WorldWideScience

Sample records for pyrolysis centrifuge reactor

  1. Rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor, said rotor comprising a rotor body having a longitudinal centre axis, and at least one pivotally mounted blade being adapted to pivot around a pivot axis under rotation of the rotor body around the longitudinal centre axis....... Moreover, the present invention relates to a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor applying such a rotor....

  2. Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Using a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sárossy, Zsuzsa

    2013-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of lignin from an ethanol plant was investigated on a lab scale pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) with respect to pyrolysis temperature, reactor gas residence time, and feed rate. A maximal organic oil yield of 34 wt % dry basis (db) (bio-oil yield of 43 wt % db) is obtained...... at temperatures of 500−550 °C, reactor gas residence time of 0.8 s, and feed rate of 5.6 g/min. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography were used to characterize the Chemical properties of the lignin oils. Acetic acid, levoglucosan, guaiacol, syringols, and p-vinylguaiacol are found...... components and molecular mass distribution of the lignin oils. The obtained lignin oil has a very different components composition when compared to a beech wood oil....

  3. Modelling solid-convective flash pyrolysis of straw and wood in the Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Niels; Larsen, Morten Boberg; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2009-01-01

    in the Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor, a novel solid-convective flash pyrolysis reactor. The model relies on the original concept for ablative pyrolysis of particles being pyrolysed through the formation of an intermediate liquid compound which is further degraded to form liquid organics, char, and gas. To describe...

  4. Historical Developments of Pyrolysis Reactors : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Nunez, J. A.; Pelaez-Samaniego, M.R.; Garcia-Perez, M. E.; Fonts, I.; Abrego, J.; Westerhof, R. J.M.; Garcia Perez, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a review of pyrolysis technologies, focusing on reactor designs and companies commercializing these technologies. The renewed interest in pyrolysis is driven by the potential to convert lignocellulosic materials into bio-oil and biochar and the use of these intermediates for the

  5. Pyrolysis of Rubber in a Screw Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnik, A. V.; Savchin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of an analysis of thermal methods described in the literature and from the results of experimental investigations of steam conversion, the authors have developed and created a facility for thermal processing of rubber waste. Rubber crumb was used as the raw material; the temperature in the reactor was 500°C; nitrogen, steam, and a mixture of light hydrocarbons (noncondensable part of pyrolysis products) represented the working medium. The pyrolysis yielded 36-38% of a solid fraction, 54-56% of a liquid hydrocarbon fraction, and 6-9% of noncondensable gases. Changes in the composition of the gas mixture have been determined at different stages of processing. Gas chromatography of pyrolysis gases has shown that the basic gases produced by pyrolysis are H2 and hydrocarbons C2H4, C3H6, C3H8, C4H8, C2H6, C3H6O2, and C4H10, and a small amount of H2S, CO, and CO2. Noncondensable gases will be used as a fuel to heat the reactor and to implement the process.

  6. Internally Heated Screw Pyrolysis Reactor (IHSPR) heat transfer performance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, S. H.; Gan, H. L.; Alias, A.; Gan, L. M.

    2018-04-01

    1.5 billion end-of-life tyres (ELT) were discarded globally each year and pyrolysis is considered the best solution to convert the ELT into valuable high energy-density products. Among all pyrolysis technologies, screw reactor is favourable. However, conventional screw reactor risks plugging issue due to its lacklustre heat transfer performance. An internally heated screw pyrolysis reactor (IHSPR) was developed by local renewable energy industry, which serves as the research subject for heat transfer performance study of this particular paper. Zero-load heating test (ZLHT) was first carried out to obtain the operational parameters of the reactor, followed by the one dimensional steady-state heat transfer analysis carried out using SolidWorks Flow Simulation 2016. Experiments with feed rate manipulations and pyrolysis products analyses were conducted last to conclude the study.

  7. Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiman, William R.; Gregg, David W.

    1983-01-01

    Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN STALK HEMICELLULOSE PYROLYSIS IN A TUBULAR REACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Gao-Jin Lv; Shu-Bin Wu; Rui Lou

    2010-01-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of corn stalk hemicellulose were investigated in a tubular reactor at different temperatures, with focus mainly on the releasing profiles and forming behaviors of pyrolysis products (gas, char, and tar). The products obtained were further identified using various approaches (including GC, SEM, and GC-MS) to understand the influence of temperature on product properties and compositions. It was found that the devolatilization of hemicellulose mainly occurred at low tem...

  9. Pyrolysis of Softwood Carbohydrates in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Yu. Murzin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work pyrolysis of pure pine wood and softwood carbohydrates, namely cellulose and galactoglucomannan (the major hemicellulose in coniferous wood, was conducted in a batch mode operated fluidized bed reactor. Temperature ramping (5°C/min was applied to the heating until a reactor temperature of 460 °C was reached. Thereafter the temperature was kept until the release of non-condensable gases stopped. The different raw materials gave significantly different bio-oils. Levoglucosan was the dominant product in the cellulose pyrolysis oil. Acetic acid was found in the highest concentrations in both the galactoglucomannan and in the pine wood pyrolysis oils. Acetic acid is most likely formed by removal of O-acetyl groups from mannose units present in GGM structure.

  10. Pyrolysis of softwood carbohydrates in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Atte; Kumar, Narendra; Eränen, Kari; Holmbom, Bjarne; Hupa, Mikko; Salmi, Tapio; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2008-09-01

    In the present work pyrolysis of pure pine wood and softwood carbohydrates, namely cellulose and galactoglucomannan (the major hemicellulose in coniferous wood), was conducted in a batch mode operated fluidized bed reactor. Temperature ramping (5 degrees C/min) was applied to the heating until a reactor temperature of 460 degrees C was reached. Thereafter the temperature was kept until the release of non-condensable gases stopped. The different raw materials gave significantly different bio-oils. Levoglucosan was the dominant product in the cellulose pyrolysis oil. Acetic acid was found in the highest concentrations in both the galactoglucomannan and in the pine wood pyrolysis oils. Acetic acid is most likely formed by removal of O-acetyl groups from mannose units present in GGM structure.

  11. Performance of rotary kiln reactor for the elephant grass pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, D; Silvestre, W P; Baldasso, C; Godinho, M

    2016-10-01

    The influence of process conditions (rotary speed/temperature) on the performance of a rotary kiln reactor for non-catalytic pyrolysis of a perennial grass (elephant grass) was investigated. The product yields, the production of non-condensable gases as well as the biochar properties were evaluated. The maximum H2 yield was close to that observed for catalytic pyrolysis processes, while the bio-oil yield was higher than reported for pyrolysis of other biomass in rotary kiln reactors. A H2/CO ratio suitable for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was obtained. The biochars presented an alkaline pH (above 10) and interesting contents of nutrients, as well as low electrical conductivity, indicating a high potential as soil amendment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. LMR [liquid metal reactor] centrifugal pump coastdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, F.E.; Malloy, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    A centrifugal pump model which describes the interrelationships of the pump discharge flowrate, pump speed, shaft torque and dynamic head has been implemented based upon existing models. Specifically, the pump model is based upon the dimensionless-homologous pump theory of Wylie and Streeter. Given data from a representative pump, homologous theory allows one to predict the transient characteristics of similarly sized pumps. This homologous pump model has been implemented into both the one-dimensional SASSYS-1 systems analysis code and the three-dimensional COMMIX-1A code. Comparisons have been made both against other pump models (CRBR) and actual pump coastdown data (EBR-II and FFTF). Agreement with this homologous pump model has been excellent. Additionally, these comparisons indicate the validity of applying the medium size pump data of Wylie and Streeter to a range of typical LMR centrifugal pumps

  13. Improvements in centrifugal nuclear disintegration or 'streaked nuclei' reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to the so-called 'Centrifugal Nucleon Disintegrator Reactor' (CND) in which it is proposed to release the binding energy between nucleons of high atomic number by applying a violent spin to the nuclei. The reactor described comprises means for producing atomic nuclei that have been stripped of their electrons by heating to form a high temperature plasma. The reactor comprises an outer cylinder having a polished bore, an inner cylinder coaxial with the outer cylinder, the inner cylinder having a number of holes. A number of light beams are directed non-radially on to the bore and undergo reflections therefrom so as to create around the inner cylinder a coaxial cylindrical wall of unidirectionally moving light photons. Means are provided for introducing the nuclei into the inner cylinder, passing then out through the holes therein, and urging them against the photon wall. The direction of the light beams is slightly non-horizontal so that their reflections from the bore trace out a very closely coiled helix, extending the photon wall up the length of the inner cylinder through which the plasmatic nuclei are admitted. (U.K.)

  14. Pyrolysis of rice husk and corn stalk in auger reactor:Part 1. Characterization of char and gas at various temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yang; Yang, Yang; Cheng, Zhicai; Blanco, Paula H.; Liu, Ronghou; Bridgwater, A.V.; Cai, Junmeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, rice husk and corn stalk have been pyrolyzed in an auger pyrolysis reactor at pyrolysis temperatures of 350, 400, 450, 500, 550, and 600 °C in order to investigate the effect of the pyrolysis temperature on the pyrolysis performance of the reactor and physicochemical properties of pyrolysis products (this paper focuses on char and gas). The results have shown that the pyrolysis temperature significantly affects the mass yields and properties of the pyrolysis products. The mass ...

  15. Centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaramajer.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the processes taking place at centrifugal method of isotope separation taking into account the latest investigations, in particular, investigation of velocity field applying the theory of boundary layers in rotating gas is conducted. As a result of using power computers for the solution of hydrodynamics equations by numerical methods sufficiently exact solutions of main hydrodynamic equations, reflecting the real centrifuge construction are derived. The increase of calculation accuracy of the flow field reflected also on the accuracy of the diffusion equation solution. Three parameters of similarity (height of transfer unit, flow, mass transfer coefficient) and their connection with the flow field, elementary separation coefficient in a cetrifugal field and molecular diffusion coefficient is determined. Modified formulas for the separation coefficient and separation centrifuge power taking into account similarity parameter changes over the axis are derived. The possibility of determining the system of controlled parameters optimizing the separation centrifuge power is shown

  16. Fast pyrolysis of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor: in-situ filtering of the vapors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; Hogendoorn, Kees; Wang, X.; Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Groeneveld, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    A system to remove in situ char/ash from hot pyrolysis vapors has been developed and tested at the University of Twente. The system consists of a continuous fluidized bed reactor (0.7 kg/h) with immersed filters (wire mesh, pore size 5 μm) for extracting pyrolysis vapors. Integration of the filter

  17. CENTRIFUGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  18. Improvements in centrifugal nucleon disintegration of CND reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to the so-called 'Centrifugal Nucleon Disintegrator Reactor' (CND) in which it is proposed to release the binding energy between nucleons of high atomic number by applying a violent spin to the nuclei. The reactor described comprises means for producing atomic nuclei that have been stripped of their electrons by heating to form a high temperature plasma. A number of laser beams are directed on to a cylinder having a polished bore and reflected therefrom so as to create tangentially a cylindrical wall or surface having a high concentration of photons moving unidirectionally, together with means for introducing nuclei into the cylindrical wall or surface of photons. A high electrostatic charge is applied to urge the nuclei against the cylindrical wall or surface. The nuclei are discharged into the space between the cylinder and the photon wall. Nucleons that have been separated from their nuclei are carried upwards in a flow of plasma, which can be arranged to produce an electrical output by interaction with an electromagnetic field. (U.K.)

  19. Effect of acid washing on pyrolysis of Cladophora socialis alga in microtubing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ly, Hoang Vu; Kim, Seung-Soo; Kim, Jinsoo; Choi, Jae Hyung; Woo, Hee Chul

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis of macroalgae Cladophora socialis was conducted in micro tubular reactor. • Acid washing affected the pyrolysis behavior of Cladophora socialis. • Pyrolysis of raw and acid washed C. socialis produced bio-oils with different compositions. • Pyrolysis reaction pathway was from C. socialis to liquid and then to gas (C_1–C_4). - Abstract: Cladophora socialis is a unique macroalga that is widely grown in the coastal regions of Vietnam. In this work, the pyrolysis characteristics of C. socialis were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and pyrolysis in a tubing reactor. Macroalgae have a high content of inorganic compounds. These compounds result in high char content during pyrolysis of the macroalgae, which degrades the quality of the product bio-oil. In order to study this effect, C. socialis was demineralized by acid washing to remove the inorganic compounds. The effect of acid washing on the pyrolysis product distribution and the selectivity of composition in pyrolysis oil was carefully investigated. The kinetic parameters and the primary reaction pathways were also determined based on experimental data using nonlinear least-squares regression assuming a first-order kinetics model.

  20. Bio-oil from Flash Pyrolysis of Agricultural Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Norazana

    This thesis describes the production of bio-oils from flash pyrolysis of agricultural residues, using a pyrolysis centrifugal reactor (PCR). By thermal degradation of agricultural residues in the PCR, a liquid oil, char and non-condensable gases are produced. The yield of each fraction...

  1. Fast pyrolysis of biomass in the rotating cone reactor. Reactor development and operation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansekoele, E.; Wagenaar, B.M.

    2001-07-01

    This report describes the design and characteristics of BTGs pyrolysis plant with a biomass throughput capacity of 50 kg per hour. The pilot plant has been developed for 2 reasons: to produce modest quantities of bio-oil for application purposes, and to generate know-how for the development of a larger 200 kg/hr pilot plant. The design of the 50 kg/hr plant continues the development line which started in 1995 when a similar unit was delivered to China. Major design improvements of the current pyrolysis unit are that it can be operated in a continuous mode and utilizes the combustion heat of the produced char to heat the pyrolysis process. A measurement program has meanwhile been executed as a means to characterize the pyrolysis plant. Results of the characterization study were the following: the pilot plant produces approx. 35 liters of bio-oil per hour and thus achieves a maximum oil yield of 70 weight percent. The bio-oil yield of the plant was inversely proportional with the reactor temperature and inversely proportional with the gas phase residence time. As a result of the pilot plant operation, a few tons of bio-oil have been produced; alongside with a bulk of know-how. All know-how has successfully been utilized in the development of the 200 kg per hour facility

  2. Product Characterization and Kinetics of Biomass Pyrolysis in a Three-Zone Free-Fall Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthaya Punsuwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of biomass including palm shell, palm kernel, and cassava pulp residue was studied in a laboratory free-fall reactor with three separated hot zones. The effects of pyrolysis temperature (250–1050°C and particle size (0.18–1.55 mm on the distribution and properties of pyrolysis products were investigated. A higher pyrolysis temperature and smaller particle size increased the gas yield but decreased the char yield. Cassava pulp residue gave more volatiles and less char than those of palm kernel and palm shell. The derived solid product (char gave a high calorific value of 29.87 MJ/kg and a reasonably high BET surface area of 200 m2/g. The biooil from palm shell is less attractive to use as a direct fuel, due to its high water contents, low calorific value, and high acidity. On gas composition, carbon monoxide was the dominant component in the gas product. A pyrolysis model for biomass pyrolysis in the free-fall reactor was developed, based on solving the proposed two-parallel reactions kinetic model and equations of particle motion, which gave excellent prediction of char yields for all biomass precursors under all pyrolysis conditions studied.

  3. Fast pyrolysis of sugarcane and cassava residues in a free-fall reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattiya, Adisak; Sukkasi, Sittha; Goodwin, Vituruch

    2012-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of agricultural residues from sugarcane and cassava plantations was carried out in a laboratory-scale free-fall reactor unit. The objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of biomass types and pyroysis conditions, such as reactor temperature, condensation temperature, nitrogen flow rate and run duration, on pyrolysis product distribution, as well as to study the basic properties of the products. The results showed that all of the parameters affected the product distribution. The optimum reactor temperatures for maximising bio-oil yield were in the range of 350–450 °C. About 70 wt% of bio-oil yield could be obtained by pyrolysis of cassava stalk at a reactor temperature of 450 °C and a primary condensation temperature of 10 °C. It was also found that the minimum flow rate of nitrogen for obtaining high bio-oil yield was 1.5 l/min. The product characterisation showed that the bio-oil and char produced from the agricultural residues with the free-fall reactor unit were to a certain extent similar to those produced from different types of biomass with different types of pyrolysis reactor configurations. -- Highlights: ► Fast pyrolysis of sugarcane and cassava agricultural residues was carried out in a laboratory-scale free-fall reactor unit. ► The effects of process parameters on product yields were investigated. ► The process parameters included reactor temperature, condensation temperature, nitrogen flow rate and run duration. ► Basic properties of pyrolysis products were examined.

  4. Numerical simulation of vortex pyrolysis reactors for condensable tar production from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1998-08-01

    A numerical study is performed in order to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of vortex pyrolysis reactors used for condensable tar production from biomass. A detailed mathematical model of porous biomass particle pyrolysis is coupled with a compressible Reynolds stress transport model for the turbulent reactor swirling flow. An initial evaluation of particle dimensionality effects is made through comparisons of single- (1D) and multi-dimensional particle simulations and reveals that the 1D particle model results in conservative estimates for total pyrolysis conversion times and tar collection. The observed deviations are due predominantly to geometry effects while directional effects from thermal conductivity and permeability variations are relatively small. Rapid ablative particle heating rates are attributed to a mechanical fragmentation of the biomass particles that is modeled using a critical porosity for matrix breakup. Optimal thermal conditions for tar production are observed for 900 K. Effects of biomass identity, particle size distribution, and reactor geometry and scale are discussed.

  5. Chapter 8: Pyrolysis Mechanisms of Lignin Model Compounds Using a Heated Micro-Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2015-10-03

    Lignin is an important component of biomass, and the decomposition of its thermal deconstruction products is important in pyrolysis and gasification. In this chapter, we investigate the unimolecular pyrolysis chemistry through the use of singly and doubly substituted benzene molecules that are model compounds representative of lignin and its primary pyrolysis products. These model compounds are decomposed in a heated micro-reactor, and the products, including radicals and unstable intermediates, are measured using photoionization mass spectrometry and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. We show that the unimolecular chemistry can yield insight into the initial decomposition of these species. At pyrolysis and gasification severities, singly substituted benzenes typically undergo bond scission and elimination reactions to form radicals. Some require radical-driven chain reactions. For doubly substituted benzenes, proximity effects of the substituents can change the reaction pathways.

  6. Toxic waste treatment with sliding centrifugal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, J.; Pacheco, M.; Valdivia, R.; Ramos, F.; Duran, M.; Hidalgo, M.; Cruz, A.; Martinez, J. C.; Martinez, R.; De la Cruz, S.; Flores, T.; Vidal, E.; Escobar, S.; Garduno, M.; Garcia, M.; Portillo, J.; Torres, C.; Estrada, N.; Velazquez, S.; Vasquez, C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim is to develop technology for hazardous waste treatment, including the building and putting into operation of a prototype based on a sliding centrifugal plasma technology to demonstrate its ability to degradation taking in account the existing environmental standards. (Author)

  7. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of white oak wood in-situ using a bubbling fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis was performed on white oak wood using two zeolite-type catalysts as bed material in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The two catalysts chosen, based on a previous screening study, were Ca2+ exchanged Y54 (Ca-Y54) and a proprietary ß-zeolite type catalyst (catalyst M) both ...

  8. Fast pyrolysis in a novel wire-mesh reactor: design and initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Hogendoorn, Kees

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolysis is known to occur by decomposition processes followed by vapour phase reactions. The goal of this research is to develop a novel device to study the initial decomposition processes. For this, a novel wire-mesh reactor was constructed. A small sample (<0.1 g) was clamped between two meshes

  9. Pyrolysis of Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF) wastes in a screw reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Suelem Daiane; Altafini, Carlos Roberto; Perondi, Daniele; Godinho, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Medium Density Fiberboard wastes were pirolized in an auger reactor. • Experiments were carried out at two reaction temperatures and three solid residence times. • Yields were influenced by pyrolysis temperature, as well as by solid residence time. • Higher temperature produced more bio-oil rather than char generation. • Chars superficial area were compatibles with those of commercial activated carbons. - Abstract: Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF) wastes were undergoes via a thermal treatment through of a pyrolysis process. Pyrolysis was carried out in a pilot scale reactor with screw conveyor at two reaction temperatures (450 and 600 °C) and, for each one, three solid residence times (9, 15 and 34 min) were evaluated. Products (char/bio-oil/fuel gas) of the pyrolysis process were characterized and quantified. Results revealed that the products yields were influenced by pyrolysis temperature, as well as by solid residence time. Char yield ranged between 17.3 and 39.7 (wt.%), the bio-oil yield ranged between 23.9 and 40.0 (wt.%), while the fuel gas yield ranged between 34.6 and 50.7 (wt.%). The samples surface area at 450 and 600 °C in 15-min residence time were surprisingly high, 415 and 593 m 2 g −1 , respectively, which are compatible with the superficial area of commercial activated carbons. Energetic efficiency of process was estimated from energetic content present in the reaction products and the energetic content of MDF wastes, and the following results were obtained: 41.4% (fuel gas), 35.5% (char) and 29.2% (bio-oil). The contribution of this work is the development of a detailed study of the MDF pyrolysis in a pilot reactor with screw conveyor that supports the biorefineries concept

  10. Catalytic pyrolysis of woody biomass in a fluidized bed reactor: influence of the zeolite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Aho; N. Kumar; K. Eranen; T. Salmi; M. Hupa; D.Yu. Murzin [Aabo Akademi University, Aabo/Turku (Finland). Process Chemistry Centre, Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering

    2008-09-15

    Catalytic pyrolysis of biomass from pine wood was carried out in a fluidized bed reactor at 450{sup o}C. Different structures of acidic zeolite catalysts were used as bed material in the reactor. Proton forms of Beta, Y, ZSM-5, and Mordenite were tested as catalysts in the pyrolysis of pine, while quartz sand was used as a reference material in the non-catalytic pyrolysis experiments. The yield of the pyrolysis product phases was only slightly influenced by the structures, at the same time the chemical composition of the bio-oil was dependent on the structure of acidic zeolite catalysts. Ketones and phenols were the dominating groups of compounds in the bio-oil. The formation of ketones was higher over ZSM-5 and the amount of acids and alcohols lower than over the other bed materials tested. Mordenite and quartz sand produced smaller quantities of polyaromatic hydrocarbons than the other materials tested. It was possible to successfully regenerate the spent zeolites without changing the structure of the zeolite. 12 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Waste truck-tyre processing by flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.; Alvarez, J.; Amutio, M.; Mkhize, N.M.; Danon, B.; Gryp, P.; Görgens, J.F. van der; Bilbao, J.; Olazar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Flash pyrolysis improves TPO and limonene yields vs. slow pyrolysis. • The most suitable temperature for TPO and limonene maximization was 475 °C. • Operating at 575 °C gas yields and char quality was enhanced. • Temperature showed a limited effect on sulphur distribution among products. - Abstract: The flash pyrolysis of waste truck-tyres was studied in a conical spouted bed reactor (CSBR) operating in continuous regime. The influence of temperature on product distribution was analysed in the 425–575 °C range. A detailed characterization of the pyrolysis products was carried out in order to assess their most feasible application. Moreover, special attention was paid to the sulphur distribution among the products. The analysis of gaseous products was carried out using a micro-GC and the tyre pyrolysis oil (TPO) by means of GC-FID using peak areas for quantification, with GC/MS for identification and elemental analysis. Finally, the char was subjected to elemental analysis and surface characterization. According to the results, 475 °C is an appropriate temperature for the pyrolysis of waste tyres, given that it ensures total devolatilisation of tyre rubber and a high TPO yield, 58.2 wt.%. Moreover, the quality of the oil is optimum at this temperature, especially in terms of high concentrations of valuable chemicals, such as limonene. An increase in temperature to 575 °C reduced the TPO yield to 53.9 wt.% and substantially changed its chemical composition by increasing the aromatic content. However, the quality of the recovered char was improved at high temperatures.

  12. A CFD model for biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingluan; Heindel, T. J.; Fox, R. O.

    2010-11-01

    A numerical study is conducted to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of fluidized-bed reactors for fast pyrolysis of biomass to bio-oil. A comprehensive CFD model, coupling a pyrolysis kinetic model with a detailed hydrodynamics model, is developed. A lumped kinetic model is applied to describe the pyrolysis of biomass particles. Variable particle porosity is used to account for the evolution of particle physical properties. The kinetic scheme includes primary decomposition and secondary cracking of tar. Biomass is composed of reference components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Products are categorized into groups: gaseous, tar vapor, and solid char. The particle kinetic processes and their interaction with the reactive gas phase are modeled with a multi-fluid model derived from the kinetic theory of granular flow. The gas, sand and biomass constitute three continuum phases coupled by the interphase source terms. The model is applied to investigate the effect of operating conditions on the tar yield in a fluidized-bed reactor. The influence of various parameters on tar yield, including operating temperature and others are investigated. Predicted optimal conditions for tar yield and scale-up of the reactor are discussed.

  13. Demonstration of the waste tire pyrolysis process on pilot scale in a continuous auger reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez, Juan Daniel; Murillo, Ramón; García, Tomás; Veses, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The continuous pyrolysis of waste tire has been demonstrated at pilot scale in an auger reactor. • More than 500 kg of waste tires were processed in 100 operational hours. • The yields and characteristics of the pyrolysis products remained constant. • Mass and energy balances for an industrial scale plant are provided. • The reaction enthalpy necessary to perform the waste tire pyrolysis was determined. -- Abstract: This work shows the technical feasibility for valorizing waste tires by pyrolysis using a pilot scale facility with a nominal capacity of 150 kW th . A continuous auger reactor was operated to perform thirteen independent experiments that conducted to the processing of more than 500 kg of shredded waste tires in 100 h of operation. The reaction temperature was 550 °C and the pressure was 1 bar in all the runs. Under these conditions, yields to solid, liquid and gas were 40.5 ± 0.3, 42.6 ± 0.1 and 16.9 ± 0.3 wt.% respectively. Ultimate and proximate analyses as well as heating value analysis were conducted for both the solid and liquid fraction. pH, water content, total acid number (TAN), viscosity and density were also assessed for the liquid and compared to the specifications of marine fuels (standard ISO 8217). Gas chromatography was used to calculate the composition of the gaseous fraction. It was observed that all these properties remained practically invariable along the experiments without any significant technical problem. In addition, the reaction enthalpy necessary to perform the waste tire pyrolysis process (907.1 ± 40.0 kJ/kg) was determined from the combustion and formation enthalpies of waste tire and conversion products. Finally, a mass balance closure was performed showing an excellent reliability of the data obtained from the experimental campaign

  14. Demonstration of the waste tire pyrolysis process on pilot scale in a continuous auger reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Juan Daniel, E-mail: juand.martinez@upb.edu.co [Instituto de Carboquímica, ICB-CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castán 4, 50018, Zaragoza (Spain); Grupo de Investigaciones Ambientales, Instituto de Energía, Materiales y Medio Ambiente, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Circular 1 N°70-01, Bloque 11, piso 2, Medellín (Colombia); Murillo, Ramón; García, Tomás; Veses, Alberto [Instituto de Carboquímica, ICB-CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castán 4, 50018, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The continuous pyrolysis of waste tire has been demonstrated at pilot scale in an auger reactor. • More than 500 kg of waste tires were processed in 100 operational hours. • The yields and characteristics of the pyrolysis products remained constant. • Mass and energy balances for an industrial scale plant are provided. • The reaction enthalpy necessary to perform the waste tire pyrolysis was determined. -- Abstract: This work shows the technical feasibility for valorizing waste tires by pyrolysis using a pilot scale facility with a nominal capacity of 150 kW{sub th}. A continuous auger reactor was operated to perform thirteen independent experiments that conducted to the processing of more than 500 kg of shredded waste tires in 100 h of operation. The reaction temperature was 550 °C and the pressure was 1 bar in all the runs. Under these conditions, yields to solid, liquid and gas were 40.5 ± 0.3, 42.6 ± 0.1 and 16.9 ± 0.3 wt.% respectively. Ultimate and proximate analyses as well as heating value analysis were conducted for both the solid and liquid fraction. pH, water content, total acid number (TAN), viscosity and density were also assessed for the liquid and compared to the specifications of marine fuels (standard ISO 8217). Gas chromatography was used to calculate the composition of the gaseous fraction. It was observed that all these properties remained practically invariable along the experiments without any significant technical problem. In addition, the reaction enthalpy necessary to perform the waste tire pyrolysis process (907.1 ± 40.0 kJ/kg) was determined from the combustion and formation enthalpies of waste tire and conversion products. Finally, a mass balance closure was performed showing an excellent reliability of the data obtained from the experimental campaign.

  15. Evaluation of co-pyrolysis petrochemical wastewater sludge with lignite in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a packed-bed reactor: Pyrolysis characteristics, kinetics, and products analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Lin; Chen, Jianbiao; Yao, Pikai; Zhou, Dapeng; Zhao, Liang; Yin, Hongchao

    2016-12-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of petrochemical wastewater sludge and Huolinhe lignite were investigated using thermogravimetric analyzer and packed-bed reactor coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and gas chromatography. The pyrolysis characteristics of the blends at various sludge blending ratios were compared with those of the individual materials. Thermogravimetric experiments showed that the interactions between the blends were beneficial to generate more residues. In packed-bed reactor, synergetic effects promoted the release of gas products and left less liquid and solid products than those calculated by additive manner. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer analysis showed that main functional groups in chars gradually disappeared with pyrolysis temperatures increasing, and H 2 O, CH 4 , CO, and CO 2 appeared in volatiles during pyrolysis. Gas compositions analysis indicated that, the yields of H 2 and CO clearly increased as the pyrolysis temperature and sludge blending ratio increasing, while the changes of CH 4 and CO 2 yields were relatively complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental investigation into fast pyrolysis of biomass using an entrained flow reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, M.; Benham, C.

    1981-02-01

    Pyrolysis experiments were performed with steam as a carrier gas and two different feedstocks - wheat straw and powdered material derived from municipal solid waste (ECO-II TM). Reactor wall temperature was varied from 7000 to 1400 C. Gas composition data from the ECO-II tests were comparable to previously reported data but ethylene yield appeared to vary with reactor wall temperature and residence time. The important conclusion from the wheat straw tests is that olefin yields are about one half that obtained from ECO-II. Evidence was found that high olefin yields from ECO-II are due to the presence of plastics in the feedstock.

  17. Improved lignin pyrolysis for phenolics production in a bubbling bed reactor--Effect of bed materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongbing; Briens, Cedric; Berruti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lignin pyrolysis was studied in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor equipped with a fractional condensation train, using nitrogen as the fluidization gas. The effect of different bed materials (silica sand, lignin char, activated lignin char, birch bark char, and foamed glass beads) on bio-oil yield and quality was investigated for a pyrolysis temperature of 550 °C. Results how that a bed of activated lignin char is preferable to the commonly used silica sand: pyrolysis of Kraft lignin with a bed of activated lignin char not only provides a pure char product, but also a higher dry bio-oil yield (with a relative increase of 43%), lower pyrolytic water production, and better bio-oil quality. The bio-oil obtained from Kraft lignin pyrolysis with a bed of activated lignin char has a lower average molecular weight, less tar, more phenolics, and less acidity than when sand is used as bed material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modelling and experimental investigation of waste tyre pyrolysis process in a laboratory reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudniak Leszek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of waste tyre pyrolysis process is developed in this work. Tyre material decomposition based on a simplified reaction mechanism leads to main product lumps: noncondensable (gas, condensable (pyrolytic oil and solid (char. The model takes into account kinetics of heat and mass transfer in the grain of the shredded rubber material as well as surrounding gas phase. The main reaction routes were modelled as the pseudo-first order reactions with a rate constant calculated from the Arrhenius type equation using literature values of activation energy determined for main tyre constituents based on TG/DTG measurements and tuned pre-exponential parameter values obtained by fitting theoretical predictions to the experimental results obtained in our laboratory reactor. The model was implemented within the CFD software (ANSYS Fluent. The results of numerical simulation of the pyrolysis process revealed non-uniformity of sample’s porosity and temperature. The simulation predictions were in satisfactory agreement with the experimentally measured mass loss of the tyre sample during pyrolysis process investigated in a laboratory reactor.

  19. Oxidative pyrolysis of kraft lignin in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor with air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongbing; Briens, Cedric; Berruti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of kraft lignin with partial (air) oxidation was studied in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor at reaction temperatures of 773 and 823 K. The bio-oil vapors were fractionated using a series of three condensers maintained at desired temperatures, providing a dry bio-oil with less than 1% water and over 96% of the total bio-oil energy. Oxygen feed was varied to study its effect on yield, composition, and energy recovery in the gas, char and oil products. The addition of oxygen to the pyrolysis process increased the production of gases such as CO and CO 2 . It also changed the dry bio-oil properties, reducing its heating value, increasing its oxygen content, reducing its average molecular weight and tar concentration, while increasing its phenolics concentration. The lower reaction temperature of 773 K was preferred for both dry bio-oil yield and quality. Autothermal operation of the pyrolysis process was achieved with an oxygen feed of 72 or 54 g per kg of biomass at the reaction temperatures of 773 and 823 K, respectively. Autothermal operation reduced both yield and total energy content of the dry bio-oil, with relative reductions of 24 and 20% for the yield, 28 and 23% for the energy content, at 773 and 823 K. - Highlights: • Autothermal pyrolysis of Kraft lignin is possible with introduction of air. • Under autothermal conditions, 24% of the dry bio-oil chemicals are lost at 773 K. • Partial oxidation helps produce more simple phenols and less pyrolytic lignin. • Bio-oil from lignin pyrolysis has a very high phenolics concentration

  20. Co-pyrolysis behavior of fermentation residues with woody sawdust by thermogravimetric analysis and a vacuum reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Zhang, Yimin; Xu, Jingna; Li, Xiayang; Charles Xu, Chunbao

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed at cost-effective utilization of fermentation residues (FR) from biogas project for bio-energy via co-pyrolysis of FR and woody sawdust (WS). In this study, a vacuum reactor was used to study the pyrolysis behaviors of individual and blend samples of FR and WS. Obvious synergistic effects were observed, resulting in a lower char yield but a higher gas yield. The presence of woody sawdust promoted the devolatilization of FR, and improved the syngas (H 2 and CO) content in the gaseous products. Compared to those of the char from pyrolysis of individual feedstock, co-pyrolysis of FR and WS in the vacuum reactor promoted the cracking reactions of large aromatic rings, enlarged the surface area and reduced the oxygenated groups of the resulted char. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fast pyrolysis of Miscanthus sinensis in fluidized bed reactors: Characteristics of product yields and biocrude oil quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bok, Jin Pil; Choi, Hang Seok; Choi, Joon Weon; Choi, Yeon Seok

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, fast pyrolysis of Miscanthus sinensis was performed and the product yields and properties of the resulting biocrude oil were determined for varying reactor configurations and pyrolysis temperatures. Two types of reactors (rectangular and cylindrical fluidized beds) were adopted, and pyrolysis temperature was increased from 400 °C to 550 °C. Based on the results, it was found that the reaction temperature greatly influenced the product yield and the characteristics of biocrude oil. The highest yield of biocrude oil for the rectangular reactor was 48.9 wt.%, produced at 500 °C, and the highest yield for the cylindrical reactor was 50.01 wt.%, produced at 450 °C. Additionally, the biocrude oil yield in the rectangular reactor sharply decreased when reaction temperature was increased to 550 °C, while only a slight decrease was observed in the cylindrical reactor. From GC/MS analysis, biocrude oil was found to contain various chemical components, such as nonaromatic ketones, furans, sugars, lignin-derived phenols, guaiacols and syringols. In particular, the sugar content of the biocrude oil produced in rectangular reactor (2.11–9.35 wt.%) was generally lower than that produced in the cylindrical reactor (7.93–10.79 wt.%). - Highlights: • Fast pyrolysis of Miscanthus sinensis was performed in two fluidized bed reactors to obtain biocrude oil. • The yield and characteristics of the biocrude oil were scrutinized with changing reaction temperature and reactor type. • The reaction temperature was found to be the most influencing parameter for the fast pyrolysis reaction. • The different heating rate caused by reactor type has an effect on the final product yield and characteristics

  2. Comparative study on pyrolysis of lignocellulosic and algal biomass using a thermogravimetric and a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ting; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four algal and lignocellulosic biomass samples were studied by using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and biomass type on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products were investigated. The average activation energy for pyrolysis of biomass samples by FWO and KAS methods in this study were in the range of 211.09-291.19kJ/mol. CO2 was the main gas component in the early stage of pyrolysis, whereas H2 and CH4 concentrations increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Bio-oil from Chlorellavulgaris showed higher content of nitrogen containing compounds compared to lignocellulosic biomass. The concentration of aromatic organic compounds such as phenol and its derivatives were increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature up to 700°C. FTIR analysis results showed that with increasing pyrolysis temperature, the concentration of OH, CH, CO, OCH3, and CO functional groups in char decreased sharply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Flash pyrolysis properties of algae and lignin residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sørensen, Hanne Risbjerg

    of macroalgae showed a promising result with on yield of 54 wt% dry ash free basis (daf) and 78% energy recovery in the bio-oil. The physiochemical properties of the bio-oils were characterized with respect to higher heating value, molecular mass distribution, viscosity, pH, density and elemental compositions......A fast pyrolysis study on lignin and macroalgae (non-conventional biomass) and wood and straw (conventional biomass) were carried out in a pyrolysis centrifugal reactor. The product distributions and energy recoveries were measured and compared among these biomasses. The fast pyrolysis...

  4. CFD modeling of space-time evolution of fast pyrolysis products in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boateng, A.A.; Mtui, P.L.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed has been developed. In this study the unsteady constitutive transport equations for inert gas flow and decomposition kinetics were modeled using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT-12. The Eulerarian-Eulerian multiphase model system described herein is a fluidized bed of sand externally heated to a predetermined temperature prior to introduction of agricultural biomass. We predict the spontaneous emergence of pyrolysis vapors, char and non-condensable (permanent) gases and confirm the observation that the kinetics are fast and that bio-oil vapor evolution is accomplished in a few seconds, and occupying two-thirds of the spatial volume of the reactor as widely reported in the open literature. The model could be advantageous in the virtual design of fast pyrolysis reactors and their optimization to meet economic scales required for distributed or satellite units. - Highlights: ► We model the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed via CFD. ► We predict the spontaneous emergence of pyrolysis products. ► We confirm the experimental observation that the kinetics are fast. ► And that bio-oil vapor evolution is accomplished in a few seconds. ► The model is advantageous in the virtual design of fast pyrolysis reactors.

  5. Pyrolysis treatment of waste tire powder in a capacitively coupled RF plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Waihuanxi Road, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, L. [Department of Civil Engineering, Guangzhou University, Waihuanxi Road, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2009-03-15

    A capacitively coupled radio-frequency (RF) plasma reactor was tested mainly for the purpose of solid waste treatment. It was found that using a RF input power between 1600 and 2000 W and a reactor pressure between 3000 and 8000 Pa (absolute pressure), a reactive plasma environment with a gas temperature between 1200 and 1800 K can be reached in this lab scale reactor. Under these conditions, pyrolysis of tire powder gave two product streams: a combustible gas and a pyrolytic char. The major components of the gas product are H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} The physical properties (surface area, porosity, and particle morphology) as well as chemical properties (elemental composition, heating value, and surface functional groups) of the pyrolytic char has also been examined. (author)

  6. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures by the pyrolysis of wood sawdust in a tubular reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G. Sebag Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were produced by wood sawdust pyrolysis. The results obtained revealed that the thermodynamic simulations (FactSage were successful to predict the best reaction conditions for the synthesis of carbon, and potentially carbon fibers and nanotubes production. Graphite formation was indicated by XRD study, and by thermal analysis which presented the carbon oxidation range. The morphology of the samples (SEM/TEM analysis showed carbon nanotubes/nanofibers varying in size and thickness, with defects and flaws. The tubular reactor was considered to be an economic and environmental correct way to nanomaterials growing, with the simultaneous generation of hydrogen and lower pollutant gas emissions.

  7. Recovery of energy and iron from oily sludge pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Linbo; Han, Jun; He, Xiang; Zhan, Yiqiu; Yu, Fei

    2015-05-01

    In the steel industry, about 0.86 ton of oily sludge is produced for every 1000 tons of rolling steel. Due to the adverse impact on human health and the environment, oily sludge is designated as a hazardous waste in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRT). In this paper, the pyrolysis treatment of oily sludge is studied in a fluidized bed reactor at a temperature range of 400-600 °C. During oily sludge pyrolysis, a maximum oil yield of 59.2% and a minimum energy loss of 19.0% are achieved at 500 °C. The energy consumption of treating 1 kg oily sludge is only 2.4-2.9 MJ. At the same time, the energy of produced oil, gas and solid residue are 20.8, 6.32, and 0.83 MJ, respectively. In particular, it is found that the solid residue contains more than 42% iron oxide, which can be used as the raw material for iron production. Thus, the simultaneous recovery of energy and iron from oil sludge by pyrolysis is feasible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fast oxidative pyrolysis of sugar cane straw in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesa-Pérez, Juan Miguel; Rocha, José Dilcio; Barbosa-Cortez, Luis Augusto; Penedo-Medina, Margarita; Luengo, Carlos Alberto; Cascarosa, Esther

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the technical viability evaluation of the fast pyrolysis of sugar cane straw for its energy use. By means of this thermochemical process, the sugar cane straw is converted into bio-fuels (biochar, bio-oil) and non-condensable gases. The bio-fuels obtained could be used as fuel or as raw material in the chemical industry. The fast pyrolysis of sugar cane straw has been developed in a fluidized bed reactor. In order to improve this process to obtain high bio-oil yield, the influence of the operational conditions (equivalence ratio and temperature) on the product yields and on their characteristics was evaluated. The product yields of bio-oil and char were up to 35.5 wt.% and 48.2 wt.% respectively. The maximum bio-oil yield was achieved at temperature and equivalence ratio conditions of 470 °C and 0.14. The bio-oil obtained has low oxygen content (38.48 wt.% dry basis), very low water content, and a lower heating value of 22.95 MJ/kg. The gas chromatographic analyses allowed the identification of oxygenated compounds and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The bio-oil pH ranged between 3.14 and 3.57 due to the presence of acid organic compounds. The char obtained has a high fixed carbon and volatile matter content. Its HHV value is 13.54 MJ/kg. -- Highlights: • Pyrolysis of sugar cane straw was studied in a fluidized bed reactor. • The product yields were evaluated. • The composition of the liquid and solid products obtained was analyzed. • This is an environmentally friendly use for this waste

  9. Evaluation of the properties of tyre pyrolysis oils obtained in a conical spouted bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.; Lopez, G.; Amutio, M.; Mkhize, N.M.; Danon, B.; Gryp, P. van der; Görgens, J.F.; Bilbao, J.; Olazar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Waste truck tyre valorization by fast pyrolysis has been performed in a conical spouted bed reactor in the 425–575 °C range. The tyre pyrolysis oil (TPO) yield was found to decrease with increasing temperature whilst the yield of gas increased. The effect of temperature on TPO properties has been studied in order to establish the best possible valorization route. FTIR and chromatographic analysis revealed the presence of some undesired compounds with sulphur, nitrogen or oxygen functionalities (benzotiatholes, nitriles and carboxylic acids amongst others) and an increase of TPO aromaticity with increasing temperature. The carbon and sulphur content and the heating value of the TPO increased with temperature. The simulated distillation showed that approximately 70% of the TPOs produced at 425 and 475 °C correspond to diesel range, whereas that TPO obtained at 575 °C is between diesel and gasoline range. The properties of the TPOs evidenced their potential to substitute conventional fuels. However, some of them need to be improved, i.e., by reduction of the sulphur, nitrogen and aromatic content. Additionally, the TPO obtained at 425 and 475 °C could be an important source of limonene and that at 575 °C of xylenes, although current removal methods present some limitations. - Highlights: • The conical spouted bed reactor is suitable for truck tyre fast pyrolysis. • The highest oil yields are attained between 425 and 475 °C (≈58 wt %). • Tyre oil is a mixture of water, aromatic, aliphatic and heteroaromatic compounds. • Limonene is the major compound with a maximum yield of 13.30 wt % at 475 °C. • 425 and 475 °C oils share similarities with diesel and 575 °C one with gasoline.

  10. A Comparison of Lignin, Macroalgae, Wood and Straw Fast Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    these biomasses. The fast pyrolysis of macroalgae showed a promising result with a bio-oil yield of 65 wt% dry ash free basis (daf) and 76 % energy recovery in the bio-oil while the lignin fast pyrolysis provides a bio-oil yield of 47 wt% daf and energy recovery in bio-oil of 45 %. The physiochemical properties...... of the bio-oils were characterized with respect to higher heating value (HHV), molecular mass distribution, viscosity, pH, density, thermal behaviors, elemental concentrations, phase separation and aging. The lignin and macroalgae oil properties were different compared to those of the wood and straw oils......A fast pyrolysis study on lignin and macroalgae (non-conventional biomass) and wood and straw (conventional biomass) were carried out in a pyrolysis centrifugal reactor at pyrolysis temperature of 550 ºC. The product distributions and energy recoveries were measured and compared among...

  11. Experimental investigation of pyrolysis of rice straw using bench-scale auger, batch and fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Hyungseok; Capareda, Sergio C.; Ashwath, Nanjappa; Kongkasawan, Jinjuta

    2015-01-01

    Energy conversion efficiencies of three pyrolysis reactors (bench-scale auger, batch, and fluidized bed) were investigated using rice straw as the feedstock at a temperature of 500 °C. The highest bio-oil yield of 43% was obtained from the fluidized bed reactor, while the maximum bio-char yield of 48% was obtained from the batch reactor. Similar bio-oil yields were obtained from the auger and batch type reactors. The GCMS and FTIR were used to evaluate the liquid products from all reactors. The best quality bio-oil and bio-char from the batch reactor was determined to have a heating value of 31 MJ/kg and 19 MJ/kg, respectively. The highest alkali mineral was found in the bio-char produced from the auger reactor. The energy conversion efficiencies of the three reactors indicated that the majority of the energy (50–64%) was in the bio-char products from the auger and batch reactors, while the bio-oil from the fluidized bed reactor contained the highest energy (47%). A Sankey diagram has been produced to show the flows of product energy from each pyrolysis process. The result will help determine which conversion process would be optimal for producing specific products of bio-char, bio-oil, and gas depending on the needs. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis products from auger, batch, and fluidized bed reactor were examined. • O/C ratios of bio-oils stayed in specific ranges depending on the process reactors. • The largest quantity of bio-oil from fluidized, while the best quality from batch. • The highest alkali concentration of 37 g/kg included in the auger based bio-char. • Sankey diagram was used to understand the energy distribution from reactors.

  12. Thermal characteristics analysis of microwaves reactor for pyrolysis of used cooking oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Samsudin; Shahadati, Laily; Sumbodo, Wirawan; Wahyudi

    2017-03-01

    The research is objected to develop microwave reactor for pyrolysis of used cooking oil. The effect of microwave power as well as addition of char as absorber towards its thermal characteristic were investigated. Domestic microwave was modified and used to test the thermal characteristic of used cooking oil in the terms of temperature evolution, heating rate, and thermal efficiency. The samples were examined under various microwave power of 347W, 399W, 572W and 642W for 25 minutes of irradiation time. The char loading was tested in the level of 0, 50, and 100 g. Microwave reactor consists of microwave unit with a maximum power of 642W, a ceramic reactor, and a condenser equipped with temperature measurement system was successfully developed. It was found that microwave power and addition of absorber significantly influenced the thermal characteristic of microwave reactor. Under investigated condition, the optimum result was obtained at microwave power of 642W and 100 g of char. The condition was able to provide temperature of 480°C, heating rate of 18.2°C/min and thermal efficiency of 53% that is suitable to pyrolyze used cooking oil.

  13. Demonstration of the waste tire pyrolysis process on pilot scale in a continuous auger reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Juan Daniel; Murillo, Ramón; García, Tomás; Veses, Alberto

    2013-10-15

    This work shows the technical feasibility for valorizing waste tires by pyrolysis using a pilot scale facility with a nominal capacity of 150 kWth. A continuous auger reactor was operated to perform thirteen independent experiments that conducted to the processing of more than 500 kg of shredded waste tires in 100 h of operation. The reaction temperature was 550°C and the pressure was 1 bar in all the runs. Under these conditions, yields to solid, liquid and gas were 40.5 ± 0.3, 42.6 ± 0.1 and 16.9 ± 0.3 wt.% respectively. Ultimate and proximate analyses as well as heating value analysis were conducted for both the solid and liquid fraction. pH, water content, total acid number (TAN), viscosity and density were also assessed for the liquid and compared to the specifications of marine fuels (standard ISO 8217). Gas chromatography was used to calculate the composition of the gaseous fraction. It was observed that all these properties remained practically invariable along the experiments without any significant technical problem. In addition, the reaction enthalpy necessary to perform the waste tire pyrolysis process (907.1 ± 40.0 kJ/kg) was determined from the combustion and formation enthalpies of waste tire and conversion products. Finally, a mass balance closure was performed showing an excellent reliability of the data obtained from the experimental campaign. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid pyrolysis of wheat straw in a Bench-Scale circulating Fluidized-Bed downer reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, T. [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Li, S.; Xie, J.; Song, W.; Yao, J.; Lin, W. [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-12-15

    The effects of acid washing treatment on the pyrolysis product distribution and product properties were investigated in a bench-scale circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) downer reactor with wheat straw as feedstock. The acid treatment not only removes most of the inorganic species present in the biomass but also alters the distribution of the remaining organic constituents. It was found that the removal of the inorganic species increases the yield of liquid product and reduces char formation and gas yield. CO and CO{sub 2} are the dominant components in the gaseous product, accounting for over 90 %. The concentration of CO in the gaseous product increases after acid treatment, while the CO{sub 2} concentration decreases. The oxygen and water contents in the liquid product are decreased on acid treatment, leading to a relatively high heating value and viscosity. More volatiles can be found in the char derived from the acid-treated wheat straw than from the raw wheat straw. This may suggest that a longer residence time is needed for pyrolysis of the acid-treated wheat straw in order to obtain the maximal yield of volatile matter. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Improved annular centrifugal contactor for solvent extraction reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, G.J.; Leonard, R.A.; Ziegler, A.A.; Steindler, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    An improved annular centrifugal contactor has been developed for solvent extraction reprocessing of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The design is an extension of a contactor developed several years ago at Argonne National Laboratory. Its distinguishing features are high throughput, high stage efficiency and the ability to handle a broad range of aqueous-to-organic phase flow ratios and density ratios. Direct coupling of the mixing and separating rotor to a motorized spindle simplifies the design and makes the contactor particularly suitable for remote maintenance. A unit that is critically safe by geometry is under test and a larger unit is being fabricated. Multi-stage miniature contactors operating on the annular mixing principle are being used for laboratory flow sheet studies. 8 figures

  16. Particulate Filtration from Emissions of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly Reactor Using Regenerable Porous Metal Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Abney, Morgan; Greenwood, Zachary; West, Philip; Mitchell, Karen; Vijayakumar, R.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2017-01-01

    Microwave-based plasma pyrolysis technology is being studied as a means of supporting oxygen recovery in future spacecraft life support systems. The process involves the conversion of methane produced from a Sabatier reactor to acetylene and hydrogen, with a small amount of solid carbon particulates generated as a side product. The particles must be filtered before the acetylene is removed and the hydrogen-rich gas stream is recycled back to the CRA. We discuss developmental work on porous metal media filters for removing the carbon particulate emissions from the PPA exit gas stream and to provide in situ media regeneration capability. Because of the high temperatures involved in oxidizing the deposited carbon during regeneration, there was particular focus in this development on the materials that could be used, the housing design, and heating methods. This paper describes the design and operation of the filter and characterizes their performance from integrated testing at the Environmental Chamber (E-Chamber) at MSFC.

  17. Flash pyrolysis of agricultural residues using a plasma heated laminar entrained flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu Shuangning; Yi Weiming; Li Baoming

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the volatilization characteristics of biomass particles at flash heating rates, a plasma heated laminar entrained flow reactor (PHLEFR) was designed and built in our lab. Two agricultural residues, wheat straw and corn stalk, were chosen as feedstock for pyrolysis which were conducted on the PHLEFR with the aim of determining the extent of thermal decomposition at high heating rate (more than 10 4o Cs -1 ). Based on the experimental data, a first order kinetic model was introduced and the relevant kinetic parameters (apparent active energy and apparent frequency factor) were determined for the two straws: E=31.51kJmol -1 , A=1028s -1 (wheat straw) and E=33.74kJmol -1 , A=1013s -1 (corn stalk). The predicted conversion of the fitted model to the experimental data provided general agreements when one considered the experimental errors

  18. Fuel gas and char from pyrolysis of waste paper in a microwave plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khongkrapan, Parin; Thanompongchart, Patipat; Tippayawong, Nakorn; Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a microwave plasma reactor was used for pyrolysis of waste papers. The effects of different argon flow rates on char and gas generation were investigated. Changes in carbon and oxygen contents from those in paper to char were significant. Char yield of over 25 % was obtained with the heating value of about 38 MJ/kg. Average gas yield and total content of combustible fraction (CO, CH4 and H2) in the gas product were 2.56 m3/kg and 36 %, respectively. The heating value of gas product and carbon conversion efficiency of the process were maximum at 6.0 MJ/m3 and 73 %, respectively.

  19. Successful scaling-up of self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass under pool-type reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Juferi; Shirai, Yoshihito; Andou, Yoshito; Mohd Ali, Ahmad Amiruddin; Othman, Mohd Ridzuan; Ibrahim, Izzudin; Yamamoto, Akio; Yasuda, Nobuhiko; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    An appropriate technology for waste utilisation, especially for a large amount of abundant pressed-shredded oil palm empty fruit bunch (OFEFB), is important for the oil palm industry. Self-sustained pyrolysis, whereby oil palm biomass was combusted by itself to provide the heat for pyrolysis without an electrical heater, is more preferable owing to its simplicity, ease of operation and low energy requirement. In this study, biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass in the form of oil palm empty fruit bunch was tested in a 3-t large-scale pool-type reactor. During the pyrolysis process, the biomass was loaded layer by layer when the smoke appeared on the top, to minimise the entrance of oxygen. This method had significantly increased the yield of biochar. In our previous report, we have tested on a 30-kg pilot-scale capacity under self-sustained pyrolysis and found that the higher heating value (HHV) obtained was 22.6-24.7 MJ kg(-1) with a 23.5%-25.0% yield. In this scaled-up study, a 3-t large-scale procedure produced HHV of 22.0-24.3 MJ kg(-1) with a 30%-34% yield based on a wet-weight basis. The maximum self-sustained pyrolysis temperature for the large-scale procedure can reach between 600 °C and 700 °C. We concluded that large-scale biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis was successfully conducted owing to the comparable biochar produced, compared with medium-scale and other studies with an electrical heating element, making it an appropriate technology for waste utilisation, particularly for the oil palm industry. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Optimization of process parameters in flash pyrolysis of waste tyres to liquid and gaseous fuel in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwin Raj, R.; Robert Kennedy, Z.; Pillai, B.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-recyclable, hazards, under-utilized waste tyre was converted to useful fuel. ► Design of experiment was used to optimize the process parameters. ► Fuel compatibility for IC engines was tested by standard fuel testing procedures. ► Optimized process parameters were tested and the empirical model validated. - Abstract: Pyrolysis process offers solution to utilize huge quantity of worn out automobile tyres to produce fuel for energy needs. Shredded tyre wastes were subjected to pyrolysis at atmospheric pressure under inert gas atmosphere in a fluidized bed combustion setup. The shredded tyre particle size, the feed rate of the feed stock, and the pyrolysis temperature were varied systematically as per the designed experiment to study their influence on product yield. Maximizing the oil yield and subduing the gas and char yield is the objective to optimize the process parameters. A low pyrolysis temperature of 440 °C with low feed rate increases the residence time in the combustion reactor yielding maximum oil. The physical properties of raw pyrolysis oil, distilled oil and the evolved gases were done to find its suitability to utilize them as alternatives to the conventional fuels

  1. Fast pyrolysis of creosote treated wood ties in a fluidized bed reactor and analytical characterization of product fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Su-Hwa; Koo, Won-Mo; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2013-01-01

    A fraction of creosote treated wood ties was pyrolyzed in a pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor and char-separation system at different temperatures. Analyses of each pyrolysis product, especially the oil, were carried out using a variety of analytical tools. The maximum oil yield was obtained at 458 °C with a value of 69.3 wt%. Oils obtained were easily separated into two phases, a creosote-derived fraction (CDF) and a wood-derived fraction (WDF). Major compounds of the WDF were acetic acid, furfural and levoglucosan, while the CDF was mainly composed of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as 1-methylnaphthalene, biphenyl, acenaphthene, dibenzofuran, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene. HPLC analysis showed that the concentration of PAHs of the CDF obtained at 458 °C constituted about 22.5 wt% of the oil. - Highlights: • Creosote treated wood ties was stably pyrolyzed in a fluidized bed reactor. • Pyrolysis oil contained extremely low metal content due to the char removal system. • Bio-oil components was quantitatively analyzed by relative response factor. • Creosote-derived pyrolysis oil fraction was composed of PHAs and has a high caloric value (39 MJ/kg)

  2. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydary, J., E-mail: juma.haydary@stuba.sk [Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Susa, D.; Dudáš, J. [Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of aseptic packages was carried out in a laboratory flow reactor. ► Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields was obtained. ► Composition of the pyrolysis products was estimated. ► Secondary thermal and catalytic decomposition of tars was studied. ► Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  3. Pyrolysis of the lignocellulose fermentation residue by fixed-bed micro reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ze; Lin, Weigang; Song, Wenli; Wu, Xuexing

    2012-01-01

    Thermal gravimetric (TG) analysis was conducted to compare the fundamental pyrolytic behaviors between the lignocellulose fermentation residue (LFR) and three other biomass raw materials. It was found that the TG weight loss curve of LFR appeared very close to the curve of acidified alkaline lignin (AAL), but different to the material of dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS, also a fermentation residue but obtained from liquor producing process). Pyrolysis of LFR by fixed-bed micro reactor in the range of 430 °C–700 °C was carried out. It was found that the liquid yield had a maximum value at the pyrolytic temperature of 475 °C. The oil phase of the liquid was mainly composed of phenols, and the content of dimethyl phenol and fatty acids decreased with increasing pyrolytic temperature. In the aqueous liquid, besides the most abundant phenol derivatives, small acids and nitrogen containing compounds appeared more. -- Highlights: ► The tense of the paper has been revised. ► The description of the experimental procedure was kept in past tense. ► The expression of ‘fixed bed’ was changed to ‘fixed-bed’.

  4. Synergetic effect of sewage sludge and biomass co-pyrolysis: A combined study in thermogravimetric analyzer and a fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xuebin; Deng, Shuanghui; Tan, Houzhang; Adeosun, Adewale; Vujanović, Milan; Yang, Fuxin; Duić, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The synergetic effect of sewage sludge and wheat straw co-pyrolysis was studied. • The mass balance measurement of gas, tar, and char was performed. • The synergetic effect shows strongest under a certain biomass addition ratio around 60%. • The required heat of co-pyrolysis is significantly reduced. - Abstract: Much attention has been given to the valuable products from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge. In this study, the pyrolysis of sewage sludge, biomass (wheat straw) and their mixtures in different proportions were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and percentage of wheat straw in wheat straw–sewage sludge mixtures on product distributions in terms of gas, liquid and char and the gas composition were investigated. Results indicate that there is a significantly synergetic effect during the co-pyrolysis processes of sewage sludge and wheat straw, accelerating the pyrolysis reactions. The synergetic effect resulted in an increase in gas and liquid yields but a decrease in char yield. The gas composition and the synergetic effect degree are strongly affected by the wheat straw proportions, and the strongest synergetic effect of sewage sludge and wheat straw co-pyrolysis appears at the biomass proportion of 60 wt.%. With an increase of temperature, the gas yield from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge increased but the liquid and char yields decreased. Moreover, the required heat of co-pyrolysis is significantly reduced compared with the pyrolysis of sewage sludge and wheat straw pyrolysis alone, because of the exothermic reactions between the ash components in two fuel samples.

  5. Influence of fast pyrolysis temperature on biochar labile fraction and short-term carbon loss in a loamy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Ibrahim, Norazana

    2011-01-01

    Production of bio-oil, gas and biochar from pyrolysis of biomass is considered a promising technology for combined production of bioenergy and recalcitrant carbon (C) suitable for sequestration in soil. Using a fast pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) the present study investigated the relation...... between fast pyrolysis of wheat straw at different reactor temperatures and the short-term degradability of biochar in soil. After 115 days incubation 3–12% of the added biochar-C had been emitted as CO2. On average, 90% of the total biochar-C loss occurred within the first 20 days of the experiment......, emphasizing the importance of knowing the biochar labile fraction when evaluating a specific biochars C sequestration potential. The pyrolysis temperature influenced the outputs of biochar, bio-oil and syngas significantly, as well as the stability of the biochar produced. Contrary to slow pyrolysis a fast...

  6. Centrifugal pump assembly for use in nuclear reactor plants or the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honold, E.; Ruepp, M.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a vertical centrifugal pump assembly for use as a primary recirculating pump in a nuclear reactor plant which has an uppermost shaft which is driven by a motor, a lowermost shaft which drives the impeller of the pump, and an intermediate shaft which is movable axially between the uppermost and lowermost shafts and carries a housing for radial and/or thrust bearings. A rigid coupling between the lowermost shaft and the intermediate shaft is disengaged when the intermediate shaft is lifted to thereby afford access to certain parts of the lowermost shaft. The uppermost shaft can drive the intermediate shaft through the medium of a flexible coupling having coupling elements mounted on the lower end of the uppermost shaft and the upper end of the intermediate shaft, and a distancing sleeve whose internal threads are in permanent mesh with external threads of the two coupling elements. A shroud which surrounds the flexible coupling has a maximum-diameter tubular section rigid with the housing for the bearings, a minimum-diameter tubular section rigid with but detachable from the casing of the motor, and a median tubular section which penetrates into the maximum-diameter section when the intermediate shaft is lifted. When the minimum-diameter section is detached from the casing of the motor, it can be slid, together with the intermediate section, into the maximum-diameter section to thereby afford access to the flexible coupling. The rigid coupling has two coaxial coupling elements which are mounted at the upper end of the pump shaft and the lower end of the intermediate shaft and may have teeth which mate when the intermediate shaft assumes its lower end position in which it can drive the pump

  7. Studies on Pyrolysis Kinetic of Newspaper Wastes in a Packed Bed Reactor: Experiments, Modeling, and Product Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper waste was pyrolysed in a 50 mm diameter and 640 mm long reactor placed in a packed bed pyrolyser from 573 K to 1173 K in nitrogen atmosphere to obtain char and pyro-oil. The newspaper sample was also pyrolysed in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA under the same experimental conditions. The pyrolysis rate of newspaper was observed to decelerate above 673 K. A deactivation model has been attempted to explain this behaviour. The parameters of kinetic model of the reactions have been determined in the temperature range under study. The kinetic rate constants of volatile and char have been determined in the temperature range under study. The activation energies 25.69 KJ/mol, 27.73 KJ/mol, 20.73 KJ/mol and preexponential factors 7.69 min−1, 8.09 min−1, 0.853 min−1 of all products (solid reactant, volatile, and char have been determined, respectively. A deactivation model for pyrolysis of newspaper has been developed under the present study. The char and pyro-oil obtained at different pyrolysis temperatures have been characterized. The FT-IR analyses of pyro-oil have been done. The higher heating values of both pyro-products have been determined.

  8. Bio-oil production from dry sewage sludge by fast pyrolysis in an electrically-heated fluidized bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato O. Arazo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of bio-oil produced from sewage sludge using fast pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Effects of temperature, sludge particle size and vapor residence time on bio-oil properties, such as yield, high heating value (HHV and moisture content were evaluated through experimental and statistical analyses. Characterization of the pyrolysis products (bio-oil and biogas was also done. Optimum conditions produced a bio-oil product with an HHV that is nearly twice as much as lignocellulosic-derived bio-oil, and with properties comparable to heavy fuel oil. Contrary to generally acidic bio-oil, the sludge-derived bio-oil has almost neutral pH which could minimize the pipeline and engine corrosions. The Fourier Transform Infrared and gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses of bio-oil showed a dominant presence of gasoline-like compounds. These results demonstrate that fast pyrolysis of sewage sludge from domestic wastewater treatment plant is a favorable technology to produce biofuels for various applications.

  9. Bio-Oil Production from Fast Pyrolysis of Corn Wastes and Eucalyptus Wood in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A Ebrahimi-Nik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fast pyrolysis is an attractive technology for biomass conversion, from which bio-oil is the preferred product with a great potential for use in industry and transport. Corn wastes (cob and stover and eucalyptus wood are widely being produced throughout the world. In this study, fast pyrolysis of these two materials were examined under the temperature of 500 °C; career gas flow rate of 660 l h-1; particle size of 1-2 mm; 80 and 110 g h-1 of feed rate. The experiments were carried out in a continuous fluidized bed reactor. Pyrolysis vapor was condensed in 3 cooling traps (15, 0 and -40 °C plus an electrostatic one. Eucalyptus wood was pyrolyised to 12.4, 61.4, and 26.2 percent of bio-char, bio-oil and gas, respectively while these figures were as 20.15, 49.9, and 29.95 for corn wastes. In all experiments, the bio-oil obtained from electrostatic trap was a dark brown and highly viscose liquid.

  10. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor: Co-feeding with methanol in a multi-zone fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadieraghi, Masoud; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aromatics yield improved with increasing H/C eff ratio of the feed. • HZSM-5 catalyst was an effective catalyst for in-situ bio-oil upgrading. • Biomass/methanol co-feeding attenuated the coke formation. • Methanol co-feeding enhanced the bio-oil quality. - Abstract: The in-situ catalytic upgrading of the biomass pyrolysis vapor and its mixture with methanol were conducted in a fixed bed multi-zone reactor. The steps were comprised; thermally converting the biomass in the pyrolysis reactor, passing its vapor in contact with the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst in the presence of methanol vapor, and transformation of the resulting upgraded pyrolysis vapor into the liquid product. The biomass pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis vapor upgrading were performed at 500 °C. The highly valuable chemicals production was a function of the hydrogen to carbon effective ratio (H/C eff ) of the feed. This ratio was regulated by changing the relative amount of biomass and methanol. More aromatic hydrocarbons (50.02 wt.%) and less coke deposition on the catalyst (1.3 wt.%) were yielded from the biomass, when methanol was co-fed to the catalytic pyrolysis process (H/C eff = 1.35). In this contribution, the deposited coke on the catalyst was profoundly investigated. The coke, with high contents of oxo-aromatics and aromatic compounds, was generated by polymerization of biomass lignin derived components activated by catalyst acid sites

  11. Toxic waste treatment with sliding centrifugal plasma reactor; Tratamiento de residuos toxicos con reactores de plasma centrifugo deslizante (PCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, J.; Pacheco, M.; Valdivia, R.; Ramos, F.; Duran, M.; Hidalgo, M.; Cruz, A.; Martinez, J. C.; Martinez, R.; De la Cruz, S.; Flores, T.; Vidal, E.; Escobar, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garduno, M.; Garcia, M.; Portillo, J.; Torres, C.; Estrada, N.; Velazquez, S.; Vasquez, C. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Instituto Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho la Virgen, Metepec 52140, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The aim is to develop technology for hazardous waste treatment, including the building and putting into operation of a prototype based on a sliding centrifugal plasma technology to demonstrate its ability to degradation taking in account the existing environmental standards. (Author)

  12. Hydrocarbon pyrolysis reactor experimentation and modeling for the production of solar absorbing carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, Lee Thomas

    Much of combustion research focuses on reducing soot particulates in emissions. However, current research at San Diego State University (SDSU) Combustion and Solar Energy Laboratory (CSEL) is underway to develop a high temperature solar receiver which will utilize carbon nanoparticles as a solar absorption medium. To produce carbon nanoparticles for the small particle heat exchange receiver (SPHER), a lab-scale carbon particle generator (CPG) has been built and tested. The CPG is a heated ceramic tube reactor with a set point wall temperature of 1100-1300°C operating at 5-6 bar pressure. Natural gas and nitrogen are fed to the CPG where natural gas undergoes pyrolysis resulting in carbon particles. The gas-particle mixture is met downstream with dilution air and sent to the lab scale solar receiver. To predict soot yield and general trends in CPG performance, a model has been setup in Reaction Design CHEMKIN-PRO software. One of the primary goals of this research is to accurately measure particle properties. Mean particle diameter, size distribution, and index of refraction are calculated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and a Diesel Particulate Scatterometer (DPS). Filter samples taken during experimentation are analyzed to obtain a particle size distribution with SEM images processed in ImageJ software. These results are compared with the DPS, which calculates the particle size distribution and the index of refraction from light scattering using Mie theory. For testing with the lab scale receiver, a particle diameter range of 200-500 nm is desired. Test conditions are varied to understand effects of operating parameters on particle size and the ability to obtain the size range. Analysis of particle loading is the other important metric for this research. Particle loading is measured downstream of the CPG outlet and dilution air mixing point. The air-particle mixture flows through an extinction tube where opacity of the mixture is measured with a 532 nm

  13. Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis as precursor material for preparation of activated carbon in fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqi; Wu, Jingli; He, Tao; Wu, Jinhu

    2014-09-01

    Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis was activated by physical and chemical activation process in a fluidized bed reactor. The structure and morphology of the carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption and SEM. Effects of activation time and activation agents on the structure of activation carbon were investigated. The physically activated carbons with CO2 have BET specific surface area up to 880 m(2)/g, and exhibit microporous structure. The chemically activated carbons with H3PO4 have BET specific surface area up to 600 m(2)/g, and exhibit mesoporous structure. The surface morphology shows that physically activated carbons exhibit fibrous like structure in nature with long ridges, resembling parallel lines. Whereas chemically activated carbons have cross-interconnected smooth open pores without the fibrous like structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Catalytic biomass pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, David C.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.; Kataria, Atish; Shen, Jian-Ping

    2018-04-17

    Described herein are processes for converting a biomass starting material (such as lignocellulosic materials) into a low oxygen containing, stable liquid intermediate that can be refined to make liquid hydrocarbon fuels. More specifically, the process can be a catalytic biomass pyrolysis process wherein an oxygen removing catalyst is employed in the reactor while the biomass is subjected to pyrolysis conditions. The stream exiting the pyrolysis reactor comprises bio-oil having a low oxygen content, and such stream may be subjected to further steps, such as separation and/or condensation to isolate the bio-oil.

  15. Fractional condensation of biomass pyrolysis vapors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Garcia Perez, M.; Wang, Zhouhong; Oudenhoven, Stijn; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the possibilities to steer the composition and, thus, the quality of pyrolysis liquids by the reactor temperature and the pyrolysis vapor condenser temperature. Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized-bed pyrolysis reactor operated at 330 or 480 °C. The

  16. Production of bio-oil with low contents of copper and chlorine by fast pyrolysis of alkaline copper quaternary-treated wood in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Won-Mo; Jung, Su-Hwa; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of ACQ (alkaline copper quaternary)-treated wood was carried out in a bench-scale pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor and char separation system. This study focused on the production of a bio-oil with low copper and chlorine contents, especially by adopting the fractional condensation of bio-oil using water condensers, an impact separator and an electrostatic precipitator. In addition, various analytical tools were applied to investigate the physicochemical properties of the pyrolysis products and the behavior of the preservative during pyrolysis. The bio-oil yield was maximized at 63.7 wt% at a pyrolysis temperature of 411 °C. Highly water-soluble holocellulose-derived components such as acetic acid and hydroxyacetone were mainly collected by the condensers, while lignin-derived components and levoglucosan were mainly observed in the oils collected by the impact separator and electrostatic precipitator. All the bio-oils produced in the experiments were almost free of copper and chlorine. Most copper in ACQ was transferred into the char. - Highlights: • ACQ(alkaline copper quaternary)-treated wood was successfully pyrolyzed in a bench-scale fluidized bed. • Bio-oils separately collected were different in their characteristics. • Bio-oils were free of didecyldimethylammonium chloride. • Bio oils were almost free of copper and chlorine. • The concentration of levoglucosan in a bio-oil was 24–31 wt%

  17. In-reactor behaviour of centrifugally atomized U3Si dispersion fuel irradiated at high temperature in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Park, Jong Man; Yoo, Byeong Ok; Park, Dae Kyu; Lee, Choong Sung; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2002-01-01

    The irradiation test on full-size U 3 Si dispersion fuel elements, prepared by centrifugal atomization and conventional comminution method, has been performed up to about 77 at.% U-235 in maximum burn-up at CT hole position having the highest power condition in the HANARO reactor, in order to examine the irradiation performance of the atomized U 3 Si for the driver fuels of HANARO. The in-reactor interaction of the atomized U 3 Si dispersion fuel meats is generally assumed to be acceptable with the range of 5-15 μm in average thickness. The atomized spherical particles have more uniform and thinner reaction layer than the comminuted irregular particles. The U 3 Si particles have relatively fine and uniform size distribution of fission gas bubbles, irrespective of the powdering method. The bubble population in the atomized particles appears to be finer and more homogeneous with the characteristics of narrower bubble size distribution than that of the comminuted fuel. The atomized U 3 Si dispersion fuel elements exhibit sound swelling behaviours of 5 % in ΔV/V m even at ∼77 at.% U-235 burn-up, which meets with the safety criterion of the fuel rod, 20vol.% for HANARO. The atomized U3Si dispersion fuel elements show smaller swelling than the comminuted fuel elements

  18. Thermo-catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene bottles in a packed bed reactor with different bed materials and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obeid, Farah; Zeaiter, Joseph; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala’a H.; Bouhadir, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene bottles was investigated. • The highest yield of liquid (82%) was obtained over a cement powder bed. • Acidic catalysts narrowed the carbon chain length of the paraffins to C 10 –C 28 . • Combination of cement bed with HBeta catalyst gave the highest yield of liquid. • Significant yield of aromatics was obtained mainly naphthalene and D-limonene. - Abstract: Plastic waste is an increasing economic and environmental problem as such there is a great need to process this waste and reduce its environmental impact. In this work, the pyrolysis of high density polyethylene (HDPE) waste products was investigated using both thermal and catalytic cracking techniques. The experimental work was carried out using packed bed reactor operating under an inert atmosphere at 450 °C. Different reactor bed materials, including sand, cement and white clay were used to enhance the thermal cracking of HDPE. In addition, the catalytic effect of sodium hydroxide, HUSY and HBeta zeolite catalysts on the degradation of HDPE waste was also investigated. The reactor beds were found to significantly alter the yield as well as the product composition. Products such as paraffins (⩽C 44 ), olefins (⩽C 22 ), aromatics (⩽C 14 ) and alcohols (C 16 and C 17 ) were obtained at varying rates. The highest yield of liquid (82%) was obtained over a cement powder bed with a paraffin yield of 58%. The yield of paraffins and olefins followed separate paths, for paraffins it was found to increase in the order or Cement > White clay > Silica Sand, whereas for the olefins it was in the reverse order Silica Sand > White clay > Cement. The results obtained in this work exhibited a higher P/O ratio than expected, where the amount of generated paraffins was greater than 60% in most cases. Less olefin was generated as a consequence. This indicates that the product generated is more suited to be used as a fuel rather than as a chemical

  19. Fast pyrolysis of corn stovers with ceramic ball heat carriers in a novel dual concentric rotary cylinder reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peng; Bai, Xueyuan; Li, Zhihe; Yi, Weiming; Li, Yongjun; Zhang, Yuchun

    2018-05-09

    Fast pyrolysis of corn stovers with ceramic ball heat carriers in a dual concentric rotary cylinder reactor was studied to explore the product yields and characteristics in response to temperature. The reactor was confirmed to successfully scale up to a 25 kg/h pilot plant, with its performance being excellent. The highest bio-oil yield of 48.3 wt% at 500 °C was attained with the char and gas yields being 26.8 and 24.9 wt%. Phenols content was reduced from 22.3% to 18.9% when elevating temperature from 450 until 600 °C, with guaiacols and alkyl phenols being the predominant compounds, while ketones accounted for 15.8-23.0% and their content showed a continuous increase, with hydroxyacetone being the paramount ketonic one. Acetic acid was the dominant acidic compound with its peak content of 9.4% at 500 °C. The char characteristics in response to temperatures were determined for subsequent processing and high value-added utilization. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Co-production of furfural and acetic acid from corncob using ZnCl2 through fast pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Jin; Jung, Su-Hwa; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2013-09-01

    Corncob was pyrolyzed using ZnCl2 in a pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor to co-produce furfural and acetic acid. The effects of reaction conditions, the ZnCl2 content and contacting method of ZnCl2 with corncob on the yields of furfural and acetic acid were investigated. The pyrolysis was performed within the temperature range between 310 and 410°C, and the bio-oil yield were 30-60 wt% of the product. The furfural yield increased up to 8.2 wt%. The acetic acid yield was maximized with a value of 13.1 wt%. A lower feed rate in the presence of ZnCl2 was advantageous for the production of acetic acid. The fast pyrolysis of a smaller corncob sample mechanically mixed with 20 wt% of ZnCl2 gave rise to a distinct increase in furfural. A high selectivity for furfural and acetic acid in bio-oil would make the pyrolysis of corncob with ZnCl2 very economically attractive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pyrolysis of biomass in a semi-industrial scale reactor: Study of the fuel-nitrogen oxidation during combustion of volatiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mura, E.; Debono, O.; Villot, A.; Paviet, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, an experimental study of the NOx-fuel formation, carried out on a semi-industrial scale reactor during combustion of volatiles of the pyrolysis, is performed. Two different biomasses with different nitrogen contents such as a mixture of organic sludge and wood were tested. Results show that the temperature of pyrolysis does not obviously affect the production of NOx-fuel because of the most active precursors (NH 3 and HCN) are already released at low temperatures (400 °C). In the case of sludge mixture, the combustion conditions play the discriminating role in the production of NOx-fuel: the higher the excess air ratio the larger the production of nitrogen oxides from N-fuel. -- Highlights: • An experimental study of the pyrolysis of biomass from waste has been carried out. • The study consists in the analysis of NOx-fuel production during combustion. • The temperature of pyrolysis does not affect the production of NOx. • Only a small part of the N-fuel released in the volatile fraction is oxidized. • In the case of sewage sludge the excess air ratio affects the NOx production

  2. Optimization of the pyrolysis process of empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a fixed-bed reactor through a central composite design (CCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Alina Rahayu; Hamzah, Zainab; Daud, Mohamed Zulkali Mohamed

    2014-07-01

    The production of crude palm oil from the processing of palm fresh fruit bunches in the palm oil mills in Malaysia hs resulted in a huge quantity of empty fruit bunch (EFB) accumulated. The EFB was used as a feedstock in the pyrolysis process using a fixed-bed reactor in the present study. The optimization of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature (factor A), biomass particle size (factor B) and holding time (factor C) were investigated through Central Composite Design (CCD) using Stat-Ease Design Expert software version 7 with bio-oil yield considered as the response. Twenty experimental runs were conducted. The results were completely analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The model was statistically significant. All factors studied were significant with p-values oil from EFB pyrolysis process. A quadratic model equation was developed and employed to predict the highest theoretical bio-oil yield. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.2 % was achieved at pyrolysis temperature of 442.15 °C using the EFB particle size of 866 μm which corresponded to the EFB particle size in the range of 710-1000 μm and holding time of 483 seconds.

  3. Optimization of the pyrolysis process of empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a fixed-bed reactor through a central composite design (CCD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Alina Rahayu; Hamzah, Zainab; Daud, Mohamed Zulkali Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The production of crude palm oil from the processing of palm fresh fruit bunches in the palm oil mills in Malaysia hs resulted in a huge quantity of empty fruit bunch (EFB) accumulated. The EFB was used as a feedstock in the pyrolysis process using a fixed-bed reactor in the present study. The optimization of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature (factor A), biomass particle size (factor B) and holding time (factor C) were investigated through Central Composite Design (CCD) using Stat-Ease Design Expert software version 7 with bio-oil yield considered as the response. Twenty experimental runs were conducted. The results were completely analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The model was statistically significant. All factors studied were significant with p-values 2 was 0.9564 which indicated that the selected factors and its levels showed high correlation to the production of bio-oil from EFB pyrolysis process. A quadratic model equation was developed and employed to predict the highest theoretical bio-oil yield. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.2 % was achieved at pyrolysis temperature of 442.15 °C using the EFB particle size of 866 μm which corresponded to the EFB particle size in the range of 710–1000 μm and holding time of 483 seconds

  4. Application of 1D and 2D MFR reactor technology for the isolation of insecticidal and anti-microbial properties from pyrolysis bio-oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad M; Scott, Ian M; Berruti, Franco; Briens, Cedric

    2016-12-01

    Valuable chemicals can be separated from agricultural residues by chemical or thermochemical processes. The application of pyrolysis has already been demonstrated as an efficient means to produce a liquid with a high concentration of desired product. The objective of this study was to apply an insect and microorganism bioassay-guided approach to separate and isolate pesticidal compounds from bio-oil produced through biomass pyrolysis. Tobacco leaf (Nicotianata bacum), tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum), and spent coffee (Coffea arabica) grounds were pyrolyzed at 10°C/min from ambient to 565°C using the mechanically fluidized reactor (MFR). With one-dimensional (1D) MFR pyrolysis, the composition of the product vapors varied as the reactor temperature was raised allowing for the selection of the temperature range that corresponds to vapors with a high concentration of pesticidal properties. Further product separation was performed in a fractional condensation train, or 2D MFR pyrolysis, thus allowing for the separation of vapor components according to their condensation temperature. The 300-400°C tobacco and tomato bio-oil cuts from the 1D MFR showed the highest insecticidal and anti-microbial activity compared to the other bio-oil cuts. The 300-350 and 350-400°C bio-oil cuts produced by 2D MFR had the highest insecticidal activity when the bio-oil was collected from the 210°C condenser. The tobacco and tomato bio-oil had similar insecticidal activity (LC 50 of 2.1 and 2.2 mg/mL) when the bio-oil was collected in the 210°C condenser from the 300-350°C reactor temperature gases. The 2D MFR does concentrate the pesticidal products compared to the 1D MFR and thus can reduce the need for further separation steps such as solvent extraction.

  5. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  6. Ex situ themo-catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors using a traveling wave microwave reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microwave heating offers a number of advantages over conventional heating methods, such as, rapid and volumetric heating, precise temperature control, energy efficiency and lower temperature gradient. In this article we demonstrate the use of 2450 MHz microwave traveling wave reactor to heat the cat...

  7. Optimization of the pyrolysis process of empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a fixed-bed reactor through a central composite design (CCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Alina Rahayu; Hamzah, Zainab; Daud, Mohamed Zulkali Mohamed [School of Bioprocess Engineering, Jejawi Complex of Academics (3), UniMAP, 02600 Arau Perlis (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The production of crude palm oil from the processing of palm fresh fruit bunches in the palm oil mills in Malaysia hs resulted in a huge quantity of empty fruit bunch (EFB) accumulated. The EFB was used as a feedstock in the pyrolysis process using a fixed-bed reactor in the present study. The optimization of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature (factor A), biomass particle size (factor B) and holding time (factor C) were investigated through Central Composite Design (CCD) using Stat-Ease Design Expert software version 7 with bio-oil yield considered as the response. Twenty experimental runs were conducted. The results were completely analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The model was statistically significant. All factors studied were significant with p-values < 0.05. The pyrolysis temperature (factor A) was considered as the most significant parameter because its F-value of 116.29 was the highest. The value of R{sup 2} was 0.9564 which indicated that the selected factors and its levels showed high correlation to the production of bio-oil from EFB pyrolysis process. A quadratic model equation was developed and employed to predict the highest theoretical bio-oil yield. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.2 % was achieved at pyrolysis temperature of 442.15 °C using the EFB particle size of 866 μm which corresponded to the EFB particle size in the range of 710–1000 μm and holding time of 483 seconds.

  8. Pyrolysis of safflower (Charthamus tinctorius L.) seed press cake in a fixed-bed reactor: part 2. Structural characterization of pyrolysis bio-oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensöz, Sevgi; Angin, Dilek

    2008-09-01

    Biomass in the form of agricultural residues is becoming popular among new renewable energy sources, especially given its wide potential and abundant usage. Pyrolysis is the most important process among the thermal conversion processes of biomass. In this study, the various characteristics of bio-oils acquired under different pyrolysis conditions from safflower seed press cake (SPC) were identified. The elemental analyses and calorific values of the bio-oils were determined, and then the chemical compositions of the bio-oils were investigated using chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques such as column chromatography, (1)H NMR, FTIR and GC. The fuel properties of the bio-oil such as kinematic viscosity, flash point, density, water content and ASTM distillation were also determined. Chemical compositions of bio-oils showed that some quantities of hydrocarbons were present, while oxygenated and polar fractions dominated. The bio-oils obtained from safflower seed press cake were presented as an environmentally friendly feedstock candidate for biofuels and chemicals.

  9. Pyrolysis of Coconut Shell: An Experimental Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ganapathy Sundaram

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fixed-bed slow pyrolysis experiments of coconut shell have been conducted to determine the effect of pyrolysis temperature, heating rate and particle size on the pyrolysis product yields. The effect of vapour residence time on the pyrolysis yield was also investigated by varying the reactor length. Pyrolysis experiments were performed at pyrolysis temperature between 400 and 600°C with a constant heating rate of 60°C/min and particle sizes of 1.18-1.80 mm. The optimum process conditions for maximizing the liquid yield from the coconut shell pyrolysis in a fixed bed reactor were also identified. The highest liquid yield was obtained at a pyrolysis temperature of 550 °C, particle size of 1.18-1.80 mm, with a heating rate of 60 °C/min in a 200 mm length reactor. The yield of obtained char, liquid and gas was 22-31 wt%, 38-44 wt% and 30-33 wt% respectively at different pyrolysis conditions. The results indicate that the effects of pyrolysis temperature and particle size on the pyrolysis yield are more significant than that of heating rate and residence time. The various characteristics of pyrolysis oil obtained under the optimum conditions for maximum liquid yield were identified on the basis of standard test methods.

  10. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A., E-mail: aidabenhassen@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Kraiem, T. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Naoui, S. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Belayouni, H. [Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

  11. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A.; Kraiem, T.; Naoui, S.; Belayouni, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy

  12. Plasma centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, Takashi; Mase, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    The plasma centrifuge is one of statistical isotope separation processes which uses the centrifugal force of a J x B driven rotating plasma in a magnetic field to give rise to the mass-dependent radial transport of isotopic ions. The system has been developed as an alternative to the gas centrifuge because a much higher rotational velocity and separation factor have been achieved. In this review, the physical aspects of the plasma centrifuge followed by the recent experimental achievements are described, especially in comparison with the gas centrifuge. (author)

  13. Pyrolysis process and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Kuei

    1983-01-01

    This invention discloses a process and apparatus for pyrolyzing particulate coal by heating with a particulate solid heating media in a transport reactor. The invention tends to dampen fluctuations in the flow of heating media upstream of the pyrolysis zone, and by so doing forms a substantially continuous and substantially uniform annular column of heating media flowing downwardly along the inside diameter of the reactor. The invention is particularly useful for bituminous or agglomerative type coals.

  14. Biomass fast pyrolysis for bio-oil production in a fluidized bed reactor under hot flue atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Wang, Xiang; Bai, Xueyuan; Li, Zhihe; Zhang, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Fast pyrolysis experiments of corn stalk were performed to investigate the optimal pyrolysis conditions of temperature and bed material for maximum bio-oil production under flue gas atmosphere. Under the optimized pyrolysis conditions, furfural residue, xylose residue and kelp seaweed were pyrolyzed to examine their yield distributions of products, and the physical characteristics of bio-oil were studied. The best flow rate of the flue gas at selected temperature is obtained, and the pyrolysis temperature at 500 degrees C and dolomite as bed material could give a maximum bio-oil yield. The highest bio-oil yield of 43.3% (W/W) was achieved from corn stalk under the optimal conditions. Two main fractions were recovered from the stratified bio-oils: light oils and heavy oils. The physical properties of heavy oils from all feedstocks varied little. The calorific values of heavy oils were much higher than that of light oils. The pyrolysis gas could be used as a gaseous fuel due to a relatively high calorific value of 6.5-8.5 MJ/m3.

  15. Influence of fast pyrolysis temperature on biochar labile fraction and short-term carbon loss in a loamy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruun, Esben W.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Ibrahim, Norazana; Egsgaard, Helge; Ambus, Per; Jensen, Peter A.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Production of bio-oil, gas and biochar from pyrolysis of biomass is considered a promising technology for combined production of bioenergy and recalcitrant carbon (C) suitable for sequestration in soil. Using a fast pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) the present study investigated the relation between fast pyrolysis of wheat straw at different reactor temperatures and the short-term degradability of biochar in soil. After 115 days incubation 3-12% of the added biochar-C had been emitted as CO 2 . On average, 90% of the total biochar-C loss occurred within the first 20 days of the experiment, emphasizing the importance of knowing the biochar labile fraction when evaluating a specific biochars C sequestration potential. The pyrolysis temperature influenced the outputs of biochar, bio-oil and syngas significantly, as well as the stability of the biochar produced. Contrary to slow pyrolysis a fast pyrolysis process may result in incomplete conversion of biomass due to limitations to heat transfer and kinetics. In our case chemical analysis of the biochars revealed unconverted cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions, which in turn were found to be proportional with the short-term biochar degradation in soil. As these labile carbohydrates are rapidly mineralized, their presence lowers the biochar-C sequestration potential. By raising the pyrolysis temperature, biochar with none or low contents of these fractions can be produced, but this will be on the expense of the biochar quantity. The yield of CO 2 neutral bio-oil is the other factor to optimize when adjusting the pyrolysis temperature settings to give the overall greatest climate change mitigation effect.

  16. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  17. Centrifugal pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, HH

    1981-01-01

    Centrifugal Pumps describes the whole range of the centrifugal pump (mixed flow and axial flow pumps are dealt with more briefly), with emphasis on the development of the boiler feed pump. Organized into 46 chapters, this book discusses the general hydrodynamic principles, performance, dimensions, type number, flow, and efficiency of centrifugal pumps. This text also explains the pumps performance; entry conditions and cavitation; speed and dimensions for a given duty; and losses. Some chapters further describe centrifugal pump mechanical design, installation, monitoring, and maintenance. The

  18. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  19. Design of small centrifugal compressor test model for a supercritical CO2 compressor in the fast reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Y.; Ishizuka, T.; Aritomi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In order to clarify the CO 2 compressor performance in the vicinity of critical point, a research project has been started in Tokyo Institute of Technology based on Japanese government fund. This paper describes how fundamental parameters were selected and sizing of a small and high speed impeller of the test centrifugal compressor. The concept of canned type compressor structures provided with high speed electric motor and preliminary aerodynamic performance prediction are also given. (authors)

  20. Pyrolysis of oil palm mesocarp fiber and palm frond in a slow-heating fixed-bed reactor: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, G; Mohd Din, A T; Hameed, B H

    2017-10-01

    Oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF) and palm frond (PF) were respectively devolatilized by pyrolysis to OPMF-oil and PF-oil bio-oils and biochars, OPMF-char and PF-char in a slow-heating fixed-bed reactor. In particular, the OPMF-oil and PF-oil were produced to a maximum yield of 48wt% and 47wt% bio-oils at 550°C and 600°C, respectively. The high heating values (HHVs) of OPMF-oil and PF-oil were respectively found to be 23MJ/kg and 21MJ/kg, whereas 24.84MJ/kg and 24.15MJ/kg were for the corresponding biochar. The HHVs of the bio-oils and biochars are associated with low O/C ratios to be higher than those of the corresponding biomass. The Fourier transform infrared spectra and peak area ratios highlighted the effect of pyrolysis temperatures on the bio-oil compositions. The bio-oils are pervaded with numerous oxygenated carbonyl and aromatic compounds as suitable feedstocks for renewable fuels and chemicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characteristic and kinetics of corn stalk pyrolysis in a high pressure reactor and steam gasification of its char

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guojie; Sun, Yinghui; Shi, Yuliang; Jia, Yong; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Peiyu; Zhang, Yongfa

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of the corn stalk were investigated at different temperatures and pressures, with focus mainly on the releasing profiles and forming behaviors of gas. The results show that a higher pressure was conducive to the yield of H2 and CH4, and was not conducive to the generation of CO. Combustible gas components increase with the increase temperature. H2 concentration was affected significantly by temperature, was mainly released at higher temperatures (>500 °C). At 700 °C,...

  2. Pyrolysis of high-ash sewage sludge in a circulating fluidized bed reactor for production of liquids rich in heterocyclic nitrogenated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wu; Jin, Baosheng; Huang, Yaji; Sun, Yu; Li, Rui; Jia, Jiqiang

    2013-01-01

    A circulating fluidized bed reactor was used for pyrolyzing sewage sludge with a high ash content to produce liquids rich in heterocyclic nitrogenated compounds. GC/MS and FTIR analyses showed that heterocyclic nitrogenated compounds and hydrocarbons made up 38.5-61.21% and 2.24-17.48% of the pyrolysis liquids, respectively. A fluidized gas velocity of 1.13 m/s, a sludge feed rate of 10.78 kg/h and a particle size of 1-2mm promoted heterocyclic nitrogenated compound production. Utilizing heterocyclic nitrogenated compounds as chemical feedstock could be a way for offsetting the cost of sewage sludge treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasma centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karchevskij, A.I.; Potanin, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    The review of the most important studies on the isotope separation processes in the rotating plasma is presented. The device is described and the characteristics of operation of the pulse plasma centrifuges with weakly and strongly ionized plasma as well as the stationary plasma centrifuges with the medium weak ionization and devices, applying the stationary vacuum arc with the high ionization rate and the stationary beam-plasma discharge with complete ionization, are presented. The possible mechanisms of the isotope separation in plasma centrifuges are considered. The specific energy consumption for isotope separation in these devices is discussed [ru

  4. Thermal compatibility of U-2wt.%Mo and U-10wt.%Mo fuel prepared by centrifugal atomization for high density research reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Ki Hwan; Lee Don Bae; Kim Chang Kyu; Kuk Il Hyun; Hofman, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    Research on the intermetallic compounds of uranium was revived in 1978 with the decision by the international research reactor community to develop proliferation-resistant fuels. The reduction of 93% 235 U (HEU) to 20% 235 U (LEU) necessitates the use of higher U-loading fuels to accommodate the addition 238 U in the LEU fuels. While the vast majority of reactors can be satisfied with U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel, several high performance reactors require high loadings of up to 8-9 g U cm -3 . Consequently, in the renewed fuel development program of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program, attention has shifted to high density uranium alloys. Early irradiation experiments with uranium alloys showed promise of acceptable irradiation behavior, if these alloys can be maintained in their cubic γ-U crystal structure. It has been reported that high density atomized U-Mo powders prepared by rapid cooling have metastable isotropic γ-U phase saturated with molybdenum, and good γ-U phase stability, especially in U-10wt.%Mo alloy fuel. If the alloy has good thermal compatibility with aluminium, and this metastable gamma phase can be maintained during irradiation, U-Mo alloy would be a prime candidate for dispersion fuel for research reactors. In this paper, U-2w.%Mo and U-10w.%Mo alloy powder which have high density (above 15 g-U/cm 3 ), are prepared by centrifugal atomization. The U-Mo alloy fuel meats are made into rods extruding the atomized powders. The characteristics related to the thermal compatibility of U-2w.%Mo and U-10w.%Mo alloy fuel meat at 400 o C for time up to 2000 hours are examined. (author)

  5. Centrifuge apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartory, Walter K.; Eveleigh, John W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a continuous flow blood separation centrifuge are provided. The hematocrit of the entrant whole blood is continuously maintained at an optimum constant value by the addition of plasma to the entrant blood. The hematocrit of the separated red cells is monitored to indicate the degree of separation taking place, thereby providing a basis for regulating the flow through the centrifuge.

  6. Hydrogen Recovery by ECR Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is...

  7. Effects of slow and fast pyrolysis biochar on soil C and N turnover dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben; Ambus, Per; Egsgaard, Helge

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effect of two principal pyrolysis methods on the chemical characteristics of biochar and the impact on C and N dynamics after soil incorporation. Biochar was produced from wheat straw that was thermally decomposed at 525 °C by slow pyrolysis (SP) in a nitrogen flushed oven...... and by fast pyrolysis (FP) using a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor (PCR). After 65 days of soil incubation, 2.9% and 5.5% of the SP- and FP-biochar C, respectively, was lost as CO2, significantly less than the 53% C-loss observed when un-pyrolyzed feedstock straw was incubated. Whereas the SP-biochar appeared...... completely pyrolyzed, an un-pyrolyzed carbohydrate fraction (8.8% as determined by acid released C6 and C5 sugars) remained in the FP-biochar. This labile fraction possibly supported the higher CO2 emission and larger microbial biomass (SMB-C) in the FP-biochar soil. Application of fresh FP-biochar to soil...

  8. Characterization of the gas releasing behaviors of catalytic pyrolysis of rice husk using potassium over a micro-fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Guo, Feiqiang; Li, Xiaolei; Li, Tiantao; Guo, Chenglong; Chang, Jiafu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Releasing propensity of CO, CO 2 , CH 4 and H 2 was studied in a micro-fluidized bed. • Gas releasing pattern was influenced by temperature and potassium concentration. • Variations in gas forming E a are indicative of catalytic performance of potassium. - Abstract: Influence of potassium on the gas releasing behaviors during rice husk high-temperature pyrolysis was investigated under isothermal conditions in a two stage micro-fluidized bed reactor. Reaction kinetics for generating H 2 , CO, CO 2 and CH 4 was investigated based on the Friedman and model-fitting approaches. Results indicated that different gas species had different times to start and end the gas release process, particularly at 600 °C, representing different chemical routes and mechanics for generating these gas components. The resulting apparent activation energies for H 2 , CO, and CO 2 decreased from 23.10 to 12.00 kJ/mol, 15.48 to 14.03 kJ/mol and 10.14 to 7.61 kJ/mol respectively with an increase in potassium concentration from 0 to 0.5 mol/kg, while that for CH 4 increased from 16.85 to 19.40 kJ/mol. The results indicated that the addition of potassium could promote the generation reactions of H 2 , CO and CO 2 while hinder the generation reactions of CH 4 . The pyrolysis reaction was further found to be subject to the three-dimensional diffusion model for all the samples.

  9. Methods and apparatuses for deoxygenating pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Frey, Stanley Joseph

    2017-09-12

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for deoxygenating pyrolysis oil. A method includes contacting a pyrolysis oil with a deoxygenation catalyst in a first reactor at deoxygenation conditions to produce a first reactor effluent. The first reactor effluent has a first oxygen concentration and a first hydrogen concentration, based on hydrocarbons in the first reactor effluent, and the first reactor effluent includes an aromatic compound. The first reactor effluent is contacted with a dehydrogenation catalyst in a second reactor at conditions that deoxygenate the first reactor effluent while preserving the aromatic compound to produce a second reactor effluent. The second reactor effluent has a second oxygen concentration lower than the first oxygen concentration and a second hydrogen concentration that is equal to or lower than the first hydrogen concentration, where the second oxygen concentration and the second hydrogen concentration are based on the hydrocarbons in the second reactor effluent.

  10. Fast pyrolysis of biomass in fluidized bed reactor UNICAMP, Brazil: problems, causes and solutions; Pirolise rapida de biomassa em reator de leito fluidizado UNICAMP-Brasil: problemas, causas e solucoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesa Perez, Juan Miguel; Marin Mesa, Henry Ramon [Bioware Tecnologia, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Jose Dilcio; Olivares Gomez, Edgardo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (NIPE/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico; Cortez, Luis Augusto Barbosa; Shimabukuro, Fabio Rodrigo; Vallin, Marco Jim Gui [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola

    2006-07-01

    The fluidized bed reactor developed by the researchers of the UNICAMP in the installations of the Sugar Cane Technology Center (CTC), in Piracicaba-SP, is the first reactor of biomass fast pyrolysis in Brazil to produce bio-oil. In this work the problems of operation with the reactor in functioning are presented as the emptying of gases produced in the pyrolysis by means of the biomass feeding system, the block of the thread of biomass feeding, the inert material sintering in the bed, etc. The possible causes are described. Thus it, the first ones could be solved, either by the reduction of the height of the inert bed, or by the increase of the wadding percentage of the thread, among others. These results of the exploratory tests make possible the steady work of the plant, greater knowledge of the phenomena that occur during the fast pyrolysis in flutizide bed, as well as the establishment of adjusted levels for the identified independent factors during the remaining experimental works. (author)

  11. Extent of pyrolysis impacts on fast pyrolysis biochar properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Catherine E; Hu, Yan-Yan; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Loynachan, Thomas E; Laird, David A; Brown, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    A potential concern about the use of fast pyrolysis rather than slow pyrolysis biochars as soil amendments is that they may contain high levels of bioavailable C due to short particle residence times in the reactors, which could reduce the stability of biochar C and cause nutrient immobilization in soils. To investigate this concern, three corn ( L.) stover fast pyrolysis biochars prepared using different reactor conditions were chemically and physically characterized to determine their extent of pyrolysis. These biochars were also incubated in soil to assess their impact on soil CO emissions, nutrient availability, microorganism population growth, and water retention capacity. Elemental analysis and quantitative solid-state C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed variation in O functional groups (associated primarily with carbohydrates) and aromatic C, which could be used to define extent of pyrolysis. A 24-wk incubation performed using a sandy soil amended with 0.5 wt% of corn stover biochar showed a small but significant decrease in soil CO emissions and a decrease in the bacteria:fungi ratios with extent of pyrolysis. Relative to the control soil, biochar-amended soils had small increases in CO emissions and extractable nutrients, but similar microorganism populations, extractable NO levels, and water retention capacities. Corn stover amendments, by contrast, significantly increased soil CO emissions and microbial populations, and reduced extractable NO. These results indicate that C in fast pyrolysis biochar is stable in soil environments and will not appreciably contribute to nutrient immobilization. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Fuel performance of rod-type research reactor fuel using a centrifugally atomized U-Mo powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Yoon Sang; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2009-01-01

    A low enriched uranium nuclear fuel for research reactors has been developed in order to replace a highly enriched uranium fuel according to the non-proliferation policy under the reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) program. In KAERI, a rod-type U 3 Si dispersion fuel has been developed for a localization of the HANARO fuel and a U 3 Si/Al dispersion fuel of 3.15 gU/cc has been used at HANARO as a driver fuel since 2005. Although uranium silicide dispersion fuels such as U 3 Si 2 /Al and U 3 Si/Al are being used widely, high uranium density dispersion fuels (8-9 g/cm 3 ) are required for some high performance research reactors. U-Mo alloys have been considered as one of the most promising uranium alloys for a dispersion fuel due to their good irradiation performance. An international qualification program on U-Mo fuel to replace a uranium silicide dispersion fuel with a U-Mo dispersion fuel has been carried out

  13. Pyrolysis of biomass briquettes, modelling and experimental verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, B; Lammers, G; Beenackers, AACM; Kopetz, H; Weber, T; Palz, W; Chartier, P; Ferrero, GL

    1998-01-01

    Carbonisation of biomass briquettes was studied using a dedicated single briquette carbonisation reactor. The reactor enabled continuous measurement of the briquette mass and continuous measurement of the radial temperature profile in the briquette. Furthermore pyrolysis gas production and

  14. Controlled air pyrolysis incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufrane, K.H.; Wilke, M.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced controlled air pyrolysis incinerator has been researched, developed and placed into commercial operation for both radioactive and other combustible wastes. Engineering efforts cocentrated on providing an incinerator which emitted a clean, easily treatable off-gas and which produced a minimum amount of secondary waste. Feed material is continuously fed by gravity into the system's pyrolysis chamber without sorting, shredding, or other such pretreatment. Metal objects, liquids such as oil and gasoline, or solid products such as resins, blocks of plastic, tire, animal carcasses, or compacted trash may be included along with normal processed waste. The temperature of the waste is very gradually increased in a reduced oxygen atmosphere. Volatile pyrolysis gases are produced, tar-like substances are cracked and the resulting product, a relatively uniform, easily burnable material, is introduced into the combustion chamber. Steady burning is thus accomplished under easily controlled excess air conditions with the off-gasthen passing through a simple dry clean-up system. Gas temperatures are then reduced by air dilution before passing through final HEPA filters. Both commercial and nuclear installations have been operated with the most recent application being the central incinerator to service West Germany's nuclear reactors

  15. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor: Using a cascade system of various catalysts in a multi-zone fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadieraghi, Masoud; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A cascade system of different catalysts exhibited the best performance to produce high quality bio-oil. • Meso-HZSM-5, Ga (1 wt.%)/meso-HZSM-5 and Cu (5 wt.%)/SiO 2 were employed in a cascade system. • The incorporation of the appropriate gallium amount to meso-HZSM-5 enhanced the aromatics selectivity. • Meso-HZSM-5 indicated a very good activity in bio-oil upgrading. - Abstract: The in-situ catalytic upgrading of palm kernel shell (PKS) fast pyrolysis vapors was performed over each individual meso-H-ZSM-5, Ga/meso-HZSM-5 and Cu/SiO 2 catalyst or a cascade system of them in a multi-zone fixed bed reactor. The effects of mesoporosity creation into the parent H-ZSM-5 catalyst and also gallium incorporation into mesoporous H-ZSM-5 on the produced bio-oil chemical composition and distribution were studied. Key upgrading reactions for different oxygenated compounds in pyrolysis oil (small oxygenates, lignin derived and sugar derived components), including aldol condensation, alkylation, hydrogenation, aromatization, and deoxygenation were discussed. The catalysts were characterized using SEM, XRF, XRD, N 2 adsorption and NH 3 -TPD methods. Furthermore, the produced bio-oils (catalytic and non-catalytic) were analyzed using GC–MS, FTIR, CHNS/O elemental analyzer and Karl Fischer titration. Production of the upgraded bio-oil with lower content of oxygenated compound was the main objective of this investigation. Among different catalysts, meso-H-ZSM-5 zeolite demonstrated a very good activity in aromatization and deoxygenation during the upgrading of pyrolytic vapors, although it decreased the bio-oil yield (32.6 wt.%). The gallium incorporation into the meso-HZSM-5 zeolite increased the bio-oil yield from 32.6 wt.% (meso-HZSM-5) to 35.8 wt.% (using 1.0 wt.% Ga). Furthermore, the aromatics selectivity was enhanced when the appropriate amount of gallium (1.0 wt.%) was introduced. A cascade system of various catalysts comprising meso-HZSM-5, Ga (1

  16. Properties of bio-oil generated by a pyrolysis of forest cedar residuals with the movable Auger-type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Shun; Ebitani, Kohki, E-mail: ebitani@jaist.ac.jp [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Miyazato, Akio [Nanotechnology Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Our research project has developed the new movable reactor for bio-oil production in 2013 on the basis of Auger-type system. This package would be a great impact due to the concept of local production for local consumption in the hilly and mountainous area in not only Japan but also in the world. Herein, we would like to report the properties of the bio-oil generated by the developing Auger-type movable reactor. The synthesized bio-oil possessed C: 46.2 wt%, H: 6.5 wt%, N: wt%, S: <0.1 wt%, O: 46.8 wt% and H{sub 2}O: 18.4 wt%, and served a good calorific value of 18.1 MJ/kg. The spectroscopic and mass analyses such as FT-IR, GC-MS, {sup 13}C-NMR and FT-ICR MS supported that the bio-oil was composed by the fine mixtures of methoxy phenols and variety of alcohol or carboxylic acid functional groups. Thus, it is suggested that the bio-oil generated by the new movable Auger-type reactor has a significant potential as well as the existing bio-oil reported previously.

  17. Properties of bio-oil generated by a pyrolysis of forest cedar residuals with the movable Auger-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shun; Ebitani, Kohki; Miyazato, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Our research project has developed the new movable reactor for bio-oil production in 2013 on the basis of Auger-type system. This package would be a great impact due to the concept of local production for local consumption in the hilly and mountainous area in not only Japan but also in the world. Herein, we would like to report the properties of the bio-oil generated by the developing Auger-type movable reactor. The synthesized bio-oil possessed C: 46.2 wt%, H: 6.5 wt%, N: wt%, S: <0.1 wt%, O: 46.8 wt% and H 2 O: 18.4 wt%, and served a good calorific value of 18.1 MJ/kg. The spectroscopic and mass analyses such as FT-IR, GC-MS, 13 C-NMR and FT-ICR MS supported that the bio-oil was composed by the fine mixtures of methoxy phenols and variety of alcohol or carboxylic acid functional groups. Thus, it is suggested that the bio-oil generated by the new movable Auger-type reactor has a significant potential as well as the existing bio-oil reported previously

  18. Pyrolysis of soybean oil with H-ZSM5 (Proton-exchange of Zeolite Socony Mobil 5) and MCM41 (Mobil Composition of Matter No. 41) catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Thanh-An; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Sun Kuk; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    Soybean oil was pyrolyzed with various catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor under nitrogen flow at 420 and 450 o C. The H-ZSM5 catalysts (molar ratio SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 = 28, 40, and 180) and 2 wt% (Ga, Al or Cu) impregnated MCM41 catalysts were used in order to investigate the effect of catalysts during the pyrolysis process. The gas products in all experiments were mainly methane, ethane and propylene. The liquid products in the presence of H-ZSM5 catalysts were mainly aromatic components while those with metal/MCM41 catalysts were a mixture of alkanes, alkenes, alkadienes, aromatic and carboxylic acids. The highest coke yield of 4.4 wt% was obtained with Ga/MCM41 catalyst at the pyrolysis temperature of 420 o C. The effect of catalysts on product yield and composition was systematically investigated.

  19. Centrifugal pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Gülich, Johann Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This book gives an unparalleled, up-to-date, in-depth treatment of all kinds of flow phenomena encountered in centrifugal pumps including the complex interactions of fluid flow with vibrations and wear of materials. The scope includes all aspects of hydraulic design, 3D-flow phenomena and partload operation, cavitation, numerical flow calculations, hydraulic forces, pressure pulsations, noise, pump vibrations (notably bearing housing vibration diagnostics and remedies), pipe vibrations, pump characteristics and pump operation, design of intake structures, the effects of highly viscous flows, pumping of gas-liquid mixtures, hydraulic transport of solids, fatigue damage to impellers or diffusers, material selection under the aspects of fatigue, corrosion, erosion-corrosion or hydro-abrasive wear, pump selection, and hydraulic quality criteria. As a novelty, the 3rd ed. brings a fully analytical design method for radial impellers, which eliminates the arbitrary choices inherent to former design procedures. The d...

  20. Bitumen pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braehler, G.; Noll, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the past bitumen was a preferred matrix for the embedding of low and intermediate level radioactive waste: its geological history promised long term stability in final repositories. A great variety of waste has been embedded: technological waste, spent ion exchange resins, concrete, rubble, etc. Liquid waste like evaporator concentrates can be dried and embedded simultaneously in extruders, allowing simple processes and equipment. Unfortunately, during long term intermediate storage the bituminized waste drums proved out being not as stable as expected: a significant number turned out to be no longer acceptable for final disposal, and some of them even needed repacking to enable further intermediate storage. A method to rework such drums with bituminized radioactive waste seems to be urgently needed. Pyrolysis and pyro-hydrolysis (= pyrolysis with water steam added) have a long history for the treatment of organic waste: spent solvent (TBP), spent ion exchange resins, alpha waste (predominantly PVC), etc. Due to its low process temperature and the endothermic character, such processes offer significant safety advantages, as compared to incineration or dissolving in organic solvents. Results of lab-scale investigations and concepts for facilities are presented. (authors)

  1. Reprint of: Pyrolysis technologies for municipal solid waste: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dezhen, E-mail: chendezhen@tongji.edu.cn [Thermal & Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Yin, Lijie; Wang, Huan [Thermal & Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); He, Pinjing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • MSW pyrolysis reactors, products and environmental impacts are reviewed. • MSW pyrolysis still has to deal with flue gas emissions and products’ contamination. • Definition of standardized products is suggested to formalize MSW pyrolysis technology. • Syngas is recommended to be the target product for single MSW pyrolysis technology. - Abstract: Pyrolysis has been examined as an attractive alternative to incineration for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal that allows energy and resource recovery; however, it has seldom been applied independently with the output of pyrolysis products as end products. This review addresses the state-of-the-art of MSW pyrolysis in regards to its technologies and reactors, products and environmental impacts. In this review, first, the influence of important operating parameters such as final temperature, heating rate (HR) and residence time in the reaction zone on the pyrolysis behaviours and products is reviewed; then the pyrolysis technologies and reactors adopted in literatures and scale-up plants are evaluated. Third, the yields and main properties of the pyrolytic products from individual MSW components, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) made from MSW, and MSW are summarised. In the fourth section, in addition to emissions from pyrolysis processes, such as HCl, SO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}, contaminants in the products, including PCDD/F and heavy metals, are also reviewed, and available measures for improving the environmental impacts of pyrolysis are surveyed. It can be concluded that the single pyrolysis process is an effective waste-to-energy convertor but is not a guaranteed clean solution for MSW disposal. Based on this information, the prospects of applying pyrolysis technologies to dealing with MSW are evaluated and suggested.

  2. Pyrolysis technologies for municipal solid waste: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dezhen, E-mail: chendezhen@tongji.edu.cn [Thermal and Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Yin, Lijie; Wang, Huan [Thermal and Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); He, Pinjing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • MSW pyrolysis reactors, products and environmental impacts are reviewed. • MSW pyrolysis still has to deal with flue gas emissions and products’ contamination. • Definition of standardized products is suggested to formalize MSW pyrolysis technology. • Syngas is recommended to be the target product for single MSW pyrolysis technology. - Abstract: Pyrolysis has been examined as an attractive alternative to incineration for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal that allows energy and resource recovery; however, it has seldom been applied independently with the output of pyrolysis products as end products. This review addresses the state-of-the-art of MSW pyrolysis in regards to its technologies and reactors, products and environmental impacts. In this review, first, the influence of important operating parameters such as final temperature, heating rate (HR) and residence time in the reaction zone on the pyrolysis behaviours and products is reviewed; then the pyrolysis technologies and reactors adopted in literatures and scale-up plants are evaluated. Third, the yields and main properties of the pyrolytic products from individual MSW components, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) made from MSW, and MSW are summarised. In the fourth section, in addition to emissions from pyrolysis processes, such as HCl, SO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}, contaminants in the products, including PCDD/F and heavy metals, are also reviewed, and available measures for improving the environmental impacts of pyrolysis are surveyed. It can be concluded that the single pyrolysis process is an effective waste-to-energy convertor but is not a guaranteed clean solution for MSW disposal. Based on this information, the prospects of applying pyrolysis technologies to dealing with MSW are evaluated and suggested.

  3. Pyrolysis of waste tyres: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul T

    2013-08-01

    Approximately 1.5 billion tyres are produced each year which will eventually enter the waste stream representing a major potential waste and environmental problem. However, there is growing interest in pyrolysis as a technology to treat tyres to produce valuable oil, char and gas products. The most common reactors used are fixed-bed (batch), screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed. The key influence on the product yield, and gas and oil composition, is the type of reactor used which in turn determines the temperature and heating rate. Tyre pyrolysis oil is chemically very complex containing aliphatic, aromatic, hetero-atom and polar fractions. The fuel characteristics of the tyre oil shows that it is similar to a gas oil or light fuel oil and has been successfully combusted in test furnaces and engines. The main gases produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres are H(2), C(1)-C(4) hydrocarbons, CO(2), CO and H(2)S. Upgrading tyre pyrolysis products to high value products has concentrated on char upgrading to higher quality carbon black and to activated carbon. The use of catalysts to upgrade the oil to a aromatic-rich chemical feedstock or the production of hydrogen from waste tyres has also been reported. Examples of commercial and semi-commercial scale tyre pyrolysis systems show that small scale batch reactors and continuous rotary kiln reactors have been developed to commercial scale. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Centrifugal shot blast system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997

  5. Application of fast pyrolysis biochar to a loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun, E W

    2011-05-15

    Thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment (pyrolysis) produces bio-oil, syngas, and char. All three products can be used to generate energy, but an emerging new use of the recalcitrant carbon-rich char (biochar) is to apply it to the soil in order to enhance soil fertility and at the same time mitigate climate change by sequestering carbon in the soil. In general, the inherent physicochemical characteristics of biochars make these materials attractive agronomic soil conditioners. However, different pyrolysis technologies exist, i.e. slow pyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, and full gasification systems, and each of these influence the biochar quality differently. As of yet, there is only limited knowledge on the effect of applying fast pyrolysis biochar (FP-biochar) to soil. This PhD project provides new insights into the short-term impacts of adding FP-biochar to soil on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The FP-biochars investigated in the thesis were generated at different reactor temperatures by fast pyrolysis of wheat straw employing a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor (PCR). The carbohydrate content ranged from more than 35 % in FP-biochars made at a low reactor temperature (475 deg. C) down to 3 % in FP-biochars made at high temperatures (575 deg. C). The relative amount of carbohydrates in the FP-biochar was found to be correlated to the short-term degradation rates of the FP-biochars when applied to soil. Fast and slow pyrolysis of wheat straw resulted in two different biochar types with each their distinct physical structures and porosities, carbohydrate contents, particle sizes, pH values, BET surface areas, and elemental compositions. These different physicochemical properties obviously have different impacts on soil processes, which underscores that results obtained from soil studies using slow pyrolysis biochars (SP-biochar) are not necessarily applicable for FP-biochars. For example, the incorporation

  6. Application of fast pyrolysis biochar to a loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun, E.W.

    2011-05-15

    Thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment (pyrolysis) produces bio-oil, syngas, and char. All three products can be used to generate energy, but an emerging new use of the recalcitrant carbon-rich char (biochar) is to apply it to the soil in order to enhance soil fertility and at the same time mitigate climate change by sequestering carbon in the soil. In general, the inherent physicochemical characteristics of biochars make these materials attractive agronomic soil conditioners. However, different pyrolysis technologies exist, i.e. slow pyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, and full gasification systems, and each of these influence the biochar quality differently. As of yet, there is only limited knowledge on the effect of applying fast pyrolysis biochar (FP-biochar) to soil. This PhD project provides new insights into the short-term impacts of adding FP-biochar to soil on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The FP-biochars investigated in the thesis were generated at different reactor temperatures by fast pyrolysis of wheat straw employing a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor (PCR). The carbohydrate content ranged from more than 35 % in FP-biochars made at a low reactor temperature (475 deg. C) down to 3 % in FP-biochars made at high temperatures (575 deg. C). The relative amount of carbohydrates in the FP-biochar was found to be correlated to the short-term degradation rates of the FP-biochars when applied to soil. Fast and slow pyrolysis of wheat straw resulted in two different biochar types with each their distinct physical structures and porosities, carbohydrate contents, particle sizes, pH values, BET surface areas, and elemental compositions. These different physicochemical properties obviously have different impacts on soil processes, which underscores that results obtained from soil studies using slow pyrolysis biochars (SP-biochar) are not necessarily applicable for FP-biochars. For example, the incorporation

  7. Separations by centrifugal phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The technical information presented herein emphasizes the uniqueness of the centrifugal separations methodology and pertinent theory for various kinds of centrifugation. The topics are arranged according to gas, liquid, and solid phases, in the order of increasing densities. Much space is devoted to liquid centrifugation because of the importance of this technique in chemical and biological laboratories. Many separational and characterizational examples are illustrated in detail. The material has been divided into 7 chapters entitled: 1) Introduction, 2) Basic Theory of Centrifugation, 3) Gas Centrifuges, 4) Preparative Liquid Centrifuges, 5) Analytical Liquid Centrifuges, 6) Liquid Centrifuges in Practice, and 7) Mechanical Separations by Centrifuges. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each chapter except the introduction

  8. Pyrolysis of rubber gloves in integral pyrolysis test plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norasalwa Zakaria; Mohd Noor Muhd Yunus; Mohd Annuar Assadat Husain; Farid Nasir Ani

    2010-01-01

    Previously, pyrolysis of rubber gloves in laboratory study was described. In order to visualize the practical application of rubber gloves pyrolysis in terms of treating rubber gloves in medical waste, a new test plant was designed and constructed. The semi-continuous test plant was designed to accommodate rubber gloves that were not cut or shredded. The test plant has a capacity of 2kg/ hr and employed auxiliary fuel instead of the conventional electrical power for heating. The concept was based on moving bed reactor, but additional feature of sand jacket feature was also introduced in the design. Pyrolysis of the gloves was conducted at three temperatures, namely 350 degree Celsius, 400 degree Celsius and 450 degree Celsius. Oxygen presents inside of the reactor due to the combined effect of imperfect sealing and suction effect. This study addresses the performance of this test plant covering the time temperature profile, gas evolution profile and product yield. Comparison between the yield of the liquid, gas and char pyrolyzate was made against the laboratory study. It was found that the oil yield was less than the one obtained from bench scale study. Water formation was more pronounced. The presence of the oxygen also altered the tail gas composition but eliminate the sticky nature of solid residue, making it easier to handle. The chemical composition of the oil was determined and the main compounds in the oil were esters and phtalic acid. (author)

  9. Pyrolysis of Algal Biomass Obtained from High-Rate Algae Ponds Applied to Wastewater Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas e Silva, Fernanda; Monteggia, Luiz Olinto

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the results of the pyrolysis of algal biomass obtained from high-rate algae ponds treating sewage. The two high-rate algae ponds (HRAP) were built and operated at the São João Navegantes Wastewater Treatment Plant. The HRAP A was fed with raw sewage while the HRAP B was fed with effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The HRAP B provided higher productivity, presenting total solids concentration of 487.3 mg/l and chlorophyll a of 7735 mg/l. The algal productivity in the average depth was measured at 41.8 g·m −2 day −1 in pond A and at 47.1 g·m −2 day −1 in pond B. Algae obtained from the HRAP B were separated by the process of coagulation/flocculation and sedimentation. In the presence of alum, a separation efficiency in the range of 97% solid removal was obtained. After centrifugation the biomass was dried and comminuted. The biofuel production experiments were conducted via pyrolysis in a tubular quartz glass reactor which was inserted in a furnace for external heating. The tests were carried out in an inert nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 60 ml/min. The system was operated at 400, 500, and 600°C in order to determine the influence of temperature on the obtained fractional yields. The studies showed that the pyrolysis product yield was influenced by temperature, with a maximum liquid phase (bio-oil and water) production rate of 44% at 500°C, 45% for char and around 11% for gas.

  10. PYROLYSIS OF ALGAL BIOMASS OBTAINED FROM HIGH RATE ALGAE PONDS APPLIED TO WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda eVargas E Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of the pyrolysis of algal biomass obtained from high rate algae ponds treating sewage. The two high-rate algae ponds (HRAP were built and operated at the São João Navegantes Wastewater Treatment Plant. The HRAP A was fed with raw sewage while the HRAP B was fed with effluent from an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB reactor. The HRAP B provided higher productivity, presenting total solids concentration of 487.3mg/l and chlorophyll a of 7735mg/l. The algal productivity in the average depth was measured at 41,8 gm-2day-1 in pond A and at 47.1 gm-2day-1 in pond B. Algae obtained from the HRAP B were separated by the process of coagulation/flocculation and sedimentation. In the presence of alum, a separation efficiency in the range of 97% solids removal was obtained. After centrifugation the biomass was dried and comminuted. The biofuel production experiments were conducted via pyrolysis in a tubular quartz glass reactor which was inserted in a furnace for external heating. The tests were carried out in an inert nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 60ml/min. The system was operated at 400°C, 500°C and 600°C in order to determine the influence of temperature on the obtained fractional yields. The studies showed that the pyrolysis product yield was influenced by temperature, with a maximum liquid phase (bio-oil and water production rate of 44% at 500°C, 45% for char and around 11% for gas.

  11. Pyrolysis of Algal Biomass Obtained from High-Rate Algae Ponds Applied to Wastewater Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas e Silva, Fernanda, E-mail: fervs@globo.com; Monteggia, Luiz Olinto [Institute of Hydraulic Research, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2015-06-30

    This work presents the results of the pyrolysis of algal biomass obtained from high-rate algae ponds treating sewage. The two high-rate algae ponds (HRAP) were built and operated at the São João Navegantes Wastewater Treatment Plant. The HRAP A was fed with raw sewage while the HRAP B was fed with effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The HRAP B provided higher productivity, presenting total solids concentration of 487.3 mg/l and chlorophyll a of 7735 mg/l. The algal productivity in the average depth was measured at 41.8 g·m{sup −2} day{sup −1} in pond A and at 47.1 g·m{sup −2} day{sup −1} in pond B. Algae obtained from the HRAP B were separated by the process of coagulation/flocculation and sedimentation. In the presence of alum, a separation efficiency in the range of 97% solid removal was obtained. After centrifugation the biomass was dried and comminuted. The biofuel production experiments were conducted via pyrolysis in a tubular quartz glass reactor which was inserted in a furnace for external heating. The tests were carried out in an inert nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 60 ml/min. The system was operated at 400, 500, and 600°C in order to determine the influence of temperature on the obtained fractional yields. The studies showed that the pyrolysis product yield was influenced by temperature, with a maximum liquid phase (bio-oil and water) production rate of 44% at 500°C, 45% for char and around 11% for gas.

  12. Hydrogen Recovery by ECR Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible microwave plasma methane pyrolysis reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is lost as methane in the...

  13. Laser induced pyrolysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderborgh, N.E.

    1976-01-01

    The application of laser pyrolysis techniques to the problems of chemical analysis is discussed. The processes occurring during laser pyrolysis are first briefly reviewed. The problems encountered in laser pyrolysis gas chromatography are discussed using the analysis of phenanthrene and binary hydrocarbons. The application of this technique to the characterization of naturally occurring carbonaceous material such as oil shales and coal is illustrated

  14. Enrichment: centrifuge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubbaramayer.

    1989-01-01

    This short course is divided into three sections devoted respectively to the physics of the process, some practical problems raised by the design of a centrifuge and the present situation of centrifugation in the World. 31 figs., 18 refs

  15. Slow pyrolysis of pistachio shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apaydin-Varol, Esin; Putun, Ersan; Putun, Ayse E [Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-08-15

    In this study, pistachio shell is taken as the biomass sample to investigate the effects of pyrolysis temperature on the product yields and composition when slow pyrolysis is applied in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure to the temperatures of 300, 400, 500, 550, 700{sup o}C. The maximum liquid yield was attained at about 500-550{sup o}C with a yield of 20.5%. The liquid product obtained under this optimum temperature and solid products obtained at all temperatures were characterized. As well as proximate and elemental analysis for the products were the basic steps for characterization, column chromatography, FT-IR, GC/MS and SEM were used for further characterization. The results showed that liquid and solid products from pistachio shells show similarities with high value conventional fuels. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  17. Observations on centrifugation: application to centrifuge development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T; Smith, M; Roberts, B

    1999-11-01

    This report outlines the background to the development of an automated, serial, discrete centrifuge, reporting on the criteria considered essential in such an instrument. We established the criteria by examining the detailed logistics of centrifuge operation in a hospital laboratory. The mean sample load per run, using six centrifuges, was 13.6 samples, and the user-selectable cycle time ranged from 00:01:10 to 00:12:33 (hours:minutes:seconds) with a fixed g value of 1050. During the laboratory working window, (0900-1700), only 50% of the centrifuge capacity was utilized and more than one-third of the sample workload was delayed for >5 min because the centrifuges were not emptied promptly. In addition, 35% of the sample workload was centrifuged for less than the time prescribed in the operational specifications. Based on these findings, we designed a new continuous, serial centrifuge to overcome some of the deficiencies noted in the logistics study. The centrifuge operates continuously, nominally treating 150 samples/h, with a cycle time of 5 min at 1,000 g. The cycle time and g value are variable between limits, and their selection governs the throughput rate. Each sample is centrifuged separately in individual rotors mounted in a sturdy carousel with a periphery that traverses a load/unload station. There is no sample delay because of operator absence, and the capacity is fully utilized. The centrifuge can operate in a stand-alone capacity or has the capability of being integrated into a sample preparation system or as a direct front end for high-throughput analyzers.

  18. Physicochemical characterization of sludge obtained in a UASB reactor: influence on the energetic utilization in the pyrolysis process; Caracterizacao fisico-quimica de lodo obtido em um reator UASB: influencia no aproveitamento energetico em processo de pirolise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Murillo Barros de [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Palmas, TO (Brazil)], Email: murillopur@yahoo.com.br; Vieira, Glaucia Eliza Gama; Cardoso, Aderlanio da Silva; Silveira, Dyego Amaral; Figueiredo, Radson Lima [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (LEDBIO/UFT), Palmas, TO (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios e Desenvolvimento de Biomassas e Biocombustiveis

    2010-07-01

    In biological treatment processes of domestic sewer it leaves of the organic matter is converted and another is absorbed being part of the microbial biomass denominated generic of mud biological or secondary composed mainly of biological solids, and that for that reason can also be denominated of sewage sludge. To give a maintainable final destiny for that residue has been one of the great challenges of the sanitation in the last years. Great part of that material is destined unproductive some are incinerated, others are disposed in sanitary embankments. This work had as objective the physiochemical characterization of the digested sludge, virgin and free from oxide of calcium (CaO), produced in the reactor UASB, of ETE Vila Uniao located in the city of Palmas-TO, for the destination as raw material for energy use in pyrolysis process. The collected sample was taken drought and stabilized to be analyzed at the laboratory LEDBIO/UFT where they were studied the particle, tenor of ashes, humidity and volatile density and sequential extraction for soxhlet. Found in the biomass loud tenor of volatile (56,72%), carbon fastens low (5,21%) and a considerable tenor of ashes (32,78%), what suggests that that sludge, in agreement with the comparisons of the literature, can obtain good incomes in pyrolysis process, especially incomes in bio-oil and coal. (author)

  19. Flash pyrolysis kinetics of pine wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, B.M.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of sawdust pyrolysis in the temperature range from 300 to 600 °C has been measured. A thermogravimetric analyser was applied for the temperature range from 300 to 450 °C while for measurements in the temperature range from 450 to 600 °C, an entrained flow reactor has been used. The

  20. Effect of operating parameters on production of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of maize stalk in bubbling fluidized bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Najaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The yield and composition of pyrolysis products depend on the characteristics of feed stock and process operating parameters. Effect of particle size, reaction temperature and carrier gas flow rate on the yield of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of Pakistani maize stalk was investigated. Pyrolysis experiments were performed at temperature range of 360-540°C, feed particle size of 1-2 mm and carrier gas fl ow rate of 7.0-13.0 m3/h (0.61.1 m/s superficial velocity. Bio-oil yield increased with the increase of temperature followed by a decreasing trend. The maximum yield of bio-oil obtained was 42 wt% at a temperature of 490°C with the particle size of around 1.0 mm and carrier gas flow rate of 11.0 m3/h (0.9 m/s superficial velocity. High temperatures resulted in the higher ratios of char and non-condensable gas.

  1. Centrifuge modeling of monopiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, Rasmus Tofte

    2010-01-01

    To gain a larger knowledge of the monopile foundation concept, centrifuge modeling is used by the geotechnical group at DTU. The centrifuge operated at DTU is a beam centrifuge and was built in 1976. In the recent years it has been upgraded with onboard data acquisition and control systems....... The capabilities of the centrifuge at DTU makes it possible to obtain a scale factor of 85 in experiments which equals a soil volume in prototype scale of a diameter of 40 meters and a depth of 40 meters. This paper describes centrifuge modeling theory, the centrifuge setup at DTU and as an example show results...... from centrifuge tests performed on large diameter piles installed in dry sand....

  2. Techno-economic evaluation of high temperature pyrolysis processes for mixed plastic waste.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, R.W.J.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; van Koningsbruggen, M.P.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1998-01-01

    Three pyrolysis processes for Mixed Plastic Waste (MPW) with different reactors (Bubbling Fluidized Bed, Circulating Fluidized Bed and Rotating Cone Reactor, respectively BFB, CFB and RCR) were designed and evaluated. The estimated fixed capital investment for a 50 kton/year MPW pyrolysis plant

  3. Design, fabrication, and test plan of a small centrifugal compressor test model for a supercritical CO2 compressor in the fast reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Yasushi; Ishizuka, Takao; Aritomi, Masanori

    2009-01-01

    To clarify the CO 2 compressor performance in the vicinity of the critical point, a research project has begun at Tokyo Institute of Technology based on Japanese government funding. This paper describes the design and fabrication results of a small and high-speed centrifugal test compressor. Drawings of compressor structures such as an impeller and a rotor are presented. Numerical analysis results confirm that a desirable fluid flow distribution and structural integrity with respect to both the vane strength and rotor vibration can be expected. (author)

  4. Suspension Combustion of Wood: Influence of Pyrolysis Conditions on Char Yield, Morphology, and Reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall'Ora, Michelangelo; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    Chars from pine and beech wood were produced by fast pyrolysis in an entrained flow reactor and by slow pyrolysis in a thermogravimetric analyzer. The influence of pyrolysis temperature, heating rate and particle size on char yield and morphology was investigated. The applied pyrolysis temperature...... varied in the range 673−1673 K for slow pyrolysis and between 873 and 1573 K for fast pyrolysis. The chars were oxidized in a thermogravimetric analyzer and the mass loss data were used to determine char oxidation reactivity. Char yield from fast pyrolysis (104−105 K/s) was as low as 1 to 6% on a dry ash......, char oxidation reactivity decreased as pyrolysis temperature increased. The amount and composition of the ash forming matter of the wood fuels seems to play an important role in determining the differences in char yield, morphology and reactivity....

  5. PYROLYSIS OF ZINC CONTAMINATED BIOMASS FROM PHYTOREMEDIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Özkan, Aysun; Günkaya, Zerrin; Banar, Müfide; Kulaç, Alev; Yalçın, Gülser; Taşpınar, Kadriye; Altay, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to stabilize of zinc (Zn) from soil to pyrolysis solid product. For this aim, phytoremediation and pyrolysis were sequentially applied. In the first stage of the study, phytoremediation was first applied to zinc contaminated soil via  sunflower (Helianthus annuus), corn (Zea mays) and rape (Brassica napus), After harvesting, the plants were pyrolyzed at 500°C with the heating rate of 35 °C/min in a fixed bed stainless steel (380 S) 240 cm3 reactor. The phytorem...

  6. Modelling of biomass pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakova, Nadezhda; Petkov, Venko; Mihailov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis is an essential preliminary step in a gasifier. The first step in modelling the pyrolysis process of biomass is creating a model for the chemical processes taking place. This model should describe the used fuel, the reactions taking place and the products created in the process. The numerous different polymers present in the organic fraction of the fuel are generally divided in three main groups. So, the multistep kinetic model of biomass pyrolysis is based on conventional multistep devolatilization models of the three main biomass components - cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin. Numerical simulations have been conducted in order to estimate the influence of the heating rate and the temperature of pyrolysis on the content of the virgin biomass, active biomass, liquid, solid and gaseous phases at any moment. Keywords: kinetic models, pyrolysis, biomass pyrolysis.

  7. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis

  8. Valorization of algal waste via pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulkas, A; Hammani, H; El Achaby, M; Bilal, E; Barakat, A; El Harfi, K

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to develop processes for the production of bio-oil and bio-char from algae waste using the pyrolysis at controlled conditions. The pyrolysis was carried out at different temperatures 400-600°C and different heating rates 5-50°C/min. The algal waste, bio-oil and bio-char were successfully characterized using Elemental analysis, Chemical composition, TGA, FTIR, 1 H NMR, GC-MS and SEM. At a temperature of 500°C and a heating rate of 10°C/min, the maximum yield of bio-oil and bio-char was found to be 24.10 and 44.01wt%, respectively, which was found to be strongly influenced by the temperature variation, and weakly affected by the heating rate variation. Results show that the bio-oil cannot be used as bio-fuel, but can be used as a source of value-added chemicals. On the other hand, the bio-char is a promising candidate for solid fuel applications and for the production of carbon materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Centrifuge design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.T.; Holmes, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    BNFL has been enriching uranium on an industrial scale using the centrifuge process for over a decade. Together with its Urenco partners, a joint development programme has been and is being vigorously pursued to reduce specific costs, increase output and maintain competitiveness throughout the 1990s. The paper summarises the development of the centrifuge from its earliest concepts through to the centrifuges of today which are jointly designed by the Urenco partners. The potential for further development is also examined. (author)

  10. Co pyrolysis of biomass and PP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Hyeon Su; Kim, Jung Hwan; Cho, Hye Jung; Ko, Jeong Huy; Park, Hye Jin; Bae, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Full text: While bio-oil has received considerable attention both as a source of energy and as an organic feedstock, its stability as fuel is very low due to high oxygen content. Therefore, there are many efforts to upgrade it. Among them, co pyrolysis with polyolefin can be a method to obtain stable bio-oil. Because polyolefins contain higher hydrogen and carbon content than biomass and no oxygen, plastic/ biomass co pyrolysis may upgrade the bio-oil properties by increasing the carbon and hydrogen contents while reducing oxygen content. In this study, wood biomass was mixed with PP and then co pyrolysis was carried out in a batch reactor. The produced oil and gas was analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Also elemental analysis was performed to know the hydrogen, carbon and oxygen content of bio-oil. The effect of various reaction conditions on bio-oil properties were presented in detail. (author)

  11. Coal pyrolysis under hydrogen-rich gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, H.; Sun, C.; Li, B.; Liu, Z. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry

    1998-04-01

    To improve the economy of the pyrolysis process by reducing the hydrogen cost, it is suggested to use cheaper hydrogen-rich gases such as coke-oven gas (COG) or synthesis gas (SG) instead of pure hydrogen. The pyrolysis of Chinese Xianfeng lignite which was carried out with real COG and SG at 3-5 MPa, a final temperature of 650{degree}C and a heating rate of 5{degree}C/min in a 10g fixed-bed reactor is compared with coal pyrolysis with pure hydrogen and nitrogen under the same conditions. The results indicate that compared with hydropyrolysis at the same total pressure, the total conversion and tar yields from coal pyrolysis with COG and SG decreases while the unwanted water increases. However, at the same H{sub 2} partial pressure, the tar yields and yields of BBTX, PCX and naphthalene from the pyrolysis of coal with COG and SG are all significantly higher than those of hydropyrolysis. Therefore, it is possible to use COG and SG instead of pure hydrogen. 8 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Release of Chlorine and Sulfur during Biomass Torrefaction and Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, Suriyati Binti; Flensborg, Julie Pauline; Shoulaifar, Tooran Khazraie

    2014-01-01

    The release of chlorine (Cl) and sulfur (S) during biomass torrefaction and pyrolysis has been investigated via experiments in two laboratory-scale reactors: a rotating reactor and a fixed bed reactor. Six biomasses with different chemical compositions covering a wide range of ash content and ash...... reporting that biomasses with a lower chlorine content release a higher fraction of chlorine during the pyrolysis process. A significant sulfur release (about 60%) was observed from the six biomasses investigated at 350 degrees C. The initial sulfur content in the biomass did not influence the fraction...

  13. Pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis as a recycling method of waste CDs originating from polycarbonate and HIPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonakou, E.V. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogiannis, K.G.; Stephanidis, S.D. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Triantafyllidis, K.S. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Lappas, A.A. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Achilias, D.S., E-mail: axilias@chem.auth.gr [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis is a powerful method for recycling of WEEEs. • Liquid products obtained from the pyrolysis of PC or HIPS found in waste CDs are very different. • Mainly phenols are obtained from pyrolysis PC based wastes while aromatics from HIPS. • Use of MgO catalyst increases the amount of phenols from CD recycling compared to ZSM-5. • Use of MgO or ZSM-5 catalysts reduces the amount of styrene recovered from HIPS. - Abstract: Pyrolysis appears to be a promising recycling process since it could convert the disposed polymers to hydrocarbon based fuels or various useful chemicals. In the current study, two model polymers found in WEEEs, namely polycarbonate (PC) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and their counterparts found in waste commercial Compact Discs (CDs) were pyrolysed in a bench scale reactor. Both, thermal pyrolysis and pyrolysis in the presence of two catalytic materials (basic MgO and acidic ZSM-5 zeolite) was performed for all four types of polymers. Results have shown significant recovery of the monomers and valuable chemicals (phenols in the case of PC and aromatic hydrocarbons in the case of HIPS), while catalysts seem to decrease the selectivity towards the monomers and enhance the selectivity towards other desirable compounds.

  14. Pyrolysis and gasification behavior of black liquor under pressurized conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitty, K

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study has been to enhance the understanding of the processes involved in pressurized black liquor gasification. Gasification is known to occur in three stages: drying, pyrolysis and char gasification. The work presented here focuses on the pyrolysis and gasification stages. Experiments were carried out primarily in two laboratory-scale reactors. A pressurized grid heater was used to study black liquor pyrolysis under pressurized conditions. Char yields and the fate of elements in the liquor, as well as the degree of liquor swelling, were measured in this device. A pressurized thermogravimetric reactor was used to measure the rate of the char gasification process under different temperatures and pressures and in various gas atmospheres. Pyrolysis experiments were also carried out in this device, and data on swelling behavior, char yields and component release were obtained 317 refs.

  15. RESEARCH CENTRIFUGE- ADVANCED TOOL SEPERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan Ashwini; Prof. B.V. Jain; Dr Surajj Sarode

    2015-01-01

    A centrifuge is a critical piece of equipment for the laboratory. Purpose of this study was to study research centrifuge in detail, its applications, uses in different branches and silent features. Their are two types of research centrifuge study here revolutionary research centrifuge and microprocessor research centrifuge. A centrifuge is a device that separates particles from a solution through use of a rotor. In biology, the particles are usually cells, sub cellular organelles, or large mo...

  16. Novel technique for coal pyrolysis and hydrogenation product analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, L.D.; Boyle, J.

    1993-03-15

    A microjet reactor coupled to a VUV photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used to obtain species measurements during high temperature pyrolysis and oxidation of a wide range of hydrocarbon compounds ranging from allene and acetylene to cyclohexane, benzene and toluene. Initial work focused on calibration of the technique, optimization of ion collection and detection and characterization of limitations. Using the optimized technique with 118 nm photoionization, intermediate species profiles were obtained for analysis of the hydrocarbon pyrolysis and oxidation mechanisms. The soft'' ionization, yielding predominantly molecular ions, allowed the study of reaction pathways in these high temperature systems where both sampling and detection challenges are severe. Work has focused on the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures representative of coal pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis products. The detailed mass spectra obtained during pyrolysis and oxidation of hydrocarbon mixtures is especially important because of the complex nature of the product mixture even at short residence times and low primary reactant conversions. The combustion community has advanced detailed modeling of pyrolysis and oxidation to the C4 hydrocarbon level but in general above that size uncertainties in rate constant and thermodynamic data do not allow us to a priori predict products from mixed hydrocarbon pyrolyses using a detailed chemistry model. For pyrolysis of mixtures of coal-derived liquid fractions with a large range of compound structures and molecular weights in the hundreds of amu the modeling challenge is severe. Lumped models are possible from stable product data.

  17. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of glycerol pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, F.; Frassoldati, A.; Bartocci, P.; Cinti, G.; Quagliarini, F.; Bidini, G.; Ranzi, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Glycerol pyrolysis can produce about 44–48%v hydrogen at 750–800 °C. • A simplified 452 reactions kinetic model of glycerol pyrolysis has been developed. • The model has good agreement with experimental data. • Non condensable gas yields can reach 70%. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of glycerol, a by-product of the biodiesel industry, is an important potential source of hydrogen. The obtained high calorific value gas can be used either as a fuel for combined heat and power (CHP) generation or as a transportation fuel (for example hydrogen to be used in fuel cells). Optimal process conditions can improve glycerol pyrolysis by increasing gas yield and hydrogen concentration. A detailed kinetic mechanism of glycerol pyrolysis, which involves 137 species and more than 4500 reactions, was drastically simplified and reduced to a new skeletal kinetic scheme of 44 species, involved in 452 reactions. An experimental campaign with a batch pyrolysis reactor was properly designed to further validate the original and the skeletal mechanisms. The comparisons between model predictions and experimental data strongly suggest the presence of a catalytic process promoting steam reforming of methane. High pyrolysis temperatures (750–800 °C) improve process performances and non-condensable gas yields of 70%w can be achieved. Hydrogen mole fraction in pyrolysis gas is about 44–48%v. The skeletal mechanism developed can be easily used in Computational Fluid Dynamic software, reducing the simulation time.

  18. Pyrolysis mechanism of microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. based on model compounds and their interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Tang, Xiaohan; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis experiments were conducted by model compounds of algal components. • Interaction affected little bio-crude yield of model compounds co-pyrolysis. • Some interaction pathways between microalgae components were recommended. • N-heterocyclic compounds were further pyrolysis products of Maillard reaction products. • Surfactant synthesis (lipid-amino acids and lipid-glucose) between algal components. - Abstract: Pyrolysis is one of important pathways to convert microalgae to liquid biofuels and key components of microalgae have different chemical composition and structure, which provides a barrier for large-scale microalgae-based liquid biofuel application. Microalgae component pyrolysis mechanism should be researched to optimal pyrolysis process parameters. In this study, single pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis of microalgal components (model compounds castor oil, soybean protein and glucose) were conducted to reveal interaction between them by thermogrametric analysis and bio-crude evaluation. Castor oil (model compound of lipid) has higher pyrolysis temperature than other model compounds and has the maximum contribution to bio-crude formation. Bio-crude from soybean protein has higher N-heterocyclic compounds as well as phenols, which could be important aromatic hydrocarbon source during biorefineries and alternative aviation biofuel production. Potential interaction pathways based on model compounds are recommended including further decomposition of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) and surfactant synthesis, which indicate that glucose played an important role on pyrolysis of microalgal protein and lipid components. The results should provide necessary information for microalgae pyrolysis process optimization and large-scale pyrolysis reactor design.

  19. A centrifuge CO2 pellet cleaning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.; Fisher, P.W.; Nelson, W.D.; Schechter, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Centrifuge-based cryogenic pellet accelerator technology, originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the purpose of refueling fusion reactors with high-speed pellets of frozen deuterium/tritium,is now being developed as a method of cleaning without the use of conventional solvents. In these applications large quantities of pellets made of frozen CO 2 or argon are accelerated in a high-speed rotor. The accelerated pellet stream is used to clean or etch surfaces. The advantage of this system is that the spent pellets and debris resulting from the cleaning process can be filtered leaving only the debris for disposal. This paper discusses the centrifuge CO 2 pellet cleaning system, the physics model of the pellet impacting the surface, the centrifuge apparatus, and some initial cleaning and etching tests

  20. Modeling of biomass pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samo, S.R.; Memon, A.S.; Akhund, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The fuels used in industry and power sector for the last two decades have become expensive. As a result renewable energy source have been emerging increasingly important, of these, biomass appears to be the most applicable in the near future. The pyrolysis of biomass plays a key role amongst the three major and important process generally encountered in a gas producer, namely, pyrolysis, combustion and reduction of combustion products. Each biomass has its own pyrolysis characteristics and this important parameters must be known for the proper design and efficient operation of a gasification system. Thermogravimetric analysis has been widely used to study the devolatilization of solid fuels, such as biomass. It provides the weight loss history of a sample heated at a predetermined rate as a function of time and temperature. This paper presents the experimental results of modelling the weight loss curves of the main biomass components i.e. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Thermogravimetric analysis of main components of biomass showed that pyrolysis is first order reaction. Furthermore pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloe can be regarded as taking place in two stages, for while lignin pyrolysis is a single stage process. This paper also describes the Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) technique to predict the weight retained during pyrolysis at any temperature, for number of biomass species, such as cotton stalk, bagasse ad graoundnut shell. (author)

  1. Centrifuge enrichment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astley, E.R.

    1976-01-01

    Exxon Nuclear has been active in privately funded research and development of centrifuge enrichment technology since 1972. In October of 1975, Exxon Nuclear submitted a proposal to design, construct, and operate a 3000-MT SWU/yr centrifuge enrichment plant, under the provisions of the proposed Nuclear Fuel Assurance Act of 1975. The U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) accepted the proposal as a basis for negotiation. It was proposed to build a 1000-MT SWU/yr demonstration increment to be operational in 1982; and after successful operation for about one year, expand the facilities into a 3000-MT SWU/yr plant. As part of the overall centrifuge enrichment plant, a dedicated centrifuge manufacturing plant would be constructed; sized to support the full 3000-MT SWU/yr plant. The selection of the centrifuge process by Exxon Nuclear was based on an extremely thorough evaluation of current and projected enrichment technology; results show that the technology is mature and the process will be cost effective. The substantial savings in energy (about 93%) from utilization of the centrifuge option rather than gaseous diffusion is a compelling argument. As part of this program, Exxon Nuclear has a large hardware R and D program, plus a prototype centrifuge manufacturing capability in Malta, New York. To provide a full-scale machine and limited cascade test capability, Exxon Nuclear is constructing a $4,000,000 Centrifuge Test Facility in Richland, Washington. This facility was to initiate operations in the Fall of 1976. Exxon Nuclear is convinced that the centrifuge enrichment process is the rational selection for emergence of a commercial enrichment industry

  2. Centrifugal pump handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pumps, Sulzer

    2010-01-01

    This long-awaited new edition is the complete reference for engineers and designers working on pump design and development or using centrifugal pumps in the field. This authoritative guide has been developed with access to the technical expertise of the leading centrifugal pump developer, Sulzer Pumps. In addition to providing the most comprehensive centrifugal pump theory and design reference with detailed material on cavitation, erosion, selection of materials, rotor vibration behavior and forces acting on pumps, the handbook also covers key pumping applications topics and operational

  3. Development of centrifugal contactors [Paper No. : IIIB-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koganti, S.B.; Nagarajan, S.; Balasubramanian, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Development of short residence contactors is one of the main objectives of Reprocessing Programme for fast reactor fuels in Reactor Research Centre, Kalpakkam. Paper discusses the suitability of centrifugal contactor as one of the candidate solvent contactors. Description of various stages of development of this work in the Reprocessing Development Laboratory, RRC and also characteristics of small contactor developed are given. (author)

  4. Development of uranium enrichment technology by gas centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibata, Tomofumi; Kai, Tsunetoshi

    1996-01-01

    The development of a gas-centrifuge for uranium enrichment has been conducted by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation in Japan after the first several years' fruitless works, the R and D works came to the point and continuing rapid improvements of centrifuges have started, Cascade tests were given with C-1 and C-2 cascade experimental facilities. Life, reliability and feasibility tests were given with the pilot plant and the demonstration plant. As a result of these works, the private commercial plant has started the operation. Although the main efforts were devoted to the development of metal rotor centrifuges in the course mentioned above, composite material rotor centrifuges have also been developed in parallel to achieve higher performance. Promising results have been being obtained with cascade test facilities on the pilot plant scale. Furthermore, R and D works are being proceeded on more excellent and advanced centrifuges. (author)

  5. Valve for gas centrifuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  6. Scrap tire pyrolysis using a new type two-stage pyrolyzer: Effects of dolomite and olivine on producing a low-sulfur pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Gyung-Goo; Oh, Seung-Jin; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Scrap tire pyrolysis was performed using a two-stage pyrolyzer consisting of an auger reactor and a fluidized bed reactor to produce a low-sulfur pyrolysis oil. In the experiments, the effect of the residence time of the feed material in the auger reactor was investigated at ∼300 (auger reactor) and 500 °C (fluidized bed reactor). In addition, natural dolomite and olivine and calcined dolomite and olivine were used as the fluidized bed materials to examine their effects on reducing the sulfur content of pyrolysis oil. In the experiments, the yields of the oil from the auger reactor were 1.4–3.7 wt%, and it was enriched with DL-limonene whose content in the oil was 40–50 wt%. The yields of the oil from the fluidized bed reactor were 42–46 wt%. The optimum residence time of the feed material in the auger reactor turned out to be 3.5 min. Calcined dolomite and olivine significantly decreased the sulfur content of pyrolysis oil. Metal oxides of the additives appeared to react with H_2S to form metal sulfides. The sulfur content of pyrolysis oil obtained with calcined olivine was 0.45 wt%. - Highlights: • Scrap tires were successfully pyrolyzed in a new type two-stage pyrolyzer. • The two-stage pyrolyzer is composed of an auger and fluidized bed reactors. • Calcination of olivine and dolomite led to a strong decrease in sulfur. • The lowest sulfur content of pyrolysis oil was 0.45 wt%. • Pyrolysis oil yields from the fluidized bed reactor were 43–46 wt%.

  7. a novel interconnected fluidised bed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of char

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.M.C.; Janse, Arthur M.C.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1999-01-01

    A novel system of two adjacent fluidised beds operating in different gas atmospheres and exchanging solids was developed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of the produced char. Fluidised sand particles (200 μm < dp < 400 μm) are transported from the pyrolysis reactor to the

  8. A novel interconnected fluidised bed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of char.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Arthur M.C.; Janse, A.M.C.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2000-01-01

    A novel system of two adjacent fluidised beds operating in different gas atmospheres and exchanging solids was developed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of the produced char. Fluidised sand particles (200 μm < dp < 400 μm) are transported from the pyrolysis reactor to the

  9. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    -oil by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is challenged by severe polymerization and coking upon heating the oil. Alternatively, performing fast pyrolysis in high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere in a fluid bed reactor with a HDO catalyst as bed medium could immediately stabilize reactive pyrolysis vapors [2...

  10. Pyrolysis and Gasification Kinetics of Large Biomass Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenson, Jenny; Hagstroem, Magnus; Andersson, Patrik U.; Loenn, Benny; Pettersson, Jan B.C. [Goteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dep. of Chemistry, Atmospheric Science; Davidsson, Kent O. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Energy Conversion

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the project is to provide experimental data on single biomass particle pyrolysis that have an applied as well as a fundamental bearing. Transport phenomena and kinetics on the single particle level are characterized, including heat and mass transport processes. New experimental techniques and methods are applied and developed within the project. A single-particle reactor has been developed for the investigations, and several detection techniques including fast thermogravimetric analysis, molecular beam mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy, video recording and pyrometry are applied. The experimental data are used to develop robust models for pyrolysis and gasification, which are essential components in the design of gasification and combustion reactors.

  11. Volume reduction of ion exchange resin by a pyrolysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, M.; Funabashi, K.; Uchida, S.; Kikuchi, M.

    1985-01-01

    Volume reduction techniques, such as incineration and acid digestion, of spent ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants are being developed with a view toward reducing radioactive waste volume and also making the final waste form more stable. The authors chose pyrolysis as a technique that can be done at low operating temperatures and low gas flow rates in a reactor vessel. Fundamental experiments were performed to clarify the resin pyrolysis characteristics, and the optimum pyrolysis temperature was determined. Consequently, a pilot plant with a treatment capacity of approx. 50 kg/batch was constructed based on the results. Using the pilot plant, the authors are now performing pyrolysis of the resins and solidification of their residues. This report will give the results of fundamental experiments and pilot plant tests

  12. Pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis performance of Shendong and Pingshuo coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiping Huang; Bo Wu; Yunpeng Zhao; Lijun Jin; Haoquan Hu [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China). Institute of Coal Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of Shendong (SD) and Pingshuo (PS) coal were performed from 500 to 700{sup o}C in a fixed-bed reactor and the product distribution and gas evolution of both processes were analyzed. The results show that, the tar yields of both PS coal and SD coal reach the highest value, about 17 wt% and 13 wt% respectively at temperature 650{sup o}C for pyrolysis. However, the tar yields of PS coal get to the highest value, about 20 wt% at temperature 650{sup o}C, and the tar yields of SD coal are improving with temperature increasing, about 12 wt% at temperature 700{sup o}C for hydropyrolysis. The tar yields of PS coal are higher than those of SD coal at the same conditions for both pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis. The total gas yield of PS coal is higher than that of SD coal for pyrolysis, but lower for hydropyrolysis.

  13. Distribution of sulphur into products from waste tire pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susa, D.; Haydary, J.; Markos, J.

    2012-01-01

    Tire pyrolysis is getting growing attention as an effective waste tire disposal method in comparison to environmentally less friendly methods like dumping or incineration. But the scrap tire sulphur content can be a potential obstacle to scrap tire utilization as a fuel. In this paper the distribution of sulphur into tire pyrolysis yields, solid (char) and liquid (tar), was investigated. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out under different conditions to determine the partitioning of sulphur into pyrolysis products. The influence of different temperatures and reaction times was investigated in a laboratory flow reactor under nitrogen atmosphere. Solid and liquid residues were collected and analyzed by elemental analysis. The sulphur content in residual char and tar was determined using an elemental analyzer and the sulphur forms in tar were characterized by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). (Authors)

  14. Pipeline system for gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumoto, Tsutomu; Umezawa, Sadao.

    1977-01-01

    Purpose: To enable effective operation for the gas centrifuge cascade system upon failures in the system not by interrupting the operation of all of the centrifuges in the system but by excluding only the failed centrifuges. Constitution: A plurality of gas centrifuges are connected by way of a pipeline and an abnormal detector for the automatic detection of abnormality such as destruction in a vacuum barrel and loss of vacuum is provided to each of the centrifuges. Bypass lines for short-circuitting adjacent centrifuges are provided in the pipelines connecting the centrifuges. Upon generation of abnormality in a centrifuge, a valve disposed in the corresponding bypass is automatically closed or opened by a signal from the abnormal detector to change the gas flow to thereby exclude the centrifuge in abnormality out of the system. This enables to effectively operate the system without interrupting the operation for the entire system. (Moriyama, K.)

  15. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  16. Hot char-catalytic reforming of volatiles from MSW pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Na; Chen, Dezhen; Arena, Umberto; He, Pinjing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Volatile from MSW pyrolysis is reformed with hot char from the same pyrolysis process. • The yields of syngas increase evidently with H 2 being the main contributor and the major component of the syngas. • Pyrolysis oil becomes light and its composition distribution is narrowed. • The HHV, volatile elements and alkali metals contents in the char decrease. • The emissions including SO 2 , NO, NO 2 and HCN changed after reforming process. - Abstract: Volatile products obtained from pyrolysis of municipal solid waste (MSW), including syngas and pyrolysis oil, were forced to contact the hot char from the same pyrolysis process at 500–600 °C in a fixed bed reactor to be reformed. The yields and properties of syngas, char and pyrolysis liquid were investigated; and the energy re-distribution among the products due to char reforming was quantified. The preliminary investigation at lab scale showed that hot char-catalytic reforming of the volatiles leads to an increase in the dry syngas yield from 0.25 to 0.37 N m 3 kg −1 MSW at 550 °C. Accordingly, the carbon conversion ratio into syngas increases from 29.6% to 35.0%; and the MSW chemical energy transferred into syngas increased from 41.8% to 47.4%. The yield of pyrolysis liquid products, including pyrolysis oil and water, decreased from 27.3 to 16.5 wt%, and the molecular weight of the oil becoming lighter. Approximately 60% of the water vapour contained in the volatiles converted into syngas. After reforming, the concentrations of SO 2 and HCN in the syngas decreases, while those of NO and NO 2 increase. The char concentrations of N, H, C and alkali metal species decreased and its higher heating value decreased too.

  17. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinghua; Wang Tiejun; Ma Longlong; Chang Jie

    2008-01-01

    Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na 2 CO 3 , NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 deg. C to 600 deg. C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 deg. C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 deg. C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) ∼205 deg. C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na 2 CO 3 addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H 2 , CO, CH 4 , CO 2 , C 2 H 4 and C 2 H 6 . Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher

  18. Methane Pyrolysis for Hydrogen & Carbon Nanotube Recovery from Sabatier Products, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible catalytic methane pyrolysis reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is lost as methane in the...

  19. Experimental and modeling study on pyrolysis of n-decane initiated by nitromethane

    KAUST Repository

    Jia, Zhenjian; Wang, Zhandong; Cheng, Zhanjun; Zhou, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Initiator could accelerate the rate of hydrocarbon pyrolysis and reduce the required material temperatures for a hypersonic aircraft heat exchanger/reactor. Nitroalkanes were proposed as the effective initiator because of the lower CN bond

  20. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  1. Refining fast pyrolysis of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil produced from biomass is a promising renewable alternative to crude oil. Such pyrolysis oil has transportation, storage, and processing benefits, none of which are offered by the bulky, inhomogeneous solid biomass from which it originates. However, pyrolysis oil has both a different

  2. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  3. Biofuel from jute stick by pyrolysis technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, J.; Parveen, M.; Islam, M. R.; Haniu, H.; Takai, K.

    2017-06-01

    In this study the conversion of jute stick into biofuels and chemicals by externally heated fixed-bed pyrolysis reactor have been taken into consideration. The solid jute stick was characterized through proximate and ultimate analysis, gross calorific values and thermo-gravimetric analysis to investigate their suitability as feedstock for this consideration. The solid biomass particles were fed into the reactor by gravity feed type reactor feeder. The products were oil, char and gases. The liquid and char products were collected separately while the gas was flared into the atmosphere. The process conditions were varied by fixed-bed temperature; feed stock particle size, N2 gas flow rate and running time. All parameters were found to influence the product yields significantly. The maximum liquid yields were 50 wt% of solid jute stick at reactor temperature 425°C for N2 gas flow rate 6 l/min, feed particle size 1180-1700 µm and running time 30 min. Liquid products obtained at these conditions were characterized by physical properties, chemical analysis and GC-MS techniques. The results show that it is possible to obtained liquid products that are comparable to petroleum fuels and valuable chemical feedstock from the selected biomass if the pyrolysis conditions are chosen accordingly.

  4. Quality improvement of pyrolysis oil from waste rubber by adding sawdust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-liang; Chang, Jian-min; Cai, Li-ping; Shi, Sheldon Q

    2014-12-01

    This work was aimed at improving the pyrolysis oil quality of waste rubber by adding larch sawdust. Using a 1 kg/h stainless pyrolysis reactor, the contents of sawdust in rubber were gradually increased from 0%, 50%, 100% and 200% (wt%) during the pyrolysis process. Using a thermo-gravimetric (TG) analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis of evolving products (TG-FTIR), the weight loss characteristics of the heat under different mixtures of sawdust/rubber were observed. Using the pyrolysis-gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), the vapors from the pyrolysis processes were collected and the compositions of the vapors were examined. During the pyrolysis process, the recovery of the pyrolysis gas and its composition were measured in-situ at a reaction temperature of 450 °C and a retaining time of 1.2s. The results indicated that the efficiency of pyrolysis was increased and the residual carbon was reduced as the percentage of sawdust increased. The adding of sawdust significantly improved the pyrolysis oil quality by reducing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrogen and sulfur compounds contents, resulting in an improvement in the combustion efficiency of the pyrolysis oil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Correia Grácio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. OBJECTIVE: To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation

  6. Human Powered Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  7. Lightweight Shield for Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luper, C.

    1982-01-01

    Centrifuge bowl composed of laminated aluminum offers required combination of high strength at reduced weight. Around outside wall of bowl core of 1/16 inch thick spun aluminum are wrapped two layers of aluminum, each also one-sixteenth inch thick. Layered structure prevents cracks from propagating through wall.

  8. Multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevostyanov, V. S.; Uralskij, V. I.; Uralskij, A. V.; Sinitsa, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents scientific and engineering developments of multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit in which the selective effect of grinding bodies on the crushing material is realized, depending on its physical and mechanical characteristics and various schemes for organizing the technological process

  9. Centrifugal blood pump 603

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Centrifugal blood pump 603 pressure obtained for real blood, as shown in figure 6, is a little higher than that for glycerin aqua Solution with the same viscosity as blood. This may indicate the effect of slight non-. Newtonian turbulent flow. The radial whirl motion of the impeller was observed by dual laser position sensors.

  10. Centrifugal analyzer development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtis, C.A.; Bauer, M.L.; Bostick, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    The development of the centrifuge fast analyzer (CFA) is reviewed. The development of a miniature CFA with computer data analysis is reported and applications for automated diagnostic chemical and hematological assays are discussed. A portable CFA system with microprocessor was adapted for field assays of air and water samples for environmental pollutants, including ammonia, nitrates, nitrites, phosphates, sulfates, and silica. 83 references

  11. New centrifugation blood culture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, G L; Smith, K

    1978-01-01

    A single-tube blood culture device designed for centrifugation in a tabletop centrifuge is described. Reconstruction experiments using 21 different organisms and human donor blood indicate that excellent recovery can be obtained by centrifugation for 30 min at 3,000 X g. PMID:342539

  12. Flow control arrangements for centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderton, G.W.; Davidge, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    In a centrifuge plant for the separation of uranium isotopes, when a centrifuge machine breaks down, light gas is produced. This gas can cause adjacent machines to break down, so propagating the fault. The present invention provides flow control arrangements in gas pipes to the centrifuge, whereby sudden egress of gas from a failed machine is inhibited. (author)

  13. A novel approach of solid waste management via aromatization using multiphase catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaurh, Pramendra; Pramanik, Hiralal

    2018-01-01

    A new and innovative approach was adopted to increase the yield of aromatics like, benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) in the catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene (PE). The BTX content was significantly increased due to effective interaction between catalystZSM-5 and target molecules i.e., lower paraffins within the reactor. The thermal and catalytic pyrolysis both were performed in a specially designed semi-batch reactor at the temperature range of 500 °C-800 °C. Catalytic pyrolysis were performed in three different phases within the reactor batch by batch systematically, keeping the catalyst in A type- vapor phase, B type- liquid phase and C type- vapor and liquid phase (multiphase), respectively. Total aromatics (BTX) of 6.54 wt% was obtained for thermal pyrolysis at a temperature of 700 °C. In contrary, for the catalytic pyrolysis A, B and C types reactor arrangement, the aromatic (BTX) contents were progressively increased, nearly 6 times from 6.54 wt% (thermal pyrolysis) to 35.06 wt% for C-type/multiphase (liquid and vapor phase). The pyrolysis oil were characterized using GC-FID, FT-IR, ASTM distillation and carbon residue test to evaluate its end use and aromatic content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Staged catalytic gasification/steam reforming of pyrolysis oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, G.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2009-01-01

    Gasification/steam reforming of pyrolysis oil was studied in a staged reactor concept, which consisted of an inert fluidized bed and a catalytic fixed bed. Methane and C2−C3 free syngas is produced at a single temperature around 800 °C at atmospheric pressure. By lowering the temperature of the

  15. Biochar production from freshwater algae by slow pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanongkiat Kiatsiriroat

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A study on the feasibility of biochar production from 3 kinds of freshwateralgae, viz. Spirulina, Spirogyra and Cladophora, was undertaken. Using a slow pyrolysis process in a specially designed reactor, biochar could be generated at 550oC under nitrogen atmosphere. The yields of biochar were between 28-31% of the dry algae.

  16. Development of advanced technologies for biomass pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ran

    the entering vapors and gases to spin, providing good heat transfer and driving the condensed droplets to the wall through cyclonic action. This condenser design has been successfully demonstrated for the application on the pilot fluidized bed pyrolysis unit. After condensation, a stable aerosol is also typically formed which is difficult to be efficiently captured with conventional technologies. A pilot scale helicoidal rotary demister, a novel technology for removing persistent fine bio-oil droplets from gases using dynamic centrifugal forces, has been developed. The demister uses a helicoidal element, which consists of a metal sheet wound as a spiral, designed to rotate at high speeds within a cyclone body. Larger droplets are separated as they enter the cyclone housing, while the smaller droplets are carried by the gas into the helicoidal path of the rotating element, where they are centrifuged towards the outer collecting walls and, as a result of a specially designed baffle, may flow counter-currently to the gas and are drained out from the bottom of the rotating element. The mist-free gas leaves through a channel located at the center of the spiral. This unique demister design has demonstrated a high separation efficiency when tested offline with artificial submicron mist and tested online for demisting bio-oil aerosol on the pyrolysis unit. Bio-oil Upgrading: Very often, phase separation of bio-oil occurs naturally upon condensation of the bio-oil vapors, typically through the use of cyclonic condensers. The bio-oil is separated into an organic phase and an aqueous phase. Research has been conducted on the possibility to enhance the fuel properties and energy performance of the organic phase by reducing its water content, enhancing its heating value and improving its stability. Through the use of drying agents, a remarkable reduction of water content and an increase of heating value can be achieved. Moreover, the volumetric energy density can be greatly

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vail' eva, N A; Buyanov, R A

    1979-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of petroleum fractions (undecane) was performed with the object of clarifying such questions as the mechanism of action of the catalyst, the concepts of activity and selectivity of the catalyst, the role of transport processes, the temperature ranges and limitations of the catalytic process, the effect of the catalyst on secondary processes, and others. Catalysts such as quartz, MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, were used. Analysis of the experimental findings and the fact that the distribution of products is independent of the nature of the surface, demonstrate that the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in the presence of catalysts is based on the heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-chain mechanism of action, and that the role of the catalysts reduces to increasing the concentration of free radicals. The concept of selectivity cannot be applied to catalysts here, since they do not affect the mechanism of the unfolding of the process of pyrolysis and their role consists solely in initiating the process. In catalytic pyrolysis the concepts of kinetic and diffusive domains of unfolding of the catalytic reaction do not apply, and only the outer surface of the catalyst is engaged, whereas the inner surface merely promotes deletorious secondary processes reducing the selectivity of the process and the activity of the catalyst. 6 references, 2 figures.

  18. Pyrolysis of Pine Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2005-01-01

    In this study, pinewood has been pyrolyzed using a fixed heating rate with a variable end-temperature. The pyrolysis process has been simulated using a mechanism with three parallel reactions for the formation of char, gas and tar. First order irreversible kinetics is assumed. This kind of model ...

  19. A kinetic reaction model for biomass pyrolysis processes in Aspen Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Jens F.; Banks, Scott W.; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Dufour, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Predictive kinetic reaction model applicable to any lignocellulosic feedstock. • Calculates pyrolysis yields and product composition as function of reactor conditions. • Detailed modelling of product composition (33 model compounds for the bio-oil). • Good agreement with literature regarding yield curves and product composition. • Successful validation with pyrolysis experiments in bench scale fast pyrolysis rig. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel kinetic reaction model for biomass pyrolysis processes. The model is based on the three main building blocks of lignocellulosic biomass, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin and can be readily implemented in Aspen Plus and easily adapted to other process simulation software packages. It uses a set of 149 individual reactions that represent the volatilization, decomposition and recomposition processes of biomass pyrolysis. A linear regression algorithm accounts for the secondary pyrolysis reactions, thus allowing the calculation of slow and intermediate pyrolysis reactions. The bio-oil is modelled with a high level of detail, using up to 33 model compounds, which allows for a comprehensive estimation of the properties of the bio-oil and the prediction of further upgrading reactions. After showing good agreement with existing literature data, our own pyrolysis experiments are reported for validating the reaction model. A beech wood feedstock is subjected to pyrolysis under well-defined conditions at different temperatures and the product yields and compositions are determined. Reproducing the experimental pyrolysis runs with the simulation model, a high coincidence is found for the obtained fraction yields (bio-oil, char and gas), for the water content and for the elemental composition of the pyrolysis products. The kinetic reaction model is found to be suited for predicting pyrolysis yields and product composition for any lignocellulosic biomass feedstock under typical pyrolysis conditions

  20. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis reactor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor was conducted in an entrained flow pyrolysis reactor by feeding a premixed feedstock of the catalyst and biomass. Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 was very effective for de-oxygenation of the pyrolysis liquid and oxygen content of the bio-oil was decreased from 47.5 wt.% to 16.4 wt.%. An organic rich bio-oil was obtained with 5.8 wt.% water content and a higher heating value of 36.1 MJ/kg. Carboxylic acids were completely removed and the bio-oil had almost a neutral pH. This bio-oil of high calorific low, low water and oxygen content may be an attractive fuel precursor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor produced a very similar quality bio-oil compared to post treatment of pyrolysis vapors, and shows the possible application of Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 in a commercial type reactor system such as a fluidized bed reactor. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wild, P.

    2011-07-15

    The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for materials and energy where biomass provides the only renewable source for chemicals. In a biorefinery, biomass is converted via different technologies into heat, power and various products. Here, pyrolysis (thermal degradation without added oxygen) of lignocellulosic biomass can play an important role, because it leads to an array of useful chemicals. Examples are furfural and acetic acid from hemicellulose, levoglucosan from cellulose and phenols and biochar from lignin. Since the three major biomass polymers hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin possess dissimilar thermal stabilities and reactivities, type and amount of degradation products are tunable by proper selection of the pyrolysis conditions. To determine if step-wise pyrolysis would be suitable for the production of chemicals, staged degasification of lignocellulosic biomass was studied. Due to limited yields, a hot pressurized water pre-treatment (aquathermolysis) followed by pyrolysis was subsequently developed as an improved version of a staged approach to produce furfural and levoglucosan from the carbohydrate fraction of the biomass. Lignin is the only renewable source for aromatic chemicals. Lignocellulosic biorefineries for bio-ethanol produce lignin as major by-product. The pyrolysis of side-streams into valuable chemicals is of prime importance for a profitable biorefinery. To determine the added-value of lignin side-streams other than their use as fuel for power, application research including techno-economic analysis is required. In this thesis, the pyrolytic valorisation of lignin into phenols and biochar was investigated and proven possible.

  2. Separation parameters of gas centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    Early work on development of the gas centrifuge for separation of uranium isotopes has recently been reviewed. Several configurations were investigated. The preferred configuration eventually turned out to be a countercurrent centrifuge. In this form, an internal circulation is set up, and as a consequence, light isotope concentrates at one end of the centrifuge, heavy isotope at the other. In many ways the effect resembles the separation obtained in packed columns in the chemical and petroleum industries. It is the purpose of this paper to develop this analogy between countercurrent gas centrifuges and packed towers and to illustrate its usefulness in understanding the separation process in the centrifuge. 8 figures

  3. Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini, Alessandro; Passarini, Fabrizio; Vassura, Ivano; Serrano, David; Dufour, Javier; Morselli, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► In this work, we exploited mechanical separation and pyrolysis to recycle ASR. ► Pyrolysis of the floating organic fraction is promising in reaching ELV Directive targets. ► Zeolite catalyst improve pyrolysis oil and gas yield. - Abstract: sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a “waste-to-chemicals” perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

  4. Centrifugal compressor case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, B.

    2010-10-15

    Three centrifugal compressors at a pipeline station were retrofitted with higher head impellers in 2008. The owners of the station experienced vibration problems over the following 2 years that caused transmitter and position failures that were assumed to be flow-induced pulsations. A vibration and pulsation analysis indicated that the shell mode piping vibration excited by the blade pass pulsation was responsible for the failures. This study outlined factors that contributed to the vibration problem. Interferences between the compressor and shell mode piping natural frequencies were predicted, and potential excitation sources were examined. The study demonstrated how centrifugal vibration analyses can be used during the design phase to avoid costly adjustments. Recommendations included the addition of stiffeners to alter the shell modes, and the addition of constrained layer damping material to reduce resonant responses. 2 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  5. Container for centrifuging blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narra, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    A container is described for use in drawing patient's blood, centrifuging the blood and then labelling the separated red cells with sup(99m)Tc. It consists of a tube with a central chamber and a lower portion provided with an aperture in which a weir is supported and extends into the central chamber. The weir has a central channel. A resilient plug seals the aperture. (author)

  6. Thermogravimetric analysis and fast pyrolysis of Milkweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Soo; Agblevor, Foster A

    2014-10-01

    Pyrolysis of Milkweed was carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a bubbling fluidized bed reactor. Total liquid yield of Milkweed pyrolysis was between 40.74% and 44.19 wt% between 425 °C and 550 °C. The gas yield increased from 27.90 wt% to 33.33 wt% with increasing reaction temperature. The higher heating values (HHV) of the Milkweed bio-oil were relatively high (30.33-32.87 MJ/kg) and varied with reaction temperature, feeding rate and fluidization velocity. The selectivity for CO2 was highest within non-condensable gases, and the molar ratio of CO2/CO was about 3 at the different reaction conditions. The (13)C NMR analysis, of the bio-oil showed that the relative concentration carboxylic group and its derivatives was higher at 425 °C than 475 °C, which resulted in slightly higher oxygen content in bio-oil. The pH of aqueous phase obtained at 475 °C was 7.37 which is the highest reported for any lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis oils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Olive bagasse (Olea europa L.) pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensoz, S.; Demiral, I. [Osmangazi Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Gercel, H.F. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-15

    Olive bagasse (Olea europea L.) was pyrolysed in a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, heating rate, particle size and sweep gas flow rates on the yields of the products were investigated. Pyrolysis runs were performed using pyrolysis temperatures between 350 and 550 {sup o}C with heating rates of 10 and 50 {sup o}C min{sup -} {sup 1}. The particle size and sweep gas flow rate varied in the ranges 0.224-1.8 mm and 50-200 cm{sup 3} min {sup -1}, respectively. The bio-oil obtained at 500 {sup o}C was analysed and at this temperature the liquid product yield was the maximum. The various characteristics of bio-oil obtained under these conditions were identified on the basis of standard test methods. The empirical formula of the bio-oil with heating value of 31.8 MJ kg{sup -1} was established as CH{sub 1.65}O{sub 0.25}N{sub 0.03}. The chemical characterization showed that the bio-oil obtained from olive bagasse may be potentially valuable as a fuel and chemical feedstock. (author)

  8. Experiments and stochastic simulations of lignite coal during pyrolysis and gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.I.; Gupta, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Lignite pyrolysis and gasification has been conducted in a semi batch reactor. ► The objective is to understand mechanism of syngas evolution during pyrolysis. ► Stochastic simulations of lignite pyrolysis were conducted using Gillespie algorithm. ► First order, single step mechanism failed to fit cumulative yield of hydrogen. ► Evolution of hydrogen via pyrolysis of gaseous hydrocarbon following bridges scission. -- Abstract: Lignite pyrolysis and gasification has been conducted in a semi batch reactor at reactor temperatures of 800–950 °C in 50 °C intervals. CO 2 has been used as the gasifying agent for gasification experiments. The objective of this investigation is to understand the mechanism of syngas evolution during pyrolysis and to unravel the effect of CO 2 on pyrolysis mechanism. Stochastic simulations of lignite pyrolysis have been conducted using Gillespie algorithm. Two reaction mechanisms have been used in the simulations; first order, single step mechanism and the FLASHCHAIN mechanism. The first order single step mechanism was successful in fitting cumulative yield of CO 2 , CO, CH 4 and other hydrocarbons (C n H m ). The first order, single step failed to fit the cumulative yield of hydrogen, which suggests a more complex mechanism for hydrogen evolution. Evolution of CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , C n H m and H 2 flow rates has been monitored. The only effect of CO 2 on pyrolysis mechanism is promotion of reverse water gas shift reaction for the experiments described here. Methane evolution extended for slightly longer time than other hydrocarbons and hydrogen evolution extended for a slightly longer time than methane. This indicated the evolution of hydrogen via further pyrolysis of aliphatic hydrocarbon. It is also suggested that this step occurs in series after aliphatic hydrocarbons evolution by bridges scission.

  9. Pyrolysis and Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Bilitewski, B.

    2011-01-01

    a waste management perspective, pyrolysis and gasification are of relatively little importance as an overall management option. Today, gasification is primarily used on specific waste fractions as opposed to mixed household wastes. The main commercial activity so far has been in Japan, with only limited....... Today gasification is used within a range of applications, the most important of which are conversion of coal into syngas for use as chemical feedstock or energy production; but also gasification of biomass and waste is gaining significant interest as emerging technologies for sustainable energy. From...... success in Europe and North America (Klein et al., 2004). However, pyrolysis and gasification of waste are generally expected to become more widely used in the future. A main reason for this is that public perceptions of waste incineration in some countries is a major obstacle for installing new...

  10. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Nitroethane Pyrolysis at a Low Pressure: Competition Reactions in the Primary Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kuiwen; Glarborg, Peter; Zhou, Xueyao

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis of nitroethane has been investigated over the temperature range of 682-1423 K in a plug flow reactor at a low pressure. The major species in the pyrolysis process have been identified and quantified using tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry...

  11. Quality improvement of pyrolysis oil from waste rubber by adding sawdust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wen-liang [MOE Key Laboratory of Wooden Material Science and Application, College of Material Science and Technology, Wood Science and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, 100083 Beijing (China); Chang, Jian-min, E-mail: cjianmin@bjfu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Wooden Material Science and Application, College of Material Science and Technology, Wood Science and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, 100083 Beijing (China); Cai, Li-ping [Mechanical and Energy Engineering Department, University of North Texas, 3940 N. Elm, Denton 72076, TX (United States); Shi, Sheldon Q., E-mail: Sheldon.Shi@unt.edu [Mechanical and Energy Engineering Department, University of North Texas, 3940 N. Elm, Denton 72076, TX (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Rubber-pyrolysis oil is difficult to be fuel due to high proportion of PAHs. • The efficiency of pyrolysis was increased as the percentage of sawdust increased. • The adding of sawdust improved pyrolysis oil quality by reducing the PAHs content. • Adding sawdust reduced nitrogen/sulfur in oil and was easier to convert to diesel. - Abstract: This work was aimed at improving the pyrolysis oil quality of waste rubber by adding larch sawdust. Using a 1 kg/h stainless pyrolysis reactor, the contents of sawdust in rubber were gradually increased from 0%, 50%, 100% and 200% (wt%) during the pyrolysis process. Using a thermo-gravimetric (TG) analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis of evolving products (TG–FTIR), the weight loss characteristics of the heat under different mixtures of sawdust/rubber were observed. Using the pyrolysis–gas chromatography (GC)–mass spectrometry (Py–GC/MS), the vapors from the pyrolysis processes were collected and the compositions of the vapors were examined. During the pyrolysis process, the recovery of the pyrolysis gas and its composition were measured in-situ at a reaction temperature of 450 °C and a retaining time of 1.2 s. The results indicated that the efficiency of pyrolysis was increased and the residual carbon was reduced as the percentage of sawdust increased. The adding of sawdust significantly improved the pyrolysis oil quality by reducing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrogen and sulfur compounds contents, resulting in an improvement in the combustion efficiency of the pyrolysis oil.

  12. Quality improvement of pyrolysis oil from waste rubber by adding sawdust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wen-liang; Chang, Jian-min; Cai, Li-ping; Shi, Sheldon Q.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Rubber-pyrolysis oil is difficult to be fuel due to high proportion of PAHs. • The efficiency of pyrolysis was increased as the percentage of sawdust increased. • The adding of sawdust improved pyrolysis oil quality by reducing the PAHs content. • Adding sawdust reduced nitrogen/sulfur in oil and was easier to convert to diesel. - Abstract: This work was aimed at improving the pyrolysis oil quality of waste rubber by adding larch sawdust. Using a 1 kg/h stainless pyrolysis reactor, the contents of sawdust in rubber were gradually increased from 0%, 50%, 100% and 200% (wt%) during the pyrolysis process. Using a thermo-gravimetric (TG) analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis of evolving products (TG–FTIR), the weight loss characteristics of the heat under different mixtures of sawdust/rubber were observed. Using the pyrolysis–gas chromatography (GC)–mass spectrometry (Py–GC/MS), the vapors from the pyrolysis processes were collected and the compositions of the vapors were examined. During the pyrolysis process, the recovery of the pyrolysis gas and its composition were measured in-situ at a reaction temperature of 450 °C and a retaining time of 1.2 s. The results indicated that the efficiency of pyrolysis was increased and the residual carbon was reduced as the percentage of sawdust increased. The adding of sawdust significantly improved the pyrolysis oil quality by reducing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrogen and sulfur compounds contents, resulting in an improvement in the combustion efficiency of the pyrolysis oil

  13. Multiple-isotope separation in gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Houston G.; Mason, T.C.; Soubbaramayer

    1996-01-01

    In previous works, the Onsager's pancake equation was used to provide solution to the internal counter-current flow field, which is necessary to calculate solutions to the isotope transport equation. The diffusion coefficient was assumed to be constant which is a good approximation for gases with large molecular weights, and small differences in the molecular weights of the various isotopes. A new optimization strategy was presented for determining the operating parameters of a gas centrifuge to be used for multiple-component isotope separation. Scoop drag, linear wall temperature gradient, the feed rate ant the cut have been chosen as operating parameters for the optimization. The investigation was restricted to a single centrifuge, and the problem of cascading for multiple-isotope separation was not addressed. The model describing the flow and separation phenomena in centrifuge includes a set of equations describing the fluid dynamics of the counter-current flow and the diffusion equations written for each isotope of the mixture. In this paper, an optimization algorithm is described and applied to an example for the re enrichment of spent reactor uranium

  14. Unsteady flow measurements in centrifugal compressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bammert, K.; Mobarak, A.; Rautenberg, M.

    1976-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors and blowers are often used for recycling the coolant gas in gas-cooled reactors. To achieve the required high pressure ratios, highly loaded centrifugal compressors are built. The paper deals with unsteady flow measurements on highly loaded centrifugal impellers. Measurements of the approaching flow have been done with hot wires. The method of measurement enabled us to get the velocity distribution across the pitch ahead of the inducer. The static pressure signals along the shroud line has been discussed on the basis of some theoretical considerations. Accordingly the form of flow in the impeller and the wave flow or separation zones in the impeller can now be better interpreted. The importance of the unsteady nature of the relative flow, especially at impeller exit, is clearly demonstrated. Measurements with high responsive total pressure probes in the vicinity of impeller exit and the subsequent calculations have shown, that the instantaneous energy transfer at a certain point after the impeller may differ by more than 30% from the Euler work. Lastly, unsteady pressure measurements along the shroud line have been performed during surge and rotating stall. The surge signal have been analyzed in more detail and the mechanism of flow rupture and pressure recovery during a surge cycle is thoroughly discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. The magnetic centrifugal mass filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages.

  16. The magnetic centrifugal mass filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages.

  17. Biomass pyrolysis/gasification for product gas production: the overall investigation of parametric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.; Andries, J.; Luo, Z.; Spliethoff, H.

    2003-01-01

    The conventional biomass pyrolysis/gasification process for production of medium heating value gas for industrial or civil applications faces two disadvantages, i.e. low gas productivity and the accompanying corrosion of downstream equipment caused by the high content of tar vapour contained in the gas phase. The objective of this paper is to overcome these disadvantages, and therefore, the effects of the operating parameters on biomass pyrolysis are investigated in a laboratory setup based on the principle of keeping the heating value of the gas almost unchanged. The studied parameters include reaction temperature, residence time of volatile phase in the reactor, physico-chemical pretreatment of biomass particles, heating rate of the external heating furnace and improvement of the heat and mass transfer ability of the pyrolysis reactor. The running temperature of a separate cracking reactor and the geometrical configuration of the pyrolysis reactor are also studied. However, due to time limits, different types of catalysts are not used in this work to determine their positive influences on biomass pyrolysis behaviour. The results indicate that product gas production from biomass pyrolysis is sensitive to the operating parameters mentioned above, and the product gas heating value is high, up to 13-15 MJ/N m 3

  18. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  19. National geotechnical centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  20. Centrifugal-reciprocating compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, W. H. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor is described which includes at least one pair of cylinders arranged in coaxial alignment and supported for angular displacement about a common axis of rotation normally disecting a common longitudinal axis of symmetry for the cylinders. The cylinders are characterized by ported closures located at the mutually remote ends thereof through which the cylinders are charged and discharged, and a pair of piston heads seated within the cylinders and supported for floating displacement in compressive strokes in response to unidirectional angular displacement imparted to the cylinders.

  1. Kinetic study and syngas production from pyrolysis of forestry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Mian; Wang, Xun; Chen, Jian; Yang, Ping; Liu, Cuixia; Xiao, Bo; Guo, Dabin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis process can be divided into three stages using differential DTG method. • A modified discrete DAEM model fitted experimental data well. • Fe/biochar catalyst showed a good performance on catalytic reforming process. - Abstract: Kinetic study and syngas production from pyrolysis of forestry waste (pine sawdust (PS)) were investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor, respectively. In TGA, it was found that the pyrolysis of PS could be divided into three stages and stage II was the major mass reduction stage with mass loss of 73–74%. The discrete distributed activation energy model (DAEM) with discrete 200 first-order reactions was introduced to study the pyrolysis kinetic. The results indicated that the DAEM with 200 first-order reactions could approximate the pyrolysis process with an excellent fit between experimental and calculated data. The apparent activation energies of PS ranged from 147.86 kJ·mol −1 to 395.76 kJ·mol −1 , with corresponding pre-exponential factors of 8.30 × 10 13 s −1 to 3.11 × 10 25 s −1 . In the fixed-bed reactor, char supported iron catalyst was prepared for tar cracking. Compared with no catalyst which the gas yield and tar yield were 0.58 N m 3 /kg biomass and 201.23 g/kg biomass, the gas yield was markedly increased to 1.02 N m 3 /kg biomass and the tar yield was decreased to only 26.37 g/kg biomass in the presence of char supported iron catalyst. These results indicated that char supported iron catalyst could potentially be used to catalytically decompose tar molecules in syngas generated via biomass pyrolysis.

  2. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  3. Pyrolysis characteristics of typical biomass thermoplastic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhen Cai

    Full Text Available The biomass thermoplastic composites were prepared by extrusion molding method with poplar flour, rice husk, cotton stalk and corn stalk. The thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA has also been used for evaluating the pyrolysis process of the composites. The results showed that the pyrolysis process mainly consists of two stages: biomass pyrolysis and the plastic pyrolysis. The increase of biomass content in the composite raised the first stage pyrolysis peak temperature. However, the carbon residue was reduced and the pyrolysis efficiency was better because of synergistic effect of biomass and plastic. The composite with different kinds of biomass have similar pyrolysis process, and the pyrolysis efficiency of the composite with corn stalk was best. The calcium carbonate could inhibit pyrolysis process and increase the first stage pyrolysis peak temperature and carbon residue as a filling material of the composite. Keywords: Biomass thermoplastic composite, Calcium carbonate, Pyrolysis characteristic

  4. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braehler, Georg; Slametschka, Rainer

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchangers (IEX in international language) are used to remove radionuclides from the primary coolant in all nuclear power stations with a water cooling circuit. This is done by continuously removing a volume of coolant from the primary circuit and passing it through coolers, filters and the ion exchange beds. Cation and anion exchangers, in the form of coarse-grained resin beads in pressurized-water reactors and as finely ground powdered resins in boiling water reactors, are used. The trend for new power stations is to exploit all the possibilities for avoiding the generation of contaminated liquids and then to clean, as far as possible, the solutions that are nevertheless generated using ion exchange for it to be possible to dispose of them as non-radioactive waste. This relieves the burden on evaporator facilities, or means that these can even be dispensed with entirely. Regeneration is possible in principle, but little use is made of it. As the regeneration usual in conventional technologies is not employed in nuclear power stations, it is necessary to dispose of this material as radioactive waste. On the international level, a great number of processes are offered that are intended to meet the relevant national regulations, and these will be discussed in brief with their advantages and disadvantages. The aim is then to find a process which reduces the volume, yields an inert or mineralized product, works at temperatures of no more than approximately 600 deg. C and can be run in a simple facility. Originally, the pyrolysis process was developed to treat liquid organic waste from reprocessing. A typical application is the decomposition of spent solvent (TBP, tributyl phosphate, mixed with kerosene). In this process TBP is pyrolyzed together with calcium hydroxide in a fluidized bed facility at temperatures of around 500 deg. C, the calcium hydroxide reacts with the phosphate groups directly to form calcium pyrophosphate which contains all the radioactivity

  5. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post treatment of the pyrolysis vapors. The in-situ catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in an entrained flow reactor system using a premixed feedstock of Na2CO3 and biomass and post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was conducted in a downstream fixed bed reactor of Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3. Results have shown that both Na2CO3 and Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 can be used for the production of a high quality bio-oil from catalytic pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake. The catalytic bio-oil had very low oxygen content, water content as low as 1wt.%, a neutral pH, and a high calorific value upto 41.8MJ/kg. The bio-oil consisted of high value chemical compounds mainly hydrocarbons and undesired compounds in the bio-oil were either completely removed or considerably reduced. Increasing the triglycerides content (vegetable oil) in the wood enhanced the formation of hydrocarbons in the bio-oil. Post treatment of the pyrolysis vapor over a fixed bed of Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 produced superior quality bio-oil compared to in-situ catalytic pyrolysis with Na2CO3. This high quality bio-oil may be used as a precursor in a fractionating process for the production of alternative fuels. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Thermodynamic analysis for syngas production from volatiles released in waste tire pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez, Juan Daniel; Murillo, Ramón; García, Tomás; Arauzo, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis experiments have been conducted in a continuous auger reactor. • Pyrolysis temperature influence on composition of both volatiles and char was studied. • A process for syngas production has been proposed from the volatiles. • Equivalence ratio down to 0.4 is a practical limit for syngas production. • The results provide essential data prior to perform any experimental campaign. - Abstract: This paper shows the maximum limit on syngas composition obtained from volatiles released in waste tire pyrolysis when they are submitted to an air–steam partial oxidation process. Thus, from mass and energy balances and a stoichiometric equilibrium model, syngas composition and reaction temperature as well as some process parameters were predicted by varying both the equivalence ratio (ER) and the steam to fuel ratio (SF). In addition, pyrolysis experiments were performed using a continuous auger reactor, and the influence of pyrolysis temperature on composition of both volatiles and char was studied. Consequently, the resulting syngas characteristics were correlated with the pyrolysis temperature. The stoichiometric equilibrium model showed that an ER down to 0.4 is a practical limit to perform the air–steam partial oxidation process. When the process is carried out only with air, volatiles obtained at high pyrolysis temperature lead to lower reaction temperature and higher LHV of syngas in comparison with those found at low pyrolysis temperature. The H 2 production is favored between 0.20 and 0.40 of ER and seems to be more influenced by the H/C ratio than by the water gas-shift reaction. On the other hand, the steam addition shows a more notable effect on the H 2 production for volatiles obtained at the highest pyrolysis temperature (600 °C) in agreement with the lower reaction temperature under these experimental conditions. This thermodynamic analysis provides essential data on the optimization of syngas production from volatiles

  7. Fast pyrolysis of linseed. Product yields and compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acikgoz, C.; Onay, O.; Kockar, O.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Iki Eylul Campus, Anadolu University, Eskisehir 26470 (Turkey)

    2004-06-01

    Fixed-bed fast pyrolysis experiments have been conducted on a sample of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) to determine particularly the effect of pyrolysis temperature, heating rate, particle size and sweep gas flow rate on the pyrolysis product yields and their compositions. The maximum oil yield of 57.7wt.% was obtained at a final pyrolysis temperature of 550C, particle size range 0.6mmreactor. The pyrolysis products were characterised by elemental analysis and various chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. Chromatographic and spectroscopic studies on oil showed that it can be used as a renewable fuel and chemical feedstock, with a calorific value of 38.45MJ/kg and empirical formula of CH{sub 1.64}O{sub 0.11}N{sub 0.03}.

  8. Pyrolysis oil as diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gros, S [Wartsila Diesel International Ltd., Vaasa (Finland). Diesel Technology

    1997-12-31

    Wood waste pyrolysis oil is an attractive fuel alternative for diesel engine operation. The main benefit is the sustainability of the fuel. No fossil reserves are consumed. The fact that wood waste pyrolysis oil does not contribute to CO{sub 2} emissions is of utmost importance. This means that power plants utilising pyrolysis oil do not cause additional global warming. Equally important is the reduced sulphur emissions that this fuel alternative implies. The sulphur content of pyrolysis oil is extremely low. The high water content and low heating value are also expected to result in very low NO{sub x} emissions. Utilisation of wood waste pyrolysis oil in diesel engines, however, involves a lot of challenges and problems to be solved. The low heating value requires a new injection system with high capacity. The corrosive characteristics of the fluid also underline the need for new injection equipment materials. Wood waste pyrolysis oil contains solid particles which can clog filters and cause abrasive wear. Wood waste pyrolysis oil has proven to have extremely bad ignition properties. The development of a reliable injection system which is able to cope with such a fuel involves a lot of optimisation tests, redesign and innovative solutions. Successful single-cylinder tests have already been performed and they have verified that diesel operation on wood pyrolysis oil is technically possible. (orig.)

  9. Time resolved pyrolysis of char

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Ahrenfeldt, J.; Henriksen, U.B.

    pyrolysis, and slow heating in direct combination with mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection, respectively. Characteristic ions derived from the flash pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry data enable the release of volatiles to be time and, hence...

  10. Pyrolysis oil as diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gros, S. [Wartsila Diesel International Ltd., Vaasa (Finland). Diesel Technology

    1996-12-31

    Wood waste pyrolysis oil is an attractive fuel alternative for diesel engine operation. The main benefit is the sustainability of the fuel. No fossil reserves are consumed. The fact that wood waste pyrolysis oil does not contribute to CO{sub 2} emissions is of utmost importance. This means that power plants utilising pyrolysis oil do not cause additional global warming. Equally important is the reduced sulphur emissions that this fuel alternative implies. The sulphur content of pyrolysis oil is extremely low. The high water content and low heating value are also expected to result in very low NO{sub x} emissions. Utilisation of wood waste pyrolysis oil in diesel engines, however, involves a lot of challenges and problems to be solved. The low heating value requires a new injection system with high capacity. The corrosive characteristics of the fluid also underline the need for new injection equipment materials. Wood waste pyrolysis oil contains solid particles which can clog filters and cause abrasive wear. Wood waste pyrolysis oil has proven to have extremely bad ignition properties. The development of a reliable injection system which is able to cope with such a fuel involves a lot of optimisation tests, redesign and innovative solutions. Successful single-cylinder tests have already been performed and they have verified that diesel operation on wood pyrolysis oil is technically possible. (orig.)

  11. Centrifugal precipitation chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoichiro; Lin, Qi

    2009-01-01

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography separates analytes according their solubility in ammonium sulfate (AS) solution and other precipitants. The separation column is made from a pair of long spiral channels partitioned with a semipermeable membrane. In a typical separation, concentrated ammonium sulfate is eluted through one channel while water is eluted through the other channel in the opposite direction. The countercurrent process forms an exponential AS concentration gradient through the water channel. Consequently, protein samples injected into the water channel is subjected to a steadily increasing AS concentration and at the critical AS concentration they are precipitated and deposited in the channel bed by the centrifugal force. Then the chromatographic separation is started by gradually reducing the AS concentration in the AS channel which lowers the AS gradient concentration in the water channel. This results in dissolution of deposited proteins which are again precipitated at an advanced critical point as they move through the channel. Consequently, proteins repeat precipitation and dissolution through a long channel and finally eluted out from the column in the order of their solubility in the AS solution. The present method has been successfully applied to a number of analytes including human serum proteins, recombinant ketosteroid isomerase, carotenoid cleavage enzymes, plasmid DNA, polysaccharide, polymerized pigments, PEG-protein conjugates, etc. The method is capable to single out the target species of proteins by affinity ligand or immunoaffinity separation. PMID:19541553

  12. Relativistic centrifugal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2018-03-01

    Near the central engine, many astrophysical jets are expected to rotate about their axis. Further out they are expected to go through the processes of reconfinement and recollimation. In both these cases, the flow streams along a concave surface and hence, it is subject to the centrifugal force. It is well known that such flows may experience the centrifugal instability (CFI), to which there are many laboratory examples. The recent computer simulations of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei undergoing the process of reconfinement show that in such jets CFI may dominate over the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated with velocity shear (Gourgouliatos & Komissarov). In this letter, we generalize the Rayleigh criterion for CFI in rotating fluids to relativistic flows using a heuristic analysis. We also present the results of computer simulations which support our analytic criterion for the case of an interface separating two uniformly rotating cylindrical flows. We discuss the difference between CFI and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in flows with curved streamlines.

  13. Centrifugal gas separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanagawa, A; Fujii, O; Nakamoto, H

    1970-03-09

    Counter currents in the rotary drum of a centrifugal gas separator are produced by providing, at either end of the drum in the vicinity of the circumferential and central positions, respectively, outflow and inflow holes with a communicating passage external to the drum there between whereby gaseous counter currents are caused to flow within the drum and travel through the passage which is provided with gas flow adjustment means. Furthermore, the space defined by the stationary portion of the passage and the rotor drum is additionally provided with a screw pump or throttling device at either its stationary side or drum side or both in order to produce a radially directed gas flow therewithin. A gas mixture is axially admitted into the drum while centrifugal force and a cooling element provided therebelow cause an increase in gas pressure along and a gaseous flow toward the wall member, whereupon the comparatively high pressured circumferentially distributed gas is extracted from the outlet holes, flows through the external gas passage and back into the lower pressured drum core through the inlet holes, thus producing the desired counter currents. The gases thus separated are withdrawn along axially provided discharge pipes. Accordingly, this invention permits heating elements which were formerly used to produce thermal convection currents to be disposed of and allows the length of the rotor drum to be more efficiently utilized to enhance separation efficiency.

  14. Entrained-Flow, Fast Ablative Pyrolysis of Biomass - Annual Report, 1 December 1984 - 31 December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, J. P.; Scahill, J. W.; Evans, R. J.

    1986-07-01

    The ablative, fast pyrolysis system was relocated to SERI's new, permanent Field Test Laboratory. Pyrolysis system modifications were made to increase the energy available to the vortex reactor and to enhance the collection efficiency of primary pyrolysis vapors. Mathematical modeling of the vapor cracker has resulted in the ability to accurately predict experimental results with respect to the thermal cracking of the primary vapors, the generation of noncondensible gases, and the gas composition. The computer algorithm of this model can be readily used to perform experimental simulation and/or reactor scale-up due to its fundamental nature. Preliminary screening tests with pure ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, supplied by Mobil Research and Development Corporation, have shown promise for the conversion of primary pyrolysis oil vapors to aromatic hydrocarbons; i.e., gasoline.

  15. Hybrid-renewable processes for biofuels production: concentrated solar pyrolysis of biomass residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Anthe [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Geier, Manfred [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dedrick, Daniel E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The viability of thermochemically-derived biofuels can be greatly enhanced by reducing the process parasitic energy loads. Integrating renewable power into biofuels production is one method by which these efficiency drains can be eliminated. There are a variety of such potentially viable "hybrid-renewable" approaches; one is to integrate concentrated solar power (CSP) to power biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL) processes. Barriers to CSP integration into BTL processes are predominantly the lack of fundamental kinetic and mass transport data to enable appropriate systems analysis and reactor design. A novel design for the reactor has been created that can allow biomass particles to be suspended in a flow gas, and be irradiated with a simulated solar flux. Pyrolysis conditions were investigated and a comparison between solar and non-solar biomass pyrolysis was conducted in terms of product distributions and pyrolysis oil quality. A novel method was developed to analyse pyrolysis products, and investigate their stability.

  16. Effect of temperature in fluidized bed fast pyrolysis of biomass: oil quality assessment in test units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed fast pyrolysis reactor that allows a residence time of pine wood particles up to 25 min. The reactor temperature was varied between 330 and 580 °C to study the effect on product yields and oil composition. Apart from the physical−chemical analysis, a

  17. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of spent organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.; Shirsat, A.N.; Bharadwaj, S.R.

    2005-08-01

    The spent IX resins from nuclear power reactors are highly active solid wastes generated during operations of nuclear reactors. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of these resins can lead to high volume reduction of these wastes. Low temperature pyrolysis of transition metal ion loaded IX resins in presence of nitrogen was carried out in order to optimize catalyst composition to achieve maximum weight reduction. Thermo gravimetric analysis of the pyrolysis residues was carried out in presence of air in order to compare the oxidative characteristics of transition metal oxide catalysts. Copper along with iron, chromium and nickel present in the spent IX resins gave the most efficient catalyst combination for catalytic and oxidative pyrolysis of the residues. During low temperature catalytic pyrolysis, 137 Cesium volatility was estimated to be around 0.01% from cationic resins and around 0.1% from anionic resins. During oxidative pyrolysis at 700 degC, nearly 10 to 40% of 137 Cesium was found to be released to off gases depending upon type of resin and catalyst loaded on to it. The oxidation of pyrolytic residues at 700 degC gave weight reduction of 15% for cationic resins and 93% for anionic resins. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis is attractive for reducing weight and volume of spent cationic resins from PHWRs and VVERs. (author)

  18. Centrifuges and inertial shear forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van J.J.W.A.; Folgering, H.T.E.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Smit, T.H.

    2004-01-01

    Centrifuges are often used in biological studies for 1xg control samples in space flight microgravity experiments as well as in ground based research. Using centrifugation as a tool to generate an Earth like acceleration introduces unwanted inertial shear forces to the sample. Depending on the

  19. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  20. NASA low speed centrifugal compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a low speed centrifugal compressor were examined at NASA Lewis Research Center to improve understanding of the flow in centrifugal compressors, to provide models of various flow phenomena, and to acquire benchmark data for three dimensional viscous flow code validation. The paper describes the objectives, test facilities' instrumentation, and experiment preliminary comparisons.

  1. Novel technique for coal pyrolysis and hydrogenation product analysis. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, L.D.; Boyle, J.

    1993-03-15

    A microjet reactor coupled to a VUV photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used to obtain species measurements during high temperature pyrolysis and oxidation of a wide range of hydrocarbon compounds ranging from allene and acetylene to cyclohexane, benzene and toluene. Initial work focused on calibration of the technique, optimization of ion collection and detection and characterization of limitations. Using the optimized technique with 118 nm photoionization, intermediate species profiles were obtained for analysis of the hydrocarbon pyrolysis and oxidation mechanisms. The ``soft`` ionization, yielding predominantly molecular ions, allowed the study of reaction pathways in these high temperature systems where both sampling and detection challenges are severe. Work has focused on the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures representative of coal pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis products. The detailed mass spectra obtained during pyrolysis and oxidation of hydrocarbon mixtures is especially important because of the complex nature of the product mixture even at short residence times and low primary reactant conversions. The combustion community has advanced detailed modeling of pyrolysis and oxidation to the C4 hydrocarbon level but in general above that size uncertainties in rate constant and thermodynamic data do not allow us to a priori predict products from mixed hydrocarbon pyrolyses using a detailed chemistry model. For pyrolysis of mixtures of coal-derived liquid fractions with a large range of compound structures and molecular weights in the hundreds of amu the modeling challenge is severe. Lumped models are possible from stable product data.

  2. Gas-centrifuge unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope-enrichment unit is described for separating a gaseous mixture feedstock including a compound of a light nuclear isotope at a predetermined concentration and a compound of a heavy nuclear isotope at a predetermined concentration into at least two unit-output fractions including a waste fraction depleted in the light isotope to a predetermined concentration and a product fraction enriched in the light isotope to a predetermined concentration. The unit comprises a first group of cascades of gas centrifuges, each cascade having an enriching stage, a stripping stage, an input, a light-fraction output, and a heavy-fraction output for separating the gaseous-mixture feed stock into light and heavy gaseous-mixture fractions; and an auxillary cascade

  3. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  4. Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behavior, kinetic parameters and products properties of moso bamboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhang, Qisheng

    2014-10-01

    Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behaviors, kinetic parameters, and products properties of moso bamboo were investigated in this study. Pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 700 °C at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30 °C/min using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a lab-scale fixed bed pyrolysis reactor. The results show that the onset and offset temperatures of the main devolatilization stage of thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) curves obviously shift toward the high-temperature range, and the activation energy values increase with increasing heating rate. The heating rate has different effects on the pyrolysis products properties, including biochar (element content, proximate analysis, specific surface area, heating value), bio-oil (water content, chemical composition), and non-condensable gas. The solid yields from the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor are noticeably different from those of TGA mainly because the thermal hysteresis of the sample in the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor is more thorough. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pyrolysis characteristics of typical biomass thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hongzhen; Ba, Ziyu; Yang, Keyan; Zhang, Qingfa; Zhao, Kunpeng; Gu, Shiyan

    The biomass thermoplastic composites were prepared by extrusion molding method with poplar flour, rice husk, cotton stalk and corn stalk. The thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) has also been used for evaluating the pyrolysis process of the composites. The results showed that the pyrolysis process mainly consists of two stages: biomass pyrolysis and the plastic pyrolysis. The increase of biomass content in the composite raised the first stage pyrolysis peak temperature. However, the carbon residue was reduced and the pyrolysis efficiency was better because of synergistic effect of biomass and plastic. The composite with different kinds of biomass have similar pyrolysis process, and the pyrolysis efficiency of the composite with corn stalk was best. The calcium carbonate could inhibit pyrolysis process and increase the first stage pyrolysis peak temperature and carbon residue as a filling material of the composite.

  6. Gas centrifuge purge method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  7. Rapid and slow pyrolysis of pistachio shell: effect of pyrolysis conditions on the product yields and characterization of the liquid product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putun, Ayse E [Department of Chemical Engineering, Anadolu University, Eskisehir 26470, (Turkey); Ozbay, Nurgul [Bozuyuk Vocational School, Anadolu University, Bozuyuk/Bilecik, (Turkey); Varol, Esin Apaydin; Uzun, Basak B; Ates, Fuda [Department of Chemical Engineering, Anadolu University, Eskisehir 26470, (Turkey)

    2006-10-30

    This study reports the experimental results for the pyrolysis of pistachio shell under different conditions in a tubular reactor under a nitrogen flow. For the different conditions of pyrolysis temperature, nitrogen flow rate and heating rate, pyrolysis temperature of 773 K gave the highest bio-oil yield with a value of 27.7% when the heating rate and carrier gas flow rate were chosen as 300 K min{sup -1} and 100 cm{sup 3} min{sup -1}, respectively. Column chromatography was applied to this bio-oil and its subfractions were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and 1H-NMR. Aliphatic subfraction was conducted to gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy for further characterization. The results for the characterization show that using pistachio shell as a renewable source to produce valuable liquid products is applicable via pyrolysis. (Author)

  8. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  9. Sewage sludge pyrolysis - the distribution of heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistler, R.; Widmer, F.; Brunner, P.

    1986-01-01

    The paper informs about the heavy metal contents of sewage sludges and discusses the origin of household, industry and surface sewerage of the respective heavy metals. The study aimed at assessing whether and in how far heavy metal volatility may be checked by reducing the temperature during sewage sludge pyrolysis. The testing equipment used was made of glass/silica glass. Instead of in particles heavy metals were precipitated in the gaseous state. Except from mercury heavy metals are retained by the ashes up to temperatures from 450 to 555/sup 0/C. Due to the persistence of mercury care should be taken to keep the sewerage clear of it from the very beginning. Emissions caused by reactor materials can be avoided by choosing appropriate pyrolysis reactors.

  10. Slow, Wet and Catalytic Pyrolysis of Fowl Manure

    OpenAIRE

    Renzo Carta; Mario Cruccu; Francesco Desogus

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results obtained at a pilot plant which works with a slow, wet and catalytic pyrolysis process of dry fowl manure. This kind of process mainly consists in the cracking of the organic matrix and in the following reaction of carbon with water, which is either already contained in the organic feed or added, to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Reactions are conducted in a rotating reactor maintained at a temperature of 500°C; the requi...

  11. Pyrolysis of biofuels of the future: Sewage sludge and microalgae – Thermogravimetric analysis and modelling of the pyrolysis under different temperature conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria-Verdugo, Antonio; Goos, Elke; Morato-Godino, Andrés; García-Hernando, Nestor; Riedel, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis of microalgae and sewage sludge is studied by thermogravimetric analysis. • Accurate values of the kinetic parameters of the pyrolysis reaction are reported. • Pyrolysis is modeled for parabolic and exponential temperature increases. • Estimations of the model are compared with experimental measurements in TGA. • Excellent agreement is reached between the model estimations and the experiments. - Abstract: The pyrolysis process of both microalgae and sewage sludge was investigated separately, by means of non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM) was employed to obtain the pyrolysis kinetic parameters of the samples, i.e. the activation energy E_a and the pre-exponential factor k_0. Nine different pyrolysis tests at different constant heating rates were conducted for each sample in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) to obtain accurate values of the pyrolysis kinetic parameters when applying DAEM. The accurate values of the activation energy and the pre-exponential factor that characterize the pyrolysis reaction of Chlorella vulgaris and sewage sludge were reported, together with their associated uncertainties. The activation energy and pre-exponential factor for the C. vulgaris vary between 150–250 kJ/mol and 10"1"0–10"1"5 s"−"1 respectively, whereas values ranging from 200 to 400 kJ/mol were obtained for the sewage sludge activation energy, and from 10"1"5 to 10"2"5 s"−"1 for its pre-exponential factor. These values of E_a and k_0 were employed to estimate the evolution of the reacted fraction with temperature during the pyrolysis of the samples under exponential and parabolic temperature increases, more typical for the pyrolysis reaction of fuel particles in industrial reactors. The estimations of the relation between the reacted fraction and the temperature for exponential and parabolic temperature increases were found to be in good agreement with the experimental values

  12. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis experiments with organization exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ung Kyung

    1997-01-01

    Pyrolysis may be an important pretreatment step before vitrification in a cold crucible melter (CCM). During vitrification of organic resin the carbon or other remaining residues may harm the performance of the cold crucible melter of the eventual stability of the final glass product. Hence, it is important to reduce or prevent such harmful waste from entry into the cold crucible melter. Pretreatment with pyrolysis will generally provide volume reduction resulting in less amount of solid waste that needs to be handled by the CCM; in addition, the pyrolytic processes may breakdown much of the complex organics causing release through volatilization resulting in less carbon and other harmful substances. Hence, KEPRI has undertaken studies on the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of organic ion exchange resin. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis were examined with TGA and a tube furnace. TGA results for pyrolysis with the flow of nitrogen indicate that even after pyrolyzing from room temperature to about 900 deg C, a significant mass fraction of the original cationic resin remains, approximately 46 %. The anionic resin when pyrolytically heated in a flow of nitrogen only, from room temperature to about 900 deg C, produced a final residue mass fraction of about 8 percent. Oxidation at a ratio of air to nitrogen, 1:2, reduced the cationic resin to 5.3% when heated at 5 C/min. Oxidation of anionic resin at the same ratio and same heating rate left almost no solid residue. Pyrolysis (e.g. nitrogen-only environment) in the tube furnace of larger samples relative to the TGA produced very similar results to the TGA. The differences may be attributed to the scale effects such as surface area exposure to the gas stream, temperature distributions throughout the resin, etc. (author) 7 refs., 7 figs

  13. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis experiments with organization exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Ung Kyung [Korea Electric Power Research Insititute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Pyrolysis may be an important pretreatment step before vitrification in a cold crucible melter (CCM). During vitrification of organic resin the carbon or other remaining residues may harm the performance of the cold crucible melter of the eventual stability of the final glass product. Hence, it is important to reduce or prevent such harmful waste from entry into the cold crucible melter. Pretreatment with pyrolysis will generally provide volume reduction resulting in less amount of solid waste that needs to be handled by the CCM; in addition, the pyrolytic processes may breakdown much of the complex organics causing release through volatilization resulting in less carbon and other harmful substances. Hence, KEPRI has undertaken studies on the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of organic ion exchange resin. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis were examined with TGA and a tube furnace. TGA results for pyrolysis with the flow of nitrogen indicate that even after pyrolyzing from room temperature to about 900 deg C, a significant mass fraction of the original cationic resin remains, approximately 46 %. The anionic resin when pyrolytically heated in a flow of nitrogen only, from room temperature to about 900 deg C, produced a final residue mass fraction of about 8 percent. Oxidation at a ratio of air to nitrogen, 1:2, reduced the cationic resin to 5.3% when heated at 5 C/min. Oxidation of anionic resin at the same ratio and same heating rate left almost no solid residue. Pyrolysis (e.g. nitrogen-only environment) in the tube furnace of larger samples relative to the TGA produced very similar results to the TGA. The differences may be attributed to the scale effects such as surface area exposure to the gas stream, temperature distributions throughout the resin, etc. (author) 7 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Waves in Strong Centrifugal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarization and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modeling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  15. Development of centrifugal contactor for FBR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washiya, Tadahiro; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Suganuma, Takashi; Aose, Shinichi; Ogino, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    In the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems, the aqueous reprocessing technology is nominated as a candidate for future reprocessing system, which supposes to apply a centrifugal contactor in the extraction process. For the reprocessing plant, the centrifugal contactor has great advantages such as reducing solvent degradation, improving of equipment utilization rate, compact designing of equipment layout and critical safety domination. From these advantages, the centrifugal contactor is crucial equipment in the aqueous reprocessing process. Since 1985, JNC has been developing the centrifugal contactor. The single unit development has been accomplished and basic characteristics such as extraction performance, fluidic performance and remote maintenance performance have been determined. A durability test has been conducted for high longevity, with consideration given to the nitric acid mist and estimation of the equipment lifetime. System test equipment with centrifugal contactors of engineering scale was installed, and uranium test was conducted. Up to now, a standard flow sheet test in the extraction process and mal-operation test assuming the one stage shutdown condition have been performed. (author)

  16. A comprehensive study of methyl decanoate pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyl, Steven P.; Van Geem, Kevin M.; Puimège, Philip; Sabbe, Maarten K.; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Marin, Guy B.

    2012-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of methyl decanoate (MD) was studied in a bench-scale pyrolysis set-up equipped with a dedicated on-line analysis section including a GC × GC-FID/(TOF-MS). This analysis section enables quantitative and qualitative on-line analyses of the entire reactor effluent with high level of detail including measurement of formaldehyde and water. The reactor temperature was varied from 873 K to 1123 K at a fixed pressure of 1.7 bar and a fixed residence time of 0.5 s, for both high (10mol N 2 /mol MD ) and low (0.6mol N 2 /mol MD ) nitrogen dilution. Thus covering a wide conversion range in both dilution regimes. In these experiments, significant amounts of large linear olefins and unsaturated esters were observed at lower temperatures, the amounts of which decreased at higher temperatures in favor of permanent gasses (CO, CO 2 , CH 4 ) and light olefins. At the highest temperatures more than 5 wt% of mono-aromatic and poly-aromatic components were observed. The acquired dataset was used to validate 3 recently published microkinetic models which were developed to model oxidation and/or pyrolysis of methyl decanoate. The results showed that these models accurately predict the product distribution, although important discrepancies were observed for some major products such as certain unsaturated esters, CO 2 and H 2 O. Reaction path analyses and CBS-QB3 quantum-chemical calculations are presented and discussed in order to explain the observed differences. -- Highlights: ► New extensive experimental dataset for the pyrolysis of methyl decanoate in a tubular reactor. ► A dedicated separation section including on-line GC × GC allows to obtain quantitative data for over 150 components. ► High level ab-initio calculations for important reactions of the methyl decanoate decomposition. ► Identification of missing reactions/reaction families/inaccurate kinetics in the presently available kinetic models.

  17. A study of paint sludge deactivation by pyrolysis reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniz L.A.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of large quantities of paint sludge is a serious environmental problem. This work evaluates the use of pyrolysis reaction as a process for deactivating paint sludge that generates a combustible gas phase, a solvent liquid phase and an inert solid phase. These wastes were classified into three types: water-based solvent (latex resin and solvents based on their resins (alkyd and polyurethane. An electrically heated stainless steel batch reactor with a capacity of 579 mL and a maximum pressure of 30 atm was used. Following the reactor, a flash separator, which was operated at atmospheric pressure, partially condensed and separated liquid and gas products. Pressure and temperature were monitored on-line by a control and data acquisition system, which adjusted the heating power supplied to the pyrolysis reactor. Reactions followed an experimental design with two factors (reaction time and temperature and three levels (10, 50 and 90 minutes; 450, 550 and 650degreesC. The response variables were liquid and solid masses and net heat of combustion. The optimal operational range for the pyrolysis process was obtained for each response variable. A significant reduction in total mass of solid waste was obtained.

  18. Results of the International Energy Agency Round Robin on Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Meier, Dietrich; Oasmaa, Anja; van de Beld, Bert; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Marklund, Magnus

    2017-04-06

    An international round robin study of the production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil was undertaken. Fifteen institutions in six countries contributed. Three biomass samples were distributed to the laboratories for processing in fast pyrolysis reactors. Samples of the bio-oil produced were transported to a central analytical laboratory for analysis. The round robin was focused on validating the pyrolysis community understanding of production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil by providing a common feedstock for bio-oil preparation. The round robin included: •distribution of 3 feedstock samples from a common source to each participating laboratory; •preparation of fast pyrolysis bio-oil in each laboratory with the 3 feedstocks provided; •return of the 3 bio-oil products (minimum 500 ml) with operational description to a central analytical laboratory for bio-oil property determination. The analyses of interest were: density, viscosity, dissolved water, filterable solids, CHN, S, trace element analysis, ash, total acid number, pyrolytic lignin, and accelerated aging of bio-oil. In addition, an effort was made to compare the bio-oil components to the products of analytical pyrolysis through GC/MS analysis. The results showed that clear differences can occur in fast pyrolysis bio-oil properties by applying different reactor technologies or configurations. The comparison to analytical pyrolysis method suggested that Py-GC/MS could serve as a rapid screening method for bio-oil composition when produced in fluid-bed reactors. Furthermore, hot vapor filtration generally resulted in the most favorable bio-oil product, with respect to water, solids, viscosity, and total acid number. These results can be helpful in understanding the variation in bio-oil production methods and their effects on bio-oil product composition.

  19. Evaluating the effect of potassium on cellulose pyrolysis reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trendewicz, Anna; Evans, Robert; Dutta, Abhijit; Sykes, Robert; Carpenter, Daniel; Braun, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes modifications to an existing cellulose pyrolysis mechanism in order to include the effect of potassium on product yields and composition. The changes in activation energies and pre-exponential factors due to potassium were evaluated based on the experimental data collected from pyrolysis of cellulose samples treated with different levels of potassium (0–1% mass fraction). The experiments were performed in a pyrolysis reactor coupled to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) performed on the collected data revealed that cellulose pyrolysis products could be divided into two groups: anhydrosugars and other fragmentation products (hydroxyacetaldehyde, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, acetyl compounds). Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) was used to extract the time resolved concentration score profiles of principal components. Kinetic tests revealed that potassium apparently inhibits the formation of anhydrosugars and catalyzes char formation. Therefore, the oil yield predicted at 500 ° C decreased from 87.9% from cellulose to 54.0% from cellulose with 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment. The decrease in oil yield was accompanied by increased yield of char and gases produced via a catalyzed dehydration reaction. The predicted char and gas yield from cellulose were 3.7% and 8.4%, respectively. Introducing 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment resulted in an increase of char yield to 12.1% and gas yield to 33.9%. The validation of the cellulose pyrolysis mechanism with experimental data from a fluidized-bed reactor, after this correction for potassium, showed good agreement with our results, with differences in product yields of up to 5%

  20. Microwave assisted centrifuge and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    Centrifuge samples may be exposed to microwave energy to heat the samples during centrifugation and to promote separation of the different components or constituents of the samples using a centrifuge device configured for generating microwave energy and directing the microwave energy at a sample located in the centrifuge.

  1. Uranium enrichment by gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heriot, I.D.

    1988-01-01

    After recalling the physical principles and the techniques of centrifuge enrichment the report describes the centrifuge enrichment programmes of the various countries concerned and compares this technology with other enrichment technologies like gaseous diffusion, laser, aerodynamic devices and chemical processes. The centrifuge enrichment process is said to be able to replace with advantage the existing enrichment facilities in the short and medium term. Future prospects of the process are also described, like recycled uranium enrichment and economic improvements; research and development needs to achieve the economic prospects are also indicated. Finally the report takes note of the positive aspect of centrifuge enrichment as far as safeguards and nuclear safety are concerned. 27 figs, 113 refs

  2. Centar's gas centrifuge enrichment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abajian, V.V.; Fishman, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Plans for the building and operating of Centar Associates gas centrifuge uranium enrichment plant are described. Operating costs and machine manufacture are considered. Commitments with the utilities are summarised. (U.K.)

  3. 75 FR 70300 - USEC, Inc.; American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility; American Centrifuge Plant; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility; American Centrifuge Plant; Notice of Receipt of a License Transfer... SNM-2011, for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and the American Centrifuge Plant... USEC Inc., (the Licensee), for its American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility (LCF) and American...

  4. Rotary drum for centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mitsuo; Ichinoto, Seiichi.

    1972-01-01

    An outwardly concaved metallic end plate is fitted into each end of a metallic rotary drum for a centrifuge until each end face of the drum is brought to bear upon a section of the end plate radially projected in a direction perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the drum, said section being provided at the marginal edge of the end plate. Following completion of the fitting operation, the end plate is welded to the rotary drum. During high speed rotation, the drum contracts axially and expands radially, while the concave end plate, radially tensioned due to the radial expansion of the drum, undergoes a reduction in its degree of concavity resulting in outwardly directed axial displacement of the end plate proper its marginal edge remaining unaffected relative to the drum. Such displacement conpensates for axial contraction of the drum. Since displacement of the end plate and contraction of the drum depend upon the speed of rotation, substantial axial distortion of the drum can be avoided relative to the end plates at both low and high speeds to permit a high degree of balance for the rotary drum. (Ohno, Y.)

  5. Centrifugal gas separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, M

    1970-03-27

    A centrifugal gas separator of a highly endurable construction and with improved gas sealing qualities utilizes a cylincrical elastic bellows or similar system in cooperation with a system of dynamic pressure operable gas seals as means for removing separated gases from the interior of the rotor drum, collecting the separated gases in their respective separated gas chambers defined by the corresponding bellows and their supporting stationary wall members, gas seals and rotor end caps, and means for discharging to the exterior of the surrounding cylindrical wall member the gaseous components from their respective separated gas chambers. In the vicinity of the rotary drum motor is a mixed gas chamber and means for providing the gas mixture along a co-axial passage into the rotary drum chamber. Orifices are bored into the end caps of the rotary drum to direct the separated gases into the aforementioned separated gas chambers which, through the action of the gas seals, freely slide upon the rotating drum to collect and thereafter discharge the thus separated gases. Therefore, according to the present invention, helium gas used to prevent separated gas remixture is unnecessary and, furthermore, the gas seals and elastic bellows means provide an air-tight seal superior to that of the contact sealing system of the former art.

  6. Centrifugal gas separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mitsuo.

    1970-01-01

    A centrifugal gas separator of a highly endurable construction and with improved gas sealing qualities utilizes a cylincrical elastic bellows or similar system in cooperation with a system of dynamic pressure operable gas seals as means for removing separated gases from the interior of the rotor drum, collecting the separated gases in their respective separated gas chambers defined by the corresponding bellows and their supporting stationary wall members, gas seals and rotor end caps, and means for discharging to the exterior of the surrounding cylindrical wall member the gaseous components from their respective separated gas chambers. In the vicinity of the rotary drum motor is a mixed gas chamber and means for providing the gas mixture along a co-axial passage into the rotary drum chamber. Orifices are bored into the end caps of the rotary drum to direct the separated gases into the aforementioned separated gas chambers which, through the action of the gas seals, freely slide upon the rotating drum to collect and thereafter discharge the thus separated gases. Therefore, according to the present invention, helium gas used to prevent separated gas remixture is unnecessary and, furthermore, the gas seals and elastic bellows means provide an air-tight seal superior to that of the contact sealing system of the former art. (K.J. Owens)

  7. Radwaste disposal drum centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, L.S.; Deltete, C.P.; Crook, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The drum or processing bowl of the DDC becomes the disposal container when the filling operation is completed. Rehandling of the processed resin is eliminated. By allowing the centrifugally compacted resin to remain in the processing container, extremely efficient waste packaging can be achieved. The dewatering results and volume reductions reported during 1986 were based upon laboratory scale testing sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Department of Energy (DOE). Since the publication of these preliminary results, additional testing using a full-scale prototype DDC has been completed, again under the auspices of the DOE. Full-scale testing has substantiated the results of earlier testing and has formed the basis for preliminary discussions with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding DDC licensing for radioactive applications. A comprehensive Topical Report and Process Control Program is currently being prepared for submittal to the NRC for review under a utility licensing action. Detailed cost-benefit analyses for actual plant operations have been prepared to substantiate the attractiveness of the DDC. Several methods to physically integrate a DDC into a nuclear power plant have also been developed

  8. Theoretical investigations on plasma centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S.H.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the steady-state dynamics of plasma centrifuges is dealt with to understand the physics of rotating plasmas and their feasibility for isotope separation. The centrifuge systems under consideration employ cylindrical gas discharge chambers with externally-applied axial magnetic fields. The cathode and anode are symmetric about the cylinder axis and arranged in such a way for each system, i.e., (1) two ring electrodes of different radii in the chamber end plates or (2) two ring electrodes embedded in the mantle of the cylinder. They produce converging and/or diverging current density field lines, which intersect the external magnetic field under a nonvanishing angle. The associated Lorentz forces set the plasma, which is produced through an electrical discharge, into rotation around the cylinder axis. Three boundary-value problems for the coupled partial differential equations of the centrifuge fields are formulated, respectively, on the basis of the magnetogasdynamic equations. The electric field, electrostatic potential, current density, induced magnetic field, and velocity distributions are discussed in terms of the Hartmann number, the Hall coefficient, and the magnetic Reynolds number. The plasma centrifuge analyses presented show that the speeds of plasma rotation up to the order of 10 4 m/sec are achievable at typical conditions. The associated centrifugal forces produce a significant spatial isotope separation, which is somewhat reduced in the viscous boundary layers at the centrifuge walls. The speeds of plasma rotation increase with increasing Hartmann number and Hall coefficient. For small Hall coefficient, the induced azimuthal magnetic field does not affect the plasma rotation. For large volumes of rotating isotope mixtures, a multidischarge centrifuge can be constructed by setting up a large number of centrifuge systems in series

  9. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  10. Pyrolysis oil production, properties, and utilization; Pyrolyysioeljyn valmistus, ominaisuudet ja kaeyttoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K; Oasmaa, A; Arpiainen, V; Kuoppala, E; Leppaemaeki, E; Solantausta, Y; Levander, J. VTT Energia

    1996-12-31

    The main tasks for 1995 were: design and assembling of experimental reactors, and physical and chemical characterisation of pyrolysis oils. A PDU-unit (20 kg/h) has been designed and it will be assembled in April 1996. A 1 kg/h pyrolyzer has been constructed with a hot-filtration system (a ceramic candle filter) and direct quenching with a hydrocarbon oil. The equipment has worked well. Pine saw dust has been used as a feed and a good-quality solids-free product oil has been obtained. In addition to this, a smaller (150 g/h) pyrolyzer has been bought from Canada (University of Waterloo). The small equipment will be used for example for catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapours. Chemical characterisation of pyrolysis oil has been carried out 1995. Water extraction has been developed for a fractionation method. Pyrolysis oil samples produced from mixed hardwood, eucalyptus and straw have been employed. The objective of the study has been to develop a simple characterisation method for comparison of different pyrolysis oils. For example reactive compounds have been identified. Main analytical method for analysing the water-soluble fraction has been GC-MS. The research will be continued 1996. A literature review of chemical and physical characterization of pyrolysis oils has been published 1995. Testing of fuel oil analyses has been continued within the IEA pyrolysis project. VTT Energy is responsible for fuel oil analytical methods

  11. Pyrolysis oil production, properties, and utilization; Pyrolyysioeljyn valmistus, ominaisuudet ja kaeyttoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K.; Oasmaa, A.; Arpiainen, V.; Kuoppala, E.; Leppaemaeki, E.; Solantausta, Y.; Levander, J. VTT Energia

    1995-12-31

    The main tasks for 1995 were: design and assembling of experimental reactors, and physical and chemical characterisation of pyrolysis oils. A PDU-unit (20 kg/h) has been designed and it will be assembled in April 1996. A 1 kg/h pyrolyzer has been constructed with a hot-filtration system (a ceramic candle filter) and direct quenching with a hydrocarbon oil. The equipment has worked well. Pine saw dust has been used as a feed and a good-quality solids-free product oil has been obtained. In addition to this, a smaller (150 g/h) pyrolyzer has been bought from Canada (University of Waterloo). The small equipment will be used for example for catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapours. Chemical characterisation of pyrolysis oil has been carried out 1995. Water extraction has been developed for a fractionation method. Pyrolysis oil samples produced from mixed hardwood, eucalyptus and straw have been employed. The objective of the study has been to develop a simple characterisation method for comparison of different pyrolysis oils. For example reactive compounds have been identified. Main analytical method for analysing the water-soluble fraction has been GC-MS. The research will be continued 1996. A literature review of chemical and physical characterization of pyrolysis oils has been published 1995. Testing of fuel oil analyses has been continued within the IEA pyrolysis project. VTT Energy is responsible for fuel oil analytical methods

  12. Investigation of waste biomass co-pyrolysis with petroleum sludge using a response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Zhang, Xinying; Li, Yubao

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of waste biomass (sawdust) through co-pyrolysis with refinery oily sludge was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor. Response surface method was applied to evaluate the main and interaction effects of three experimental factors (sawdust percentage in feedstock, temperature, and heating rate) on pyrolysis oil and char yields. It was found that the oil and char yields increased with sawdust percentage in feedstock. The interaction between heating rate and sawdust percentage as well as between heating rate and temperature was significant on the pyrolysis oil yield. The higher heating value of oil originated from sawdust during co-pyrolysis at a sawdust/oily sludge ratio of 3:1 increased by 5 MJ/kg as compared to that during sawdust pyrolysis alone, indicating a synergistic effect of co-pyrolysis. As a result, petroleum sludge can be used as an effective additive in the pyrolysis of waste biomass for improving its energy recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of solid organic waste processing by oxidative pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolibaba, O. B.; Sokolsky, A. I.; Gabitov, R. N.

    2017-11-01

    A thermal analysis of a mixture of municipal solid waste (MSW) of the average morphological composition and its individual components was carried out in order to develop ways to improve the efficiency of its utilization for energy production in thermal reactors. Experimental studies were performed on a synchronous thermal analyzer NETZSCH STA 449 F3 Jupiter combined with a quadrupole mass spectrometer QMC 403. Based on the results of the experiments, the temperature ranges of the pyrolysis process were determined as well as the rate of decrease of the mass of the sample of solid waste during the drying and oxidative pyrolysis processes, the thermal effects accompanying these processes, as well as the composition and volumes of gases produced during oxidative pyrolysis of solid waste and its components in an atmosphere with oxygen content of 1%, 5%, and 10%. On the basis of experimental data the dependences of the yield of gas on the moisture content of MSW were obtained under different pyrolysis conditions under which a gas of various calorific values was produced.

  14. MODELING OF NAPHTHA PYROLYSIS WITH USING GENETIC ALGORITM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Bityukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In operation of industrial pyrolysis furnaces, the main task is the selection of the optimal mode of thermal decomposition of the feedstock, depending on the yield of the desired products under conditions of technological limitations on the process. To solve this problem for an operating reactor, this paper considers the SRT-VI Large-Capacity industrial Furnace , the mathematical model of the pyrolysis process was constructed, using a kinetic scheme which consists of primary reaction of decomposition of raw materials and secondary elementary reactions of interaction of the considered mixture components, the heat balance equation and hydrodynamics of flow in the coil. The raw material for the selected installation type is naphtha (straight-run petrol. Output parameters of the model are the molar costs of marketable hydrocarbons. The reactor is described by the equation of ideal displacement in the static mode of operation. It is assumed that all reactions have a temperature dependence that follows the Arrhenius law. The activation energies of chemical processes were estimated using the PolanyiSemenov equation and identification of pre-exponential factors was carried out using a genetic algorithm (GA. This task requires solving simultaneous system of differential equations describing the pyrolysis process and a search for a large number of unknown parameters, and therefore it is proposed to modify the GA. Optimal scheme includes Gray encoding arithmetic operators, tournament selection, with tournament ranking more than 4, crossover with partial random choice of alleys, mutations with a high probability of occurring and elitism with competitive global competition. Using the proposed approach, the parametric identification of model process is accomplished. The analysis of the simulation results with the data of operating reactor showed its suitability for use in order to control the pyrolysis process.

  15. Centrifugation. A theoretical study of oxygen enrichment by centrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kierkegaard, P.; Raetz, E.

    1998-12-01

    In the present paper we first investigate what happens if we fill a cylinder with air, close it and rotate it. The results show that no matter which peripheral speed is used, it is not possible by means of the radial separation effect alone, to enrich the oxygen concentration from the previous 21% to more then 23.3%, which is of no practical value. In case of a too low enrichment in one centrifuge, the wanted material from this centrifuge can be used as an input for a second centrifuge and so on, in this way forming a cascade of centrifuges. Oxygen will be enriched in each step, until the desired concentration is reached. Cascading was the technology in the very beginning by enrichment plants for uraniumhexaflouride, used for atomic weapons and nuclear power plants. In this study we try to avoid cascading by aiming for higher separation factors. Therefore, we next investigate the possibilities of using a countercurrent centrifuge where in principle the enriched gas is subjected to several centrifugation in the same centrifuge. The calculations show, that in this way it is possible to produce nearly a 100% pure oxygen (polluted with some heavier molecules like argon) in one machine. Our third step was to calculate the amount of oxygen produced per hour. Using a countercurrent centrifuge of the Zippe type, 100 cm high and 20 cm in diameter, it is or will be possible in the near future to produce 17 g enriched air per hour enriched to 50% oxygen. That corresponds to processing 1 m{sup 3} atmospherical air in the period of approximately 24 hours. This is not very impressive. Our fourth step was to estimate the amount of power used for producing this amount of oxygen. A rough, but complicated, estimate shows that the power consumption at the production level will be about the double of the consumption used today. The overall conclusion is, that centrifugation as a production method for oxygen (or nitrogen) will not be competitive with the currently used method in the

  16. Techniques in gas-phase thermolyses - Part 7. Direct surface participation in gas-phase Curie-point pyrolysis: The pyrolysis of phenyl azide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Carlsen, Lars

    1986-01-01

    The possible direct participation of the hot reactor surface in the formation of pyrolysis products was elucidated through the pyrolytic decomposition of phenyl azide. It is demonstrated that the intermediate phenyl nitrene generated reacts with elemental carbon at the filament surface, leading...

  17. Multistage centrifugal extractor of E92 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Houheng; Xing Zhifu; Liu Xiangyan; Liu Shi; Wan Yi; Liang Kui; Hu Benyue

    1987-01-01

    The E92 Model multistage centrifugal extractor has been developed for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear reactor fuel. It offers the following advantages: shorter residence time, low hlod-up, less space required, and simplified startup and shutdown procedures, etc. Experiments on performaces of hydraulics, mass-transfer and crud discharging have proved that this unit provides a wide range of operation. The total flow rate can very from 300 to 450 L/h at organic to aqueous flow ratio of 1 to 5. The unit is designed for ratio of oranic to aqueous phase densities at a range of 0.75 to 0.85. Overall extraction and back-extraction efficiencies which is great than 99.99% were achieved using natural uranium as feed. Experiments showed that mechanical assembling and disassembling of the unit could be rapidly carried out. A run continuning up to 500 hours was stable

  18. Feasibility study for thermal treatment of solid tire wastes in Bangladesh by using pyrolysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.R.; Joardder, M.U.H.; Hasan, S.M.; Takai, K.; Haniu, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this study on the basis of lab data and available resources in Bangladesh, feasibility study has been carried out for pyrolysis process converting solid tire wastes into pyrolysis oils, solid char and gases. The process considered for detailed analysis was fixed-bed fire-tube heating pyrolysis reactor system. The comparative techno-economic assessment was carried out in US$ for three different sizes plants: medium commercial scale (144 tons/day), small commercial scale (36 tons/day), pilot scale (3.6 tons/day). The assessment showed that medium commercial scale plant was economically feasible, with the lowest unit production cost than small commercial and pilot scale plants for the production of crude pyrolysis oil that could be used as boiler fuel oil and for the production of upgraded liquid-products.

  19. Decomposition of pyrite and the interaction of pyrite with coal organic matrix in pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Li, B.; Zhang, B. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Conversion, Inst. of Coal Chemistry

    2000-10-01

    The thermal behaviour of pure pyrite was studied under nitrogen and hydrogen atmospheres in a pressurized thermal balance. The transfer of pyrite in coal during pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor. The results suggest that the indigenous hydro-carbon with hydrogen donor ability in coal can promote the reduction of pyrite in pyrolysis. At low temperatures, organic sulfur removal is almost the same in pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of two coals. It is likely that indigenous hydrogen in coal is the dominant factor in organic sulfur elimination in the low-temperature stage. An increase of organic sulfur in pyrolysis of Hongmiao coal indicates that the lack of the indigenous hydrogen may be the key factor determining the transformation of pyritic sulfur into organic sulfur. Oxygen affects the conversion of pyrite into organic sulfur through the competitive consumption of hydrogen. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Bio-oil production from fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust in a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Hyeon Su; Park, Hyun Ju; Park, Young-Kwon; Ryu, Changkook; Suh, Dong Jin; Suh, Young-Woong; Yim, Jin-Heong; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    The amount of waste furniture generated in Korea was over 2.4 million tons in the past 3 years, which can be used for renewable energy or fuel feedstock production. Fast pyrolysis is available for thermo-chemical conversion of the waste wood mostly into bio-oil. In this work, fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust was investigated under various reaction conditions (pyrolysis temperature, particle size, feed rate and flow rate of fluidizing medium) in a fluidized-bed reactor. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for increased yields of bio-oil was 450 degrees C. Excessively smaller or larger feed size negatively affected the production of bio-oil. Higher flow and feeding rates were more effective for the production of bio-oil, but did not greatly affect the bio-oil yields within the tested ranges. The use of product gas as the fluidizing medium had a potential for increased bio-oil yields.

  1. The IPRP (Integrated Pyrolysis Regenerated Plant) technology: From concept to demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Alessandro, Bruno; D’Amico, Michele; Desideri, Umberto; Fantozzi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► IPRP technology development for distributed conversion of biomass and wastes. ► IPRP demonstrative unit combines a rotary kiln pyrolyzer to a 80 kWe microturbine. ► Main performances and critical issues are pointed out for different residual fuels. -- Abstract: The concept of integrated pyrolysis regenerated plant (IPRP) is based on a Gas Turbine (GT) fuelled by pyrogas produced in a rotary kiln slow pyrolysis reactor, where waste heat from GT is used to sustain the pyrolysis process. The IPRP plant provides a unique solution for microscale (below 250 kW) power plants, opening a new and competitive possibility for distributed biomass or wastes to energy conversion systems. The paper summarizes the state of art of the IPRP technology, from preliminary numerical simulation to pilot plant facility, including some new available data on pyrolysis gas from laboratory and pilot plants.

  2. Morphological characteristics of waste polyethylene/polypropylene plastics during pyrolysis and representative morphological signal characterizing pyrolysis stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Chen, D; Yuan, G; Ma, X; Dai, X

    2013-02-01

    values. When impurities were involved, the shape of BR curves showed that intense decomposition started earlier but morphological characteristics remained the same. In addition, compared to parameters such as pressure, the BR reflects reaction stages better and its change with pyrolysis process of PE/PP plastics with or without impurities was more intrinsically process correlated; therefore it can be adopted as a signal for pyrolysis process characterization, as well as offering guide to process improvement and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2001-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  4. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  5. Solar Assisted Fast Pyrolysis: A Novel Approach of Renewable Energy Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad U. H. Joardder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofuel produced by fast pyrolysis from biomass is a promising candidate. The heart of the system is a reactor which is directly or indirectly heated to approximately 500°C by exhaust gases from a combustor that burns pyrolysis gas and some of the by-product char. In most of the cases, external biomass heater is used as heating source of the system while internal electrical heating is recently implemented as source of reactor heating. However, this heating system causes biomass or other conventional forms of fuel consumption to produce renewable energy and contributes to environmental pollution. In order to overcome these, the feasibility of incorporating solar energy with fast pyrolysis has been investigated. The main advantages of solar reactor heating include renewable source of energy, comparatively simpler devices, and no environmental pollution. A lab scale pyrolysis setup has been examined along with 1.2 m diameter parabolic reflector concentrator that provides hot exhaust gas up to 162°C. The study shows that about 32.4% carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions and almost one-third portion of fuel cost are reduced by incorporating solar heating system. Successful implementation of this proposed solar assisted pyrolysis would open a prospective window of renewable energy.

  6. The Advanced Gas Centrifuge program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riepe, R.

    1984-01-01

    Although the gas centrifuge process for uranium enrichment is often referred to as a ''new technology,'' it has been under development for approximately 25 years to bring it to its current state of deployment. Centrifuges are now being installed in a new gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) at Portsmouth, Ohio. The objective of this new plant was to provide additional U.S. uranium enrichment capacity at a production cost comparable to the U.S. diffusion process but requiring much less power per separative work unit (SWU) produced. The current, commercial scale centrifuge technology being installed meets that objective. The objective for new U.S. enrichment capacity has changed. The objective is not to provide more SWUs but to provide cheaper SWUs. The objective is to make the U.S. uranium enrichment enterprise competitive on the international market. Where the U.S. at one time supplied virtually all of the free world SWU demand, the U.S. market share has now dropped to approximately 35% of the foreign free world market. The Advanced Gas Centrifuge (AGC) program provides an avenue for making the U.S. the economically attractive, reliable enrichment supplier

  7. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA)); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA)); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA))

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  8. The structure and pyrolysis product distribution of lignite from different sedimentary environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Dexiang; Wang, Lanlan; Zhou, Yang; Pan, Tieying; Lu, Xilan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon structure of three lignites was measured by solid "1"3C NMR. • Effect of carbon structure on pyrolysis product distribution was studied. • Tar yield is influenced by aliphatic carbon and oxygen functional group. • C1–C4 content of pyrolysis gas is related to CH_2/CH_3 ratio. - Abstract: Low-temperature pyrolysis is an economically efficient method for lignite to obtain coal tar and improve its combustion calorific value. The research on the distribution of pyrolysis product (especially coal tar yield) plays an important role in energy application and economic development in the now and future. Pyrolysis test was carried out in a tube reactor at 873 K for 15 min. The structure of the lignite was measured by solid "1"3C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The thermal analysis was analyzed by thermo-gravimetric (TG) analyzer. The results show that the pyrolysis product distribution is related to the breakage of branch structures of aromatic ring in lignites from different sedimentary environment. The gas yield and composition are related to the decomposition of carbonyl group and the breakage of aliphatic carbon. The tar yield derived from lignite pyrolysis follows the order: Xianfeng lignite (XF, 13.67 wt.%) > Xiaolongtan lignite (XLT, 7.97 wt.%) > Inner Mongolia lignite (IM, 6.30 wt.%), which is mainly influenced by the aliphatic carbon contents, the CH_2/CH_3 ratio and the oxygen functional groups in lignite. The pyrolysis water yield depends on the decomposition of oxygen functional groups. IM has the highest content of oxygen-linked carbon so that the pyrolysis water yield derived from IM is the highest (9.20 wt.%), and is far more than that from the other two lignites.

  9. Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soncini, Ryan M.; Means, Nicholas C.; Weiland, Nathan T.

    2013-10-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

  10. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    details the catalytic partial oxidation of glycerol without preheat: droplets of glycerol are sprayed directly onto the top of the catalyst bed, where they react autothermally with contact times on the order of tau ≈ 30 ms. The reactive flash volatilization of glycerol results in equilibrium syngas production over Rh-Ce catalysts. In addition, water can be added to the liquid glycerol, resulting in true autothermal reforming. This highly efficient process can increase H2 yields and alter the H2 to CO ratio, allowing for flexibility in syngas quality depending on the purpose. Chapter 5 details the results of a time on stream experiment, in which optimal syngas conditions are chosen. Although conversion is 100% for 450 hours, these experiments demonstrate the deactivation of the catalyst over time. Deactivation is exhibited by decreases in H2 and CO 2 production accompanied by a steady increase in CO and temperature. These results are explained as a loss of water-gas shift equilibration. SEM images suggest catalyst sintering may play a role; EDS indicates the presence of impurities on the catalyst. In addition, the instability of quartz in the reactor is demonstrated by etching, resulting in a hole in the reactor tube at the end of the experiment. These results suggest prevaporization may be desirable in this application, and that quartz is not a suitable material for the reactive flash volatilization of oxygenated fuels. In Chapter 6, pyrolysis oil samples from three sources - poplar, pine, and hardwoods - are explored in the context of catalytic partial oxidation. Lessons derived from the tests with model compounds are applied to reactor design, resulting in the reactive flash vaporization of bio oils. Syngas is successfully produced, though deactivation due to coke and ash deposition keeps H2 below equlibrium. Coke formation is observed on the reactor walls, but is avoided between the fuel injection site and catalyst by increasing the proximity of these in the reactor

  11. Exploratory studies on fast pyrolysis oil upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, Farchad Husein

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil is a dark brown liquid which can be produced in high yield from different kind of biomass sources by means of fast pyrolysis. Pyrolysis oil is considered as a promising second generation energy carrier and may play an important role in the future of "biobased economies". The energy

  12. Centrifugal force: a few surprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, M.A.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching

    1990-01-01

    The need for a rather fundamental revision in understanding of the nature of the centrifugal force is discussed. It is shown that in general relativity (and contrary to the situation in Newtonian theory) rotation of a reference frame is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the centrifugal force to appear. A sufficient condition for its appearance, in the instantaneously corotating reference frame of a particle, is that the particle motion in space (observed in the global rest frame) differs from a photon trajectory. The direction of the force is the same as that of the gradient of the effective potential for photon motion. In some cases, the centrifugal force will attract towards the axis of rotation. (author)

  13. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    Full Text Available Particles leaving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E×B drift. This effect which we refer to as "centrifugal trapping" appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E×B drift speed plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  14. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Particles leaving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E×B drift. This effect which we refer to as "centrifugal trapping" appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E×B drift speed plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  15. Coal pyrolysis under synthesis gas, hydrogen and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariunaa, A.; Li Bao-Qing; Li Wen; Purevsuren, B. (and others) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China)

    2007-02-15

    Chinese Xundian, Mongolian Shiveeovoo lignites and Khoot oil shale are pyrolyzed under synthesis gas (SG) at temperature range from 400 to 800{sup o}C for lignite and from 300 to 600{sup o}C for oil shale with heating rate of 10{sup o}C/min in a fixed bed reactor. The results were compared with those obtained by pyrolysis under hydrogen and nitrogen. The results showed that unlike pyrolysis at high pressure, there are only slight different in the yields of char and tar among pyrolyses under various gases at room pressure for lignite, while higher liquid yield with lower yields of char and gas was obtained in pyrolysis of oil shale under SG and H{sub 2} than under N{sub 2}. It is found that the pyrite S can be easily removed to partially convert to organic S under various gaseous atmosphere and the total sulfur removal for oil shale is much less than lignite, which might be related to its high ash content. The higher total sulfur removal and less organic S content in the presence of SG in comparison with those under N{sub 2} and even under H{sub 2} in pyrolysis of Xundian lignite might result from the action of CO in SG. However, CO does not show its function in pyrolysis of Khoot oil shale, which might also be related to the high ash content. The results reported show the possibility of using synthesis gas instead of pure hydrogen as the reactive gas for coal hydropyrolysis. 11 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Characterisation of coking activity during supercritical hydrocarbon pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoin, Nicolas; Gillard, Philippe; Bernard, Stephane [Laboratoire Energetique, Explosion, Structure, UPRES-EA 1205, 63, avenue de Lattre de Tassigny, 18020 Bourges Cedex (France); Bouchez, Marc [MBDA France, 8, rue Le Brix, 18000 Bourges (France)

    2008-12-15

    The active cooling of the Supersonic Combustion Ramjet engine, for hypersonic flight purpose, is ensured thanks to fuel, n-dodecane for the present study. The endothermic fuel pyrolysis, starting above 800 K, could generate an unwanted coke formation. Experimental tests up to 1125 K and between 1 MPa and 6 MPa have been performed on the hydrocarbon fuel pyrolysis to evaluate the coking activity. 316L stainless steel, low carbon steel and titanium reactors have been considered. A witness of the coke formation, based on its thermal insulation and pressure loss effects, has been found. A correlation between methane production and coke deposit was found. The coke has been studied with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffractometer and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The porosity, the density and the permeability of the coke have been estimated. (author)

  17. Physical simulations using centrifuge techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Centrifuge techniques offer a technique for doing physical simulations of the long-term mechanical response of deep ocean sediment to the emplacement of waste canisters and to the temperature gradients generated by them. Preliminary investigations of the scaling laws for pertinent phenomena indicate that the time scaling will be consistent among them and equal to the scaling factor squared. This result implies that this technique will permit accelerated-life-testing of proposed configurations; i.e, long-term studies may be done in relatively short times. Presently, existing centrifuges are being modified to permit scale model testing. This testing will start next year

  18. New type of centrifugal extractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyauchi, T.; Tolich, A.

    1975-01-01

    The main principles of a centrifugal extractor design which can be used in the reprocessing of spent fuel with high degree of burning out are given. The extractor consists of two rotating coaxial cylinders. The contact of liquid phases is done in the circular space between the cylinders. By the cylinder rotating the phases are dispersed and the interface, as well as the extraction rate is increased. The given principles of the extractor design are realized in two simplified laboratory installations. The preliminary data obtained point out that much greater rates of the phases contact are achieved in centrifugal extractors than in extraction columns

  19. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-05-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  20. Forces on Centrifugal Pump Impellers

    OpenAIRE

    Jery, Belgacem; Brennen, Christopher E.; Caughey, Thomas K.; Acosta, Allan

    1985-01-01

    Forces are exerted on a centrifugal pump impeller, due to the asymmetry of the flow caused by the volute of diffuser, and to the motion of the center of the impeller whenever the shaft whirls. Recent work in the measurement of these forces as a function of the whirl speed to shaft speed ratio, and the influence of the volute, is reviewed. These forces may be decomposed into a steady force, a static stiffness matrix, a damping matrix and an inertia matrix. It is shown that for centrifugal p...

  1. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  2. Co-Pyrolysis Behaviors of the Cotton Straw/PP Mixtures and Catalysis Hydrodeoxygenation of Co-Pyrolysis Products over Ni-Mo/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derun Hua

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The doping of PP (polypropylene with cotton straw improved the bio-oil yield, which showed there was a synergy in the co-pyrolysis of the cotton straw and PP at the range of 380–480 °C. In a fixed-bed reactor, model compounds and co-pyrolysis products were used for reactants of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO over Ni-Mo/Al2O3. The deoxygenation rate of model compounds decreased over Ni-Mo/Al2O3 in the following order: alcohol > aldehyde > acetic acid > ethyl acetate. The upgraded oil mainly consisted of C11 alkane.

  3. Chemistry of decomposition of freshwater wetland sedimentary organic material during ramped pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. K.; Rosenheim, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    Ramped pyrolysis methodology, such as that used in the programmed-temperature pyrolysis/combustion system (PTP/CS), improves radiocarbon analysis of geologic materials devoid of authigenic carbonate compounds and with low concentrations of extractable authochthonous organic molecules. The approach has improved sediment chronology in organic-rich sediments proximal to Antarctic ice shelves (Rosenheim et al., 2008) and constrained the carbon sequestration potential of suspended sediments in the lower Mississippi River (Roe et al., in review). Although ramped pyrolysis allows for separation of sedimentary organic material based upon relative reactivity, chemical information (i.e. chemical composition of pyrolysis products) is lost during the in-line combustion of pyrolysis products. A first order approximation of ramped pyrolysis/combustion system CO2 evolution, employing a simple Gaussian decomposition routine, has been useful (Rosenheim et al., 2008), but improvements may be possible. First, without prior compound-specific extractions, the molecular composition of sedimentary organic matter is unknown and/or unidentifiable. Second, even if determined as constituents of sedimentary organic material, many organic compounds have unknown or variable decomposition temperatures. Third, mixtures of organic compounds may result in significant chemistry within the pyrolysis reactor, prior to introduction of oxygen along the flow path. Gaussian decomposition of the reaction rate may be too simple to fully explain the combination of these factors. To relate both the radiocarbon age over different temperature intervals and the pyrolysis reaction thermograph (temperature (°C) vs. CO2 evolved (μmol)) obtained from PTP/CS to chemical composition of sedimentary organic material, we present a modeling framework developed based upon the ramped pyrolysis decomposition of simple mixtures of organic compounds (i.e. cellulose, lignin, plant fatty acids, etc.) often found in sedimentary

  4. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of durian rind using silica-alumina catalyst: Effects of pyrolysis parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y L; Abdullah, A Z; Hameed, B H

    2018-05-18

    Silica-alumina catalyst was prepared and used in the catalytic fast pyrolysis of durian rind in a drop-type two-stage reactor. The effects of catalytic temperature (400 °C-600 °C) and catalyst-to-durian rind ratio (1:30-3:30) were evaluated. Bio-oil yield was increased with increased catalytic temperature due to considerable dehydration process, but it was reduced with high catalyst loading due to the overcracking of organics into light gases. Silica-alumina catalyst possessed good selectivity and the products changed according to the temperature. The major components in bio-oil were hydrocarbons, furan derivatives, and aromatic compounds at 400 °C, 500 °C, and 600 °C, respectively. The hydrogen and carbon contents of bio-oil were reduced with high catalyst loading due to the overcracking of organics, and the deoxygenation process became unfavorable. The silica-alumina catalyst worked well in catalytic fast pyrolysis of durian rind, and the condition may be adjusted based on the desired products. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 76 FR 9613 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [EA-11-013] USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order Approving Direct Transfer of Licenses and Conforming Amendment I USEC... Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility (Lead Cascade) and American Centrifuge Plant (ACP), respectively, which...

  6. 77 FR 9273 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0355] USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct Transfer of Licenses In the Matter of USEC INC. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order EA-12- [[Page 9274

  7. Production, properties and utilisation of pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K; Oasmaa, A; Arpiainen, V; Solantausta, Y; Leppaemaeki, E; Kuoppala, E; Levander, J; Kleemola, J; Saarimaeki, P [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-01

    In this project VTT Energy co-ordinates the EU JOULE Project `Biofuel oil for power plants and boilers` supporting the development projects of Finnish enterprises, and participates in the Pyrolysis Project of IEA Bioenergy Agreement. Presently two pyrolysis devices with capacities of 150 g/h and 1 kg/h are used for the project. Hot gas filtering tests by using one ceramic candle equipment have been carried out with the 1 kg/h device for pyrolysis oil. The solids and alkali contents of the product oil were reduced clearly. Suitable conditions are being defined for continuous hot gas filtering. A PDU device of 20 kg/h is being commissioned. The main aim of the chemical characterisation of pyrolysis oil was to develop as simple a method as possible for differentiating pyrolysis oils and for finding correlations between the characteristics and behaviour of pyrolysis oils. Pyrolysis oils produced from various raw materials (hardwood, pine, straw) were analysed and compared with each other. VTT Energy participates in the pyrolysis network (EU/PYNE) of EU, the aim of which is to collect and disseminate research results of pyrolysis studies, i.e., through a journal with a wide circulation. VTT also participates in the pyrolysis activity of IEA (PYRA), the other partners being Great Britain, EU, Canada and the United States. I.e., quality criteria and improvement, occupational safety and pyrolysis kinetics are discussed in IEA/PYRA

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of microalgae to high-quality liquid bio-fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babych, Igor V.; van der Hulst, M.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Moulijn, J.A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; O'Connor, P.

    2011-01-01

    The pyrolytic conversion of chlorella algae to liquid fuel precursor in presence of a catalyst (Na2CO3) has been studied. Thermal decomposition studies of the algae samples were performed using TGA coupled with MS. Liquid oil samples were collected from pyrolysis experiments in a fixed-bed reactor

  9. Influence of fast pyrolysis conditions on yield and structural transformation of biomass chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2015-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass (wood, straw, rice husk) and its major components (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin) was conducted in a wire mesh reactor. The aim of this study was to understand the influence of temperature (350-1400 ° C), heating rate (10-3000 ° C/s), particle size (0.05-2 mm) and hol...

  10. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  11. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, Olli [Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  12. Reflection of centrifugal pumps maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozos Fernandez, V.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to prove that is not necessary a deep and complex knowledge to manage the centrifugal pumps maintenance. According to the author, only deep but single technical knowledge about causes of breakdowns in the different and simple component parts of the pumps, are required. (Author)

  13. Centrifugal separator cascade connected in zigzag manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Tsunetoshi; Inoue, Yoshiya; Oya, Akio; Nagakura, Masaaki.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To effectively accommodate centrifugal separators of the entire cascade within the available space in a plant by freely selecting perpendicular direction of connection of the centrifugal separator. Structure: Centrifugal separators are connected in zigzag fashion by using a single header for each stage so that in a rectangular shape the entire cascade is arranged. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5350 Microsedimentation centrifuge. (a) Identification. A microsedimentation centrifuge is a...

  15. Application of pyrolysis models in COCOSYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein-Hessling, W.; Roewekamp, M.; Allelein, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    For the assessment of the efficiency of severe accident management measures the simulation of severe accident development, progression and potential consequences in containments of nuclear power plants is required under conditions as realistic as possible. Therefore, the containment code item (COCOSYS) has been developed by GRS. The main objective is to provide a code system on the basis of mechanistic models for the comprehensive simulation of all relevant processes and plant states during severe accidents in the containment of light water reactors also covering the design basis accidents. In this context the simulation of oil and cable fires is of high priority. These processes strongly depend on the thermal hydraulic boundary conditions. An input-definition of the pyrolysis rate by the user is not consistent with the philosophy of COCOSYS. Therefore, a first attempt has been made for the code internal simulation of the pyrolysis rate and the following combustion process for oil and cable fires. The oil fire model used has been tested against the HDR E41.7 experiment. Because the cable fire model is still under development, a so-called 'simplified cable burning' model has been implemented in COCOSYS and tested against the HDR E42 cable fire experiments. Furthermore, in the frame of the bilateral (between German and Ukrainian government) project INT9131 in the field of fire safety at nuclear power plants (NPP), an exemplary fire hazard analysis (FHA) has been carried out for the cable spreading rooms below the unit control room of a VVER-1000/W-320 type reference plant. (authors)

  16. Molten salt pyrolysis of milled beech wood using an electrostatic precipitator for oil collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi S. Nygård

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A tubular electrostatic precipitator (ESP was designed and tested for collection of pyrolysis oil in molten salt pyrolysis of milled beech wood (0.5-2 mm. The voltage-current (V-I characteristics were studied, showing most stable performance of the ESP when N2 was utilized as inert gas. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out in FLiNaK and (LiNaK2CO3 over the temperature range of 450-600 ℃. The highest yields of pyrolysis oil were achieved in FLiNaK, with a maximum of 34.2 wt% at 500 ℃, followed by a decrease with increasing reactor temperature. The temperature had nearly no effect on the oil yield for pyrolysis in (LiNaK2CO3 (19.0-22.5 wt%. Possible hydration reactions and formation of HF gas during FLiNaK pyrolysis were investigated by simulations (HSC Chemistry software and measurements of the outlet gas (FTIR, but no significant amounts of HF were detected.

  17. Thermo-Catalytic Pyrolysis of Waste Plastics from End of Life Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miskolczi Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of waste plastics is widely used recycling method. Owing to the end-of-life vehicles regulations, 95% of passenger cars and vehicles must reused/recovered after the dismantling. Pyrolysis of waste polyethylene and polypropylene obtained from end-of-life vehicles was investigated in a continuously stirred batch reactor using 500 and 600°C temperatures. To ensure the pyrolysis reactions the tested catalysts (5% of ZSM-5, HZSM-5, Ni-ZSM-5 and Fe-ZSM-5 were added directly to the mixtures of raw materials. Products of pyrolysis were separated into gases, pyrolysis oil and heavy oil, which was further analyzed by gas-chromatography, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and other standardized methods. Based on the results it was concluded, that the catalysts significantly increase the yields of volatile products, and modify their composition. Especially the alkane/alkene ratio, the methane concentration and the concentration of branched hydrocarbon could be affected by the applied catalysts. Ni-ZSM-5 catalyst had the highest activity in methane production, while HZSM-5 catalyst proved effective in isomerization reactions. Using H-ZSM-5, Ni-ZSM-5, and Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst notably decreased average molecular weight of pyrolysis oils and significantly higher aromatic content was observed.

  18. Catalytic pyrolysis of microalgae to high-quality liquid bio-fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babich, I.V.; Hulst, M. van der; Lefferts, L.; Moulijn, J.A.; O'Connor, P.; Seshan, K.

    2011-01-01

    The pyrolytic conversion of chlorella algae to liquid fuel precursor in presence of a catalyst (Na 2 CO 3 ) has been studied. Thermal decomposition studies of the algae samples were performed using TGA coupled with MS. Liquid oil samples were collected from pyrolysis experiments in a fixed-bed reactor and characterized for water content and heating value. The oil composition was analyzed by GC-MS. Pretreatment of chlorella with Na 2 CO 3 influences the primary conversion of chlorella by shifting the decomposition temperature to a lower value. In the presence of Na 2 CO 3 , gas yield increased and liquid yield decreased when compared with non-catalytic pyrolysis at the same temperatures. However, pyrolysis oil from catalytic runs carries higher heating value and lower acidity. Lower content of acids in the bio-oil, higher aromatics, combined with higher heating value show promise for production of high-quality bio-oil from algae via catalytic pyrolysis, resulting in energy recovery in bio-oil of 40%. -- Highlights: → The pyrolytic catalytic conversion of chlorella algae to liquid fuel precursor. → Na 2 CO 3 as a catalyst for the primary conversion of chlorella. → Pyrolysis oil from catalytic runs carries higher heating value and lower acidity. → High-quality bio-oil from algae via catalytic pyrolysis with energy recovery in bio-oil of 40%.

  19. Pyrolysis behavior of different type of materials contained in the rejects of packaging waste sorting plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrados, A; De Marco, I; Lopez-Urionabarrenechea, A; Caballero, B M; Laresgoiti, M F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper rejected streams coming from a waste packaging material recovery facility have been characterized and separated into families of products of similar nature in order to determine the influence of different types of ingredients in the products obtained in the pyrolysis process. The pyrolysis experiments have been carried out in a non-stirred batch 3.5 dm(3) reactor, swept with 1 L min(-1) N(2), at 500°C for 30 min. Pyrolysis liquids are composed of an organic phase and an aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is greater as higher is the cellulosic material content in the sample. The organic phase contains valuable chemicals as styrene, ethylbenzene and toluene, and has high heating value (HHV) (33-40 MJ kg(-1)). Therefore they could be used as alternative fuels for heat and power generation and as a source of valuable chemicals. Pyrolysis gases are mainly composed of hydrocarbons but contain high amounts of CO and CO(2); their HHV is in the range of 18-46 MJ kg(-1). The amount of COCO(2) increases, and consequently HHV decreases as higher is the cellulosic content of the waste. Pyrolysis solids are mainly composed of inorganics and char formed in the process. The cellulosic materials lower the quality of the pyrolysis liquids and gases, and increase the production of char. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. THE EFFECT OF AMOUNT OF NATURAL ZEOLIT CATALYST IN PRODUCT OF POLYPROPILENE (PP PLASTIC WASTE PYROLYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khalimatus sa'diyah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the waste problem, especially plastic waste , environmental concerned scientists from various disciplines have conducted various research and actions. Catalytic pyrolysis processes was chosen as an alternative method to recycle plastic waste. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of natural zeolit catalyst on the pyrolysis process with oxygen-free conditions to obtain maximum hydrocarbon compounds (gasoline fraction in C5-C9. The process of pyrolysis was conducted in 3.5 dm3 unstirred stainless steel semi-batch reactor. This process operated at atmospheric pressure with nitrogen injection. Plastic waste that used in this particular paper was 50 grams of polypropylene (PP. In pyrolysis process, natural zeolite catalysts was added 2,5 gram (5% weight of natural zeolite per weight of plastic waste samples, 5 gram (10% , and 10 gram (20%. Temperature of pyrolysis was 450°C and were maintained until 30 minutes. Steam that produced from pyrolisis was condensed and analysed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS to determine yield of hydrocarbons produced. From the analysis of GC-MS, liquid products of pyrolysis contained lots of aromatic hydrocarbons. The optimal amount of catalyst that produce liquid with hydrocarbon compound that has the quality of gasoline was 10 gram (20% with ≤C9 composition as 29,16% n-paraffin, 9,22% cycloparaffin, and 61,64% aromatics.

  1. Centrifugal dewatering of acid casein curd: effect of casein manufacturing and centrifugation variables on curd compression in a laboratory centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, P A; Van Til, H J

    1988-10-20

    Data relevant to curd compression in a horizontal, solid bowl decanter centrifuge have been obtained by studying the dewatering of acid casein curd in a batch laboratory centrifuge. Analysis of curd compression under centrifugal force predicts a moisture content gradient in the dewatered curd from a maximum at the curd-liquid interface to a minimum at the centrifuge bowl wall. This moisture content gradient was also measured experimentally, and its practical implications are discussed. Increases in centrifugal force, centrifugation time, and centrifugation temperature all caused a marked de crease in dewatered curd moisture content, whereas in creases in precipitation pH and maximum washing temperature caused a smaller decrease in dewatered curd moisture content.

  2. Experimental and modeling study on pyrolysis of n-decane initiated by nitromethane

    KAUST Repository

    Jia, Zhenjian

    2016-01-15

    Initiator could accelerate the rate of hydrocarbon pyrolysis and reduce the required material temperatures for a hypersonic aircraft heat exchanger/reactor. Nitroalkanes were proposed as the effective initiator because of the lower CN bond dissociation energy. In order to investigate the initiation mechanism of nitroalkanes on hydrocarbon pyrolysis, the pyrolysis of n-decane, nitromethane and their binary mixture were carried out at 30, 150 and 760 Torr in a flow reactor with synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry (SVUV-PIMS). The identified and quantified pyrolysis species include C1C2 alkanes, C2C10 alkenes, C3C6 dialkenes, C2C3 alkynes, nitrogen oxides such as NO and NO2, benzene, and radicals including CH3, C3H3, and C3H5, which shed light on the mechanism of n-decane and nitromethane pyrolysis, as well as the interactions of these two fuels. The experimental results indicate that the addition of nitromethane decreases the initial decomposition temperature of n-decane, and a stronger promotion effect could be obtained as the experimental pressure increases. The distributions of alkanes, alkenes, dialkenes, alkynes and benzene are also influenced by the addition of nitromethane. A detailed kinetic model with 266 species and 1648 reactions was developed and validated against the mole fraction profiles of reactants, major products and important intermediates during the pyrolysis of each fuel and their binary mixture. The satisfactory model prediction to the experimental measurements permits the analysis of the kinetic effect of nitromethane initiation on the pyrolysis of n-decane. So that, the increase of the conversion rate at a lower temperature, the selectivity of decomposition products, and reduction of benzene formation are better understood.

  3. Optimization of fuel recovery through the stepwise co-pyrolysis of palm shell and scrap tire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abnisa, Faisal; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The co-pyrolysis of palm shell and scrap tire was studied. • The effect of stepwise co-pyrolysis temperature was investigated. • Co-pyrolysis successfully improved the quantity and quality of product yields. • Stepwise co-pyrolysis slightly increased oil and gas, and decreased char. • The co-pyrolysis of 50% biomass and 50% scrap tire is recommended. - Abstract: This study optimized the use of biomass waste to generate fuel through co-pyrolysis. In this paper, the effects of stepwise co-pyrolysis temperature and different ratios between palm shells and scrap tires in feedstock were studied to observe any improvements in the quantity and quality of the liquid yield and its byproduct. The ratio of palm shells and scrap tires varied at 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100. The experiment was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor. The study was divided into two scenarios. The first scenario was performed at the optimum temperature of 500 °C with a reaction time of 60 min. In the second scenario, the temperature was set at 500 °C for 60 min before the temperature was increased to 800 °C with a high heating rate. After the temperature reached 800 °C, the condition was maintained for approximately 45 min. Results showed that an increase in the liquid and gas yields was achieved when the temperature increased after optimum conditions. Increased yield was also obtained when the proportion of scrap tire was increased in the feedstock. Several other important findings are discussed in this paper, including the phases of pyrolysis oil, features of the liquid product, and characteristics of the byproducts. All products from both scenarios were analyzed by various methods to understand their fuel characteristics

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF BIO-OIL FROM PALM KERNEL SHELL PYROLYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of palm kernel shell in a fixed-bed reactor was studied in this paper. The objectives were to investigate the effect of pyrolysis temperature and particle size on the products yield and to characterize the bio-oil product. In order to get the optimum pyrolysis parameters on bio-oil yield, temperatures of 350, 400, 450, 500 and 550 °C and particle sizes of 212–300 µm, 300–600 µm, 600µm–1.18 mm and 1.18–2.36 mm under a heating rate of 50 °C min-1 were investigated. The maximum bio-oil yield was 38.40% at 450 °C with a heating rate of 50 °C min-1 and a nitrogen sweep gas flow rate of 50 ml min-1. The bio-oil products were analysed by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR and gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GCMS. The FTIR analysis showed that the bio-oil was dominated by oxygenated species. The phenol, phenol, 2-methoxy- and furfural that were identified by GCMS analysis are highly suitable for extraction from the bio-oil as value-added chemicals. The highly oxygenated oils need to be upgraded in order to be used in other applications such as transportation fuels.

  5. ADVANCED CONTROL FOR A ETHYLENE REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru POPESCU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is the design and implementation of control solutions for petrochemical processes, namely the control and optimization of a pyrolysis reactor, the key-installation in the petrochemical industry. We present the technological characteristics of this petrochemical process and some aspects about the proposed control system solution for the ethylene plant. Finally, an optimal operating point for the reactor is found, considering that the process has a nonlinear multi-variable structure. The results have been implemented on an assembly of pyrolysis reactors on a petrochemical platform from Romania.

  6. Basic characteristics of centrifuges, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Tsunetoshi

    1977-01-01

    A method of numerically solving the convection-diffusion equation is presented for a binary isotopic gas mixture in the axisymmetric velocity field. A modified Newton's method is employed to perform the numerical integration without the assumptions that the pressure can be estimated from the rigid rotation model and the temperature of gas is uniform. A suitable form of the finite difference equation gives a computationally stable integration with reasonable representation of the molar concentration distribution of isotopic molecules in a rotating cylinder. The method includes a Gaussian elimination procedure which consists of the transformation of the Jacobian matrix to a triangular matrix followed by the backward elimination. Computations are made on UF 6 gas in various centrifuges which have the openings for feed, product and waste on the end plates. Discussions are also presented on gas flows and separative efficiencies for the centrifuges which have baffle plates, skirting plates and bellows. (auth.)

  7. Centrifugal pumps: fundamentals and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar Manuel, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Centrifugal pumps are usually employed to impulse water to elevate it, dose it or give it pressure or speed. They can be used with clean water or loaded with high solid concentration and don't work properly with air or another gas flow. There are another less used pumps, coming from volumetric or ram pumps to magnetic ones for specific uses. Centrifugal ones are rotokinetic pumps, like peripherical or lateral channel pumps. They work in a different way that non rotational kinetic ones and static ones. The work approaches their pre definition, selection, installation, operation and maintenance. It also review their morphology, hidromechanic principles and the basic elements pumps are made of. (Author)

  8. Centrifuge pellet injector for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Buchelt, E.; Jacobi, D.; Lackner, E.; Schilling, H.B.; Ulrich, M.; Weber, G.

    1983-08-01

    An engineering design of a centrifuge pellet injector for JET is reported as part of the Phase I contract number JE 2/9016. A rather detailed design is presented for the mechanical and electronic features. Stress calculations, dynamic behaviour and life estimates are considered. The interfaces to the JET vacuum system and CODAS are discussed. Proposals for the pellet diagnostics (velocity, mass and shape) are presented. (orig.)

  9. Centrifugal separation of mixture gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, M.S.; Chen, W.N.; Yin, Y.T.

    2008-01-01

    An attempt for single centrifugal separation of mixtures with different molecular formula was presented in this paper. The mixtures of SF 6 and CCl 3 F, and SF 6 and CCl 4 were chosen as the processing gases, which were prepared in three mass ratios, 0.5, 0.8 and 0.2, respectively. The separating characteristics such as the overall separation factors and the variation of cuts were studied. (author)

  10. Gas centrifuge bibliography 1970 - 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, G.E.; Edwards, K.J.

    1978-05-01

    A bibliography, with abstract, is presented of the gas centrifuge literature published during 1970 to 1974. It supplements PG Information Series 25 (CA) which covered the period 1895 to 1970. Following reference to bibliographies, books and pamphlets, and a few items omitted from the previous bibliography, main items are grouped under the headings Reports, Journal articles and Conference papers and are listed chronologically. There are indexes to subject, author, and document number, the latter including the issuing body. (UK)

  11. Centrifugal pumps and allied machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, HH

    1994-01-01

    This book will be of vital interest to all engineers and designers concerned with centrifugal pumps and turbines. Including statistical information derived from 20000 pumps and 700 turbines with capacities of 5gpm to 5000000gpm, this book offers the widest range and scope of information currently available. Statistical analyses suggest practical methods of increasing pump performance and provide valuable data for new design aspects.

  12. Effect of fast pyrolysis conditions on biomass solid residues at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of wood and straw was conducted in a drop tube furnace (DTF) and compared with corresponding data from a wire mesh reactor (WMR) to study the influence of temperature (1000-1400)°C, biomass origin (pinewood, beechwood, wheat straw, alfalfa straw), and heating rate (103 °C/s, 104 °C...... in its half-width with respect to the parental fuel, whereas the alfalfa straw char particle size remained unaltered at higher temperatures. Soot particles in a range from 60 to 300 nm were obtained during fast pyrolysis. The soot yield from herbaceous fuels was lower than from wood samples, possibly due...

  13. Effect of temperature on energy potential of pyrolysis products from oil palm shells

    OpenAIRE

    Lina María Romero Millán; María Alejandra Cruz Domínguez; Fabio Emiro Sierra Vargas

    2016-01-01

    Context: Taking into account that near 220 000 tons of oil palm shells are produced every year in Colombia, as a waste of the Elaeis Guineensis palm oil transformation process, the aim of this work is to determine the energy potential of oil palm shells, when transformed through slow pyrolysis process. Methods: Using a fixed bed lab scale reactor, different oil palm shells pyrolysis tests were performed between 300°C and 500°C. The effect of the temperature in the process product yield an...

  14. Phase separation of bio-oil produced by co-pyrolysis of corn cobs and polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supramono, D.; Julianto; Haqqyana; Setiadi, H.; Nasikin, M.

    2017-11-01

    In co-pyrolysis of biomass-plastics, bio-oil produced contains both oxygenated and non-oxygenated compounds. High oxygen composition is responsible for instability and low heating value of bio-oil and high acid content for corrosiveness. Aims of the present work are to evaluate possibilities of achieving phase separation between oxygenated and non-oxygenated compounds in bio-oil using a proposed stirred tank reactor and to achieve synergistic effects on bio-oil yield and non-oxygenated compound layer yield. Separation of bio-oil into two layers, i.e. that containing oxygenated compounds (polar phase) and non-oxygenated compounds (non-polar phase) is important to obtain pure non-polar phase ready for the next processing of hydrogenation and used directly as bio-fuel. There has been no research work on co-pyrolysis of biomass-plastic considering possibility of phase separation of bio-oil. The present work is proposing a stirred tank reactor for co-pyrolysis with nitrogen injection, which is capable of tailoring co-pyrolysis conditions leading to low viscosity and viscosity asymmetry, which induce phase separation between polar phase and non-polar phase. The proposed reactor is capable of generating synergistic effect on bio-oil and non-polar yields as the composition of PP in feed is more than 25% weight in which non-polar layers contain only alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes.

  15. Production and characterization of bio-oil from catalytic biomass pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonakou Eleni V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass flash pyrolysis is a very promising thermochemical process for the production of bio-fuels and/or chemicals. However, large-scale applications are still under careful consideration, because of the high bio-liquid upgrading cost. In this paper the production of bio-liquids from biomass flash pyrolysis in a single stage catalytic process is being investigated using a novel once through fluid bed reactor. This biomass pyrolysis unit was constructed in Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute and comprises of a catalyst regenerator, a biomass-vibrating hopper, a fluidization reactor (that consists of an injector and a riser reactor, a product stripper along with a hot cyclone and a filter housing and finally a product condensation/recovery section. The unit can process up to 20 g/min. of biomass (50-800 mm and can circulate up to 300 g/min. of catalyst or inert material. The experiments performed in the pilot plant showed that the unit operates without problems and with satisfactory mass balances in a wide range of experimental conditions both in the absence and presence of catalyst. With the incorporation of an FCC catalyst in the pyrolysis, the physical properties of the bio-oil produced changed, while more stable bio-oil was produced. .

  16. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  17. Materials recovery from plastic wastes and toxic waste by pyrolysis in a fluidized bed. Cooperation with RAS `Kiviter`, Kohtla-Jaerve. Final report; Stoffliche Verwertung von Kunststoffabfaellen und Sondermuell durch Wirbelschichtpyrolyse. Zusammenarbeit mit RAS `Kiviter`, Kohtla-Jaerve (Estland). Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminsky, W.; Sinn, H.

    1997-07-01

    Described are experimental investigations on the pyrolysis of platic wastes in a fluidized bed reactor (laboratory scale and process development units). Products are: aromatics, steamcracker feedstocks (oils and waxes). Data listed are: mass balance, product gases; product oils; stillage; chlorine balance; heavy metal balance. Further investigations had been made on the pyrolysis of estonian oil shale using the same process. (SR)

  18. Simulation of an industrial pyrolysis gasoline hydrogenation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostoufi, N.; Sotudeh-Gharebagh, R.; Ahmadpour, M.; Eyvani, J. [Process Design and Simulation Research Centre, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11365/4563, Tehran (Iran)

    2005-02-01

    A model is developed based on a two-stage hydrogenation of pyrolysis gasoline to obtain a C{sub 6}-C{sub 8} cut suitable for extraction of aromatics. In order to model the hydrogenation reactors, suitable hydrodynamic and reaction submodels should be solved simultaneously. The first stage hydrogenation takes place in a trickle bed reactor. The reaction rates of different di-olefines as well as hydrodynamic parameters of the trickle bed (i.e., catalyst wetting efficiency, pressure drop, mass transfer coefficient and liquid hold-up) have been combined to derive the equations to model this reactor. The second stage hydrogenation takes place in a two compartment fixed bed reactor. Hydrogenation of olefines takes place in the first compartment while sulfur is eliminated from the flow in the second compartment. These reactions occur at relatively higher temperature and pressure compared to the first stage. The key component in this stage is considered to be cyclohexene, of which the hydrogenation was found to be the most difficult of the olefines present in the feed. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic expression was adopted for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene and its kinetic parameters were determined experimentally in a micro-reactor in the presence of the industrial catalyst. The model was solved for the whole process of hydrogenation, including hydro-desulfurization. The predictions of the model were compared with actual plant data from an industrial scale pyrolysis gasoline hydrogenation unit and satisfactory agreement was found between the model and plant data. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Desulfurized gas production from vertical kiln pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Harry A.; Jones, Jr., John B.

    1978-05-30

    A gas, formed as a product of a pyrolysis of oil shale, is passed through hot, retorted shale (containing at least partially decomposed calcium or magnesium carbonate) to essentially eliminate sulfur contaminants in the gas. Specifically, a single chambered pyrolysis vessel, having a pyrolysis zone and a retorted shale gas into the bottom of the retorted shale zone and cleaned product gas is withdrawn as hot product gas near the top of such zone.

  20. Biodiesel synthesis from Jatropha curcas L. oil and ethanol in a continuous centrifugal contactor separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abduh, Muhammad Yusuf; van Ulden, Wouter; Kalpoe, Vijay; van de Bovenkamp, Hendrik H.; Manurung, Robert; Heeres, Hero J.

    The synthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) from Jatropha curcas L. oil was studied in a batch reactor and a continuous centrifugal contactor separator (CCCS) using sodium ethoxide as the catalyst. The effect of relevant process variables like rotational speed, temperature, catalyst

  1. Process Intensification. Continuous Two-Phase Catalytic Reactions in a Table-Top Centrifugal Contact Separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, Gerard N.; Schuur, Boelo; van Zwol, Floris; Haak, Robert M.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.; Heeres, Hero J.; de Vries, Johannes G.; Prunier, ML

    2009-01-01

    Production of fine chemicals is mostly performed in batch reactors. Use of continuous processes has many advantages which may reduce the cost of production. We have developed the use of centrifugal contact separators (CCSs) for continuous two-phase catalytic reactions. This equipment has previously

  2. A pyrolysis study for the thermal and kinetic characteristics of an agricultural waste with two different plastic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çepelioğullar, Özge; Pütün, Ayşe E

    2014-10-01

    In this study, thermochemical conversion of plastic wastes (PET and PVC) together with an agricultural waste (hazelnut shell) was investigated. In order to determine the thermal and kinetic behaviours, pyrolysis experiments were carried out from room temperature to 800 °C, with a heating rate of 10 °C min(-1) in the presence of a N2 atmosphere in a thermogravimetric analyzer. With the obtained thermogravimetric data, an appropriate temperature was specified for the pyrolysis of biomass-plastic wastes in a fixed-bed reactor. At the second step, pyrolysis experiments were carried out at the same conditions with the thermogravimetric analyzer, except the final temperature which was up to 500 °C in this case. After pyrolysis experiments, pyrolysis yields were calculated and characterization studies for bio-oil were investigated. Experimental results showed that co-pyrolysis has an important role in the determination of the pyrolysis mechanism and the process conditions while designing/implementing a thermochemical conversion method where biomass-plastic materials were preferred as raw materials. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  4. Understanding the fast pyrolysis of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Pushkaraj R; Brown, Robert C; Shanks, Brent H

    2011-11-18

    In the present study, pyrolysis of corn stover lignin was investigated by using a micro-pyrolyzer coupled with a GC-MS/FID (FID=flame ionization detector). The system has pyrolysis-vapor residence times of 15-20 ms, thus providing a regime of minimal secondary reactions. The primary pyrolysis product distribution obtained from lignin is reported. Over 84 % mass balance and almost complete closure on carbon balance is achieved. In another set of experiments, the pyrolysis vapors emerging from the micro-pyrolyzer are condensed to obtain lignin-derived bio-oil. The chemical composition of the bio-oil is analyzed by using GC-MS and gel permeation chromatography techniques. The comparison between results of two sets of experiments indicates that monomeric compounds are the primary pyrolysis products of lignin, which recombine after primary pyrolysis to produce oligomeric compounds. Further, the effect of minerals (NaCl, KCl, MgCl(2), and CaCl(2)) and temperature on the primary pyrolysis product distribution is investigated. The study provides insights into the fundamental mechanisms of lignin pyrolysis and a basis for developing more descriptive models of biomass pyrolysis. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Pyrolysis and its potential use in nuclear graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.B.; Bradbury, D.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite is used as a moderator material in a number of nuclear reactor designs, such as MAGNOX and AGR gas cooled reactors in the United Kingdom and the RBMK design in Russia. During construction the moderator of the reactor is usually installed as an interlocking structure of graphite bricks. At the end of reactor life the graphite moderator, weighing typically 2,000 tonnes, is a radioactive waste which requires eventual management. Radioactive graphite disposal options conventionally include: In-situ SAFESTORE for extended periods to permit manual disassembly of the graphite moderator through decay of short-lived radionuclides. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by disposal of the graphite blocks. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by incineration of the graphite and release of the resulting carbon dioxide Studsvik, Inc. is a nuclear waste management and waste processing company organised to serve the US nuclear utility and government facilities. Studsvik's management and technical staff have a wealth of experience in processing liquid, slurry and solid low level radioactive waste using (amongst others) pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques. Bradtec is a UK company specialising in decontamination and waste management. This paper describes the use of pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques to gasify graphite leading to a low volume off-gas product. This allows the following options/advantages. Safe release of any stored Wigner energy in the graphite. The process can accept small pieces or a water-slurry of graphite, which enables the graphite to be removed from the reactor core by mechanical machining or water cutting techniques, applied remotely in the reactor fuel channels. In certain situations the process could be used to gasify the reactor moderator in-situ. The low volume of the off-gas product enables non-carbon radioactive impurities to be efficiently separated from the off-gas. The off-gas product can

  6. Centrifuge facilities at Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane; Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne; Hededal, Ole

    2008-01-01

    The geotechnical group at the Danish Technical University (DTU) operates a geotechnical beam centrifuge. The centrifuge was build in 1976 and has been upgraded through the years, latest with onboard data and control systems. The centrifuge concept involves an increased gravity field in which...... the physical model is placed and tested. The capabilities of the centrifuge at DTU makes it possible to obtain a scale factor of 75-85 in the tests which equals a soil volume in prototype scale of ø40m and a depth of 36 m. The centrifuge facilities at DTU have through the years been used for testing various...... geotechnical issues, such as suction anchors, tension piles in clay, active earth pressures on sheet piles and group effects for lateral loaded piles. The paper describes physical modelling in general, the centrifuge, present setups and shows samples of obtained results....

  7. Empirical Design Considerations for Industrial Centrifugal Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD has been extensively used in centrifugal compressor design. CFD provides further optimisation opportunities for the compressor design rather than designing the centrifugal compressor. The experience-based design process still plays an important role for new compressor developments. The wide variety of design subjects represents a very complex design world for centrifugal compressor designers. Therefore, some basic information for centrifugal design is still very important. The impeller is the key part of the centrifugal stage. Designing a highly efficiency impeller with a wide operation range can ensure overall stage design success. This paper provides some empirical information for designing industrial centrifugal compressors with a focus on the impeller. A ported shroud compressor basic design guideline is also discussed for improving the compressor range.

  8. Well-to-wheels analysis of fast pyrolysis pathways with the GREET model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.; Elgowainy, A.; Palou-Rivera, I.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M.Q. (Energy Systems)

    2011-12-01

    natural gas and the amount of fossil natural gas used for hydrogen production is reduced; however, internal hydrogen production also reduces the potential petroleum energy savings (per unit of biomass input basis) because the fuel yield declines dramatically. Typically, a process that has a greater liquid fuel yield results in larger petroleum savings per unit of biomass input but a smaller reduction in life-cycle GHG emissions. Sequestration of the large amount of bio-char co-product (e.g., in soil applications) provides a significant carbon dioxide credit, while electricity generation from bio-char combustion provides a large energy credit. The WTW energy and GHG emissions benefits observed when a pyrolysis oil refinery was integrated with a pyrolysis reactor were small when compared with those that occur when pyrolysis oil is distributed to a distant refinery, since the activities associated with transporting the oil between the pyrolysis reactors and refineries have a smaller energy and emissions footprint than do other activities in the pyrolysis pathway.

  9. FAST PYROLYSIS – EFFECT OF WOOD DRYING ON THE YIELD AND PROPERTIES OF BIO-OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriks Samulis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The composition and properties of the products of fast pyrolysis of hardwood, obtained in a two-chamber (drying and pyrolytic ablation type reactor in the temperature range 450-600ºС, were investigated. It has been found that, upon the additional drying of wood at 200ºС and subsequent pyrolysis, the quality of bio-oil is improved owing to the decrease in the amount of water and acids. It has been shown that the increase of the drying temperature to 240ºС decreases the yield of the main product. Optimum parameters of the drying conditions and the temperature of the pyrolysis of wood, at which the bio-oil yield exceeds 60% and its calorific value makes up 17-20 МJ/kg, have been determined.

  10. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-25

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using similar methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The "as received" feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be "reactor ready". This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed

  11. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-28

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using the same methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The “as received” feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be “reactor ready.” This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps

  12. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of $10^6$g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wa...

  13. Decontamination of nuclear fuels with centrifugal separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Li; Camassa, R.; Ecke, R.; Venneri, F.

    1995-01-01

    The treatment and disposal of nuclear material is a crucial element in today's nuclear power industry. We present a physical process of centrifugal separation that has potential to deal with existing waste and provide opportunities for realizing advanced accelerator-driven power generation. In our proposed process a liquid metal solution containing actinides and fission products is fed through a series of continuous flow centrifuges. We show fundamentals of centrifugation including theory and experiments and estimate how the processing can be optimized

  14. Decontamination of nuclear fuels with centrifugal separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, L.; Camassa, R.; Ecke, R.; Venneri, F.

    1995-01-01

    The treatment and disposal of nuclear material is a crucial element in today's nuclear power industry. We present a physical process of centrifugal separation that has potential to deal with existing waste and provide opportunities for realizing advanced accelerator driven power generation. In our proposed process a liquid metal solution containing actinides and fission products is fed through a series of continuous flow centrifuges. We show fundamentals of centrifugation including theory and experiments and estimate how the processing can be optimized. (authors)

  15. Bio-oil production through pyrolysis of blue-green algae blooms (BGAB): Product distribution and bio-oil characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhiquan; Zheng, Yang; Yan, Feng; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolysis experiments of blue-green algae blooms (BGAB) were carried out in a fixed-bed reactor to determine the effects of pyrolysis temperature, particle size and sweep gas flow rate on pyrolysis product yields and bio-oil properties. The pyrolysis temperature, particle size and sweep gas flow rate were varied in the ranges of 300–700 °C, below 0.25–2.5 mm and 50–400 mL min −1 , respectively. The maximum oil yield of 54.97% was obtained at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C, particle size below 0.25 mm and sweep gas flow rate of 100 mL min −1 . The elemental analysis and calorific value of the oil were determined, and the chemical composition of the oil was investigated using gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC–MS) technique. The analysis of bio-oil composition showed that bio-oil from BGAB could be a potential source of renewable fuel with a heating value of 31.9 MJ kg −1 . - Highlights: ► Bio-oil production from pyrolysis of blue-green algae blooms in fixed bed reactor. ► Effects of pyrolysis conditions on product distribution were investigated. ► The maximum bio-oil yield reached 54.97 wt %. ► The bio-oil has high heating value and may be suitable as renewable fuel. ► Pyrolysis of algal biomass beneficial for energy recovery, eutrophication control

  16. CFD simulation of centrifugal cells washers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellet, Beth E; Binbing, Han; Dandy, David S; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics to guide the design of better centrifuges for processing shed blood is explored here. The velocity field and the rate of protein removal from the shed blood have been studied. The results indicate that computational fluid dynamics could help screen preliminary centrifuge bowl designs thus reducing the number of initial experimental tests required when developing new centrifuge bowls. Though the focus of this work is on washing shed blood the methods developed here are applicable to the design of centrifuge bowls for other blood processing applications.

  17. Pyrolysis behavior of different type of materials contained in the rejects of packaging waste sorting plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrados, A., E-mail: aitziber.adrados@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda. Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); De Marco, I.; Lopez-Urionabarrenechea, A.; Caballero, B.M.; Laresgoiti, M.F. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda. Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the influence of materials in the pyrolysis of real plastic waste samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inorganic compounds remain unaltered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components give rise to an increase in char formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components promote the production of aqueous phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components increase CO and CO{sub 2} contents in the gases. - Abstract: In this paper rejected streams coming from a waste packaging material recovery facility have been characterized and separated into families of products of similar nature in order to determine the influence of different types of ingredients in the products obtained in the pyrolysis process. The pyrolysis experiments have been carried out in a non-stirred batch 3.5 dm{sup 3} reactor, swept with 1 L min{sup -1} N{sub 2}, at 500 Degree-Sign C for 30 min. Pyrolysis liquids are composed of an organic phase and an aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is greater as higher is the cellulosic material content in the sample. The organic phase contains valuable chemicals as styrene, ethylbenzene and toluene, and has high heating value (HHV) (33-40 MJ kg{sup -1}). Therefore they could be used as alternative fuels for heat and power generation and as a source of valuable chemicals. Pyrolysis gases are mainly composed of hydrocarbons but contain high amounts of CO and CO{sub 2}; their HHV is in the range of 18-46 MJ kg{sup -1}. The amount of CO-CO{sub 2} increases, and consequently HHV decreases as higher is the cellulosic content of the waste. Pyrolysis solids are mainly composed of inorganics and char formed in the process. The cellulosic materials lower the quality of the pyrolysis liquids and gases, and increase the production of char.

  18. Deactivation and regeneration of ZSM-5 zeolite in catalytic pyrolysis of plastic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, A.; Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; Adrados, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Pyrolysis transforms plastic wastes in valuable liquids and gases useful as fuels or source of chemicals. → The use of ZSM-5 zeolite in pyrolysis favours the production of gases and of lighter and more aromatic liquids. → ZSM-5 zeolite is almost completely deactivated after one plastics pyrolysis experiment. → ZSM-5 zeolite used in plastic wastes pyrolysis can be regenerated by burning the deposited coke in an air stream. → Regenerated ZSM-5 recovers its activity and produces liquids and gases equivalent to those obtained with fresh catalyst. - Abstract: In this work, a study of the regeneration and reuse of ZSM-5 zeolite in the pyrolysis of a plastic mixture has been carried out in a semi-batch reactor at 440 deg. C. The results have been compared with those obtained with fresh-catalyst and in non-catalytic experiments with the same conditions. The use of fresh catalyst produces a significant change in both the pyrolysis yields and the properties of the liquids and gases obtained. Gases more rich in C3-C4 and H 2 are produced, as well as lower quantities of aromatic liquids if compared with those obtained in thermal decomposition. The authors have proved that after one pyrolysis experiment the zeolite loses quite a lot of its activity, which is reflected in both the yields and the products quality; however, this deactivation was found to be reversible since after regeneration heating at 550 deg. C in oxygen atmosphere, this catalyst recovered its initial activity, generating similar products and in equivalent proportions as those obtained with fresh catalyst.

  19. Kinetics of pyrolysis and combustion of spherical wood particles in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazziotti di Celso, Giuseppe; Rapagnà, Sergio; Prisciandaro, Marina; Zanoelo, Everton Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • H 2 , CO 2 , CO and CH 4 released during wood pyrolysis were experimentally monitored. • CO 2 formed by burning the residual tar/char mixture was experimentally determined. • The kinetics of species production was reproduced with two simplified models. • The increase of the bed reactor temperature statistically enhanced the gas yield. • The pyrolysis time is statistically reduced by decreasing the particle size. - Abstract: The kinetics of wood pyrolysis and combustion of residual fuel at different particle diameters and temperatures was investigated. A known mass of wooden spheres was fed at the top of a fluidized bed reactor filled with olivine particles and fluidized with nitrogen. The concentration of H 2 , CO 2 , CO and CH 4 was on-line monitored with gas analyzers. An irreversible first order reaction was applied to describe the biomass pyrolysis. The rate constant was dependent on the average temperature of wood particle, obtained by solving the transient one-dimensional problem of heat conduction in a sphere. The rate for an irreversible second order reaction between the residual fuel and oxygen at the fluid–solid interface, which takes a finite resistance to mass transfer into account, was adopted to describe the combustion. The semi-empirical kinetic models for pyrolysis and combustion were able to describe, with certain limitations inherent to model simplifications, the experimental transient results of molar flow rates of major released species. A statistical model based on the results of the factorial design of experiments (3 2 ) confirmed a statistical significant effect of temperature and wood particle diameter on the gas yield and time of pyrolysis, respectively

  20. An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2011-12-01

    In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break

  1. High-pressure pyrolysis and oxidation of ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob M.; Glarborg, Peter

    2018-01-01

    against the present data as well as ignition delay times and flame speed measurements from literature. The model predicted the onset of fuel conversion and the composition of products from the flow reactor experiments fairly well. It also predicted well ignition delays above 900 K whereas it overpredicted...... reported flame speeds slightly. The results of sensitivity analyses revealed the importance of the reaction between ethanol and the hydroperoxyl radical for ignition at high pressure and intermediate temperatures. An accurate determination of the rate coefficients for this reaction is important to improve......The pyrolysis and oxidation of ethanol has been investigated at temperatures of 600–900 K, a pressure of 50 bar and residence times of 4.3–6.8 s in a laminar flow reactor. The experiments, conducted with mixtures highly diluted in nitrogen, covered fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) of 0.1, 1.0, 43...

  2. Renewable energy source from pyrolysis of solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Kawser Jamil; Farid Nasir Ani

    2000-01-01

    Malaysia is blessed with a significant renewable energy resource base such as solar energy and biomass. To continue with its industrial development, Malaysia must manages energy supply its c prudently in order to avoid becoming an energy importer supply. Most significantly renewable energy from biomass such as rice husks, wood wastes, oil palm wastes, rubber wastes and other agricultural wastes. Beside rice and timber. Malaysia produces a huge amount of palm oil and natural rubber. These generate a significant amount of solid wastes in the forms of oil palm shell and rubber. These wastes are producing pollution and emission problems in Malaysia which is causing an environmental issue. Besides energy is not recovered efficiently from these waste resources. From the elemental composition and thermogravimetric studies of the wastes, it appeared that the wastes could be used as an alternative value-added source of energy. For this purpose a fast pyrolysis of 300 mi-n lone, and 50 mm diameter stainless-steel reactor was designed and fabricated. The grounded, sieved and dried solid feed particles underwent pyrolysis reactor at moderate temperature and were converted into pyrolytic oil, solid char and cas. Oil and char were collected while the cas was flared. The oil was characterised by GC-MS technique. Detailed analysis of the oil showed that there was no concentration of biologically active polycyclic aromatic species in the oil. The fuel properties of the derived oils were also analysed and compared to diesel fuel. (Author)

  3. Testing of pyrochemical centrifugal contactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.S.; Carls, E.L.; Basco, J.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    A centrifugal contactor that performs oxidation and reduction exchange reactions between molten metals and salts at 500 degrees Centigrade has been tested successfully at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The design is based on contactors for aqueous- organic systems operation near room temperature. In tests to demonstrate the performance of the pyrocontactor, cadmium and LICl-KCl eutectic salt were the immiscible solvent phases, and rare earths were the distributing solutes. The tests showed that the pyrocontactor mixed and separated the phases well, with stage efficiencies approaching 99% at rotor speeds near 2700 rpm. The contactor ran smoothly and reliably over the entire range of speeds that was tested

  4. Energy conversion assessment of vacuum, slow and fast pyrolysis processes for low and high ash paper waste sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridout, Angelo J.; Carrier, Marion; Collard, François-Xavier; Görgens, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Vacuum, slow and fast pyrolysis of low and high ash paper waste sludge (PWS) is compared. • Reactor temperature and pellet size optimised to maximise liquid and solid product yields. • Gross energy recovery from solid and liquid was assessed. • Fast pyrolysis of low and high ash PWS offers higher energy conversions. - Abstract: The performance of vacuum, slow and fast pyrolysis processes to transfer energy from the paper waste sludge (PWS) to liquid and solid products was compared. Paper waste sludges with low and high ash content (8.5 and 46.7 wt.%) were converted under optimised conditions for temperature and pellet size to maximise both product yields and energy content. Comparison of the gross energy conversions, as a combination of the bio-oil/tarry phase and char (EC_s_u_m), revealed that the fast pyrolysis performance was between 18.5% and 20.1% higher for the low ash PWS, and 18.4% and 36.5% higher for high ash PWS, when compared to the slow and vacuum pyrolysis processes respectively. For both PWSs, this finding was mainly attributed to higher production of condensable organic compounds and lower water yields during FP. The low ash PWS chars, fast pyrolysis bio-oils and vacuum pyrolysis tarry phase products had high calorific values (∼18–23 MJ kg"−"1) making them promising for energy applications. Considering the low calorific values of the chars from alternative pyrolysis processes (∼4–7 MJ kg"−"1), the high ash PWS should rather be converted to fast pyrolysis bio-oil to maximise the recovery of usable energy products.

  5. Composition of coal tar from pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of Shenmu coal macerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Q.; Li, W.; Chen, H.; Li, B. [Shandong Academy of Sciences, Jinan (China)

    2005-08-15

    To understand the relationship of the tar compositions and the coal macerals, the tars obtained from the pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of Shenmu coal macerals in a fixed-bed reactor were analysed using GC-MS. And the effects of petrographic component, atmosphere and pressure on the yield of aromatic hydrocarbon, phenols, hydrocarbons, oxygen-containing heterocycle and PAHs were systematically investigated. The results show that there is great difference in the composition and the relative content of long chain hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, oxygen-containing heterocycle and PAHs in tars from vitrinite and inertinite pyrolysis. Vitrinite tar contains high content of hydrocarbon with long chain, and inertinite tar contains high content of aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, oxygen-containing heterocycle and PAHs. It suggests that vitrinite has lower aromaticity and longer chain in its structure than inertinite, which is in well agreement with the result from {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR test. The tar yield of hydropyrolysis is higher than that of pyrolysis. With increasing the hydrogen pressure, the yield of tar increases greatly. The content of phenols and naphthalene in vitrinite tar form hydropyrolysis under 0.1 MPa is much lower than that form pyrolysis, while that of inertinite tar changes a little. The difference of tar compositions and relative content during pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis reflects the effect of hydrogenation and hydrocracking reactions and the structure characteristics of the macerals. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Evaluation of the production potential of bio-oil from Vietnamese biomass resources by fast pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, Binh M.Q.; Duong, Long T.; Nguyen, Viet D.; Tran, Trong B.; Nguyen, My H.H.; Nguyen, Luong H.; Nguyen, Duc A.; Luu, Loc C.

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural activities in Vietnam generate about 62 million tonnes of biomass (rice straw, rice husk, bagasse, corn cob, corn stover, etc.) annually. In this work, four different types of biomass from Vietnam, namely rice straw, rice husk, factory bagasse, and corn cob, have been studied as potential raw materials to produce bio-oil by fast pyrolysis technology. Test runs were conducted in a fluidized-bed reactor at a temperature of 500 °C and residence time less than 2 s. Size and moisture content of the feed were less than 2 mm and 2%, respectively. It was found that yields of bio-oil as a liquid product obtained from pyrolysis of these feedstocks were more than 50% and that obtained from the bagasse was the highest. Bio-oil quality from Vietnamese biomass resources satisfies ASTM D7544-12 standard for pyrolysis liquid biofuels. These results showed the potential of using biomass in Vietnam to produce bio-oil which could be directly used as a combustion fuel or upgraded into transportation fuels and chemicals. - Highlights: • Four types of Vietnamese biomass were firstly analyzed in detail. • Optimal conditions for fast pyrolysis reaction for Vietnamese biomass types. • Bio-oil product adapted to the standard specification for pyrolysis liquid biofuel

  7. Fast pyrolysis of wheat straw combined with SI-MCM-41 catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ates, Funda; Putun, Ayse Eren [Anadolu University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture (Turkey)], e-mail: fdivrikl@anadolu.edu.tr, email: aeputun@anadolu.edu.tr; Tophanecioglu, Sibel [Erkurt Holding (Turkey)], email: sibel8888@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give the results of an experiment in which the respective results from fast pyrolysis of wheat straw catalyzed with Si-MCM-4, and in the non-catalytic condition were compared. This experiment was carried out in a well-swept fixed-bed reactor with a heating rate of 300 degree C/min and in a nitrogen atmosphere after which, the main characteristics of pyrolyzed feedstock were determined by proximate, ultimate and component analysis. As the results of this experiment show, the maximum oil yield was 31.9% in a non-catalytic pyrolysis procedure and this gas yield increased in the pyrolysis experiment with catalyst, although the bio-oil yield decreased. On the other hand, the use of catalyst had the benefit of reducing the percentage of oxygen, the presence of which in the fuel is not desirable. Through testing pyrolysis oils, it was established that the use of a catalyst in the pyrolysis can improve fuel quality and produce valuable chemicals.

  8. Application of Gamma Radiation on Bio-oil Produced from Pyrolysis of Soybean Cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichestapong, P.; Injarean, U.; Prapakornrattana, P.; Charoen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Soybean cake residue from soy milk making can be pyrolysed to produce pyrolysis liquid or bio-oil which has potency to be used as liquid fuel. Pyrolysis of soybean cake residue with the application of gamma irradiation was investigated in a batch reactor at 450°C for 1.5 hr under nitrogen flow 250 cc/min. Feed of soybean cake residue was exposed to gamma radiation at the doses of 200 to 1,000 kGy before pyrolysing. It was found that pyrolysis liquid yield increased significantly by 12.9 to 19.3 % at the irradiation doses of 400 kGy and higher. The increment was mainly due to the increasing of aqueous phase in the pyrolysis liquid. The heating value of organic phase in the pyrolysis liquid was 7,890 kcal/kg. The organic phase from the unexposed feed was also irradiated at 20-100 kGy. The viscosity of irradiated organic phase was found to increase with the increasing irradiation dose. Irradiated organic phase was distilled at temperatures 200 and 250°C. It was found that the first distilled fraction (<200°C) corresponding to gasoline fraction increased with the increasing irradiation dose while the second distilled fraction (200-250°C) corresponding to kerosene fraction seems to decrease. The composition of organic phase was also determined by GC-MS.

  9. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyether sulfone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Olcomendy, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polyether sulfone was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Animal response times were relatively short at pyrolysis temperatures of 600 to 800 C, with death occurring within 6 min. The principal toxicant appeared to be a compound other than carbon monoxide.

  10. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  11. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 150 0 of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength KEVLAR/epoxy composite. This arbon has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s

  12. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 150 0 of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength Kevlar/epoxy composite. This arbor has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s

  13. Nitride Coating Effect on Oxidation Behavior of Centrifugally Atomized U-Mo Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong Jin; Cho, Woo Hyoung; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Yoon Sang; Yang, Jae Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Uranium metal and uranium compounds are being used as nuclear fuel materials and generally known as pyrophoric materials. Nowadays the importance of nuclear fuel about safety is being emphasized due to the vigorous exchanges and co-operations among the international community. According to the reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) program, the international research reactor community has decided to use low-enriched uranium instead of high-enriched uranium. As a part of the RERTR program, KAERI has developed centrifugally atomized U-Mo alloys as a promising candidate of research reactor fuel. Kang et al. studied the oxidation behavior of centrifugally atomized U-10wt% Mo alloy and it showed better oxidation resistance than uranium. In this study, the oxidation behavior of nitride coated U-7wt% Mo alloy is investigated to enhance the safety against pyrophoricity

  14. Slow and pressurized co-pyrolysis of coal and agricultural residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboyade, Akinwale O.; Carrier, Marion; Meyer, Edson L.; Knoetze, Hansie; Görgens, Johann F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Evaluation of co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass in pressurized packed bed reactor. ► Relative influence of coal–biomass mix ratio, temperature and pressure also investigated. ► Results show significant synergy or chemical interactions in the vapor phase. ► Synergistic interactions did not influence distribution of lumped solid liquid and gas products. - Abstract: The distribution of products from the slow heating rate pyrolysis of coal, corn residues (cobs and stover), sugarcane bagasse and their blends were investigated by slow pressurized pyrolysis in a packed bed reactor. A factorial experimental design was implemented to establish the relative significance of coal–biomass mix ratio, temperature and pressure on product distribution. Results showed that the yield and composition of tar and other volatile products were mostly influenced by mix ratio, while temperature and pressure had a low to negligible significance under the range of conditions investigated. Analysis of the composition of condensates and gas products obtained showed that there was significant synergy or chemical interactions in the vapor phase during co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass. However, the interactions did not significantly affect the relative distribution of the lumped solid, liquid and gas products obtained from the blends, beyond what would be expected assuming additive behavior from the contributing fuels.

  15. The Pyrolysis Kinetics of Large Biomass Particles. Summary Report 2000-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidsson, Kent O.; Hagstroem, Magnus; Stojkova, Borka; Andersson, Patrik U.; Loenn, Benny; Pettersson, Jan B.C. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-12-01

    This report describes the progress made during the first two years of the present project. The aim of the project is to provide experimental data on single biomass particle pyrolysis that have an applied as well as a fundamental bearing. Transport phenomena and kinetics on the single particle level are characterized, including heat and mass transport processes. New experimental techniques and methods are applied and developed within the project. A single-particle reactor has been developed for the investigations, and several detection techniques including fast thermogravimetric analysis, molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS), laser spectroscopy, video recording and pyrometry are applied. The experimental data are used to develop robust models for pyrolysis and gasification, which are essential components in the design of gasification and combustion reactors. The project is a cooperation between the Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Goeteborg University and the Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology/Chemical Technology, KTH, and personnel from both universities are directly involved in the work. Both groups are members of the CeCoST program. The project also involves cooperation with Department of Energy Conversion, CTH, and Combustion Physics, LTH. This cooperation has during the present project period involved laser spectroscopic studies of biomass pyrolysis. During the coming project period, we also intend to include direct comparisons between pyrolysis models developed by the different groups.

  16. Change of physical and chemical properties of the solid phase during biomass pyrolysis; Aenderung der physikalisch-chemischen Eigenschaften des Feststoffs waehrend der Biomassepyrolyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, Wolfgang [Kassel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermische Energietechnik; Rincon, Sonia; Gomez, Alexander [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica

    2009-01-15

    The effects of the final pyrolysis temperature on the development of the chemical composition and on the porosity of biomass undergoing pyrolysis are investigated through experiments in a thermobalance at laboratory scale of grams. Changes in the grain size of individual particles of biomass during pyrolysis are also investigated as a function of temperature in a microscope equipped with heating and camera. Oil palm shells are selected as raw materials due to their availability as biomass residue and their physical and chemical characteristics. These experiments are important for reactor design purposes in the field of thermochemical conversion, offering important information for the mathematical modelling of the processes. (orig.)

  17. Detection methods for centrifugal microfluidic platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burger, Robert; Amato, Letizia; Boisen, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidics has attracted much interest from academia as well as industry, since it potentially offers solutions for affordable, user-friendly and portable biosensing. A wide range of so-called fluidic unit operations, e.g. mixing, metering, liquid routing, and particle separation...... for the centrifugal microfluidics platform and cover optical as well as mechanical and electrical detection principles....

  18. Isotopic enrichment in a plasma centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Bosco, E.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Ludwig, G.O.; Bittencourt, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    High rotational velocity and centrifugal isotopic separation of carbon in a vacuum-arc plasma centrifuge are presented. Enrichments of up to 390% for 13 C are measured at 6 cm radius with angular rotation frequencies in excess of 1.0 x 10 5 rad/s in an axial magnetic field of 0.12 T

  19. Centrifuge modelling of offshore monopile foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, Rasmus Tofte; Hededal, Ole

    2010-01-01

    centrifuge tests on a laterally loaded monopile in dry sand. The prototype dimension of the piles was modelled to a diameter of 1 meter and penetration depth on 6 meter. The test series were designed in order to investigate the scaling laws in the centrifuge both for monotonic and cyclic loading...

  20. Modelling of hydrothermal characteristics of centrifugal nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarkho, A.A.; Omelchenko, M.P.; Borshchev, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented for the first time is a method of recalculating the hydrothermal characteristics of centrifugal nozzles obtained in laboratory conditions for full-scale nozzles. From the experimental hydrothermal characteristics of nozzles observed in the laboratory it is allowed to calculate the hydrothermal characteristics of any other centrifugal nozzle whose diameter and dimensionless geometric characteristic are known

  1. Astronaut Gordon Cooper in centrifuge for tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 9 mission, is strapped into the gondola while undergoing tests in the centrifuge at the Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania. The centrifuge is used to investigate by simulation the pilot's capability to control the vehicle during the actual flight in its booster and reentry profile.

  2. High frequency dynamics in centrifugal compressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twerda, A.; Meulendijks, D.; Smeulers, J.P.M.; Handel, R. van den; Lier, L.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Problems with centrifugal compressors relating to high frequency, i.e. Blade passing frequency (BPF) are increasing. Pulsations and vibrations generated in centrifugal compressors can lead to nuisance, due to strong tonal noise, and even breakdown. In several cases the root cause of a failure or a

  3. Gas-centrifuge unit and centrifugal process for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    An invention involving a process and apparatus for isotope-separation applications such as uranium-isotope enrichment is disclosed which employs cascades of gas centrifuges. A preferred apparatus relates to an isotope-enrichment unit which includes a first group of cascades of gas centrifuges and an auxiliary cascade. Each cascade has an input, a light-fraction output, and a heavy-fraction output for separating a gaseous-mixture feed including a compound of a light nuclear isotope and a compound of a heavy nuclear isotope into light and heavy fractions respectively enriched and depleted in the light isotope. The cascades of the first group have at least one enriching stage and at least one stripping stage. The unit further includes means for introducing a gaseous-mixture feedstock into each input of the first group of cascades, means for withdrawing at least a portion of a product fraction from the light-fraction outputs of the first group of cascades, and means for withdrawing at least a portion of a waste fraction from the heavy-fraction outputs of the first group of cascades. The isotope-enrichment unit also includes a means for conveying a gaseous-mixture from a light-fraction output of a first cascade included in the first group to the input of the auxiliary cascade so that at least a portion of a light gaseous-mixture fraction produced by the first group of cascades is further separated into a light and a heavy fraction by the auxiliary cascade. At least a portion of a product fraction is withdrawn from the light fraction output of the auxiliary cascade. If the light-fraction output of the first cascade and the heavy-fraction output of the auxiliary cascade are reciprocal outputs, the concentraton of the light isotope in the heavy fraction produced by the auxiliary cascade essentially equals the concentration of the light isotope in the gaseous-mixture feedstock

  4. Enhanced infectivity of bluetongue virus in cell culture by centrifugation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sundin, D R; Mecham, J O

    1989-01-01

    The effects of centrifugation of the infection of cell culture with bluetongue virus (BTV) were investigated. Baby hamster kidney cells were infected with BTV with or without centrifugation. Viral antigen was detected by immunofluorescence at 24 h in both centrifuged and noncentrifuged cultures. However, after 24 h of infection, the production of PFU in centrifuged cell cultures was 10- to 20-fold greater than that seen in cultures not centrifuged. In addition, centrifugation enhanced the dir...

  5. Novel sorbent materials for environmental remediation via Pyrolysis of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaniotou, Anastasia

    2013-04-01

    One of the major challenges facing society at this moment is the transition from a non-sustainable, fossil resources-based economy to a sustainable bio-based economy. By producing multiple products, a biorefinery can take advantage of the differences in biomass components and intermediates and maximize the value derived from the biomass feedstock. The high-value products enhance profitability, the high-volume fuel helps meet national energy needs, and the power production reduces costs and avoids greenhouse-gas emissions From pyrolysis, besides gas and liquid products a solid product - char, is derived as well. This char contains the non converted carbon and can be used for activated carbon production and/or as additive in composite material production. Commercially available activated carbons are still considered expensive due to the use of non-renewable and relatively expensive starting material such as coal. The present study describes pyrolysis as a method to produce high added value carbon materials such as activated carbons (AC) from agricultural residues pyrolysis. Olive kernel has been investigated as the precursor of the above materials. The produced activated carbon was characterized by proximate and ultimate analyses, BET method and porosity estimation. Furthermore, its adsorption of pesticide compound in aqueous solution by was studied. Pyrolysis of olive kernel was conducted at 800 oC for 45min in a fixed reactor. For the production of the activated carbon the pyrolytic char was physically activated under steam in the presence of CO2 at 970oC for 3 h in a bench scale reactor. The active carbons obtained from both scales were characterized by N2 adsorption at 77 K, methyl-blue adsorption (MB adsorption) at room temperature and SEM analysis. Surface area and MB adsorption were found to increase with the degree of burn-off. The surface area of the activated carbons was found to increase up to 1500 m2/g at a burn-off level of 60-65wt.%, while SEM analysis

  6. Progress in ultra-centrifuge enrichment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Dawson

    2006-01-01

    Urenco have undertaken a continuous development programme in centrifuge technology for over 35 years. This has seen development from sub-critical machines in the mid 1970's through to the company's world leading TC12 supercritical centrifuge, which has been deployed on a large-scale basis over the last decade. The latest centrifuge to emerge from this programme is Urenco's sixth generation centrifuge, the TC21, which will be commercially deployed from mid-2007 onwards. In recent times Urenco has vested its centrifuge technology in Enrichment Technology Company (ETC) as a vehicle to enable the use of this advanced technology by other operators for commercial purposes. This paper reviews why Urenco and ETC believe this technology represents the best choice for creating new global commercial enrichment capacity and its future development prospects. (author)

  7. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-08-10

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  8. Mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozuh, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mathematical model of reactor coolant pump is described in this paper. It is based on correlations for centrifugal reactor coolant pumps. This code is one of the elements needed for the simulation of the whole NPP primary system. In subroutine developed according to this model we tried in every possible detail to incorporate plant specific data for Krsko NPP. (author)

  9. Pyrolysis Strategies for Effective Utilization of Lignocellulosic and Algal Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddi, Balakrishna

    Pyrolysis is a processing technique involving thermal degradation of biomass in the absence of oxygen. The bio-oils obtained following the condensation of the pyrolysis vapors form a convenient starting point for valorizing the major components of lignocellulosic as well as algal biomass feed stocks for the production of fuels and value-added chemicals. Pyrolysis can be implemented on whole biomass or on residues left behind following standard fractionation methods. Microalgae and oil seeds predominantly consist of protein, carbohydrate and triglycerides, whereas lignocellulose is composed of carbohydrates (cellulose and hemicellulose) and lignin. The differences in the major components of these two types of biomass will necessitate different pyrolysis strategies to derive the optimal benefits from the resulting bio-oils. In this thesis, novel pyrolysis strategies were developed that enable efficient utilization of the bio-oils (and/or their vapors) from lignocellulose, algae, as well as oil seed feed stocks. With lignocellulosic feed stocks, pyrolysis of whole biomass as well as the lignin residue left behind following well-established pretreatment and saccharification (i.e., depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose to their monomeric-sugars) of the biomass was studied with and without catalysts. Following this, pyrolysis of (lipid-deficient) algae and lignocellulosic feed stocks, under similar reactor conditions, was performed for comparison of product (bio-oil, gas and bio-char) yields and composition. In spite of major differences in component bio-polymers, feedstock properties relevant to thermo-chemical conversions, such as overall C, H and O-content, C/O and H/C molar ratio as well as calorific values, were found to be similar for algae and lignocellulosic material. Bio-oil yields from algae and some lignocellulosic materials were similar; however, algal bio-oils were compositionally different and contained several N-compounds (most likely from

  10. Pyrolysis of spent ion-exchanger resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slametschka, Rainer; Braehler, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Initial tests have shown that ion exchangers (IEX) can be decomposed by pyrolysis with very good results, yielding an inert and chemically resistant product. No additives are necessary. The main constituent of the product, the pyrolysis residues or ash, is carbon. It has been discovered that the entire radioactive inventory remains in the pyrolysis residues during pyrolysis of the IEX. This is achieved by relatively low process temperatures that prevent highly volatile nuclides such as the caesium nuclides from passing into the gaseous phase. Sintered metal filters in pyrolysis plant ensure that even the radioactivity bonded to the dust remains in the pyrolysis residues. In addition to the radionuclides, the main constituents of the residue are carbon from the original polystyrene matrix and sulphur from the functional groups. The pyrolysis residues form a flowable solid material and not a melt. It is thus easy to handle and can be compacted or cemented, depending on the requirements for interim and permanent storage. Any further constituents such as inorganic filter materials or even other organic materials do not interfere with the process, they are dried, calcined or also pyrolysed. (orig.)

  11. Centrifugal and axial compressor control

    CERN Document Server

    McMillan, Gregory K

    2009-01-01

    Control engineers, mechanical engineers and mechanical technicians will learn how to select the proper control systems for axial and centrifugal compressors for proper throughput and surge control, with a particular emphasis on surge control. Readers will learn to understand the importance of transmitter speed, digital controller sample time, and control valve stroking time in helping to prevent surge. Engineers and technicians will find this book to be a highly valuable guide on compressor control schemes and the importance of mitigating costly and sometimes catastrophic surge problems. It can be used as a self-tutorial guide or in the classroom with the book's helpful end-of-chapter questions and exercises and sections for keeping notes.

  12. Converting of oil shale and biomass into liquid hydrocarbons via pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kılıç, Murat; Pütün, Ayşe Eren; Uzun, Başak Burcu; Pütün, Ersan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Co-processing of oil shale with an arid land biomass for hydrocarbon production. • Co-pyrolysis in TGA and fixed-bed reactor. • Characterization of oil and char. - Abstract: In this study, co-pyrolytic behaviors of oil shale and Euphorbia rigida were investigated at different temperatures in a fixed bed reactor at 450, 500, and 550 °C with a heating rate of 10 °C/min in the presence of nitrogen atmosphere. The obtained solid product (char) and liquid product (tar) were analyzed by using different types of characterization techniques. Experimental results showed co-pyrolysis of oil shale and biomass could be an environmental friendly way for the transformation of these precursors into valuable products such as chemicals or fuels

  13. Pyrolysis of plastic packaging waste: A comparison of plastic residuals from material recovery facilities with simulated plastic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrados, A.; Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; López, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F.; Torres, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of plastic waste. ► Comparison of different samples: real waste, simulated and real waste + catalyst. ► Study of the effects of inorganic components in the pyrolysis products. - Abstract: Pyrolysis may be an alternative for the reclamation of rejected streams of waste from sorting plants where packing and packaging plastic waste is separated and classified. These rejected streams consist of many different materials (e.g., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), aluminum, tetra-brik, and film) for which an attempt at complete separation is not technically possible or economically viable, and they are typically sent to landfills or incinerators. For this study, a simulated plastic mixture and a real waste sample from a sorting plant were pyrolyzed using a non-stirred semi-batch reactor. Red mud, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was used as a catalyst. Despite the fact that the samples had a similar volume of material, there were noteworthy differences in the pyrolysis yields. The real waste sample resulted, after pyrolysis, in higher gas and solid yields and consequently produced less liquid. There were also significant differences noted in the compositions of the compared pyrolysis products.

  14. Polar representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo Antonio; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de

    2008-01-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic parameters: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. Any one of these quantities can be expressed as a function of any two others. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves, also referred to as four-quadrant curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, the four-quadrant configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the polar form appears as the simplest way to represent the homologous curves. In the polar method, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a

  15. Parametric representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo A.; Mattos, Joao R.L. de

    2015-01-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic quantities: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, this configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the parametric form appears as the simplest way to deal with the homologous curves. In this approach, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) are transformed to the parametric form. (author)

  16. Centrifugation speed affects light transmission aggregometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, M; Nardi, M A; Berger, J S

    2012-02-01

    Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) is considered the gold standard for investigating platelet activity ex vivo. However, LTA protocols are not standardized, and differences in LTA procedure are a potential source of variance in results. Centrifugation speed is an essential component of platelet preparation in LTA, has yet to be standardized, and may affect platelet aggregation results. We sought to investigate the effect of relative centrifugal force (RCF) intensity on LTA results. Ten healthy controls had venous blood drawn and centrifuged at 150, 200, 300, and 500 g for 10 min. Cell counts in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were measured using a hematology analyzer. LTA was performed using 1.0 μm adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and 0.4 μm epinephrine as an agonist. Aggregation (%) was compared at 60, 120, 180, and 300 s and at maximum aggregation. Centrifugation speed was associated with decreasing platelet count (P centrifuge RCF at 60, 120, 180, 300 s and at maximum aggregation (P centrifugation speed in the interpretation of LTA results, supporting the need for standardization of centrifugation RCF in LTA protocols. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  18. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom

  19. Characteristics of bio-oil from the pyrolysis of palm kernel shell in a newly developed two-stage pyrolyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seung-Jin; Choi, Gyung-Goo; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis of palm kernel shell was performed using a two-stage pyrolyzer consisting of an auger reactor and a fluidized bed reactor within the auger reactor temperature range of ∼290–380 °C at the fluidized bed reactor temperature of ∼520 °C, and with a variable residence time of the feed material in the auger reactor. The highest bio-oil yield of the two-stage pyrolysis was ∼56 wt%. The bio-oil derived from the auger reactor contained degradation products of the hemicelluloses of PKS, such as acetic acid, and furfural, whereas the fluidized bed reactor produced a bio-oil with high concentrations of acetic acid and phenol. The auger reactor temperature and the residence time of PKS in the auger reactor had an influence on the acetic acid concentration in the bio-oil, while their changes did not induce an observable trend on the phenol concentration in the bio-oil derived from the fluidized bed reactor. The maximum concentrations of acetic acid and phenol in bio-oil were ∼78 and 12 wt% dry basis, respectively. As a result, it was possible for the two-stage pyrolyzer to separately produce two different bio-oils in one operation without any costly fractionation process of bio-oils. - Highlights: • The two-stage pyrolyzer is composed of an auger and a fluidized bed reactor. • The two-stage pyrolyzer produced two different bio-oils in a single operation. • The maximum bio-oil yield of the two-stage pyrolysis was ∼56 wt%. • The maximum concentration of acetic acid in bio-oil was ∼78 wt% dry basis. • The maximum concentration of phenol in bio-oil was ∼12 wt% dry basis.

  20. Jatropha waste meal as an alternative energy source via pressurized pyrolysis: A study on temperature effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kongkasawan, Jinjuta; Nam, Hyungseok; Capareda, Sergio C.

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative energy source, Jatropha is a promising biomass resource due to its high content of oil contained in the seed. However, after the oil extraction process, more than 50% of initial weight remained as residue. This Jatropha de-oiled cake was considered a valuable feedstock for thermochemical conversion process due to its high volatile matter (73%) and energy content (20.5 MJ/kg). Pyrolysis turned biomass into solid product of biochar, liquid product (bio-oil and aqueous phase), and pyrolysis gas. The effects of pyrolysis temperature under the pressure of 0.69 MPa on the product yields and characteristics were investigated using a bench-scale batch reactor. The gross calorific value of pyrolytic oil was measured to be 35 MJ/kg with high carbon content (71%) and low oxygen content (10%). Phenols and hydrocarbons were the main compounds present in the pyrolytic oil. The heating value of the biochar was also high (28 MJ/kg), which was comparable to the fuel coke. More combustible gases were released at high pyrolysis temperature with methane as a main constituent. Pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C, was determined to be an optimum condition for the mass and energy conversions with 89% of the mass and 77% of the energy recovered. - Highlights: • Pressurized pyrolysis of Jatropha wastes at different temperatures was studied. • Full analysis of biochar, bio-oil and pyro gas at different temperatures were done. • Highest aromatics (32%) and HHV (35 MJ/kg) found in bio-oil at 500 °C. • Large amount of paraffins (C 13 –C 16 range) was found in bio-oil.

  1. Coal pyrolysis and char burnout under conventional and oxy-fuel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Makhadmeh, L.; Maier, J.; Scheffknecht, G. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen

    2009-07-01

    Coal utilization processes such as combustion or gasification generally involve several steps i.e., the devolatilization of organic materials, homogeneous reactions of volatile matter with the reactant gases, and heterogeneous reactions of the solid (char) with the reactant gases. Most of the reported work about coal pyrolysis and char burnout were performed at low temperatures under environmental conditions related to the air firing process with single particle tests. In this work, coal combustion under oxy-fuel conditions is investigated by studying coal pyrolysis and char combustion separately in practical scales, with the emphasis on improving the understanding of the effect of a CO{sub 2}-rich gas environment on coal pyrolysis and char burnout. Two coals, Klein Kopje a medium volatile bituminous coal and a low-rank coal, Lausitz coal were used. Coal pyrolysis in CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} environments were performed for both coals at different temperatures in an entrained flow reactor. Overall mass release, pyrolysis gas concentrations, and char characterization were performed. For char characterization ultimate analysis, particle size, and BET surface area were measured. Chars for both coals were collected at 1150 C in both CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} environments. Char combustion was performed in a once-through 20 kW test facility in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} atmospheres. Besides coal quality, oxygen partial pressure was chosen as a variable to study the effect of the gas environment on char burnout. In general, it is found that the CO{sub 2} environment and coal rank have a significant effect on coal pyrolysis and char burnout. (orig.)

  2. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogovalov, S.V.; Kislov, V.A.; Tronin, I.V. [National research nuclear university “MEPhI”, Kashirskoje shosse, 31,115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  3. Plasma instability of a vacuum arc centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole, M.J.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Simpson, S.W.; Del Bosco, E.

    2002-01-01

    Ever since conception of the vacuum arc centrifuge in 1980, periodic fluctuations in the ion saturation current and floating potential have been observed in Langmuir probe measurements in the rotation region of a vacuum arc centrifuge. In this work we develop a linearized theoretical model to describe a range of instabilities in the vacuum arc centrifuge plasma column, and then test the validity of the description through comparison with experiment. We conclude that the observed instability is a 'universal' instability, driven by the density gradient, in a plasma with finite conductivity

  4. Influence of pyrolysis conditions on the structure and gasification reactivity of biomass chars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Cetin; B. Moghtaderi; R. Gupta; T.F. Wall [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Discipline of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Engineering

    2004-11-01

    The physical and chemical structure as well as gasification reactivities of chars generated from several biomass species (i.e. pinus radiata, eucalyptus maculata and sugar cane bagasse) were studied to gain insight into the role of heating rate and pressure on the gasification characteristics of biomass chars. Char samples were generated in a suite of reactors including a wire mesh reactor, a tubular reactor, and a drop tube furnace. Scanning electron microscopy analysis, X-ray diffractometry, digital cinematography and surface area analysis were employed to determine the impact of operating conditions on the char structure. The global gasification reactivities of char samples were also determined for a range of pressures between 1 and 20 bar using pressurised thermogravimetric analysis technique. Char reactivities were found to increase with increasing pyrolysis heating rates and decreasing pyrolysis pressure. It was found that under high heating rates the char particles underwent plastic deformation (i.e. melted) developing a structure different to that of the virgin biomass. Pressure was also found to influence the physical and chemical structures of char particles. The difference in the gasification reactivities of biomass chars at pressure was found to correlate well with the effect of pyrolysis pressure on the graphitisation process in the biomass char structure. 29 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F; Saiz-Jimenez, C; Gonzalez-Vila, F J

    1979-01-01

    Milled wood lignins from spruce, beech and bamboo were pyrolysed. The high-boiling products of pyrolysis were studied by GLC and mass spectrometry. The forty-three products identified provide information on the structural units of lignin.

  6. Production of Lunar Oxygen Through Vacuum Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matchett, John

    2006-01-01

    .... The vacuum pyrolysis method of oxygen production from lunar regolith presents a viable option for in situ propellant production because of its simple operation involving limited resources from earth...

  7. Chemical recycling of mixed waste plastics by selective pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsumoto, K.; Meglen, R.; Evans, R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The goal of this work is to use selective pyrolysis to produce high-value chemicals from waste plastics mixtures. Selectivity is achieved by exploiting differences in reaction rates, catalysis, and coreactants. Target wastes are molecular mixtures such as; blends or composites, or mixtures from manufactured products such as; carpets and post-consumer mixed-plastic wastes. The experimental approach has been to use small-scale experiments using molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS), which provides rapid analysis of reaction products and permits rapid screening of process parameters. Rapid screening experiments permit exploration of many potential waste stream applications for the selective pyrolysis process. After initial screening, small-scale, fixed-bed and fluidized-bed reactors are used to provide products for conventional chemical analysis, to determine material balances, and to test the concept under conditions that will be used at a larger scale. Computer assisted data interpretation and intelligent chemical processing are used to extract process-relevant information from these experiments. An important element of this project employs technoeconomic assessments and market analyses of durables, the availability of other wastes, and end-product uses to identify target applications that have the potential for economic success.

  8. Filtration of Carbon Particulate Emissions from a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Green, Robert; Vijayakumar, R.; Berger, Gordon; Greenwood, Zach; Abney, Morgan; Peterson, Elspeth

    2016-01-01

    NASA is investigating plasma pyrolysis as a candidate technology that will enable the recovery of hydrogen from the methane produced by the ISS Sabatier Reactor. The Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) is the current prototype of this technology which converts the methane product from the Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) to acetylene and hydrogen with 90% or greater conversion efficiency. A small amount of solid carbon particulates are generated as a side product and must be filtered before the acetylene is removed and the hydrogen-rich gas stream is recycled back to the CRA. We discuss developmental work on several options for filtering out the carbon particulate emissions from the PPA exit gas stream. The filtration technologies and concepts investigated range from fibrous media to monolithic ceramic and sintered metal media. This paper describes the different developed filter prototypes and characterizes their performance from integrated testing at the Environmental Chamber (E-Chamber) at MSFC. In addition, characterization data on the generated carbon particulates, that help to define filter requirements, are also presented.

  9. Enhancing biogas production of corn stover by fast pyrolysis pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Deli; Wu, Houkai; Yi, Weiming; Fu, Peng; Li, Yongjun; Li, Zhihe

    2016-10-01

    A new thermo-chemical pretreatment by a lower temperature fast pyrolysis (LTFP) was applied to promote anaerobic digestion (AD) efficiency of corn stover (CS). The pretreatment experiment was performed by a fluidized bed pyrolysis reactor at 180, 200 and 220°C with a carrier gas flow rate of 4 and 3m(3)/h. The components characteristics, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images and Crystal Intensity (CrI) of the pretreated CS were tested to explore effectiveness of the pretreatment. The results showed that the cumulative methane production at 180°C for 4 and 3m(3)/h were 199.8 and 200.3mL/g TS, respectively. As compared to the untreated CS, the LTFP pretreatment significantly (a<0.05) increased the methane production by 18.07% and 18.33%, respectively. Methane production was well fitted by the Gompertz models, and the maximum methane potential and AD efficiency was obtained at 180°C for 3m(3)/h. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of reaction conditions on fast pyrolysis of macroalge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Yoon Ju; Kim, Jung Hwan; Cho, Hye Jung; Ko, Jeong Huy; Heo, Hyeon Su; Park, Hye Jin; Park, Young Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The importance of renewable energy sources has increased rapidly due to the high international crude oil prices and environmental concerns over fossil fuel use. Recently, there has been a growing interest in aquatic biomass, especially marine macro algae, and a number of studies have been initiated to evaluate its potential for bio-energy. This paper reports a fast pyrolysis of macro algae under different reaction conditions such as pyrolysis temperature, particle size and sample quantity. Various macro algae such as Undaria pinnatifida, Laminaria japonica and Porphyra tenera were fast pyro lysed at temperatures between 300-600 degree Celsius in a batch reactor and the main product of bio-oil was obtained. The optimal reaction temperature for the production of bio-oil was 500 degree Celsius. At this temperature, the maximum bio-oil yields were 40.4 wt % ( by Undaria pinnatifida), 37.6 wt % (by Laminaria japonica) and 47.4 wt % (by Porphyra tenera), respectively. In particular, after pre-treatment with 2.0M HCl solution, the product yield of bio-oil was increased in macro algae, Undaria pinnatifida. The pyroylsis gases were analyzed by using GC-TCD and GC-FID and qualitative analyses of bio-oil were performed using GC-MS. The maximum yield of bio-oil, Undaria pinnatifida, Laminaria japonica and Porphyra tenera, was obtained at 500 degree Celsius (40.4 wt %, 37.6 wt % and 47.4 wt %, respectively). (author)

  11. Oxidative desulfurization of tire pyrolysis oil

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Shahzad; Ahmad Muhammad Imran; Naeem Khawar; Humayun Muhammad; Sebt-E-Zaeem; Faheem Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a low cost method for the purification of oils obtained from the pyrolysis of used tires. Oxidative desulfurization is a promising route for purification of tire pyrolysis oils as hydro-desulfurization may not be affordable for small scale industries. Different additives and acids have been employed for the enhancement of properties of pyrolytic oils. The experimental conditions were kept identical throughout, i.e. atmospheric pressure a...

  12. Pyrolysis of D-Glucose to Acrolein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chong; Zhang, Igor Ying; Fu, Gang; Xu, Xin

    2011-06-01

    Despite of its great importance, the detailed molecular mechanism for carbohydrate pyrolysis remains poorly understood. We perform a density functional study with a newly developed XYG3 functional on the processes for D-glucose pyrolysis to acrolein. The most feasible reaction pathway starts from an isomerization from D-glucose to D-fructose, which then undergoes a cyclic Grob fragmentation, followed by a concerted electrocyclic dehydration to yield acrolein. This mechanism can account for the known experimental results.

  13. Some engineering considerations when designing centrifuge enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.T.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of the three main areas where flexibility is needed in the design of centrifuge enrichment plants. These are: the need to cope with market requirements, the limitations imposed by currently available centrifuges and ever advancing centrifuge technology. Details of BNFL's experience with centrifuge enrichment at Capenhurst are presented. (U.K.)

  14. Centrifuge advances using HTS magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, F. N.; Flögel-Delor, U.; Rothfeld, R.; Wippich, D.; Riedel, T.

    2001-05-01

    Passive magnetic bearings are of increasing technical interest. We performed experiments with centrifugal rotors to analyze gyroscopic forces in terms imbalance, rotor elasticity and damping. Centrifuge rotors need to be operated soft and stable without whirling the sediments. In order to evaluate optimal parameters critical and resonance behaviors are investigated. Eccentricities up 2 mm are safely passed by accelerating test wheels. In a simple model we describe the effect of passing critical rotational speeds. Measurements of bearing properties and wheel performance are presented. We have constructed a first prototype centrifuge designed with a HTS double bearing which operates a titanium rotor safely up to 30 000 rpm. A 15 W Stirling cooler serves cryogenics of the YBCO stators. From the experiments design guidelines for centrifugal applications with HTS bearings are given.

  15. Safety aspects of gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium enrichment by gas centrifuge is a commercially proven, viable technology. Gas centrifuge enrichment plant operations pose hazards that are also found in other industries as well as unique hazards as a result of processing and handling uranium hexafluoride and the handling of enriched uranium. Hazards also found in other industries included those posed by the use of high-speed rotating equipment and equipment handling by use of heavy-duty cranes. Hazards from high-speed rotating equipment are associated with the operation of the gas centrifuges themselves and with the operation of the uranium hexafluoride compressors in the tail withdrawal system. These and related hazards are discussed. It is included that commercial gas centrifuge enrichment plants have been designed to operate safely

  16. Thermal analysis of a gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, D.A.; Bastos, J.L.F.; Maiorino, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The centrifuge separation efficiency is the result of the composition of the centrifuge field to the secondary flow in the axial direction near to the rotor wall. For a given machine, the centrifuge field can not be altered and the effort to augment the separation efficiency should be concentrated on the secondary flow. The secondary flow has a mechanical and a thermal component. The mechanical component is due to the deceleration of the gas at the scoop region. The thermal component is due to the temperature differences at the rotor. This paper presents a thermal model of a centrifuge in order to understand the main heat transfer mechanisms and to establish the boundary conditions for a fluid flow computer code. The heat transfer analysis takes into account conduction at the structure parts of the rotor and shell, radiation with multi-reflections between the rotor and the shell, and convection to the ambient. (author)

  17. Pyrolysis of propane under vacuum carburizing conditions. An experimental and modeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R.U.; Bajohr, S.; Buchholz, D.; Reimert, R. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Bereich Gas, Erdoel und Kohle, Engler Bunte Ring 1, Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Minh, H.D.; Norinaga, K.; Janardhanan, V.M.; Tischer, S.; Deutschmann, O. [Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Karlsruhe, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Propane has been pyrolyzed in a flow reactor system at different temperatures ranging from 640 C to 1010 C and at 8 mbar of partial pressure which are typical vacuum carburizing conditions for steel. Nitrogen was used as a carrier gas. The products of pyrolysis were collected and analyzed by gas chromatography. The reactor was numerically simulated by 1D and 2D flow models coupled to a detailed gas phase reaction mechanism. The gas atmosphere composition has been predicted under the conditions of vacuum carburizing of steel. (author)

  18. FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Akira; Yamakawa, Masanori.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safety and reliable after-heat removal from a reactor core. Constitution: During ordinary operation of a FBR type reactor, sodium coolants heated to a high temperature in a reactor core are exhausted therefrom, collide against the reactor core upper mechanisms to radially change the flowing direction and then enter between each of the guide vanes. In the case if a main recycling pump is failed and stopped during reactor operation and the recycling force is eliminated, the swirling stream of sodium that has been resulted by the flow guide mechanism during normal reactor operation is continuously maintained within a plenum at a high temperature. Accordingly, the sodium recycling force in the coolant flow channels within the reactor vessel can surely be maintained for a long period of time due to the centrifugal force of the sodium swirling stream. In this way, since the reactor core recycling flow rate can be secured even after the stopping of the main recycling pump, after-heat from the reactor core can safely and surely be removed. (Seki, T.)

  19. Gas centrifuge with driving motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancy, Jr., William H.

    1976-01-01

    1. A centrifuge for separating gaseous constituents of different masses comprising a vertical tubular rotor, means for introducing a gas mixture of different masses into said rotor and means for removing at least one of the gas components from the rotor, a first bearing means supporting said rotor at one end for rotational movement, a support, a damping bearing mounted on said support, a shaft fixed to said rotor at the opposite end and mechanically connecting said rotor to said damping bearing, a cup-shaped tube of electrically conductive, non-magnetic material in coaxial relationship with said shaft, the open end of said tube extending away from said rotor and the closed end of said tube being directly secured to the adjacent end of the rotor, an annular core of magnetic material fixedly mounted on said support so as to be disposed within said tube and around said shaft, and a second annular magnetic core with coils arranged thereon to receive polyphase current to produce a rotating magnetic field traversing the circumference of said tube, fixedly mounted on said support so as to surround said tube, the size of said first annular core and said second annular core being such as to permit limited radial displacement of said shaft and said tube.

  20. Gas centrifuge with driving motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dancy, W.H. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A centrifuge for separating gaseous constituents of different masses consists of: a vertical tubular rotor; means for introducing a gas mixture of different masses into the rotor and means for removing at least one of the gas components from the rotor; a first bearing means supporing the rotor at one end; a support; a damping bearing mounted on the support; a shaft fixed to the rotor at the opposite end and mechanically connecting the rotor to the damping bearing; a cup-shaped tube of electrically conductive, non-magnetic material in coaxial relationship with the shaft, the open end of the tube extending away from the rotor, and the closed end of the tube being directly secured to the adjacent end of the rotor; an annular core of magnetic material fixedly mounted on the support so as to be disposed within the tube and around the shaft; and a second annular magnetic core with coils to receive polyphase current to produce a rotating magnetic field traversing the circumference of the tube, fixedly mounted on the support so as to surround the tube, the size of first and the second annular core being such as to permit limited radial displacement of the shaft and the tube

  1. Two-Stage Centrifugal Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, David

    2011-01-01

    Fan designs are often constrained by envelope, rotational speed, weight, and power. Aerodynamic performance and motor electrical performance are heavily influenced by rotational speed. The fan used in this work is at a practical limit for rotational speed due to motor performance characteristics, and there is no more space available in the packaging for a larger fan. The pressure rise requirements keep growing. The way to ordinarily accommodate a higher DP is to spin faster or grow the fan rotor diameter. The invention is to put two radially oriented stages on a single disk. Flow enters the first stage from the center; energy is imparted to the flow in the first stage blades, the flow is redirected some amount opposite to the direction of rotation in the fixed stators, and more energy is imparted to the flow in the second- stage blades. Without increasing either rotational speed or disk diameter, it is believed that as much as 50 percent more DP can be achieved with this design than with an ordinary, single-stage centrifugal design. This invention is useful primarily for fans having relatively low flow rates with relatively high pressure rise requirements.

  2. Achieving an ever-improving centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.T.; Wilcox, P.

    1988-01-01

    To ensure that the latest technical innovations can be rapidly incorporated, centrifuge development in the Urenco organization is carried out in different phases simultaneously on different generations of machines. This system has led to progressively increased outputs and reduced specific costs, and with the further known potential available, is expected to maintain Urenco's competitiveness throughout the 1990s. The process of separating isotopes by centrifuge is described. (author)

  3. Centrifuge modelling of contaminant transport processes

    OpenAIRE

    Culligan, P. J.; Savvidou, C.; Barry, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Over the past decade, research workers have started to investigate problems of subsurface contaminant transport through physical modelling on a geotechnical centrifuge. A major advantage of this apparatus is its ability to model complex natural systems in a controlled laboratory environment In this paper, we discusses the principles and scaling laws related to the centrifugal modelling of contaminant transport, and presents four examples of recent work that has bee...

  4. Horizontal vibrations of piles in a centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdin, B.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is the study of soil dynamics for important structures like nuclear power plants, offshore platforms, dams etc. Experimental results of horizontal vibrations on a pile partially anchored in a soil scale model put into a centrifuge are presented. Mechanical similitude conditions from equilibrium equations or rheologic laws are described. After a description of testing equipment (centrifuge, electrodynamic excitator) experimental results are interpreted with a model. Non-linearities on frequency response curves are characterized [fr

  5. Studies on liquefaction and pyrolysis of peat and biomass at KTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernbom, E.; Sjoestrom, K.; Hoernel, C.; Zanzi, R.; Bjoernbom, P.

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of the study on thermochemical conversion of solid fuels is done. The study have been performed in the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, since the outbreak of energy crisis in the seventies. The main problems connected with utilisation of peat for energy are: 90% moisture content in the deposits and 35-40% oxygen content in the dry substance. Simultaneous dewatering and liquefaction of peat have been achieved by the Bjoerbom method. The wet peat has been treated with CO and H 2 O without preliminary drying, using water as a medium agent. After treatment water has been phase-separated from the heavy oil product. Another approach is de-oxygenation of peat prior to liquefaction. A significant part of oxygen in peat and biomass can be removed by thermal decomposition of the fuels prior to liquefaction and removal of carbon dioxide and water from the organic matter in them. The products obtained after de-oxygenation demand low consumption of external hydrogenation agent because they are rich in hydrogen. Some criteria for selection of peat as a raw material for liquefaction are given. The equipment and experimental procedure for pyrolysis of peat and biomass are described. A free fall tubular reactor with max operating pressure of 5 MPa and temperature of 1100 o C has been used. The effect of treatment conditions under the rapid pyrolysis in the free fall reactor on the yield and the reactivity of char obtained after the final pyrolysis is shown. Peat and wood are transformed into pyrolysis products for less than 1 second; 35-50% of the moisture- and ash-free peat and 70% of the wood have been converted into gaseous products.The char obtained in the rapid pyrolysis contains a fraction which can be further de-volatilized by slow pyrolysis for a few minutes - time much longer than the time for formation of primary products. High reactivity of char is favoured by lower pyrolysis temperature, shorter residence time and larger particle size of the fuel

  6. 76 FR 50767 - In the Matter of USEC Inc., American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility, and American Centrifuge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ...; License Nos. SNM-7003, SNM-2011] In the Matter of USEC Inc., American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility, and American Centrifuge Plant; Order Extending the Date by Which the Direct Transfer of Licenses Is To... American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility (Lead Cascade) and American Centrifuge Plant (ACP), respectively...

  7. Unexpected properties of the centrifugal force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Contrary to what is stated in the Newtonian dynamics, rotation of a reference frame is not sufficient for the occurrence of the centrifugal force. Instead, the necessary and sufficient condition is a motion along a path different from that of a photon trajectory in space. This calls for a rather fundamental change in understanding of the very nature of the centrifugal force. It also has important practical physical consequences: in a strong gravitational field, where light trajectories are substantially curved, centrifugal force is much weaker than the Newtonian theory predicts. In addition, when there are closed (circular) photon trajectories in space, the centrifugal force may reverse its direction - it attracts towards the rotation axis!. The weakening of the centrifugal force in strong gravitational fields and the reversal of its direction in the neighbourhood of close photon trajectories in space fully and clearly explain puzzling examples of counter intuitive behaviour of dynamical effects of rotation found previously by several authors: e.g. reversal of the ellipticity behaviour of the relativistic Maclaurin spheroids (Chandrasekhar and Miller, 1974), reversal of the viscous torque action (Anderson and Lemos, 1988), or the fact that rotation increases internal pressure of a sufficiently compact star (Abramowicz and Wagoner, 1974). Weakening of the centrifugal force implies that rotating neutron stars are less oblate (and probably more stable) than the Newtonian theory predicts. This is important for the recently discussed question of how fast can pulsars spin. (author). 23 refs, 3 figs

  8. Unexpected properties of the centrifugal force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Contrary to what is stated in the Newtonian dynamics, rotation of a reference frame is not sufficient for the occurrence of the centrifugal force. Instead, the necessary and sufficient condition is a motion along a path different from that of a photon trajectory in space. This calls for a rather fundamental change in understanding of the very nature of the centrifugal force. It also has important practical physical consequences: in a strong gravitational field, where light trajectories are substantially curved, centrifugal force is much weaker than the Newtonian theory predicts. In addition, when there are closed (circular) photon trajectories in space, the centrifugal force may reverse its direction - it attracts towards the rotation axis. The weakening of the centrifugal force in strong gravitational fields and the reversal of its direction in the neighborhood of close photon trajectories in space fully and clearly explain puzzling examples of counter intuitive behaviour of dynamical effects of rotation found previously by several authors: e.g. reversal of the ellipticity behaviour of the relativistic Maclaurin spheroids (Chandrasekhar and Miller, 1974), reversal of the viscous torque action (Anderson and Lemos, 1988) or the fact that rotation increases internal pressure of a sufficiently compact star (Abramowicz and Wagoner, 1974). Weakening of the centrifugal force implies that rotating neutron stars are less oblate (and probably more stable) than the Newtonian theory predicts. This is important for the recently discussed question of how fast can pulsars spins. (author). 31 refs, 3 figs

  9. Separation of uranium isotopes by gas centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, I.

    1980-05-01

    The uranium isotope enrichment is studied by means of the countercurrent gas centrifuge driven by thermal convection. A description is given of (a) the transfer and purification of the uranium hexafluoride used as process gas in the present investigation; (b) the countercurrent centrifuge ZG3; (c) the system designed for the introduction and extraction of the process gas from the centrifuge; (d) the measurement of the process gas flow rate through the centrifuge; (e) the determination of the uranium isotopic abundance by mass spectrometry; (f) the operation and mechanical behavior of the centrifuge and (g) the isotope separation experiments, performed, respectively, at total reflux and with production of enriched material. The results from the separation experiments at total reflux are discussed in terms of the enrichment factor variation with the magnitude and flow profile of the countercurrent given by the temperature difference between the rotor covers. As far as the separation experiments with production are concerned, the discussion of their results is presented through the variation of the enrichment factor as a function of the flow rate, the observed asymmetry of the process and the calculated separative power of the centrifuge. (Author) [pt

  10. Enrichment technology. Dependable vendor of gas centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    Enrichment Technology is an innovative, high-tech company that develops, manufactures and installs gas centrifuges for enriching uranium. In addition, Enrichment Technology designs enrichment plants that use gas centrifuge technology. This technology offers the most efficient and cost-effective method for enriching uranium yet: high-performance, safe technology that dominates the market with a global share of 45 percent. A determining factor in Enrichment Technology's success is its mission: supplying its customers with safe, reliable technology. Production of the centrifuges requires versatile know-how and collaboration between different departments as well as interdisciplinary teams at the various sites. More than 2000 operators at 8 sites in 5 countries contribute their individual knowledge and personal skills in order to produce this exceptional technology. The head office is in Beaconsfield near London and the operational headquarters are in Almelo in the Netherlands. There are other sites in Germany (Juelich und Gronau), Great Britain (Capenhurst) as well as project sites in the USA and France. Capenhurst is where experienced engineers design new enrichment plants and organise their construction. Centrifuge components are manufactured in Almelo and Juelich, while the pipework needed to connect up the centrifuges is produced at the site in Gronau. In Juelich, highly qualified scientists in interdisciplinary teams are continuously researching ways of improving the current centrifuges. Communication between specialists in the fields of chemistry, physics and engineering forms the basis for the company's success and the key to extending this leading position in the global enrichment market. (orig.)

  11. Microwave assisted pyrolysis of halogenated plastics recovered from waste computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Luca; Bartoli, Mattia; Frediani, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Microwave Assisted Pyrolysis (MAP) of the plastic fraction of Waste from Electric and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) from end-life computers was run with different absorbers and set-ups in a multimode batch reactor. A large amount of various different liquid fractions (up to 76.6wt%) were formed together with a remarkable reduction of the solid residue (up to 14.2wt%). The liquid fractions were characterized using the following different techniques: FT-IR ATR, 1 H NMR and a quantitative GC-MS analysis. The liquid fractions showed low density and viscosity, together with a high concentration of useful chemicals such as styrene (up to 117.7mg/mL), xylenes (up to 25.6mg/mL for p-xylene) whereas halogenated compounds were absent or present in a very low amounts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fast pyrolysis of lignin, macroalgae and sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung

    effect on the product distributions of the lignin and sewage sludge PCR pyrolysis, as well as their bio-oil properties with respect to molecular mass distribution, identified GC-MS component compositions, water-insoluble fraction, viscosity, and HHV. A maximum of organic oil yields of lignin and sewage...... samples of wood, char and grinded char with respect to phase transitions, rheological properties, elemental composition, and energy density were investigated. Also pumping properties were investigated at temperatures of 25, 40 and 60 ºC and the solids loading of 0 - 20 wt%. The bioslurries obtained...... of the condenser nozzle and high rotor speed for obtaining high bio-oil. The recognized limitations lead to that the old PCR set-up cannot be safely scaled up and perform well in a continuous mode. Thus a new set-up with significant modifications of reactor and bio-condenser has been manufactured to overcome...

  13. The effect of bioleaching on sewage sludge pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihua; Hu, Mian; Cui, Baihui; Liu, Shiming; Guo, Dabin; Xiao, Bo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of bioleaching on sewage sludge pyrolysis were studied. Sewage sludge was treated by bioleaching with solid concentrations of 6% (w/v), 8% (w/v), 10% (w/v). Results showed that bioleaching treatment could modify the physicochemical properties of sewage sludge and enhance the metals removal. The optimum removal efficiencies of heavy metals were achieved with solid concentration of 6% (w/v) bioleaching treatment: Cu, 73.08%; Zn, 78.67%; Pb, 24.65%; Cd, 79.46%. The characterization results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the bioleached sewage sludge with a 6% (w/v) solid concentration treatment was the easiest to decompose. Pyrolytic experiments of bioleached sewage sludge were performed in a laboratory-scale fixed bed reactor. Results indicated that bioleaching treatment greatly influenced the product yields and gas composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of pressure on pyrolysis of black liquor: 1. Swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Kevin; Backman, Rainer; Hupa, Mikko

    2008-02-01

    This is the first of two papers concerning the behavior of black liquor during pyrolysis under pressurized conditions. Two industrial kraft liquors were pyrolyzed in a laboratory-scale pressurized single particle reactor and a pressurized grid heater at temperatures ranging from 650 to 1100 degrees C and at pressures between 1 and 20 bar. The dimensions of the chars produced were measured and the specific swollen volume was calculated. Swelling decreased roughly logarithmically over the pressure range 1-20 r. An expression is developed to predict the specific swollen volume at elevated pressure when the volume at 1 bar is known. The bulk density of the char increased with pressure, indicating that liquors will be entrained less easily at higher pressures.

  15. Catalytic Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass Using Different Types of Zeolite and Online Vapor Fractionation

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2016-03-11

    Bio-oil produced from conventional flash pyrolysis has poor quality and requires expensive upgrading before it can be used as a transportation fuel. In this work, a high quality bio-oil has been produced using a novel approach where flash pyrolysis, catalysis and fractionation of pyrolysis vapors using two stage condensation are combined in a single process unit. A bench scale unit of 1 kg/h feedstock capacity is used for catalytic pyrolysis in an entrained down-flow reactor system equipped with two-staged condensation of the pyrolysis vapor. Zeolite-based catalysts are investigated to study the effect of varying acidities of faujasite Y zeolites, zeolite structures (ZSM5), different catalyst to biomass ratios and different catalytic pyrolysis temperatures. Low catalyst/biomass ratios did not show any significant improvements in the bio-oil quality, while high catalyst/biomass ratios showed an effective deoxygenation of the bio-oil. The application of zeolites decreased the organic liquid yield due to the increased production of non-condensables, primarily hydrocarbons. The catalytically produced bio-oil was less viscous and zeolites were effective at cracking heavy molecular weight compounds in the bio-oil. Acidic zeolites, H-Y and H-ZSM5, increased the desirable chemical compounds in the bio-oil such as phenols, furans and hydrocarbon, and reduced the undesired compounds such as acids. On the other hand reducing the acidity of zeolites reduced some of the undesired compounds in the bio-oil such as ketones and aldehydes. The performance of H-Y was superior to that of the rest of zeolites studied: bio-oil of high chemical and calorific value was produced with a high organic liquid yield and low oxygen content. H-ZSM5 was a close competitor to H-Y in performance but with a lower yield of bio-oil. Online fractionation of catalytic pyrolysis vapors was employed by controlling the condenser temperature and proved to be a successful process parameter to tailor the

  16. Effect of temperature on energy potential of pyrolysis products from oil palm shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina María Romero Millán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Taking into account that near 220 000 tons of oil palm shells are produced every year in Colombia, as a waste of the Elaeis Guineensis palm oil transformation process, the aim of this work is to determine the energy potential of oil palm shells, when transformed through slow pyrolysis process. Methods: Using a fixed bed lab scale reactor, different oil palm shells pyrolysis tests were performed between 300°C and 500°C. The effect of the temperature in the process product yield and in the energy content of produced solids and gases were analyzed. Results: With a maximum mass yield of 50%, the char is considered the main product of oil palm shells pyrolysis, containing up to 73% of the raw biomass energy. The heating value of char raised with the temperature, from 29,6 MJ/kg at 300°C to 31,34 MJ/kg at 500°C. Moreover, the gas produced in the established temperature range had up to 13% of the energy content of the raw biomass, with a heating value near 12,5 MJ/m3. Conclusions: According to the results, slow pyrolysis can be considered an interesting process for the valorization of residual biomass as oil palm shells, through the production of solids and gases that can be used as fuels, or as precursor of other value-added products.

  17. Flash pyrolysis of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) for production of liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acikgoz, C. [Department of Chemical Technology, Bilecik Higher Vocational School, GueluembeCampus, Anadolu University, 11030 Bilecik (Turkey); Kockar, O.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, iki Eyluel Campus, Anadolu University, 26470 Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2007-03-15

    Flash pyrolysis experiments of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) were performed in a tubular transport reactor at atmospheric pressure under nitrogen atmosphere. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and particle size on the yields of products were investigated with the sweep gas flow rate of 100 cm{sup 3} min{sup -1}. The temperature of pyrolysis and particle size were varied in the ranges 400-700 C and 0.6 mm < D{sub p} < 1.25 mm, 1.25 mm < D{sub p} < 1.8 mm, D{sub p} > 1.8 mm, respectively. The maximum oil yield of 68.8% was obtained at a pyrolysis temperature of 550 C, and the particle size of D{sub p} > 1.8 mm. The char and liquid product were analyzed to determine their elemental composition and calorific value. In particular, the chemical composition of the oil was investigated using chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques ({sup 1}H NMR, IR, column chromatography and GC). The chemical characterization has shown that the oil obtained from linseed can be used as a renewable fuel and chemical feedstock. (author)

  18. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the composition of the oils obtained from sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, M.E.; Menendez, J.A.; Dominguez, A.; Pis, J.J.; Martinez, O.; Calvo, L.F.; Bernad, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Sewage sludge was pyrolysed in a quartz reactor at 350, 450, 550 and 950 o C. The pyrolysis oils from the sewage sludge were characterized in detail by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Changes in the composition of the oils related to the process conditions were assessed by normalizing the areas of the peaks. It was demonstrated that, as the temperature of pyrolysis increased from 350 to 950 o C, the concentration of mono-aromatic hydrocarbons in the oils also increased. Conversely, phenol and its alkyl derivatives showed a strong decrease in their concentration as temperature rose. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with two to three rings passed through a maximum at a pyrolysis temperature of 450 o C. PAHs with 4-5 rings also presented a major increase as temperature increased up to 450 o C, the concentration at 950 o C being slightly higher than that at 450 o C. Quantification of the main compounds showed that sewage sludge pyrolysis oils contain significant quantities of potentially high-value hydrocarbons such as mono-aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds. The oils also contain substantial concentrations of PAHs, even at the lowest temperature of 350 o C. The pathway to PAH formation is believed to be via the Diels-Alder reaction and also via secondary reactions of oxygenated compounds such as phenols.

  19. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and porous carbons from printed circuit board waste pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Cui; Li Aimin; Gao Ningbo

    2010-01-01

    The possibility and feasibility of using pyrolysis oil from printed circuit board (PCB) waste as a precursor for advanced carbonaceous materials is presented. The PCB waste was first pyrolyzed in a laboratory scale fixed bed reactor at 600 deg. C to prepare pyrolysis oil. The analysis of pyrolysis oil by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy indicated that it contained a very high proportion of phenol and phenol derivatives. It was then polymerized in formaldehyde solution to synthesize pyrolysis oil-based resin which was used as a precursor to prepare carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and porous carbons. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission microscopy investigation showed that the resulting CNTs had hollow cores with outer diameter of ∼338 nm and wall thickness of ∼86 nm and most of them were filled with metal nanoparticles or nanorods. X-ray diffraction reveals that CNTs have an amorphous structure. Nitrogen adsorption isotherm analysis indicated the prepared porous carbons had a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1214 m 2 /g. The mechanism of the formation of the CNTs and porous carbons was discussed.

  20. Constructional features of an integrated centrifugal pump in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.D.; Schneider, W.

    1981-01-01

    The pump construction described here has been produced as a prototype and tested at full load. From trial runs with hot and cold water, important operating data were obtained, e.g. throughput, lift, vibrations, loads on the radial bearings, cooling water temperatures, etc. (orig./GL) [de

  1. Utilization possibilities of hydrocarbon fractions obtained by waste plastic pyrolysis: energetic utilization and applications in polymer composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miskolczi, Norbert; Borsodi, Nikolett; Angyal, Andras [University of Pannonia, MOL Department of Hydrocarbon and Coal Processing (Hungary)], email: mnorbert@almos.uni-pannon.hu, email: borsodinikolett@almos.uni-pannon.hu, email: angyala@almos.uni-pannon.hu

    2011-07-01

    With the energy crisis and the rising concerns about the environment, energy-saving measures are urgently needed. Each year about 300M tons of plastic wastes are produced world-wide and governments are now focusing on recycling and reusing these products to save significant amounts of energy. The aim of this paper was to analyze the products which can be obtained from waste plastic and determine their possible uses. Pyrolysis of commercial waste plastics was done in a reactor at 500-600 degree celsius and the products were then analyzed using several methods. Results showed that the pyrolysis produces gases, naphtha, middle distillates and heavy oils. The properties of these products were also determined and it was found that they have the potential to be used in fuel-like and additive producing applications. This study highlighted that pyrolysis of waste polymers can yield useful products.

  2. Theoretical considerations in solid bowl centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A combination of literature survey and independent analysis determined three relationships for the prediction of the critical (or minimum recoverable) particle size in a solid bowl centrifuge. The relationships were derived based on three different theories of fluid behavior within the centrifuge; (1) laminar film flow (laminar film model), (2) plug flow (Sharples Model), and parabolic flow (modified Sharples Model). The critical particle size for the centrifuge used in Cs-PTA recovery in the CAW process predicted by the three relationships range from 0.19 to 0.34 μm (1 μm = 10 -6 m). The laminar film model gives the most conservative estimate of critical particle size (0.34 μm) and the resulting relationship is recommended for use to predict solid bowl centrifuge performance. Three correction factors are incorporated into the predictive equations to account for the effects of fluid turbulence near the centrifuge feed point, fluid lag and hindered settling. Of these factors, turbulence near the feed point (which is accounted for by using an effective centrifuge length) has the greatest impact, increasing the predicted critical particle size by 15%, while the combination of fluid lag and hindered settling factors increase the recoverable particle size by 4%. The overall effect of the correction factors is an approximately 20% decrease in centrifuge effectivity. The fraction of solids smaller than the critical size range has not been reliably determined for laboratory or plant prepared Cs-PTA. In addition, the density of Cs-PTA crystals is reported to vary from 3.2 to 12 grams per cubic centimeter

  3. Ignition of DME and DME/CH4 at High Pressure: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    The pyrolysis and oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) and its mixtures with methane were investigated at high pressures (50 and 100 bar) and intermediate temperatures (450―900 K) in a laminar flow reactor. DME pyrolysis started at 825 K (at 50 bar). The onset of DME reaction was detected at 525―550 K...

  4. Alternative fuel produced from thermal pyrolysis of waste tires and its use in a DI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Bai, Chi-Jeng; Lin, Chi-Tung; Prakash, Samay

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The liquid, solid and gas yields from pyrolysis of waste tires were investigated. • For energy and economic consideration, pre-treatments of TPO were avoided. • Various proportions of TPO-diesel mixture were tested in a DI diesel engine. • TPOs derived from various pyrolysis temperatures were also tested in engine. • Fuel consumption, cylinder pressure, engine power, and SO2 emission were discussed. - Abstract: Alternative fuels from waste material have been receiving attentions due to the increasing demand of fossil fuels. Pyrolysis has been a considerable solution for processing waste tires because it gives clean emissions and produces valuable liquid or solid products. Pyrolysis oil from waste tires has become a potential replacement for petroleum diesel due to the similar physical and chemical properties to diesel fuel. In this study, waste tires were pyrolyzed in a lab-scale fixed bed reactor with various reaction temperatures. The liquid, solid and gas product yields from different pyrolysis temperatures were compared, as well as the analyses of property and element for the oil product. Due to the energy and economic consideration, the pre-treatments of TPO before adding into regular diesel were avoided. The TPO derived from various pyrolysis temperatures were mixed with regular diesel at different proportions and subsequently tested in a DI diesel engine. The engine performance, such as fuel consumption, cylinder pressure, engine power, and SO_2 emission, were examined and discussed. The results indicated that increasing the TPO fraction in diesel lead to worse engine performance, but it can be recovered using TPOs produced from higher pyrolysis temperatures.

  5. Co-pyrolysis of waste tire/coal mixtures for smokeless fuel, maltenes and hydrogen-rich gas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bičáková, Olga; Straka, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Co-pyrolysis of waste tires/coal mixtures yields mainly smokeless fuel (55–74 wt%). • Alternatively, the smokeless fuel can serve as carbonaceous sorbent. • The obtained tar contained maltenes (80–85 wt%) and asphaltenes (6–8 wt%). • Tar from co-pyrolysis can serve as heating oil or a source of maltenes for repairing of asphalt surfaces. • The hydrogen-rich gas was obtained (61–65 vol% H_2, 24–25 vol% CH_4, 1.4–2 vol% CO_2). - Abstract: The processing of waste tires with two different types of bituminous coal was studied through the slow co-pyrolysis of 1 kg of waste tire/coal mixtures with 15, 30 and 60 wt% waste tires on a laboratory scale. The waste tire/coal mixtures were pyrolysed using a quartz reactor in a stationary bed. The mixtures were heated at a rate 5 °C/min up to the final temperature of 900 °C with a soaking time of 30 min at the required temperature. The mass balance of the process and the properties of the coke and tar obtained were evaluated, further, the influence of the admixture in the charge on the amount and composition of the obtained coke and tar was determined. It was found that the smokeless fuel/carbonaceous sorbent and a high yield of tar for further use can be obtained through the slow co-pyrolysis. The obtained tars contained mostly maltenes (80–85 wt%). FTIR analysis showed that the maltenes from the co-pyrolysis of coal/waste tires exhibited significantly lower aromaticity as compared with that from coal alone. The gas obtained from pyrolysis or co-pyrolysis of waste tire/coal mixtures contained a high amount of hydrogen (above 60 vol%) and methane (above 20 vol%).

  6. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  7. Photocatalytic Desulfurization of Waste Tire Pyrolysis Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napida Hinchiranan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Waste tire pyrolysis oil has high potential to replace conventional fossil liquid fuels due to its high calorific heating value. However, the large amounts of sulfurous compounds in this oil hinders its application. Thus, the aim of this research was to investigate the possibility to apply the photo-assisted oxidation catalyzed by titanium dioxide (TiO2, Degussa P-25 to partially remove sulfurous compounds in the waste tire pyrolysis oil under milder reaction conditions without hydrogen consumption. A waste tire pyrolysis oil with 0.84% (w/w of sulfurous content containing suspended TiO2 was irradiated by using a high-pressure mercury lamp for 7 h. The oxidized sulfur compounds were then migrated into the solvent-extraction phase. A maximum % sulfur removal of 43.6% was achieved when 7 g/L of TiO2 was loaded into a 1/4 (v/v mixture of pyrolysis waste tire oil/acetonitrile at 50 °C in the presence of air. Chromatographic analysis confirmed that the photo-oxidized sulfurous compounds presented in the waste tire pyrolysis oil had higher polarity, which were readily dissolved and separated in distilled water. The properties of the photoxidized product were also reported and compared to those of crude oil.

  8. Exergy analysis of synthetic biofuel production via fast pyrolysis and hydroupgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Jens F.; Petrakopoulou, Fontina; Dufour, Javier

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the first assessment of the exergetic performance of a biorefinery process based on catalytic hydroupgrading of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis. Lignocellulosic biomass is converted into bio-oil through fast pyrolysis, which is then upgraded to synthetic fuels in a catalytic hydrotreating process. The biorefinery process is simulated numerically using commercial software and analyzed using exergetic analysis. Exergy balances are defined for each component of the plant and the exergetic efficiencies and exergy destruction rates are calculated at the component, section and plant level, identifying thermodynamic inefficiencies and revealing the potential for further improvement of the process. The overall biofuel process results in an exergetic efficiency of 60.1%, while the exergetic efficiency of the upgrading process in the biorefinery alone is 77.7%. Within the biorefinery, the steam reforming reactor is the main source of inefficiencies, followed by the two hydrotreating reactors. In spite of the high operating pressures in the hydrotreating section, the compressors have little impact on the total exergy destruction. Compared to competing lignocellulosic biofuel processes, like gasification with Fischer–Tropsch synthesis or lignocellulosic ethanol processes, the examined system achieves a significantly higher exergetic efficiency. - Highlights: • Exergetic analysis of a biorefinery for bio-oil hydroupgrading. • Detailed simulation model using 83 model compounds. • Exergy destruction quantified in each component of the plant. • Exergetic efficiency and potential for improvement determined on component level. • Highest exergy destruction in the pyrolysis plant and the steam reformer

  9. Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Ted; Agblevor, Foster; Battaglia, Francine; Klein, Michael

    2013-01-18

    The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

  10. Centrifugal extraction of highly enriched tin isotopes and increase of specific activity of the radionuclide 119mSn on the gas centrifuge cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorov, I.A.; Tcheltsov, A.N.; Sosnin, L.Yu.; Sazikin, A.A.; Rudnev, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    This work contains the results of research on centrifugal enrichment of 118 Sn isotope followed by irradiation and, finally, a second centrifugal enrichment to produce high specific activity 119m Sn. Non-steady-state separation methods were used for the effective extraction of the radionuclide 119m Sn from the irradiated target. As a result of this work, radiation sources based on 119m Sn were obtained with a specific activity of 500 mCi/g. This is 100 times greater than the specific activity obtained after irradiation in the reactor alone. In addition, the sources had an previously unattainable radio-purity ratio of 113 Sn/ 119m Sn of approximately 10 -6

  11. Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis products separation for recycling organic materials from waste liquid crystal display panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ruixue; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis characteristics are conducted for a better understanding of LCDs pyrolysis. • Optimum design is developed which is significant to guide the further industrial process. • Acetic acid and TPP are recycled and separated. - Abstract: Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate with indium-tin oxide film), and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed beforehand since the organic matters would hinder the indium recycling process. In the present study, pyrolysis process is used to remove the organic materials and recycle acetic as well as and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) from waste LCD panels in an environmental friendly way. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics analysis are conducted which is significant to get a better understanding of the pyrolysis process. (ii) Optimum design is developed by applying Box–Behnken Design (BBD) under response surface methodology (RSM) for engineering application which is significant to guide the further industrial recycling process. The oil yield could reach 70.53 wt% and the residue rate could reach 14.05 wt% when the pyrolysis temperature is 570 °C, nitrogen flow rate is 6 L min"−"1 and the particle size is 0.5 mm. (iii) Furthermore, acetic acid and TPP are recycled, and then separated by rotary evaporation, which could reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid, and be reused in electronics manufacturing industry.

  12. Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis products separation for recycling organic materials from waste liquid crystal display panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruixue; Xu, Zhenming, E-mail: zmxu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis characteristics are conducted for a better understanding of LCDs pyrolysis. • Optimum design is developed which is significant to guide the further industrial process. • Acetic acid and TPP are recycled and separated. - Abstract: Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate with indium-tin oxide film), and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed beforehand since the organic matters would hinder the indium recycling process. In the present study, pyrolysis process is used to remove the organic materials and recycle acetic as well as and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) from waste LCD panels in an environmental friendly way. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics analysis are conducted which is significant to get a better understanding of the pyrolysis process. (ii) Optimum design is developed by applying Box–Behnken Design (BBD) under response surface methodology (RSM) for engineering application which is significant to guide the further industrial recycling process. The oil yield could reach 70.53 wt% and the residue rate could reach 14.05 wt% when the pyrolysis temperature is 570 °C, nitrogen flow rate is 6 L min{sup −1} and the particle size is 0.5 mm. (iii) Furthermore, acetic acid and TPP are recycled, and then separated by rotary evaporation, which could reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid, and be reused in electronics manufacturing industry.

  13. Headlines... Areva on the way toward centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The French industrial group Areva, that gathers Cogema and Framatome-ANP, has entered into a partnership with the British nuclear consortium Urenco for creating ETC (enrichment technology company) in order to replace its uranium enrichment facility (Georges-Besse-I) that is planned to close in 2012 by a new one (George-Besse-II) that will enter into service as early as 2007. The new facility will be based on the centrifugation technique developed by Urenco, this technique will cut the consumption of electricity by 3 in comparison with the gaseous diffusion technique used in the Georges-Besse-I facility. The other asset of the centrifugation technique is that the facility can grow with the number of centrifuges that are set. In 2007 only 7% of the total number of centrifuges will be installed, which will sufficient to satisfy the demand for enriched uranium. The full size of the facility will be reached in 2016 through gradual steps of 10% more centrifuges set every year. (A.C.)

  14. Liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning is examined for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste Program currently under study at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Centrifugation might have application for the separation of the LiF-BeF 2 salt from heavier radioactive materials fission product and actinides in the separation of fission product from actinides, in the isotope separation of fission-product cesium before transmutation of the 137 Cs and 135 Cs, and in the removal of spallation product from the liquid lead target. It is found that useful chemical separations should be possible using existing materials for the centrifuge construction for all four cases with the actinide fraction in fission product perhaps as low as 1 part in 10 7 and the fraction of 137 CS in 133 Cs being as low as a few parts in 10 5 . A centrifuge cascade has the advantage that it can be assembled and operated as a completely closed system without a waste stream except that associated with maintenance or replacement of centrifuge components

  15. Bifurcated equilibria in centrifugally confined plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, I.; Teodorescu, C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Hassam, A. B.; Clary, R.; Ellis, R.; Lunsford, R.

    2008-01-01

    A bifurcation theory and associated computational model are developed to account for abrupt transitions observed recently on the Maryland Centrifugal eXperiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al. Phys. Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)], a supersonically rotating magnetized plasma that relies on centrifugal forces to prevent thermal expansion of plasma along the magnetic field. The observed transitions are from a well-confined, high-rotation state (HR-mode) to a lower-rotation, lesser-confined state (O-mode). A two-dimensional time-dependent magnetohydrodynamics code is used to simulate the dynamical equilibrium states of the MCX configuration. In addition to the expected viscous drag on the core plasma rotation, a momentum loss term is added that models the friction of plasma on the enhanced level of neutrals expected in the vicinity of the insulators at the throats of the magnetic mirror geometry. At small values of the external rotation drive, the plasma is not well-centrifugally confined and hence experiences the drag from near the insulators. Beyond a critical value of the external drive, the system makes an abrupt transition to a well-centrifugally confined state in which the plasma has pulled away from the end insulator plates; more effective centrifugal confinement lowers the plasma mass near the insulators allowing runaway increases in the rotation speed. The well-confined steady state is reached when the external drive is balanced by only the viscosity of the core plasma. A clear hysteresis phenomenon is shown.

  16. Centrifugal acceleration in the magnetotail lobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nilsson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Combined Cluster EFW and EDI measurements have shown that cold ion outflow in the magnetospheric lobes dominates the hydrogen ion outflow from the Earth's atmosphere. The ions have too low kinetic energy to be measurable with particle instruments, at least for the typical spacecraft potential of a sunlit spacecraft in the tenuous lobe plasmas outside a few RE. The measurement technique yields both density and bulk velocity, which can be combined with magnetic field measurements to estimate the centrifugal acceleration experienced by these particles. We present a quantitative estimate of the centrifugal acceleration, and the velocity change with distance which we would expect due to centrifugal acceleration. It is found that the centrifugal acceleration is on average outward with an average value of about of 5 m s−2. This is small, but acting during long transport times and over long distances the cumulative effect is significant, while still consistent with the relatively low velocities estimated using the combination of EFW and EDI data. The centrifugal acceleration should accelerate any oxygen ions in the lobes to energies observable by particle spectrometers. The data set also put constraints on the effectiveness of any other acceleration mechanisms acting in the lobes, where the total velocity increase between 5 and 19 RE geocentric distance is less than 5 km s−1.

  17. Pyrolysis of Jatropha curcas pressed cake for bio-oil production in a fixed-bed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourabchi, Seyed Amirmostafa; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The pyrolysis of Jatropha curcas waste in a fixed-bed rig was studied. • Yield, calorific value, water content and acidity of bio-oil were compared. • Empirical correlations for bio-oil yield and specifications were developed. • Optimisation of bio-oil production based on combined specifications was achieved. - Abstract: This study investigated the effects of pyrolysis parameters on the yield and quality of bio-oil from Jatropha curcas pressed cake. This biomass was pyrolysed in a fixed-bed reactor over a temperature range of 573.15 K to 1073.15 K and a nitrogen linear speed range of 7.8 × 10 −5 m/s to 6.7 × 10 −2 m/s. The heating rate and biomass grain size were 50 K/min and <2 mm, respectively. The bio-oils were tested for the gross calorific value, water content and acidity. The pyrolysis process was simulated using Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) for mass and energy balances analyses. Empirical correlations between the bio-oil specifications and pyrolysis parameters were developed using linear and nonlinear multiple regression methods for process optimisation. At optimum pyrolysis conditions, above 50% of the waste is converted to bio-oil with less than 30% water content, a gross calorific value of 15.12 MJ/kg and a pH of 6.77

  18. The production of hydrogen-rich gas by wet sludge pyrolysis using waste heat from blast-furnace slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Siyi; Feng, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Blast furnace (BF) slag, a byproduct of steelmaking industry, contains a large amount of sensible heat and is composed of some metal oxides, which exhibits preferable catalytic performance in improving tar cracking and C_nH_m reforming. This paper presents a heat recovery system from the heat of BF slag, which generates hydrogen-rich gas via the endothermic reactions of sludge pyrolysis. The effects of various parameters including the slag temperature, the mass ratio of slag to sludge (B/S), particle size and feed moisture on product yields and gas characteristics were evaluated separately. It was found that the pyrolysis products distribution was significantly influenced by the BF slag temperature. The differences resulting from varying B/S practically disappear as higher temperature heat carrier is approached. The optimum feed moisture was in favour of sludge pyrolysis by getting char and tar participate in gasification reactions, improving gas yield and quality. BF slag as catalyst can greatly increase H_2 and CO contents of gas by improving tar degradation and reforming of biogas (CO_2 and CH_4). Decreasing the slag particles size was helpful to sludge primary pyrolysis to produce more light gases, less char and condensate, while its effects on gas compositions was not evident. - Highlights: • The sensible heat of molten slag was recovered and converted into combustible gas. • A novel rotary pyrolysis reactor using BF slag as heat carrier was presented. • The moisture in sludge was used as the gasification medium and hydrogen source.

  19. Hydrogen-Rich Syngas Production from Gasification and Pyrolysis of Solar Dried Sewage Sludge: Experimental and Modeling Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïda Ben Hassen Trabelsi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar dried sewage sludge (SS conversion by pyrolysis and gasification processes has been performed, separately, using two laboratory-scale reactors, a fixed-bed pyrolyzer and a downdraft gasifier, to produce mainly hydrogen-rich syngas. Prior to SS conversion, solar drying has been conducted in order to reduce moisture content (up to 10%. SS characterization reveals that these biosolids could be appropriate materials for gaseous products production. The released gases from SS pyrolysis and gasification present relatively high heating values (up to 9.96 MJ/kg for pyrolysis and 8.02  9.96 MJ/kg for gasification due to their high contents of H2 (up to 11 and 7 wt%, resp. and CH4 (up to 17 and 5 wt%, resp.. The yields of combustible gases (H2 and CH4 show further increase with pyrolysis. Stoichiometric models of both pyrolysis and gasification reactions were determined based on the global biomass formula, CαHβOγNδSε, in order to assist in the products yields optimization.

  20. Influence of Carbonization Temperature on Physicochemical Properties of Biochar derived from Slow Pyrolysis of Durian Wood (Durio zibethinus Sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira Zaman Chowdhury

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to explore the influence of pyrolysis temperature on the physicochemical properties of biochar synthesized from durian wood (Durio zibethinus sawdust. Surface morphological features, including the porosity and BET surface area of biochars, provide appropriate dimensions for growing clusters of microorganisms with excellent water retention capacity in soil. Oxygen-containing surface functional groups play a vital role in improving soil fertility by increasing its cation and anion exchange capacities with reduced leaching of nutrients from the soil surface. Biochar was produced via slow pyrolysis of woody biomass (WS using a fixed bed reactor under an oxygen-free atmosphere at different pyrolysis temperatures (350, 450, and 550 °C. The biochars obtained were characterized using ultimate and proximate analyses, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface area, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The yield of biochar decreased from 66.46 to 24.56%, whereas the BET surface area increased sharply from 2.567 to 220.989 m2/g, when the pyrolysis temperature was increased from 350 to 550 °C. The results highlighted the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the structure of the biochar, which could be advantageous for agricultural industries.

  1. The catalytic cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolysis char on tar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Z.; Huibin, H.; Xiangling, S.; Zhenhua, M.; Lei, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of different pyrolysis conditions for tar catalytic cracking will be analyzed according to the lignite pyrolysis char as catalyst on pyrolytic tar in this paper. The pyrolysis char what is the by-product of the cracking of coal has an abundant of pore structure and it has good catalytic activity. On this basis, making the modified catalyst when the pyrolysis char is activation and loads Fe by impregnation method. The cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolytic tar is explored by applying gas chromatograph to analyze splitting products of tar. The experimental results showed that: (1) The effect of tar cracking as the pyrolysis temperature, the heating rate, the volatilization of pyrolysis char and particle size increasing is better and better. The effect of the catalytic and cracking of lignite pyrolysis char in tar is best when the heating rate, the pyrolysis temperature, the volatiles of pyrolysis char, particle size is in specific conditions.(2) The activation of pyrolysis char can improve the catalytic effect of pyrolysis char on the tar cracking. But it reduces the effect of the tar cracking when the pyrolysis char is activation loading Fe. (author)

  2. Characterization of pyrolytic oil obtained from pyrolysis of TDF (Tire Derived Fuel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banar, Müfide; Akyıldız, Vildan; Özkan, Aysun; Çokaygil, Zerrin; Onay, Özlem

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We pyrolyzed Tire Derived Fuel (TDF) at different heating rates and temperatures. ► We determine convenient pyrolysis temperature for pyrolytic oil. ► The product can be used as fuel for combustion system in industry. ► TDF pyrolysis is advisable recycling system because of low hazardous constituents. - Abstract: In recent years, waste utilization before disposing to the land is the most important point about waste management. Due to the increasing emphasis on recycling, related to the two European Commission Directives (EC End of Life Vehicle Directive, EC Waste Landfill Directive) affecting the management of waste tires, there is interest in the development of alternative technologies for recycling waste tires. One of them is pyrolysis. For this purpose, a fixed bed reactor was used to pyrolysis of Tire Derived Fuel (TDF) at the temperatures of 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600 °C with the heating rates of 5 and 35 °C/min. The maximum pyrolytic oil yield (38.8 wt.%) was obtained at 400 °C with 5 °C/min heating rate. The yield of pyrolytic oil decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperatures whereas the yield of gases increased. The fuel properties of the pyrolytic oil including higher heating value (HHV), elemental composition, flash point, viscosity, distillation and density were determined. Pyrolytic oil was characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H NMR) and gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC–MS) techniques and also, the amount of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) and congener distribution characteristics were studied for determination of environmental effects. It was seen that the pyrolytic oils have similar fuel properties with the diesel. It was also found that pyrolytic oil contained 0.00118 I-TEQs/g at very low level. Finally, the pyrolytic oil can be evaluated for energy recovery according to Regulation

  3. Design of an automated solar concentrator for the pyrolysis of scrap rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeaiter, Joseph; Ahmad, Mohammad N.; Rooney, David; Samneh, Bechara; Shammas, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Design of a solar concentrator with high focal-point temperatures. • Development of an automated continuous solar tracking system. • Catalytic pyrolysis to convert waste rubber tire to gas and liquid products. • The liquid components had high yields of C 10 –C 29 hydrocarbons. • The gaseous components were mainly propene and cyclobutene. - Abstract: An automated solar reactor system was designed and built to carry out catalytic pyrolysis of scrap rubber tires at 550 °C. To maximize solar energy concentration, a two degrees-of-freedom automated sun tracking system was developed and implemented. Both the azimuth and zenith angles were controlled via feedback from six photo-resistors positioned on a Fresnel lens. The pyrolysis of rubber tires was tested with the presence of two types of acidic catalysts, H-beta and H-USY. Additionally, a photoactive TiO 2 catalyst was used and the products were compared in terms of gas yields and composition. The catalysts were characterized by BET analysis and the pyrolysis gases and liquids were analyzed using GC–MS. The oil and gas yields were relatively high with the highest gas yield reaching 32.8% with H-beta catalyst while TiO 2 gave the same results as thermal pyrolysis without any catalyst. In the presence of zeolites, the dominant gasoline-like components in the gas were propene and cyclobutene. The TiO 2 and non-catalytic experiments produced a gas containing gasoline-like products of mainly isoprene (76.4% and 88.4% respectively). As for the liquids they were composed of numerous components spread over a wide distribution of C 10 to C 29 hydrocarbons of naphthalene and cyclohexane/ene derivatives

  4. NMR spectroscopy of coal pyrolysis products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Shevchenko, G.G.

    1985-12-01

    The authors consider the scope for using H 1 and C 13 NMR spectroscopy to describe the products from coal pyrolysis and hydrogenization. The accuracy of the structural information provided by the best NMR methods is also considered. The stuctural parameters derived from H 1 and C 13 NMR spectra are presented. Results demonstrate the high accuracy and sensitivity of the structural information provided by H 1 AND C 13 NMR spectra for coal products. There are substantial structural differences between the soluble products from medium-temperature coking of Cheremkhov coal and high-speed pyrolysis of Kan-Acha coal, and also differences in behavior during hydrogenation. These differences are related to the structure of the organic matter in the initial coal and to differences in the pyrolysis mechanisms.

  5. Improved Pyrolysis Micro reactor Design via Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-23

    Charts N/A Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified SAR 25 Thomas Smith N/A 10th ICCK May 23, 2017 In-Space Propulsion Branch Rocket Propulsion Division...layer and core flow structure altered • Heating reduces Mach No. as flow travels down the tube – Factor of ~2 pressure rise occurs when heat added Y, m

  6. Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of [3H]cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time

  7. Reaction rate of propene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peipei; Su, Kehe; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2011-10-01

    The reaction rate of propene pyrolysis was investigated based on the elementary reactions proposed in Qu et al., J Comput Chem 2009, 31, 1421. The overall reaction rate was developed with the steady-state approximation and the rate constants of the elementary reactions were determined with the variational transition state theory. For the elementary reaction having transition state, the vibrational frequencies of the selected points along the minimum energy path were calculated with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level and the energies were improved with the accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2). For the elementary reaction without transition state, the frequencies were calculated with CASSCF/6-311G(d,p) and the energies were refined with the multireference configuration interaction method MRCISD/6-311G(d,p). The rate constants were evaluated within 200-2000 K and the fitted three-parameter expressions were obtained. The results are consistent with those in the literatures in most cases. For the overall rate, it was found that the logarithm of the rate and the reciprocal temperature have excellent linear relationship above 400 K, predicting that the rate follows a typical first-order law at high temperatures of 800-2000 K, which is also consistent with the experiments. The apparent activation energy in 800-2000 K is 317.3 kJ/mol from the potential energy surface of zero Kelvin. This value is comparable with the energy barriers, 365.4 and 403.7 kJ/mol, of the rate control steps. However, the apparent activation energy, 215.7 kJ/mol, developed with the Gibbs free energy surface at 1200 K is consistent with the most recent experimental result 201.9 ± 0.6 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Study on cavitation in centrifugal sodium pumps for FBTR and PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, A.S.L.K.; Prabhakar, R.; Prakash, V.; Paranjpe, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) which is expected to become critical shortly is a loop type reactor of 40 MW thermal capacity and has two primary and two secondary centrifugal pumps for heat removal. During the initial periods of reactor operation, the steam generator is bypassed and the secondary sodium pumps are required to operate at flows less than that at best efficiency point. This paper deals with the cavitation problems associated with operation at partial f lows, theoretical estimations and experimental cavitation measurements carried out on FBTR secondary sodium pumps. These investigations revealed that operation of FBTR pumps at this off design condition is free from cavitation damage. Cavitation experiments on a model pump for the development of large sodium pumps for a 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) are described in this paper

  9. Total recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus from three wetland plants by fast pyrolysis technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Xin; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-02-01

    Fast pyrolysis of three wetland plants (Alligator weed, Oenanthe javanica and Typha angustifolia) in a vertical drop fixed bed reactor was investigated in this study. The experiments were carried out at different pyrolysis temperatures, and the maximum bio-oil yields achieved were 42.3%, 40.2% and 43.6% for Alligator weed, Oenanthe javanica and Typha angustifolia, respectively. The elemental composition of the bio-oil and char were analyzed, and the results show that a low temperature was appropriate for the nitrogen and phosphorus enrichment in char. GC-MS analysis shows that nitrogenous compounds, phenols and oxygenates were the main categories in the bio-oil. A series of leaching tests were carried out to examine the recovery of the nitrogen and phosphorus in the char, and the results indicate that significant fractions of nitrogen and phosphorus could be recovered by leaching process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomass pyrolysis: use of some agricultural wastes for alternative fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Lygia Maestri; Santos, Larissa Cardoso; Vieira, Paula Fraga; Parreira, Priciane Martins; Henrique, Humberto Molinar

    2009-01-01

    The use of biomass for energy generation has aroused great attention and interest because of the global climate changes, environmental pollution and reduction of availability of fossil energy. This study deals with pyrolysis of four agricultural wastes (sawdust, sugarcane straw, chicken litter and cashew nut shell) in a fixed bed pyrolytic reactor. The yields of char, liquid and gas were quantified at 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 deg C and the temperature and pressure effects were investigated. Pyrolytic liquids produced were separated into aqueous and oil phases. XRF spectroscopy was used for qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of the liquids and solids produced at whole temperature range. Calorific value analysis of liquids and solids were also performed for energy content evaluation. Experimental results showed sawdust, sugarcane straw and cashew nut waste have very good potential for using in pyrolysis process for alternative fuel production. (author)

  11. Spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis of oil from an oil shale flash pyrolysis unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khraisha, V.H.; Irqsousi, N.A. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Shabib, I.M. [Applied Science Univ., Amman (Jordan). Dept. of Chemistry

    2003-01-01

    In this investigation, spectroscopic (FT-IR, UV-Vis, {sup 1}H NMR) and chromatographic (GC) techniques were used to analyze two Jordanian shale oils, Sultani and El-Lajjun. The oils were extracted at different pyrolysis temperatures (400-500{sup o}C) using a fluidized bed reactor. The spectroscopic and chromatographic analyses show that the variation of pyrolysis temperature has no significant effect on the composition of the produced oil. The {sup 1}H NMR results indicate that the protons of methyl and methelyene represent the bulk of the hydrogen ({approx}90%) in most shale oil samples. GC analysis reveals that the oil samples contain n-alkanes with a predominant proportion of n-C{sub 25}. (Author)

  12. Experimental study of Coal Pyrolysis 2.: Experimental characterisation of volatile matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugony, F.; Migliavacca, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper considerations about experiments conducted through T G-Ftir are reported, in order to study the gas composition coming from coal pyrolysis. In particular qualitative and semi-qualitative evaluation of hydrocarbon evolution rate, as CH4, C2H4 and C3H6 are reported. It has been observed a strict relation between the evolution rate of the listed compounds, the coal rank and their elementary composition. The reported data constitute a good support to the validation of the predictive models of coal devolatilization. To complete the study two papers will be published in the next months: one containing experimental data from pyrolysis process in a fixed bed reactor and another one concerning the NMR analysis of the produced char. [it

  13. Pyrolysis of corn stalk biomass briquettes in a scaled-up microwave technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salema, Arshad Adam; Afzal, Muhammad T; Bennamoun, Lyes

    2017-06-01

    Pyrolysis of corn stalk biomass briquettes was carried out in a developed microwave (MW) reactor supplied with 2.45GHz frequency using 3kW power generator. MW power and biomass loading were the key parameters investigated in this study. Highest bio-oil, biochar, and gas yield of 19.6%, 41.1%, and 54.0% was achieved at different process condition. In terms of quality, biochar exhibited good heating value (32MJ/kg) than bio-oil (2.47MJ/kg). Bio-oil was also characterised chemically using FTIR and GC-MS method. This work may open new dimension towards development of large-scale MW pyrolysis technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Production of liquid fuels and chemicals from pyrolysis of Bangladeshi bicycle/rickshaw tire wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M. Rofiqul; Tushar, M.S.H.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Haniu, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kitami Institute of Technology, Kitami City, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

    2008-05-15

    Tire wastes in the form of used bicycle/rickshaw tires available in Bangladesh were pyrolyzed in a fixed-bed fire-tube heating reactor under different pyrolysis conditions to determine the role of final temperature, sweeping gas flow rate and feed size on the product yields and liquid product composition. Final temperature range studied was between 375 and 575 C and the highest liquid product yield was obtained at 475 C. Liquid products obtained under the most suitable conditions were characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR and GC-MS techniques. The results show that it is possible to obtain liquid products that are comparable to petroleum fuels and valuable chemical feedstock from bicycle/rickshaw tire wastes if the pyrolysis conditions are chosen accordingly. (author)

  15. Influence of pressure on pyrolysis of black liquor: 2. Char yields and component release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Kevin; Kullberg, Mika; Sorvari, Vesa; Backman, Rainer; Hupa, Mikko

    2008-02-01

    This is the second in a series of papers concerning the behavior of black liquor during pyrolysis at elevated pressures. Two industrial black liquors were pyrolyzed under pressurized conditions in two laboratory-scale devices, a pressurized single-particle reactor and a pressurized grid heater. Temperatures ranging between 650 and 1100 degrees C and pressures in the range 1-20 bar were studied. Char yields were calculated and based on analysis of some of the chars the fate of carbon, sodium, potassium and sulfur was determined as a function of pyrolysis pressure. At temperatures below 800 degrees C little variation in char yield was observed at different pressures. At higher temperatures char yield increased with pressure due to slower decomposition of sodium carbonate. For the same reason, sodium release decreased with pressure. Sulfur release, however, increased with pressure primarily because there was less opportunity for its capture in the less-swollen chars.

  16. Probing molecular potentials with an optical centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, A. A.; Korobenko, A.; Hepburn, J. W.; Milner, V.

    2017-09-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to excite coherent rotational wave packets in N2O, OCS, and CS2 molecules with rotational quantum numbers reaching up to J ≈465 , 690, and 1186, respectively. Time-resolved rotational spectroscopy at such ultra-high levels of rotational excitation can be used as a sensitive tool to probe the molecular potential energy surface at internuclear distances far from their equilibrium values. Significant bond stretching in the centrifuged molecules results in the growing period of the rotational revivals, which are experimentally detected using coherent Raman scattering. We measure the revival period as a function of the centrifuge-induced rotational frequency and compare it with the numerical calculations based on the known Morse-cosine potentials.

  17. Centrifugal compressor design for electrically assisted boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M Y; Martinez-Botas, R F; Zhuge, W L; Qureshi, U; Richards, B

    2013-01-01

    Electrically assisted boost is a prominent method to solve the issues of transient lag in turbocharger and remains an optimized operation condition for a compressor due to decoupling from turbine. Usually a centrifugal compressor for gasoline engine boosting is operated at high rotational speed which is beyond the ability of an electric motor in market. In this paper a centrifugal compressor with rotational speed as 120k RPM and pressure ratio as 2.0 is specially developed for electrically assisted boost. A centrifugal compressor including the impeller, vaneless diffuser and the volute is designed by meanline method followed by 3D detailed design. Then CFD method is employed to predict as well as analyse the performance of the design compressor. The results show that the pressure ratio and efficiency at design point is 2.07 and 78% specifically

  18. High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.; Jongwook, Joo; Hardin, Larry W.; McCormick, Duane C.; Cousins, William T.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Shabbir, Aamir; Holley, Brian M.; Van Slooten, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor research effort conducted by United Technologies Research Center under NASA Research Announcement NNC08CB03C is documented. The objectives were to identify key technical barriers to advancing the aerodynamic performance of high-efficiency, high work factor, compact centrifugal compressor aft-stages for turboshaft engines; to acquire measurements needed to overcome the technical barriers and inform future designs; to design, fabricate, and test a new research compressor in which to acquire the requisite flow field data. A new High-Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage -- splittered impeller, splittered diffuser, 90 degree bend, and exit guide vanes -- with aerodynamically aggressive performance and configuration (compactness) goals were designed, fabricated, and subquently tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  19. Pyrolysis of Pine Wood, Experiments and Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    In this study, pinewood has been pyrolyzed using a fixed heating rate with a variable end-temperature. The pyrolysis process has been simulated using a mechanism with three parallel reactions for the formation of char, gas and tar. First order irreversible kinetics is assumed. This kind of model...... may predict the variation of product yield with operating conditions such as temperature and heating rate. The system of coupled differential equations describing the pyrolysis process is solved using the software DYMOLA. Various literature values for kinetic parameters have been compared...

  20. Fates and roles of alkali and alkaline earth metal species during the pyrolysis and gasification of a Victorian lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mody, D.; Wu, H.; Li, C. [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    The transformation of alkali and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) species in a Victorian lignite during the pyrolysis and subsequent gasification in CO{sub 2} was studied in a novel quartz fluidised-bed reactor. Lignite samples prepared by physically adding NaCl and ion-exchanging Na{sup +} and Ca{sup ++} into the lignite were used to investigate the effects of chemical forms and valency of the AAEM species in the substrate lignite on their transformation during pyrolysis and gasification. Carboxyl-bound Na was found to be less volatile than Na present as NaCl, but more volatile than carboxyl-bound Ca during pyrolysis at temperatures between 400 and 900{sup o}C. However, the carboxyl-bound Na was volatilised to a much greater extent than the carboxyl-bound Ca in the same lignite during pyrolysis. It was seen that the loading of NaCl into the lignite did not significantly affect the char reactivity in the fluidised-bed reactor at 900{sup o}C.

  1. Evaluation of Integrated Time-Temperature Effect in Pyrolysis Process of Historically Contaminated Soils with Cadmium (Cd and Lead (Pb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulmău C

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It is already known that heavy metals pollution causes important concern to human and ecosystem health. Heavy metals in soils at the European level represents 37.3% between main contaminates affecting soils (EEA, 2007. This paper illustrates results obtained in the framework of laboratory experiments concerning the evaluation of integrated time-temperature effect in pyrolysis process applied to contaminated soil by two different ways: it is about heavy metals historically contaminated soil from one of the most polluted areas within Romania, and artificially contaminated with PCB-containing transformer oil. In particular, the authors focused on a recent evaluation of pyrolysis efficiency on removing lead (Pb and cadmium (Cd from the contaminated soil. The experimental study evaluated two important parameters related to the studied remediation methodology: thermal process temperature and the retention time in reactor of the contaminated soils. The remediation treatments were performed in a rotary kiln reactor, taking into account three process temperatures (400°C, 600°C and 800°C and two retention times: 30 min. and 60 min. Completed analyses have focused on pyrolysis solids and gas products. Consequently, both ash and gas obtained after pyrolysis process were subjected to chemical analyses.

  2. Biomass pyrolysis: Thermal decomposition mechanisms of furfural and benzaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, AnGayle K.; Kim, Jong Hyun; Ormond, Thomas K.; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Urness, Kimberly N.; Scheer, Adam M.; Robichaud, David J.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Nimlos, Mark R.; Daily, John W.; Guan, Qi; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Ellison, G. Barney

    2013-09-01

    The thermal decompositions of furfural and benzaldehyde have been studied in a heated microtubular flow reactor. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out by passing a dilute mixture of the aromatic aldehydes (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a pulsed, heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 75-150 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range of 1200-1800 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 100-200 μsec after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 μTorr. Products were detected using matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy, 118.2 nm (10.487 eV) photoionization mass spectroscopy and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization. The initial steps in the thermal decomposition of furfural and benzaldehyde have been identified. Furfural undergoes unimolecular decomposition to furan + CO: C4H3O-CHO (+ M) → CO + C4H4O. Sequential decomposition of furan leads to the production of HC≡CH, CH2CO, CH3C≡CH, CO, HCCCH2, and H atoms. In contrast, benzaldehyde resists decomposition until higher temperatures when it fragments to phenyl radical plus H atoms and CO: C6H5CHO (+ M) → C6H5CO + H → C6H5 + CO + H. The H atoms trigger a chain reaction by attacking C6H5CHO: H + C6H5CHO → [C6H6CHO]* → C6H6 + CO + H. The net result is the decomposition of benzaldehyde to produce benzene and CO.

  3. Compound drum for a centrifugal separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This invention concerns a method for centrifugal separation of UF 6 . The invention provides a composite drum capable of rapid rotation for use in a centrifugal separating arrangement for gaseous materials. The drum is provided with a first drum section comprised of a metal and a second drum section comprised of a fiber-reinforced synthetic material. The second drum section is applied on the outside peripheral surface of the first drum section, where the second drum section is provided with a number of annular components, each of which is shorter than the first drum section

  4. The commercial role for centrifuge enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Readle, P.H.; Wilcox, P.

    1987-01-01

    The enrichment market is extremely competitive and capacity greatly exceeds demand. BNFL [British Nuclear Fuels Ltd.] is in a unique position in having commercial experience of the two enrichment technologies currently used industrially: diffusion, and centrifuge enrichment through its associate company Urenco. In addition, BNFL is developing laser enrichment techniques as part of a UK development programme. The paper describes the enrichment market, briefly discusses the relative merits of the various methods of uranium enrichment and concludes that the gas centrifuge will be best able to respond to market needs for at least the remainder of the century. (author)

  5. Centrifugal compressor design options for small turbochargers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, C. [ITC, San Diego (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Evolutionary development of the small turbocharger centrifugal compressor over the past four decades has resulted in a finely honed turbomachinery component satisfying both thermodynamic and economic constraints. At this penultimate stage of development an appraisal was considered timely of the remaining design options that exist to enhance the performance characteristics and cost reduction features. This paper presents the results of an analytical study of various small centrifugal compressor design options, assessed in merit of both aerodynamic and manufacturing cost attributes, together with recommendations for future research avenues. (author)

  6. Wave-Driven Rotation In Centrifugal Mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Centrifugal mirrors use supersonic rotation to provide axial confinement and enhanced stability. Usually the rotation is produced using electrodes, but these electrodes have limited the rotation to the Alfven critical ionization velocity, which is too slow to be useful for fusion. Instead, the rotation could be produced using radio frequency waves. A fixed azimuthal ripple is a simple and efficient wave that could produce rotation by harnessing alpha particle energy. This is an extension of the alpha channeling effect. The alpha particle power and efficiency in a simulated devices is sufficient to produce rotation without external energy input. By eliminating the need for electrodes, this opens new opportunities for centrifugal traps.

  7. Kinetics of ethylcyclohexane pyrolysis and oxidation: An experimental and detailed kinetic modeling study

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong

    2015-07-01

    Ethylcyclohexane (ECH) is a model compound for cycloalkanes with long alkyl side-chains. A preliminary investigation on ECH (Wang et al., Proc. Combust. Inst., 35, 2015, 367-375) revealed that an accurate ECH kinetic model with detailed fuel consumption mechanism and aromatic growth pathways, as well as additional ECH pyrolysis and oxidation data with detailed species concentration covering a wide pressure and temperature range are required to understand the ECH combustion kinetics. In this work, the flow reactor pyrolysis of ECH at various pressures (30, 150 and 760Torr) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) and gas chromatography (GC). The mole fraction profiles of numerous major and minor species were evaluated, and good agreement was observed between the PIMS and GC data sets. Furthermore, a fuel-rich burner-stabilized laminar premixed ECH/O2/Ar flame at 30Torr was studied using synchrotron VUV PIMS. A detailed kinetic model for ECH high temperature pyrolysis and oxidation was developed and validated against the pyrolysis and flame data performed in this work. Further validation of the kinetic model is presented against literature data including species concentrations in jet-stirred reactor oxidation, ignition delay times in a shock tube, and laminar flame speeds at various pressures and equivalence ratios. The model well predicts the consumption of ECH, the growth of aromatics, and the global combustion properties. Reaction flux and sensitivity analysis were utilized to elucidate chemical kinetic features of ECH combustion under various reaction conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  8. Experimental Investigation and Aspen Plus Simulation of the MSW Pyrolysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansah, Emmanuel

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a potential feedstock for producing transportation fuels because it is readily available using an existing collection/transportation infrastructure and fees are provided by the suppliers or government agencies to treat MSW. North Carolina with a population of 9.4 millions generates 3.629 million metric tons of MSW each year, which contains about 113,396,356 TJs of energy. The average moisture content of MSW samples is 44.3% on a wet basis. About 77% of the dry MSW mass is combustible components including paper, organics, textile and plastics. The average heating values of MSW were 9.7, 17.5, and 22.7 MJ/kg on a wet basis, dry basis and dry combustible basis, respectively. The MSW generated in North Carolina can produce 7.619 million barrels of crude bio-oil or around 4% of total petroleum consumption in North Carolina. MSW can be thermally pyrolyzed into bio-oil in the absence of oxygen or air at a temperature of 500°C or above. As bio-oil can be easily stored and transported, compared to bulky MSW, landfill gas and electricity, pyrolysis offers significant logistical and economic advantages over landfilling and other thermal conversion processes such as combustion and gasification. Crude bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of MSW can be further refined to transportation fuels in existing petroleum refinery facilities. The objective of this research is to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of pyrolyzing MSW into liquid transportation fuels. A combined thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) instrument, which can serve as a micro-scale pyrolysis reactor, was used to simultaneously determine the degradation characteristics of MSW during pyrolysis. An ASPEN Plus-based mathematical model was further developed to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of pyrolysing of MSW into liquid transportation fuels in fixed bed reactors at varying operating conditions

  9. Centrifuge Health Monitoring of the 50gTon beam centrifuge at the University of Sheffield

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, C.M.; Black, J.A.; Hakhamanshi, M.; Baker, N.

    2016-01-01

    In order to fully understand scientific test data it is crucial that we first understand the back-ground centrifuge operational environment and its variation with time and centrifugal acceleration. For exam-ple, changes in ambient air temperature or relative humidity in the centrifuge chamber during operation can have a significant impact on the evaporation levels of water from the surface of a clay model. It is vital to un-derstand these temporal changes in order to mitigate drying out of th...

  10. Evaluation of enrichment by centrifugal separation: the future of the centrifugal-separation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanagawa, A.

    A gas centrifuge plant for uranium enrichment is considered from the point of view of economic competition with other methods. Characteristics of the method are presented including: energy efficiency, the cascade, the separation coefficient, the equilibrium separation process, and capability as centrifugal pump. The structure of an individual gas centrifuge separator is described including the rotating cylinder, mechanisms for gas injection and extraction, mechanisms for counter-streaming of gas, the axle holder mechanism, the gas sealing mechanism, and the driving mechanism. (U.S.)

  11. Pyrolysis model for an alpha waste incinerator prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1978-01-01

    The development of a theoretical model of the pyrolysis stage of an SRL prototype alpha waste incinerator is discussed. Pyrolysis rates for single component porous beds of Teflon (Registered trademark of Du Pont) and natural rubber have been measured on a bench-scale furnace. Experimental pyrolysis rates compare favorably to the predictions of a quasi-steady regression model. In addition, the pyrolysis rate is shown to be a weak function of the thermal diffusivity of the porous polymer bed. As a consequence, pyrolysis is controlled by thermal degradation kinetics rather than by diffusion or conduction

  12. The lignin pyrolysis composition and pyrolysis products of palm kernel shell, wheat straw, and pine sawdust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Guozhang; Huang, Yanqin; Xie, Jianjun; Yang, Huikai; Liu, Huacai; Yin, Xiuli; Wu, Chuangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The primarily pyrolysis composition of PKS lignin was p-hydroxyphenyl unit. • Higher phenol yield and lower gas energy yield were obtained from PKS pyrolysis. • PKS produced more bio-oil and biochar than WS and PS from pyrolysis at 650–850 °C. • PKS-char had poorer gasification reactivity due to higher ordering carbon degree. - Abstract: The lignin monomer composition of palm kernel shell (PKS) was characterized using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), and the characteristics and distributions of products obtained from PKS pyrolysis were investigated using Py-GC/MS, GC, and a specially designed pyrolysis apparatus. The gasification reactivity of PKS biochar was also characterized using thermogravimetry (TG) and Raman spectroscopy. All the results were compared with those obtained from wheat straw (WS) and pine sawdust (PS). The results showed that PKS lignin is primarily composed of p-hydroxyphenyl structural units, while WS and PS lignins are mainly made up of guaiacyl units. Both the mass and energy yields of non-condensable gases from PKS pyrolysis were lower than those obtained from WS and PS pyrolysis at 650–850 °C, owing to the lower volatile content (75.21%) and lack of methoxy groups in PKS. Compared with WS and PS, higher bio-oil productivity was observed during PKS pyrolysis. Phenols were the main component of PKS bio-oil from pyrolysis at 500 °C, and the phenol content of PKS bio-oil (13.49%) was higher than in WS bio-oil (1.62%) and PS bio-oil (0.55%). A higher yield of biochar (on an ash-free basis) was also obtained from PKS pyrolysis. Because of its greater relative degree of ordered carbon, PKS biochar exhibited lower in situ reactivity during CO_2 or H_2O gasification than WS and PS biochars. A longer residence time and addition of steam were found to be beneficial during PKS biochar gasification.

  13. Rhie-Chow interpolation in strong centrifugal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-10-01

    Rhie-Chow interpolation formulas are derived from the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. These formulas are generalized to gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields (as high as 106 g) occurring in gas centrifuges.

  14. Direct Monte-Carlo Siumulations In a Gas Centrifuge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roblin, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    The study is related to the centrifugation process for isotope separation. In a gas centrifuge, the major part of the rotating gas is modeled by fluid equations with this gas flow described by suitable Navier-Stokes...

  15. Vacuum chamber-free centrifuge with magnetic bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2013-09-01

    Centrifuges are devices that separate particles of different densities and sizes through the application of a centrifugal force. If a centrifuge could be operated under atmospheric conditions, all vacuum-related components such as the vacuum chamber, vacuum pump, diffusion pump, and sealing could be removed from a conventional centrifuge system. The design and manufacturing procedure for centrifuges could then be greatly simplified to facilitate the production of lightweight centrifuge systems of smaller volume. Furthermore, the maintenance costs incurred owing to wear and tear due to conventional ball bearings would be eliminated. In this study, we describe a novel vacuum chamber-free centrifuge supported by magnetic bearings. We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum chamber-free centrifuge by presenting experimental results that verify its high-speed support capability and motoring power capacity.

  16. Design of Structural Parameters for Centrifugal Elevator Overspeed Governors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yunpu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important part of overspeed and fail-safe protection for elevators, the centrifugal elevator overspeed governor is a device for limiting overspeed of elevator cars. This paper researches on the vibration of the centrifugal block, which plays a key role in the performance of this overspeed governor. By performing dynamics analysis on the centrifugal block, the differential equation on the vibration of the centrifugal block is established. Based on this, the paper performs simulation analysis on the influence of systematic parameters such as the speed of the overspeed governor sheave, the mass of centrifugal block, the turning radius of the centrifugal block, the position where the spring acts, and the stiffness of the centrifugal block spring, on the vibration of the centrifugal block, and finds out their specific influence relationship.

  17. Influences of centrifugation on cells and tissues in liposuction aspirates: optimized centrifugation for lipotransfer and cell isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Shigeura, Tomokuni; Sato, Katsujiro; Gonda, Koichi; Harii, Kiyonori; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2008-03-01

    Although injective autologous fat transplantation is one of the most attractive options for soft-tissue augmentation, problems such as unpredictability and fibrosis resulting from fat necrosis limit its universal acceptance. Centrifugation is one of most common methods for overcoming these difficulties. This study was performed to investigate quantitatively the effects of centrifugation on liposuction aspirates to optimize centrifugal conditions for fat transplantation and isolation of adipose-derived stem cells. Liposuction aspirates, obtained from eight healthy female donors, were either not centrifuged or centrifuged at 400, 700, 1200, 3000, or 4200 g for 3 minutes. The volumes of the oil, adipose, and fluid portions and numbers of blood cells and adipose-derived cells in each portion were examined. The processed adipose tissues (1 ml) were injected into athymic mice, and grafts were harvested and weighed at 4 weeks. Morphologic alterations were observed using light and scanning electron microscopy. Centrifugation concentrated adipose tissues and adipose-derived stem cells in the adipose portion and partly removed red blood cells from the adipose portion. Centrifugation at more than 3000 g significantly damaged adipose-derived stem cells. Centrifugation enhanced graft take per 1 ml centrifuged adipose but reduced calculated graft take per 1 ml adipose before centrifugation. Excessive centrifugation can destroy adipocytes and adipose-derived stem cells, but appropriate centrifugation concentrates them, resulting in enhanced graft take. The authors tentatively recommend 1200 g as an optimized centrifugal force for obtaining good short- and long-term results in adipose transplantation.

  18. Kinetic modeling of ethane pyrolysis at high conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed Sultan; Wang, Chenguang; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Dean, Anthony M

    2011-09-29

    The primary objective of this study is to develop an improved first-principle-based mechanism that describes the molecular weight growth kinetics observed during ethane pyrolysis. A proper characterization of the kinetics of ethane pyrolysis is a prerequisite for any analysis of hydrocarbon pyrolysis and oxidation. Flow reactor experiments were performed with ~50/50 ethane/nitrogen mixtures with temperatures ranging from 550 to 850 °C at an absolute pressure of ~0.8 atm and a residence time of ~5 s. These conditions result in ethane conversions ranging from virtually no reaction to ~90%. Comparisons of predictions using our original mechanism to these data yielded very satisfactory results in terms of the temperature dependence of ethane conversion and prediction of the major products ethylene and hydrogen. However, there were discrepancies in some of the minor species concentrations that are involved in the molecular weight growth kinetics. We performed a series of CBS-QB3 analyses for the C(3)H(7), C(4)H(7), and C(4)H(9) potential energy surfaces to better characterize the radical addition reactions that lead to molecular weight growth. We also extended a published C(6)H(9) PES to include addition of vinyl to butadiene. The results were then used to calculate pressure-dependent rate constants for the multiple reaction pathways of these addition reactions. Inclusion of the unadjusted rate constants resulting from these analyses in the mechanism significantly improved the description of several of the species involved in molecular weight growth kinetics. We compare the predictions of this improved model to those obtained with a consensus model recently published as well as to ethane steam cracking data. We find that a particularly important reaction is that of vinyl addition to butadiene. Another important observation is that several radical addition reactions are partially equilibrated. Not only does this mean that reliable thermodynamic parameters are essential

  19. Mathematical and physical modeling of rainfall in centrifuge

    OpenAIRE

    CAICEDO, Bernardo; THOREL, Luc; TRISTANCHO, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall simulation in centrifuge models is important for modelling soil-atmosphere interactions. However, the presence of Coriolis force, drag forces, evaporation and wind within the centrifuge may affect the distribution of rainfall over the model. As a result, development of appropriate centrifuge rain simulators requires a demanding process of experimental trial and error. This paper highlights the key factors involved in controlling rainfall in centrifuge simulations, develops a mathemat...

  20. Decarbonisation of olefin processes using biomass pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifzadeh, M.; Wang, L.; Shah, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Decarbonization of olefin processes using biomass pyrolysis oil was proposed. • The decarbonization is based on integrated catalytic processing of bio-oil. • The retrofitted process features significant economic and environmental advantages. - Abstract: An imperative step toward decarbonisation of current industrial processes is to substitute their petroleum-derived feedstocks with biomass and biomass-derived feedstocks. For decarbonisation of the petrochemical industry, integrated catalytic processing of biomass pyrolysis oil (also known as bio-oil) is an enabling technology. This is because, under certain conditions, the reaction products form a mixture consisting of olefins and aromatics, which are very similar to the products of naphtha hydro-cracking in the conventional olefin processes. These synergies suggest that the catalytic bio-oil upgrading reactors can be seamlessly integrated to the subsequent separation network with minimal retrofitting costs. In addition, the integrated catalytic processing provides a high degree of flexibility for optimization of different products in response to market fluctuations. With the aim of assessing the techno-economic viability of this pathway, five scenarios in which different fractions of bio-oil (water soluble/water insoluble) were processed with different degrees of hydrogenation were studied in the present research. The results showed that such a retrofit is not only economically viable, but also provides a high degree of flexibility to the process, and contributes to decarbonisation of olefin infrastructures. Up to 44% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions were observed in several scenarios. In addition, it was shown that hydrogen prices lower than 6 $/kg will result in bio-based chemicals which are cheaper than equivalent petrochemicals. Alternatively, for higher hydrogen prices, it is possible to reform the water insoluble phase of bio-oil and produce bio-based chemicals, cheaper than