyrolysis process. As electrocatalyst, the Co@NPC-900 exhibits bifunctional electrocatalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline media which are key reactions in some renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells and rechargeable metal-air batteries. The results indicate that the Co@NPC-900 can afford an onset potential of 1.50 V (vs. RHE) and a potential value of 1.61 V (vs. RHE) at a current density of 10 mA cm-2 for ORR and OER with high applicable stability, respectively. The efficient catalytic activity of Co@NPC-900 as bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst can be ascribed to N doping and embedded metallic Co nanoparticles in carbon structure providing catalytic active sites and porous structure favourable for electrocatalysis-related mass transport.

  16. Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC) - A Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Composites," Advanced Materials & Processes, 145(3), pp. 35-36 (1994). Anon., "K Karb - Engineered Carbon-Carbon Composites for Commercial...Germany (1992). Anon., "K- Karb (TM) Carbon-Carbon Fasteners for High Temperature Service," Kaiser Aerotech Booklet, San Leandro, CA (1991). Anon...34Report on the Economies Achieved by Replacing Asbestos with K- Karb ," Bulletin, Kaiser Aeroteeh, San Leandro, CA (1989). Anon., "Carbon Bonded Carbon

  17. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le C.; Peters, W.; Moriarty, R.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  18. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  19. Carbon Dioxide and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate that could cause significant warming of the Earth's climate in the not too distant future. Oceanographers are studying the role of the ocean as a source of carbon dioxide and as a sink for the gas. (Author/BB)

  20. COMMITTED TO CARBON REDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chinese efforts to lower carbon emissions through environmentally friendly means begin gaining momentum Efforts to curb carbon emissions continue to take shape as China adheres to its pledge for a brighter, greener future. More importantly, as environmental measures take hold and develop

  1. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and ... Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All ... Inside CPSC Accessibility ...

  3. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  4. China's carbon conundrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ye; Wu, Tong; He, Jiankun; King, David A.

    2013-07-01

    China's carbon dioxide emissions are rising fast. Yet, per capita, gross domestic product and energy use are only a fraction of their United States equivalents. With a growing urban middle class, the trend will continue, but there is progress on the path to a low-carbon economy.

  5. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  6. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  7. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le C.; Peters, W.; Moriarty, R.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  8. Global carbon budget 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Andrew, R. M.; Boden, T. A.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Houghton, R. A.; Marland, G.; Moriarty, R.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Arvanitis, A.; Bakker, D. C E; Bopp, L.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Doney, S. C.; Harper, A.; Harris, I.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Jones, S. D.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Körtzinger, A.; Koven, C.; Lefèvre, N.; Maignan, F.; Omar, A.; Ono, T.; Park, G. H.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schwinger, J.; Segschneider, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Van Heuven, S.; Viovy, N.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  9. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  10. De-carbonizingChina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zhou; Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in the energy sector will pave the way for the country’slow-carbon future Although its per-capita emission is roughly on par with the world’s average, China is the world’s largest carbon dioxide emitter,

  11. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  12. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R.M.; Canadell, J.G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J.I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G.P.; Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Houghton, R.A.; House, J.I.; Keeling, R.F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D.C.E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L.P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R.A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A.K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S.K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I.D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D.R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J.E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F.F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B.D.; Sutton, A.J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Laan-Luijkx, Van Der I.T.; Werf, Van Der G.R.; Heuven, Van S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we de

  13. Global carbon budget 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Andrew, R. M.; Boden, T. A.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Houghton, R. A.; Marland, G.; Moriarty, R.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Arvanitis, A.; Bakker, D. C E; Bopp, L.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Doney, S. C.; Harper, A.; Harris, I.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Jones, S. D.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Körtzinger, A.; Koven, C.; Lefèvre, N.; Maignan, F.; Omar, A.; Ono, T.; Park, G. H.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, Piere; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schwinger, J.; Segschneider, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Van Heuven, S.; Viovy, N.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  14. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  15. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  16. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quere, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R.M.; Canadell, J.G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J.I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G.P.; Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Houghton, R.A.; House, J.I.; Keeling, R.F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D.C.E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevalier, F.; Chini, L.P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R.A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A.K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S.K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I.D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D.R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J.E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F.F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B.D.; Sutton, A.J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I.T.; van der Werf, G.R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we

  17. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  18. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  19. Structural and mechanical characterization of ion-irradiated glassy polymeric carbon for TRISO fuel nuclear application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abunaemeh, Malek; Seif, Mohamed; Elsamadicy, Abdalla; Ila, Daryush

    2012-08-01

    Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel is considered as the fuel design of choice for the next generation of nuclear reactors (Generation IV). Its design consists of a fuel kernel of UO x coated with several layers having different functions. One of these functions is a containment shell/diffusion barrier for the fission fragments. Normally, the material of choice for this shell is pyrolytic carbon (PyC). The material does not offer a perfect barrier, due to its inherent crystalline structure, which is planar (like graphite) and therefore impossible to mold in one continuous sheet around the spherical fuel bead. Plane boundaries allow fragment diffusion at a much higher rate than through the plane. In this study, we investigate the possibility of replacing PyC with a different form of carbon, glassy polymeric carbon (GPC). We prepared samples of GPC and studied the evolution of their physical properties and structure as a function of the radiation environment that they were exposed to. The temperature at which the samples were held during irradiation was very similar to the Generation IV nuclear reactor (∼1000°C). During the fission of U235, the fission fragment mass distribution has two maxima around 98 and 137 amu, which would best correspond to elements Rb and Cs, respectively. However, both ions are hard to produce from our SNICS ion source at the Center for Irradiation of Materials; therefore, we used 107Ag and 197Au as best replacements. The irradiation sessions consisted in various fluences of 5 MeV Ag, and 5 MeV Au. For elemental sample analysis, we used transmission electron microscopy. For mechanical analysis, we used nano-indentation. It is of prime importance to measure the penetration of the implanted 107Ag.and 197Au and the evolution of mechanical properties of GPC irradiated with these ions. A procedure for manufacturing GPC with analysis is presented. This will show how the GPC structure differs as the temperature that it is prepared at increases

  20. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity.

  1. Highly fluorescent carbon dots as selective and sensitive "on-off-on" probes for iron(III) ion and apoferritin detection and imaging in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cuiping; Wang, Ru; Wang, Keying; Xu, Huiting; Sui, Meirong; Li, Jingjing; Xu, Kai

    2016-09-15

    Highly blue luminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) with a fluorescence quantum yield of 42.3% were prepared by an efficient one-step pyrolytic route from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and urea. The as-synthesized N-CDs were demonstrated as an effective fluorescent probe for label-free, selective and sensitive recognition of Fe(3+) with a linear range of 0.5μM to 2mM and a detection limit of 13.6nM due to Fe(3+)-quenched fluorescence (turn-off). The quenched fluorescence could be turned on after the addition of apoferritin owing to the removal of ferric species from the surface of N-CDs by apoferritin, making complex N-CDs/Fe(3+) a selective apoferritin probe with a linear range of 0.1-25μM and a detection limit as low as 2.6nM. In addition, the application of this novel N-CDs-based probe for imaging Fe(3+) ions and apoferritin in living cells suggest that this sensing system has great potential applications in biosensing, bioimaging, and many other fields.

  2. A unique "turn-on" fluorescence signalling strategy for highly specific detection of ascorbic acid using carbon dots as sensing probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Jessica Fung Yee; Chin, Suk Fun; Ng, Sing Muk

    2016-11-15

    Carbon dots (CDs) that showed strong blue fluorescence were successfully synthesised from sodium alginate via furnace pyrolysis. The single step pyrolytic synthesis was simple to perform while yielded CDs with high photostability, good water solubility and minimum by-products. In order to design the probe with "turn-on" sensing capability, the CDs were screened against a series of metal cations to first "turn-off" the fluorescence. It was found that ferric ions (Fe(3+)) were most responsive and effective in quenching the fluorescence of CDs. Based on this observation, the conditioning of the probe was performed to ensure the fluorescence was completely quenched, while not overloading the system with Fe(3+). At the optimised condition, the CDs-Fe(3+) mixture served as a highly specific detection probe for ascorbic acid (AA). The analytical potential of the probe was evaluated and showed a good linear range of response for AA concentration of 24-40μg/mL. The selectivity study against other possible co-existing species was carried out and proved that our unique "turn-on" fluorescence signalling strategy was highly effective and selective towards AA as the target analyte. The probe was demonstrated for quantification of AA in real samples, which was the commercially available vitamin C supplement. The result showed good accuracy with minimum deviation from standard method adopted for validation purpose.

  3. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  4. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  5. Carbon Superatom Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canning, A. [Cray Research, PSE, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Canning, A.; Galli, G. [Institut Romand de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux (IRRMA), IN-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kim, J. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report on quantum molecular dynamics simulations of C{sub 28} deposition on a semiconducting surface. Our results show that under certain deposition conditions C{sub 28} {close_quote}s act as building blocks on a nanometer scale to form a thin film of nearly defect-free molecules. The C{sub 28} {close_quote}s behave as carbon superatoms, with the majority of them being threefold or fourfold coordinated, similar to carbon atoms in amorphous systems. The microscopic structure of the deposited film supports recent suggestions about the stability of a new form of carbon, the hyperdiamond solid. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Higgins, John. A.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O2 or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  7. Carbon Stock and Carbon Cycle of Wetland Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangquan; ZENG; Canming; ZHANG; Jiao; LI; Nan; YANG; Xihao; LI; Yandong; NIU; Zijian; WU

    2014-01-01

    Wetland ecosystem is an essential ecosystem in the world. Its organic carbon stock and carbon cycle are important basis of global carbon cycle researches and also major contents of global climate change researches. Researches have shown that wetland protection and restoration can promote carbon accumulation and reduce emission of greenhouse gases. This paper discussed influence of carbon stock and carbon balance of wetland ecosystem and emission of greenhouse gases,as well as the relationship between wetland and global climate changes. Finally,it made prospect on researches about carbon cycle of Dongting Lake.

  8. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described. A novel adsorbent carbon composite material has been developed comprising carbon fibers and a binder. The material, called carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), was developed through a joint research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research (UKCAER).

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  10. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  13. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    .... In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one...

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ...

  15. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  16. [Particle therapy: carbon ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Pascal; Hu, Yi; Baron, Marie-Hélène; Chapet, Olivier; Balosso, Jacques

    2010-07-01

    Carbon ion therapy is an innovative radiation therapy. It has been first proposed in the forties by Robert Wilson, however the first dedicated centres for human care have been build up only recently in Japan and Germany. The interest of carbon ion is twofold: 1) the very sharp targeting of the tumour with the so called spread out Bragg peak that delivers most of the beam energy in the tumour and nothing beyond it, sparing very efficiently the healthy tissues; 2) the higher relative biological efficiency compared to X rays or protons, able to kill radioresistant tumour cells. Both properties make carbon ions the elective therapy for non resectable radioresistant tumours loco-regionally threatening. The technical and clinical experience accumulated during the recent decades is summarized in this paper along with a detailed presentation of the elective indications. A short comparison between conventional radiotherapy and hadrontherapy is proposed for the indications which are considered as priority for carbon ions.

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  18. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2)emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, andterrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the globalcarbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and projectfuture climate change. Here we describe

  19. Carbon partitioning in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Anastasios

    2013-06-01

    The work seeks to raise awareness of a fundamental problem that impacts the renewable generation of fuels and chemicals via (photo)synthetic biology. At issue is regulation of the endogenous cellular carbon partitioning between different biosynthetic pathways, over which the living cell exerts stringent control. The regulation of carbon partitioning in photosynthesis is not understood. In plants, microalgae and cyanobacteria, methods need be devised to alter photosynthetic carbon partitioning between the sugar, terpenoid, and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways, to lower the prevalence of sugar biosynthesis and correspondingly upregulate terpenoid and fatty acid hydrocarbons production in the cell. Insight from unusual but naturally occurring carbon-partitioning processes can help in the design of blueprints for improved photosynthetic fuels and chemicals production.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Import Safety International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  1. Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Total ecosystem carbon includes above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root), dead biomass (such as standing dead wood, down...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  4. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  5. Carbon footprint of thermowood

    OpenAIRE

    Nordlund, Teemu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of this Bachelor’s Thesis was to evaluate the carbon footprint of thermally modified wood and its manufacturing process and transportation cycle for several different ThermoWood producer. Research included the whole production cycle from harvesting raw wood to ThermoWood transportation in destination area. Carbon dioxide emissions from these areas were determined and calculated for every ThermoWood producer at first hand. Calculations were based on the PAS 2050:2011, which is ...

  6. Applications for alliform carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Mochalin, Vadym; McDonough, IV, John Kenneth; Simon, Patrice; Taberna, Pierre Louis

    2017-02-21

    This invention relates to novel applications for alliform carbon, useful in conductors and energy storage devices, including electrical double layer capacitor devices and articles incorporating such conductors and devices. Said alliform carbon particles are in the range of 2 to about 20 percent by weight, relative to the weight of the entire electrode. Said novel applications include supercapacitors and associated electrode devices, batteries, bandages and wound healing, and thin-film devices, including display devices.

  7. Nano-Carbons as Theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu, Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-carbons, including fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and nano-diamonds, are an important class of nanostructures attracting tremendous interests in the past two decades. In this special issue, seven review articles and research reports are collected, to summarize and present the latest progress in the exploration of various nano-carbons for theranostic applications.

  8. Black carbon in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Van Breugel, P.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of black carbon were determined for a number of marine sediments. A comparison of black carbon based on thermal oxidation and hot concentrated nitric acid pretreatments revealed that the latter significantly overestimates combustion derived carbon phases. Black carbon accounts for

  9. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  10. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  11. Uso de carbonos pirolíticos (Durasphere no tratamento da insuficiência glótica: estudo experimental em cães Use of pyrolytic carbon coated beads (Durasphere to treat glottic failure: an experimental study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingos Hiroshi Tsuji

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nenhum tecido ou substância ideal foi encontrado para a injeção em pregas vocais. O objetivo deste estudo prospectivo foi avaliar o uso do Durasphere como substância de injeção na prega vocal canina. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Em seis cães adultos foram injetados 0,3mL de Durasphere no terço médio da prega vocal direita no músculo tireoaritenoideo e 0,3mL de soro fisiológico na prega contralateral. Os animais foram sacrificados após 7 dias (três cães e 90 dias (três cães. Analisamos os processos inflamatórios no músculo vocal e na lâmina própria das pregas vocais. RESULTADOS: No músculo vocal com Durasphere havia uma inflamação significativamente maior que no músculo controle, formouse um infiltrado linfomononuclear moderado após 7 dias e leve após 90 dias. Não observamos formação de corpos estranhos ou granulomas. Já na lâmina própria houve um processo inflamatório leve nos dois grupos, sem diferença entre eles. CONCLUSÃO: Trata-se de uma substância com biocompatibilidade comprovada em humanos, com resultados preliminares e inéditos de sua injeção em pregas vocais caninas que causou um processo inflamatório moderado no músculo vocal após 7 dias e leve após 90 dias, sem formação de corpos estranhos ou granulomas.There is no ideal tissue or substance to be injected in the vocal folds. The objective of the present study was to assess the use of Durasphere in canine vocal fold injection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: in six adult dogs we injected 0.3 mL of Durasphere in the middle third of the thyroarytenoid muscle and 0.3 mL of saline solution in the contralateral vocal fold. The animals were slaughtered after seven days (three dogs and after 90 days (three dogs. We analyzed the inflammatory process in the vocal fold and in the lamina propria of the vocal folds. RESULTS: in the vocal muscle which received Durasphere there was a significantly more intense inflammation when compared to the control muscle - there was a moderate lymphomodular infiltrate after seven days and mild after 90 days. We did not observe foreign bodies nor granulomas. On the lamina propria there was a mild inflammatory process in the two groups, without difference between them. CONCLUSION: this is a substance of proven biocompatibility in humans, with preliminary and unprecedented results and its injection in canine vocal folds caused a moderate inflammatory process after seven days and mild after 90 days, without foreign bodies or granuloma formation.

  12. Aspects of carbon dioxide utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omae, Iwao [Omae Research Laboratories, 335-23 Mizuno, Sayama, Saitama 350-1317 (Japan)

    2006-06-30

    Carbon dioxide reacts with hydrogen, alcohols, acetals, epoxides, amines, carbon-carbon unsaturated compounds, etc. in supercritical carbon dioxide or in other solvents in the presence of metal compounds as catalysts. The products of these reactions are formic acid, formic acid esters, formamides, methanol, dimethyl carbonate, alkylene carbonates, carbamic acid esters, lactones, carboxylic acids, polycarbonate (bisphenol-based engineering polymer), aliphatic polycarbonates, etc. Especially, the productions of formic acid, formic acid methyl ester and dimethylformamide with a ruthenium catalyst; dimethyl carbonate and urethanes with a dialkyltin catalyst; 2-pyrone with a nickel-phosphine catalyst; diphenyl carbonate with a lead phenoxide catalyst; the alternating copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides with a zinc catalyst has attracted attentions as the industrial utilizations of carbon dioxide. The further development of these production processes is expected. (author)

  13. Effect of high temperature annealing on the grain size of CVD-grown SiC and experimental PBMR TRISO coated particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mokoduwe, SM

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available -Isotropic (TRISO) Coated Particles (CPs) in a graphite matrix with the SiC layer being the main barrier to fission and transmutation products. The integrity of the CP three layer system namely, Inner Pyrolytic Carbon- Silicon carbide- Outer Pyrolytic Carbon (IPy...

  14. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  15. Implications of carbon dust emission for terrestrail carbon cycling and carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion preferentially removes the finest carbon- and nutrient-rich soil fractions, and consequently its role may be significant within terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. However, the impacts of wind erosion on soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution are not considered in most carbon cycle models,...

  16. Investigations of the ternary system beryllium-carbon-tungsten and analyses of beryllium on carbon surfaces; Untersuchung des ternaeren Systems Beryllium-Kohlenstoff-Wolfram und Betrachtungen von Beryllium auf Kohlenstoffoberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, Florian

    2009-05-25

    Beryllium, carbon and tungsten are planned to be used as first wall materials in the future fusion reactor ITER. The aim of this work is a characterization of mixed material formation induced by thermal load. To this end, model systems (layers) were prepared and investigated, which give insight into the basic physical and chemical concepts. Before investigating ternary systems, the first step was to analyze the binary systems Be/C and Be/W (bottom-up approach), where the differences between the substrates PG (pyrolytic graphite) and HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) were of special interest. Particularly X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (ISS) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used as analysis methods. Beryllium evaporated on carbon shows an island growth mode, whereas a closed layer can be assumed for layer thicknesses above 0.7 nm. Annealing of the Be/C system induces Be{sub 2}C island formation for T{>=}770 K. At high temperatures (T{>=}1170 K), beryllium carbide dissociates, resulting in (metallic) beryllium desorption. For HOPG, carbide formation starts at higher temperatures compared to PG. Activation energies for the diffusion processes were determined by analyzing the decreasing beryllium amount versus annealing time. Surface morphologies were characterized using angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments were performed to study processes in the Be/W system in the temperature range from 570 to 1270 K. Be{sub 2}W formation starts at 670 K, a complete loss of Be{sub 2}W is observed at 1170 K due to dissociation (and subsequent beryllium desorption). Regarding ternary systems, particularly Be/C/W and C/Be/W were investigated, attaching importance to layer thickness (reservoir) variations. At room temperature, Be{sub 2}C, W{sub 2}C, WC and Be{sub 2}W formation at the respective interfaces was observed. Further Be{sub 2}C is forming with increasing annealing temperatures

  17. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  18. Microbially mediated carbon mineralization: Geoengineering a carbon-neutral mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; McCutcheon, J.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic mine tailings are a potentially valuable feedstock for carbon mineralization, affording the mining industry an opportunity to completely offset their carbon emissions. Passive carbon mineralization has previously been documented at the abandoned Clinton Creek asbestos mine, and the active Diavik diamond mine and Mount Keith nickel mine, yet the majority of tailings remain unreacted. Examples of microbe-carbonate interactions at each mine suggest that biological pathways could be harnessed to promote carbon mineralization. In suitable environmental conditions, microbes can mediate geochemical processes to accelerate mineral dissolution, increase the supply of carbon dioxide (CO2), and induce carbonate precipitation, all of which may accelerate carbon mineralization. Tailings mineralogy and the availability of a CO2 point source are key considerations in designing tailings storage facilities (TSF) for optimizing carbon mineralization. We evaluate the efficacy of acceleration strategies including bioleaching, biologically induced carbonate precipitation, and heterotrophic oxidation of waste organics, as well as abiotic strategies including enhancing passive carbonation through modifying tailings management practices and use of CO2 point sources (Fig. 1). With the aim of developing carbon-neutral mines, implementation of carbon mineralization strategies into TSF design will be driven by economic incentives and public pressure for environmental sustainability in the mining industry. Figure 1. Schematic illustrating geoengineered scenarios for carbon mineralization of ultramafic mine tailings. Scenarios A and B are based on non-point and point sources of CO2, respectively.

  19. Pyrolytic synthesis and luminescence of porous lanthanide Eu-MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guangya; Liu, Zhijian; Sun, Hongfa; Tian, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A lanthanide metal coordination polymer [Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O)] was synthesized by the reaction of europium oxide with benzene-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (H2BDC) in a mixed solution of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and water under hydrothermal conditions. The crystal structure of Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermo-gravimetric analysis of Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O) indicated that coordinated DMSO and H2O molecules could be removed to create Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O)-py with permanent microporosity, which was also verified by powder XRD (PXRD) and elemental analysis. Both Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O) and Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O)-py showed mainly Eu-based luminescence and had characteristic emissions in the range 550-700 nm.

  20. Pyrolytic formation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons from steroid hormones

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Four steroid hormones, namely androsterone, cholesterol, estrone and estradiol, have been pyrolysed at 300, 400 and 500 °C and the pyrolysates from these have been analysed by GC-MS. The results indicate that these formed different products under the pyrolysis and most of them evolved into polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during their residence in the pyrolysis chamber at high temperatures. The products from the pyrolysates, at all temperatures, were analysed for similarities and differences ...

  1. Superperiodic Feature on Silicon-Sputtered Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Superperiodic feature was observed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on the surface of highly oriented pyrolyticlattice constant is 7.03 nm. For the superlattice, the observed boundaries between the superlattice and the normal graphiteareas were zigzag, which was in good agreement with the result predicted theoretically. In addition, the observed latticeconstants varied slightly in the superperiodic feature area. This implies the role of intralayer strain in the formation of theobserved superlattice on the graphite surface.

  2. Mechanism of radiation-chemical and pyrolytic transformations in lexan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roustam Aliev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reportamos una nueva metodología para estudiar el mecanismo de transformaciones por radiación en materiales poliméricos basada en el análisis combinado de los gases de origen radiolítico, y los productos pirolíticos, generados mediante la pirólisis rápida de polímeros pre-irradiados, acoplado a la cromatografía de gases -espectroscopía de infrarrojo con transformada de Fourier- espectrometría de masas por impacto electrónico. El Lexan® (policarbonato de bisfenol-A fue estudiado en el rango de dosis de 0.125 a 1.0 MGy. La irradiación del Lexan estuvo acompañada por la liberación preferencial del monóxido de carbono seguida de una producción menor de hidrógeno, dióxido de carbono y metano. El Lexan pirolizado liberó principalmente dióxido de carbono, metano, benceno, tolueno y 4-metilfenol. Con base en los resultados obtenidos sugerimos dos vías principales para la incisión del Lexan por radiación con igual probabilidad: (a ruptura del enlace carbonato y (b ruptura del enlace alifático-aromático.

  3. Using the hidden isotopic heterogeneity in phyto- and zooplankton to unmask disparity in trophic carbon transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pel, R.; Hoogveld, H.L.; Floris, V.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we show that natural phototrophic populations can be probed individually for their in situ d13C signature by linking fluorescence-activated cell sorting and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) using in-line pyrolytic methylation. This novel methodology greatly improved the resoluti

  4. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2, temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1), and

  5. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  6. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  7. Electrochemical generation of volatile lead species using a cadmium cathode: Comparison with graphite, glassy carbon and platinum cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz, María; Fernández, Lenys; Domínguez, José; Alvarado, José

    2012-05-01

    Working electrodes made out of pyrolytic graphite, glassy carbon, platinum and cadmium were compared for the electrochemical generation of volatile lead species. The same electrolytic cell, using each of the different working electrodes was coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer and the experimental conditions were optimized in each case, using a univariate approach, to produce the maximum possible amount of volatile lead species. The experiments were focused on the variation of cathode hydrogen overvoltage by the application of a constant current during analysis. Under optimum conditions the performance of the electrochemical hydride generator cell should depend on the cathode material selected due to the different hydrogen overpotential of each material. The lead absorbance signal was taken as a measure of the efficiency of volatile lead species production. Best results were obtained using the Cd cathode, due to its relatively highest hydrogen overpotential, a carrier gas (Ar) flow rate of 55 mL min- 1 an electrolytic current of 0.8 A and a catholyte (HCl) concentration 0.05 mol L- 1. The analytical figures of merit of the method using the Cd electrode were evaluated and the susceptibility of the method to interferences was assessed by its application to the determination of trace amounts of lead in the presence of the most significant interferents. The calibration curve was linear between 0.5 and 15 μg L- 1 Pb. Detection limits and characteristic mass values were 0.21 μg L- 1 and 0.26 μg L- 1 respectively. A bovine liver standard reference material and a spiked urine sample were analyzed to check accuracy.

  8. Electrochemical generation of volatile lead species using a cadmium cathode: Comparison with graphite, glassy carbon and platinum cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenz, Maria; Fernandez, Lenys, E-mail: lfernandez@usb.ve; Dominguez, Jose; Alvarado, Jose

    2012-05-15

    Working electrodes made out of pyrolytic graphite, glassy carbon, platinum and cadmium were compared for the electrochemical generation of volatile lead species. The same electrolytic cell, using each of the different working electrodes was coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer and the experimental conditions were optimized in each case, using a univariate approach, to produce the maximum possible amount of volatile lead species. The experiments were focused on the variation of cathode hydrogen overvoltage by the application of a constant current during analysis. Under optimum conditions the performance of the electrochemical hydride generator cell should depend on the cathode material selected due to the different hydrogen overpotential of each material. The lead absorbance signal was taken as a measure of the efficiency of volatile lead species production. Best results were obtained using the Cd cathode, due to its relatively highest hydrogen overpotential, a carrier gas (Ar) flow rate of 55 mL min{sup -1} an electrolytic current of 0.8 A and a catholyte (HCl) concentration 0.05 mol L{sup -1}. The analytical figures of merit of the method using the Cd electrode were evaluated and the susceptibility of the method to interferences was assessed by its application to the determination of trace amounts of lead in the presence of the most significant interferents. The calibration curve was linear between 0.5 and 15 {mu}g L{sup -1} Pb. Detection limits and characteristic mass values were 0.21 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.26 {mu}g L{sup -1} respectively. A bovine liver standard reference material and a spiked urine sample were analyzed to check accuracy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium cathode for the electrochemical generation (ECHG) of lead volatile species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium cathode for the ECHG of lead hydrides improve merit figures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ECHG of the volatile species depends on the hydrogen

  9. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  10. Flexible Carbon Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Schwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels are highly porous materials with a large inner surface area. Due to their high electrical conductivity they are excellent electrode materials in supercapacitors. Their brittleness, however, imposes certain limitations in terms of applicability. In that context, novel carbon aerogels with varying degree of flexibility have been developed. These highly porous, light aerogels are characterized by a high surface area and possess pore structures in the micrometer range, allowing for a reversible deformation of the aerogel network. A high ratio of pore size to particle size was found to be crucial for high flexibility. For dynamic microstructural analysis, compression tests were performed in-situ within a scanning electron microscope allowing us to directly visualize the microstructural flexibility of an aerogel. The flexible carbon aerogels were found to withstand between 15% and 30% of uniaxial compression in a reversible fashion. These findings might stimulate further research and new application fields directed towards flexible supercapacitors and batteries.

  11. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  12. The Pyrogenic Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Michael I.; Wynn, Jonathan G.; Saiz, Gustavo; Wurster, Christopher M.; McBeath, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC; includes soot, char, black carbon, and biochar) is produced by the incomplete combustion of organic matter accompanying biomass burning and fossil fuel consumption. PyC is pervasive in the environment, distributed throughout the atmosphere as well as soils, sediments, and water in both the marine and terrestrial environment. The physicochemical characteristics of PyC are complex and highly variable, dependent on the organic precursor and the conditions of formation. A component of PyC is highly recalcitrant and persists in the environment for millennia. However, it is now clear that a significant proportion of PyC undergoes transformation, translocation, and remineralization by a range of biotic and abiotic processes on comparatively short timescales. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the production, stocks, and fluxes of PyC as well as the physical and chemical processes through which it interacts as a dynamic component of the global carbon cycle.

  13. Monoalkyl carbonates in carbonated alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Marcelo Rabello; Vidal, Denis Tadeu Rajh; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio

    2012-07-15

    The presence of monoethyl carbonate (MEC) in beer and sparkling wine is demonstrated for the first time, as well as the formation of this species in drinks prepared with a distilled beverage and a carbonated soft drink. A capillary electrophoresis (CE) equipment with two capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector (C(4)D) was used to identify and quantify this species. The concentrations of MEC in samples of lager beer and rum and cola drink were, respectively, 1.2 and 4.1 mmol/l, which agree with the levels of ethanol and CO2 available in these products. Previous results about the kinetics of the reaction suggest that only a small amount of MEC should be formed after the ingredients of a drink are mixed. However, in all three cases (whisky and club soda; rum with cola; gin and tonic water), MEC was quickly formed, which was attributed to the low pH of the drinks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  15. Porosity destruction in carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenberg, S.N. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    2006-01-15

    The important thing to understand about carbonate diagenesis is not how porosity is created, but how it is destroyed. Detailed core observations from two deeply-buried carbonate platform successions (the Finnmark platform, offshore north Norway; and the Khuff Formation, offshore Iran) show that in both cases most vertical porosity variation can be accounted for by only two or three factors, namely: (1) stylolite frequency, (2) proportion of argillaceous beds, and (3) anhydrite cement. The spatial distribution of these factors is determined by the depositional distribution of clay minerals (important for localizing chemical compaction) and the occurrence of hypersaline depositional conditions and associated brine reflux (important for localizing anhydrite precipitation and dolomitisation). However, the intensity of chemical compaction and consequent porosity loss in adjacent beds by carbonate cementation also depend upon thermal exposure (temperature as a function of time). Evidence from the Finnmark platform and other examples indicate that the stratigraphic distribution of early-formed dolomite is also important for porosity preservation during burial, but this factor is not apparent in the Khuff dataset. Insofar as the Finnmark and Khuff platforms can be regarded as representative of carbonate reservoirs in general, recognition of the above porosity-controlling factors may provide the basis for general models predicting carbonate reservoir potential both locally (reservoir-model scale) and regionally (exploration-scale). Distributions of clay, anhydrite, and dolomitization should be predictable from stratigraphic architecture, whereas variations in thermal exposure can be mapped from basin analysis. In the present examples at least, factors that do not need to be considered include eogenetic carbonate cementation and dissolution, depositional facies (other than aspects related to clay and anhydrite content), and mesogenetic leaching to create late secondary

  16. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  17. Mesoporous carbon-coated LiFePO4 nanocrystals co-modified with graphene and Mg2+ doping as superior cathode materials for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Xu, Binghui; Liu, Tiefeng; Liu, Peng; Guo, Chenfeng; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Qiuming; Xiong, Zhigang; Wang, Dianlong; Zhao, X S

    2014-01-21

    In this work, mesoporous carbon-coated LiFePO4 nanocrystals further co-modified with graphene and Mg(2+) doping (G/LFMP) were synthesized by a modified rheological phase method to improve the speed of lithium storage as well as cycling stability. The mesoporous structure of LiFePO4 nanocrystals was designed and realized by introducing the bead milling technique, which assisted in forming sucrose-pyrolytic carbon nanoparticles as the template for generating mesopores. For comparison purposes, samples modified only with graphene (G/LFP) or Mg(2+) doping (LFMP) as well as pure LiFePO4 (LFP) were also prepared and investigated. Microscopic observation and nitrogen sorption analysis have revealed the mesoporous morphologies of the as-prepared composites. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld refinement data demonstrated that the Mg-doped LiFePO4 is a single olivine-type phase and well crystallized with shortened Fe-O and P-O bonds and a lengthened Li-O bond, resulting in an enhanced Li(+) diffusion velocity. Electrochemical properties have also been investigated after assembling coin cells with the as-prepared composites as the cathode active materials. Remarkably, the G/LFMP composite has exhibited the best electrochemical properties, including fast lithium storage performance and excellent cycle stability. That is because the modification of graphene provided active sites for nuclei, restricted the in situ crystallite growth, increased the electronic conductivity and reduced the interface reaction current density, while, Mg(2+) doping improved the intrinsically electronic and ionic transfer properties of LFP crystals. Moreover, in the G/LFMP composite, the graphene component plays the role of "cushion" as it could quickly realize capacity response, buffering the impact to LFMP under the conditions of high-rate charging or discharging, which results in a pre-eminent rate capability and cycling stability.

  18. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  19. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  20. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Tallant, D. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Provencio, P. N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Overmyer, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Simpson, R. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Martinez-Miranda, L. J. [Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2000-05-22

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 degree sign C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5%-10%. We report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approx}15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperammonemia due to carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase va deficiency Related Information How are ...

  2. Carbon-carbon mirrors for exoatmospheric and space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumweide, Duane E.; Wonacott, Gary D.; Woida, Patrick M.; Woida, Rigel Q.; Shih, Wei

    2007-09-01

    The cost and leadtime associated with beryllium has forced the MDA and other defense agencies to look for alternative materials with similar structural and thermal properties. The use of carbon-carbon material, specifically in optical components has been demonstrated analytically in prior SBIR work at San Diego Composites. Carbon-carbon material was chosen for its low in-plane and through-thickness CTE (athermal design), high specific stiffness, near-zero coefficient of moisture expansion, availability of material (specifically c-c honeycomb for lightweight substrates), and compatibility with silicon monoxide (SiO) and silicon dioxide (SiO II) coatings. Subsequent development work has produced shaped carbon-carbon sandwich substrates which have been ground, polished, coated and figured using traditional optical processing. Further development has also been done on machined monolithic carbon-carbon mirror substrates which have also been processed using standard optical finishing techniques.

  3. 锂在人造石墨、中间相炭微球及无定形碳中的扩散系数%Diffusion coefficient of lithium in artificial graphite, mesocarbon microbeads, and disordered carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭华军; 李新海; 张新明; 王红强; 王志兴; 彭文杰

    2007-01-01

    采用X-射线衍射及恒电位阶跃计时电流法测定了不同炭材料的结构及锂在这些炭材料中的扩散系数.发现炭电极的放电程度与结构对锂在炭电极中的扩散系数有重要影响.随着放电程度的增加,锂在MCMB电极中的扩散系数由4.43×10-9 cm2/s减少到5.24×10-10 cm2/s,在50%的放电程度下,锂在蔗糖热解炭、树脂热解炭、人造石墨及MCMB中的扩散系数分别为1.4×10-10 cm2/s,5.75×10-10 cm2/s,1.24×10-9 cm2/s,2.1×10-9 cm2/s.与无定形碳如蔗糖热解炭及树脂热解炭比较,锂在石墨化炭如人造石墨、MCMB中的扩散要容易得多.%The structures of pyrolytic sugar carbon, resin carbon, artificial graphite, and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs) and the diffusion coefficient of lithium in them were determined by X-ray diffraction and potential step chronoamperometry measurements. It was found that the diffusion coefficient of lithium was strongly dependent on the degree of discharge and the structure of the carbon anodes. As the discharge degree increased, the diffusion coefficient of lithium in MCMB anodes decreased from 4.43 × 10 -9 cm2/s to 5.24 × 10 -10 cm2/s. At half discharge, the diffusion coefficients of lithium in sugar carbon, resin carbon, artificial graphite, and MCMB anode were 1.4 × 10-10 cm2/s, 5.75 ×10-10 cm2/s, 1.24 × 10-9 cm2/s, 2. 1 × 10-9 cm2/s, respectively, showing that diffusion of lithium in soft carbons (artificial graphite and MCMBs) was much easier than in hard carbons such as sugar and resin carbon.

  4. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  5. Simulations of phenol adsorption on activated carbon and carbon black

    OpenAIRE

    Prosenjak, Claudia; Valente Nabais, Joao; Laginhas, Carlos; Carrott, Peter; Carrott, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    We use grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption of phenol on carbon materials. Activated carbon is modelled by pore size distributions based on DFT methods; carbon black is represented by a single carbon slab with varying percentages of surface atoms removed. GCMC results for the adsorption from the corresponding gas phase gave reasonable agreement with experimental adsorption results. MD simulations, that studied the influence of the presence of ...

  6. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  7. Catalytic graphitization of carbon/carbon composites by lanthanum oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Can; LU Guimin; SUN Ze; YU Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Graphitized carbon/carbon composites were prepared by the process of catalytic graphitization with the rare-earth catalyst,lanthanum oxide (La2O3),in order to increase the degree of graphitization and reduce the electrical resistivity.The modified coal tar pitch and coal-based needle coke were used as carbon source,and a small amount of La2O3 was added to catalyze the graphitization of the disordered carbon materials.The effects of La2O3 catalyst on the graphitization degree and microstructure oftbe carbon/carbon composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction,scanning electron microscopy,and Raman spectroscopy.The results showed that La2O3 promoted the formation of more perfect and larger crystallites,and improved the electrical/mechanical properties of carbon/carbon composites.Carbon/carbon composites with a lower electrical resistivity (7.0 μΩ·m) could be prepared when adding 5 wt.% La2O3 powder with heating treatment at 2800 ℃.The catalytic effect of La2O3 for the graphitization of carbon/carbon composites was analyzed.

  8. Australian carbon dust emission: a carbon accounting omission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erosion preferentially removes the finest carbon- and nutrient-rich soil fractions, and consequently its role may be significant within terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. However, the impacts of wind erosion on soil organic carbon redistribution are not considered in most SOC models, or within the Austr...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heaters & Camping Equipment Home Heating Equipment On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon ... Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs International Newsroom About CPSC Contact Us Sitemap RSS ...

  10. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is not very poisonous. Recovery is quite likely. But, long-term overuse is more serious than a single overdose, because it can cause kidney damage. Few people die from an antacid overdose. Keep all medicines in child-proof bottles and out ...

  11. City Carbon Footprint Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwu Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progressive cities worldwide have demonstrated political leadership by initiating meaningful strategies and actions to tackle climate change. However, the lack of knowledge concerning embodied greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of cities has hampered effective mitigation. We analyse trans-boundary GHG emission transfers between five Australian cities and their trading partners, with embodied emission flows broken down into major economic sectors. We examine intercity carbon footprint (CF networks and disclose a hierarchy of responsibility for emissions between cities and regions. Allocations of emissions to households, businesses and government and the carbon efficiency of expenditure have been analysed to inform mitigation policies. Our findings indicate that final demand in the five largest cities in Australia accounts for more than half of the nation’s CF. City households are responsible for about two thirds of the cities’ CFs; the rest can be attributed to government and business consumption and investment. The city network flows highlight that over half of emissions embodied in imports (EEI to the five cities occur overseas. However, a hierarchy of GHG emissions reveals that overseas regions also outsource emissions to Australian cities such as Perth. We finally discuss the implications of our findings on carbon neutrality, low-carbon city concepts and strategies and allocation of subnational GHG responsibility.

  12. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  13. From Carbon to Buckypaper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surabhi Potnis

    2017-03-01

    This article aims to highlight the amazing properties and potentialuses of the more recently developed allotropes of carbonsuch as carbon nanotubes, graphene, fullerene, and buckypaper.This is an area offering wide opportunity for research,especially due to the multidisciplinary nature of applications.

  14. Closing carbon cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Fossil fuels are used as raw materials for the manufacture of synthetic organic materials, e.g. plastics, fibres, synthetic rubber, paints, solvents, fertilisers, surfactants, lubricants and bitumen. Since fossil carbon is embodied in these products they may be particularly relevant to climate ch

  15. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement. PMID:22655070

  16. Soil carbon, multiple benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, E.; Banwart, S.A.; Noellemeyer, E.; Abson, D.J.; Ballabio, C.; Bampa, F.; Bationo, A.; Batjes, N.H.; Bernoux, M.; Bhattacharyya, T.

    2015-01-01

    In March 2013, 40 leading experts from across the world gathered at a workshop, hosted by the European Commission, Directorate General Joint Research Centre, Italy, to discuss the multiple benefits of soil carbon as part of a Rapid Assessment Process (RAP) project commissioned by Scientific

  17. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  18. Carbon Lorenz Curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, L.F.M.

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it exhibits that standard tools in the measurement of income inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini-index, can successfully be applied to the issues of inequality measurement of carbon emissions and the equity of abatement policies across

  19. ROE Carbon Storage - Percent Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This polygon dataset depicts the percentage change in the amount of carbon stored in forests in counties across the United States, based on the difference in carbon...

  20. Carbon emission flow in networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Chongqing; Zhou, Tianrui; Chen, Qixin; Xu, Qianyao; Xia, Qing; Ji, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    As the human population increases and production expands, energy demand and anthropogenic carbon emission rates have been growing rapidly, and the need to decrease carbon emission levels has drawn increasing attention...

  1. Carbon sinks in temperate forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, P.H.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Aubinet, M.; Karjalainen, T.; Vine, E.L.; Kinsman, J.; Heath, L.S.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to being scientifically exciting, commercially important, and environmentally essential, temperate forests have also become a key diplomatic item in international climate negotiations as potential sinks for carbon. This review presents the methods used to estimate carbon sequestration, i

  2. Pyrolytic graphite crystals as components for ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy using laser-based sources%用热解石墨晶体作色散和聚焦光学元件的激光等离子体源的超快X射线光谱仪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H Stiel; H Legall; M Schnurer

    2007-01-01

    Because the photon flux of laser-based X-ray sources is considerably lower than that of synchrotron radiation sources and radiation is emitted isotropic in all directions,focusing optics with a large solid collecting angle and high integral reflectivity are required.For these requirements crystals of Pyrolytic Graphite(PG)are of particular interest for the use as dispersive and focusing elements.Due to the mosaic crystal structure,PG exhibits a very high integral reflectivity.Furthermore,thin PG films give the opportunity to realize crystal optics with arbitrary geometry by mounting them on a mold of any shape.Beyond that,mosaic focusing in specific geometry allows these crystals to be used as high resolution X-ray optics,even in bent geometry.All these properties allow the design of highly efficient dispersive collecting optics for uhrafast X-ray spectroscopy with laser plasma sources.In our contribution we describe the application of bent PG crystals in a spectrometer with a modified Von HAMOS geometry.Using this spectrometer,the spectral distribution of the X-ray radiation emitted from a fs laser produced plasma has been measured.The application of this radiation for timeresolved Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure(EXAFS)experiments is discussed. We show that,by optimizing both the crystal properties and the spectrometer geometry,a good spectral resolution sufficient for EXAFS measurements at the K-edges of transition metals can be achieved.%由于激光等离子X射线源的光子通量显著低于同步辐射源的光子通量且射线为所有方向的各向同性辐射,所以,很需要具有大的集光立体角和高的积分反射率的光学元件,用热解石墨(PG)晶体作色散和聚焦元件可满足上述要求.由于PG晶体为嵌镶结构,所以可给出很高的积分反射率,而PG薄膜还可安装在任意形状的模具上构成任意形状的光学元件.此外,特殊形状的嵌镶聚焦使这些晶体甚至在弯曲的情况下,也

  3. Where is mantle's carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganov, A. R.; Ono, S.; Ma, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Due to the strongly reducing conditions (the presence of metallic iron was suggested both by experiments [1] and theory [2]), diamond was believed to be the main host of carbon through most of the lower mantle [3]. We showed [4] that cementite Fe3C is another good candidate to be the main host of "reduced" carbon in the mantle, reinforcing an earlier hypothesis [5]. The fate of "oxidised" carbon (in subducted slabs) is of particular importance - if carbonates decompose producing fluid CO2, this would have important implications for the chemistry and rheology of the mantle. Knowledge of crystal structures and phase diagrams of carbonates is crucial here. The high-pressure structures of CaCO3 were predicted [6] and subsequently verified by experiments. For MgCO3, Isshiki et al. [7] found a new phase above 110 GPa, and several attempts were made to solve it [8,9]. Here [4], using an evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction [10], we show that there are two post-magnesite phases at mantle-relevant pressure range, one stable at 82-138 GPa, and the other from 138 GPa to ~160 GPa. Both are based on threefold rings of CO4-tetrahedra and are more favourable than all previously proposed structures. We show that through most of the P-T conditions of the mantle, MgCO3 is the major host of oxidized carbon in the Earth. We predict the possibility of CO2 release at the very bottom of the mantle (in SiO2-rich basaltic part of subducted slabs), which could enhance partial melting of rocks and be related to the geodynamical differences between the Earth and Venus. 1.Frost D.J., Liebske C., Langenhorst F., McCammon C.A., Tronnes R.G., Rubie D.C. (2004). Experimental evidence for the existence of iron-rich metal in the Earth's lower mantle. Nature 428, 409-412. 2.Zhang F., Oganov A.R. (2006). Valence and spin states of iron impurities in mantle-forming silicates. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 249, 436-443. 3.Luth R.W. (1999). Carbon and carbonates in the mantle. In: Mantle

  4. Fast and efficient adsorption of methylene green 5 on activated carbon prepared from new chemical activation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hai Nguyen; You, Sheng-Jie; Chao, Huan-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Activated carbon (AC) was synthesized from golden shower (GS) through a new chemical activation process. The three-stage process comprised (1) hydrothermal carbonization of GS to produce hydrochar, (2) pyrolysis of hydrochar to produce biochar, and (3) subsequent chemical activation of biochar with K2CO3 to obtain GSHBAC. The traditional synthesis processes (i.e., one-stage and two-stage) were also examined for comparison. In the one-stage process, GS that was impregnated with K2CO3 was directly pyrolyzed (GSAC), and the two-stage process consisted of (1) pyrolytic or hydrothermal carbonization to produce biochar or hydrochar and (2) subsequent chemical activation was defined as GSBAC and GSHAC, respectively. The synthesized ACs were characterized by scanning electron microscope, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, point zero charge, and Boehm titration. The adsorption results demonstrated that the MG5 adsorption process was not remarkably affected by neither the solution pH (2.0-10) nor ionic strength (0-0.5 M NaCl). Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption equilibrium was quickly established, with a low activation energy required for adsorption (Ea; 3.30-27.8 kJ/mol), and the ACs removed 50-73% of the MG5 concentration from solution within 01 min. Desorption studies confirmed the adsorption was irreversible. Thermodynamic experiments suggested that the MG5 adsorption was spontaneous (-ΔG°) and endothermic (+ΔH°), and increased the randomness (+ΔS°) in the system. Although the specific surface areas of the ACs followed the order GSAC (1,413) > GSHAC (1,238) > GSHBAC (903) > GSBAC (812 m(2)/g), the maximum adsorption capacities determined from the Langmuir model (Q(o)max) at 30 °C exhibited the following order: GSHBAC (531) > GSAC (344) > GSHAC (332) > GSBAC (253 mg/g). Oxygenation of the ACs' surface through a hydrothermal process with acrylic acid resulted in a decrease in MG5

  5. Carbon. Examples of Property Realization

    OpenAIRE

    Kossko, I. A.; A.A. Onoprienko; Kossko, T.G.

    2013-01-01

    Examples of realization of carbon properties in formation of section near-surface boundaries defining the mechanism of oxidizing (normal) wear are presented. Synthesis of strengt hening diamond- lonsdaleite -carbene «frame» and graphite with function of solid lubricant on a friction surface in high-desperse carbon environment is reviewed. Prospects of carbon ap placation in implementation of the concept of electronics on one element, and also use of thin-film structures of amorphous carbon – ...

  6. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  7. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  8. Managing woody bamboos for carbon farming and carbon trading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Jyoti Nath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on identifying cost-effective managed ecosystems that can substantially remove atmospheric carbon-dioxide (CO2 while providing essential societal benefits has gained momentum since the Kyoto Protocol of 1997. Carbon farming allows farmers and investors to generate tradable carbon offsets from farmlands and forestry projects through carbon trading. Carbon trading is pertinent to climate negotiations by decelerating the climate change phenomenon. Thus, the objective of this article is to describe the potential of woody bamboos in biomass carbon storage and as an option for carbon farming and carbon trading. Bamboo is an important agroforestry and forest plant managed and used by the rural communities in several countries of the Asia-Pacific region for generating diverse economic and socio-environmental needs. Mean carbon storage and sequestration rate in woody bamboos range from 30–121 Mg ha−1 and 6–13 Mg ha−1  yr−1, respectively. Bamboo has vigorous growth, with completion of the growth cycle between 120 and 150 days. Because of its rapid biomass accumulation and effective fixation of CO2, it has a high carbon sequestration capacity. Over and above the high biomass carbon storage, bamboo also has a high net primary productivity (12–26 Mg ha−1  yr−1 even with regular selective harvesting, thus making it a standing carbon stock and a living ecosystem that continues to grow. Despite its high potential in carbon storage and sequestration and its important role in livelihood of millions of rural poor’s worldwide, prospects of bamboo ecosystems in CDM (Clean Development Mechanism and REDD (Reduced Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation schemes remain to be explored. Thus, there is an urgent need to recognize ecosystem services that woody bamboo provides for well-being of rural communities and nature conservancy. Present synthesis suggests that bamboo offers tremendous opportunity for carbon farming and

  9. 废轮胎真空热解炭活化制取多孔活性炭研究%Preparation of Mesoporous Activated Carbon from CBp Derived from Vacuum Pyrolysis of Waste Tires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兴华; 马隆龙; 王铁军; 常杰

    2007-01-01

    热解炭黑(Pyrolytic carbon black ,CBp)是废轮胎热解的重要产物之一.以CO2气体作为活化剂对废轮胎真空热解炭黑进行了活化制取活性炭的实验研究.在活化温度800-950 ℃、活化时间为60-300 min、活化剂流量为50-120 mL/min的实验范围内,活化温度越高,活化反应时间越长,热解炭的烧失率越高,所得活性炭的比表面积也越大,最高BET比表面积可达664.9 m2/g,孔径以分布在20-40 nm之间为主.体现了废轮胎真空热解炭在后续深加工利用上的优势.

  10. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  11. BioCarbon Fund Experience

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2011-01-01

    Carbon finance recognizes the contribution of projects to mitigating climate change. To be able to access carbon finance, projects can certify their emission reductions under a variety of standards, one of which is the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Project developers can sell their carbon credits either in the volun...

  12. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  13. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  14. Graphene oxide assisted hydrothermal carbonization of carbon hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Deepti; Raidongia, Kalyan; Shao, Jiaojing; Huang, Jiaxing

    2014-01-28

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of biomass such as glucose and cellulose typically produces micrometer-sized carbon spheres that are insulating. Adding a very small amount of Graphene oxide (GO) to glucose (e.g., 1:800 weight ratio) can significantly alter the morphology of its HTC product, resulting in more conductive carbon materials with higher degree of carbonization. At low mass loading level of GO, HTC treatment results in dispersed carbon platelets of tens of nanometers in thickness, while at high mass loading levels, free-standing carbon monoliths are obtained. Control experiments with other carbon materials such as graphite, carbon nanotubes, carbon black, and reduced GO show that only GO has significant effect in promoting HTC conversion, likely due to its good water processability, amphiphilicity, and two-dimensional structure that may help to template the initially carbonized materials. GO offers an additional advantage in that its graphene product can act as an in situ heating element to enable further carbonization of the HTC products very rapidly upon microwave irradiation. Similar effect of GO is also observed for the HTC treatment of cellulose.

  15. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.; McPherson, B.J.; Sundquist, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  16. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY SELECTIVE PERMEATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARBON DIOXIDE , SEPARATION), (*PERMEABILITY, CARBON DIOXIDE ), POROUS MATERIALS, SILICON COMPOUNDS, RUBBER, SELECTION, ADSORPTION, TEMPERATURE, PRESSURE, POLYMERS, FILMS, PLASTICS, MEMBRANES, HUMIDITY.

  17. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  18. Properties of amorphous carbon

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon has a wide range of properties that are primarily controlled by the different bond hydridisations possible in such materials. This allows for the growth of an extensive range of thin films that can be tailored for specific applications. Films can range from those with high transparency and are hard diamond-like, through to those which are opaque, soft and graphitic-like. Films with a high degree of sp3 bonding giving the diamond-like properties are used widely by industry for hard coatings. Application areas including field emission cathodes, MEMS, electronic devices, medical and optical coatings are now close to market. Experts in amorphous carbon have been drawn together to produce this comprehensive commentary on the current state and future prospects of this highly functional material.

  19. Carbon Lorenz Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, L. [Utrecht University, Utrecht School of Economics, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it exhibits that standard tools in the measurement of income inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini-index, can successfully be applied to the issues of inequality measurement of carbon emissions and the equity of abatement policies across countries. These tools allow policy-makers and the general public to grasp at a single glance the impact of conventional distribution rules such as equal caps or grandfathering, or more sophisticated ones, on the distribution of greenhouse gas emissions. Second, using the Samuelson rule for the optimal provision of a public good, the Pareto-optimal distribution of carbon emissions is compared with the distribution that follows if countries follow Nash-Cournot abatement strategies. It is shown that the Pareto-optimal distribution under the Samuelson rule can be approximated by the equal cap division, represented by the diagonal in the Lorenz curve diagram.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  1. Carbon neutron star atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Pavlov, G G; Werner, K

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars is limited in particular by uncertainties in chemical composition of their atmospheres. For example, atmospheres of thermally - emitting neutron stars in supernova remnants might have exotic chemical compositions, and for one of them, the neutron star in CasA, a pure carbon atmosphere has recently been suggested by Ho & Heinke (2009). To test such a composition for other similar sources, a publicly available detailed grid of carbon model atmosphere spectra is needed. We have computed such a grid using the standard LTE approximation and assuming that the magnetic field does not exceed 10^8 G. The opacities and pressure ionization effects are calculated using the Opacity Project approach. We describe the properties of our models and investigate the impact of the adopted assumptions and approximations on the emergent spectra.

  2. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  3. Growing carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ando

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the exploitation of novel phenomena and properties of matter (physical, chemical, biological, electrical, etc. at that length scale. CNTs are supposed to be a key component of nanotechnology. Almost every week a new potential application of CNTs is identified, stimulating scientists to peep into this tiny tube with ever increasing curiosity.

  4. Carbon materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang

    As an important energy storage device, electrochemical supercapacitors or ultracapacitors fill the gap between conventional dielectric capacitors and batteries in terms of specific energy and power. Although supercapacitors have been used in electric vehicles, digital communication instruments, and pulsed lasers, further improvement of supercapacitor performance is highly needed to enhance the energy density without significantly losing the power density. Additionally, the conventional supercapacitors use rigid packages and liquid electrolytes, which limit applications in transparent and flexible electronics. To address these challenges, the research efforts in this dissertation mainly focused on: 1) improvement of the energy density of carbon nanoonions by chemical activation; 2) laser-assisted activation of carbon nanotubes for improved energy density; 3) fabrication of flexible solid-state supercapacitors based on nanocarbon and manganese dioxide (MnO2) hybrid electrodes; and 4) investigation of the electrochemical performance of graphene as transparent and flexible supercapacitor electrodes.

  5. Increasing the Tensile Property of Unidirectional Carbon/Carbon Composites by Grafting Carbon Nanotubes onto Carbon Fibers by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Song; Kezhi Li; Hejun Li; Qiangang Fu

    2013-01-01

    Although in-situ growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers could greatly increase the matrix-dominated mechanical properties of carbon/carbon composites (C/Cs),it always decreased the tensile strength of carbon fibers.In this work,CNTs were introduced into unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) preforms by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and they were used to reinforce C/Cs.Effects of the content of CNTs introduced by EPD on tensile property of unidirectional C/Cs were investigated.Results demonstrated that EPD could be used as a simple and efficient method to fabricate carbon nanotube reinforced C/Cs (CNT-C/Cs) with excellent tensile strength,which pays a meaningful way to maximize the global performance of CNT-C/Cs.

  6. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  7. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we pr...

  8. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    conductance. Inside thecentral section of the carbon nanotube, we obtained an impressive Peltier cooling 57 K down from the liquid nitrogentemperature. 15... trapped charges or dipoles) that occur either at the interface between the CNT and the gate dielectric (interface defects) or at some position within... liquid nitrogen temperature 77T  K up to hot 134 8T  K, or decreases from 77T  K down to about cold 20 6T  K, thus evidencing a strong

  9. Digital carbonate rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  10. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Field Emitters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhbanov, Alexander; Pogorelov, Evgeny; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we theoretically investigate the field emission from carbon nanotube field emitters in diode configuration between a flat anode and cathode. Exact analytical formulas of the electrical field, field enhancement factor, ponderomotive force, and field emission current are found. Applied voltage, height of the needle, radius of curvature on its top, and the work function are the parameters at our disposal. The field enhancement factor, total force and emission current, as well as ...

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  13. Improving Carbon Fixation Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ducat, Daniel C.; Silver, Pamela A

    2012-01-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing...

  14. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations. PMID:27626943

  15. Securing tropical forest carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharlemann, Jörn P. W.; Kapos, Valerie; Campbell, Alison;

    2010-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation in the tropics contribute 6-17% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Protected areas cover 217.2 million ha (19.6%) of the world's humid tropical forests and contain c. 70.3 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) in biomass and soil to 1 m depth. Between 2000 and 2005, we estimate...... that 1.75 million ha of forest were lost from protected areas in humid tropical forests, causing the emission of 0.25-0.33 Pg C. Protected areas lost about half as much carbon as the same area of unprotected forest. We estimate that the reduction of these carbon emissions from ongoing deforestation...... in protected sites in humid tropical forests could be valued at USD 6,200-7,400 million depending on the land use after clearance. This is >1.5 times the estimated spending on protected area management in these regions. Improving management of protected areas to retain forest cover better may be an important...

  16. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  17. Carbon taxes and India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Shukla, P.R. [Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India)

    1994-07-01

    Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India`s rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) {open_quotes}Grandfathered emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) {open_quotes}Equal per capita emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions.

  18. Oxidation of Carbon/Carbon through Coating Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Roth, d. J.; Rauser, R. W.; Cawley, J. D.; Curry, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    Reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) is used to protect the wing leading edge and nose cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter on re-entry. It is composed of a lay-up of carbon/carbon fabric protected by a SiC conversion coating. Due to the thermal expansion mismatch of the carbon/carbon and the SiC, the SiC cracks on cool-down from the processing temperature. The cracks act as pathways for oxidation of the carbon/carbon. A model for the diffusion controlled oxidation of carbon/carbon through machined slots and cracks is developed and compared to laboratory experiments. A symmetric cylindrical oxidation cavity develops under the slots, confirming diffusion control. Comparison of cross sectional dimensions as a function of oxidation time shows good agreement with the model. A second set of oxidation experiments was done with samples with only the natural craze cracks, using weight loss as an index of oxidation. The agreement of these rates with the model is quite reasonab

  19. A carbon sink pathway increases carbon productivity in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, John W K; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-05-01

    The burning of fossil reserves, and subsequent release of carbon into the atmosphere is depleting the supply of carbon-based molecules used for synthetic materials including plastics, oils, medicines, and glues. To provide for future society, innovations are needed for the conversion of waste carbon (CO2) into organic carbon useful for materials. Chemical production directly from photosynthesis is a nascent technology, with great promise for capture of CO2 using sunlight. To improve low yields, it has been proposed that photosynthetic capacity can be increased by a relaxation of bottlenecks inherent to growth. The limits of carbon partitioning away from growth within the cell and the effect of partitioning on carbon fixation are not well known. Here we show that expressing genes in a pathway between carbon fixation and pyruvate increases partitioning to 2,3-butanediol (23BD) and leads to a 1.8-fold increase in total carbon yield in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Specific 2,3-butanediol production increases 2.4-fold. As partitioning increases beyond 30%, it leads to a steep decline in total carbon yield. The data suggests a local maximum for carbon partitioning from the Calvin Benson cycle that is scalable with light intensity.

  20. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Tehrani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers employing a synthesis method, graphitic structures by design (GSD, in which carbon structures are grown from fuel mixtures using nickel particles as the catalyst. The synthesis technique is proven feasible to grow nanofilament structures—from ethylene mixtures at 550 °C—on commercial polyacrylonitrile (PAN-based carbon fibers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the surface-grown carbon species. For comparison purposes, a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD technique was also utilized to grow multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs on carbon fiber yarns. The mechanical characterization showed that composites using the GSD-grown carbon nanofilaments outperform those using the CCVD-grown CNTs in terms of stiffness and tensile strength. The results suggest that further optimization of the GSD growth time, patterning and thermal shield coating of the carbon fibers is required to fully materialize the potential benefits of the GSD technique.