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Sample records for pyrogallol

  1. Pyrogallol-imprinted polymers with methyl methacrylate via precipitation polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehamod, Faizatul Shimal; Othman, Nor Amira; Bulat, Ku Halim Ku; Suah, Faiz Bukhari Mohd

    2018-06-01

    Molecular simulation techniques are important to study the understanding of chemical and physical properties of any material. Computational modeling is considered as time reducer in finding the best recipes for Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers (MIPs). In this study, Pyrogallol-imprinted polymers (PIP) and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) were synthesized via precipitation polymerization using Pyrogallol (Py), methyl methacrylate (MMA), divinylbenzene (DVB) as template, functional monomer and cross-linker, respectively. The recipe was according to the results from computational techniques. The synthesized PIP and NIPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). Studies on adsorption isotherm showed that PIP and NIPs follow Scatchard isotherm models. Sorption kinetic study found that PIP and NIPs follow pseudo-second order which indicates the rate-limiting step is the surface adsorption. The imprinting factor of PIP was determined by selectivity study and showed the value of k >1, which proved that PIP was selective toward Pyrogallol compared to NIP.

  2. Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid and Pyrogallol Reaction with Metallic Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaen, J. A.; Gonzalez, L.; Vargas, A.; Olave, G.

    2003-01-01

    The reaction between gallic acid, ellagic acid and pyrogallol with metallic iron was studied using infrared and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Most hydrolysable tannins with interesting anticorrosive or inhibition properties are structurally related to these compounds, thus they may be used as models for the study of hydrolysable tannins and related polyphenols. The interaction was followed up to 3 months. Results indicated two different behaviors. At polyphenol concentrations higher than 1% iron converts to sparingly soluble and amorphous ferric (and ferrous) polyphenolate complexes. At lower concentrations (0.1%), the hydrolysis reactions are dominant, resulting in the formation of oxyhydroxides, which can be further reduced to compounds like magnetite by the polyphenols.

  3. Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid and Pyrogallol Reaction with Metallic Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaen, J. A., E-mail: jjaen@ancon.up.ac.p [Universidad de Panama, Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Exactas y Tecnologia (Panama); Gonzalez, L.; Vargas, A.; Olave, G. [Universidad de Panama, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Exactas y Tecnologia (Panama)

    2003-06-15

    The reaction between gallic acid, ellagic acid and pyrogallol with metallic iron was studied using infrared and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Most hydrolysable tannins with interesting anticorrosive or inhibition properties are structurally related to these compounds, thus they may be used as models for the study of hydrolysable tannins and related polyphenols. The interaction was followed up to 3 months. Results indicated two different behaviors. At polyphenol concentrations higher than 1% iron converts to sparingly soluble and amorphous ferric (and ferrous) polyphenolate complexes. At lower concentrations (0.1%), the hydrolysis reactions are dominant, resulting in the formation of oxyhydroxides, which can be further reduced to compounds like magnetite by the polyphenols.

  4. Effect of pyrogallol on the physiology and biochemistry of litchi fruit during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guoxing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn. fruit are highly perishable and have a very short shelf life, easily turning brown and decaying. This study investigated the efficiency of pyrogallol, a catechin on the physiology and biochemistry in relation to storage life of litchi fruit. Results Fruit were treated with pyrogallol at 1 mM and then stored at ambient temperature (25°C or low temperature (4°C. Compared with control, pyrogallol significantly reduced pericarp browning and delayed the rotting of fruit day 4 at 25°C, and on day 30 at 4°C. The chemical treatment reduced respiration rate and the activities of peroxidase (POD and polyphenol oxidase (PPO, and delayed the loss of membrane permeability. Pyrogallol increased the activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, delayed the loss of anthocyanin and phenolics, and maintained high 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrlhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity and reducing power. High performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC analysis clearly indicated that treated fruit contained higher concentration of the four phenolic compounds procyanidin B1, (+-catechin, (−-epicatechin and (−-epicatechin-3-gallate. Conclusions The application of pyrogallol partially reducing pericarp browning and changed quality-related physiological activities and, thus, pyrogallol could have beneficial effects on pericarp browning and fruit decay control, and could be helpful for litchi fruit postharvest storage.

  5. Effect of Myricetin, Pyrogallol, and Phloroglucinol on Yeast Resistance to Oxidative Stress

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    Vanda Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The health beneficial effects of dietary polyphenols have been attributed to their intrinsic antioxidant activity, which depends on the structure of the compound and number of hydroxyl groups. In this study, the protective effects of pyrogallol, phloroglucinol, and myricetin on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Pyrogallol and myricetin, which have a pyrogallol structure in the B ring, increased H2O2 resistance associated with a reduction in intracellular oxidation and protein carbonylation, whereas phloroglucinol did not exert protective effects. The acquisition of oxidative stress resistance in cells pretreated with pyrogallol and myricetin was not associated with an induction of endogenous antioxidant defences as assessed by the analysis of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. However, myricetin, which provided greater stress resistance, prevented H2O2-induced glutathione oxidation. Moreover, myricetin increased the chronological lifespan of yeast lacking the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2p, which exhibited a premature aging phenotype and oxidative stress sensitivity. These findings show that the presence of hydroxyl groups in the ortho position of the B ring in pyrogallol and myricetin contributes to the antioxidant protection afforded by these compounds. In addition, myricetin may alleviate aging-induced oxidative stress, particularly when redox homeostasis is compromised due to downregulation of endogenous defences present in mitochondria.

  6. Reaction product of pyrogallol with methyl linoleate and its antioxidant potential for biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanto, H.; Ainny, L.; Lukman; Susanto, B. H.; Nasikin, M.

    2018-03-01

    The demand of biodiesel as an alternative fuel is increasing due to fossil fuel depletion. Biodiesel is a renewable diesel fuel in the form of fatty acid methyl ester or FAME as a result of an esterification of plant oils in a presence of catalyst. Compared to the conventional diesel fuel, biodiesel is more biodegradable, has higher lubricity, and lower toxic emissions. However, the high content of unsaturated fatty acid leads to a problem that biodiesel is prone to oxidation during storage period. This oxidation instability causes degradation of fuel quality and will affect engine performance. Pyrogallol and other phenolic derivatives have been used as the antioxidant additives to prevent biodiesel oxidation. As reported in many researches, pyrogallol is one of the best phenolic antioxidant. However, its low solubility in biodiesel needs an attention. Several reports indicate the increasing solubility of pyrogallol using molecule modification with the addition of alkyl groups to its benzene ring via electrophilic substitution. This paper discusses the idea about modification of pyrogallol molecule and methyl linoleate using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical in order to increase its solubility in biodiesel while keeping its antioxidant property. Three responses were analyzed to examine the antioxidant activity: iodine value, viscosity, and color intensity. The result shown that the addition of 0.1% reaction product exhibit antioxidant activity in biodiesel.

  7. Pyrogallol, ROS generator inhibits As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells via cell cycle arrest of G2 phase and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woo Hyun; Han, Yong Hwan; Kim, Suhn Hee; Kim, Sung Zoo

    2007-01-01

    Pyrogallol as a catechin compound has been employed as an O 2 · - generator and often used to investigate the role of ROS in the biological system. Here, we investigated the in vitro effect of pyrogallol on cell growth, cell cycle and apoptosis in As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells. Dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth was observed with IC 50 of about 60 μM for 48 h using MTT assay. Pyrogallol (100 μM) did not alter intracellular H 2 O 2 level and catalase activity, but increased the intracellular O 2 · - level and decreased SOD activity in As4.1 cells. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that 50 and 100 μM pyrogallol significantly increased G2 phase cells as compared with those of pyrogallol-untreated cells. Also, pyrogallol induced apoptosis as evidenced by flow cytometric detection of sub-G1 DNA content, annexin V binding assay and DAPI staining. This apoptosis process was accompanied with the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ m ), Bcl-2 decrease, caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Pan caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD) could significantly rescue As4.1 cells from pyrogallol-induced cell death. But, the inhibitors of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 did not prevent apoptotic events in pyrogallol-treated As4.1 cells. Taken together, we have demonstrated that an ROS inducer, pyrogallol inhibits the growth of As4.1 JG cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and suggest that the compound exhibits an anti-proliferative efficacy on these cells

  8. Sensitive voltammetric method for the fast analysis of the antioxidant pyrogallol using a boron-doped diamond electrode in biofuels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chýlková, J.; Tomášková, M.; Janíková, L.; Šelešovská, R.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Chudobová, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 6 (2017), s. 1047-1054 ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : antioxidant * voltammetry * pyrogallol Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  9. Antimicrobial and enhancement of the antibiotic activity by phenolic compounds: Gallic acid, caffeic acid and pyrogallol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Valéria N; Oliveira-Tintino, Cícera D M; Santos, Enaide S; Morais, Luís P; Tintino, Saulo R; Freitas, Thiago S; Geraldo, Yuri S; Pereira, Raimundo L S; Cruz, Rafael P; Menezes, Irwin R A; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2016-10-01

    The indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs has increased the spectrum of exposure of these organisms. In our studies, these phenolic compounds were evaluated: gallic acid, caffeic acid and pyrogallol. The antibacterial, antifungal and modulatory of antibiotic activities of these compounds were assayed using microdilution method of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) to bacteria and Minimum Fungicide Concentration (MFC) to fungi. The modulation was made by comparisons of the MIC and MFC of the compounds alone and combined with drugs against bacteria and fungi respectively, using a sub-inhibitory concentration of 128 μg/mL of substances (MIC/8). All substances not demonstrated clinically relevant antibacterial activity with a MIC above ≥1024 μg/mL. As a result, we observed that the caffeic acid presented a potentiating antibacterial effect over the 3 groups of bacteria studied. Pyrogallol showed a synergistic effect with two of the antibiotics tested, but only against Staphylococcus aureus. In general, caffeic acid was the substance that presented with the greatest number of antibiotics and with the greatest number of bacteria. In relation to the antifungal activity of all the compounds, the verified results were ≥1024 μg/mL, not demonstrating significant activity. Regarding potentiation of the effect of fluconazole, was observed synergistic effect only when assayed against Candida tropicalis, with all substances. Therefore, as can be seen, the compounds presented as substances that can be promising potentiating agents of antimicrobial drugs, even though they do not have direct antibacterial and antifungal action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystal Structure of an L-Carnitine Complex with Pyrogallol[4]arene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, I; Takeuchi, D; Kitamura, Y; Okamoto, R; Aoki, K

    2012-01-01

    L-Carnitine is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids from cytosol into mitochondria for generating metabolic energy. The survey of crystal structures of carnitine-containing proteins in the Protein Data Bank reveals that carnitine can take several conformations with the quarternary trimethylammonium terminal being always bound to aromatic residues through cation-π interactions in acyltransferases or carnitine-binding proteins. In order to demonstrate the importance of cation-π interaction as a carnitine recognition mechanism in the artificial receptor-ligand system that mimics the carnitine-binding sites, we have determined the crystal structure of a complex formed between L-carnitine and pyrogallol[4]arene (pyrogallol cyclic tetramer: PCT) as a carnitine receptor, 2PCT·2(L-carnitine)·4EtOH. There form two crystallographically independent monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, which further form an obliquely arranged capsule-like dimeric [PCT·L-carnitine] 2 structure through a pair of O-H (PCT)···O (L-carnitine) hydrogen bonds. This is the first report of PCT complex with chiral molecules. In each of the two monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, the L-carnitine molecule takes the elongated form with an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group and the carboxylate oxygen, and the cationic trimethylammonium moiety is incorporated into the cavity of the bowl-shaped PCT molecule through cation-π interactions. These features are similar to those at the D-carnitine-binding site in the crystal structure of the glycine betaine/carnitine/choline-binding protein complex.

  11. Identification of pyrogallol as an antiproliferative compound present in extracts from the medicinal plant Emblica officinalis: effects on in vitro cell growth of human tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahmud Tareq Hassan; Lampronti, Ilaria; Martello, Dino; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Jabbar, Shaila; Choudhuri, Mohammad Shahabuddin Kabir; Datta, Bidduyt Kanti; Gambari, Roberto

    2002-07-01

    In this study we compared the in vitro antiproliferative activity of extracts from medicinal plants toward human tumor cell lines, including human erythromyeloid K562, B-lymphoid Raji, T-lymphoid Jurkat, erythroleukemic HEL cell lines. Extracts from Emblica officinalis were the most active in inhibiting in vitro cell proliferation, after comparison to those from Terminalia arjuna, Aphanamixis polystachya, Oroxylum indicum, Cuscuta reflexa, Aegle marmelos, Saraca asoka, Rumex maritimus, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Red Sandalwood. Emblica officinalis extracts have been studied previously, due to their hepatoprotective, antioxidant, antifungal, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory medicinal activities. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses allowed to identify pyrogallol as the common compound present both in unfractionated and n-butanol fraction of Emblica officinalis extracts. Antiproliferative effects of pyrogallol were therefore determined on human tumor cell lines thus identifying pyrogallol as an active component of Emblica officinalis extracts.

  12. Roentgenographic and derivatographic investigation of gallium and indium complexes with azo compounds on the base of pyrogallol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarov, D.G.; Rzaev, R.Z.; Musaev, F.N.; Musaeva, A.N.; Chyragov, F.M.

    1985-01-01

    Seven complexes of gallium and indium with N-donor ligands obtained on the base of pyrogallol are synthesized. Their chemical composition is established. Nitrogen-containing ligands and their complexes are investigated by the methods of roentgenographic and thermogravimetric analyses. It is shown that gallium and indium complexes are amorphous compounds. An assumption is made on the thermolysis character that complexes have a similar structure: structural complex nucleus constitutes a six-term chelate ring. Para-substitutors in the ligand do not participate in complexing, possibly they participate in H-bonds formation. It is established by spectrophotometric methods that in solutions stoichiometric ratio metal: ligand is the same as in the solid phase

  13. Roentgenographic and derivatographic investigation of gallium and indium complexes with azo compounds on the base of pyrogallol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarov, D G; Rzaev, R Z; Musaev, F N; Musaeva, A N; Chyragov, F M

    1985-01-01

    Seven complexes of gallium and indium with N-donor ligands obtained on the base of pyrogallol are synthesized. Their chemical composition is established. Nitrogen-containing ligands and their complexes are investigated by the methods of roentgenographic and thermogravimetric analyses. It is shown that gallium and indium complexes are amorphous compounds. An assumption is made on the thermolysis character that complexes have a similar structure: structural complex nucleus constitutes a six-term chelate ring. Para-substitutors in the ligand do not participate in complexing, possibly they participate in H-bonds formation. It is established by spectrophotometric methods that in solutions stoichiometric ratio metal: ligand is the same as in the solid phase.

  14. Mechanism of pyrogallol red oxidation induced by free radicals and reactive oxidant species. A kinetic and spectroelectrochemistry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atala, E; Velásquez, G; Vergara, C; Mardones, C; Reyes, J; Tapia, R A; Quina, F; Mendes, M A; Speisky, H; Lissi, E; Ureta-Zañartu, M S; Aspée, A; López-Alarcón, C

    2013-05-02

    Pyrogallol red (PGR) presents high reactivity toward reactive (radical and nonradical) species (RS). This property of PGR, together with its characteristic spectroscopic absorption in the visible region, has allowed developing methodologies aimed at evaluating the antioxidant capacity of foods, beverages, and human fluids. These methods are based on the evaluation of the consumption of PGR induced by RS and its inhibition by antioxidants. However, at present, there are no reports regarding the degradation mechanism of PGR, limiting the extrapolation to how antioxidants behave in different systems comprising different RS. In the present study, we evaluate the kinetics of PGR consumption promoted by different RS (peroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitrogen dioxide, and hypochlorite) using spectroscopic techniques and detection of product by HPLC mass spectrometry. The same pattern of oxidation and spectroscopic properties of the products is observed, independently of the RS employed. Mass analysis indicates the formation of only one product identified as a quinone derivative, excluding the formation of peroxides or hydroperoxides and/or chlorinated compounds, in agreement with FOX's assays and oxygen consumption experiments. Cyclic voltammetry, carried out at different pH's, shows an irreversible oxidation of PGR, indicating the initial formation of a phenoxy radical and a second charge transfer reaction generating an ortho-quinone derivative. Spectroelectrochemical oxidation of PGR shows oxidation products with identical UV-visible absorption properties to those observed in RS-induced oxidation.

  15. Applications of 4,5,6-trihydroxy-9-phenylfluorones as analytical reagents. 5. Examination of the reaction of indium with pyrogallol red and diphenylguanidine in a flotation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minczewski, J.; Skorko-Trybula, Z.; Krzyzanowska, M.

    1979-01-01

    The course of the reaction of indium with pyrogallol red and diphenylguanidine has been examined in a flotation system using benzene as flotation agent and dimethylformamide as solvent of the floated precipitate. The optimum pH for the flotation is 5.0-6.5. The composition of the complex is In: PGR: DPG = 1 : 2 : 2, its molar absorptivity epsilon = 4 x 10 4 at lambda = 545. Owing to the high sensitivity and negligible blank the reaction is suitable for analytical determinations. (author)

  16. Enhancement of periodate-hydrogen peroxide chemiluminescence by nitrogen doped carbon dots and its application for the determination of pyrogallol and gallic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Niaz Ali; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2016-06-01

    A new sensitized chemiluminescence (CL) was developed to broaden the analytical application of KIO4-H2O2 system. The nitrogen doped carbon dots (N-CDs) dramatically boosted the CL intensity of KIO4-H2O2 system which was further enriched by basic medium. In light of EPR analysis, free radical scavenging studies and CL spectra the detail mechanism for the enhancement was conferred in the presence of N-CDs and NaOH. The results suggested that CL of KIO4-H2O2 system in the presence and absence of N-CDs and NaOH proceeds via radical pathway. The enhanced CL was used for the determination of pyrogallol and gallic acid in range of 1.0×10(-4)-1.0×10(-7)M with 4.6×10(-8) and 6.1×10(-8)M limit of detection respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) at a concentration of 10(-5) for gallic acid and pyrogallol was 1.4% and 2.3% respectively (n=11). The attained results unveil that the present method is sensitive, faster, simpler and less costly compared to other methods and could be applied to determine polyphenols in real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Glycine Betaine Recognition through Cation−π Interactions in Crystal Structures of Glycine Betaine Complexes with C-Ethyl-pyrogallol[4]arene and C-Ethyl-resorcin[4]arene as Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuhide Fujisawa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The glycine betaine (betaine, interacts with several types of proteins with diverse structures in vivo, and in the contact regions, the aromatic rings of protein residues are frequently found beside the trimethylammonium group of betaine, implying the importance of the cation−π interactions in recognition of this molecule. The crystal structures determined by X-ray crystallography of the complexes of betaine and C-ethyl-pyrogallol[4]arene (pyrogallol cyclic tetramer: PCT and betaine and C-ethyl-resorcin[4]arene (resorcinol cyclic tetramer: RCT mimic the conformations of betaine and protein complexes and show that the clathrate conformations are retained by the cation−π interactions. The difference of the conformation feature of betaine in the Protein Data Bank and in the Cambridge Structural Database was found by chance during the research and analyzed with the torsion angles.

  18. Pyrogallol, an absorbable microbial gallotannins-metabolite and mango polyphenols (Mangifera Indica L.) suppress breast cancer ductal carcinoma in situ proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Matthew J; Kim, Hyemee; Marciante, Alexandria B; Barnes, Ryan C; Talcott, Stephen T; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2016-09-14

    Mango is rich in bioactive absorbable polyphenols, but also contains considerable amounts of unabsorbable gallotannins at varying degrees of polymerization. Gallotannins are not absorbable upon consumption and have rarely been considered in the discussion of health benefits of polyphenols. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the anti-proliferative activities of the major microbial metabolite of gallotannins, pyrogallol (PG) and a low molecular weight fraction of mango (Mangifera Indica L.) polyphenols (ML) and involved pathways including the AKT/mTOR signaling axis in an in situ breast cancer cell line, MCF10DCIS.COM. Fluorouracil (5-FU), a widely used genotoxic cancer therapeutic, was used a positive control and in combination with ML and PG to assess potential interactions. Concentrations that were non-cytotoxic in non-cancer cells were identified in non-cancer mammary fibroblasts (MCF-12F) and only non-cytotoxic dietarily relevant concentrations were selected for the investigation in MCF10DCIS.COM cancer cells. In addition to proliferation and viability, mRNA and expression of total and phosphorylated protein were investigated. Results show that both, ML and PG significantly reduced proliferation in MCF10DCIS.COM, but did not significantly reduce viability following a 48 h exposure. ML significantly reduced mRNA expression of mTOR and HIF-1α, while PG significantly reduced mRNA of IGF-1R, AKT, mTOR and HIF-1α. ML and PG reduced total protein expression of IGF-1R, IR, AKT, mTOR, and P70S6K. In addition, PG reduced IRS protein. Both treatments also had an effect on phosphorylated protein levels, with PG significantly reducing IGF-1R, AKT, and P70S6K levels. ML had a similar effect and significantly decreased IR, AKT, and P70S6K phosphorylation levels. Within the low concentration-range, ML and PG did not interact with the cytotoxic activities of 5-FU. Overall, the AKT/mTOR signaling axis appears to be implicated as causal in decreased

  19. stoichiometry of pyrogallol/ammonium-nitrogen complex using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BARTH EKWUEME

    2010-04-22

    Apr 22, 2010 ... calculations and so that analytical procedures can be properly defined. Since the complex is coloured (pale- yellow), its stoichiometry can be established using visible spectrometry to measure the absorbance of solutions of known composition. One method widely applicable is Job's method of continuous ...

  20. Stoichiometry of pyrogallol/ammonium-nitrogen complex using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This complex, which we now refer to as P/NH4 +-N complex, can be the basis for the spectrophotometric determination of NH4 +-N in aqueous solution. Aqueous NH4 +-N is a very important pollution index. Therefore it is imperative that the stoichiometry of this complex be thoroughly understood. In this work, Job's method of ...

  1. Photometric investigation of tungsten (6) reaction with monoazo compound based on pyrogallol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarov, D.G.; Gusejnov, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility has been studied to use a new monoazo compound 2,3,4-trihydroxy-4'-sulfoazobenzene (TSAB) for the photometric determination of tungsten in steels. The maximum yield of W(6) complex is observed in the interval from 0.3 NHCl to pH2. The maximum absorption of the complex is observed at 460 nm and that of reagent - at 380 nm. The complex coloring immediately develops and in stable for more than one day. Molar coefficient of complex extinctior equals 43000+-300. Tungsten concentration interval being determined in 0.3 N HCl is 10-140 μg/25 ml. Tungsten determination technique in chromium-nickel-tungsten and chromium-silicon-nickel steels is given. If steel samples contain Mo > 0.1 mg, Y > 0.2 mg, Zr > 1.0 mg, Fe > 0.03 mg and Si > 0.3 mg then it is necessary to separate Mo, Y and Zr beforehand. Fe and Si are respectively well camouflaged by ascorbic acid and EDTA

  2. Cascading electron and hole transfer dynamics in a CdS/CdTe core-shell sensitized with bromo-pyrogallol red (Br-PGR): slow charge recombination in type II regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Partha; Debnath, Tushar; Chopra, Uday; Ghosh, Hirendra Nath

    2015-02-14

    Ultrafast cascading hole and electron transfer dynamics have been demonstrated in a CdS/CdTe type II core-shell sensitized with Br-PGR using transient absorption spectroscopy and the charge recombination dynamics have been compared with those of CdS/Br-PGR composite materials. Steady state optical absorption studies suggest that Br-PGR forms strong charge transfer (CT) complexes with both the CdS QD and CdS/CdTe core-shell. Hole transfer from the photo-excited QD and QD core-shell to Br-PGR was confirmed by both steady state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. Charge separation was also confirmed by detecting electrons in the conduction band of the QD and the cation radical of Br-PGR as measured from femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Charge separation in the CdS/Br-PGR composite materials was found to take place in three different pathways, by transferring the photo-excited hole of CdS to Br-PGR, electron injection from the photo-excited Br-PGR to the CdS QD, and direct electron transfer from the HOMO of Br-PGR to the conduction band of the CdS QD. However, in the CdS/CdTe/Br-PGR system hole transfer from the photo-excited CdS to Br-PGR and electron injection from the photo-excited Br-PGR to CdS take place after cascading through the CdTe shell QD. Charge separation also takes place via direct electron transfer from the Br-PGR HOMO to the conduction band of CdS/CdTe. Charge recombination (CR) dynamics between the electron in the conduction band of the CdS QD and the Br-PGR cation radical were determined by monitoring the bleach recovery kinetics. The CR dynamics were found to be much slower in the CdS/CdTe/Br-PGR system than in the CdS/Br-PGR system. The formation of the strong CT complex and the separation of charges cascading through the CdTe shell help to slow down charge recombination in the type II regime.

  3. Identification of protoxins and a microbial basis for red maple (Acer rubrum) toxicosis in equines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Karan; Ebel, Joseph G; Altier, Craig; Bischoff, Karyn

    2013-01-01

    The leaves of Acer rubrum (red maple), especially when wilted in the fall, cause severe oxidative damage to equine erythrocytes, leading to potentially fatal methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia. Gallic acid and tannins from A. rubrum leaves have been implicated as the toxic compounds responsible for red maple toxicosis, but the mechanism of action and toxic principle(s) have not been elucidated to date. In order to investigate further how red maple toxicosis occurs, aqueous solutions of gallic acid, tannic acid, and ground dried A. rubrum leaves were incubated with contents of equine ileum, jejunum, cecum, colon, and liver, and then analyzed for the metabolite pyrogallol, as pyrogallol is a more potent oxidizing agent. Gallic acid was observed to be metabolized to pyrogallol maximally in equine ileum contents in the first 24 hr. Incubation of tannic acid and A. rubrum leaves, individually with ileum contents, produced gallic acid and, subsequently, pyrogallol. Ileum suspensions, when passed through a filter to exclude microbes but not enzymes, formed no pyrogallol, suggesting a microbial basis to the pathway. Bacteria isolated from ileum capable of pyrogallol formation were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae. Therefore, gallotannins and free gallic acid are present in A. rubrum leaves and can be metabolized by K. pneumoniae and E. cloacae found in the equine ileum to form pyrogallol either directly or through a gallic acid intermediate (gallotannins). Identification of these compounds and their physiological effects is necessary for the development of effective treatments for red maple toxicosis in equines.

  4. Polyphenolics from mango (Mangifera indica L.) suppress breast cancer ductal carcinoma in situ proliferation through activation of AMPK pathway and suppression of mTOR in athymic nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Matthew J; Kim, Hyemee; Marciante, Alexandria B; Barnes, Ryan C; Hendrick, Erik D; Bisson, William H; Talcott, Stephen T; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the underlying mechanisms of mango polyphenol decreased cell proliferation and tumor volume in ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer. We hypothesized that mango polyphenols suppress signaling along the AKT/mTOR axis while up-regulating AMPK. To test this hypothesis, mango polyphenols (0.8 mg gallic acid equivalents per day) and pyrogallol (0.2 mg/day) were administered for 4 weeks to mice xenografted with MCF10DCIS.com cells subcutaneously (n=10 per group). Tumor volumes were significantly decreased, both mango and pyrogallol groups displayed greater than 50% decreased volume compared to control. There was a significant reduction of phosphorylated protein levels of IR, IRS1, IGF-1R, and mTOR by mango; while pyrogallol significantly reduced the phosphorylation levels of IR, IRS1, IGF-1R, p70S6K, and ERK. The protein levels of Sestrin2, which is involved in AMPK-signaling, were significantly elevated in both groups. Also, mango significantly elevated AMPK phosphorylation and pyrogallol significantly elevated LKB1 protein levels. In an in vitro model, mango and pyrogallol increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and arrested cells in S phase. In silico modeling indicates that pyrogallol has the potential to bind directly to the allosteric binding site of AMPK, inducing activation. When AMPK expression was down-regulated using siRNA in vitro, pyrogallol reversed the reduced expression of AMPK. This indicates that pyrogallol not only activates AMPK, but also increases constitutive protein expression. These results suggest that mango polyphenols and their major microbial metabolite, pyrogallol, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells through ROS-dependent up-regulation of AMPK and down-regulation of the AKT/mTOR pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement of superoxide dismutase-like activity in peel and pulp of apple from Anshan acres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lijuan

    2018-04-01

    Pyrogallol autoxidation method was used for measurement of SOD-like activity. They are 259.56 u/g and 148.78 u/g in peel and pulp of apple from Anshan acres. The proper-conditions for this measurement was determined through experiment as following: detection wavelength of spectrophotometer 325nm, buffer system Tris-HAc, concentration of Tris-HAc solution 50 mmoL and pH8.2. The inhibition rate of SOD-L again pyrogallol antioxidation are 92% and 90% in peel and pulp of apple.

  6. Bioactivity-Guided Isolation of Anticancer Agents from Bauhinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Flowers of Bauhinia kockiana were investigated for their anticancer properties. Methods: Gallic acid (1), and methyl gallate (2), were isolated via bioassay-directed isolation, and they exhibited anticancer properties towards several cancer cell lines, examined using MTT cell viability assay. Pyrogallol (3) was ...

  7. Biosynthesis of reduced graphene oxide and its in-vitro cytotoxicity against cervical cancer (HeLa) cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lan; Xu, Lina; Zhao, Haibo

    2017-09-01

    The present work proposed a simple, one pot, and green approach for the deoxygenation of graphene oxide (GO) using pyrogallol as reducing and stabilizing agent. This synthetic strategy prevents the utilization of toxic reducing reagents during synthesis. The characterization results of Ultra violet visible (UV-Vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the synthesized GO and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) indicated the strong removal of oxygen groups after reduction which followed by stabilization with oxidized form of pyrogallol. TEM analysis showed the thin transparent silk like sheets of graphene. FTIR analysis confirmed the stabilization of graphene sheets with oxidized pyrogallol molecules. XRD and XPS analysis represented the deoxygenation of GO to RGO. The in-vitro cytotoxicity of RGO towards HeLa cells is dose dependant. The prepared RGO also exhibited the percent cell viability of about 80% even at higher concentrations indicating the less toxic nature of the RGO stabilized with pyrogallol. These results have represented that this synthetic approach is effective for the preparation of bulk scale RGO in a simple, less expensive and eco-friendly method. Since this method avoids the use of chemical reagents that are toxic in nature, the produced graphene are likely to offer several potential biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Enhanced functional properties of tannic acid after thermal hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal hydrolysis processing of fresh tannic acid was carried out in a closed reactor at four different temperatures (65, 100, 150 and 200°C). Pressures reached in the system were 1.3 and 4.8 MPa at 150 and 200°C, respectively. Hydrolysis products (gallic acid and pyrogallol) were separated and qua...

  9. Bioactivity-guided isolation of anticancer agents from Bauhinia kockiana Korth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Yik Ling; Lim, Yau Yan; Stanslas, Johnson; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Goh, Joo Kheng

    2014-01-01

    Flowers of Bauhinia kockiana were investigated for their anticancer properties. Gallic acid (1), and methyl gallate (2), were isolated via bioassay-directed isolation, and they exhibited anticancer properties towards several cancer cell lines, examined using MTT cell viability assay. Pyrogallol (3) was examined against the same cancer cell lines to deduce the bioactive functional group of the phenolic compounds. The results showed that the phenolic compounds could exhibit moderate to weak cytotoxicity towards certain cell lines (GI50 30 - 86 µM), but were inactive towards DU145 prostate cancer cell (GI50 > 100 µM). It was observed that pyrogallol moiety was one of the essential functional structures of the phenolic compounds in exhibiting anticancer activity. Also, the carboxyl group of compound 1 was also important in anticancer activity. Examination of the PC-3 cells treated with compound 1 using fluorescence microscopy showed that PC-3 cells were killed by apoptosis.

  10. [Antibacterial and anti-hemolysin activities of tea catechins and their structural relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, M; Okubo, S; Ikigai, H; Shimamura, T

    1990-03-01

    Among catechins tested, (-)epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)epicatechin gallate (ECg), (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae O1 classical Inaba 569B and El Tor Inaba V86. S. aureus was more sensitive than V. cholerae O1 to these compounds. EGCg showed also a bactericidal activity against V. cholerae O1 569B. Pyrogallol showed a stronger antibacterial activity against S. aureus and V. cholerae O1 than tannic and gallic acid. Rutin or caffein had no effect on them. ECg and EGCg showed the most potent anti-hemolysin activity against S. aureus alpha-toxin, Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin (Vp-TDH) and cholera hemolysin. Among catechin relatives, only tannic acid had a potent anti-hemolysin activity against alpha-toxin. These results suggest that the catechol and pyrogallol groups are responsible for the antibacterial and bactericidal activities, while the conformation of catechins might play an important role in the anti-hemolysin activity.

  11. Investigation of Oxidation stability of Pongamia Biodiesel and its blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Dwivedi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel from Pongamia oil is one of the promising non edible sources in India. But the main problem of using Pongamia biodiesel as fuel is its poor stability characteristics. Poor stability leads to gum formation which further leads to a storage problem of these fuels for a longer period of time. This paper investigates the methodology of improving the stability characteristics of Pongamia biodiesel by blending with diesel and use of the antioxidant Pyrogallol. The experimental investigation shows that blending with diesel and using of antioxidant Pyrogallol improves the stability characteristics of Pongamia biodiesel significantly. Results of the study show that the optimum amount of antioxidant (PY for pure PB20 is 300 ppm to maintain the oxidation stability specification and blending of diesel with Pongamia shows that PB10 requires no additive to maintain its stability characteristics.

  12. Chromatographic studies of gamma radiolysis products of phenols in methanolic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordeiro, P.J.M.

    1989-10-01

    The radiolytic effects on phenolic compounds (catechol, resorcinol, hydroquinone and pyrogallol), under different doses of gamma irradiation, were studied. The results shown that the radiolytic effects are independent of the irradiation doses with almost all compounds formed from the solvent radiolysis. Analysis of the resulting products were carried out by High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Capillary Gas Chromatography. The quantification of these compounds was made by mass spectrometry. (author)

  13. Characterization and purification of polyphenol oxidase from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Serap; Turan, Yusuf; Ertürk, Hatibe; Arslan, Oktay

    2005-02-09

    In this study, the polyphenol oxidase (PPO) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) was first purified by a combination of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation, dialysis, and a Sepharose 4B-L-tyrosine-p-aminobenzoic acid affinity column. At the end of purification, 43-fold purification was achieved. The purified enzyme migrated as a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that PPO had a 57 kDa molecular mass. Second, the contents of total phenolic and protein of artichoke head extracts were determined. The total phenolic content of artichoke head was determined spectrophotometrically according to the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and was found to be 425 mg 100 g(-1) on a fresh weight basis. Protein content was determined according to Bradford method. Third, the effects of substrate specificity, pH, temperature, and heat inactivation were investigated on the activity of PPO purified from artichoke. The enzyme showed activity to 4-methylcatechol, pyrogallol, catechol, and L-dopa. No activity was detected toward L-tyrosine, resorsinol, and p-cresol. According to V(max)/K(m) values, 4-methylcatechol (1393 EU min(-1) mM(-1)) was the best substrate, followed by pyrogallol (1220 EU min(-1) mM(-1)), catechol (697 EU min(-1) mM(-1)), and L-dopa (102 EU min(-1) mM(-1)). The optimum pH values for PPO were 5.0, 8.0, and 7.0 using 4-methylcatechol, pyrogallol, and catechol as substrate, respectively. It was found that optimum temperatures were dependent on the substrates studied. The enzyme activity decreased due to heat denaturation of the enzyme with increasing temperature and inactivation time for 4-methylcatechol and pyrogallol substrates. However, all inactivation experiments for catechol showed that the activity of artichoke PPO increased with mild heating, reached a maximum, and then decreased with time. Finally, inhibition of artichoke PPO was investigated with inhibitors such as L-cysteine, EDTA, ascorbic

  14. Properties and quality verification of biodiesel produced from tobacco seed oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usta, N., E-mail: n_usta@pau.edu.t [Pamukkale University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 20070 Denizli (Turkey); Aydogan, B. [Pamukkale University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 20070 Denizli (Turkey); Con, A.H. [Pamukkale University, Food Engineering Department, 20070 Denizli (Turkey); Uguzdogan, E. [Pamukkale University, Chemical Engineering Department, 20070 Denizli (Turkey); Ozkal, S.G. [Pamukkale University, Food Engineering Department, 20070 Denizli (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} High quality biodiesel fuel can be produced from tobacco seed oil. {yields} Pyrogallol was found to be effective antioxidant improving the oxidation stability. {yields} The iodine number was reduced with a biodiesel including more saturated fatty acids. {yields} Octadecene-1-maleic anhydride copolymer was an effective cold flow improver. {yields} The appropriate amounts of the additives do not affect the properties negatively. -- Abstract: Tobacco seed oil has been evaluated as a feedstock for biodiesel production. In this study, all properties of the biodiesel that was produced from tobacco seed oil were examined and some solutions were derived to bring all properties of the biodiesel within European Biodiesel Standard EN14214 to verify biodiesel quality. Among the properties, only oxidation stability and iodine number of the biodiesel, which mainly depend on fatty acid composition of the oil, were not within the limits of the standard. Six different antioxidants that are tert-butylhydroquinone, butylated hydroxytoluene, propyl gallate, pyrogallol, {alpha}-tocopherol and butylated hydroxyanisole were used to improve the oxidation stability. Among them, pyrogallol was found to be the most effective antioxidant. The iodine number was improved with blending the biodiesel produced from tobacco seed oil with a biodiesel that contains more saturated fatty acids. However, the blending caused increasing the cold filter plugging point. Therefore, four different cold flow improvers, which are ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, octadecene-1-maleic anhydride copolymer and two commercial cold flow improvers, were used to decrease cold filter plugging point of the biodiesel and the blends. Among the improvers, the best improver is said to be octadecene-1-maleic anhydride copolymer. In addition, effects of temperature on the density and the viscosity of the biodiesel were investigated.

  15. The microbiota is essential for the generation of black tea theaflavins-derived metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huadong Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Theaflavins including theaflavin (TF, theaflavin-3-gallate (TF3G, theaflavin-3'-gallate (TF3'G, and theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TFDG, are the most important bioactive polyphenols in black tea. Because of their poor systemic bioavailability, it is still unclear how these compounds can exert their biological functions. The objective of this study is to identify the microbial metabolites of theaflavins in mice and in humans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study, we gavaged specific pathogen free (SPF mice and germ free (GF mice with 200 mg/kg TFDG and identified TF, TF3G, TF3'G, and gallic acid as the major fecal metabolites of TFDG in SPF mice. These metabolites were absent in TFDG- gavaged GF mice. The microbial bioconversion of TFDG, TF3G, and TF3'G was also investigated in vitro using fecal slurries collected from three healthy human subjects. Our results indicate that TFDG is metabolized to TF, TF3G, TF3'G, gallic acid, and pyrogallol by human microbiota. Moreover, both TF3G and TF3'G are metabolized to TF, gallic acid, and pyrogallol by human microbiota. Importantly, we observed interindividual differences on the metabolism rate of gallic acid to pyrogallol among the three human subjects. In addition, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum 299v and Bacillus subtilis have the capacity to metabolize TFDG. CONCLUSIONS: The microbiota is important for the metabolism of theaflavins in both mice and humans. The in vivo functional impact of microbiota-generated theaflavins-derived metabolites is worthwhile of further study.

  16. Remedial Investigation Concept Plan for Picatinny Arsenal. Volume 1. Environmental Setting, Applicable Regulations, Summaries of Site Sampling Plans, Sampling Priorities, and Supporting Appendixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-22

    and Propellant Processing Closure Pila The revised closure plan includes decontaminating the building and equipment. Two wash water or rinsate...Toxic 2,4-Dinitrophenol Toxic 4-NitroDhenol Toxic Pentachlorophenol Toxic Phenol Toxic Pyrogallol a Resorcinol Toxic 101 Combustibles and Polysulfide a...1 C- 0.L .C(D V V) 0 -3- -LC 0 0 a’ aU 0 . C - OV -, 0*- -0 - 0. C’- (D ---- ".- 0 C O~- ID E 0 DE 0 z- 0 0 0- E M V) -1 ) 0a a0 0C3 ) OL r- CL r

  17. Stabilization of azadirachtin A in neem formulations: effect of some solid carriers, neem oil, and stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J; Parmar, B S

    1999-04-01

    Formulation of azadirachtin A on attapulgite, kaolinite, fuller's earth, hydrated calcium silicate, and fly ash revealed that it degraded to the tune of 70-95% on different solid carriers as compared to 56% in neem oil, during the 14 day heat storage studies at 54 +/- 1 degrees C in the laboratory. The degradation was reduced by 26-60% on different carriers by employing either anthraquinone or epichlorohydrin as stabilizer. Pyrogallol and hydroquinone enhanced the degradation. The cation exchange capacity and surface area of the carriers revealed a significant negative correlation with t(1/2) of azadirachtin A.

  18. How Many Drugs Are Catecholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Peng Yang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available By examination of the 8659 drugs recorded in the Comprehensive Medicinal Chemistry (CMC database, 78 catecholics (including five pyrogallolics were identified, of which 17 are currently prescribed by FDA. Through analyzing the substitutent patterns, ClogPs and O-H bond dissociation enthalpies(BDEs of the catecholic drugs, some molecular features that may benefit circumventing the toxicity of catecholics were revealed: i strong electron-donating substituents are excluded; ii ClogP 3; iii an energy penalty exists for quinone formation. Besides, the present analyses also suggest that the clinical usage and dosage of currently prescribed catecholic drugs are of importance in designing or screening catecholic antioxidants.

  19. Bioconversion of Biomass-Derived Phenols Catalyzed by Myceliophthora thermophila Laccase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Zerva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomass-derived phenols have recently arisen as an attractive alternative for building blocks to be used in synthetic applications, due to their widespread availability as an abundant renewable resource. In the present paper, commercial laccase from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila was used to bioconvert phenol monomers, namely catechol, pyrogallol and gallic acid in water. The resulting products from catechol and gallic acid were polymers that were partially characterized in respect to their optical and thermal properties, and their average molecular weight was estimated via solution viscosity measurements and GPC. FT-IR and 1H-NMR data suggest that phenol monomers are connected with ether or C–C bonds depending on the starting monomer, while the achieved molecular weight of polycatechol is found higher than the corresponding poly(gallic acid. On the other hand, under the same condition, pyrogallol was dimerized in a pure red crystalline compound and its structure was confirmed by 1H-NMR as purpurogallin. The herein studied green synthesis of enzymatically synthesized phenol polymers or biological active compounds could be exploited as an alternative synthetic route targeting a variety of applications.

  20. Preparative isolation and purification of phlorotannins from Ecklonia cava using centrifugal partition chromatography by one-step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Ko, Ju-Young; Oh, Jae-Young; Kim, Chul-Young; Lee, Hee-Ju; Kim, Jaeil; Jeon, You-Jin

    2014-09-01

    Various bioactive phlorotannins of Ecklonia cava (e.g., dieckol, eckol, 6,6-bieckol, phloroglucinol, phloroeckol, and phlorofucofuroeckol-A) are reported. However, their isolation and purification are not easy. Centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) can be used to efficiently purify the various bioactive-compounds efficiently from E. cava. Phlorotannins are successfully isolated from the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of E. cava by CPC with a two-phase solvent system comprising n-hexane:EtOAc:methanol:water (2:7:3:7, v/v) solution. The dieckol (fraction I, 40.2mg), phlorofucofuroeckol-A (fraction III, 31.1mg), and fraction II (34.1mg) with 2,7-phloroglucinol-6,6-bieckol and pyrogallol-phloroglucinol-6,6-bieckol are isolated from the crude extract (500 mg) by a one-step CPC system. The purities of the isolated dieckol and phlorofucofuroeckol-A are ⩾90% according to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electrospray ionization multi stage tandem mass spectrometry analyses. The purified 2,7-phloroglucinol-6,6-bieckol and pyrogallol-phloroglucinol-6,6-bieckol are collected from fraction II by recycle-HPLC. Thus, the CPC system is useful for easy and simple isolation of phlorotannins from E. cava. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tunicate-Inspired Gallic Acid/Metal Ion Complex for Instant and Efficient Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajatelistia, Ekavianty; Ju, Sung-Won; Sanandiya, Naresh D; Jun, Sang Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-04-20

    Dentin hypersensitivity is sharp and unpleasant pains caused by exposed dentinal tubules when enamel outside of the tooth wears away. The occlusion of dentinal tubules via in situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite is the best method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity. Commercially available dental desensitizers are generally effective only on a specific area and are relatively toxic, and their performance usually depends on the skill of the clinician. Here, a facile and efficient dentin hypersensitivity treatment with remarkable aesthetic improvement inspired by the tunicate-self-healing process is reported. As pyrogallol groups in tunicate proteins conjugate with metal ions to heal the torn body armor of a tunicate, the ingenious mechanism by introducing gallic acid (GA) as a cheap, abundant, and edible alternative to the pyrogallol groups of the tunicate combined with a varied daily intake of metal ion sources is mimicked. In particular, the GA/Fe(3+) complex exhibits the most promising results, to the instant ≈52% blockage in tubules within 4 min and ≈87% after 7 d of immersion in artificial saliva. Overall, the GA/metal ion complex-mediated coating is facile, instant, and effective, and is suggested as an aesthetic solution for treating dentin hypersensitivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Ekrem; Gülçin, Ilhami

    2008-01-01

    Peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; donor: hydrogen peroxide oxidoreductase) are part of a large group of enzymes. In this study, peroxidase, a primer antioxidant enzyme, was purified with 19.3 fold and 0.2% efficiency from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis, CM-Sephadex ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-25 purification steps. The substrate specificity of peroxidase was investigated using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol), 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol), 1,2,3-trihyidroxybenzene (pyrogallol) and 4-methylcatechol. Also, optimum pH, optimum temperature, optimum ionic strength, stable pH, stable temperature, thermal inactivation conditions were determined for guaiacol/H(2)O(2), pyrogallol/H(2)O(2), ABTS/H(2)O(2), catechol/H(2)O(2) and 4-methyl catechol/H(2)O(2) substrate patterns. The molecular weight (M(w)) of this enzyme was found to be 44 kDa by gel filtration chromatography method. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was performed for isoenzyme determination and a single band was observed. K(m) and V(max) values were calculated from Lineweaver-Burk graph for each substrate patterns.

  3. Enzymatic Activity Enhancement of Non-Covalent Modified Superoxide Dismutase and Molecular Docking Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Jun Song

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase was improved in the pyrogallol autoxidation system by about 27%, after interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclo- dextrin and superoxide dismutase. Fluorescence spectrometry was used to study the interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and superoxide dismutase at different temperatures. By doing this, it can be found that these interactions increase fluorescence sensitivity. In the meantime, the synchronous fluorescence intensity revealed the interaction sites to be close to the tryptophan (Trp and tyrosine (Tyr residues of superoxide dismutase. Furthermore, molecular docking was applied to explore the binding mode between the ligands and the receptor. This suggested that HP-β-CD interacted with the B ring, G ring and the O ring and revealed that the lysine (Lys residues enter the nanocavity. It was concluded that the HP-β-CD caused specific conformational changes in SOD by non-covalent modification.

  4. Spectral, magnetic, and thermal properties of some thiazolylazo complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoud, M. S.; Mohamed, G. B.; Abdulrazek, Y. H.; Ali, A. E. [Alexandria Univ., Alexandria (Egypt); Khairy, F. N. [Ahfad Univ. for Women, Omderman (Sudan)

    2002-04-01

    The thiazolylazo compounds and their Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of barbituric acid, uracil, thiouracil, citrazinic acid, chromotropic acid, gallic acid, pyrogallol and salicylic acid were prepared and characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, IR and the effect of pH on the electronic absorption spectra. The mode of ionization, the electronic transitions and the dissociation constants were discussed. The stoichiometries of the complexed were of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:2 (M:L). The copper complexes are of isotropic ESR spectra (except that of gallic acid which showed a complicated one) and are of magnetically diluted behavior with orbital contribution. Detailed DTA data were obtained and discussed.

  5. Scavenging of peroxynitrite by phycocyanin and phycocyanobilin from Spirulina platensis: protection against oxidative damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, V B; Madyastha, K M

    2001-07-13

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is known to inactivate important cellular targets and also mediate oxidative damage in DNA. The present study has demonstrated that phycocyanin, a biliprotein from spirulina platensis and its chromophore, phycocyanobilin (PCB), efficiently scavenge ONOO(-), a potent physiological inorganic toxin. Scavenging of ONOO(-) by phycocyanin and PCB was established by studying their interaction with ONOO(-) and quantified by using competition kinetics of pyrogallol red bleaching assay. The relative antioxidant ratio and IC(50) value clearly indicate that phycocyanin is a more efficient ONOO(-) scavenger than PCB. The present study has also shown that PCB significantly inhibits the ONOO(-)-mediated single-strand breaks in supercoiled plasmid DNA in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) value of 2.9 +/- 0.6 microM. These results suggest that phycocyanin, has the ability to inhibit the ONOO(-)-mediated deleterious biological effects and hence has the potential to be used as a therapeutic agent. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. In vitro solubility of uranium tetrafluoride with oxidizing medium compared with in vivo solubility in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Chalabreysse, J.; Escallon, S.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple in vitro solubility test for UF 4 was developed to investigate effects of addition of enzymes, proteins or gases (eg O 2 ) to synthetic biological fluid or Gamble solvent. Tests were made concomitantly with an in vivo inhalation study using male rats. With Gamble solvent alone, UF 4 showed class Y behaviour with dissolution half-time 300-500 days. When O 2 or carbonates were added to Gamble solvent, UF 4 showed class W behaviour (half-time 25-50 days). In the presence of oxygen and pyrogallol, the superoxide ion was formed and UF 4 behaved as class D (half-time 2-3 days). Results correlated with those of the inhalation experiment in which dissolution half-time was 2.5 and 5.2 days. Data also agree with urine monitoring data for workers exposed to UF 4 over 20 years. (author)

  7. Spectral, magnetic, and thermal properties of some thiazolylazo complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masoud, M. S.; Mohamed, G. B.; Abdulrazek, Y. H.; Ali, A. E.; Khairy, F. N.

    2002-01-01

    The thiazolylazo compounds and their Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of barbituric acid, uracil, thiouracil, citrazinic acid, chromotropic acid, gallic acid, pyrogallol and salicylic acid were prepared and characterized by 1 H NMR, IR and the effect of pH on the electronic absorption spectra. The mode of ionization, the electronic transitions and the dissociation constants were discussed. The stoichiometries of the complexed were of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:2 (M:L). The copper complexes are of isotropic ESR spectra (except that of gallic acid which showed a complicated one) and are of magnetically diluted behavior with orbital contribution. Detailed DTA data were obtained and discussed

  8. New Hybrid Properties of TiO2 Nanoparticles Surface Modified With Catecholate Type Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džunuzović Enis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surface modification of nanocrystalline TiO2 particles (45 Å with bidentate benzene derivatives (catechol, pyrogallol, and gallic acid was found to alter optical properties of nanoparticles. The formation of the inner-sphere charge–transfer complexes results in a red shift of the semiconductor absorption compared to unmodified nanocrystallites. The binding structures were investigated by using FTIR spectroscopy. The investigated ligands have the optimal geometry for chelating surface Ti atoms, resulting in ring coordination complexes (catecholate type of binuclear bidentate binding–bridging thus restoring in six-coordinated octahedral geometry of surface Ti atoms. From the Benesi–Hildebrand plot, the stability constants at pH 2 of the order 103 M−1 have been determined.

  9. Heavy metal-induced cytotoxicity to cultured human epidermal keratinocytes and effects of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, H; Reinhold, C

    1994-04-01

    Human epidermal keratinocytes which have been cultured were treated with the heavy metal ions of cadmium, mercury, copper and zinc. Cytotoxicity was measured either by protein estimation or by using the neutral red assay. Antioxidants were added in order to find out whether heavy metal-induced cytotoxicity is related to oxidative stress. All metals used showed considerable cytotoxic effects within 24 h in moderate concentrations. None of the antioxidants vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), pyrogallol, propyl gallate, BHT or ebselen showed any protective or preventive effect. This indicates that oxidative stress may not be involved in the cytotoxicity induced by heavy metals in human epidermal keratinocytes. The cells used are, however, a valuable tool to study mechanisms of cytotoxicity.

  10. Purification and Characterization of Antioxidant Peptide from Sunflower Protein Hydrolysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Qun Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sunflower proteins were hydrolyzed with Flavourzyme for the production of antioxidant peptide. DEAE-Sepharose Fast Flow, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC were consecutively employed to purify a novel sunflower antioxidant peptide, and the ability to inhibit the autoxidation of pyrogallol was expressed as the antioxidative activity of the peptide. The amino acid sequence was identified as Ala-Cys-Ala-His-Asp-Lys-Val by a Q-Tof2 mass spectrometer. This novel peptide exhibited a high antioxidative activity of 79.42 U/mL, which is expected to protect against oxidative damage in living systems in relation to aging and carcinogenesis. Higher antioxidative activities were presumed mainly due to the presence of hydrophobic amino acids in its sequence.

  11. Method of molybdenum kinetic determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejngol'd, S.U.; Dzotsenidze, N.E.; Ruseishviyai, T.G.; Nelen', I.M.

    1980-01-01

    The method molybdenum kinetic determination according to oxidation of pyrogallol with bromate in the medium of 0.05-0.15 M perchloric or sulphuric acids is presented. 1 mg of Ni, Co, Mn, Mg, Zn, Cr(3); 100 μg of Ca, Al, Cu, 10 μg of Cr(4), W; 10 μg of Fe in the presence of 22x10 - 4 M solution of EDTA, as well as 10 - 4 M solutions of chlorides and fluorides, 10 - 5 M solutions of bromides do not interfere with molybdenum determination using the given method. The method is rather simple, it takes 30 min to carry out the analysis. Determination limit of molybdenum constitutes 0.01 μg/ml

  12. Depressing effect of phenoxyl acetic acids on flotation of minerals containing Ca2+/Mg2+ gangues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Phenoxyl acetic acids were applied to determine their depressing effect on minerals containing Ca2+/Mg2+ gangues. Calcite,mixture of calcite and fluorite, and nickel ore were used in the flotation. And the depression mechanism was studied by the determination of contact angle, zeta potential, adsorptive capacity of collector, and IR analysis as well. It is found that 0.1 mmol/L of phenoxyl acetic acid derived from pyrogallol or gallic acid exhibits strong depressing ability on calcite in almost zero yields at pH value of 9.8, and calcite can be depressed in the flotation of calcite/fluorite mixture for approximate 87% yield of fluorite. The flotation result of practical nickel ore containing serpentine indicates that these two depressants may also show better depression performance to serpentine than traditional depressants such as sodium fluosilicate and carboxylmethyl cellulose. Analysis for the depression mechanism reveals that there exists strong chemical interaction between the depressants and minerals.

  13. Microbial screening of thorium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) chelates with oxine and phenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapadia, M.A.; Patel, M.M.; Patel, G.P.; Joshi, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    In the present investigation synthesis, characterization of mixed ligand chelates of the type MA 2 L 2 , where, M = Th 4+ and UO 2 2+ , A 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) and L = phenols, H2L I = catechol, H 2 L 2 pyrogallol, H 2 L 3 = 2,3-dihydroxy naphthalene, H 2 L 4 = 1,5-dihydroxy naphthalene and H 2 L 5 = 1,7-dihydroxy naphthalene have been reported. Their geometry have been elucidated on the basis of elemental analyses, thermogravimetric, magnetic moments, NMR, IR and electronic spectra. A study of thermal properties has also been carried out. The antimicrobial activity of 8-hydroxyquinoline and MA 2 L 2 chelates have been determined and described. All the chelates showed an effective antimicrobial activity than the free ligand. (author)

  14. A Bioinspired Organocatalytic Cascade for the Selective Oxidation of Amines under Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largeron, Martine; Fleury, Maurice-Bernard

    2017-05-17

    A bioinspired organocatalytic cascade reaction for the selective aerobic oxidative cross-coupling of primary amines to imines is described. This approach takes advantages of commercially available pyrogallol monomeric precursor to deliver low loadings of natural purpurogallin in situ, under air. This is further engaged in a catalytic process with the amine substrate affording, under single turnover, the active biomimetic quinonoid organocatalyst and the homocoupled imine intermediate, which is then converted into cross-coupled imine after dynamic transimination. This organocatalytic cascade inspired by both purpurogallin biosynthesis and copper amine oxidases allows the aerobic oxidation of non-activated primary amines that non-enzymatic organocatalysts were not able to accomplish alone. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Urinary metabolites from mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Keitt) galloyl derivatives and in vitro hydrolysis of gallotannins in physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ryan C; Krenek, Kimberly A; Meibohm, Bernd; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U; Talcott, Stephen T

    2016-03-01

    The absorption, metabolism, and excretion of mango galloyl derivatives (GD) has not yet been investigated in humans, and studies investigating repeated dosages of polyphenols are limited. In this human pilot trial, healthy volunteers (age = 21-38 y, n = 11) consumed 400 g/day of mango-pulp (cv. Keitt) for 10 days, and seven metabolites of gallic acid (GA) were characterized and quantified in urine excreted over a 12 h period. Pyrogallol-O-sulfate and deoxypyrogallol-O-sulfate were found to be significantly more excreted between days 1 and 10 (p mango consumption. Mango GTs were also found to release free GA in conditions similar to the intestines. GTs may serve as a pool of pro-GA compounds that can be absorbed or undergo microbial metabolism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Property modification of jatropha oil biodiesel by blending with other biodiesels or adding antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi-Hung; Chen, Jhih-Hong; Luo, Yu-Min; Shang, Neng-Chou; Chang, Cheng-Hsin; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Shie, Je-Lueng

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of biodiesel production from jatropha (Jatropha curcas) oil was investigated with respect to the biodiesel blending properties and its oxidation stability with antioxidants. The JME (jatropha oil methyl esters) had the cetane number of 54, cold filter plugging point of -2 o C, density of 881 kg/m 3 at 15 o C, ester content of 99.4 wt.%, iodine value of 96.55 g I 2 /100 g, kinematic viscosity of 4.33 mm 2 /s at 40 o C, and oxidation stability of 3.86 h. Furthermore, the JME was blended with palm oil biodiesel and soybean oil biodiesel at various weight ratios and evaluated for fuel properties as compared to the relevant specifications. In addition, several antioxidants at concentrations between 100 and 1000 ppm were studied for their potential to improve the oxidation stability of the JME. The relationship between the IP (induction period) in the measurement of the oxidation stability associated with the antioxidant consumption in the JME was described by first-order reaction rate kinetics. Moreover, the ln IP (natural logarithm of the IP) at various concentrations of pyrogallol showed a linear relationship with the test temperature. The oxidation stability at ambient temperatures was predicted on the basis of an extrapolation of the temperature-dependent relationship. -- Highlights: → Jatropha oil methyl esters had satisfactory biodiesel properties except for the oxidation stability. → The oxidation stability and cold filter plugging point of the jatropha-based biodiesel blends cannot meet the EN 14214 requirements simultaneously. → The addition of pyrogallol was recommended for the stabilization of the jatropha oil methyl esters with a concentration of 100-250 ppm.

  17. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of low levels arsenic species in beverages after ion-pairing vortex-assisted cloud-point extraction with acridine red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Nail; Gürkan, Ramazan; Kır, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    A new, low-cost, micellar-sensitive and selective spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of inorganic arsenic (As) species in beverage samples. Vortex-assisted cloud-point extraction (VA-CPE) was used for the efficient pre-concentration of As(V) in the selected samples. The method is based on selective and sensitive ion-pairing of As(V) with acridine red (ARH(+)) in the presence of pyrogallol and sequential extraction into the micellar phase of Triton X-45 at pH 6.0. Under the optimised conditions, the calibration curve was highly linear in the range of 0.8-280 µg l(-1) for As(V). The limits of detection and quantification of the method were 0.25 and 0.83 µg l(-1), respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace As in the pre-treated and digested samples under microwave and ultrasonic power. As(V) and total As levels in the samples were spectrophotometrically determined after pre-concentration with VA-CPE at 494 nm before and after oxidation with acidic KMnO4. The As(III) levels were calculated from the difference between As(V) and total As levels. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by analysis of two certified reference materials (CRMs) where the measured values for As were statistically within the 95% confidence limit for the certified values.

  19. Comparative study of binary and ternary complexes of some rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhijani, S.D.; Sangal, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    Modified form of Irving and Rossotti's pH titration technique has been used to evaluate and compare the stability constants of the binary and ternary complexes of Sc(III), Y(III), La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III) and Sm(III) at 30 0 at an ionic strength of 0.2M NaClO 4 . For the study of ternary complexes, nitrilotriacetic acid has been used as a primary ligand and polyhydroxy phenols i.e. pyrocatechol (PYC), pyrogallol (PYG) and gallic acid (GA) as secondary ligands. The stability constants of the binary complexes were found to be more than those of the corresponding ternary complexes which can reasonably be explained on the basis of electrostatic force between primary complex (metal in the case of binary complex) and secondary ligand, and space available to accommodate the secondary ligand. The stability decreases with the increase in ionic radii, i.e. Sc(III)>Y(III)>Sm(III)>Nd(III)>Pr(III)>La(III). In terms of secondary ligand, it follows the order PYC>GA>PYG. Rare earths form only 1:1 binary complex, and 1:1:1 mixed ligand complex in all the cases. (author)

  20. Curcumin-Artemisinin Coamorphous Solid: Xenograft Model Preclinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Chaitanya Mannava

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a natural compound present in Indian spice turmeric. It has diverse pharmacological action but low oral solubility and bioavailability continue to limit its use as a drug. With the aim of improving the bioavailability of Curcumin (CUR, we evaluated Curcumin-Pyrogallol (CUR-PYR cocrystal and Curcumin-Artemisinin (CUR-ART coamorphous solid. Both of these solid forms exhibited superior dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior compared to pure CUR, which is practically insoluble in water. CUR-ART coamorphous solid showed two fold higher bioavailability than CUR-PYR cocrystal (at 200 mg/kg oral dose. Moreover, in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF, CUR-ART is stable up to 3 and 12 h, respectively. In addition, CUR-PYR and CUR-ART showed no adverse effects in toxicology studies (10 times higher dose at 2000 mg/kg. CUR-ART showed higher therapeutic effect and inhibited approximately 62% of tumor growth at 100 mg/kg oral dosage of CUR in xenograft models, which is equal to the positive control drug, doxorubicin (2 mg/kg by i.v. administration.

  1. Impact of short-term intake of red wine and grape polyphenol extract on the human metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Doris M; Fuhrmann, Jens C; van Dorsten, Ferdinand A; Rein, Dietrich; Peters, Sonja; van Velzen, Ewoud J J; Hollebrands, Boudewijn; Draijer, Richard; van Duynhoven, John; Garczarek, Ursula

    2012-03-28

    Red wine and grape polyphenols are considered to promote cardiovascular health and are involved in multiple biological functions. Their overall impact on the human metabolome is not known. Therefore, exogenous and endogenous metabolic effects were determined in fasting plasma and 24 h urine from healthy male adults consuming a mix of red wine and grape juice extracts (WGM) for 4 days in a placebo-controlled, crossover study. Syringic acid, 3-hydroxyhippuric acid, pyrogallol, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid were confirmed as the strongest urinary markers of WGM intake. Overall, WGM had a mild impact on the endogenous metabolism. Most noticeable were changes in several amino acids deriving from tyrosine and tryptophan. Reductions in the microbial metabolites p-cresol sulfate and 3-indoxylsulfuric acid and increases in indole-3-lactic acid and nicotinic acid were observed in urine. In plasma, tyrosine was reduced. The results suggest that short-term intake of WGM altered microbial protein fermentation and/or amino acid metabolism.

  2. Phytochemicals and nutritional composition in accessions of Kei-apple (Dovyalis caffra): Southern African indigenous fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpai, Semkaleng; du Preez, Rosemary; Sultanbawa, Yasmina; Sivakumar, Dharini

    2018-07-01

    Current study was initiated to identify the phytochemicals and the nutritional profile of eleven Kei-apple fruit accessions. Accession FH29 showed the highest level (492.45 mg 100 g -1 fresh weight) of total phenolic content, higher than the referral fruit, blueberry. Pyrogallol was identified as the predominant phenolic compound in all accessions. Accession FH 29 showed the highest (49.75 µmol TEAC g -1 fresh weight) antioxidant capacity. Catechin content was higher in accessions; FH151, FH15, FH14, FH29, FH243, FH 239 and FH 231. Accessions, FH14 and FH232 exhibited higher levels of β-carotene than the referral fruit apples (cv. Top red) and peaches (cv. Excellence). The total sugar (glucose and fructose) was highest (50 mg g -1 fresh weight) in accession FH240. Asparagine (3122.18 mg L -1 ) and gamma-aminobutyric (1688.87 mg L -1 ) were higher in accessions FH239 and FH243 respectively. Overall, the accession Kei-apple FH236 can be regarded as a good source of essential amino acids. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Polyphenol Contents and Antioxidant Properties of Medlar (Mespilus germanica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhami Gülçin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Medlar is the fruit of Mespilus germanica L. in the family of Rosaceae. The present study outlines that the native medlar (Mespilus germanica L. fruits an extremely rich source of antioxidants. In this study, antioxidant and antiradical property of medlar fruits were evaluated. Total phenolics and flavonoids amounts in lyophilized extract of medlar (LEM fruits were calculated as gallic acid and quercetin equivalents, respectively. Antioxidant and radical scavenging activity of LEM were investigated using different in vitro assays including 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH∙, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPD •+, and superoxide anion radicals (O 2 •- scavenging activity, hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2, ferric ions (Fe 3+ and cupric ions (Cu 2+ reducing ability, Fe 3+-TPTZ reducing ability, ferrous ions (Fe 2+ chelating activity as trolox equivalent. In addition, quantitative amounts of caffeic acid, ferulic acid, syringic acid, ellagic acid, quercetin, α-tocopherol, pyrogallol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillin, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid and ascorbic acid in LEM were detected by high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The presence of these antioxidant compounds can be considered as a quality parameter for edible medlar fruits.

  4. Interaction of humic acids and humic-acid-like polymers with herpes simplex virus type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöcking, Renate; Helbig, Björn

    The study was performed in order to compare the antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) of synthetic humic-acid-like polymers to that of their low-molecular-weight basic compounds and naturally occurring humic acids (HA) in vitro. HA from peat water showed a moderate antiviral activity at a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 µg/ml. HA-like polymers, i.e. the oxidation products of caffeic acid (KOP), hydrocaffeic acid (HYKOP), chlorogenic acid (CHOP), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPOP), nordihydroguaretic acid (NOROP), gentisinic acid (GENOP), pyrogallol (PYROP) and gallic acid (GALOP), generally inhibit virus multiplication, although with different potency and selectivity. Of the substances tested, GENOP, KOP, 3,4-DHPOP and HYKOP with MEC values in the range of 2 to 10 µg/ml, proved to be the most potent HSV-1 inhibitors. Despite its lower antiviral potency (MEC 40 µg/ml), CHOP has a remarkable selectivity due to the high concentration of this polymer that is tolerated by the host cells (>640 µg/ml). As a rule, the antiviral activity of the synthetic compounds was restricted to the polymers and was not preformed in the low-molecular-weight basic compounds. This finding speaks in favour of the formation of antivirally active structures during the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds and, indirectly, of corresponding structural parts in different HA-type substances.

  5. Solid/liquid extraction equilibria of phenolic compounds with trioctylphosphine oxide impregnated in polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2016-06-01

    Trioctylphosphine oxide based extractant impregnated membranes (EIM) were used for extraction of phenol and its methyl, hydroxyl and chloride substituted derivatives. The distribution coefficients of the phenols varied from 2 to 234, in the order of 1-napthol > p-chlorophenol > m-cresol > p-cresol > o-cresol > phenol > catechol > pyrogallol > hydroquinone, when initial phenols loadings was varied in 100-2000 mg/L. An extraction model, based on the law of mass action, was formulated to predict the equilibrium distribution of the phenols. The model was in excellent agreement (R(2) > 0.97) with the experimental results at low phenols concentrations ( 0.95), which signified high mass transfer resistance in the EIMs. Examination of the effects of ring substitution on equilibrium, and bivariate statistical analysis between the amounts of phenols extracted into the EIMs and factors affecting phenols interaction with TOPO, indicated the dominant role of hydrophobicity in equilibrium determination. These results improve understanding of the solid/liquid equilibrium process between phenols and the EIMs, and these will be useful in designing phenol recovery process from wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of Trace Antimony (III by Adsorption Voltammetry at Carbon Paste Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nongyue He

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a sensitive method for the determination of trace antimonybased on the antimony-pyrogallol red (PGR adsorption at a carbon paste electrode (CPE.The optimal conditions were to use an electrode containing 25% paraffin oil and 75%high purity graphite powder as working electrode, a 0.10 mol/L HCl solution containing3.0×10-5 mol/L PGR as accumulation medium and a 0.20 mol/L HCl solution aselectrolyte with an accumulation time of 150 s and a reduction time of 60 s at -0.50 Vfollowed with a sweep from -0.50 V to 0.20 V. The mechanism of the electrode reactionwas discussed. Interferences of other metal ions were studied as well. The detection limitwas 1×10-9 mol/L. The linear range was from 2.0×10-9 mol/L to 5.0×10-7 mol/L.Application of the proposed method to the determination of antimony in water andhuman hair samples gave good results.

  7. Peroxidase of Brazilian Cerrado grass as an alternative for agro industrial waste treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Pinheiro Reis Souza Ramalho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Decontamination of wastewater continues to be a challenge for society and the scientific community. Despite the availability of various materials for study, enzymes stand out due to their specificity for decomposition and biodegradability for disposal. New sources of enzymes may represent efficient and low-cost alternatives compared to routinely used techniques. In this survey, the peroxidase profile from Echinolaena inflexa fruits was studied for possible applications in the treatment of wastewater. The protein content was found to be 5.33 mg g-1. The optimum reaction conditions were: 50°C, pH 7.5 at 0.1 mol L-1 of phosphate buffer for 15 min. The enzyme was inactivated after 5 min at 94°C and was inhibited when incubated with ascorbic acid at 10 mmol L-1. In tests using phenols and agro industrial waste, the peroxidase was able to oxidase 87.5% of catechol, 67.8% of pyrogallol, 39.1% of resorcinol and still presented 29.1% of the degradation capacity of raw wastewater phenolic compounds. The results showed that the Echinolaena inflexa peroxidase, a new source of enzymes, is a potential alternative to wastewater treatment.

  8. Processing ‘Ataulfo’ Mango into Juice Preserves the Bioavailability and Antioxidant Capacity of Its Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elena Quirós-Sauceda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The health-promoting effects of phenolic compounds depend on their bioaccessibility from the food matrix and their consequent bioavailability. We carried out a randomized crossover pilot clinical trial to evaluate the matrix effect (raw flesh and juice of ‘Ataulfo’ mango on the bioavailability of its phenolic compounds. Twelve healthy male subjects consumed a dose of mango flesh or juice. Blood was collected for six hours after consumption, and urine for 24 h. Plasma and urine phenolics were analyzed by electrochemical detection coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ECD. Five compounds were identified and quantified in plasma. Six phenolic compounds, plus a microbial metabolite (pyrogallol were quantified in urine, suggesting colonic metabolism. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax occurred 2–4 h after consumption; excretion rates were maximum at 8–24 h. Mango flesh contributed to greater protocatechuic acid absorption (49%, mango juice contributed to higher chlorogenic acid absorption (62%. Our data suggests that the bioavailability and antioxidant capacity of mango phenolics is preserved, and may be increased when the flesh is processed into juice.

  9. Efecto antioxidante y contenido polifenólico de Syringodium filiforme (Cymodoceaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kethia L González García

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant effect and polyphenol content of Syringodium filiforme (Cymodoceaceae. The marine phanerogam Syringodium filiforme, known as "manatee grass", is a common species that grows in coastal areas associated to Thalassia testudinum. With the aim to describe some of its possible chemical characteristics, this study was performed with a sample of 1.2kg, collected in March 2009, in Guanabo beach, Havana, Cuba. The sample was dried (less than 12% humidity and a total extract prepared; other three extracts were prepared with the use of solvents of increasing polarity. The phytochemical screening and analytical determinations of each fraction were undertaken Total polyphenol content was determined using pyrogallol as reference´s standard; chlorophyll a and b and anthocyanin content were also quantified. Total extract and fractions antioxidant activity were evaluated by using the free radical scavenging activity assay with 1,1- Diphenyl-2-Picrylhydrazyl reactive (knowing as DPPH´s method. The phytochemical screening of the different extracts detected the presence of high concentrations of flavonoids, phenols, terpenes, antocyaninns, reducing sugars and alkaloids. The total extract and methanol fraction showed significant free radical scavenging properties, while the petroleum ether fraction showed moderate activity, and the chloroform fraction and the aqueous soluble precipitate (residual salt obtained didn’t show antioxidant properties against free radicals. The results of this work confirmed the potentialities of this species for biological purposes. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (1: 465-472. Epub 2011 March 01.

  10. Effect of ultrasonic waves on the water turbidity during the oxidation of phenol. Formation of (hydro)peroxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Natalia; Lomas, Jose M; Camarero, Luis M

    2017-11-01

    Analysis of the kinetics of aqueous phenol oxidation by a sono-Fenton process reveals that the via involving ortho-substituted intermediates prevails: catechol (25.0%), hydroquinone (7.7%) and resorcinol (0.6%). During the oxidation, water rapidly acquires color that reaches its maximum intensity at the maximum concentration of p-benzoquinone. Turbidity formation occurs at a slower rate. Oxidant dosage determines the nature of the intermediates, being trihydroxylated benzenes (pyrogallol, hydroxyhydroquinone) and muconic acid the main precursors causing turbidity. It is found that the concentration of iron species and ultrasonic waves affects the intensity of the turbidity. The pathway of (hydro)peroxo-iron(II) complexes formation is proposed. Operating with 20.0-27.8mgFe 2+ /kW rates leads to formation of (hydro)peroxo-iron(II) complexes, which induce high turbidity levels. These species would dissociate into ZZ-muconic acid and ferrous ions. Applying relationships around 13.9mgFe 2+ /kW, the formation of (hydro)peroxo-iron(III) complexes would occur, which could react with carboxylic acids (2,5-dioxo-3-hexenedioic acid). That reaction induces turbidity slower. This is due to the organic substrate reacting with two molecules of the (hydro)peroxo complex. Therefore, it is necessary to accelerate the iron regeneration, intensifying the ultrasonic irradiation. Afterwards, this complex would dissociate into maleic acid and ferric ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Alleloppathic effects and insecticidal activity of the aqueous extract of Satureja montana L.

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    Šućur Jovana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of synthetic insecticides, herbicides and other pesticides has negative effects on the environment and on human and animal health. Therefore scientists are turning towards natural pesticides such as active components of plant extracts. Effect of two concentrations (0.1% and 0.2% of Satureja montana L. aqueous extract on lipid peroxidation process, as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPX, PPX and CAT in leaves and roots of pepper and black nightshade seedlings were examined 24, 72 and 120h after the treatment. Our results showed that higher concentration of S. montana aqueous extract induced lipid peroxidation in black nightshade roots. Furthermore, significant increases of pyrogallol and guaiacol peroxidase were detected in black nightshade leaves treated with 0.2% S. montana aqueous extract. The second aim was to evaluate effectiveness of aqueous extract as contact toxicant against whitefly. It was observed that aqueous extract with concentration of 0.2% showed toxic effect with 68.33% mortality after 96h.

  12. Effects of Phenolic Compounds of Fermented Thai Indigenous Plants on Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

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    Chaiyavat Chaiyasut

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of antioxidant activity of fermentation product (FP of five Thai indigenous products on oxidative stress in Wistar rats with streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes type II. The rats were fed with placebo and with the FP (2 and 6 mL/kg body weight/day for 6 weeks. Rutin, pyrogallol and gallic acid were main compounds found in the FP. Plasma glucose levels in diabetic rats receiving the higher dose of the FP increased less when compared to the diabetic control group as well as the group receiving the lower FP dose (13.1%, 29%, and 21.1%, respectively. A significant dose-dependent decrease in plasma levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (P<.05 was observed. In addition, the doses of 2 and 6 mL FP/kg/day decreased the levels of erythrocyte ROS in diabetic rats during the experiment, but no difference was observed when compared to the untreated diabetic rat group. Results imply that FP decreased the diabetes-associated oxidative stress to a large extent through the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. The FP also improved the abnormal glucose metabolism slightly but the difference was not statistically significant. Thus, FP may be a potential therapeutic agent by reducing injury caused by oxidative stress associated with diabetes.

  13. Assessment of aerobic and respiratory growth in the Lactobacillus casei group.

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    Teresa Zotta

    Full Text Available One hundred eighty four strains belonging to the species Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei and L. rhamnosus were screened for their ability to grow under aerobic conditions, in media containing heme and menaquinone and/or compounds generating reactive oxygen species (ROS, in order to identify respiratory and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes. Most strains were able to cope with aerobic conditions and for many strains aerobic growth and heme or heme/menaquinone supplementation increased biomass production compared to anaerobic cultivation. Only four L. casei strains showed a catalase-like activity under anaerobic, aerobic and respiratory conditions and were able to survive in presence of H2O2 (1 mM. Almost all L. casei and L. paracasei strains tolerated menadione (0.2 mM and most tolerated pyrogallol (50 mM, while L. rhamnosus was usually resistant only to the latter compound. This is the first study in which an extensive screening of oxygen and oxidative stress tolerance of members of the L. casei group has been carried out. Results allowed the selection of strains showing the typical traits of aerobic and respiratory metabolism (increased pH and biomass under aerobic or respiratory conditions and unique oxidative stress response properties. Aerobic growth and respiration may confer technological and physiological advantages in the L. casei group and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes could be exploited in several food industry applications.

  14. Effect of Rubia cordifolia, Fagonia cretica linn, and Tinospora cordifolia on free radical generation and lipid peroxidation during oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawal, Avinash; Muddeshwar, Manohar; Biswas, Saibal

    2004-01-01

    The major damaging factor during and after the ischemic/hypoxic insult is the generation of free radicals, which leads to apoptosis, necrosis, and ultimately cell death. Rubia cordifolia (RC), Fagonia cretica linn (FC), and Tinospora cordifolia (TC) have been reported to contain a wide variety of antioxidants and have been in use in the eastern system of medicine for various disorders. Hippocampal slices were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and divided into three groups, control, OGD, and OGD+drug treated. Cytosolic reduced glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide [NO, measured as nitrite (NO 2 )]. EPR was used to establish the antioxidant effect of RC, FC, and TC with respect to superoxide anion (O2-), hydroxyl radicals (OH), nitric oxide (NO) radical, and peroxynitrite anion (ONOO - ) generated from pyrogallol, menadione, DETA-NO, and Sin-1, respectively. RT-PCR was performed for the three herbs to assess their effect on the expression of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCLC), iNOS, and GAPDH gene expression. All the three herbs were effective in elevating the GSH levels and expression of the GCLC. The herbs also exhibited strong free radical scavenging properties against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, diminishing the expression of iNOS gene. RC, FC, and TC therefore attenuate oxidative stress mediated cell injury during OGD and exert the above effects at both the cytosolic as well as at gene expression levels and may be effective therapeutic tool against ischemic brain damage

  15. Characterisation of an acidic peroxidase from papaya (Carica papaya L. cv Tainung No. 2) latex and its application in the determination of micromolar hydrogen peroxide in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Chun; Chung, Yun-Chin; Chang, Chen-Tien

    2012-12-15

    An acidic peroxidase isoform, POD-A, with a molecular mass of 69.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 3.5 was purified from papaya latex. Using o-phenylenediamine (OPD) as a hydrogen donor (citrate-phosphate as pH buffer), the optimum pH for the function of POD-A was 4.6, and the optimum temperature was 50°C. The peroxidase activity of POD-A toward hydrogen donors was both pH- and concentration-dependent. Under optimal conditions, POD-A catalysed the oxidation of OPD at higher rates than pyrogallol, catechol, quercetin and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS). The chemical modification reagents N-bromosuccinimide and sodium azide significantly inhibited POD-A activity. The results of kinetic studies indicated that POD-A followed a ping-pong mechanism and had a K(m) value of 2.8mM for OPD. Using CPC silica-immobilised POD-A for the determination of micromolar H(2)O(2) in milk, the lower limit of determination was 0.1 μM, and the recoveries of added H(2)O(2) were 96-109%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrochemical study of the increased antioxidant capacity of flavonoids through complexation with iron(II) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porfírio, Demóstenes Amorim; Ferreira, Rafael de Queiroz; Malagutti, Andréa Renata; Valle, Eliana Maíra Agostini

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal-Flavonoid complexes exhibit greater antioxidant capacity than the free flavonoid;. • Voltammetric profile is an additional information for determining antioxidant capacity;. • Pyrogallol group is a stronger complex-forming group than the catechol;. • Morin, quercetin and fisetin increased their antioxidant capacity in 15%, 32% and 28%, respectively. - Abstract: Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that act as natural antioxidants in the human body through various mechanisms, with an emphasis on suppressing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation by inhibiting enzymes, the direct capture of ROS, and the regulation/protection of antioxidant defenses. Additionally, flavonoids can coordinate with transition metals to catalyze electron transport and promote free radical capture. Recently, metal ion chelation mechanisms have generated considerable interest, as experimental data show that flavonoids in metal complexes exhibit greater antioxidant activity than free flavonoids. However, few studies have correlated the complexing properties of flavonoids with their antioxidant capacity. Thus, the aim of this study was to use the CRAC (Ceric Reducing Antioxidant Capacity) electrochemical assay to measure the antioxidant capacity of five free flavonoids and Fe 2+ -flavonoid complexes. In addition, the interactions between the flavonoids and Fe 2+ were analyzed based on the oxidation peaks formed in their cyclic voltammograms

  17. Determination of C-glucosidic ellagitannins in Lythri salicariaeherba by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with charged aerosol detector: method development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granica, Sebastian; Piwowarski, Jakub P; Kiss, Anna K

    2014-01-01

    Lythri salicariaeherba is a pharmacopoeial plant material used by patients in the form of infusions in the treatment of acute diarrhoea. According to its pharmacopoeial monograph it is standardised for total tannin content, which should be not less than 5.0% using pyrogallol as a standard. Previous studies have shown that aqueous extracts from Lythri herba contain mainly ellagitannins among which vescalagin, castalagin and salicarinins A and B are dominating constituents. To develop and validate an efficient UHPLC coupled with a charged aerosol detector (CAD) method for quantification of four major ellagitannins in Lythri salicariaeherba and in one commercial preparation. Extraction conditions of ellagitannins from plant material were optimised. The relative response factors for vescalagin, castalagin and salicarinins A and B using gallic acid as an external standard were determined for the CAD detector. Then, a UHPLC method for quantification of ellagitannins was developed and validated. Four major ellagitannins were quantified in four samples of Lythri herba and in one commercial preparation. The sum of ellagitannins for each sample was determined, which varied from 30.66 to 48.80 mg/g of raw material and 16.57 mg per capsule for the preparation investigated. The first validated UHPLC/CAD UHPLC-CAD method for quantification of four major ellagitannins was developed. The universality of the CAD response was evaluated and it is shown that although all compounds analysed have similar structures their CAD response differs significantly. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Potentiometric titration and equivalent weight of humic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, A.M.; Breger, I.A.

    1960-01-01

    The "acid nature" of humic acid has been controversial for many years. Some investigators claim that humic acid is a true weak acid, while others feel that its behaviour during potentiometric titration can be accounted for by colloidal adsorption of hydrogen ions. The acid character of humic acid has been reinvestigated using newly-derived relationships for the titration of weak acids with strong base. Re-interpreting the potentiometric titration data published by Thiele and Kettner in 1953, it was found that Merck humic acid behaves as a weak polyelectrolytic acid having an equivalent weight of 150, a pKa of 6.8 to 7.0, and a titration exponent of about 4.8. Interdretation of similar data pertaining to the titration of phenol-formaldehyde and pyrogallol-formaldehyde resins, considered to be analogs for humic acid by Thiele and Kettner, leads to the conclusion that it is not possible to differentiate between adsorption and acid-base reaction for these substances. ?? 1960.

  19. Niobium Nb and tantalum Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for determining niobium and tantalum in various objects are described. Nb and Ta are separated with the aid of N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine by precipitating Nb(5) from a tartaric acid solution with subsequent precipitation of Ta from the filtrate. The gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta in steels is based on their quantitative separation from a diluted solution by way of hydrolysis with subsequent after-precipitation with phenylarsonic acid (in the absence of W). The gravimetric determination of Nb in the presence of W is carried out with the aid of Cupferron. To determine Nb in its carbide, Nb(5) reduced to Nb(3) is titrated with a solution of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 in the presence of phenyl-anthranilic acid. The photometric determination of Nb in tungsten-containing steels and in ores containing Ti, W, Mo and Cr is based on the rhodanide method. Nb is determined in alloys with Zr and Ti photometrically with the aid of 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcin and in alloyed steels with the aid of benzhydroxamic acid. The latter complex is extracted with chloroform. This method is used to determine Nb in rocks. The photometric determination of Ta in TiCl 4 is carried out with the aid of pyrogallol, in commercial niobium with the aid of methyl violet, and in steel with the aid of 4-(-pyridylazo)-resorcin. Also described is the polarographic determination of Nb in tantalum pentoxide

  20. Analysis of commercial proanthocyanidins. Part 4: solid state (13)C NMR as a tool for in situ analysis of proanthocyanidin tannins, in heartwood and bark of quebracho and acacia, and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, David G; Bonnet, Susan L; Kemp, Gabre; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    (13)C NMR is an effective method of characterizing proanthocyanidin (PAC) tannins in quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii) heartwood and black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark, before and after commercial extraction. The B-rings of the constituent flavan-3-ols, catechols (quebracho) or pyrogallols (wattle), are recognized in unprocessed source materials by "marker" signals at ca. 118 or 105ppm, respectively. NMR allows the minimum extraction efficiency to be calculated; ca. 30%, and ca. 80%, for quebracho heartwood and black wattle bark, respectively. NMR can also identify PAC tannin (predominantly robinetinidin), and compare tannin content, in bark from other acacia species; tannin content decreases in the order A. mearnsii, Acacia pycnantha (87% of A. mearnsii), Acacia dealbata and Acacia decurrens (each 74%) and Acacia karroo (30%). Heartwood from an underexploited PAC tannin source, Searsia lancea, taxonomically close to quebracho, shows abundant profisetinidin and catechin PACs. NMR offers the advantage of being applicable to source materials in their native state, and has potential applications in optimizing extraction processes, identification of tannin sources, and characterization of tannin content in cultivar yield improvement programmes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tannins in tropical woods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doat, J

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study was made of the chemistry of pyrogallol- and catecholtannins, their general properties and methods of extraction and determination. Three methods of estimation - Lowenthal, powdered hide and spectrophotometry - were compared using two control solutions, four samples of wood and one of bark. Using the empirical powdered hide method, tannins of both types were estimated in wood and bark of various tropical species (some separately and some as a mixture), Moroccan oaks (Quercus suber and Q. ilex), and European oak 9Q. petraea). Further tests were made on the wood and bark of the two mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and R. racemosa, by subjecting them to successive extraction with a range of solvents. None of the woods tested had as much as the 10% of tannins considered necessary in economic sources. The bark of the two mangroves, of Eucalyptus urophylla and of Prosopis africana had tannin contents over 10% and the latter two species had very favorable tannin/non-tannin ratios. All the tropical species, with the probable exception of E. urophylla, had only catecholtannins. Only the oaks and E. urophylla bark gave positive results when tested for gallotannins.

  2. Gelled composition procedures for hydraulic degradation of a subterrestrial formation and for displacing petroleum in such a formation by use of the composition. Gelert sammensetning, fremgangsmaate til hydraulisk oppbrytning av en underjordisk formasjon ved bruk av sammensetningen og fremgangsmaate til fortrengning av olje inne i en underjordisk formasjon ved bruk av sammensetningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, B L

    1984-09-17

    This is a claim for a gelled compositions suitable as fracture fluids and water diversion agents comprising water, a polymeric viscosifier an aldehyde component, and at least one phenolic component such as resorcinol, catechol, and the like, as well as selected oxidized phenolic materials such as 1,4-benzoquinone of natural or synthetic origin and natural and modified tannins. The gelled compositions can additionally contain gel stabilizers and chemical buffering agents. Claim: Gelled composition suitable as fracture fluids and water diversion agents consisting essentially of: (A) Water, (B) A water-thickening amount of a water-dispersible polymer selected from the group consisting of cellulose ethers, polyacrylamides, and bipolysaccharides or heteropolysaccharides produced by the action of bacteria of the genus xanthomonas upon carbohydrate, (C) A small, but effective amount in the range of 0.02 to 2 weight percent, of at least one aldehyde component selected from the group consisting of aliphatic monoaldhydes having from one to about 10 carbon atoms per molecule, glyoxal, glutaraldehyde, and terepththaldehyde, and (D) A small, but effective amount in the range of 0.005 to 2 weight percent of at least one phenolic compound selected from the group consisting of phenol, catechol, resorcinol, phloroglucinol, pyrogallol, 4,4'-diphenyl, 1,3 dihydroxynapthalene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, quinhydrone, and quebracho which amounts of aldehyde (C) and phenolic compound (D) are sufficient to cause gelation of an aqueous dispersion of polymer (B) and formsaid gelled composition. 5 drawings, 11 tables.

  3. Biased activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase: the Janus face of thymoquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detremmerie, Charlotte; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan

    2017-07-01

    The natural compound thymoquinone, extracted from Nigella sativa (black cumin), is widely used in humans for its anti-oxidative properties. Thymoquinone is known for its acute endothelium-independent vasodilator effects in isolated rat aortae and pulmonary arteries, depending in part on activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The compound also improves endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries of ageing rodents and in aortae of rabbits treated with pyrogallol, by inhibiting oxidative stress. Serendipitously, thymoquinone was found to augment contractions in isolated arteries with endothelium of both rats and pigs. The endothelium-dependent augmentation it causes counterintuitively depends on biased activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) producing inosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic IMP) rather than guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. This phenomenon shows a striking mechanistic similarity to the hypoxic augmentation previously observed in porcine coronary arteries. The cyclic IMP preferentially produced under thymoquinone exposure causes an increased contractility of arterial smooth muscle by interfering with calcium homeostasis. This brief review summarizes the vascular pharmacology of thymoquinone, focussing in particular on how the compound causes endothelium-dependent contractions by biasing the activity of sGC.

  4. Biased activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase: the Janus face of thymoquinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Detremmerie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The natural compound thymoquinone, extracted from Nigella sativa (black cumin, is widely used in humans for its anti-oxidative properties. Thymoquinone is known for its acute endothelium-independent vasodilator effects in isolated rat aortae and pulmonary arteries, depending in part on activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The compound also improves endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries of ageing rodents and in aortae of rabbits treated with pyrogallol, by inhibiting oxidative stress. Serendipitously, thymoquinone was found to augment contractions in isolated arteries with endothelium of both rats and pigs. The endothelium-dependent augmentation it causes counterintuitively depends on biased activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC producing inosine 3ʹ,5ʹ-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic IMP rather than guanosine 3ʹ,5ʹ-cyclic monophosphate. This phenomenon shows a striking mechanistic similarity to the hypoxic augmentation previously observed in porcine coronary arteries. The cyclic IMP preferentially produced under thymoquinone exposure causes an increased contractility of arterial smooth muscle by interfering with calcium homeostasis. This brief review summarizes the vascular pharmacology of thymoquinone, focussing in particular on how the compound causes endothelium-dependent contractions by biasing the activity of sGC.

  5. Chromatographic fingerprinting through chemometric techniques for herbal slimming pills: A way of adulterant identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekari, Nafiseh; Vosough, Maryam; Tabar Heidar, Kourosh

    2018-05-01

    In the current study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) fingerprinting of herbal slimming pills assisted by chemometric methods has been presented. Deconvolution of two-way chromatographic signals of nine herbal slimming pills into pure chromatographic and spectral patterns was performed. The peak clusters were resolved using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) by employing appropriate constraints. It was revealed that more useful chemical information about the composition of the slimming pills can be obtained by employing sophisticated GC-MS method coupled with proper chemometric tools yielding the extended number of identified constituents. The thorough fingerprinting of the complex mixtures proved the presence of some toxic or carcinogen components, such as toluene, furfural, furfuryl alcohol, styrene, itaconic anhydride, citraconic anhydride, trimethyl phosphate, phenol, pyrocatechol, p-propenylanisole and pyrogallol. In addition, some samples were shown to be adulterated with undeclared ingredients, including stimulants, anorexiant and laxatives such as phenolphthalein, amfepramone, caffeine and sibutramine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DEGRADATION OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati, H. Ganjidoust, M. Mir Fattah

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available For biological treatment of water, there are many different biofilm systems in use. Examples of them are trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fixed media submerged biofilters, granular media biofilters and fluidized bed reactors. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor process was developed in Norway in the late 1980s and early 1990s to adopt the best features of the activated sludge process as well as those of the biofilter processes, without including the worst. Two cylindrical moving bed biofilm reactors were used in this study working in upflow stream conditions. Experiments have been done in aerobic batch flow regime. Laboratory experiments were conducted at room temperature (23–28C and synthetic wastewater comprising a composition of phenol and hydroquinone in each reactor as the main organic constituents, plus balanced nutrients and alkalinity were used to feed the reactor. The ratio of influent to effluent COD was determined at different retention times. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of each selected compound is affected by the detention time. At low phenol and hydroquinone concentration (from 700 to 1000 mg/L maximum removal efficiency (over 80 % was obtained. By further increasing in COD loading rate up to 3000 mg/L, a decrease in COD removal rate was occurred. In the reactor containing pyrogallol in COD of 1500 mg/L, the removal rate decreased to 10 percent because of its toxicity for microorganisms.

  7. Antioxidant Activities of Total Pigment Extract from Blackberries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiechao Liu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Total pigment has been extracted from blackberries and its antioxidant activity against lipid peroxidation and scavenging capacities towards superoxide anion radicals, hydroxyl radicals and nitrite in different in vitro systems have been investigated. The total pigment extract from blackberries (TPEB exhibited strong antioxidant activity against lipid peroxidation in a linoleic acid model system and scavenging capacities towards superoxide anion radicals, generated by a pyrogallol autoxidation system or by an illuminating riboflavin system, hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton reaction, and nitrite. Furthermore, the antioxidant activities were correlated with the concentrations of the TPEB. In the test concentration range, the maximum inhibition percentage against linoleic acid peroxidation was 98.32 % after one week’s incubation, and the maximum scavenging percentages for the free radicals and nitrite inhibition in the above reactive systems reached 90.48, 96.48, 93.58 and 98.94 %, respectively. The TPEB is a natural, edible colorant with excellent antioxidant activities and health benefits and it seems to be applicable in both healthy food and medicine.

  8. Critical assessment of three high performance liquid chromatography analytical methods for food carotenoid quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, M Graça; Oliveira, Luísa; Camões, M Filomena G F C; Nunes, Baltazar; Versloot, Pieter; Hulshof, Paul J M

    2010-05-21

    Three sets of extraction/saponification/HPLC conditions for food carotenoid quantification were technically and economically compared. Samples were analysed for carotenoids alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene, and zeaxanthin. All methods demonstrated good performance in the analysis of a composite food standard reference material for the analytes they are applicable to. Methods using two serial connected C(18) columns and a mobile phase based on acetonitrile, achieved a better carotenoid separation than the method using a mobile phase based on methanol and one C(18)-column. Carotenoids from leafy green vegetable matrices appeared to be better extracted with a mixture of methanol and tetrahydrofuran than with tetrahydrofuran alone. Costs of carotenoid determination in foods were lower for the method with mobile phase based on methanol. However for some food matrices and in the case of E-Z isomer separations, this was not technically satisfactory. Food extraction with methanol and tetrahydrofuran with direct evaporation of these solvents, and saponification (when needed) using pyrogallol as antioxidant, combined with a HPLC system using a slight gradient mobile phase based on acetonitrile and a stationary phase composed by two serial connected C(18) columns was the most technically and economically favourable method. 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Glycosylation of phenolic compounds by the site-mutated β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lili; Xu, Lijuan; Guo, Yuchuan; Zhang, Dayu; Qi, Tingting; Jin, Lan; Gu, Guofeng; Xu, Li; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    β-Galactosidases can transfer the galactosyl from lactose or galactoside donors to various acceptors and thus are especially useful for the synthesis of important glycosides. However, these enzymes have limitations in the glycosylation of phenolic compounds that have many physiological functions. In this work, the β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3 was subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis at the W980 residue. The recombinant pET-21b plasmid carrying the enzyme gene was used as the template for mutation. The mutant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli cells for screening. One recombinant mutant, W980F, exhibited increased yield of glycoside when using hydroquinone as the screening acceptor. The enzyme was purified and the effects of the mutation on enzyme properties were determined in detail. It showed improved transglycosylation activity on novel phenolic acceptors besides hydroquinone. The yields of the glycosides produced from phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol were increased by 7.6% to 53.1%. Moreover, it generated 32.3% glycosides from the pyrogallol that could not be glycosylated by the wild-type enzyme. Chemical structures of these glycoside products were further determined by MS and NMR analysis. Thus, a series of novel phenolic galactosides were achieved by β-galactosidase for the first time. This was a breakthrough in the enzymatic galactosylation of the challenging phenolic compounds of great values.

  10. Glycosylation of phenolic compounds by the site-mutated β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Lu

    Full Text Available β-Galactosidases can transfer the galactosyl from lactose or galactoside donors to various acceptors and thus are especially useful for the synthesis of important glycosides. However, these enzymes have limitations in the glycosylation of phenolic compounds that have many physiological functions. In this work, the β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3 was subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis at the W980 residue. The recombinant pET-21b plasmid carrying the enzyme gene was used as the template for mutation. The mutant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli cells for screening. One recombinant mutant, W980F, exhibited increased yield of glycoside when using hydroquinone as the screening acceptor. The enzyme was purified and the effects of the mutation on enzyme properties were determined in detail. It showed improved transglycosylation activity on novel phenolic acceptors besides hydroquinone. The yields of the glycosides produced from phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol were increased by 7.6% to 53.1%. Moreover, it generated 32.3% glycosides from the pyrogallol that could not be glycosylated by the wild-type enzyme. Chemical structures of these glycoside products were further determined by MS and NMR analysis. Thus, a series of novel phenolic galactosides were achieved by β-galactosidase for the first time. This was a breakthrough in the enzymatic galactosylation of the challenging phenolic compounds of great values.

  11. Chromatographic analysis of phytochemicals components present in mangifera indica leaves for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by AgNO3 reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Bernett, D; Silva-Granados, A; Herrera, A; Correa-Torres, S N

    2016-01-01

    It was studied the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from the reduction of a silver nitrate solution (1 and 10mM) in the presence of an extract of mangifera indica leaves. Phytochemicals components present in extracts of mango leaves were determined using a GC-MS chromatograph. The results showed the presence of the phenolic compound pyrogallol (26.9% wt/5mL of extract) and oleic acid (29.1% wt/5mL of extract), which are useful for the reduction of the metallic salt AgNO 3 and the stabilization of silver nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), evidencing absorbances at wavelengths of 417nm (AgNPs-1) and 414nm (AgNPs- 10), which are characteristic peaks of this metallic nanoparticles. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the size of the synthesized nanoparticles. A particle size of about 28±7nm was observed for the AgNPs-1 sample and 26±5nm for the AgNPs-10. This suggests the advantages of green chemistry to obtain silver nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution. (paper)

  12. Multifunctional Polyphenols- and Catecholamines-Based Self-Defensive Films for Health Care Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Chetna; Harini, Sriram; Venkatesh, Mayandi; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Ng, Alice; Liu, Shouping; Verma, Navin Kumar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Beuerman, Roger W; Loh, Xian Jun; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani

    2016-01-20

    In an era of relentless evolution of antimicrobial resistance, there is an increasing demand for the development of efficient antimicrobial coatings or surfaces for food, biomedical, and industrial applications. This study reports the laccase-catalyzed room-temperature synthesis of mechanically robust, thermally stable, broad spectrum antimicrobial films employing interfacial interactions between poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA, and 14 naturally occurring catecholamines and polyphenols. The oxidative products of catecholamines and polyphenols reinforce the PVA films and also alter their surface and bulk properties. Among the catecholamines-reinforced films, optimum surface and bulk properties can be achieved by the oxidative products of epinephrine. For polyphenols, structure-property correlation reveals an increase in surface roughness and elasticity of PVA films with increasing number of phenolic groups in the precursors. Interestingly, PVA films reinforced with oxidized/polymerized products of pyrogallol (PG) and epinephrine (EP) display potent antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains, whereas hydroquinone (HQ)-reinforced PVA films display excellent antimicrobial properties against Gram-positive bacteria only. We further demonstrate that HQ and PG films retain their antimicrobial efficacy after steam sterilization. With an increasing trend of giving value to natural and renewable resources, our results have the potential as durable self-defensive antimicrobial surfaces/films for advanced healthcare and industrial applications.

  13. Bioactive compounds produced by gut microbial tannase: implications for colorectal cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix eLópez De Felipe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract have a profound influence on the transformation of food into metabolites which can impact human health. Gallic acid and pyrogallol are bioactive compounds displaying diverse biological properties, including carcinogenic inhibiting activities. However its concentration in fruits and vegetables is generally low. These metabolites can be also generated as final products of tannin metabolism by microbes endowed with tannase, which opens up the possibility of their anti-cancer potential being increased. Patients with colorectal cancer display an imbalanced gut microbiota respect to healthy population. The recent use of next generation sequencing technologies has greatly improved knowledge of the identity of bacterial species that colonize non-tumorous and tumorous tissues of colorectal cancer patients. This information provides a unique opportunity to shed light on the role played by gut microorganisms in the different stages of this disease. We here review the recently published gut microbiome associated to colorectal cancer patients and highlight tannase as an underlying gene function of bacterial species that selectively colonize tumorous tissues, but not adjacent non-malignant

  14. Study of the Stereochemistry and Oxidation Mechanism of Plant Polyphenols, Assisted by Computational Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, plant polyphenols have attracted great attention due to their wide range of biological activities. Certain kinds of polyphenols have complex structures; therefore, it is difficult to elucidate their total structure, including stereochemistry. In this study, we reinvestigated the stereostructures of two major C-glycosidic ellagitannins contained in Quercus plants, vescalagin and castalagin, and revised their stereostructures based on theoretical calculations of spectroscopic data. We also determined the structures of quercusnins A and B, isolated from the sapwood of Quercus crispula, based on theoretical calculations of NMR data. The oxidation mechanism of polyphenols has not been entirely elucidated. Therefore, we have also studied the oxidation mechanism of tea catechins during black tea production. Our investigation of the oxidation mechanism of black tea pigment theaflavins revealed that the difference in the position of the galloyl ester affords different oxidation products of theaflavins. In addition, oxidation products of pyrogallol-type catechins could be classified into three types-dehydrotheasinensins, theacitrins, and proepitheaflagallins; their detailed production and degradation mechanisms were also examined.

  15. Assessment of Aerobic and Respiratory Growth in the Lactobacillus casei Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotta, Teresa; Ricciardi, Annamaria; Ianniello, Rocco G.; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Rossi, Franca; Iacumin, Lucilla; Comi, Giuseppe; Coppola, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    One hundred eighty four strains belonging to the species Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei and L. rhamnosus were screened for their ability to grow under aerobic conditions, in media containing heme and menaquinone and/or compounds generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), in order to identify respiratory and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes. Most strains were able to cope with aerobic conditions and for many strains aerobic growth and heme or heme/menaquinone supplementation increased biomass production compared to anaerobic cultivation. Only four L. casei strains showed a catalase-like activity under anaerobic, aerobic and respiratory conditions and were able to survive in presence of H2O2 (1 mM). Almost all L. casei and L. paracasei strains tolerated menadione (0.2 mM) and most tolerated pyrogallol (50 mM), while L. rhamnosus was usually resistant only to the latter compound. This is the first study in which an extensive screening of oxygen and oxidative stress tolerance of members of the L. casei group has been carried out. Results allowed the selection of strains showing the typical traits of aerobic and respiratory metabolism (increased pH and biomass under aerobic or respiratory conditions) and unique oxidative stress response properties. Aerobic growth and respiration may confer technological and physiological advantages in the L. casei group and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes could be exploited in several food industry applications. PMID:24918811

  16. Inhibiting Effects of Achyranthes Bidentata Polysaccharide and Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharide on Nonenzyme Glycation in D-galactose Induced Mouse Aging Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG-BIN DENG; DA-PENG CUI; JIAN-MING JIANG; YAN-CHUN FENG; NIAN-SHENG CAI; DIAN-DONG LI

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the inhibiting effects and mechanism of achyranthes bidentata polysaccharide (ABP) and lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP) on nonenzyme glycation in D-galactose induced mouse aging model. Methods Serum AGE levels were determined by AGE-ELISA, MTT method was used to determine lymphocyte proliferation, IL-2 activity was determined by a bioassay method. Spontaneous motor activity was used to detect mouse's neuromuscular movement, latency of step-through method was used to examine learning and memory abilities of mouse, colormetric assay was used to determine hydroxyproline concentration in mouse skin, pyrogallol autoxidation method was used to determine superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of erythrocytes. Results Decreased levels of serum AGE, hydroxyproline concentration in mouse skin and spontaneous motor activity in D-galactose mouse aging model were detected after treated with ABP or LBP, while lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 activity, learning and memory abilities,SOD activity of erythrocytes, were enhanced. Conclusions ABP and LBP could inhibit nonenzyme glycation in D-galactose induced mouse aging model in vivo and ABP has a better inhibiting effect than LBP.

  17. Chromatographic analysis of phytochemicals components present in mangifera indica leaves for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by AgNO3 reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bernett, D.; Silva-Granados, A.; Correa-Torres, S. N.; Herrera, A.

    2016-02-01

    It was studied the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from the reduction of a silver nitrate solution (1 and 10mM) in the presence of an extract of mangifera indica leaves. Phytochemicals components present in extracts of mango leaves were determined using a GC-MS chromatograph. The results showed the presence of the phenolic compound pyrogallol (26.9% wt/5mL of extract) and oleic acid (29.1% wt/5mL of extract), which are useful for the reduction of the metallic salt AgNO3 and the stabilization of silver nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), evidencing absorbances at wavelengths of 417nm (AgNPs-1) and 414nm (AgNPs- 10), which are characteristic peaks of this metallic nanoparticles. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the size of the synthesized nanoparticles. A particle size of about 28±7nm was observed for the AgNPs-1 sample and 26±5nm for the AgNPs-10. This suggests the advantages of green chemistry to obtain silver nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution.

  18. Inhibition study of additives towards the corrosion of ferrous metal in palm biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, M.A.; Sazzad, B.S.; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • TBA doped biodiesel exhibits fairly good corrosion inhibition efficiency. • TBA forms nitrogen-containing layer on metal surface and protects the corrosion. • Materials exposed to TBA doped biodiesel show less surface roughness. - Abstract: Some efforts have already been given by other researchers to characterize the corrosion behavior of different metals in biodiesel. However, there is very limited information on its remedial measure. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of tert-butylamine (TBA), benzotriazole (BTA), butylate-dhydroxytoluene (BHT), and pyrogallol (PY) on the corrosion of cast iron (CI) and low carbon steel (LCS) through an immersion test in palm biodiesel (B100) at 300 K. Result shows that TBA-doped biodiesel exhibits fairly good corrosion-inhibiting properties for materials exposed to B100. Inhibition efficiency of TBA is found to be 86.54% and 86.71% for CI and LCS, respectively which is far better than other tested additives in this study. The high inhibition efficiency could be attributed to the dominant physical adsorption of N-containing compound which creates a protective layer over the metal surface and prevents corrosion.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of electrical conducting nanoporous carbon structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mir, L.; Kraiem, S.; Bengagi, M.; Elaloui, E.; Ouederni, A.; Alaya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoporous organic xerogel compounds were prepared by sol-gel method from pyrogallol-formaldehyde (PF) mixtures in water using perchloric acid as catalyst. The preparation conditions of electrical conducting carbon (ECC) structures were explored by changing the pyrolysis temperature. The effect of this preparation parameters on the structural and electrical properties of the obtained ECCs were studied, respectively, by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption isotherms, IR spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements. The analysis of the obtained results revealed that, the polymeric insulating phase was transformed progressively with pyrolysis temperature into carbon conducting phase; this means the formation of long continuous conducting path for charge carriers when the carbon microparticles inside the structure agglomerated with thermal treatment and the samples exhibited tangible percolation behaviour where the percolation threshold can be determined by pyrolysis temperature. The temperature-dependent conductivity and the I(V) characteristics of the obtained ECC structures show a non-ohmic behaviour. The results obtained from TGA and differential thermal analyser (DTA) thermograms, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs, IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that, the obtained ECC structures consist of amorphous and nanoporous electrical conducting carbon materials

  20. Silica Sol-Gel Entrapment of the Enzyme Chloro peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T.; Chan, S.; Ebaid, B.; Sommerhalter, M.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme chloro peroxidase (CPO) was immobilized in silica sol-gel beads prepared from tetramethoxysilane. The average pore diameter of the silica host structure (∼3 nm) was smaller than the globular CPO diameter (∼6 nm) and the enzyme remained entrapped after sol-gel maturation. The catalytic performance of the entrapped enzyme was assessed via the pyrogallol peroxidation reaction. Sol-gel beads loaded with 4 μg CPO per mL sol solution reached 9-12% relative activity compared to free CPO in solution. Enzyme kinetic analysis revealed a decrease in K_cat but no changes in K_M or K_I . Product release or enzyme damage might thus limit catalytic performance. Yet circular dichroism and visible absorption spectra of transparent CPO sol-gel sheets did not indicate enzyme damage. Activity decline due to methanol exposure was shown to be reversible in solution. To improve catalytic performance the sol-gel protocol was modified. The incorporation of 5, 20, or 40% methyltrimethoxysilane resulted in more brittle sol-gel beads but the catalytic performance increased to 14% relative to free CPO in solution. The use of more acidic casting buffers (ph 4.5 or 5.5 instead of 6.5) resulted in a more porous silica host reaching up to 18% relative activity

  1. Tocotrienol Rich Palm Oil Extract Is More Effective Than Pure Tocotrienols at Improving Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in the Presence of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saher F. Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative endothelial dysfunction is a critical initiator of vascular disease. Vitamin E is an effective antioxidant but attempts to use it to treat vascular disorders have been disappointing. This study investigated whether tocotrienols, the less abundant components of vitamin E compared to tocopherols, might be more effective at preserving endothelial function. Superoxide generated by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase or rat aorta was measured using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. The effect of α-tocopherol, α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols and a tocotrienol rich palm oil extract (tocomin on levels of superoxide was assessed. Endothelial function in rat aorta was assessed in the presence of the auto-oxidant pyrogallol. Whilst all of the compounds displayed antioxidant activity, the tocotrienols were more effective when superoxide was produced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase whereas tocomin and α-tocopherol were more effective in the isolated aorta. Tocomin and α-tocopherol restored endothelial function in the presence of oxidant stress but α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols were ineffective. The protective effect of tocomin was replicated when the tocotrienols were present with, but not without, α-tocopherol. Tocotrienol rich tocomin is more effective than α-tocopherol at reducing oxidative stress and restoring endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat aortae and although α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols effectively scavenged superoxide, they did not improve endothelial function.

  2. Tocotrienol Rich Palm Oil Extract Is More Effective Than Pure Tocotrienols at Improving Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in the Presence of Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saher F.; Woodman, Owen L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative endothelial dysfunction is a critical initiator of vascular disease. Vitamin E is an effective antioxidant but attempts to use it to treat vascular disorders have been disappointing. This study investigated whether tocotrienols, the less abundant components of vitamin E compared to tocopherols, might be more effective at preserving endothelial function. Superoxide generated by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase or rat aorta was measured using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. The effect of α-tocopherol, α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols and a tocotrienol rich palm oil extract (tocomin) on levels of superoxide was assessed. Endothelial function in rat aorta was assessed in the presence of the auto-oxidant pyrogallol. Whilst all of the compounds displayed antioxidant activity, the tocotrienols were more effective when superoxide was produced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase whereas tocomin and α-tocopherol were more effective in the isolated aorta. Tocomin and α-tocopherol restored endothelial function in the presence of oxidant stress but α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols were ineffective. The protective effect of tocomin was replicated when the tocotrienols were present with, but not without, α-tocopherol. Tocotrienol rich tocomin is more effective than α-tocopherol at reducing oxidative stress and restoring endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat aortae and although α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols effectively scavenged superoxide, they did not improve endothelial function. PMID:26075031

  3. Production and partial purification of tannase from Aspergillus ficuum Gim 3.6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wan-liang; Zhao, Fen-fen; Ye, Qin; Hu, Zhen-xing; Yan, Dong; Hou, Jie; Yang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    A novel fungal strain, Aspergillus ficuum Gim 3.6, was evaluated for its tannase-producing capability in a wheat bran-based solid-state fermentation. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis revealed that the strain was able to degrade tannic acid to gallic acid and pyrogallol during the fermentation process. Quantitation of enzyme activity demonstrated that this strain was capable of producing a relatively high yield of extracellular tannase. Single-factor optimization of process parameters resulted in high yield of tannase after 60 hr of incubation at a pH of 5.0 at 30°C, 1 mL of inoculum size, and 1:1 solid-liquid ratio in the presence of 2.0% (w/v) tannic acid as inducer. The potential of aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) for the purification of tannase was investigated. Influence of various parameters such as phase-forming salt, molecular weight of polyethylene glycol (PEG), pH, and stability ratio on tannase partition and purification was studied. In all the systems, the target enzyme was observed to preferentially partition to the PEG-rich top phase, and the best result of purification (2.74-fold) with an enzyme activity recovery of 77.17% was obtained in the system containing 17% (w/w) sodium citrate and 18.18% (w/w) PEG1000, at pH 7.0.

  4. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10 4  s -1 subunit -1 at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  5. Effect of Hydro Alcoholic Ginger Extracts on the Body Weight, Testis Weight and Spermatogenesis in Male Rats Undergoing Chemotherapy with Cyclophosphamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Sharifi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cyclophosphamide is used as an anti cancer medicine in chemotherapy. This is an alkalizing medicine and causes the binding of DNA strands, breaking of DNA and control of protein synthesis and RNA. The side effects of this medicine include lack of appetite, nausea, reduction in activity of sexual lymph nodes, causing amenorrhea, azoospermia and oligospermia. Ginger includes many compounds, some of which are shogaols, gingerols, pyrogallols and sesquiterpenes. Ginger has anti nauseating, anti cancer, anti oxidant effects and eliminates free radicals. This medicine is used along with cyclophosphamide to reduce its destructive side effects in the body. Methods: For 21 days, the rats were fed with ginger and cyclophosphamide. After 21 days, the animals were weighed and rendered unconscious. Their testes were removed and tissue samples were provided from their testes. Results: The results showed that cyclophosphamide alone reduces body weight, testes weight and spermatogenesis as compared to the control group. In other experimental groups that were fed with ginger and cyclophosphamide, increased dosage of ginger increased the body weight, the testes weight and spermatogenesis in comparison to the other experimental groups. Conclusion: It seems that compounds present in ginger are anti tumoral and control the production of active metabolites. Therefore, if administered together with Cyclophosphamide, it can be useful and effective in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  6. Effects of Ephedras Herba on the activity of antioxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Min Song

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidative effects of Ephedrae Herba extract. Methods : Total antioxidant status was examined by total antioxidant capacity(TAC, total antioxidant response(TAR against potent free radical reactions, total phenolic content, DPPH radical scavenging activities, and the inhibitory effect of the extract on lipid peroxidation in rat liver mitochondria. Results : 1. TAC and TAR of Ephedrae Herba extract at the concentration of 5mg/ml were 3.76 and 1.65 mM Trolox equivalents , respectively. 2. Total phenolic content of Ephedrae Herba extract at the concenuation of 5mg/ml was 3.52 mM gallic acid equivalent. 3. Concentration of Ephedrae Herba extract at which DPPH radical scavenging activity was inhibited by 50% was 0.46mg/ml as compared to 100% by pyrogallol solution as a reference. 4. Ephedrae Herba extract at the concentration of 2mg/ml significantly decreased TBARS concentration by 97%, showing that Ephedrae Herba extract prevented lipid peroxidation at the low concentration. Conclusion : Thus antioxidant effects of Ephedrae Herba extract appear to be due to, at least in part, the prevention from free radicalsinduced oxidation, followed by inhibition of lipid peroxidation

  7. Phytochemical Characteristics, Free Radical Scavenging Activities, and Neuroprotection of Five Medicinal Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Lin Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine phytochemical characteristics, chemiluminescence antioxidant capacities, and neuroprotective effects on PC12 cells for methanol extracts of Spatholobus suberectus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Alpinia officinarum, Drynaria fortunei, and Crataegus pinnatifida. The C. pinnatifida extract (CPE afforded the greatest yield and total phenolic content. The S. suberectus extract (SSE yielded the greatest total flavonoid content. The U. rhynchophylla extract (URE produced the greatest total tannin content, and the A. officinarum extract (AOE produced the greatest total triterpenoid content. The D. fortunei extract, assayed using horseradish peroxidase-luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and AOE using pyrogallol-luminol assay each exhibited better antioxidant activity than the L-ascorbic acid and 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid did. The CPE, SSE, and URE presented neurogrowth effects and neuroprotective activities on H2O2-induced PC12 cell death at 0.5–5.0 μg/mL. The CPE represents a promising medicinal plant source for the treatment of H2O2-induced neurodegenerative disease, because of its useful phytochemical characteristics.

  8. Phytochemical Characteristics, Free Radical Scavenging Activities, and Neuroprotection of Five Medicinal Plant Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Lin; Lin, Che San; Lai, Guia Hung

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine phytochemical characteristics, chemiluminescence antioxidant capacities, and neuroprotective effects on PC12 cells for methanol extracts of Spatholobus suberectus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Alpinia officinarum, Drynaria fortunei, and Crataegus pinnatifida. The C. pinnatifida extract (CPE) afforded the greatest yield and total phenolic content. The S. suberectus extract (SSE) yielded the greatest total flavonoid content. The U. rhynchophylla extract (URE) produced the greatest total tannin content, and the A. officinarum extract (AOE) produced the greatest total triterpenoid content. The D. fortunei extract, assayed using horseradish peroxidase-luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and AOE using pyrogallol-luminol assay each exhibited better antioxidant activity than the L-ascorbic acid and 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid did. The CPE, SSE, and URE presented neurogrowth effects and neuroprotective activities on H2O2-induced PC12 cell death at 0.5–5.0 μg/mL. The CPE represents a promising medicinal plant source for the treatment of H2O2-induced neurodegenerative disease, because of its useful phytochemical characteristics. PMID:21845204

  9. Purification and partial biochemical characterization of polyphenol oxidase from mango (Mangifera indica cv. Manila).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Orozco, Gisela; Marrufo-Hernández, Norma A; Sampedro, José G; Nájera, Hugo

    2014-10-08

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an enzyme widely distributed in the plant kingdom that has been detected in most fruits and vegetables. PPO was extracted and purified from Manila mango (Mangifera indica), and its biochemical properties were studied. PPO was purified 216-fold by hydrophobic interaction and ion exchange chromatography. PPO was purified to homogeneity, and the estimated PPO molecular weight (MW) by SDS-PAGE was ≈31.5 kDa. However, a MW of 65 kDa was determined by gel filtration, indicating a dimeric structure for the native PPO. The isolated PPO showed the highest affinity to pyrogallol (Km = 2.77 mM) followed by 4-methylcatechol (Km = 3.14 mM) and catechol (Km = 15.14 mM). The optimum pH for activity was 6.0. PPO was stable in the temperature range of 20-70 °C. PPO activity was completely inhibited by tropolone, ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulfite, and kojic acid at 0.1 mM.

  10. Characterization and cloning of laccase gene from Hericium coralloides NBRC 7716 suitable for production of epitheaflagallin 3-O-gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuya; Takagi, Shinya; Miki, Asami; Kurokawa, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Epitheaflagallin 3-O-gallate (ETFGg) is a minor polyphenol found in black tea extract, which has good physiological functions. It is synthesized from epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) with gallic acid via laccase oxidation. Various basidiomycetes and fungi were screened to find a suitable laccase for the production of ETFGg. A basidiomycete, Hericium coralloides NBRC 7716, produced an appropriate extracellular laccase. The purified laccase produced twice the level of ETFGg compared with commercially available laccase from Trametes sp. The enzyme, termed Lcc2, is a monomeric protein with an apparent molecular mass of 67.2 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of Lcc2 is quite different from laccase isolated from the fruiting bodies of Hericium. Lcc2 showed similar substrate specificity to known laccases and could oxidize various phenolic substrates, including pyrogallol, gallic acid, and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol. The full-length lcc2 gene was obtained by PCR using degenerate primers, which were designed based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of Lcc2 and conserved copper-binding sites of laccases, and 5'-, and 3'-RACE PCR with mRNA. The Lcc2 gene showed homology with Lentinula edodes laccase (sharing 77% amino acid identity with Lcc6). We successfully produced extracellular Lcc2 using a heterologous expression system with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover, it was confirmed that the recombinant laccase generates similar levels of ETFGg as the native enzyme. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The oxidation of organic additives in the positive vanadium electrolyte and its effect on the performance of vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tam D.; Whitehead, Adam; Scherer, Günther G.; Wai, Nyunt; Oo, Moe O.; Bhattarai, Arjun; Chandra, Ghimire P.; Xu, Zhichuan J.

    2016-12-01

    Despite many desirable properties, the vanadium redox flow battery is limited, in the maximum operation temperature that can be continuously endured, before precipitation begins in the positive electrolyte. Many additives have been proposed to improve the thermal stability of the charged positive electrolyte. However, we have found that the apparent stability, revealed in laboratory testing, is often simply an artifact of the test method and arises from the oxidation of the additive, with corresponding partial reduction of V(V) to V(IV). This does not improve the stability of the electrolyte in an operating system. Here, we examined the oxidation of some typical organic additives with carboxyl, alcohol, and multi-functional groups, in sulfuric acid solutions containing V(V). The UV-vis measurements and titration results showed that many compounds reduced the state-of-charge (SOC) of vanadium electrolyte, for example, by 27.8, 88.5, and 81.9% with the addition of 1%wt of EDTA disodium salt, pyrogallol, and ascorbic acid, respectively. The cell cycling also indicated the effect of organic additives on the cell performance, with significant reduction in the usable charge capacity. In addition, a standard screening method for thermally stable additives was introduced, to quickly screen suitable additives for the positive vanadium electrolyte.

  12. Secretory expression of the non-secretory-type Lentinula edodes laccase by Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Akira; Kikuchi, Sayaka; Nakagawa, Yuko; Sakamoto, Yuichi; Sato, Toshitsugu

    2009-01-01

    The shiitake mushroom, Lentinula edodes, has an extracelluar secretory-type laccase, Lcc1, and a fruiting-body-accumulation-type laccase, Lcc4. We previously reported the production of Lcc1 by plant cells, but had difficulty producing Lcc4. Here, we report the production of Lcc1 and Lcc4 by Aspergillus oryzae and the extracellular secretory production of Lcc4 using a modified secretion signal peptide (SP) from Lcc1. Sp-Lcc4 produced by A. oryzae had biochemical activities similar to Lcc4 produced by L. edodes. Lcc1 did not react with beta-(3,4-dihydroxyphenol) alanine (DOPA), but Lcc4 from L. edodes and A. oryzae could oxidize DOPA. K(M) values for the substrates 2,2'-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazolinsulfonate), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, guaiacol, pyrogallol, and catechol were similar for Lcc4 and Sp-Lcc4. In conclusion, a non-secretory-type fungal laccase is secreted into the culture media with its original enzymatic properties by exploiting modified secretory signal peptide. 2008 Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of fresh and processed white cauliflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Fouad A; Ali, Rehab F M

    2013-01-01

    Brassica species are very rich in health-promoting phytochemicals, including phenolic compounds, vitamin C, and minerals. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different blanching (i.e., water and steam) and cooking (i.e., water boiling, steam boiling, microwaving, and stir-frying) methods on the nutrient components, phytochemical contents (i.e., polyphenols, carotenoids, flavonoid, and ascorbic acid), antioxidant activity measured by DPPH assay, and phenolic profiles of white cauliflower. Results showed that water boiling and water blanching processes had a great effect on the nutrient components and caused significant losses of dry matter, protein, and mineral and phytochemical contents. However, steam treatments (blanching and cooking), stir-frying, and microwaving presented the lowest reductions. Methanolic extract of fresh cauliflower had significantly the highest antioxidant activity (68.91%) followed by the extracts of steam-blanched, steam-boiled, stir-fried, and microwaved cauliflower 61.83%, 59.15%, 58.93%, and 58.24%, respectively. HPLC analysis revealed that the predominant phenolics of raw cauliflower were protocatechuic acid (192.45), quercetin (202.4), pyrogallol (18.9), vanillic acid (11.90), coumaric acid (6.94), and kaempferol (25.91) mg/100 g DW, respectively.

  14. QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF MAIN GROUPS OF SUBSTANCES IN GRANULES ON THE BASIS OF MEDICINAL VEGETABLE RAW MATERIAL FOR TREATING GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiridonov S.V.

    2014-12-01

    methanol - ethyl acetate - acetic acid environment and calculation of flavonoid content as hyperoside recalculating. For the quantitative determination of polyphenols was used the methods of State Pharmacopoeia of Ukraine "Determination of tannins in herbal drugs" or European Pharmacopoeia «Determination of tannins in herbal drugs». The method is based on the color reaction of polyphenolic substances, which including in the plant raw material, with phosphomolybdic-tungsten reagent and measuring the optical density of the resulting solution at the wavelength of 760 nm. The content of total polyphenols in the drug was determined as pyrogallol recalculating. Conclusions 1. The determination of quantitative content of biologically active substances in granules based on medicinal plant raw material for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract diseases is carried out. 2. In the studied sample of granules contents of flavonoids, calculated as hyperoside, which equal to 0.43% and the polyphenols, calculated as pyrogallol, which equal to 0.44% has been established. 3. The data obtained can be used to develop the normative and technical documentation.

  15. Prospecting Russula senecis: a delicacy among the tribes of West Bengal

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    Somanjana Khatua

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Russula senecis, a worldwide distributed mushroom, is exclusively popular among the tribal communities of West Bengal for food purposes. The present study focuses on its reliable taxonomic identification through macro- and micro-morphological features, DNA barcoding, confirmation of its systematic placement by phylogenetic analyses, myco-chemicals and functional activities. For the first time, the complete Internal Transcribed Spacer region of R. senecis has been sequenced and its taxonomic position within subsection Foetentinae under series Ingratae of the subgen. Ingratula is confirmed through phylogenetic analysis. For exploration of its medicinal properties, dried basidiocarps were subjected for preparation of a heat stable phenol rich extract (RusePre using water and ethanol as solvent system. The antioxidant activity was evaluated through hydroxyl radical scavenging (EC50 5 µg/ml, chelating ability of ferrous ion (EC50 0.158 mg/ml, DPPH radical scavenging (EC50 1.34 mg/ml, reducing power (EC50 2.495 mg/ml and total antioxidant activity methods (13.44 µg ascorbic acid equivalent/mg of extract. RusePre exhibited antimicrobial potentiality against Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, different parameters were tested to investigate its chemical composition, which revealed the presence of appreciable quantity of phenolic compounds, along with carotenoids and ascorbic acid. HPLC-UV fingerprint indicated the probable existence of at least 13 phenolics, of which 10 were identified (pyrogallol > kaempferol > quercetin > chlorogenic acid > ferulic acid, cinnamic acid > vanillic acid > salicylic acid > p-coumaric acid > gallic acid. Result from the present work suggests that the fraction, RusePre, may open novel prospect as a functional ingredient in antioxidant supplements and in drugs to treat infectious disease.

  16. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the properties of carbon/nickel nanocomposites prepared by sol–gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, N. Ben, E-mail: Nabil.Benmansour@fsg.rnu.tn [Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Gabès University, Faculty of Sciences in Gabès, Gabès (Tunisia); Najeh, I.; Mansouri, S. [Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Gabès University, Faculty of Sciences in Gabès, Gabès (Tunisia); El Mir, L. [Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Gabès University, Faculty of Sciences in Gabès, Gabès (Tunisia); Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), College of Sciences, Department of Physics, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of nickel oxide nanoparticles in carbon structures. • Presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) around Ni nanoparticles for the sample treated at high pyrolysis temperature. • DC conductivity exhibited the presence of conduction percolation phenomenon and the dominance of conduction model 3D-GVRH in the studied materials. • From AC conductance PF/Ni nanocomposites have two behaviors: semiconductor and metal, depending on the pyrolysis temperature. • Appearance of a negative differential resistance (NDR) at room temperature in the sample treated at 600 °C. - Abstract: Carbon–nickel nanocomposites (C/Ni) were prepared by sol–gel method after the incorporation of nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles in organic matrix based on pyrogallol-formaldehyde (PF). The nanocomposites heated under inert atmosphere have been characterized by various techniques such as X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and electrical analysis. The XRD spectra exhibited the presence of NiO or metallic Ni phase in amorphous carbon matrix at low pyrolysis temperature, while at 1000 °C the graphite structure line was observed. The TEM images indicate the presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) around Ni nanoparticles for the sample treated at high pyrolysis temperature. The AC conductance shows that our nanocomposites have two behaviors: semiconductor and metal, depending on the pyrolysis temperature. The voltage–current V(I) characteristics of the compound show two different regions: an Ohmic region at low current and a negative differential resistance (NDR) region at higher current. This switching phenomenal behavior has been explained by an electrothermal model.

  17. Stability of vitamin E content of {gamma}-irradiated biscuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taipina, Magda S.; Mastro, Nelida L. del [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: nlmastro@ipen.br; magtaipina@ig.com.br; Lamardo, Leda C.A. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Quimica Biologica]. E-mail: llamardo@ial.sp.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    The technology of food irradiation is seen by the industry as a means of ensuring food safety, since it exposes foods to ionizing radiation that kills insects, moulds and bacteria. The need to eliminate bacterial pathogens from read-to-eat food products must always be balanced with the maintenance of product quality. In addition to determining the effective ionizing radiation doses required for pathogen elimination the effects of irradiation on product chemistry, nutritional value and quality must also been determined. Vitamin E ({alpha}-tocopherol) is one of the most potent natural lipophilic antioxidants commonly present in the human diet. As it is considered a free radical scavenger there is a growing concern that irradiation might reduce the vitamin E content of food products prepared with ingredients rich in any of the dietary source of the vitamin. This work describes the effects of ionizing radiation on the vitamin E content of some biscuits commercially found in the market. Three lots of biscuits were used. Irradiation was performed in a {sup 60}Co Gammacell 220 source, dose rate of about 3.5 kGy/h at doses of 1 kGy and 3 kGy. For vitamin E determination samples were saponified with ethanolic potassium hydroxide in the presence of pyrogallol, and the tocopherols were extracted with petroleum ether. The absorbance was measured at 520 nm. From the obtained results it is possible to conclude that there was a notorious stability of the vitamin content of the biscuits submitted to gamma-irradiation at the assayed doses. (author)

  18. Determinação de compostos fenólicos em amostras comerciais de chás verde e preto - Camellia sinensis (L. Kuntze, Theaceae = Determination of phenolic componds in commercial samples of green and black tea - Camellia sinensis (L. Kuntze, Theaceae

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    Airton Vicente Pereira

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available O chá de Camellia sinensis é rico em compostos fenólicos antioxidantes, responsáveis por efeitos benéficos à saúde humana. Neste trabalho, foram realizadas as determinações da concentração de fenóis totais e flavonoides de sete amostras comerciais dos chás preto e verde. Os teores de fenóis totais variaram de 4,80 a 26,60 mg de pirogalol g-1 de amostra e os de flavonoides, de 0,46 a 1,10 mg de quercetina g-1 de amostra. A análise anatômica do conteúdo das amostras permitiu caracterizar a autenticidade dos produtos,observando-se os marcadores anatômicos típicos da espécie (estômatos anomocíticos, tricomas tectores unicelulares, mesofilo dorsiventral, drusas de oxalato de cálcio e esclereides.The tea from Camellia sinensis (green tea and black tea is rich in antioxidant phenolic compounds, responsible for beneficial effects to human health. In this work, determinations were carried out on theconcentration of total phenols and flavonoids in seven commercial samples of black tea and green tea. The samples presented concentrations of total phenols varying between 4.80 and 26.60 mg of pyrogallol g-1 and concentrations of flavonoids from 0.46 to 1.10 mg of quercetin g-1. With the purpose of characterizing the authenticity of the product contained in the sachets, the samples were fixed for histological studies. The samples presented the typical anatomical markers of the species (anomocytic stomata, unicellular non-glandulartrichomes, dorsiventral mesophyll, calcium oxalate druses and sclereids.

  19. Phytochemical Analysis and Antimicrobial Activities of Methanolic Extracts of Leaf, Stem and Root from Different Varieties of Labisa pumila Benth

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    Ehsan Karimi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A local herb, Kacip Fatimah, is famous amongst Malay women for its uses in parturition; however, its phytochemical contents have not been fully documented. Therefore, a study was performed to evaluate the phenolics, flavonoids, and total saponin contents, and antibacterial and antifungal properties of the leaf, stem and root of three varieties of Labisia pumila Benth. Total saponins were found to be higher in the leaves of all three varieties, compared to the roots and stems. Leaves of var. pumila exhibited significantly higher total saponin content than var. alata and lanceolata, with values of 56.4, 43.6 and 42.3 mg diosgenin equivalent/g dry weight, respectively. HPLC analyses of phenolics and flavonoids in all three varieties revealed the presence of gallic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, and myricetin in all plant parts. Higher levels of flavonoids (rutin, quercitin, kaempferol were observed in var. pumila compared with alata and lanceolata, whereas higher accumulation of phenolics (gallic acid, pyrogallol was recorded in var. alata, followed by pumila and lanceolata. Antibacterial activities of leaf, stem and root extracts of all varieties determined against both Gram positive (Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis B145, Bacillus cereus B43, Staphylococcus aureus S1431 and Gram negative (Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumonia K36, Escherichia coli E256, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PI96 pathogens showed that crude methanolic extracts are active against these bacteria at low concentrations, albeit with lower antibacterial activity compared to kanamycin used as the control. Antifungal activity of methanolic extracts of all plant parts against Fusarium sp., Candida sp. and Mucor using the agar diffusion disc exhibited moderate to appreciable antifungal activities compared to streptomycin used as positive control.

  20. Effects of Puerariae Radix extract on the activity of antioxidant

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    Young-Joon Eun

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The objective of this study was to investigate the antioxidative effects of Puerariae Radix extract. Method : Total antioxidant capacity (TAC, Total antioxidant response (TAR, Total phenolic content, Reactive oxygen species (ROS, 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging activities, lipid peroxidation were examined. Result : Total antioxidant status was examined by total antioxidant capacity(TAC and total antioxidant response(TAR against potent free radical reactions. TAC and TAR of Puerariae Radix extract at the concentration of 5 mg/㎖ were 2.02 and 1.50 mM Trolox equivalents, respectively. Total phenolic content of Puerariae Radix extract at the concentration of 5mg/㎖ was 2.29 mM gallic acid equivalent. Concentration of Puerariae Radix extract at which DPPH radical scavenging activity was inhibited by 50% was 5.91 mg/㎖ as compared to 100% by pyrogallol solution as a reference. The inhibitory effect of the extract on lipid peroxidation was examined using rat liver mitochondria induced by FeSO4/ascorbic acid. Puerariae Radix extract at the concentration of 1 mg/㎖ slightly but significantly decreased TBARS concentration. The extract further prevented lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of Puerariae Radix extract on reactive oxygen species (ROS generation was examined using cell-free system induced by hydrogen peroxide/FeSO4. Addition of 1 mg/㎖ of Puerariae Radix extract significantly reduced dichloroflurescein (DCF fluorescence. The extract caused concentration-dependent attenuation of the increase in DCF fluorescence, indicating that the extract significantly prevented ROS generation in vitro. Thus antioxidant effects of Puerariae Radix extract seem to be due to, at least in part, the prevention from free radicals-induced oxidation, followed by inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Conclusion : As a result, Puerariae Radix seems to have antioxitative effect and antioxidant compount.

  1. The Cutoff Level for Urine Protein in Urine Immunofixation Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Curek, Gulten; Eren, Esin; Aydin, Ozgur; Yilmaz, Necat

    2015-01-01

    Immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) maintains its importance in diagnosing monoclonal gammopathies. In particular, urine IFE detects free light chains (FLC) in urine samples even at low concentrations and offers higher sensitivity compared to serum electrophoresis and serum IFE. The aim of the present study was to determine the place and significance of quantitative urinary protein measurement before IFE in interpreting the results of subsequent IFE and to determine the most appropriate protein concentrations for the appearance of bands. The records of a total of 600 patients, who underwent screening for Bence Jones proteinuria using IFE on 24-hour urine, were retrospectively reviewed. Urine IFE was performed using Helena SAS-I and SAS-I devices. The total protein concentration in the urine was quantitatively determined by the Pyrogallol red method, and the urine albumin level was determined using the immunoturbidimetric method. These analyses were measured on an Olympus/Beckmann AU5800. The evaluation of IFE results revealed that 311 patients had normal results, 108 patients had monoclonal bands, five patients had biclonal bands, 28 had polyclonal bands, and 148 patients had various degrees of proteinuria. ROC curves were created in order to determine the most appropriate urinary protein and albumin levels to observe bands in IFE. Accordingly, urine baseline protein level (mg/dL) showed the highest AUC value (cutoff value: 19.4 mg/dL, sensitivity: 92%, specificity: 98.2%, AUC: 0.972). The present study showed that quantitative protein measurement before IFE eliminated the disadvantages associated with the IFE method and its interpretation.

  2. Changes of turbidity during the phenol oxidation by photo-Fenton treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Natalia; Camarero, Luis M; Lomas, Jose M; Perez, Jonatan

    2014-11-01

    Turbidity presented by phenol solutions oxidized with Fenton reagent shows the tendency of a first order intermediate kinetics. Thus, turbidity can be considered a representative parameter of the presence of intermediate oxidation species, which are generated along the decomposition of toxic and reluctant contaminants, such as phenol. Moreover, that parameter presents a linear dependence with the catalyst dosage, but is also determined by the initial contaminant load. When analyzing the oxidation mechanism of phenol, it is found that the maximum turbidity occurs when the treatment is carried out at oxidant to phenol molar ratios R = 4.0. These oxidation conditions correspond to the presence of a reaction mixture mainly composed of dihydroxylated rings, precursors of the muconic acid formation. The oxidation via "para" comprises the formation reactions of charge transfer complexes (quinhydrone), between the para-dihydroxylated intermediates (hydroquinone) and the para-substituted quinones (p-benzoquinone), which are quite unstable and reactive species, quickly decomposed into hydroxyhydroquinones. Working with oxidant ratios up to R = 6.0, the maximum observed value of turbidity in the oxidized solutions is kept almost constant. It is found that, in these conditions, the pyrogallol formation is maximal, what is generated through the degradation of ortho-species (catechol and ortho-benzoquinone) and meta-substituted (resorcinol). Operating with ratios over R = 6.0, these intermediates are decomposed into biodegradable acids, generating lower turbidity in the solution. Then, the residual turbidity is a function of the molar ratio of the ferrous ions vs. moles of oxidant utilized in the essays, that lets to estimate the stoichiometric dosage of catalyst as 20 mg/L at pH = 3.0, whereas operating in stoichiometric conditions, R = 14.0, the residual turbidity of water results almost null.

  3. Bioactive compounds, antioxidant potential, and hepatoprotective activity of sea cucumber (Holothuria atra) against thioacetamide intoxication in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmat, Amr Y; Said, Mahmoud M; Soliman, Amel A; El-Masry, Khaled S H; Badiea, Elham Abdel

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the active phenolic compounds in the mixed extract of sea cucumber (Holothuria atra) body wall by high-performance liquid chromatography and an assessment of its hepatoprotective activity against thioacetamide-induced liver fibrosis in rats. Female Swiss albino rats were divided into four groups: normal controls; oral administration of a sea cucumber mixed extract (14.4 mg/kg of body weight) on days 2, 4, and 6 weekly for 8 consecutive weeks; intoxication with thioacetamide (200 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneally) on days 2 and 6 weekly for 8 wk; and oral administration of a sea cucumber extract and then intoxication with thioacetamide 2 h later for 8 wk. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the sea cucumber mixed extract revealed the presence of some phenolic components, such as chlorogenic acid, pyrogallol, rutin, coumaric acid, catechin, and ascorbic acid. In vitro studies have shown that the extract has a high scavenging activity for the nitric oxide radical, a moderate iron-chelating activity, and a weak inhibitory effect of lipid peroxidation. The subchronic oral administration of sea cucumber extract to the rats did not show any toxic side effects but increased hepatic superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. The coadministration of sea cucumber extract and thioacetamide (protection modality) normalized serum direct bilirubin, alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, hepatic malondialdehyde, and hydroxyproline concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activities. In addition, the histologic examination of liver sections from the protection group that were stained with hematoxylin and eosin showed substantial attenuation of the degenerative cellular changes and regressions in liver fibrosis and necrosis induced by the thioacetamide intoxication. Sea cucumber mixed extract contains physiologically active phenolic compounds with antioxidant activity, which afforded a potential hepatoprotective activity

  4. Chemical Profile and Biological Activity of Casimiroa Edulis Non-Edible Fruit`s Parts

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    Wafaa Mostafa Elkady

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the non-edible fruit parts of Casimiroa edulis Llave et were evaluated for their active constituents and their potential as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity. Methods: Fruits peel (FP and seeds kernel (SK of Casimiroa edulis Llave et Lex. were extracted successively with hexane and then methanol. Fatty acids were prepared from hexane extracts and identified by GC. Total flavonoid, phenolic acids and tannins contents in methanol extracts were determined by UV spectrophotometer and identified by HPLC. Antioxidant, in-vitro anti-inflammatory activity and antitumor effect against Caco-2 cell line were determined. Results: GC analysis of hexane extracts showed that oleic acid (47.00% was the major unsaturated fatty acids in both extracts while lignoceric acid (15.49% is the most abundant saturated fatty acid in (FP. Total phenolic, flavonoid and tannin contents in (FP & (SK methanol extracts were; 37.5±1.5, 10.79±0.66 and 22.28±0.23 for (FP; 53.5±1.5mg/g, 14.44±0.32 mg/g; and 53.73±3.58 mg/g for (SK respectively. HPLC analysis of methanol extract revealed that; the major phenolic compound was pyrogallol in (FP and p-hydroxybenzoic acid in (SK, the major flavonoid was luteolin 6-arabinose-8-glucose in (FP and acacetin in (SK. Conclusion: This study showed that non-edible parts of C. edulis fruit is a rich source of different phenolic compounds and fatty acids which has great antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities; that could be used as a natural source in pharmaceutical industry.

  5. Hydroxybenzoic Acid Derivatives as Dual-Target Ligands: Mitochondriotropic Antioxidants and Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Catarina; Cagide, Fernando; Teixeira, José; Amorim, Ricardo; Sequeira, Lisa; Mesiti, Francesco; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Remião, Fernando; Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Oliveira, Paulo J; Borges, Fernanda

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial age-related disease associated with oxidative stress (OS) and impaired cholinergic transmission. Accordingly, targeting mitochondrial OS and restoring cholinergic transmission can be an effective therapeutic strategy toward AD. Herein, we report for the first time dual-target hydroxybenzoic acid (HBAc) derivatives acting as mitochondriotropic antioxidants and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors. The studies were performed with two mitochondriotropic antioxidants AntiOxBEN 1 (catechol derivative), and AntiOxBEN 2 (pyrogallol derivative) and compounds 15-18 , which have longer spacers. Compounds AntiOxBEN 1 and 15 , with a shorter carbon chain spacer (six- and eight-carbon) were shown to be potent antioxidants and BChE inhibitors (IC 50 = 85 ± 5 and 106 ± 5 nM, respectively), while compounds 17 and 18 with a 10-carbon chain were more effective AChE inhibitors (IC 50 = 7.7 ± 0.4 and 7.2 ± 0.5 μM, respectively). Interestingly, molecular modeling data pointed toward bifunctional ChEs inhibitors. The most promising ChE inhibitors acted by a non-competitive mechanism. In general, with exception of compounds 15 and 17 , no cytotoxic effects were observed in differentiated human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) and human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells, while Aβ-induced cytotoxicity was significantly prevented by the new dual-target HBAc derivatives. Overall, due to its BChE selectivity, favorable toxicological profile, neuroprotective activity and drug-like properties, which suggested blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, the mitochondriotropic antioxidant AntiOxBEN 1 is considered a valid lead candidate for the development of dual acting drugs for AD and other mitochondrial OS-related diseases.

  6. Stability of vitamin E content of γ-irradiated biscuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taipina, Magda S.; Mastro, Nelida L. del; Lamardo, Leda C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The technology of food irradiation is seen by the industry as a means of ensuring food safety, since it exposes foods to ionizing radiation that kills insects, moulds and bacteria. The need to eliminate bacterial pathogens from read-to-eat food products must always be balanced with the maintenance of product quality. In addition to determining the effective ionizing radiation doses required for pathogen elimination the effects of irradiation on product chemistry, nutritional value and quality must also been determined. Vitamin E (α-tocopherol) is one of the most potent natural lipophilic antioxidants commonly present in the human diet. As it is considered a free radical scavenger there is a growing concern that irradiation might reduce the vitamin E content of food products prepared with ingredients rich in any of the dietary source of the vitamin. This work describes the effects of ionizing radiation on the vitamin E content of some biscuits commercially found in the market. Three lots of biscuits were used. Irradiation was performed in a 60 Co Gammacell 220 source, dose rate of about 3.5 kGy/h at doses of 1 kGy and 3 kGy. For vitamin E determination samples were saponified with ethanolic potassium hydroxide in the presence of pyrogallol, and the tocopherols were extracted with petroleum ether. The absorbance was measured at 520 nm. From the obtained results it is possible to conclude that there was a notorious stability of the vitamin content of the biscuits submitted to gamma-irradiation at the assayed doses. (author)

  7. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-06-01

    The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2 (-) scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays. Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2(-) scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3',4'-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form.

  8. Phytochemical study of phenolic compounds of labrador tea (Lédum palústre L.

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    Валентина Петровна Гапоненко

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This work is devoted a phytochemical study of biologically active substances in herb of Labrador Tea (Lédum palústre L., as well as investigation of the possibility of complex use of raw materials in order to create on its basis new herbal medicines.Methods. The object of the study served as the herb Labrador Tea. Separation of isolated substances was performed by adsorption and partition chromatography on various adsorbents. The structure of the isolated compounds was determined based on physicochemical methods: paper (PC and the thin layer (TLC chromatography, UV, IR and NMR spectroscopy in comparison with the original valid standards of flavonoids. Acid hydrolys was used for the determination of the flavonoid aglycone composition. The content of total flavonoids was determined by differential spectrophotometry at a wavelength of 412 nm from the reaction with aluminum chloride based on the hyperoside-standard (Ukrainian scientific Pharmacopoeial center for quality of medicines (Pharmacopoeial center, Kharkоv.Results. During this study we found more than 40 of phenolic compounds and identified 31compounds. The phytochemical analysis showed the presence of flavonols (11 compounds, catechins (5. Hydroxycinnamic acids represented by caffeic, ferulic, chlorogenic acids. Besides that, it were found phenolic glycoside arbutin, coumarins - coumarin, umbelliferon, scopoletin, esculetin and esculin, tannins – metyl gallate, pyrogallol.Conclusions. The following biologically active substances were defined for the first time: flavonoids – 5-methyl-kaempferol, avicularin, polistahozid, quercitrin; coumarins – esculetin, esculin; as well as hydroxycinnamic acids – ferulic, chlorogenic, neochlorogenic of Labrador Tea. The obtained data justify the prospectivefor creation of new and effective herbal medicines from Labrador Tea

  9. Adsorption recovery of thorium(IV) by Myrica rubra tannin and larch tannin immobilized onto collagen fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuepin Liao; Li Li; Bi Shi

    2004-01-01

    Novel adsorbents which can concentrate Th(IV) in aqueous solution were prepared by immobilizing Myrica rubra tannin and larch tannin onto collagen fibre matrices. The adsorption capacities of the immobilized tannins to Th(IV) are related to temperature and pH value of the adsorption process. For example, when the initial concentration of Th(IV) was 116.0 mg x l -1 and the immobilized tannin was 100 mg, the adsorption capacities of immobilized Myrica rubra tannin and larch tannin were 55.98 mg Th(IV) x g -1 and 13.19 mg Th(IV) x g -1 , respectively at 303 K, and 73.67 mg Th(IV) x g -1 and 18.19 mg Th(IV) x g -1 at 323 K. It was also found that the higher adsorption capacity was obtained at higher pH value. The adsorption equilibrium data of the immobilized tannins for Th(IV) can be well fitted by the Langmuir model and the mechanism of the adsorption was found to be a chemical adsorption. In general, the adsorption capacity of immobilized Myrica rubra tannin to Th(IV) is significantly higher than that of immobilized larch tannin, probably due to the fact that the B ring of Myrica rubra tannin has a pyrogallol structure which has higher reaction activity with metal ions. The breakthrough point of the adsorption column of immobilized Myrica rubra tannin was at 33 bed volumes for the experimental system. The mass transfer coefficient of adsorption column determined by Adams-Bohart equation was 1.61 x 10 -4 l x mg -1 x min -1 . The adsorption column can be easily regenerated by 0.1 mol x l -1 HNO 3 solution, showing outstanding ability of concentrating Th(IV). (author)

  10. Robust superhydrophobic surface by nature-inspired polyphenol chemistry for effective oil-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yiming; Huang, Jingjing; Zhang, Shiyu; Wang, Yinghua; Gu, Shaojin; Cao, Genyang; Yang, Hongjun; Ye, Dezhan; Zhou, Yingshan; Xu, Weilin

    2018-05-01

    With the ever-increasing oil spillages, oil-water separation has attracted widespread concern in recent years. In this work, a nature-inspired polyphenol method has been developed to fabricate the durable superhydrophobic surfaces for the oil-water separation. Inspiring from the adhesion of polyphenol and reducing capacity of free catechol/pyrogallol groups in polyphenol, firstly, the simple immersion of commercial materials (melamine sponge, PET, and nonwoven cotton fabrics) in tannic acid (TA) solution allows to form a multifunctional coating on the surface of sponge or fabrics, which was used as reducing reagent to generate Ag nanoparticles (NPs). Then, decoration of 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecanethiol (PFDT) molecules produced superhydrophobic surfaces. The surface topological structure, chemical composition, and superhydrophobic property of the as-prepared surface are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and water contact angle (WCA) measurements. The WCAs of as-prepared sponge and fabrics were higher than 150°. The stability, absorption capacity, and recyclability of as-prepared sponge and fabrics were investigated. The as-prepared sponge demonstrates high oil/water selectivity and high absorption capacity (66-150 g/g) for a broad variety of oils and organic solvents, and was chemically resistant, robust against abrasion, and long-term durability in harsh environments. Most important of all, it can continuously separate various kinds of oils or organic pollutants from the surface of water. This study presents a facile strategy to fabricate superhydrophobic materials for continuous oil-water separation, displaying great potential in large-scale practical application.

  11. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the properties of carbon/nickel nanocomposites prepared by sol–gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, N. Ben; Najeh, I.; Mansouri, S.; El Mir, L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of nickel oxide nanoparticles in carbon structures. • Presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) around Ni nanoparticles for the sample treated at high pyrolysis temperature. • DC conductivity exhibited the presence of conduction percolation phenomenon and the dominance of conduction model 3D-GVRH in the studied materials. • From AC conductance PF/Ni nanocomposites have two behaviors: semiconductor and metal, depending on the pyrolysis temperature. • Appearance of a negative differential resistance (NDR) at room temperature in the sample treated at 600 °C. - Abstract: Carbon–nickel nanocomposites (C/Ni) were prepared by sol–gel method after the incorporation of nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles in organic matrix based on pyrogallol-formaldehyde (PF). The nanocomposites heated under inert atmosphere have been characterized by various techniques such as X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and electrical analysis. The XRD spectra exhibited the presence of NiO or metallic Ni phase in amorphous carbon matrix at low pyrolysis temperature, while at 1000 °C the graphite structure line was observed. The TEM images indicate the presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) around Ni nanoparticles for the sample treated at high pyrolysis temperature. The AC conductance shows that our nanocomposites have two behaviors: semiconductor and metal, depending on the pyrolysis temperature. The voltage–current V(I) characteristics of the compound show two different regions: an Ohmic region at low current and a negative differential resistance (NDR) region at higher current. This switching phenomenal behavior has been explained by an electrothermal model

  12. Hydroxybenzoic Acid Derivatives as Dual-Target Ligands: Mitochondriotropic Antioxidants and Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Oliveira

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a multifactorial age-related disease associated with oxidative stress (OS and impaired cholinergic transmission. Accordingly, targeting mitochondrial OS and restoring cholinergic transmission can be an effective therapeutic strategy toward AD. Herein, we report for the first time dual-target hydroxybenzoic acid (HBAc derivatives acting as mitochondriotropic antioxidants and cholinesterase (ChE inhibitors. The studies were performed with two mitochondriotropic antioxidants AntiOxBEN1 (catechol derivative, and AntiOxBEN2 (pyrogallol derivative and compounds 15–18, which have longer spacers. Compounds AntiOxBEN1 and 15, with a shorter carbon chain spacer (six- and eight-carbon were shown to be potent antioxidants and BChE inhibitors (IC50 = 85 ± 5 and 106 ± 5 nM, respectively, while compounds 17 and 18 with a 10-carbon chain were more effective AChE inhibitors (IC50 = 7.7 ± 0.4 and 7.2 ± 0.5 μM, respectively. Interestingly, molecular modeling data pointed toward bifunctional ChEs inhibitors. The most promising ChE inhibitors acted by a non-competitive mechanism. In general, with exception of compounds 15 and 17, no cytotoxic effects were observed in differentiated human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y and human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2 cells, while Aβ-induced cytotoxicity was significantly prevented by the new dual-target HBAc derivatives. Overall, due to its BChE selectivity, favorable toxicological profile, neuroprotective activity and drug-like properties, which suggested blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability, the mitochondriotropic antioxidant AntiOxBEN1 is considered a valid lead candidate for the development of dual acting drugs for AD and other mitochondrial OS-related diseases.

  13. Hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives as dual-target ligands: mitochondriotropic antioxidants and cholinesterase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Catarina; Cagide, Fernando; Teixeira, José; Amorim, Ricardo; Sequeira, Lisa; Mesiti, Francesco; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Remião, Fernando; Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Oliveira, Paulo J.; Borges, Fernanda

    2018-04-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a multifactorial age-related disease associated with oxidative stress (OS) and impaired cholinergic transmission. Accordingly, targeting mitochondrial OS and restoring cholinergic transmission can be an effective therapeutic strategy towards AD. Herein, we report for the first time dual-target hydroxybenzoic acid (HBAc) derivatives acting as mitochondriotropic antioxidants and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors. The studies were performed with two mitochondriotropic antioxidants AntiOxBEN1 (catechol derivative), and AntiOxBEN2 (pyrogallol derivative) and compounds 15-18, which have longer spacers. Compounds AntiOxBEN1 and 15, with a shorter carbon chain spacer (six- and eight-carbon) were shown to be potent antioxidants and BChE inhibitors (IC50 = 85 ± 5 and 106 ± 5 nM, respectively), while compounds 17 and 18 with a ten-carbon chain were more effective AChE inhibitors (IC50 = 7.7 ± 0.4 and 7.2 ± 0.5 nM, respectively). Interestingly, molecular modelling data pointed towards bifunctional ChEs inhibitors. The most promising ChE inhibitors acted by a non-competitive mechanism. In general, with exception of compounds 15 and 17, no cytotoxic effects were observed in differentiated human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) and human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells, while Αβ-induced cytotoxicity was significantly prevented by the new dual-target HBAc derivatives. Overall, due to its BChE selectivity, favourable toxicological profile, neuroprotective activity and drug-like properties, which suggested blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, the mitochondriotropic antioxidant AntiOxBEN1 is considered a valid lead candidate for the development of dual acting drugs for AD and other mitochondrial OS-related disease

  14. Chemical and Antimicrobial Analyses of Sideritis romana L. subsp. purpurea (Tal. ex Benth.) Heywood, an Endemic of the Western Balkan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadić, Vanja; Oliva, Alessandra; Božović, Mijat; Cipolla, Alessia; De Angelis, Massimiliano; Vullo, Vincenzo; Garzoli, Stefania; Ragno, Rino

    2017-08-23

    A comprehensive study on essential oil and different solvent extracts of Sideritis romana L. subsp. purpurea (Tal. ex Benth.) Heywood (Lamiaceae) from Montenegro is reported. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the essential oil revealed a total of 43 components with bicyclogermacrene (23.8%), germacrene D (8%), ( E )-caryophyllene (7.9%) and spathulenol (5.5%) as the major ones. Sesquiterpenoid group was found to be the most dominant one (64.8%), with 19.9% of the oxygenated forms. In the crude methanol extract of the investigated plant, obtained by Sohhlet exraction, the total phenol content was 14.7 ± 0.4 mg of GA/g, the total flavonoids were 0.29 ± 0.03% expressed as hyperoside percentage, whereas the total tannins content was 0.22 ± 0.04% expressed as pyrogallol percentage. For the antimicrobial activity determination, the following microorganisms have been used: methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 29213)) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (clinical strain)), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), carbapenem-susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae (clinical strain), carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (clinical strain) and Candida albicans (ATCC 14053). The essential oil showed high potency against MSSA and MRSA, both at high (~5 × 10⁵ CFU/mL) and low (~5 × 10³ CFU/mL) inoculum. With respect to MSSA, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value was 0.307 mg/mL, with bactericidal activity obtained at 0.615 mg/mL, while, in the case of MRSA, the MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were 0.076 and 0.153 mg/mL, respectively. Regarding anti- Candida albicans activity, the MIC value was 2.46 mg/mL without reaching fungicidal activity. In addition to the observed essential oil efficacy, different solvent extracts were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity. Similarly to the essential oil, thehighest efficacy was observed against both MSSA and MRSA strains, at high and

  15. Agdc1p – a Gallic Acid Decarboxylase Involved in the Degradation of Tannic Acid in the Yeast Blastobotrys (Arxula) adeninivorans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Anna K.; Worch, Sebastian; Böer, Erik; Hartmann, Anja; Mascher, Martin; Marzec, Marek; Scholz, Uwe; Riechen, Jan; Baronian, Kim; Schauer, Frieder; Bode, Rüdiger; Kunze, Gotthard

    2017-01-01

    Tannins and hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), are plant secondary metabolites which protect plants against herbivores and plant-associated microorganisms. Some microbes, such as the yeast Arxula adeninivorans are resistant to these antimicrobial substances and are able to use tannins and gallic acid as carbon sources. In this study, the Arxula gallic acid decarboxylase (Agdc1p) which degrades gallic acid to pyrogallol was characterized and its function in tannin catabolism analyzed. The enzyme has a higher affinity for gallic acid (Km −0.7 ± 0.2 mM, kcat −42.0 ± 8.2 s−1) than to protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) (Km −3.2 ± 0.2 mM, kcat −44.0 ± 3.2 s−1). Other hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid are not gallic acid decarboxylase substrates. A. adeninivorans G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1, which expresses the AGDC1 gene under the control of the strong nitrate inducible AYNI1 promoter achieved a maximum gallic acid decarboxylase activity of 1064.4 U/l and 97.5 U/g of dry cell weight in yeast grown in minimal medium with nitrate as nitrogen source and glucose as carbon source. In the same medium, gallic acid decarboxylase activity was not detected for the control strain G1212/YRC102 with AGDC1 expression under the control of the endogenous promoter. Gene expression analysis showed that AGDC1 is induced by gallic acid and protocatechuic acid. In contrast to G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1 and G1212/YRC102, A. adeninivorans G1234 [Δagdc1] is not able to grow on medium with gallic acid as carbon source but can grow in presence of protocatechuic acid. This confirms that Agdc1p plays an essential role in the tannic acid catabolism and could be useful in the production of catechol and cis,cis-muconic acid. However, the protocatechuic acid catabolism via Agdc1p to catechol seems to be

  16. Agdc1p - a Gallic Acid Decarboxylase Involved in the Degradation of Tannic Acid in the Yeast Blastobotrys (Arxula) adeninivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Anna K; Worch, Sebastian; Böer, Erik; Hartmann, Anja; Mascher, Martin; Marzec, Marek; Scholz, Uwe; Riechen, Jan; Baronian, Kim; Schauer, Frieder; Bode, Rüdiger; Kunze, Gotthard

    2017-01-01

    Tannins and hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), are plant secondary metabolites which protect plants against herbivores and plant-associated microorganisms. Some microbes, such as the yeast Arxula adeninivorans are resistant to these antimicrobial substances and are able to use tannins and gallic acid as carbon sources. In this study, the Arxula gallic acid decarboxylase (Agdc1p) which degrades gallic acid to pyrogallol was characterized and its function in tannin catabolism analyzed. The enzyme has a higher affinity for gallic acid (K m -0.7 ± 0.2 mM, k cat -42.0 ± 8.2 s -1 ) than to protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) (K m -3.2 ± 0.2 mM, k cat -44.0 ± 3.2 s -1 ). Other hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid are not gallic acid decarboxylase substrates. A. adeninivorans G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1, which expresses the AGDC1 gene under the control of the strong nitrate inducible AYNI1 promoter achieved a maximum gallic acid decarboxylase activity of 1064.4 U/l and 97.5 U/g of dry cell weight in yeast grown in minimal medium with nitrate as nitrogen source and glucose as carbon source. In the same medium, gallic acid decarboxylase activity was not detected for the control strain G1212/YRC102 with AGDC1 expression under the control of the endogenous promoter. Gene expression analysis showed that AGDC1 is induced by gallic acid and protocatechuic acid. In contrast to G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1 and G1212/YRC102, A. adeninivorans G1234 [Δ agdc1 ] is not able to grow on medium with gallic acid as carbon source but can grow in presence of protocatechuic acid. This confirms that Agdc1p plays an essential role in the tannic acid catabolism and could be useful in the production of catechol and cis,cis -muconic acid. However, the protocatechuic acid catabolism via Agdc1p to catechol seems to be

  17. Processed coffee alleviates DSS-induced colitis in mice

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    Bernd L. Fiebich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and it has been demonstrated that it has important therapeutic activities not only because of its caffeine content but also owing to the presence of other biologically active small molecules such as chlorogenic acid, trigonelline and cyclopentadiones. However, chlorogenic acid is degraded into catechol, pyrogallol and hydroxyhydroquinone, which are thought to induce irritation of the gastric mucosa. To reduce the content of irritant compounds processing methods have been developed prior to roasting the coffee beans.Objectives: The aim of this study was to study the anti-inflammatory and gastro-protective effects of processed coffee (Idee-Kaffee on in LPS-treated human primary monocytes and in a murine model of colon inflammation (IBD model.Results: In this study we have analyzed the effects on inflammatory events in cultured cells and in mice drinking a commercially available processed coffee. The processed coffee inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF, IL-6 and IL-8, and other inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin (PGE2 and 8-isoprostane in cultured human primary monocytes. Oral administration of dissolved processed coffee, i.e., in its usual beverage form, improved greatly the adverse macroscopic and histological features of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Processed coffee not only largely prevented DSS-induced colitis but also dramatically suppressed in vivo NF-B and STAT3 activities through inhibition of IB and STAT3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, this solubleFunctional Foods in Health and Disease 2013; 3(5:133-145coffee bean extract reduced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-11, and IL-6 and the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX-2 in colonic tissues.Conclusions: This work identified

  18. Rubia cordifolia, Fagonia cretica linn and Tinospora cordifolia exert neuroprotection by modulating the antioxidant system in rat hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas Saibal K

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major damaging factor during and after the ischemic/hypoxic insult is the generation of free radicals, which leads to apoptosis, necrosis and ultimately cell death. Rubia cordifolia (RC, Fagonia cretica linn (FC and Tinospora cordifolia (TC have been reported to contain a wide variety of antioxidants and have been in use in the eastern system of medicine for various disorders. However, their mechanism of action was largely unknown. We therefore selected these herbs for the present study to test their neuroprotective ability and the associated mechanism in rat hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Methods Hippocampal Slices were subjected to OGD (oxygen glucose deprivation and divided into 3 groups: control, OGD and OGD + drug treated. Cytosolic Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD, reduced glutathione (GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, nitric oxide (NO was measured as nitrite (NO2 in the supernatant and protein assays were performed in the respective groups at various time intervals. EPR was used to establish the antioxidant effect of RC, FC and TC with respect to superoxide anion (O2.-, hydroxyl radicals (. OH, nitric oxide (NO radical and peroxynitrite anion (ONOO generated from pyrogallol, menadione, DETA-NO and Sin-1 respectively. RT-PCR was performed for the three groups for GCLC, iNOS, Cu-Zn SOD and GAPDH gene expression. Results All the three herbs were effective in elevating the GSH levels, expression of the gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase and Cu-Zn SOD genes. The herbs also exhibited strong free radical scavenging properties against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition all the three herbs significantly diminished the expression of iNOS gene after 48 hours which plays a major role in neuronal injury during hypoxia/ischemia. Conclusions RC, FC and TC therefore attenuate oxidative stress mediated cell injury during OGD

  19. Formulation of a fish feed for goldfish with natural astaxanthin extracted from shrimp waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeratunge, W K O V; Perera, B G K

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll carotenoid, which exhibits many important biological activities including a high degree of antioxidant capacity (AOC) and antibacterial activity, hence has a significant applicability in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. An attempt was made towards optimization of astaxanthin extraction conditions using three different extraction conditions and a solvent series, from uncooked, cooked and acid-treated shrimp waste, which is a readily available and cheap source of the pigment. The astaxanthin extracts were analyzed by comparing their UV-visible absorbance spectra and thin layer chromatograms with a standard astaxanthin sample. The percentage of astaxanthin in each crude sample was determined using the Beer-Lambert law. The Folin-Ciocalteu assay and the disk diffusion assay were used to investigate the antioxidant capacities and antibacterial activities of extracted astaxanthin samples respectively. The extracted astaxanthin was incorporated into fish feeds to test its ability to enhance the skin color of goldfish. The best astaxanthin percentage of 68 % was observed with the acetone:ethyl acetate (1:1) solvent system facilitated by maceration of cooked and acid treated shrimp, whereas the best crude yield of 33 % was found to be in the acetone extract of the acid-treated shrimp sample. The highest AOC of 65 µg pyrogallol equivalents/mg was observed for the EtOAc extract obtained by maceration of acid-treated shrimp waste. The highest AOC by sonication and soxhlet extraction methods were also obtained with the EtOAc solvent. The extracts exhibited antibacterial activity against four selected bacterial strains. The newly formulated astaxanthin enriched fish feed was economical and indicated a significant improvement of the skin color and healthiness of goldfish compared to the control feeds. Biologically active astaxanthin can be successfully extracted from shrimp waste in higher percentages. The extraction technique and the

  20. Agdc1p – a Gallic Acid Decarboxylase Involved in the Degradation of Tannic Acid in the Yeast Blastobotrys (Arxula adeninivorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Meier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tannins and hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, are plant secondary metabolites which protect plants against herbivores and plant-associated microorganisms. Some microbes, such as the yeast Arxula adeninivorans are resistant to these antimicrobial substances and are able to use tannins and gallic acid as carbon sources. In this study, the Arxula gallic acid decarboxylase (Agdc1p which degrades gallic acid to pyrogallol was characterized and its function in tannin catabolism analyzed. The enzyme has a higher affinity for gallic acid (Km −0.7 ± 0.2 mM, kcat −42.0 ± 8.2 s−1 than to protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Km −3.2 ± 0.2 mM, kcat −44.0 ± 3.2 s−1. Other hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid are not gallic acid decarboxylase substrates. A. adeninivorans G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1, which expresses the AGDC1 gene under the control of the strong nitrate inducible AYNI1 promoter achieved a maximum gallic acid decarboxylase activity of 1064.4 U/l and 97.5 U/g of dry cell weight in yeast grown in minimal medium with nitrate as nitrogen source and glucose as carbon source. In the same medium, gallic acid decarboxylase activity was not detected for the control strain G1212/YRC102 with AGDC1 expression under the control of the endogenous promoter. Gene expression analysis showed that AGDC1 is induced by gallic acid and protocatechuic acid. In contrast to G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1 and G1212/YRC102, A. adeninivorans G1234 [Δagdc1] is not able to grow on medium with gallic acid as carbon source but can grow in presence of protocatechuic acid. This confirms that Agdc1p plays an essential role in the tannic acid catabolism and could be useful in the production of catechol and cis,cis-muconic acid. However, the protocatechuic acid catabolism via Agdc1p to

  1. Chemical composition, antioxidant, antitumor, anticancer and cytotoxic effects of Psidium guajava leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Aisha; Sarfraz, Raja Adil; Rashid, Muhammad Abid; Mahmood, Adeel; Shahid, Muhammad; Noor, Nadia

    2016-10-01

    Context Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) leaves are used in traditional medicines for the treatment of cancer, inflammation and other ailments. Objective The current study explores scientific validation for this traditional medication. Materials and methods We used ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazil (DPPH) assays to estimate antioxidant activity of P. guajava leaf extracts (methanol, hexane and chloroform). Antitumour and in vivo cytotoxic activities were determined using potato disc assay (PDA) and brine shrimp lethality assay, respectively. Three human carcinoma cell lines (KBM5, SCC4 and U266) were incubated with different doses (10-100 μg/mL) of extracts and the anticancer activity was estimated by MTT assay. NF-κB suppressing activity was determined using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Chemical composition of the three extracts was identified by GC-MS. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were measured by colorimetric assays. Results and discussions The order of antioxidant activity of three extracts was methanol > chloroform > hexane. The IC50 values ranged from 22.73 to 51.65 μg/mL for KBM5; 22.82 to 70.25 μg/mL for SCC4 and 20.97 to 89.55 μg/mL for U266 cells. The hexane extract exhibited potent antitumour (IC50  value = 65.02 μg/mL) and cytotoxic (LC50  value = 32.18 μg/mL) activities. This extract also completely inhibited the TNF-α induced NF-κB activation in KBM5 cells. GC-MS results showed that pyrogallol, palmitic acid and vitamin E were the major components of methanol, chloroform and hexane extracts. We observed significant (p guajava leaf extracts play a substantial role against cancer and down-modulate inflammatory nuclear factor kB.

  2. Cloning, sequence analysis, expression of Cyathus bulleri laccase in Pichia pastoris and characterization of recombinant laccase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg Neha

    2012-10-01

    successfully produced extra-cellularly to a high level of 7200 U L-1 in P. pastoris under the control of the AOX1 promoter and purified by a simple three-step procedure to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters against ABTS, Guaiacol and Pyrogallol were similar with the nLac and the rLac. Tryptic finger print analysis of the nLac and the rLac indicated altered glycosylation patterns. Increased thermo-stability and salt tolerance of the rLac was attributed to this changed pattern of glycosylation.

  3. Cloning, sequence analysis, expression of Cyathus bulleri laccase in Pichia pastoris and characterization of recombinant laccase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neha; Bieler, Nora; Kenzom, Tenzin; Chhabra, Meenu; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion; Mishra, Saroj

    2012-10-23

    U L(-1) in P. pastoris under the control of the AOX1 promoter and purified by a simple three-step procedure to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters against ABTS, Guaiacol and Pyrogallol were similar with the nLac and the rLac. Tryptic finger print analysis of the nLac and the rLac indicated altered glycosylation patterns. Increased thermo-stability and salt tolerance of the rLac was attributed to this changed pattern of glycosylation.

  4. Differential Gene Expression by Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in Response to Phenolic Compounds Reveals New Genes Involved in Tannin Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverón, Inés; Jiménez, Natalia; Curiel, José Antonio; Peñas, Elena; López de Felipe, Félix; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario

    2017-04-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium that can degrade food tannins by the successive action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. In the L. plantarum genome, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of gallate decarboxylase ( lpdC , or lp_2945 ) is only 6.5 kb distant from the gene encoding inducible tannase ( L. plantarum tanB [ tanB Lp ], or lp_2956 ). This genomic context suggests concomitant activity and regulation of both enzymatic activities. Reverse transcription analysis revealed that subunits B ( lpdB , or lp_0271 ) and D ( lpdD , or lp_0272 ) of the gallate decarboxylase are cotranscribed, whereas subunit C ( lpdC , or lp_2945 ) is cotranscribed with a gene encoding a transport protein ( gacP , or lp_2943 ). In contrast, the tannase gene is transcribed as a monocistronic mRNA. Investigation of knockout mutations of genes located in this chromosomal region indicated that only mutants of the gallate decarboxylase (subunits B and C), tannase, GacP transport protein, and TanR transcriptional regulator ( lp_2942 ) genes exhibited altered tannin metabolism. The expression profile of genes involved in tannin metabolism was also analyzed in these mutants in the presence of methyl gallate and gallic acid. It is noteworthy that inactivation of tanR suppresses the induction of all genes overexpressed in the presence of methyl gallate and gallic acid. This transcriptional regulator was also induced in the presence of other phenolic compounds, such as kaempferol and myricetin. This study complements the catalog of L. plantarum expression profiles responsive to phenolic compounds, which enable this bacterium to adapt to a plant food environment. IMPORTANCE Lactobacillus plantarum is a bacterial species frequently found in the fermentation of vegetables when tannins are present. L. plantarum strains degrade tannins to the less-toxic pyrogallol by the successive action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. The genes encoding these enzymes are

  5. [An application of electrochemical detector to dental pharmacology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, J

    1990-03-01

    The electrochemical detection (ECD) is highly sensitive and can distinguish selectively electrochemically active materials. A sensitive and selective ECD is widely used for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of phenolic compounds, such as catecholamines, indoleamines and phenolic steroids in biological materials. In the present study, the HPLC/ECD system was applied for the simultaneous determination of various dental drugs, such as phenol, guaiacol, m-cresol, o-chlorophenol, p-chlorophenol, m-chlorophenol, eugenol, pyrogallol and resorcin. As a compromise between sensitivity and stability, the applied voltage was set at 1.2 V vs the reference electrode. These drugs were rapidly and selectively separated on a reversed-phase column using 10 mM acetate buffer (pH 4.0)-methanol (7:3, v/v) as a mobile phase. The detection limits of these drugs were determined to be 0.25 pmol per injection. These results imply that the HPLC/ECD method should be capable of determining these dental drugs with high sensitivity. The ECD was also applied to determine the enzyme activity. A highly sensitive and specific assay for alkaline and acid phosphatases and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase in biological materials, such as plasma, saliva and bone, has been established. Phenol, formed enzymatically from the substrate, was determined by HPLC/ECD. The retention time of phenol was 7 min and no other peaks were observed. The method is rapid and sensitive with a detection limit for phenol of as little as 0.5 pmol. Thus, as little as 0.5 microliters of rat plasma or 10 microliters of human saliva is all that is required for both alkaline and acid phosphatase assays. The assay is accurate and reproducible. Using this assay, alkaline and acid phosphatase activities in human saliva and in rat saliva elicited by pilocarpine and isoproterenol were determined. It will be possible to apply this new assay method to extremely small biological samples. Thus, the application of the HPLC

  6. Exposure to radiofrequency radiation induces oxidative stress in duckweed Lemna minor L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkalec, Mirta; Malaric, Kresimir; Pevalek-Kozlina, Branka

    2007-01-01

    Widespread use of radiofrequency radiation emitting devices increased the exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from 300 MHz to 300 GHz. Various biological effects of exposure to these fields have been documented so far, but very little work has been carried out on plants. The aim of the present work was to investigate the physiological responses of the plant Lemna minor after exposure to radiofrequency EMFs, and in particular, to clarify the possible role of oxidative stress in the observed effects. Duckweed was exposed for 2 h to EMFs of 400 and 900 MHz at field strengths of 10, 23, 41 and 120 V m -1 . The effect of a longer exposure time (4 h) and modulation was also investigated. After exposure, parameters of oxidative stress, such as lipid peroxidation, H 2 O 2 content, activities and isoenzyme pattern of antioxidative enzymes as well as HSP70 expression were evaluated. At 400 MHz, lipid peroxidation and H 2 O 2 content were significantly enhanced in duckweed exposed to EMFs of 23 and 120 V m -1 while other exposure treatments did not have an effect. Compared to the controls, the activities of antioxidative enzymes showed different behaviour: catalase (CAT) activity increased after most exposure treatments while pyrogallol (PPX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities were not changed. Exceptions were reduced PPX and APX activity after longer exposure at 23 V m -1 and increased PPX activity after exposures at 10 and 120 V m -1 . By contrast, at 900 MHz almost all exposure treatments significantly increased level of lipid peroxidation and H 2 O 2 content but mostly decreased PPX activity and did not affect CAT activity. Exceptions were exposures to a modulated field and to the field of 120 V m -1 which increased PPX and CAT activity. At this frequency APX activity was significantly decreased after exposure at 10 V m -1 and longer exposure at 23 V m -1 but it increased after a shorter exposure at 23 V m -1 . At both frequencies no differences in isoenzyme

  7. Direct and mediated electrochemistry of peroxidase and its electrocatalysis on a variety of screen-printed carbon electrodes: amperometric hydrogen peroxide and phenols biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekin, Fereshteh; Gorton, Lo; Tapsobea, Issa

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the behaviour of direct and mediated electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilised on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs), screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with carboxyl-functionalised multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-SPCEs) and screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with carboxyl-functionalised single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-SPCEs). The techniques of cyclic voltammetry and amperometry in the flow mode were used to characterise the properties of the HRP immobilised on screen-printed electrodes. From measurements of the mediated and mediatorless currents of hydrogen peroxide reduction at the HRP-modified electrodes, it was concluded that the fraction of enzyme molecules in direct electron transfer (DET) contact with the electrode varies substantially for the different electrodes. It was observed that the screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-SPCEs and SWCNT-SPCEs) demonstrated a substantially higher percentage (≈100 %) of HRP molecules in DET contact than the screen-printed carbon electrodes (≈60 %). The HRP-modified electrodes were used for determination of hydrogen peroxide in mediatorless mode. The SWCNT-SPCE gave the lowest detection limit (0.40 ± 0.09 μM) followed by MWCNT-SPCE (0.48 ± 0.07 μM) and SPCE (0.98 ± 0.2 μM). These modified electrodes were additionally developed for amperometric determination of phenolic compounds. It was found that the SWCNT-SPCE gave a detection limit for catechol of 110.2 ± 3.6 nM, dopamine of 640.2 ± 9.2 nM, octopamine of 3341 ± 15 nM, pyrogallol of 50.10 ± 2.9 nM and 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine of 980.7 ± 8.7 nM using 50 μM H2O2 in the flow carrier.

  8. Efecto antioxidante y contenido polifenólico de Syringodium filiforme (Cymodoceaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kethia L González García

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant effect and polyphenol content of Syringodium filiforme (Cymodoceaceae. The marine phanerogam Syringodium filiforme, known as "manatee grass", is a common species that grows in coastal areas associated to Thalassia testudinum. With the aim to describe some of its possible chemical characteristics, this study was performed with a sample of 1.2kg, collected in March 2009, in Guanabo beach, Havana, Cuba. The sample was dried (less than 12% humidity and a total extract prepared; other three extracts were prepared with the use of solvents of increasing polarity. The phytochemical screening and analytical determinations of each fraction were undertaken Total polyphenol content was determined using pyrogallol as reference´s standard; chlorophyll a and b and anthocyanin content were also quantified. Total extract and fractions antioxidant activity were evaluated by using the free radical scavenging activity assay with 1,1- Diphenyl-2-Picrylhydrazyl reactive (knowing as DPPH´s method. The phytochemical screening of the different extracts detected the presence of high concentrations of flavonoids, phenols, terpenes, antocyaninns, reducing sugars and alkaloids. The total extract and methanol fraction showed significant free radical scavenging properties, while the petroleum ether fraction showed moderate activity, and the chloroform fraction and the aqueous soluble precipitate (residual salt obtained didn’t show antioxidant properties against free radicals. The results of this work confirmed the potentialities of this species for biological purposes. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (1: 465-472. Epub 2011 March 01.La fanerógama marina Syringodium filiforme, conocida comúnmente como "Hierba Manatí", crece en los fondos marinos tropicales asociada con la especie Thalassia testudinum. Este estudio fue realizado con una muestra de S. filiforme (1.2kg peso húmedo recolectada en la playa de Guanabo en La Habana, Cuba en Marzo 2009. La muestra fue secada

  9. Exposure to radiofrequency radiation induces oxidative stress in duckweed Lemna minor L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkalec, Mirta [Department of Botany, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: mtkalec@zg.biol.pmf.hr; Malaric, Kresimir [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, Unska 3, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pevalek-Kozlina, Branka [Department of Botany, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2007-12-15

    Widespread use of radiofrequency radiation emitting devices increased the exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from 300 MHz to 300 GHz. Various biological effects of exposure to these fields have been documented so far, but very little work has been carried out on plants. The aim of the present work was to investigate the physiological responses of the plant Lemna minor after exposure to radiofrequency EMFs, and in particular, to clarify the possible role of oxidative stress in the observed effects. Duckweed was exposed for 2 h to EMFs of 400 and 900 MHz at field strengths of 10, 23, 41 and 120 V m{sup -1}. The effect of a longer exposure time (4 h) and modulation was also investigated. After exposure, parameters of oxidative stress, such as lipid peroxidation, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content, activities and isoenzyme pattern of antioxidative enzymes as well as HSP70 expression were evaluated. At 400 MHz, lipid peroxidation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content were significantly enhanced in duckweed exposed to EMFs of 23 and 120 V m{sup -1} while other exposure treatments did not have an effect. Compared to the controls, the activities of antioxidative enzymes showed different behaviour: catalase (CAT) activity increased after most exposure treatments while pyrogallol (PPX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities were not changed. Exceptions were reduced PPX and APX activity after longer exposure at 23 V m{sup -1} and increased PPX activity after exposures at 10 and 120 V m{sup -1}. By contrast, at 900 MHz almost all exposure treatments significantly increased level of lipid peroxidation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content but mostly decreased PPX activity and did not affect CAT activity. Exceptions were exposures to a modulated field and to the field of 120 V m{sup -1} which increased PPX and CAT activity. At this frequency APX activity was significantly decreased after exposure at 10 V m{sup -1} and longer exposure at 23 V m{sup -1} but it increased after a shorter exposure at

  10. DFT and EXAFS, mutually enhancing tools for structure elucidation of Tc complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breynaert, E.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, A.

    2005-01-01

    experimental Tc EXAFS/XANES spectra of the Tc-pyrogallol complexes under consideration have yielded relatively good estimates of the coordination number, surrounding atom types and bond lengths of the chemical environment of the Tc atom in the species under investigation. This information was used to construct a first guess for an initial geometry from which a DFT geometry optimization was started. The DFT-optimized geometry was in its turn used to create high quality theoretical standards with ab initio multiple scattering software like FEFF [4] which were used to perform high quality fits of the experimental EXAFS/XANES spectra being studied. The authors acknowledge a grant from KULeuven University and financial support from the KULeuven Geconcerteerde Onderzoeksacties (GOA2000/007). We also kindly acknowledge NIRAS/ONDRAF for financial support from Contract CCHO 20004004862 [1] Cui, D.Q. and T.E. Eriksen, Reduction of pertechnetate in solution by heterogeneous electron transfer from Fe(II)-containing geological material. Environmental Science and Technology, 1996. 30(7): p. 2263-2269. [2] Maes, A., et al., Quantification of the interaction of Tc with dissolved boom clay humic substances. Environmental Science and Technology, 2003. 37(4): p. 747-753. [3] Gancheff, J., et al., Density functional study of technetium and rhenium compounds. Journal of Molecular Structure-Theochem, 2002. 580: p. 107-116. [4] Zabinsky, S.I., et al., Multiple-scattering calculations of x-ray-absorption spectra. Phys. Rev. B, 1995. 52: p. p. 2995. (authors)

  11. Spot protein-creatinine ratio and spot albumin-creatinine ratio in the assessment of pre-eclampsia: a diagnostic accuracy study with decision-analytic model-based economic evaluation and acceptability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Jason; Hooper, Richard; Lamb, Edmund; Robson, Stephen; Shennan, Andrew; Milne, Fiona; Price, Christopher; Thangaratinam, Shakila; Berdunov, Vladislav; Bingham, Jenn

    2017-10-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines highlighted the need for 'large, high-quality prospective studies comparing the various methods of measuring proteinuria in women with new-onset hypertensive disorders during pregnancy'. The primary objective was to evaluate quantitative assessments of spot protein-creatinine ratio (SPCR) and spot albumin-creatinine ratio (SACR) in predicting severe pre-eclampsia (PE) compared with 24-hour urine protein measurement. The secondary objectives were to investigate interlaboratory assay variation, to evaluate SPCR and SACR thresholds in predicting adverse maternal and fetal outcomes and to assess the cost-effectiveness of these models. This was a prospective diagnostic accuracy cohort study, with decision-analytic modelling and a cost-effectiveness analysis. The setting was 36 obstetric units in England, UK. Pregnant women (aged ≥ 16 years), who were at > 20 weeks' gestation with confirmed gestational hypertension and trace or more proteinuria on an automated dipstick urinalysis. Women provided a spot urine sample for protein analysis (the recruitment sample) and were asked to collect a 24-hour urine sample, which was stored for secondary analysis. A further spot sample of urine was taken immediately before delivery. Outcome data were collected from hospital records. There were four index tests on a spot sample of urine: (1) SPCR test (conducted at the local laboratory); (2) SPCR test [conducted at the central laboratory using the benzethonium chloride (BZC) assay]; (3) SPCR test [conducted at the central laboratory using the pyrogallol red (PGR) assay]; and (4) SACR test (conducted at the central laboratory using an automated chemistry analyser). The comparator tests on 24-hour urine collection were a central test using the BZC assay and a central test using the PGR assay. The primary reference standard was the NICE definition of severe PE. Secondary reference standards were a clinician

  12. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.; Orta, M.M.; Alba, M.D.; Alvero, R.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Chain, P.; Escudero, A.; Naranjo, M.; Pavon, E.; Trillo, J.M.; Vejsada, J.; Vokal, A.; Zadvernyuk, H.P.; Fedorenko, Y.G.; Zlobenko, B.P.; Koromyslichenko, T.I.; Battaglia, S.; Cervelli, M.; Millot, R.; Girard, J.P.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Escudero, A.; Gonzalez-Carrascosa, T.; Hurtado, S.; Pavon, E.; Villa, M.; Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Rabung, Th.; Dahn, R.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Vancluysen, J.; Credoz, A.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M.; Raynal, J.; Petronin, J.C.; Trotignon, L.; Pokrovsky, O.; Jacquier, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Vuillaume, A.L.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Ly, J.; Page, J.; Savoye, S.; Pitsch, H.; Jacques, D.; Wang, L.; Galunin, E.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Vidal, M.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Andre, L.; Pauwels, H.; Azaroual, M.; Albrecht, A.; Romero, M.A.; Aerts, S.; Boven, P.; Van Geet, M.; Boever, P. de; Alonso, U.; Albarran, N.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Guillaume, D.; Jacquot, E.; Tournassat, Ch.; Lerouge, C.; Brendle, J.; Greneche, J.M.; Touzelet, St.; Blanc, Ph.; Gaucher, E.C.; Thoenen, T.; Klinkenberg, M.; Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.; Liu, D.J.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Weber, T.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Bildstein, O.; Combarieu, G. de; Frugier, P.; Menut, D

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 52 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of natural sorbents immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cement; the chemical stability of rare-earth silicate; the mineralogical heterogeneity of Rokle bentonite and radionuclide adsorption: A case study for cesium; the rheological and sorption properties of clay-polymer composites; the clay mineral interactions with leachate solutions in landfills; the lithium isotope fractionation during adsorption onto mineral surfaces; the sorption of Sr{sup 2+} onto mixed smectite / illite clays; Eh and pH in the pore water of compacted bentonite; the chemical interaction of {sup 152}Eu with the clay barrier; the modeling of the acid-base surface chemistry of Montmorillonite; a time resolved laser fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of lanthanide/actinide sorption on clay minerals: influence of carbonate complexation; the structure elucidation and occurrence of Tc(IV) pyrogallol complexes; the geochemistry of Se(0) under boom clay conditions; an experimental and modelling study of pure secondary silicate minerals reactivity in geological CO{sub 2} sequestration conditions; an experimental evaluation of a retention model for major groundwater elements on the Tournemire argillite; modelling the long term interaction of cementitious pore water with Boom clay; the sorption-desorption of radionuclides and analogues in clays suitable for barriers; the modelling of the Redox evolution in the tunnel backfill of a high level nuclear waste repository; the reactivity of nitrates in the different storage compartments of type-b wastes; an investigation into the biodiversity of sulphate reducing bacteria in Boom clay; the colloid generation mechanisms from compacted bentonite under different geochemical conditions; the experimental reduction of aqueous sulphate by hydrogen in the context of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; cation exchanged Fe(II) and Sr as compared to other divalent cations