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Sample records for pyrococcus horikoshii tryptophanyl-trna

  1. Theoretical Study on the Allosteric Regulation of an Oligomeric Protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii by Cl− Ion

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    Dongling Zhan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermophilic intracellular protease (PH1704 from Pyrococcus horikoshii that functions as an oligomer (hexamer or higher forms has proteolytic activity and remarkable stability. PH1704 is classified as a member of the C56 family of peptidases. This study is the first to observe that the use of Cl− as an allosteric inhibitor causes appreciable changes in the catalytic activity of the protease. Theoretical methods were used for further study. Quantum mechanical calculations indicated the binding mode of Cl− with Arg113. A molecular dynamics simulation explained how Cl− stabilized distinct contact species and how it controls the enzyme activity. The new structural insights obtained from this study are expected to stimulate further biochemical studies on the structures and mechanisms of allosteric proteases. It is clear that the discovery of new allosteric sites of the C56 family of peptidases may generate opportunities for pharmaceutical development and increases our understanding of the basic biological processes of this peptidase family.

  2. Characterization of the archaeal ribonuclease P proteins from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

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    Terada, Atsushi; Honda, Takashi; Fukuhara, Hideo; Hada, Kazumasa; Kimura, Makoto

    2006-08-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is a ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA). Our earlier study revealed that RNase P RNA (pRNA) and five proteins (PhoPop5, PhoRpp38, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, and PhoRpp30) in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 reconstituted RNase P activity that exhibits enzymatic properties like those of the authentic enzyme. In present study, we investigated involvement of the individual proteins in RNase P activity. Two particles (R-3Ps), in which pRNA was mixed with three proteins, PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38 or PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp21 showed a detectable RNase P activity, and five reconstituted particles (R-4Ps) composed of pRNA and four proteins exhibited RNase P activity, albeit at reduced level compared to that of the reconstituted particle (R-5P) composed of pRNA and five proteins. Time-course analysis of the RNase P activities of R-4Ps indicated that the R-4Ps lacking PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, or PhoRpp30 had virtually reduced activity, while omission of PhoRpp29 or PhoRpp38 had a slight effect on the activity. The results indicate that the proteins contribute to RNase P activity in order of PhoPop5 > PhoRpp30 > PhoRpp21 > PhoRpp29 > PhoRpp38. It was further found that R-4Ps showed a characteristic Mg2+ ion dependency approximately identical to that of R-5P. However, R-4Ps had optimum temperature of around at 55 degrees C which is lower than 70 degrees C for R-5P. Together, it is suggested that the P. horikoshii RNase P proteins are predominantly involved in optimization of the pRNA conformation, though they are individually dispensable for RNase P activity in vitro.

  3. Substrate recognition of N,N'-diacetylchitobiose deacetylase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

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    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Niiyama, Mayumi; Ida, Kurumi; Oshima, Maki; Morita, Junji; Uegaki, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Enzymes of carbohydrate esterase (CE) family 14 catalyze hydrolysis of N-acetyl groups at the non-reducing end of the N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue of chitooligosaccharides or related compounds. N,N'-diacetylchitobiose deacetylase (Dac) belongs to the CE-14 family and plays a role in the chitinolytic pathway in archaea by deacetylating N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc2), which is the end product of chitinase. In this study, we revealed the structural basis of reaction specificity in CE-14 deacetylases by solving a crystal structure of Dac from Pyrococcus horikoshii (Ph-Dac) in complex with a novel reaction intermediate analog. We developed 2-deoxy-2-methylphosphoramido-d-glucose (MPG) as the analog of the tetrahedral oxyanion intermediate of the monosaccharide substrate GlcNAc. The crystal structure of Ph-Dac in complex with MPG demonstrated that Arg92, Asp115, and His152 side chains interact with hydroxyl groups of the glucose moiety of the non-reducing-end GlcNAc residue. The amino acid residues responsible for recognition of the MPG glucose moiety are spatially conserved in other CE-14 deacetylases. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure of the Ph-Dac-GlcNAc2 complex indicated that the reducing GlcNAc residue is placed in a large intermolecular cleft and is not involved with specific interactions with the enzyme. This observation was consistent with results indicating that Ph-Dac displayed similar kinetic parameters for both GlcNAc and GlcNAc2. This study provides the structural basis of reaction-site specificity of Dac and related CE-14 enzymes.

  4. Functional analysis of hyperthermophilic endocellulase from Pyrococcus horikoshii by crystallographic snapshots.

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    Kim, Han-Woo; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2011-07-15

    A hyperthermophilic membrane-related β-1,4-endoglucanase (family 5, cellulase) of the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii was found to be capable of hydrolysing cellulose at high temperatures. The hyperthermophilic cellulase has promise for applications in biomass utilization. To clarify its detailed function, we determined the crystal structures of mutants of the enzyme in complex with either the substrate or product ligands. We were able to resolve different kinds of complex structures at 1.65-2.01 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm). The structural analysis of various mutant enzymes yielded a sequence of crystallographic snapshots, which could be used to explain the catalytic process of the enzyme. The substrate position is fixed by the alignment of one cellobiose unit between the two aromatic amino acid residues at subsites +1 and +2. During the enzyme reaction, the glucose structure of cellulose substrates is distorted at subsite -1, and the β-1,4-glucoside bond between glucose moieties is twisted between subsites -1 and +1. Subsite -2 specifically recognizes the glucose residue, but recognition by subsites +1 and +2 is loose during the enzyme reaction. This type of recognition is important for creation of the distorted boat form of the substrate at subsite -1. A rare enzyme-substrate complex was observed within the low-activity mutant Y299F, which suggested the existence of a trapped ligand structure before the formation by covalent bonding of the proposed intermediate structure. Analysis of the enzyme-substrate structure suggested that an incoming water molecule, essential for hydrolysis during the retention process, might be introduced to the cleavage position after the cellobiose product at subsites +1 and +2 was released from the active site.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

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    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kunishima, Naoki, E-mail: kunisima@spring8.or.jp [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2006-04-01

    RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with ATP. Both crystal forms belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21 and diffract X-rays to 2.0 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. Circadian (daily) protein clocks are found in cyanobacteria, where a complex of the KaiA, KaiB and KaiC proteins generates circadian rhythms. The 28.09 kDa KaiC homologue PH0284 protein from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was cloned and expressed and the purified protein was crystallized by the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data from the crystal were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.06, c = 298.90 Å. Assuming the presence of one hexamer in the asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.36 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 47.9%. A cocrystal with ATP was prepared and a diffraction data set was collected at 2.3 Å resolution.

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of archaeal 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydrobiopterin synthase homologue PH0634 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

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    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sugahara, Mitsuaki [Structural Biophysics Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kunishima, Naoki, E-mail: kunisima@spring8.or.jp [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2007-01-01

    An archaeal 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydrobiopterin synthase homologue from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed as native and selenomethionine-substituted protein, purified and crystallized. The native and selenomethionine-derivative crystals are isomorphous and diffract X-rays to 2.1 and 2.9 Å resolution, respectively. 6-Pyruvoyl tetrahydrobiopterin synthase (PTPS) catalyses the conversion of dihydroneopterin triphosphate to 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin, the second of the three enzymatic steps in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin from GTP. PH0634, a 13.51 kDa archaeal PTPS homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, was overexpressed as native and selenomethionine-substituted protein and the purified protein was crystallized by the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution from the native crystal using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 35.83, b = 95.71, c = 105.65 Å. Threefold noncrystallographic symmetry was identified from self-rotation calculations. Assuming the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 45% (V{sub M} = 2.24 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}). The selenomethionine-substituted crystal is isomorphous to the native crystal and diffracts X-rays to 2.9 Å.

  7. Subunit interaction and regulation of activity through terminal domains of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

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    Shen, Y; Tang, X-F; Matsui, E; Matsui, I

    2004-04-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) has recently been found in the Euryarchaeota subdomain of Archaea. Its genes are adjacent to several other genes related to DNA replication, repair and recombination in the genome, suggesting that this enzyme may be the major DNA replicase in Euryarchaeota. We successfully cloned, expressed, and purified the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PolDPho). By site-directed mutagenesis, we identified amino acid residues Asp-1122 and Asp-1124 of a large subunit as the essential residues responsible for DNA-polymerizing activity. We analysed the domain structure using proteins truncated at the N- and C-termini of both small and large subunits (DP1Pho and DP2Pho), and identified putative regions responsible for subunit interaction, oligomerization and regulation of the 3'-5' exonuclease activity in PolDPho. It was also found that the internal region of the putative zinc finger motif (cysteine cluster II) at the C-terminal of DP2Pho is involved in the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Using gel filtration analysis, we determined the molecular masses of the recombinant PolDPho and the N-terminal putative dimerization domain of the large subunit, and proposed that PolD from P. horikoshii probably forms a heterotetrameric structure in solution. Based on these results, a model regarding the subunit interaction and regulation of activity of PolDPho is proposed.

  8. Characterization of the PH1704 protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 and the critical functions of Tyr120.

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    Zhan, Dongling; Bai, Aixi; Yu, Lei; Han, Weiwei; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The PH1704 protease from hyperthermophilic archaean Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 is a member of DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily with diverse functional subclasses. The recombinant PH1704 was efficiently purified and was systematically characterized by a combination of substrate specificity analysis, steady-state kinetics study and molecular docking research. The homogeneous protease was obtained as a presumed dodecamer with molecular weight of ∼240 kDa. Iodoacetamide strongly inhibited the peptidase activity, confirming that Cys100 is a nucleophilic residue. The recombinant protein was identified as both an aminopeptidase and an endopeptidase. Experimental data showed that L-R-amc was the best substrate of PH1704. Structural interaction fingerprint analysis (SIFt) indicated the binding pose of PH1704 and showed that Tyr120 is important in substrate binding. Kinetic parameters Kcat and Kcat/Km of the Y120P mutant with L-R-amc was about 7 and 7.8 times higher than that of the wild type (WT). For the endopeptidase Y120P with AAFR-amc, Kcat and Kcat/Km is 10- and 21-fold higher than that of WT. Experimental data indicate the important functions of Tyr120: involvement in enzyme activity to form a hydrogen bond with Cys100 and as an entrance gate of the substrate with Lys43. The results of this study can be used to investigate the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily.

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of archaeal 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydrobiopterin synthase homologue PH0634 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

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    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    6-Pyruvoyl tetrahydrobiopterin synthase (PTPS) catalyses the conversion of dihydroneopterin triphosphate to 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin, the second of the three enzymatic steps in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin from GTP. PH0634, a 13.51 kDa archaeal PTPS homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, was overexpressed as native and selenomethionine-substituted protein and the purified protein was crystallized by the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.1 A resolution from the native crystal using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 35.83, b = 95.71, c = 105.65 A. Threefold noncrystallographic symmetry was identified from self-rotation calculations. Assuming the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 45% (V(M) = 2.24 A3 Da(-1)). The selenomethionine-substituted crystal is isomorphous to the native crystal and diffracts X-rays to 2.9 A.

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the biotin-protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

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    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kuroishi, Chizu; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-02-01

    Biotin-protein ligase is an enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent biotinylation of a specific lysine residue in acetyl-CoA carboxylase. The biotin-protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 has been cloned, overexpressed and purified. Crystallization was performed by the microbatch method or the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 2000 as a precipitant at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.6 A resolution from a native crystal and to 1.55 A resolution from a selenomethionine-derivative crystal for multiple anomalous dispersion phasing using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The native crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 38.601, b = 78.264, c = 70.147 A, beta = 101.48 degrees. Assuming a homodimer per asymmetric unit gives a VM value of 2.14 A3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 42.5%. Cocrystals with biotin, ADP and biotinyl-5'-AMP were prepared and diffraction data sets were collected to 1.6, 1.6 and 1.45 A resolution, respectively.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

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    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kunishima, Naoki

    2006-04-01

    Circadian (daily) protein clocks are found in cyanobacteria, where a complex of the KaiA, KaiB and KaiC proteins generates circadian rhythms. The 28.09 kDa KaiC homologue PH0284 protein from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was cloned and expressed and the purified protein was crystallized by the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data from the crystal were collected to 2.0 angstroms resolution using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the trigonal space group P3(2)21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.06, c = 298.90 angstroms. Assuming the presence of one hexamer in the asymmetric unit gives a V(M) value of 2.36 angstroms3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 47.9%. A cocrystal with ATP was prepared and a diffraction data set was collected at 2.3 angstroms resolution.

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the biotin–protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

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    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kuroishi, Chizu; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    Biotin–protein ligase is an enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent biotinylation of a specific lysine residue in acetyl-CoA carboxylase. The biotin–protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 has been cloned, overexpressed and purified. Crystallization was performed by the microbatch method or the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 2000 as a precipitant at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.6 Å resolution from a native crystal and to 1.55 Å resolution from a selenomethionine-derivative crystal for multiple anomalous dispersion phasing using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The native crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.601, b = 78.264, c  =  70.147 Å, β = 101.48°. Assuming a homodimer per asymmetric unit gives a V M value of 2.14 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 42.5%. Cocrystals with biotin, ADP and biotinyl-5′-AMP were prepared and diffraction data sets were collected to 1.6, 1.6 and 1.45 Å resolution, respectively. PMID:16510991

  13. Structural basis for the transglycosylase activity of a GH57-type glycogen branching enzyme from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

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    Na, Soohui; Park, Minjeong; Jo, Inseong; Cha, Jaeho; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2017-03-18

    Glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) catalyzes the formation of α-1,6-branching points during glycogenesis by cleaving α-1,4 bonds and making new α-1,6 bonds. Most GBEs belong to the glycoside hydrolase 13 family (GH13), but new GBEs in the GH57 family have been isolated from Archaea. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a GH57 GBE from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhGBE) at a resolution of 2.3 Å. PhGBE exhibits both α-1,6-branching activity and endo-α-1,4 hydrolytic activity. PhGBE has a central (β/α)7-barrel domain that contains an embedded helix domain and an α-helix-rich C-terminal domain. The active-site cleft is located at the interface of the central and C-terminal domains. Amino acid substitution at Trp22, which is separate from the catalytic nucleophilic residue, abolished both enzymatic activities, indicating that Trp22 might be responsible for substrate recognition. We also observed that shortening of the flexible loop near the catalytic residue changed branched chain lengths of the reaction products with increased hydrolytic activity. Taken together, our findings propose a molecular mechanism for how GH57 GBEs exhibit the two activities and where the substrate binds the enzyme.

  14. Crystal structure of product-bound complex of UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

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    Pampa, K.J., E-mail: sagarikakj@gmail.com [Department of Studies in Microbiology, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Lokanath, N.K. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Girish, T.U. [Department of General Surgery, JSS Medical College and Hospital, JSS University, Mysore 570 015 (India); Kunishima, N. [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Rai, V.R. [Department of Studies in Microbiology, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Determined the structure of UDP-D-ManNAcADH to a resolution of 1.55 Å. • First complex structure of PhUDP-D-ManNAcADH with UDP-D-ManMAcA. • The monomeric structure consists of three distinct domains. • Cys258 acting as catalytic nucleophilic and Lys204 acts as acid/base catalyst. • Oligomeric state plays an important role for the catalytic function. - Abstract: UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase (UDP-D-ManNAcDH) belongs to UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose dehydrogenase family and catalyzes Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (UDP-D-ManNAc) to Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid (UDP-D-ManNAcA) through twofold oxidation of NAD{sup +}. In order to reveal the structural features of the Pyrococcus horikoshii UDP-D-ManNAcADH, we have determined the crystal structure of the product-bound enzyme by X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.55 Å. The protomer folds into three distinct domains; nucleotide binding domain (NBD), substrate binding domain (SBD) and oligomerization domain (OD, involved in the dimerization). The clear electron density of the UDP-D-ManNAcA is observed and the residues binding are identified for the first time. Crystal structures reveal a tight dimeric polymer chains with product-bound in all the structures. The catalytic residues Cys258 and Lys204 are conserved. The Cys258 acts as catalytic nucleophile and Lys204 as acid/base catalyst. The product is directly interacts with residues Arg211, Thr249, Arg244, Gly255, Arg289, Lys319 and Arg398. In addition, the structural parameters responsible for thermostability and oligomerization of the three dimensional structure are analyzed.

  15. Science Letters:Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PH1948, predicted RNA methyltransferase from Pyrococcus horikoshii

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    GAO Yong-gui; YAO Min; TANAKA Isao

    2005-01-01

    RNA methyltransferase is responsible for transferring methyl and resulting in methylation on the bases or ribose ring of RNA, which existed widely but mostly remains an open question. A recombinant protein PH1948 predicting RNA methyltransferase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 has been crystallized. The crystals of selenomethionyl PH1948 belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=207.0 (A),b=43.1 (A), c= 118.2 (A), β=92.1°, and diffract X-rays to 2.2(A) resolution. The VM value was determined to be 2.8(A)3/Da, indicating the presence of four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  16. Identification of a novel amino acid racemase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 induced by D-amino acids.

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    Kawakami, Ryushi; Ohmori, Taketo; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    To date, there have been few reports analyzing the amino acid requirement for growth of hyperthermophilic archaea. We here found that the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 requires Thr, Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, Trp, His and Arg in the medium for growth, and shows slow growth in medium lacking Met or Ile. This largely corresponds to the presence, or absence, of genes related to amino acid biosynthesis in its genome, though there are exceptions. The amino acid requirements were dramatically lost by addition of D-isomers of Met, Leu, Val, allo-Ile, Phe, Tyr, Trp and Arg. Tracer analysis using (14)C-labeled D-Trp showed that D-Trp in the medium was used as a protein component in the cells, suggesting the presence of D-amino acid metabolic enzymes. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent racemase activity toward Met, Leu and Phe was detected in crude extract of P. horikoshii and was enhanced in cells grown in the medium supplemented with D-amino acids, especially D-allo-Ile. The gene encoding the racemase was narrowed down to one open reading frame on the basis of enzyme purification from P. horikoshii cells, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited PLP-dependent racemase activity toward several amino acids, including Met, Leu and Phe, but not Pro, Asp or Glu. This is the first report showing the presence in a hyperthermophilic archaeon of a PLP-dependent amino acid racemase with broad substrate specificity that is likely responsible for utilization of D-amino acids for growth.

  17. Improving the Catalytic Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii Prolidase for Detoxification of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents over a Broad Range of Temperatures

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    Casey M. Theriot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolidases hydrolyze Xaa-Pro dipeptides and can also cleave the P-F and P-O bonds found in organophosphorus (OP compounds, including the nerve agents soman and sarin. Ph1prol (PH0974 has previously been isolated and characterized from Pyrococcus horikoshii and was shown to have higher catalytic activity over a broader pH range, higher affinity for metal, and increased thermostability compared to P. furiosus prolidase, Pfprol (PF1343. To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamination and to investigate the structural factors that may influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated Ph1prol enzymes were prepared. Four Ph1prol mutants (A195T/G306S-, Y301C/K342N-, E127G/E252D-, and E36V-Ph1prol were isolated which had greater thermostability and improved activity over a broader range of temperatures against Xaa-Pro dipeptides and OP nerve agents compared to wild type Pyrococcus prolidases.

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the biotin–protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

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    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kuroishi, Chizu; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki, E-mail: kunisima@spring8.or.jp

    2005-02-01

    The biotin–protein ligase from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with biotin, ADP and biotinyl-5′-AMP. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} and diffract to beyond 1.6 Å resolution.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein and biotin protein ligase complex from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

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    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Bagautdinova, Svetlana; Kunishima, Naoki

    2007-04-01

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) catalyses the biotinylation of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. To elucidate the exact details of the protein-protein interactions in the biotinylation function, the C-terminal half fragment of BCCP (BCCPDeltaN76), the R48A mutant of BPL (BPL*) and the R48A K111A double mutant of BPL (BPL**), all of which are from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, have been expressed, purified and successfully cocrystallized. Cocrystals of the BPL*-BCCPDeltaN76 and BPL**-BCCPDeltaN76 complexes as well as crystals of BPL*, BPL** and BCCPDeltaN76 were obtained by the oil-microbatch method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant at 295 K. Complete X-ray diffraction data sets for BPL*-BCCPDeltaN76 and BPL**-BCCPDeltaN76 crystals were collected at 100 K to 2.7 and 2.0 A resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. They belong to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with similar unit-cell parameters a = 69.85, b = 63.12, c = 75.64 A, beta = 95.9 degrees . Assuming two subunits of the complex per asymmetric unit gives a V(M) value of 2.45 A(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 50%.

  20. The structures of the CutA1 proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Pyrococcus horikoshii: characterization of metal-binding sites and metal-induced assembly

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    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin

    2014-01-01

    CutA1 (copper tolerance A1) is a widespread cytoplasmic protein found in archaea, bacteria, plants and animals, including humans. In Escherichia coli it is implicated in divalent metal tolerance, while the mammalian CutA1 homologue has been proposed to mediate brain enzyme acetylcholinesterase activity and copper homeostasis. The X-ray structures of CutA1 from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus (TtCutA1) with and without bound Na+ at 1.7 and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively, and from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhCutA1) in complex with Na+ at 1.8 Å resolution have been determined. Both are short and rigid proteins of about 12 kDa that form intertwined compact trimers in the crystal and solution. The main difference in the structures is a wide-type β-bulge on top of the TtCutA1 trimer. It affords a mechanism for lodging a single-residue insertion in the middle of β2 while preserving the interprotomer main-chain hydrogen-bonding network. The liganded forms of the proteins provide new structural information about the metal-binding sites and CutA1 assembly. The Na+–TtCutA1 structure unveils a dodecameric assembly with metal ions in the trimer–trimer interfaces and the lateral clefts of the trimer. For Na+–PhCutA1, the metal ion associated with six waters in an octahedral geometry. The structures suggest that CutA1 may contribute to regulating intracellular metal homeostasis through various binding modes. PMID:24699729

  1. Crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase and structure-based phylogenetic analysis suggest an archaeal origin of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

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    Dong, Xianchi; Zhou, Minyun; Zhong, Chen; Yang, Bei; Shen, Ning; Ding, Jianping

    2010-03-01

    The ancient and ubiquitous aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases constitute a valuable model system for studying early evolutionary events. So far, the evolutionary relationship of tryptophanyl- and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS and TyrRS) remains controversial. As TrpRS and TyrRS share low sequence homology but high structural similarity, a structure-based method would be advantageous for phylogenetic analysis of the enzymes. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an archaeal TrpRS, the structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii TrpRS (pTrpRS) in complex with tryptophanyl-5' AMP (TrpAMP) at 3.0 A resolution which demonstrates more similarities to its eukaryotic counterparts. With the pTrpRS structure, we perform a more complete structure-based phylogenetic study of TrpRS and TyrRS, which for the first time includes representatives from all three domains of life. Individually, each enzyme shows a similar evolutionary profile as observed in the sequence-based phylogenetic studies. However, TyrRSs from Archaea/Eucarya cluster with TrpRSs rather than their bacterial counterparts, and the root of TrpRS locates in the archaeal branch of TyrRS, indicating the archaeal origin of TrpRS. Moreover, the short distance between TrpRS and archaeal TyrRS and that between bacterial and archaeal TrpRS, together with the wide distribution of TrpRS, suggest that the emergence of TrpRS and subsequent acquisition by Bacteria occurred at early stages of evolution.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein and biotin protein ligase complex from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Bagautdinova, Svetlana; Kunishima, Naoki, E-mail: kunisima@spring8.or.jp [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2007-04-01

    A truncated form of biotin carboxyl carrier protein containing the C-terminal half fragment (BCCPΔN76) and the biotin protein ligase (BPL) with the mutation R48A (BPL*) or the double mutation R48A K111A (BPL**) were successfully cocrystallized in the presence of ATP and biotin. The BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} and diffract X-rays to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Biotin protein ligase (BPL) catalyses the biotinylation of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. To elucidate the exact details of the protein–protein interactions in the biotinylation function, the C-terminal half fragment of BCCP (BCCPΔN76), the R48A mutant of BPL (BPL*) and the R48A K111A double mutant of BPL (BPL**), all of which are from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, have been expressed, purified and successfully cocrystallized. Cocrystals of the BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 complexes as well as crystals of BPL*, BPL** and BCCPΔN76 were obtained by the oil-microbatch method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant at 295 K. Complete X-ray diffraction data sets for BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals were collected at 100 K to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. They belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with similar unit-cell parameters a = 69.85, b = 63.12, c = 75.64 Å, β = 95.9°. Assuming two subunits of the complex per asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.45 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 50%.

  3. A 21-amino acid peptide from the cysteine cluster II of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii stimulates its nuclease activity which is Mre11-like and prefers manganese ion as the cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yulong; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a new type of DNA polymerase possessing polymerization and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. Here we report the characterization of the nuclease activity of PolD from Pyrococcus horikoshii. By site-directed mutagenesis, we verified that the putative Mre11-like nuclease domain in the small subunit (DP1), predicted according to computer analysis and structure inference reported previously, is the catalytic domain. We show that D363, H365 and H454 are the essential residues, while D407, N453, H500, H563 and H565 are critical residues for the activity. We provide experimental evidence demonstrating that manganese, rather than magnesium, is the preferable metal ion for the nuclease activity of PolD. We also show that DP1 alone is insufficient to perform full catalysis, which additionally requires the formation of the PolD complex and manganese ion. We found that a 21 amino acid, subunit-interacting peptide of the sequence from cysteine cluster II of the large subunit (DP2) stimulates the exonuclease activity of DP1 and the internal deletion mutants of PolD lacking the 21-aa sequence. This indicates that the putative zinc finger motif of the cysteine cluster II is deeply involved in the nucleolytic catalysis.

  4. Identification of a glycolytic regulon in the archaea Pyrococcus and Thermococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, Harmen J G; Verhees, Corné H; Akerboom, Jasper; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John

    2006-07-01

    The glycolytic pathway of the hyperthermophilic archaea that belong to the order Thermococcales (Pyrococcus, Thermococcus and Palaeococcus) differs significantly from the canonical Embden-Meyerhof pathway in bacteria and eukarya. This archaeal glycolysis variant consists of several novel enzymes, some of which catalyze unique conversions. Moreover, the enzymes appear not to be regulated allosterically, but rather at transcriptional level. To elucidate details of the gene expression control, the transcription initiation sites of the glycolytic genes in Pyrococcus furiosus have been mapped by primer extension analysis and the obtained promoter sequences have been compared with upstream regions of non-glycolytic genes. Apart from consensus sequences for the general transcription factors (TATA-box and BRE) this analysis revealed the presence of a potential transcription factor binding site (TATCAC-N(5)-GTGATA) in glycolytic and starch utilizing promoters of P. furiosus and several thermococcal species. The absence of this inverted repeat in Pyrococcus abyssi and Pyrococcus horikoshii probably reflects that their reduced catabolic capacity does not require this regulatory system. Moreover, this phyletic pattern revealed a TrmB-like regulator (PF0124 and TK1769) which may be involved in recognizing the repeat. This Thermococcales glycolytic regulon, with more than 20 genes, is the largest regulon that has yet been described for Archaea.

  5. Domain topology of the DNA polymerase D complex from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Feng; Shen, Yulong; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-09-21

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a recently found DNA polymerase extensively existing in Euryarchaeota of Archaea. Here, we report the domain function of PolD in oligomerization and interaction with other proteins, which were characterized with the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assays. A proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PhoPCNA, interacted with the N-terminus of the small subunit, DP1(1-200). Specific interaction between the remaining part of the small subunit, DP1(201-622), and the N-terminus of the large subunit, DP2(1-300), was detected by the Y2H assay. The SPR assay also indicated the intrasubunit interaction within the N-terminus, DP2(1-100), and the C-terminus, DP2(792-1163), of the large subunit. A synthetic 21 amino acid peptide corresponding to the sequence from cysteine cluster II, DP2(1290-1310), tightly interacted (a dissociation constant K(D) = 4.3 nM) with the N-terminus of the small subunit, DP1(1-200). Since the peptide could increase the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of DP1 [Shen et al. (2004) Nucleic Acids Res. 32, 158], the short region DP2(1290-1310) seems to play dual roles to form the PhoPolD complex and to regulate the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of DP1 through interaction with DP1(1-200). Furthermore, DP2(792-1163) containing the catalytic residues for DNA polymerization, Asp1122 and Asp1124, interacted with the intrasubunit domain, DP2(1-100), and the intersubunit domain, DP1(1-200). DP2(792-1163) probably forms the most important domain deeply involved in both the catalysis of DNA polymerization and stabilization of the PhoPolD complex through these multiple interactions.

  6. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.; Bol, E.; Krijgen, G.; Wolterbeek, H.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native–native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t1/2 = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mM, of

  7. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Bol, E.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native-native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t(1/2) = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mu M

  8. Pyrococcus furiosus strains and methods of using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipscomb, Gina L; Farkas, Joel Andrew; Adams, Michael W. W.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-06

    Provided herein are methods for transforming a Pyrococcus furiosus with a polynucleotide. In one embodiment, the method includes contacting a P. furiosus with a polynucleotide under conditions suitable for uptake of the polynucleotide by the P. furiosus, and identifying transformants at a frequency of, for instance, at least 10.sup.3 transformants per microgram DNA. Also provided are isolated Pyrococcus furiosus having the characteristics of Pyrococcus furiosus COM1, and plasmids that include an origin of replication that functions in a Pyrococcus furiosus. The plasmid is stable in a recipient P. furiosus without selection for more than 100 generations and is structurally unchanged after replication in P. furiosus for more than 100 generations.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus horikoshii Strain 20a from Cuatro Cienegas, Coahuila, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarza, Eugenia; Alcaraz, Luis D; Aguilar-Salinas, Bernardo; Islas, Africa; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2017-07-27

    We sequenced the Bacillus horikoshii 20a genome, isolated from sediment collected in Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico. We identified genes involved in establishing antagonistic interactions in microbial communities (antibiotic resistance and bacteriocins) and genes related to the metabolism of cyanophycin, a reserve compound and spore matrix material potentially relevant for survival in an oligotrophic environment. Copyright © 2017 Zarza et al.

  10. The structures of the CutA1 proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Pyrococcus horikoshii: characterization of metal‐binding sites and metal‐induced assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin

    2014-01-01

    .... In Escherichia coli it is implicated in divalent metal tolerance, while the mammalian CutA1 homologue has been proposed to mediate brain enzyme acetylcholinesterase activity and copper homeostasis. The X...

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of archaeal 6‐pyruvoyl tetrahydrobiopterin synthase homologue PH0634 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    .... The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P 2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit‐cell parameters a = 35.83, b = 95.71, c = 105.65 Å. Threefold noncrystallographic symmetry was identified from self...

  12. Improving the Catalytic Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii Prolidase for Detoxification of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents over a Broad Range of Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Reactions contained Mutazyme II reaction buffer, 125 ng/μL of each primer, 40mM dNTP mix, and 2.5U of Mutazyme II DNA polymerase. Initial DNA template...there was interest in determining the relative activity of recombi - nant Ph1prol compared to Pf prol and Phprol against G- type nerve agent simulants DFP

  13. Molybdenum incorporation in tungsten aldehyde oxidoreductase enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M; Bevers, L.E.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagen, W.R.; Hagedoorn, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus expresses five aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR) enzymes, all containing a tungsto-bispterin cofactor. The growth of this organism is fully dependent on the presence of tungsten in the growth medium. Previous studies have suggested that molybdenum is no

  14. Molybdenum incorporation in tungsten aldehyde oxidoreductase enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M; Bevers, L.E.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagen, W.R.; Hagedoorn, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus expresses five aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR) enzymes, all containing a tungsto-bispterin cofactor. The growth of this organism is fully dependent on the presence of tungsten in the growth medium. Previous studies have suggested that molybdenum is no

  15. Enzymology and bioenergetics of the glycolytic pathway of pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuininga, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    During growth ondi- and polysaccharides, the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcusfuriosus uses a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway

  16. A proposal to rename the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus woesei as Pyrococcus furiosus subsp. woesei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirojne Kanoksilapatham

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus species are hyperthermophilic members of the order Thermococcales, with optimal growth temperatures approaching 100 °C. All species grow heterotrophically and produce H2 or, in the presence of elemental sulfur (S°, H2S. Pyrococcus woesei and P. furiosus were isolated from marine sediments at the same Vulcano Island beach site and share many morphological and physiological characteristics. We report here that the rDNA operons of these strains have identical sequences, including their intergenic spacer regions and part of the 23S rRNA. Both species grow rapidly and produce H2 in the presence of 0.1% maltose and 10–100 µM sodium tungstate in S°-free medium. However,P. woesei shows more extensive autolysis than P. furiosus in the stationary phase. Pyrococcusfuriosus and P. woesei share three closely related families of insertion sequences (ISs. A Southern blot performed with IS probes showed extensive colinearity between the genomes of P. woesei and P. furiosus. Cloning and sequencing of ISs that were in different contexts in P. woesei and P. furiosus revealed that the napA gene in P. woesei is disrupted by a type III IS element, whereas in P. furiosus, this gene is intact. A type I IS element, closely linked to the napA gene, was observed in the same context in both P. furiosus and P. woesei genomes. Our results suggest that the IS elements are implicated in genomic rearrangements and reshuffling in these closely related strains. We propose to rename P. woesei a subspecies of P. furiosus based on their identical rDNA operon sequences, many common IS elements that are shared genomic markers, and the observation that all P. woesei nucleotide sequences deposited in GenBank to date are > 99% identical to P. furiosus sequences.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a novel alkalitolerant thermophile, Anaerobranca horikoshii gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, M.; Youhong Li; Wiegel, J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Woese, C. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Nine moderately alkalitolerant thermophilic bacteria with similar properties were isolated from water and soil samples obtained from Yellowstone National Park. These Gram-type-positive, rod-shaped bacteria produce cells with primary branches. The cells are peritrichous and exhibit only slight tumbling motility. At 60{degrees}C the pH range for growth is 6.9 to 10.3, and the optimum pH is 8.5. At pH 8.5 the temperature range for growth is 34 to 66{degrees}C, with an optimum temperature of 57{degrees}C. The strains are mainly proteolytic. The fermentation products from yeast extract are acetate, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. Fumarate added to minimal medium containing yeast extract is stoichiometrically converted to succinate, indicating that it is used as an alternative electron acceptor. The DNA G+C content is 33 to 34 mol%. On the basis of its unique properties, such as branch formation, growth at alkaline pH values at elevated temperatures, and the relative distance of its 16S rRNA sequence from those of other known bacteria, we propose that strain JW/YL-138{sub t} (T = type strain) and eight similar strains represent a new genus and species, Anaerobranca horikoshii. Strain JW/YL-138 is designated the type strain of the type species, A. horikoshii, which was named in honor of Koki Horikoshi, a pioneer in the field of alkaliphilic bacteria.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a novel alkalitolerant thermophile, Anaerobranca horikoshii gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, M; Li, Y; Woese, C; Wiegel, J

    1995-07-01

    Nine moderately alkalitolerant thermophilic bacteria with similar properties were isolated from water and soil samples obtained from Yellowstone National Park. These Gram-type-positive, rod-shaped bacteria produce cells with primary branches. The cells are peritrichous and exhibit only slight tumbling motility. At 60 degrees C the pH range for growth is 6.9 to 10.3, and the optimum pH is 8.5. At pH 8.5 the temperature range for growth is 34 to 66 degrees C, with an optimum temperature of 57 degrees C. The strains are mainly proteolytic. The fermentation products from yeast extract are acetate, CO2, and H2. Fumarate added to minimal medium containing yeast extract is stoichiometrically converted to succinate, indicating that it is used as an alternative electron acceptor. The DNA G + C content is 33 to 34 mol%. On the basis of its unique properties, such as branch formation, growth at alkaline pH values at elevated temperatures, and the relative distance of its 16S rRNA sequence from those of other known bacteria, we propose that strain JW/YL-138T (T = type strain) and eight similar strains represent a new genus and species, Anaerobranca horikoshii. Strain JW/YL-138 is designated the type strain of the type species, A. horikoshii, which was named in honor of Koki Horikoshi, a pioneer in the field of alkaliphilic bacteria.

  19. Oligosaccharide synthesis by the hyperthermostable b-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus: kinetics and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.E.; Strubel, M.; Lieshout, van J.F.T.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Oligosaccharides can be synthesised from monosaccharides or disaccharides, using glycosidases as a catalyst. To investigate the potential of this synthesis with beta-glycosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus we determined kinetic parameters for substrate conversion and product formation from cellobiose,

  20. Identification of a glycolytic regulon in the Archaea Pyrococcus and Thermococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werken, van de H.J.G.; Verhees, C.H.; Akerboom, A.P.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The glycolytic pathway of the hyperthermophilic archaea that belong to the order Thermococcales (Pyrococcus, Thermococcus and Palaeococcus) differs significantly from the canonical Embden-Meyerhof pathway in bacteria and eukarya. This archaeal glycolysis variant consists of several novel enzymes, so

  1. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity’s growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed.

  2. Crystallization of [Fe4S3]-ferredoxin from the hyperthermophile archaeon pyrococcus furiosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Ericsson Skovbo; Harris, Pernille; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin with a [Fe3S4]-cluster was crystallized through steps of optimization and X-ray diffraction data were collected from several crystal forms. Flat plate-like crystals were grown by hanging-drop vapour diffusion. The precipitant used was 30% PEG 400; the p...

  3. Exploring the reductive capacity of Pyrococcus furiosus. The reduction of carboxylic acids and pyridine nucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ban, van den E.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    This Ph.D. project started in 1997 and its main goal was to obtain insight in the reductive capacity of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus . The research was focused on the biocatalytic reduction of carboxylic acids.Reductions of carboxylic acids are interes

  4. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel type of alpha-galactosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, van J.F.T.; Verhees, C.H.; Ettema, T.J.G.; Sar, van der S.; Imamura, H.; Matsuzawa, H.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2003-01-01

    An -galactosidase gene from Pyrococcus furiosus was identified, cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. It is the first -galactosidase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon described to date. The gene encodes a unique amino acid sequence compared to other -galactosidases. Highest homology

  5. Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a DNA-guided nuclease that targets cognate DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swarts, D.C.; Hegge, J.W.; Hinojo, Ismael; Shiimori, Masami; Ellis, Michael A.; Dumrongkulraksa, Justin; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Oost, Van Der John

    2015-01-01

    Functions of prokaryotic Argonautes (pAgo) have long remained elusive. Recently, Argonautes of the bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Thermus thermophilus were demonstrated to be involved in host defense. The Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PfAgo) belongs to a different branch in

  6. Exploring the reductive capacity of Pyrococcus furiosus : the reduction of carboxylic acids and pyridine nucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ban, van den E.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    This Ph.D. project started in 1997 and its main goal was to obtain insight in the reductive capacity of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus . The research was focused on the biocatalytic reduction of carboxylic

  7. Production and characterization of a thermostable L-threonine dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding a threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) has been identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The Pf-TDH protein has been functionally produced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme has a tetrameric conformation with a molecular mass of ¿ 155 kDa.

  8. Evidence supporting a cis-enediol-based mechanism for Pyrococcus furiosus phosphoglucose isomerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrisford, J.M.; Hounslow, A.M.; Akerboom, A.P.; Hagen, W.R.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.; Murray, I.A.; Blackburn, G.M.; Waltho, J.P.; Rice, D.W.; Baker, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    The enzymatic aldose ketose isomerisation of glucose and fructose sugars involves the transfer of a hydrogen between their C1 and C2 carbon atoms and, in principle, can proceed through either a direct hydride shift or via a cis-enediol intermediate. Pyrococcus furiosus phosphoglucose isomerase (PfPG

  9. Practical applications of hydrogenase I from Pyrococcus furiosus for NADPH generation and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, R.; Greiner, L.; Ban, van den E.C.D.; Haaker, H.B.C.M.; Liese, A.

    2003-01-01

    The soluble hydrogenase I (H-2:NADP(+) oxidoreductase, EC 1.18.99.1) from the marine hyperthermophilic strain of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was partially purified by anion-exchange chromatography. This P furiosus hydrogenase I preparation (PF H(2)ase I) has been used as biocatalyst in the enzy

  10. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel type of alpha-galactosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, van J.F.T.; Verhees, C.H.; Ettema, T.J.G.; Sar, van der S.; Imamura, H.; Matsuzawa, H.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2003-01-01

    An -galactosidase gene from Pyrococcus furiosus was identified, cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. It is the first -galactosidase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon described to date. The gene encodes a unique amino acid sequence compared to other -galactosidases. Highest homology

  11. Crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus phosphoglucose isomerase: Implications for substrate binding and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrisford, J.M.; Akerboom, A.P.; Turnbull, A.P.; Geus, de D.; Sedelnikova, S.E.; Staton, I.; McLeod, C.W.; Verhees, C.H.; Oost, van der J.; Rice, D.W.; Baker, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) catalyzes the reversible isomerization between D-fructose 6-phosphate and D-glucose 6-phosphate as part of the glycolytic pathway. PGI from the Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) was crystallized, and its structure was determined by x-ray diffraction to a 2-Angstrom

  12. Adsorption of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus of hydrophobic (polysterene) and hydrophilic (silica) surfaces increases protein heat stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S.; Oost, van der J.; Norde, W.

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus with two types of surfaces, that is, hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica, was investigated, and the adsorption isotherms were determined. The adsorbed hyperthermostable enzyme did not undergo

  13. Adsorption of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus on hydrophobic (polystyrene) and hydrophilic (silica) surfaces increases protein heat stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S.; van der Oost, J.; Norde, Willem

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus with two types of surfaces, that is, hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica, was investigated, and the adsorption isotherms were determined. The adsorbed hyperthermostable enzyme did not undergo

  14. Recombinant expression library of Pyrococcus furiosus constructed by high-throughput cloning: a useful tool for functional and structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eYuan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally near 100°C and is an important resource of many industrial and molecular biological enzymes. To study the structure and function of Pyrococcus furiosus proteins at whole genome level, we constructed expression plasmids of each Pyrococcus furiosus gene using a ligase-independent cloning method, which was based on amplifying target gene and vector by PCR using phosphorothioate-modified primers and digesting PCR products by λ exonuclease. Our cloning method had a positive clone percentage of ≥ 80% in 96-well plate cloning format. Small-scale expression experiment showed that 55 out of 80 genes were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli Strain Rosetta 2(DE3pLysS. In summary, this recombinant expression library of Pyrococcus furiosus provides a platform for functional and structural studies, as well as developing novel industrial enzymes. Our cloning scheme is adaptable to constructing recombinant expression library of other sequenced organisms.

  15. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, Grégoire; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins.

  16. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    KAUST Repository

    Michoud, Gregoire

    2016-06-02

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins.

  17. Exploring the reductive capacity of Pyrococcus furiosus. The reduction of carboxylic acids and pyridine nucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Ban, van den, A.W.

    2001-01-01

    This Ph.D. project started in 1997 and its main goal was to obtain insight in the reductive capacity of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus . The research was focused on the biocatalytic reduction of carboxylic acids.Reductions of carboxylic acids are interesting reactions, since the generated products, aldehydes and alcohols, are potentially applicable in the fine-chemical industry. However, the reduction of carboxylic acids to the corresponding aldehydes is a thermodynamicall...

  18. Phosphate and arsenate removal efficiency by thermostable ferritin enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus using radioisotopes

    KAUST Repository

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-13

    Oxo-anion binding properties of the thermostable enzyme ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus were characterized with radiography. Radioisotopes 32P and 76As present as oxoanions were used to measure the extent and the rate of their absorption by the ferritin. Thermostable ferritin proved to be an excellent system for rapid phosphate and arsenate removal from aqueous solutions down to residual concentrations at the picomolar level. These very low concentrations make thermostable ferritin a potential tool to considerably mitigate industrial biofouling by phosphate limitation or to remove arsenate from drinking water.

  19. Characterization of DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus sp. strain KOD1 and its application to PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The DNA polymerase gene from the archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain KOD1 (KOD DNA polymerase) contains a long open reading frame of 5,013 bases that encodes 1,671 amino acid residues (GenBank accession no. D29671). Similarity analysis revealed that the DNA polymerase contained a putative 3'-5' exonuclease activity and two in-frame intervening sequences of 1,080 bp (360 amino acids; KOD pol intein-1) and 1,611 bp (537 amino acids; KOD pol intein-2), which are located in the middle of regions conse...

  20. Increased susceptibility of ß-glucosidase from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus to thermal inactivation at higher pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.E.; Meersman, F.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Heremans, K.; Boom, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    The stability of ß-glucosidase from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was studied as a function of pressure, temperature and pH. The conformational stability was monitored using FTIR spectroscopy, and the functional enzyme stability was monitored by inactivation studies. The enzyme proved to

  1. Biochemical evidence for the presence of two α-glucoside ABC-transport systems in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Sonja M.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus can utilize different carbohydrates, such as starch, maltose and trehalose. Uptake of α-glucosides is mediated by two different, binding protein-dependent, ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type transport systems. The maltose transporter also transports tr

  2. Accurate Computation of Reduction Potentials of 4Fe−4S Clusters Indicates a Carboxylate Shift in Pyrococcus furiosus Ferredoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Ooi, Bee Lean; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the computation and accurate reproduction of subtle shifts in reduction potentials for two mutants of the iron-sulfur protein Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin. The computational models involved only first-sphere ligands and differed with respect to one ligand, either acetate (as...

  3. Replication slippage of the thermophilic DNA polymerases B and D from the Euryarchaeota Pyrococcus abyssi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa G. eCastillo-Lizardo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Replication slippage or slipped-strand mispairing involves the misalignment of DNA strands during the replication of repeated DNA sequences, and can lead to genetic rearrangements such as microsatellite instability. Here, we show that PolB and PolD replicative DNA polymerases from the archaeal model Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab slip in vitro during replication of a single-stranded DNA template carrying a hairpin structure and short direct repeats. We find that this occurs in both their wild-type (exo+ and exonuclease deficient (exo- forms. The slippage behavior of PabPolB and PabPolD, probably due to limited strand displacement activity, resembles that observed for the high fidelity Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu DNA polymerase. The presence of PabPCNA inhibited PabPolB and PabPolD slippage. We propose a model whereby PabPCNA stimulates strand displacement activity and polymerase progression through the hairpin, thus permitting the error-free replication of repetitive sequences.

  4. Determinació de l'estructura tridimensional de la glicogen sintasa de "Pyrococcus abyssi"

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Les glicogen i midó sintases són glicosiltransferases que catalitzen la transferència de residus glucosil a l'extrem no reductor d'una cadena creixent d'un glucà α-1,4, retenint la configuració del carboni anomèric del sucre transferit. Aquest procès és central en el metabolisme energètic de la majoria d'èssers vius.En aquest treball presentem l'estructura cristal·logràfica de la glicogen sintasa de Pyrococcus abyssi (PaGS). Aquest enzim és termoestable i presenta una activitat màxima a ...

  5. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Jan Schut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally-relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.

  6. Recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a hyperthermostable α-glucan/maltodextrin phosphorylase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman M. Mizanur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-glucan phosphorylase catalyzes the reversible cleavage of α-1-4-linked glucose polymers into α-D-glucose-1-phosphate. We report the recombinant production of an α-glucan/maltodextrin phosphorylase (PF1535 from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, and the first detailed biochemical characterization of this enzyme from any archaeal source using a mass-spectrometry-based assay. The apparent 98 kDa recombinant enzyme was active over a broad range of temperatures and pH, with optimal activity at 80 °C and pH 6.5–7. This archaeal protein retained its complete activity after 24 h at 80 °C in Tris-HCl buffer. Unlike other previously reported phosphorylases, the Ni-affinity column purified enzyme showed broad substrate specificity in both the synthesis and degradation of maltooligosaccharides. In the synthetic direction of the enzymatic reaction, the lowest oligosaccharide required for the chain elongation was maltose. In the degradative direction, the archaeal enzyme can produce glucose-1-phosphate from maltotriose or longer maltooligosaccharides including both glycogen and starch. The specific activity of the enzyme at 80 °C in the presence of 10 mM maltoheptaose and at 10 mg ml–1 glycogen concentration was 52 U mg–1 and 31 U mg–1, respectively. The apparent Michaelis constant and maximum velocity for inorganic phosphate were 31 ± 2 mM and 0.60 ± 0.02 mM min–1 µg–1, respectively. An initial velocity study of the enzymatic reaction indicated a sequential bi-bi catalytic mechanism. Unlike the more widely studied mammalian glycogen phosphorylase, the Pyrococcus enzyme is active in the absence of added AMP.

  7. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Gerrit J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Nguyen, Diep M. N.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms. PMID:26858706

  8. Structural Analysis and Bioengineering of Thermostable Pyrococcus furiosus Prolidase for the Optimization of Organophosphorus Nerve Agent Detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS prolidase, organophosphate , OP nerve agent, thermostable enzyme, Pyrococcus furiosus...Singh, 2009). Annually, there are an estimated 3 million poisonings and 300,000 human deaths owing to OP compounds (Singh, 2009). There is a need... organophosphate anhydrolase/prolidase. Biochemistry, 49, 547-59. Wang, Q., Sun, M., Zhang, H. & Huang, C. 1998. Purification and properties of soman

  9. Hydrolysis of isoflavone glycosides by a thermostable β-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Bi-Na; Kim, Yeong-Su; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2012-02-15

    The recombinant β-glucosidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was purified with a specific activity of 330 U/mg for genistin by His-trap chromatography. The specific activity of the purified enzyme followed the order genistin > daidzin > glycitin> malonyl glycitin > malonyl daidzin > malonyl genistin. The hydrolytic activity for genistin was highest at pH 6.0 and 95 °C with a half-life of 59 h, a K(m) of 0.5 mM, and a k(cat) of 6050 1/s. The enzyme completely hydrolyzed 1.0 mM genistin, daidzin, and glycitin within 100, 140, and 180 min, respectively. The soybean flour extract at 7.5% (w/v) contained 1.0 mM genistin, 0.9 mM daidzin, and 0.3 mM glycitin. Genistin, daidzin, and glycitin in the soybean flour extract were completely hydrolyzed after 60, 75, and 120 min, respectively. Of the reported β-glucosidases, P. furiosusβ-glucosidase exhibited the highest thermostability, k(cat), k(cat)/K(m), yield, and productivity for hydrolyzing genistin. These results suggest that this enzyme may be useful for the industrial hydrolysis of isoflavone glycosides.

  10. Differential signal transduction via TrmB, a sugar sensing transcriptional repressor of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Surma, Melanie; Seitz, Sabine; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2007-06-01

    TrmB is a transcriptional repressor of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus serving at least two operons. TrmB represses genes encoding an ABC transporter for trehalose and maltose (the TM system) with trehalose and maltose as inducers. TrmB also represses genes encoding another ABC transporter for maltodextrins (the MD system) with maltotriose and sucrose as inducers. Here we report that glucose which was also bound by TrmB acted as a corepressor (causing stronger repression) for both the TM and the MD system. Binding of glucose by TrmB was increased in the presence of TM promoter DNA. Maltose which acted as inducer for the TM system acted as a corepressor for the MD system intensifying repression. We propose that the differential conformational changes of TrmB in response to binding the different sugars governs the ability of TrmB to interact with the promoter region and represents a simple mechanism for selecting the usage of one carbon source over the other, reminiscent of catabolite repression in bacteria.

  11. Replication slippage of the thermophilic DNA polymerases B and D from the Euryarchaeota Pyrococcus abyssi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Lizardo, Melissa; Henneke, Ghislaine; Viguera, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Replication slippage or slipped-strand mispairing involves the misalignment of DNA strands during the replication of repeated DNA sequences, and can lead to genetic rearrangements such as microsatellite instability. Here, we show that PolB and PolD replicative DNA polymerases from the archaeal model Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) slip in vitro during replication of a single-stranded DNA template carrying a hairpin structure and short direct repeats. We find that this occurs in both their wild-type (exo+) and exonuclease deficient (exo-) forms. The slippage behavior of PabPolB and PabPolD, probably due to limited strand displacement activity, resembles that observed for the high fidelity P. furiosus (Pfu) DNA polymerase. The presence of PabPCNA inhibited PabPolB and PabPolD slippage. We propose a model whereby PabPCNA stimulates strand displacement activity and polymerase progression through the hairpin, thus permitting the error-free replication of repetitive sequences.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04, Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F.; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na+ gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential. PMID:22843576

  13. In situ STM imaging and direct electrochemistry of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin assembled on thiolate-modified Au(111) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Ooi, Bee Lean

    2004-01-01

    We have addressed here electron transfer (ET) of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin (PfFd, 7.5 kDa) in both homogeneous solution using edge plane graphite (EPG) electrodes and in the adsorbed state by electrochemistry on surface-modified single-crystal Au(111) electrodes, This has been supported...... surface modified by the same functional group monolayer and to address diffusionless direct electrochemistry, as well as surface microstructures of the protein monolayer. PfFd molecules were found to assemble on either mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) or cysteine-modified Au(111) surfaces in stable monolayers...

  14. Coupled TLC and MALDI-TOF/MS Analyses of the Lipid Extract of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Lobasso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipidome of the marine hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was studied by means of combined thin-layer chromatography and MALDI-TOF/MS analyses of the total lipid extract. 80–90% of the major polar lipids were represented by archaeol lipids (diethers and the remaining part by caldarchaeol lipids (tetraethers. The direct analysis of lipids on chromatography plate showed the presence of the diphytanylglycerol analogues of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol, the N-acetylglucosamine-diphytanylglycerol phosphate plus some caldarchaeol lipids different from those previously described. In addition, evidence for the presence of the dimeric ether lipid cardiolipin is reported, suggesting that cardiolipins are ubiquitous in archaea.

  15. A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, lacking flagella, has unusual growth physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Derrick L; Notey, Jaspreet S; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Loder, Andrew J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638 exhibited an extended exponential phase and atypical cell aggregation behavior. Genomic DNA from the mutant culture was sequenced and compared to wild-type (WT) DSM3638, revealing 145 genes with one or more insertions, deletions, or substitutions (12 silent, 33 amino acid substitutions, and 100 frame shifts). Approximately, half of the mutated genes were transposases or hypothetical proteins. The WT transcriptome revealed numerous changes in amino acid and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathways coincidental with growth phase transitions, unlike the mutant whose transcriptome reflected the observed prolonged exponential phase. Targeted gene deletions, based on frame-shifted ORFs in the mutant genome, in a genetically tractable strain of P. furiosus (COM1) could not generate the extended exponential phase behavior observed for the mutant. For example, a putative radical SAM family protein (PF2064) was the most highly up-regulated ORF (>25-fold) in the WT between exponential and stationary phase, although this ORF was unresponsive in the mutant; deletion of this gene in P. furiosus COM1 resulted in no apparent phenotype. On the other hand, frame-shifting mutations in the mutant genome negatively impacted transcription of a flagellar biosynthesis operon (PF0329-PF0338).Consequently, cells in the mutant culture lacked flagella and, unlike the WT, showed minimal evidence of exopolysaccharide-based cell aggregation in post-exponential phase. Electron microscopy of PF0331-PF0337 deletions in P. furiosus COM1 showed that absence of flagella impacted normal cell aggregation behavior and, furthermore, indicated that flagella play a key role, beyond motility, in the growth physiology of P. furiosus.

  16. Crystal Structure of PAV1-137: A Protein from the Virus PAV1 That Infects Pyrococcus abyssi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Leulliot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1 was the first virus particle infecting a hyperthermophilic Euryarchaeota (Pyrococcus abyssi strain GE23 that has been isolated and characterized. It is lemon shaped and is decorated with a short fibered tail. PAV1 morphologically resembles the fusiform members of the family Fuselloviridae or the genus Salterprovirus. The 18 kb dsDNA genome of PAV1 contains 25 predicted genes, most of them of unknown function. To help assigning functions to these proteins, we have initiated structural studies of the PAV1 proteome. We determined the crystal structure of a putative protein of 137 residues (PAV1-137 at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The protein forms dimers both in solution and in the crystal. The fold of PAV1-137 is a four-α-helical bundle analogous to those found in some eukaryotic adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase, suggesting that PAV1-137 is involved in protein-protein interactions.

  17. Mutations of Asp540 and the domain-connecting residues synergistically enhance Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2014-01-21

    The structure of Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase (PfuLig), which architecturally resembles human DNA ligase I (hLigI), revealed that the C-terminal helix stabilizes the closed conformation through several ionic interactions between two domains (adenylylation domain (AdD) and C-terminal OB-fold domain (OBD)). This helix is oriented differently in DNA-bound hLigI, suggesting that the disruption of its interactions with AdD facilitates DNA binding. Previously, we demonstrated that the replacement of Asp540 with arginine improves the ligation activity. Here we report that the combination of the Asp540-replacement and the elimination of ionic residues in the helix, forming interactions with AdD, effectively enhanced the activity.

  18. Structure of a double hexamer of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance protein N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Martin; Enemark, Eric J.

    2016-06-22

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of thePyrococcus furiosusminichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein as a double hexamer is described. The MCM complex is a ring-shaped helicase that unwinds DNA at the replication fork of eukaryotes and archaea. Prior to replication initiation, the MCM complex assembles as an inactive double hexamer at specific sites of DNA. The presented structure is highly consistent with previous MCM double-hexamer structures and shows two MCM hexamers with a head-to-head interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain. Minor differences include a diminished head-to-head interaction and a slightly reduced inter-hexamer rotation.

  19. Cloning, expression, and purification of the His(6)-tagged hyper-thermostable dUTPase from Pyrococcus woesei in Escherichia coli: application in PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabrowski, Slawomir; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    The gene encoding dUTPase from Pyrococcus woesei was cloned into Escherichia coli expression system. It shows 100% gene identity to homologous gene in Pyrococcus furiosus. The expression of N-terminal His(6)-tagged Pwo dUTPase was performed in E coli BL21(DE3)pLysS and E. coli Rosetta(DE3)p......LysS strain that contains plasmid encoding additional copies of rare E. coli tRNAs. E. coli Rosetta(pLysS) strain was found with two times higher expression yield of His(6)-tagged Pwo dUTPase than E. coli BL21(DE3)pLysS. The His(6)-tagged Pwo dUTPase was purified on Ni2+-IDA-Sepharose, dialyzed...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Piezophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus kukulkanii NCB100 Isolated from the Rebecca's Roost Hydrothermal Vent in the Guaymas Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oger, Philippe M; Callac, Nolwenn; Oger-Desfeux, Christine; Hughes, Sandrine; Gillet, Benjamin; Jebbar, Mohamed; Godfroy, Anne

    2017-02-16

    Members of the order Thermococcales are common inhabitants of high-temperature hydrothermal vent systems (black smokers) that are represented in clone libraries mostly by isolates from the Thermococcus genus. We report the complete sequence of a novel species from the Pyrococcus genus, P. kukulkanii strain NCB100, which has been isolated from a flange fragment of the Rebecca's Roost hydrothermal vent system in the Guaymas Basin.

  1. Homology modelling of two subtilisin-like proteases from the hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermococcus stetteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhorst, W G; Warner, A; de Vos, W M; Siezen, R J

    1997-08-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus produces an extracellular, glycosylated hyperthermostable subtilisin-like serine protease, termed pyrolysin (Voorhorst,W.G.B., Eggen,R.I.L., Geerling,A.C.M., Platteeuw,C., Siezen,R.J. and de Vos,W.M. (1996) J. Biol. Chem., 271, 20426-20431). Based on the pyrolysin coding sequence, a pyrolysin-like gene fragment was cloned and characterized from the extreme thermophilic archaeon Thermococcus stetteri. Like pyrolysin, the deduced sequence of this serine protease, designated stetterlysin, contains a catalytic domain with high homology with other subtilases, allowing homology modelling starting from known crystal structures. Comparison of the predicted three-dimensional models of the catalytic domain of stetterlysin and pyrolysin with the crystal structure of subtilases from mesophilic and thermophilic origin, i.e. subtilisin BPN' and thermitase, and the homology model of subtilisin S41 from psychrophilic origin, led to the identification of features that could be related to protein stabilization. Higher thermostability was found to be correlated with an increased number of residues involved in pairs and networks of charge-charge and aromatic-aromatic interactions. These highly thermostable proteases have several extra surface loops and inserts with a relatively high frequency of aromatic residues and Asn residues. The latter are often present in putative N-glycosylation sites. Results from modelling of known substrates in the substrate-binding region support the broad substrate range and the autocatalytic activation previously suggested for pyrolysin.

  2. N-Linked Glycans Are Assembled on Highly Reduced Dolichol Phosphate Carriers in the Hyperthermophilic Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Michelle M; Imperiali, Barbara; Eichler, Jerry; Guan, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    In all three domains of life, N-glycosylation begins with the assembly of glycans on phosphorylated polyisoprenoid carriers. Like eukaryotes, archaea also utilize phosphorylated dolichol for this role, yet whereas the assembled oligosaccharide is transferred to target proteins from dolichol pyrophosphate in eukaryotes, archaeal N-linked glycans characterized to date are derived from a dolichol monophosphate carrier, apart from a single example. In this study, glycan-charged dolichol phosphate from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was identified and structurally characterized. Normal and reverse phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the existence of dolichol phosphate charged with the heptasaccharide recently described in in vitro studies of N-glycosylation on this species. As with other described archaeal dolichol phosphates, the α- and ω-terminal isoprene subunits of the P. furiosus lipid are saturated, in contrast to eukaryal phosphodolichols that present only a saturated α-position isoprene subunit. Interestingly, an additional 1-4 of the 12-14 isoprene subunits comprising P. furiosus dolichol phosphate are saturated, making this lipid not only the longest archaeal dolichol phosphate described to date but also the most highly saturated.

  3. N-Linked Glycans Are Assembled on Highly Reduced Dolichol Phosphate Carriers in the Hyperthermophilic Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Chang

    Full Text Available In all three domains of life, N-glycosylation begins with the assembly of glycans on phosphorylated polyisoprenoid carriers. Like eukaryotes, archaea also utilize phosphorylated dolichol for this role, yet whereas the assembled oligosaccharide is transferred to target proteins from dolichol pyrophosphate in eukaryotes, archaeal N-linked glycans characterized to date are derived from a dolichol monophosphate carrier, apart from a single example. In this study, glycan-charged dolichol phosphate from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was identified and structurally characterized. Normal and reverse phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the existence of dolichol phosphate charged with the heptasaccharide recently described in in vitro studies of N-glycosylation on this species. As with other described archaeal dolichol phosphates, the α- and ω-terminal isoprene subunits of the P. furiosus lipid are saturated, in contrast to eukaryal phosphodolichols that present only a saturated α-position isoprene subunit. Interestingly, an additional 1-4 of the 12-14 isoprene subunits comprising P. furiosus dolichol phosphate are saturated, making this lipid not only the longest archaeal dolichol phosphate described to date but also the most highly saturated.

  4. X-ray crystalline structures of pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase from a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and its cys-free mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Chinami, M; Mizushima, T; Ogasahara, K; Ota, M; Tsukihara, T; Yutani, K

    2001-07-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of the thermostability of proteins from hyperthermophiles, X-ray crystalline structures of pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase from a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus (PfPCP), and its mutant protein with Ser substituted at Cys142 and Cys188 were determined at 2.2 and 2.7 A resolution, respectively. The obtained structures were compared with those previously reported for pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidases from a hyperthermophilie, Thermococcus litoralis (TlPCP), and from a mesophile, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BaPCP). The PfPCP structure is a tetramer of four identical subunits similar to that of the TlPCP and BaPCP. The largest structural changes among the three PCPs were detected in the C-terminal protrusion, which interacts with that of another subunit. A comparison of the three structures indicated that the high stability of PfPCP is caused by increases in hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds, the formation of an intersubunit ion-pair network, and improvement to an ideal conformation. On the basis of the structures of the three proteins, it can be concluded that PfPCP does not have any special factors responsible for its extremely high stability and that the conformational structure of PfPCP is superior in its combination of positive and negative stabilizing factors compared with BaPCP.

  5. Crystal structure and nucleic acid-binding activity of the CRISPR-associated protein Csx1 of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Kwan; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2013-02-01

    In many prokaryotic organisms, chromosomal loci known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (CAS) genes comprise an acquired immune defense system against invading phages and plasmids. Although many different Cas protein families have been identified, the exact biochemical functions of most of their constituents remain to be determined. In this study, we report the crystal structure of PF1127, a Cas protein of Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 that is composed of 480 amino acids and belongs to the Csx1 family. The C-terminal domain of PF1127 has a unique β-hairpin structure that protrudes out of an α-helix and contains several positively charged residues. We demonstrate that PF1127 binds double-stranded DNA and RNA and that this activity requires an intact β-hairpin and involve the homodimerization of the protein. In contrast, another Csx1 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 that is composed of 377 amino acids does not have the β-hairpin structure and exhibits no DNA-binding properties under the same experimental conditions. Notably, the C-terminal domain of these two Csx1 proteins is greatly diversified, in contrast to the conserved N-terminal domain, which appears to play a common role in the homodimerization of the protein. Thus, although P. furiosus Csx1 is identified as a nucleic acid-binding protein, other Csx1 proteins are predicted to exhibit different individual biochemical activities. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Improving the Thermostability and Optimal Temperature of a Lipase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by Covalent Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta V. Branco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A recombinant thermostable lipase (Pf2001Δ60 from the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PFUL was immobilized by hydrophobic interaction on octyl-agarose (octyl PFUL and by covalent bond on aldehyde activated-agarose in the presence of DTT at pH = 7.0 (one-point covalent attachment (glyoxyl-DTT PFUL and on glyoxyl-agarose at pH 10.2 (multipoint covalent attachment (glyoxyl PFUL. The enzyme’s properties, such as optimal temperature and pH, thermostability, and selectivity, were improved by covalent immobilization. The highest enzyme stability at 70°C for 48 h incubation was achieved for glyoxyl PFUL (around 82% of residual activity, whereas glyoxyl-DTT PFUL maintained around 69% activity, followed by octyl PFUL (27% remaining activity. Immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose improved the optimal temperature to 90°C, while the optimal temperature of octyl PFUL was 70°C. Also, very significant changes in activity with different substrates were found. In general, the covalent bond derivatives were more active than octyl PFUL. The E value also depended substantially on the derivative and the conditions used. It was observed that the reaction of glyoxyl-DTT PFUL using methyl mandelate as a substrate at pH 7 presented the best results for enantioselectivity E=22 and enantiomeric excess (ee (% = 91.

  7. Expression and Characterization of a Novel Glycerophosphodiester Phosphodiesterase from Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 That Possesses Lysophospholipase D Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanghua Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases (GDPD are enzymes which degrade various glycerophosphodiesters to produce glycerol-3-phosphate and the corresponding alcohol moiety. Apart from this, a very interesting finding is that this enzyme could be used in the degradation of toxic organophosphorus esters, which has resulted in much attention on the biochemical and application research of GDPDs. In the present study, a novel GDPD from Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 (pfGDPD was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically characterized. This enzyme hydrolyzed bis(p-nitrophenyl phosphate, one substrate analogue of organophosphorus diester, with an optimal reaction temperature 55 °C and pH 8.5. The activity of pfGDPD was strongly dependent on existing of bivalent cations. It was strongly stimulated by Mn2+ ions, next was Co2+ and Ni2+ ions. Further investigations were conducted on its substrate selectivity towards different phospholipids. The results indicated that except of glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC, this enzyme also possessed lysophospholipase D activity toward both sn1-lysophosphatidylcholine (1-LPC and sn2-lysophosphatidylcholine (2-LPC. Higher activity was found for 1-LPC than 2-LPC; however, no hydrolytic activity was found for phosphatidylcholine (PC. Molecular docking based on the 3D-modeled structure of pfGDPD was conducted in order to provide a structural foundation for the substrate selectivity.

  8. Expression cloning and characterization of a novel gene that encodes the RNA-binding protein FAU-1 from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Akio; Oida, Hanako; Matsuura, Nana; Doi, Hirofumi

    2003-05-15

    We systematically screened a genomic DNA library to identify proteins of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using an expression cloning method. One gene product, which we named FAU-1 (P. furiosus AU-binding), demonstrated the strongest binding activity of all the genomic library-derived proteins tested against an AU-rich RNA sequence. The protein was purified to near homogeneity as a 54 kDa single polypeptide, and the gene locus corresponding to this FAU-1 activity was also sequenced. The FAU-1 gene encoded a 472-amino-acid protein that was characterized by highly charged domains consisting of both acidic and basic amino acids. The N-terminal half of the gene had a degree of similarity (25%) with RNase E from Escherichia coli. Five rounds of RNA-binding-site selection and footprinting analysis showed that the FAU-1 protein binds specifically to the AU-rich sequence in a loop region of a possible RNA ligand. Moreover, we demonstrated that the FAU-1 protein acts as an oligomer, and mainly as a trimer. These results showed that the FAU-1 protein is a novel heat-stable protein with an RNA loop-binding characteristic.

  9. Genomewide and biochemical analyses of DNA-binding activity of Cdc6/Orc1 and Mcm proteins in Pyrococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Fujihiko; Glatigny, Annie; Mucchielli-Giorgi, Marie-Hélène; Agier, Nicolas; Delacroix, Hervé; Marisa, Laetitia; Durosay, Patrice; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Aggerbeck, Lawrence; Forterre, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The origin of DNA replication (oriC) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains multiple ORB and mini-ORB repeats that show sequence similarities to other archaeal ORB (origin recognition box). We report here that the binding of Cdc6/Orc1 to a 5 kb region containing oriC in vivo was highly specific both in exponential and stationary phases, by means of chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with hybridization on a whole genome microarray (ChIP-chip). The oriC region is practically the sole binding site for the Cdc6/Orc1, thereby distinguishing oriC in the 1.8 M bp genome. We found that the 5 kb region contains a previously unnoticed cluster of ORB and mini-ORB repeats in the gene encoding the small subunit (dp1) for DNA polymerase II (PolD). ChIP and the gel retardation analyses further revealed that Cdc6/Orc1 specifically binds both of the ORB clusters in oriC and dp1. The organization of the ORB clusters in the dp1 and oriC is conserved during evolution in the order Thermococcales, suggesting a role in the initiation of DNA replication. Our ChIP-chip analysis also revealed that Mcm alters the binding specificity to the oriC region according to the growth phase, consistent with its role as a licensing factor.

  10. Specific interaction between DNA polymerase II (PolD) and RadB, a Rad51/Dmc1 homolog, in Pyrococcus furiosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, I; Morikawa, K; ISHINO, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus has an operon containing the DNA polymerase II (PolD) gene and three other genes. Using a two-hybrid screening to examine the interactions of the proteins encoded by the operon, we identified a specific interaction between the second subunit of PolD (DP1) and a Rad51/Dmc1 homologous protein (RadB). To ensure the specific interaction between these two proteins, each gene in the operon was expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells separately and the products were purifie...

  11. Specific interaction between DNA polymerase II (PolD) and RadB, a Rad51/Dmc1 homolog, in Pyrococcus furiosus.

    OpenAIRE

    I. Hayashi; Morikawa, K.; Ishino, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus has an operon containing the DNA polymerase II (PolD) gene and three other genes. Using a two-hybrid screening to examine the interactions of the proteins encoded by the operon, we identified a specific interaction between the second subunit of PolD (DP1) and a Rad51/Dmc1 homologous protein (RadB). To ensure the specific interaction between these two proteins, each gene in the operon was expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells separately and the products were purifie...

  12. Electronic, Magnetic, and Redox Properties of [MFe(3)S(4)] Clusters (M = Cd, Cu, Cr) in Pyrococcus furiosus Ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Christopher R.; Dhawan, Ish K.; Finnegan, Michael G.; Dwinell, Derek A.; Zhou, Zhi Hao; Huang, Heshu; Verhagen, Marc F. J. M.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Johnson, Michael K.

    1997-12-01

    The ground- and excited-state properties of heterometallic [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), and [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) cubane clusters assembled in Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin have been investigated by the combination of EPR and variable-temperature/variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies. The results indicate Cd(2+) incorporation into [Fe(3)S(4)](0,-) cluster fragments to yield S = 2 [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+) and S = (5)/(2) [CdFe(3)S(4)](+) clusters and Cu(+) incorporation into [Fe(3)S(4)](+,0) cluster fragments to yield S = (1)/(2) [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+) and S = 2 [CuFe(3)S(4)](+) clusters. This is the first report of the preparation of cubane type [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) clusters, and the combination of EPR and MCD results indicates S = 0 and S = (3)/(2) ground states for the oxidized and reduced forms, respectively. Midpoint potentials for the [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), and [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) couples, E(m) = -470 +/- 15, -440 +/- 10, and +190 +/- 10 mV (vs NHE), respectively, were determined by EPR-monitored redox titrations or direct electrochemistry at a glassy carbon electrode. The trends in redox potential, ground-state spin, and electron delocalization of [MFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) clusters in P. furiosus ferredoxin are discussed as a function of heterometal (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Tl).

  13. Influence of ionic liquid cosolvent on transgalactosylation reactions catalyzed by thermostable beta-glycosylhydrolase CelB from Pyrococcus Furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Markus; Kamrat, Thomas; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2006-12-20

    The synthesis of glycosides by enzymatic transglycosylation is a kinetically controlled reaction performed in the context of a non-favorable thermodynamic equilibrium. An unreactive organic cosolvent which increases the selectivity of the enzyme for glycosyl transfer to the acceptor nucleophile compared with water (Ksel) could improve maximum product yield. Here we report on the effect of the ionic liquid 1,3-dimethylimidazoliummethylsulfate on hydrolase and transferase activities of the hyperthermostable beta-glycosidase CelB from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. CelB retained full catalytic efficiency for lactose hydrolysis at 80 degrees C in a 50% (by vol.) solution of ionic liquid in sodium citrate buffer, pH 5.5. It was inactive but not irreversibly denatured at 70% ionic liquid. Using lactose (0.15 M) as galactosyl donor, values of Ksel for a representative series of eight acceptor alcohols were determined in kinetic assays at 80 degrees C and found to increase between 1.3-fold (D-xylose) and 3.1-fold (glycerol) in 45% ionic liquid. Enhancement of Ksel was dependent on ionic liquid concentration and higher than expected from the decrease in water activity caused by the cosolvent. Experimental molar ratios of D-glucose and D-galactose produced during enzymatic conversion of lactose (75-150 mM) in the presence of D-xylose (0.5 M) or glycerol (0.5 M) showed excellent agreement with predictions based on Ksel values and confirm a significant, yet moderate effect of 45% ionic liquid on increasing the yield of D-galactoside product, by < or = 10%.

  14. Structural basis of thermal stability of the tungsten cofactor synthesis protein MoaB from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastassia Havarushka

    Full Text Available Molybdenum and tungsten cofactors share a similar pterin-based scaffold, which hosts an ene-dithiolate function being essential for the coordination of either molybdenum or tungsten. The biosynthesis of both cofactors involves a multistep pathway, which ends with the activation of the metal binding pterin (MPT by adenylylation before the respective metal is incorporated. In the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus, the hexameric protein MoaB (PfuMoaB has been shown to catalyse MPT-adenylylation. Here we determined the crystal structure of PfuMoaB at 2.5 Å resolution and identified key residues of α3-helix mediating hexamer formation. Given that PfuMoaB homologues from mesophilic organisms form trimers, we investigated the impact on PfuMoaB hexamerization on thermal stability and activity. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we successfully disrupted the hexamer interface in PfuMoaB. The resulting PfuMoaB-H3 variant formed monomers, dimers and trimers as determined by size exclusion chromatography. Circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry confirmed a wild-type-like fold of the protomers as well as inter-subunits contacts. The melting temperature of PfuMoaB-H3 was found to be reduced by more than 15 °C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, thus demonstrating hexamerization as key determinant for PfuMoaB thermal stability. Remarkably, while a loss of activity at temperatures higher than 50 °C was observed in the PfuMoaB-H3 variant, at lower temperatures, we determined a significantly increased catalytic activity. The latter suggests a gain in conformational flexibility caused by the disruption of the hexamerization interface.

  15. Normal mode analysis of pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin via nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and resonance raman spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Y.; Wang, H.; George, S.J.; Smith, M.C.; Adams, M.W.W.; Jenney, F.E., Jr.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E.E.; Zhao, J.; Yoda, Y.; Dey, A.; Solomon, E.I.; Cramer, S.P.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Univ. of California; LBNL; Stanford Univ.; Univ. of Georgia; SPring-8

    2005-10-26

    We have used {sup 57}Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(S{sub cys})4 site in reduced and oxidized rubredoxin (Rd) from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf). The oxidized form has also been investigated by resonance Raman spectroscopy. In the oxidized Rd NRVS, strong asymmetric Fe-S stretching modes are observed between 355 and 375 cm{sup -1}; upon reduction these modes shift to 300-320 cm{sup -1}. This is the first observation of Fe-S stretching modes in a reduced Rd. The peak in S-Fe-S bend mode intensity is at {approx}150 cm{sup -1} for the oxidized protein and only slightly lower in the reduced case. A third band occurs near 70 cm{sup -1} for both samples; this is assigned primarily as a collective motion of entire cysteine residues with respect to the central Fe. The {sup 57}Fe partial vibrational density of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. The three main bands were qualitatively reproduced using a D{sub 2d} Fe(SC){sub 4} model. A C{sub 1} Fe(SCC){sub 4} model based on crystallographic coordinates was then used to simulate the splitting of the asymmetric stretching band into at least 3 components. Finally, a model employing complete cysteines and 2 additional neighboring atoms was used to reproduce the detailed structure of the PVDOS in the Fe-S stretch region. These results confirm the delocalization of the dynamic properties of the redox-active Fe site. Depending on the molecular model employed, the force constant KFe-S for Fe-S stretching modes ranged from 1.24 to 1.32 mdyn/Angstrom. KFe-S is clearly diminished in reduced Rd; values from {approx}0.89 to 1.00 mdyn/Angstrom were derived from different models. In contrast, in the final models the force constants for S-Fe-S bending motion, HS-Fe-S, were 0.18 mdyn/Angstrom for oxidized Rd and 0.15 mdyn/Angstrom for reduced Rd. The NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative

  16. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. [University of Georgia; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and

  17. Mutational analyses of the enzymes involved in the metabolism of hydrogen by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit J Schut

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally near 100°C by fermenting carbohydrates to produce hydrogen (H2 or, if elemental sulfur (S0, is present hydrogen sulfide instead. It contains two cytoplasmic hydrogenases, SHI and SHII, that use NADP(H as an electron carrier, and a membrane bound hydrogenase (MBH, that utilizes the redox protein ferredoxin. We previously constructed deletion strains lacking SHI and/or SHII and showed that they exhibited no obvious phenotype. This study has now been extended to include biochemical analyses and growth studies using the ΔSHI and ΔSHII deletion strains together with strains lacking a functional MBH (ΔMbhL. Hydrogenase activities in cytoplasmic extracts of ΔSHII and the parent strain were similar but were much lower (<10% in the ΔSHI strain, and no activity was detected in the ΔSHIΔSHII double deletion strain, indicating that SHI is responsible for most of the cytoplasmic hydrogenase activity. In contrast, the ΔmbhL strain showed no growth in the absence of S0, confirming the hypothesis that, in the absence of S0, MBH is the only enzyme that can dispose of reductant (as H2 generated during sugar oxidation. The deletion strain devoid of all three hydrogenases also grew only in the presence of S0 and did not produce any detectable H2. When grown in the presence of limiting S0, both H2S and H2 were produced by the parent and ΔSHI/ΔSHII strains. A significant amount of H2 was also produced by the ΔmbhL strain, showing that SHI can produce H2 from NADPH in vivo, although this does not enable significant growth of ΔmbhL in the absence of S0. We propose that the physiological function of SHI is to recycle H2 and provide a link between external H2 and the intracellular pool of NADPH needed for biosynthesis. This likely has a distinct energetic advantage in the environment, but it is clearly not required for growth of the organism under the usual laboratory conditions. The function of SHII, however, remains

  18. Domain Modeling: NP_115604.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_115604.1 chr11 Crystal structure of hypothetical protein PH0414 from Pyrococcus ...horikoshii OT3 p2hunb_ chr11/NP_115604.1/NP_115604.1_holo_12-402.pdb psi-blast 16T,17G,19T,20G,21F,22L,23G,5

  19. Conformational heterogeneity of the aspartate transporter Glt(Ph)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hänelt, Inga; Wunnicke, Dorith; Bordignon, Enrica; Steinhoff, Heinz-Juergen; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2013-01-01

    Glt(Ph) is a Pyrococcus horikoshii homotrimeric Na+-coupled aspartate transporter that belongs to the glutamate transporter family. Each protomer consists of a trimerization domain involved in subunit interaction and a transporting domain with the substrate-binding site. Here, we have studied the co

  20. Domain Modeling: NP_054887.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_054887.2 chr2 crystal structure of a putative RNA methyltransferase PH1948 from ...Pyrococcus horikoshii c1wy7d_ chr2/NP_054887.2/NP_054887.2_holo_5-208.pdb blast 19F,26L,27E,28Q,29Y,30P,31T,

  1. Low affinity and slow Na+-binding precedes high affinity aspartate binding in GltPh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hänelt, Inga; Jensen, Sonja; Wunnicke, Dorith; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2015-01-01

    GltPh from Pyrococcus horikoshii is a homotrimeric Na+-coupled aspartate transporter. It belongs to the widespread family of glutamate transporters, which also includes the mammalian excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) that take up the neurotransmitter glutamate. Each protomer in GltPh consis

  2. Structural features underlying the selective cleavage of a novel exo-type maltose-forming amylase from Pyrococcus sp. ST04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Hyun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myeong-Eun; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2014-06-01

    A novel maltose-forming α-amylase (PSMA) was recently found in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. ST04. This enzyme shows exo-type manner. Here, the crystal structure of PSMA at a resolution of 1.8 Å is reported, showing a tight ring-shaped tetramer with monomers composed of two domains: an N-domain (amino acids 1-341) with a typical GH57 family (β/α)7-barrel fold and a C-domain (amino acids 342-597) composed of α-helical bundles. A small closed cavity observed in proximity to the catalytic residues Glu153 and Asp253 at the domain interface has the appropriate volume and geometry to bind a maltose unit, accounting for the selective exo-type maltose hydrolysis of the enzyme. A narrow gate at the putative subsite +1 formed by residue Phe218 and Phe452 is essential for specific cleavage of glucosidic bonds. The closed cavity at the active site is connected to a short substrate-binding channel that extends to the central hole of the tetramer, exhibiting a geometry that is significantly different from classical maltogenic amylases or β-amylases. The structural features of this novel exo-type maltose-forming α-amylase provide a molecular basis for its unique enzymatic characteristics and for its potential use in industrial applications and protein engineering.

  3. Tungsten transport protein A (WtpA) in Pyrococcus furiosus: the first member of a new class of tungstate and molybdate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Krijger, Gerard C; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2006-09-01

    A novel tungstate and molybdate binding protein has been discovered from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This tungstate transport protein A (WtpA) is part of a new ABC transporter system selective for tungstate and molybdate. WtpA has very low sequence similarity with the earlier-characterized transport proteins ModA for molybdate and TupA for tungstate. Its structural gene is present in the genome of numerous archaea and some bacteria. The identification of this new tungstate and molybdate binding protein clarifies the mechanism of tungstate and molybdate transport in organisms that lack the known uptake systems associated with the ModA and TupA proteins, like many archaea. The periplasmic protein of this ABC transporter, WtpA (PF0080), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, WtpA was observed to bind tungstate (dissociation constant [K(D)] of 17 +/- 7 pM) and molybdate (K(D) of 11 +/- 5 nM) with a stoichiometry of 1.0 mol oxoanion per mole of protein. These low K(D) values indicate that WtpA has a higher affinity for tungstate than do ModA and TupA and an affinity for molybdate similar to that of ModA. A displacement titration of molybdate-saturated WtpA with tungstate showed that the tungstate effectively replaced the molybdate in the binding site of the protein.

  4. Uncovering the stoichiometry of Pyrococcus furiosus RNase P, a multi-subunit catalytic ribonucleoprotein complex, by surface-induced dissociation and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Lai, Lien B; Lai, Stella M; Tanimoto, Akiko; Foster, Mark P; Wysocki, Vicki H; Gopalan, Venkat

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate that surface-induced dissociation (SID) coupled with ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a powerful tool for determining the stoichiometry of a multi-subunit ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex assembled in a solution containing Mg(2+). We investigated Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RNase P, an archaeal RNP that catalyzes tRNA 5' maturation. Previous step-wise, Mg(2+)-dependent reconstitutions of Pfu RNase P with its catalytic RNA subunit and two interacting protein cofactor pairs (RPP21⋅RPP29 and POP5⋅RPP30) revealed functional RNP intermediates en route to the RNase P enzyme, but provided no information on subunit stoichiometry. Our native MS studies with the proteins showed RPP21⋅RPP29 and (POP5⋅RPP30)2 complexes, but indicated a 1:1 composition for all subunits when either one or both protein complexes bind the cognate RNA. These results highlight the utility of SID and IM-MS in resolving conformational heterogeneity and yielding insights on RNP assembly.

  5. The role of TrmB and TrmB-like transcriptional regulators for sugar transport and metabolism in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Surma, Melanie; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2008-09-01

    TrmB of Pyrococcus furiosus was discovered as the trehalose/maltose-specific repressor for the genes encoding the trehalose/maltose high-affinity ABC transporter (the TM system). TrmB also represses the genes encoding the high affinity maltodextrin-specific ABC transporter (the MD system) with maltodextrin and sucrose as inducers. In addition, TrmB binds glucose leading to an increased repression of both, the TM and the MD system. Thus, TrmB recognizes different promoters and depending on the promoter it will be activated or inactivated for promoter binding by different sugar effectors. The TrmB-like protein TrmBL1 of P. furiosus is a global regulator and recognizes preferentially, but not exclusively, the TGM (for Thermococcales-glycolytic motif) sequence that is found upstream of the MD system as well as of genes encoding enzymes involved in the glycolytic and the gluconeogenic pathway. It responds to maltose and maltotriose as inducers and functions as repressor for the genes encoding the MD system and glycolytic enzymes, but as activator for genes encoding gluconeogenic enzymes. The TrmB-like protein TrmBL2 of P. furiosus lacks the sugar-binding domain that has been determined in TrmB. It recognizes the MD promoter, but not all TGM harboring promoters. It is evolutionary the most conserved among the Thermococcales. The regulatory range of TrmBL2 remains unclear.

  6. Specific interaction between DNA polymerase II (PolD) and RadB, a Rad51/Dmc1 homolog, in Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, I; Morikawa, K; Ishino, Y

    1999-12-15

    Pyrococcus furiosus has an operon containing the DNA polymerase II (PolD) gene and three other genes. Using a two-hybrid screening to examine the interactions of the proteins encoded by the operon, we identified a specific interaction between the second subunit of PolD (DP1) and a Rad51/Dmc1 homologous protein (RadB). To ensure the specific interaction between these two proteins, each gene in the operon was expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells separately and the products were purified. The in vitro analyses using the purified proteins also showed the interaction between DP1 and RadB. The deletion mutant analysis of DP1 revealed that a region important for binding with RadB is located in the central part of the sequence (amino acid residues 206-498). This region has an overlap to the C-terminal half (amino acids 334-613), which is highly conserved among euryarchaeal DP1s and is essential for the activity of PolD. Our results suggest that, although RadB does not noticeably affect the primer extension ability of PolD in vitro, PolD may utilize the RadB protein in DNA synthesis under certain conditions.

  7. DNA Polymerases BI and D from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus Both Bind to Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen with Their C-Terminal PIP-Box Motifs▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tori, Kazuo; Kimizu, Megumi; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the sliding clamp that is essential for the high processivity of DNA synthesis during DNA replication. Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, has at least two DNA polymerases, polymerase BI (PolBI) and PolD. Both of the two DNA polymerases interact with the archaeal P. furiosus PCNA (PfuPCNA) and perform processive DNA synthesis in vitro. This phenomenon, in addition to the fact that both enzymes display 3′-5′ exonuclease activity, suggests that both DNA polymerases work in replication fork progression. We demonstrated here that both PolBI and PolD functionally interact with PfuPCNA at their C-terminal PIP boxes. The mutant PolBI and PolD enzymes lacking the PIP-box sequence do not respond to the PfuPCNA at all in an in vitro primer extension reaction. This is the first experimental evidence that the PIP-box motif, located at the C termini of the archaeal DNA polymerases, is actually critical for PCNA binding to form a processive DNA-synthesizing complex. PMID:17496095

  8. DNA polymerases BI and D from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus both bind to proliferating cell nuclear antigen with their C-terminal PIP-box motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tori, Kazuo; Kimizu, Megumi; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-08-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the sliding clamp that is essential for the high processivity of DNA synthesis during DNA replication. Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, has at least two DNA polymerases, polymerase BI (PolBI) and PolD. Both of the two DNA polymerases interact with the archaeal P. furiosus PCNA (PfuPCNA) and perform processive DNA synthesis in vitro. This phenomenon, in addition to the fact that both enzymes display 3'-5' exonuclease activity, suggests that both DNA polymerases work in replication fork progression. We demonstrated here that both PolBI and PolD functionally interact with PfuPCNA at their C-terminal PIP boxes. The mutant PolBI and PolD enzymes lacking the PIP-box sequence do not respond to the PfuPCNA at all in an in vitro primer extension reaction. This is the first experimental evidence that the PIP-box motif, located at the C termini of the archaeal DNA polymerases, is actually critical for PCNA binding to form a processive DNA-synthesizing complex.

  9. Replication factor C from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi does not need ATP hydrolysis for clamp-loading and contains a functionally conserved RFC PCNA-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneke, Ghislaine; Gueguen, Yannick; Flament, Didier; Azam, Philippe; Querellou, Joël; Dietrich, Jacques; Hübscher, Ulrich; Raffin, Jean-Paul

    2002-11-08

    The molecular organization of the replication complex in archaea is similar to that in eukaryotes. Only two proteins homologous to subunits of eukaryotic replication factor C (RFC) have been detected in Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab). The genes encoding these two proteins are arranged in tandem. We cloned these two genes and co-expressed the corresponding recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Two inteins present in the gene encoding the small subunit (PabRFC-small) were removed during cloning. The recombinant protein complex was purified by anion-exchange and hydroxyapatite chromatography. Also, the PabRFC-small subunit could be purified, while the large subunit (PabRFC-large) alone was completely insoluble. The highly purified PabRFC complex possessed an ATPase activity, which was not enhanced by DNA. The Pab proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) activated the PabRFC complex in a DNA-dependent manner, but the PabRFC-small ATPase activity was neither DNA-dependent nor PCNA-dependent. The PabRFC complex was able to stimulate PabPCNA-dependent DNA synthesis by the Pabfamily D heterodimeric DNA polymerase. Finally, (i) the PabRFC-large fraction cross-reacted with anti-human-RFC PCNA-binding domain antibody, corroborating the conservation of the protein sequence, (ii) the human PCNA stimulated the PabRFC complex ATPase activity in a DNA-dependent way and (iii) the PabRFC complex could load human PCNA onto primed single-stranded circular DNA, suggesting that the PCNA-binding domain of RFC has been functionally conserved during evolution. In addition, ATP hydrolysis was not required either for DNA polymerase stimulation or PCNA-loading in vitro.

  10. Enhancing Heat Tolerance of the Little Dogwood Cornus canadensis L. f. with Introduction of a Superoxide Reductase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xing-Min; Liu, Xiang; Ji, Mikyoung; Hoffmann, William A; Grunden, Amy; Xiang, Qiu-Yun J

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be accelerated under various biotic and abiotic stresses causing lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and DNA damage. Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a novel antioxidant enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus and is employed by this anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon for efficient detoxification of ROS. In this study, SOR was introduced into a flowering plant Cornus canadensis to enhance its heat tolerance and reduce heat induced damage. A fusion construct of the SOR gene and Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP) was introduced into C. canadensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Heat tolerance of the GFP-SOR expressing transgenic plants was investigated by observing morphological symptoms of heat injury and by examining changes in photosynthesis, malondialdehyde (MDA), and proline levels in the plants. Our results indicate that the expression of the P. furiosus SOR gene in the transgenic plants alleviated lipid peroxidation of cell membranes and photoinhibition of PS II, and decreased the accumulation of proline at 40°C. After a series of exposures to increasing temperatures, the SOR transgenic plants remained healthy and green whereas most of the non-transgenic plants dried up and were unable to recover. While it had previously been reported that expression of SOR in Arabidopsis enhanced heat tolerance, this is the first report of the successful demonstration of improved heat tolerance in a non-model plant resulting from the introduction of P. furiosus SOR. The study demonstrates the potential of SOR for crop improvement and that inherent limitations of plant heat tolerance can be ameliorated with P. furiosus SOR.

  11. Enhancing heat tolerance of the little dogwood Cornus canadensis L. f. with introduction of a superoxide reductase gene from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinmin eGeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS can be accelerated under various biotic and abiotic stresses causing lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and DNA damage. Superoxide reductase (SOR is a novel antioxidant enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus and is employed by this anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon for efficient detoxification of ROS. In this study, SOR was introduced into a flowering plant Cornus canadensis to enhance its heat tolerance and reduce heat induced damage. A fusion construct of the SOR gene and Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP was introduced into C. canadensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Heat tolerance of the GFP-SOR expressing transgenic plants was investigated by observing morphological symptoms of heat injury and by examining changes in photosynthesis, malondialdehyde (MDA, and proline levels in the plants. Our results indicate that the expression of the P. furiosus SOR gene in the transgenic plants alleviated lipid peroxidation of cell membranes and photoinhibition of PS II, and decreased the accumulation of proline at 40°C. After a series of exposures to increasing temperatures, the SOR transgenic plants remained healthy and green whereas most of the non-transgenic plants dried up and were unable to recover. While it had previously been reported that expression of SOR in Arabidopsis enhanced heat tolerance, this is the first report of the successful demonstration of improved heat tolerance in a non-model plant resulting from the introduction of P. furiosus SOR. The study demonstrates the potential of SOR for crop improvement and that inherent limitations of plant heat tolerance can be ameliorated with P. furiosus SOR.

  12. Hydrolysis of flavanone glycosides by β-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus and its application to the production of flavanone aglycones from citrus extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-Chul; Nam, Hyun-Koo; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2013-11-27

    The hydrolytic activity of the recombinant β-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus for the flavanone glycoside hesperidin was optimal at pH 5.5 and 95 °C in the presence of 0.5% (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 0.1% (w/v) Tween 40 with a half-life of 88 h, a Km of 1.6 mM, and a kcat of 68.4 1/s. The specific activity of the enzyme for flavonoid glycosides followed the order hesperidin > neohesperidin > naringin > narirutin > poncirin > diosmin > neoponcirin > rutin. The specific activity for flavanone was higher than that for flavone or flavonol. DMSO at 10% (v/v) was used to increase the solubility of flavanone glycosides as substrates. The enzyme completely converted flavanone glycosides (1 g/L) to flavanone aglycones and disaccharides via one-step reaction. The major flavanone in grapefruit peel, grapefruit pulp, or orange peel extract was naringin (47.5 mg/g), naringin (16.6 mg/g), or hesperidin (18.2 mg/g), respectively. β-Glucosidase from P. furiosus completely converted naringin and narirutin in 100% (w/v) grapefruit peel extract to 22.5 g/L naringenin after 12 h, with a productivity of 1.88 g L(-1) h(-1); naringin and narirutin in 100% (w/v) grapefruit pulp extract to 8.1 g/L naringenin after 9 h, with a productivity of 0.90 g L(-1) h(-1); and hesperidin in 100% (w/v) orange peel extract to 9.0 g/L hesperetin after 9 h, with a productivity of 1.00 g L(-1) h(-1). The conversion yields, concentrations, and productivities of flavanone aglycones in this study are the highest among those obtained from citrus extracts. Thus, this enzyme may be useful for the industrial hydrolysis of flavanone glycosides in citrus extracts.

  13. TrmB, a sugar sensing regulator of ABC transporter genes in Pyrococcus furiosus exhibits dual promoter specificity and is controlled by different inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Moulakakis, Christina; Koning, Sonja M; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2005-09-01

    TrmB is the transcriptional repressor for the gene cluster of the trehalose/maltose ABC transporter of the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus (malE or TM operon), with maltose and trehalose acting as inducers. We found that TrmB (the protein is identical in both organisms) also regulated the transcription of genes encoding a separate maltodextrin ABC transporter in P. furiosus (mdxE or MD operon) with maltotriose, longer maltodextrins and sucrose acting as inducers, but not with maltose or trehalose. In vitro transcription of the malE and the mdxE operons was inhibited by TrmB binding to the different operator sequences. Inhibition of the TM operon was released by maltose and trehalose whereas inhibition of the MD operon was released by maltotriose and larger maltodextrins as well as by sucrose. Scanning mutagenesis of the TM operator revealed the role of the palindromic TACTNNNAGTA sequence for TrmB recognition. TrmB exhibits a broad spectrum of sugar-binding specificity, binding maltose, sucrose, maltotriose and trehalose in decreasing order of affinity, half-maximal binding occurring at 20, 60, 250 and 500 microM substrate concentration respectively. Of all substrates, only maltose shows sigmoidal binding characteristics with a Hill coefficient of 2. As measured by molecular sieve chromatography and cross-linking TrmB behaved as dimer in dilute buffer solution at room temperature. We conclude that TrmB acts as a bifunctional transcriptional regulator acting on two different promoters and being differentially controlled by binding to different sugars. We believe this to represent a novel strategy of prokaryotic transcription regulation.

  14. Characterization of the TrmB-like protein, PF0124, a TGM-recognizing global transcriptional regulator of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Surma, Melanie; Seitz, Sabine; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2007-07-01

    The characterization of the transcriptional regulator TrmBL1 of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, homologous to TrmB (transcriptional regulator of the maltose system), was studied. The genome of P. furiosus contains three TrmB paralogues. One of the TrmB-like proteins (TrmBL), PF0124 (TrmBL1), was analysed in more detail. It regulated the expression of the genes encoding enzymes of the glycolytic pathway as well as the maltodextrin (MD) ABC transporter. By molecular sieve chromatography, purified TrmBL1 behaved at ambient temperature as a tetramer of 148.8 kDa. In the presence of 1 mM maltotriose or 5 mM maltose TrmBL1 formed octamers. As shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) TrmBL1 was found to bind the MD (maltodextrin ABC transport genes) promoter DNA with sixfold higher binding affinity (K(d) 0.2 microM) than to the trehalose/maltose ABC transporter (TM) promoter (K(d) 1.2 microM). Maltotriose and maltose interfered in these assays indicating inducer function. In vitro transcription assays using purified transcription components corroborated the data obtained with EMSA and showed inhibition of transcription of the MD promoter by TrmBL1. Recently, van de Werken et al. (FEMS Microbiol Lett 2006; 260: 69-76) identified TGM, a conserved sequence (Thermococcales-Glycolytic-Motif) upstream of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes and the MD ABC transporter. The position of TGM is invariably located downstream of the BRE-TATA box and overlapping the transcription start site on each promoter. By footprint analysis TrmBL1 was found to recognize the TGM sequence in several TGM-containing promoter sequences. We identified the recognition helix in TrmBL1 revealing tyrosine (Y49) to be essential for target DNA binding. However, the TGM motif was not essential for TrmBL1 binding. We conclude that TrmBL1 is a global sugar-sensing transcriptional regulator controlling the genes of transport systems and of sugar-metabolizing enzymes.

  15. Tungsten biochemistry of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten is the heaviest element that exhibits biological activity (atomic number 74), when it is present in an enzyme. It is taken up by cells in the form of tungstate, and it is subsequently processed into an organic cofactor referred to as tungstopterin, which is found as active center in several

  16. New Therapeutic Strategies for Antibiotic-Resistant Select Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-31

    Soriano, A., Zhao, W., Gullo, V. P., and Chan, T.-M. (2004) Two new bacterial DNA primase inhibitors from the plant Polygonum cuspidatum, Bioorg...hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii, J. Biochem. 130, 727-730. 26. Sheaff, R. J., and Kuchta, R. D. (1993) Mechanism of calf thymus DNA primase...Misincorporation of nucleotides by calf thymus DNA primase and elongation of primers containing multiple noncognate nucleotides by DNA-polymerase-alpha, J

  17. InterProScan Result: FS915693 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS915693 FS915693_2_ORF2 CDEF7E3969427AE5 PANTHER PTHR10055 TRYPTOPHANYL-TRNA SYNTHETAS...E 2.5e-84 T IPR002306 Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, class Ib Molecular Function: nucleotide binding (GO:

  18. Dynamics of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in Pyrococcus furiosus D14C ferredoxin via nuclear resonance vibrational and resonance Raman spectroscopies, force field simulations, and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Devrani; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Case, David A; Wang, Hongxin; Dong, Weibing; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Jenney, Francis E; Adams, Michael W W; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P

    2011-06-14

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study oxidized and reduced forms of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the D14C variant ferredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf D14C Fd). To assist the normal-mode assignments, we conducted NRVS with D14C ferredoxin samples with (36)S substituted into the [4Fe-4S] cluster bridging sulfide positions, and a model compound without ligand side chains, (Ph(4)P)(2)[Fe(4)S(4)Cl(4)]. Several distinct regions of NRVS intensity are identified, ranging from "protein" and torsional modes below 100 cm(-1), through bending and breathing modes near 150 cm(-1), to strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes between 250 and ∼400 cm(-1). The oxidized ferredoxin samples were also investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. We found good agreement between NRVS and RR frequencies, but because of different selection rules, the intensities vary dramatically between the two types of spectra. The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states for the oxidized samples were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields for local models of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Full protein model calculations were also conducted using a supplemented CHARMM force field, and these calculations revealed low-frequency modes that may be relevant to electron transfer with Pf Fd partners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations complemented these empirical analyses, and DFT was used to estimate the reorganization energy associated with the [Fe(4)S(4)](2+/+) redox cycle. Overall, the NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins.

  19. Dynamics of the [4Fe-4S] Cluster in Pyrococcus furiosus D14C Ferredoxin via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational and Resonance Raman Spectroscopies, Force Field Simulations, and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Devrani; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Case, David A.; Wang, Hongxin; Dong, Weibing; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Jenney, Francis E.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    We have used 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study oxidized and reduced forms of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the D14C variant ferredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf D14C Fd). To assist the normal mode assignments, we recorded the NRVS of D14C ferredoxin samples with 36S substituted into the [4Fe-4S] cluster bridging sulfide positions, and a model compound without ligand side chains: (Ph4P)2[Fe4S4Cl4]. Several distinct regions of NRVS intensity are identified, ranging from `protein' and torsional modes below 100 cm−1, through bending and breathing modes near 150 cm−1, to strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes between 250 cm−1 and ~400 cm−1. The oxidized ferredoxin samples were also investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. We found good agreement between NRVS and RR frequencies, but because of different selection rules, the intensities vary dramatically between the two types of spectra. The 57Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) for the oxidized samples were interpreted by normal mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields for local models of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Full protein model calculations were also conducted using a supplemented CHARMM force field, and these calculations revealed low frequency modes that may be relevant to electron transfer with Pf Fd partners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations complemented these empirical analyses, and DFT was used to estimate the reorganization energy associated with the [Fe4S4]2+/1+ redox cycle. Overall, the NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins. PMID:21500788

  20. Hydrogenases from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaster, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogenase is an electron-transfer protein and catalyses the simplest chemical redox reaction, the reversible two-electron oxidation of molecular hydrogen in aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. A kinetic study of the hydrogen oxidation reaction by Fe-hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris

  1. Molecular characterization of glycolysis in Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    In the last few decades microorganisms have been isolated from rather unknown and hostile locations, such as those with high salt concentrations, an extreme pH, or low or high temperatures. Microorganisms isolated from these environments are referred to as extremophiles (1). The most

  2. Hydrogenases from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaster, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogenase is an electron-transfer protein and catalyses the simplest chemical redox reaction, the reversible two-electron oxidation of molecular hydrogen in aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. A kinetic study of the hydrogen oxidation reaction by Fe-hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hilde

  3. Crystal Structures of the Iron–Sulfur Cluster-Dependent Quinolinate Synthase in Complex with Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate, Iminoaspartate Analogues, and Quinolinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenwick, Michael K. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Ealick, Steven E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-07-12

    The quinolinate synthase of prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes, NadA, contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster with unknown function. We report crystal structures of Pyrococcus horikoshii NadA in complex with dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), iminoaspartate analogues, and quinolinate. DHAP adopts a nearly planar conformation and chelates the [4Fe-4S] cluster via its keto and hydroxyl groups. The active site architecture suggests that the cluster acts as a Lewis acid in enediolate formation, like zinc in class II aldolases. The DHAP and putative iminoaspartate structures suggest a model for a condensed intermediate. The ensemble of structures suggests a two-state system, which may be exploited in early steps.

  4. Use of cellobiohydrolase-free cellulase blends for the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose and sugarcane bagasse pretreated by either ball milling or ionic liquid [Emim][Ac].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; da Silva, Ayla Sant'Ana; Kim, Han-Woo; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Endo, Takashi; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Bon, Elba P S

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the requirement of cellobiohydrolases (CBH) for saccharification of microcrystalline cellulose and sugarcane bagasse pretreated either by ball milling (BM) or by ionic liquid (IL) [Emim][Ac]. Hydrolysis was done using CBH-free blends of Pyrococcus horikoshii endoglucanase (EG) plus Pyrococcus furiosus β-glucosidase (EGPh/BGPf) or Optimash™ BG while Acremonium Cellulase was used as control. IL-pretreated substrates were hydrolyzed more effectively by CBH-free enzymes than were the BM-pretreated substrates. IL-treatment decreased the crystallinity and increased the specific surface area (SSA), whereas BM-treatment decreased the crystallinity without increasing the SSA. The hydrolysis of IL-treated cellulose by EGPh/BGPf showed a saccharification rate of 3.92 g/Lh and a glucose yield of 81% within 9h. These results indicate the efficiency of CBH-free enzymes for the hydrolysis of IL-treated substrates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms...... of different origin, The typical genomic periodicity for Bacteria is 11 bp whilst it is 10 bp for Archaea, Eukaryotes have more complex spectra but the dominant period in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is 10.2 bp. These periodicities are most likely reflective of differences in chromatin structure....

  6. Orientation of growing crystals of Co- or Gd-containing L-threonine dehydrogenase by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Syou; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Ataka, Mitsuo

    2009-12-01

    L-Threonine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (TDH) is a water-soluble metalloenzyme, the molecular structure of which has been unknown until recently. The Zn 2+ ion in the native TDH, prepared as a recombinant protein, is replaced artificially with Co 2+, Ni 2+ or Gd 3+. These samples are crystallized in homogeneous magnetic fields of 2-10 T. Half of the Co- or Gd-substituted crystals show magnetic orientation in a field of 2 T at 278 K whereas the crystals of the native TDH require a 4 T magnetic field for half orientation. The sensitivity to magnetic orientation can thus be increased by metal substitution. On the other hand, we cannot assign clear changes in the size, number, and quality of the native and metal-substituted crystals with and without the presence of the magnetic field.

  7. Diphthamide biosynthesis requires an organic radical generated by an iron-sulphur enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Xuling; Torelli, Andrew T; Lee, Michael; Dzikovski, Boris; Koralewski, Rachel M; Wang, Eileen; Freed, Jack; Krebs, Carsten; Ealick, Steve E; Lin, Hening [Cornell; (Penn)

    2010-08-30

    Archaeal and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 contain a unique post-translationally modified histidine residue called diphthamide, which is the target of diphtheria toxin. The biosynthesis of diphthamide was proposed to involve three steps, with the first being the formation of a C-C bond between the histidine residue and the 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl group of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). However, further details of the biosynthesis remain unknown. Here we present structural and biochemical evidence showing that the first step of diphthamide biosynthesis in the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii uses a novel iron-sulphur-cluster enzyme, Dph2. Dph2 is a homodimer and each of its monomers can bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Biochemical data suggest that unlike the enzymes in the radical SAM superfamily, Dph2 does not form the canonical 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Instead, it breaks the Cγ,Met-S bond of SAM and generates a 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl radical. Our results suggest that P. horikoshii Dph2 represents a previously unknown, SAM-dependent, [4Fe-4S]-containing enzyme that catalyses unprecedented chemistry.

  8. Genomic analysis of hyperthermophilic archaea; Chokonetsusei kosaikin no genomu kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, C. [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1997-05-20

    Whole genome sequences of five strains of microorganisms have been reported up to the present and many genome analysis projects are in progress in the world. Among archaea (archaebacteria), the genome analysis of Methanococcus jannaschii have been completed and the sequencing data are opened to public. While 134 regulatory genes were identified in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (eubacteria, 3.6 genome size), only 7 regulatory genes were identified in M. jannaschii (1.7Mb). Difference of the genome size is believed to correspond to the quantity of the environmental stresses. In Japan, the genome analysis project on a new hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii is in progress. P. horikoshii was isolated in a deep sea hydrothermal vent. It shows barophilic growth at maximum high temperature of 103degC under pressure of 30MPa. Thus, the genome analysis of barophilic hyperthermophilic archaea is expected to contribute to the understanding of the origin of life and evolution. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Structural basis for activation of an archaeal ribonuclease P RNA by protein cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is an endoribonuclease that catalyzes the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA) in all phylogenetic domains. We have found that RNase P in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 consists of RNase P RNA (PhopRNA) and five protein cofactors designated PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38. Biochemical characterizations over the past 10 years have revealed that PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30 fold into a heterotetramer and cooperate to activate a catalytic domain (C-domain) in PhopRNA, whereas PhoRpp21 and PhoRpp29 form a heterodimer and function together to activate a specificity domain (S-domain) in PhopRNA. PhoRpp38 plays a role in elevation of the optimum temperature of RNase P activity, binding to kink-turn (K-turn) motifs in two stem-loops in PhopRNA. This review describes the structural and functional information on P. horikoshii RNase P, focusing on the structural basis for the PhopRNA activation by the five RNase P proteins.

  10. Combining biomass wet disk milling and endoglucanase/β-glucosidase hydrolysis for the production of cellulose nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; da Silva, Ayla Sant'Ana; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Kim, Han-Woo; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Endo, Takashi; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Bon, Elba P S

    2015-09-05

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), a biomaterial with high added value, were obtained from pure cellulose, Eucalyptus holocellulose, unbleached Kraft pulp, and sugarcane bagasse, by fibrillating these biomass substrates using wet disk milling (WDM) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis using endoglucanase/β-glucosidase. The hydrolysis experiments were conducted using the commercial enzyme OptimashBG or a blend of Pyrococcus horikoshii endoglucanase and Pyrococcus furiosus β-glucosidase. The fibrillated materials and CNCs were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and the specific surface area (SSA) was measured. WDM resulted in the formation of long and twisted microfibers of 1000-5000 nm in length and 4-35 nm in diameter, which were hydrolyzed into shorter and straighter CNCs of 500-1500 nm in length and 4-12 nm in diameter, with high cellulose crystallinity. Therefore, the CNC's aspect ratio was successfully adjusted by endoglucanases under mild reaction conditions, relative to the reported acidic hydrolysis method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The intein of the Thermoplasma A-ATPase A subunit: Structure, evolution and expression in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogarten J Peter

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inteins are selfish genetic elements that excise themselves from the host protein during post translational processing, and religate the host protein with a peptide bond. In addition to this splicing activity, most reported inteins also contain an endonuclease domain that is important in intein propagation. Results The gene encoding the Thermoplasma acidophilum A-ATPase catalytic subunit A is the only one in the entire T. acidophilum genome that has been identified to contain an intein. This intein is inserted in the same position as the inteins found in the ATPase A-subunits encoding gene in Pyrococcus abyssi, P. furiosus and P. horikoshii and is found 20 amino acids upstream of the intein in the homologous vma-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the other inteins in catalytic ATPase subunits, the T. acidophilum intein does not contain an endonuclease domain. T. acidophilum has different codon usage frequencies as compared to Escherichia coli. Initially, the low abundance of rare tRNAs prevented expression of the T. acidophilum A-ATPase A subunit in E. coli. Using a strain of E. coli that expresses additional tRNAs for rare codons, the T. acidophilum A-ATPase A subunit was successfully expressed in E. coli. Conclusions Despite differences in pH and temperature between the E. coli and the T. acidophilum cytoplasms, the T. acidophilum intein retains efficient self-splicing activity when expressed in E. coli. The small intein in the Thermoplasma A-ATPase is closely related to the endonuclease containing intein in the Pyrococcus A-ATPase. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that this intein was horizontally transferred between Pyrococcus and Thermoplasma, and that the small intein has persisted in Thermoplasma apparently without homing.

  12. Gene Transfer & Hybridization Studies in Hyperthermophilic Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Karen E.

    2005-10-14

    A. ABSTRACT The importance of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of microbial species has become increasingly evident with each completed microbial genome sequence. Most significantly, the genome of Thermotoga maritima MSB8, a hyperthermophilic bacterium isolated by Karl Stetter and workers from Vulcano Italy in 1986, and sequenced at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville Maryland in 1999, revealed extensive LGT between % . this bacterium and members of the archaeal domain (in particular Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyracoccus frcriosus species). Based on whole genome comparisons, it was estimated that 24% of the genetic information in this organism was acquired by genetic exchange with archaeal species, Independent analyses including periodicity analysis of the T. maritimu genomic DNA sequence, phylogenetic reconstruction based on genes that appear archaeal-like, and codon and amino acid usage, have provided additional evidence for LGT between T. maritima and the archaea. More recently, DiRuggiero and workers have identified a very recent LGT event between two genera of hyperthermophilic archaea, where a nearly identical DNA fragment of 16 kb in length flanked by insertion sequence (IS) elements, exists. Undoubtedly, additional examples of LGT will be identified as more microbial genomes are completed. For the present moment however, the genome sequence of T. maritima and other hyperthermophiles including P. furiosus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Pyrococcus abyssi, A. fulgidus, and Aquifex aeolicus, have significantly increased out awareness of evolution being a web of life rather than a tree of life, as suggested by single gene phylogenies. In this proposal, we will aim to determine the extent of LGT across the hyperthemophiles, employing iY maritima as the model organism. A variety of biochemical techniques and phylogenetic reconstructions will allow for a detailed and thorough characterization of the extent of LGT in this species. The

  13. ADPase activity of recombinantly expressed thermotolerant ATPases may be caused by copurification of adenylate kinase of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; Nixon, B.Tracy; (IIT); (Penn)

    2009-10-06

    Except for apyrases, ATPases generally target only the {gamma}-phosphate of a nucleotide. Some non-apyrase ATPases from thermophilic microorganisms are reported to hydrolyze ADP as well as ATP, which has been described as a novel property of the ATPases from extreme thermophiles. Here, we describe an apparent ADP hydrolysis by highly purified preparations of the AAA+ ATPase NtrC1 from an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Aquifex aeolicus. This activity is actually a combination of the activities of the ATPase and contaminating adenylate kinase (AK) from Escherichia coli, which is present at 1/10 000 of the level of the ATPase. AK catalyzes conversion of two molecules of ADP into AMP and ATP, the latter being a substrate for the ATPase. We raise concern that the observed thermotolerance of E. coli AK and its copurification with thermostable proteins by commonly used methods may confound studies of enzymes that specifically catalyze hydrolysis of nucleoside diphosphates or triphosphates. For example, contamination with E. coli AK may be responsible for reported ADPase activities of the ATPase chaperonins from Pyrococcus furiosus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Methanococcus jannaschii and Thermoplasma acidophilum; the ATP/ADP-dependent DNA ligases from Aeropyrum pernix K1 and Staphylothermus marinus; or the reported ATP-dependent activities of ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase of P. furiosus. Purification methods developed to separate NtrC1 ATPase from AK also revealed two distinct forms of the ATPase. One is tightly bound to ADP or GDP and able to bind to Q but not S ion exchange matrixes. The other is nucleotide-free and binds to both Q and S ion exchange matrixes.

  14. Structural and functional studies of the iron storage protein ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tatur, J.

    2007-01-01

    This research focuses on the iron storage protein ferritin. Ferritin is a protein involved in iron homeostasis by storing Fe(II) excess in the form of an Fe(III) mineral core in the presence of oxygen and by releasing iron during iron deficiency. Ferritins are vital for human health. Their malfuncti

  15. Evaluation of sulfur-reducing microorganisms for organic desulfurization. [Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    Because of substantial portion of the sulfur in Illinois coal is organic, microbial desulfurization of sulfidic and thiophenic functionalities could hold great potential for completing pyritic sulfur removal. We are testing the hypothesis that organic sulfur can be reductively removed as H{sub 2}S through the activities of anaerobic microorganisms. Our objectives for this year include the following: (1) To obtain cultures that will reductively desulfurize thiophenic model compounds. In addition to crude oil enrichments begun last year, we sampled municipal sewage sludge. (2) To continue to work toward optimizing the activity of the DBDS-reducing cultures obtained during the previous year. (3) To expand coal desulfurization work to include other coals including Illinois Basin Coal 101 and a North Dakota lignite, which might be more susceptible to the dibenzyldisulfide reducing cultures due to its lower rank. (4) To address the problem of sulfide sorption, by investigating the sorption capacity of coals in addition to Illinois Basin Coal 108.

  16. The ABC of ABC-transport in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, S

    2003-01-01

    Living organisms of our earth can be divided into two groups, the prokaryotes and the eukaryotes. Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, a special compartment in the cell, where the genetic material, the DNA is located. The DNA in the prokaryotic cell is floating freely in the cell. The eukaryotes, that i

  17. The ABC of ABC-transport in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    OpenAIRE

    Koning, S.

    2003-01-01

    Living organisms of our earth can be divided into two groups, the prokaryotes and the eukaryotes. Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, a special compartment in the cell, where the genetic material, the DNA is located. The DNA in the prokaryotic cell is floating freely in the cell. The eukaryotes, that is where we belong to, together with animals, plants and fungi. Bacteria and archaea belong to the prokaryotes. Archaea resemble bacteria but in certain features they resemble more the eukaryotes. T...

  18. Identification of CRISPR and riboswitch related RNAs among novel noncoding RNAs of the euryarchaeon Pyrococcus abyssi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpousis Agamemnon J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noncoding RNA (ncRNA has been recognized as an important regulator of gene expression networks in Bacteria and Eucaryota. Little is known about ncRNA in thermococcal archaea except for the eukaryotic-like C/D and H/ACA modification guide RNAs. Results Using a combination of in silico and experimental approaches, we identified and characterized novel P. abyssi ncRNAs transcribed from 12 intergenic regions, ten of which are conserved throughout the Thermococcales. Several of them accumulate in the late-exponential phase of growth. Analysis of the genomic context and sequence conservation amongst related thermococcal species revealed two novel P. abyssi ncRNA families. The CRISPR family is comprised of crRNAs expressed from two of the four P. abyssi CRISPR cassettes. The 5'UTR derived family includes four conserved ncRNAs, two of which have features similar to known bacterial riboswitches. Several of the novel ncRNAs have sequence similarities to orphan OrfB transposase elements. Based on RNA secondary structure predictions and experimental results, we show that three of the twelve ncRNAs include Kink-turn RNA motifs, arguing for a biological role of these ncRNAs in the cell. Furthermore, our results show that several of the ncRNAs are subjected to processing events by enzymes that remain to be identified and characterized. Conclusions This work proposes a revised annotation of CRISPR loci in P. abyssi and expands our knowledge of ncRNAs in the Thermococcales, thus providing a starting point for studies needed to elucidate their biological function.

  19. Analysis of complete genomes suggests that many prokaryotes do not rely on hairpin formation in transcription termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, T; Sasayama, J; Tomita, M

    1998-12-01

    Free energy values of mRNA tertiary structures around stop codons were systematically calculated to surmise the hairpin-forming potential for all genes in each of the 16 complete prokaryote genomes. Instead of trying to detect each individual hairpin, we averaged the free energy values around the stop codons over the entire genome to predict how extensively the organism relies on hairpin formation in the process of transcription termination. The free energy values of Escherichia coli K-12 shows a sharp drop, as expected, at 30 bp downstream of the stop codon, presumably due to hairpin-forming sequences. Similar drops are observed for Haemophilus influenzae Rd, Bacillus subtilis and Chlamydia trachomatis, suggesting that these organisms also form hairpins at their transcription termination sites. On the other hand, 12 other prokaryotes- Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Synechocystis PCC6803, Helicobacter pylori, Borrelia burgdorferi, Methanococcus jannaschii, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Aquifex aeolicus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Treponema pallidum -show no apparent decrease in free energy value at the corresponding regions. This result suggests that these prokaryotes, or at least some of them, may never form hairpins at their transcription termination sites.

  20. Induction of Apoptotic Effects of Antiproliferative Protein from the Seeds of Borreria hispida on Lung Cancer (A549 and Cervical Cancer (HeLa Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rupachandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35 KDa protein referred to as F3 was purified from the seeds of Borreria hispida by precipitation with 80% ammonium sulphate and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 column. RP-HPLC analysis of protein fraction (F3 on an analytical C-18 column produced a single peak, detected at 220 nm. F3 showed an apparent molecular weight of 35 KDa by SDS PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis of F3 showed the closest homology with the sequence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase of Pyrococcus horikoshii. The protein (F3 exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against lung (A549 and cervical (HeLa cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations ranging from 10 µg to 1000 µg/mL, as revealed by the MTT assay. Cell cycle analysis revealed the increased growth of sub-G0 population in both cell lines exposed to a concentration of 1000 µg/mL of protein fraction F3 as examined from flow cytometry. This is the first report of a protein from the seeds of Borreria hispida with antiproliferative and apoptotic activity in lung (A549 and cervical (HeLa cancer cells.

  1. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong [FSU

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  2. Fiscal 2000 achievement report on project for research and development of technologies for intelligent infrastructure creation and utilization. Development of high-efficiency protein expression system (Development of high-efficiency protein expression system utilizing protein folding mechanism of hyperthermophile); 2000 nendo chiteki kiban sose riyo gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. Kokoritsu tanpakushitsu hatsugen system no kaihatsu (Cho konetsukin no tanpakushitsu oritatami kiko wo riyo shita kokoritsu tanpaku hatsugen system no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Studies were conducted aiming at a heterogenic expression system, with E. coli acting as the host, capable of high-efficiency expression of the protein of hyperthermophiles, hyperthermophilic archaebacteria in particular. In this fiscal year, 9 kinds of enzymes were caused by E. coli to express from the genomes of P. Horikoshi, A. pernix, etc., and examined for characteristics. Concerning the L-proline dehydrogenase obtained by the screening of hyperthermophiles of the Thermococcus profundus genus, it was noted that the ferredoxin was possibly a natural acceptor of electrons and that it was possibly an amino acid dehydrogenase of an utterly new category. Furthermore, it was found that the NADkinase of Pyrococcus horikoshii was a unique heat-resistant enzyme which used the inexpensive polyphosphoric acid instead of expensive ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and this justified a hope that it would be quite useful in the industrial production of NADP (H) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate). A success was attained in uniformly refining the glutamate dehydrogenase of hyperthermophilic and inactive Pyrobaculum islandicum produced by E. coli. (NEDO)

  3. Biosynthesis of ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate in archaea: a phylogenetic analysis of archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Soderberg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A phylogenetic analysis of the genes encoding enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP pathway, and the chorismate pathway of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, employing data from 13 complete archaeal genomes, provides a potential explanation for the enigmatic phylogenetic patterns of the PPP genes in archaea. Genomic and biochemical evidence suggests that three archaeal species (Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Thermoplasma volcanium produce ribose-5-phosphate via the nonoxidative PPP (NOPPP, whereas nine species apparently lack an NOPPP but may employ a reverse RuMP pathway for pentose synthesis. One species (Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 lacks both the NOPPP and the RuMP pathway but may possess a modified oxidative PPP (OPPP, the details of which are not yet known. The presence of transketolase in several archaeal species that are missing the other two NOPPP genes can be explained by the existence of differing requirements for erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P among archaea: six species use transketolase to make E4P as a precursor to aromatic amino acids, six species apparently have an alternate biosynthetic pathway and may not require the ability to make E4P, and one species (Pyrococcus horikoshii probably does not synthesize aromatic amino acids at all.

  4. Characteristic features of kynurenine aminotransferase allosterically regulated by (alpha-ketoglutarate in cooperation with kynurenine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Okada

    Full Text Available Kynurenine aminotransferase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PhKAT, which is a homodimeric protein, catalyzes the conversion of kynurenine (KYN to kynurenic acid (KYNA. We analyzed the transaminase reaction mechanisms of this protein with pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP, KYN and α-ketoglutaric acid (2OG or oxaloacetic acid (OXA. 2OG significantly inhibited KAT activities in kinetic analyses, suggesting that a KYNA biosynthesis is allosterically regulated by 2OG. Its inhibitions evidently were unlocked by KYN. 2OG and KYN functioned as an inhibitor and activator in response to changes in the concentrations of KYN and 2OG, respectively. The affinities of one subunit for PLP or 2OG were different from that of the other subunit, as confirmed by spectrophotometry and isothermal titration calorimetry, suggesting that the difference of affinities between subunits might play a role in regulations of the KAT reaction. Moreover, we identified two active and allosteric sites in the crystal structure of PhKAT-2OG complexes. The crystal structure of PhKAT in complex with four 2OGs demonstrates that two 2OGs in allosteric sites are effector molecules which inhibit the KYNA productions. Thus, the combined data lead to the conclusion that PhKAT probably is regulated by allosteric control machineries, with 2OG as the allosteric inhibitor.

  5. Cloning,sequencing and function of sanA,a gene involved in nikkomycin biosynthesis of Streptomyces ansochromogenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Several genetically stable mutants blocked in nikkomycin biosynthesis were obtained after the slightly germinated spores of Streptomyces ansochromogenes,a nikkomycin producer,were treated with ultra violet radiation.One of the mutants is the same in morpholotical differentiation as the wild type strain and is designated as NBB19.A DNA library was constructed using plasmid pIJ702 as cloning vector,NBB19 as cloning recipient.A 6 kb DNA fragment which can genetically complement NBB19 was cloned when screening the library for antifungal activity.Sequence analysis showed that the 3 kb Bgl II-Sal I fragment contains one complete ORF (ORF1) and one partial ORF (ORF2).ORF1 is designated as sanA.sanA is 1 365 bp,encoding a protein consisting of 454 amino acid residues.Database searching indicated that sanA is homologous to the hypothetical methyltransferase in Pyrococcus horikoshii with 25% identities and 41% positives.Disruptant of sanA lost the ability to synthesize nikkomycin.It indicated that sanA is a novel gene which is essential for nikkomycin biosynthesis.

  6. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme.

  7. Structural studies of the toxin-antitoxin proteins RelE and RelB from E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Overgaard, Martin; Gerdes, Kenn;

    the special tRNA-mRNA mimic, tmRNA [1]. Questions to be addressed Many questions remain to be answered in the bacterial toxin-antitoxin system. The crystal structure of RelBE from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was previously solved at 2.3Å [2]. This structure shows the molecule in an inactive state, but OT3......The bacterial toxin-antitoxin system The relBE operon in E. coli encodes two small proteins: A toxin, RelE (12 kDa) and an antitoxin, RelB (9 kDa). RelE is activated under nutritional stress and is able to inhibit protein synthesis by cleaving the mRNA in the ribosomal A-site. This stress response...... serves to down-regulate metabolism in the cell when growth conditions are limited. RelB is expressed in excess over RelE during balanced growth, and inhibits the toxicity of RelE by forming an extremely stable toxin-antitoxin complex. The activation of RelE is induced when the labile RelB protein...

  8. Crystal structures of type III{sub H} NAD-dependent D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase from two thermophiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.M. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Pampa, K.J. [Department of Studies in Microbiology, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Manjula, M. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Hemantha Kumar, G. [Department of Studies in Computer Science, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Kunishima, Naoki [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Lokanath, N.K., E-mail: lokanath@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Determined the crystal structures of PGDH from two thermophiles. • Monomer is composed of nucleotide binding domain and substrate binding domain. • Crystal structures of type III{sub H} PGDH. - Abstract: In the L-Serine biosynthesis, D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH) catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-3-phosphoglycerate to phosphohydroxypyruvate. PGDH belongs to 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases family. We have determined the crystal structures of PGDH from Sulfolobus tokodaii (StPGDH) and Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhPGDH) using X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.77 Å and 1.95 Å, respectively. The PGDH protomer from both species exhibits identical structures, consisting of substrate binding domain and nucleotide binding domain. The residues and water molecules interacting with the NAD are identified. The catalytic triad residues Glu-His-Arg are highly conserved. The residues involved in the dimer interface and the structural features responsible for thermostability are evaluated. Overall, structures of PGDHs with two domains and histidine at the active site are categorized as type III{sub H} and such PGDHs structures having this type are reported for the first time.

  9. Active-site models for complexes of quinolinate synthase with substrates and intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, Erika V.; Zhang, Yang; Colabroy, Keri L.; Sanders, Jennie M.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: see3@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Structural studies of quinolinate synthase suggest a model for the enzyme–substrate complex and an enzyme–intermediate complex with a [4Fe–4S] cluster. Quinolinate synthase (QS) catalyzes the condensation of iminoaspartate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate to form quinolinate, the universal precursor for the de novo biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QS has been difficult to characterize owing either to instability or lack of activity when it is overexpressed and purified. Here, the structure of QS from Pyrococcus furiosus has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure is a homodimer consisting of three domains per protomer. Each domain shows the same topology with a four-stranded parallel β-sheet flanked by four α-helices, suggesting that the domains are the result of gene triplication. Biochemical studies of QS indicate that the enzyme requires a [4Fe–4S] cluster, which is lacking in this crystal structure, for full activity. The organization of domains in the protomer is distinctly different from that of a monomeric structure of QS from P. horikoshii [Sakuraba et al. (2005 ▶), J. Biol. Chem.280, 26645–26648]. The domain arrangement in P. furiosus QS may be related to protection of cysteine side chains, which are required to chelate the [4Fe–4S] cluster, prior to cluster assembly.

  10. The 1.5 resolution structure of the [Fe4S3]-ferredoxin from the hyperthermiphilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Ericsson Skovbo; Harris, Pernille; Ooi, Bee Lean;

    2004-01-01

    contains a double-conformation disulfide bond existing in a left-handed and a right-handed spiral conformation. The crystal packing reveals a beta-sheet interaction, which supports the suggestion that P. furiosus ferredoxin is a functional dimer. The extraordinary thermostability of P. furiosus ferredoxin...

  11. Archease from Pyrococcus abyssi improves substrate specificity and solubility of a tRNA m5C methyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auxilien, Sylvie; El Khadali, Fatima; Rasmussen, Anette;

    2007-01-01

    Members of the archease superfamily of proteins are represented in all three domains of life. Archease genes are generally located adjacent to genes encoding proteins involved in DNA or RNA processing. Archease have therefore been predicted to play a modulator or chaperone role in selected steps...

  12. Dph3 is an electron donor for Dph1-Dph2 in the first step of eukaryotic diphthamide biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Min; Su, Xiaoyang; Dzikovski, Boris; Dando, Emily E; Zhu, Xuling; Du, Jintang; Freed, Jack H; Lin, Hening

    2014-02-01

    Diphthamide, the target of diphtheria toxin, is a unique posttranslational modification on translation elongation factor 2 (EF2) in archaea and eukaryotes. The biosynthesis of diphthamide was proposed to involve three steps. The first step is the transfer of the 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to the histidine residue of EF2, forming a C-C bond. Previous genetic studies showed this step requires four proteins in eukaryotes, Dph1-Dph4. However, the exact molecular functions for the four proteins are unknown. Previous study showed that Pyrococcus horikoshii Dph2 (PhDph2), a novel iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme, forms a homodimer and is sufficient for the first step of diphthamide biosynthesis in vitro. Here we demonstrate by in vitro reconstitution that yeast Dph1 and Dph2 form a complex (Dph1-Dph2) that is equivalent to the homodimer of PhDph2 and is sufficient to catalyze the first step in vitro in the presence of dithionite as the reductant. We further demonstrate that yeast Dph3 (also known as KTI11), a CSL-type zinc finger protein, can bind iron and in the reduced state can serve as an electron donor to reduce the Fe-S cluster in Dph1-Dph2. Our study thus firmly establishes the functions for three of the proteins involved in eukaryotic diphthamide biosynthesis. For most radical SAM enzymes in bacteria, flavodoxins and flavodoxin reductases are believed to serve as electron donors for the Fe-S clusters. The finding that Dph3 is an electron donor for the Fe-S clusters in Dph1-Dph2 is thus interesting and opens up new avenues of research on electron transfer to Fe-S proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  13. The quaternary structure of the amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8 is revealed by its crystal packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarkar, Vinod B. [Advanced Research Centre for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Kimani, Serah W. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Cowan, Donald A.; Sayed, Muhammed F.-R. [Advanced Research Centre for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Sewell, B. Trevor, E-mail: sewell@uctvms.uct.ac.za [Electron Microscope Unit, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Advanced Research Centre for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2006-12-01

    The amidase from G. pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned, expressed and purified, and then crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, is a member of the nitrilase enzyme superfamily. It converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and has been purified by heat treatment and a number of chromatographic steps. The enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals produced in the presence of 1.2 M sodium citrate, 400 mM NaCl, 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.6 were selected for X-ray diffraction studies. A data set having acceptable statistics to 1.96 Å resolution was collected under cryoconditions using an in-house X-ray source. The space group was determined to be primitive cubic P4{sub 2}32, with unit-cell parameter a = 130.49 (±0.05) Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the backbone of the hypothetical protein PH0642 from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PDB code 1j31) with all non-identical side chains substituted with alanine as a probe. There is one subunit per asymmetric unit. The subunits are packed as trimers of dimers with D3 point-group symmetry around the threefold axis in such a way that the dimer interface seen in the homologues is preserved.

  14. The structure of the archaebacterial ribosomal protein S7 and its possible interaction with 16S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, H; Yao, M; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-11-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 is one of the ubiquitous components of the small subunit of the ribosome. It is a 16S rRNA-binding protein positioned close to the exit of the tRNA, and it plays a role in initiating assembly of the head of the 30S subunit. Previous structural analyses of eubacterial S7 have shown that it has a stable alpha-helix core and a flexible beta-arm. Unlike these eubacterial proteins, archaebacterial or eukaryotic S7 has an N-terminal extension of approximately 60 residues. The crystal structure of S7 from archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhoS7) has been determined at 2.1 A resolution. The final model of PhoS7 consists of six major alpha-helices, a short 3(10)-helix and two beta-stands. The major part (residues 18-45) of the N-terminal extension of PhoS7 reinforces the alpha-helical core by well-extended hydrophobic interactions, while the other part (residues 46-63) is not visible in the crystal and is possibly fixed only by interacting with 16S rRNA. These differences in the N-terminal extension as well as in the insertion (between alpha1 and alpha2) of the archaebacterial S7 structure from eubacterial S7 are such that they do not necessitate a major change in the structure of the currently available eubacterial 16S rRNA. Some of the inserted chains might pass through gaps formed by helices of the 16S rRNA.

  15. A rigidifying salt-bridge favors the activity of thermophilic enzyme at high temperatures at the expense of low-temperature activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Y Lam

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thermophilic enzymes are often less active than their mesophilic homologues at low temperatures. One hypothesis to explain this observation is that the extra stabilizing interactions increase the rigidity of thermophilic enzymes and hence reduce their activity. Here we employed a thermophilic acylphosphatase from Pyrococcus horikoshii and its homologous mesophilic acylphosphatase from human as a model to study how local rigidity of an active-site residue affects the enzymatic activity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Acylphosphatases have a unique structural feature that its conserved active-site arginine residue forms a salt-bridge with the C-terminal carboxyl group only in thermophilic acylphosphatases, but not in mesophilic acylphosphatases. We perturbed the local rigidity of this active-site residue by removing the salt-bridge in the thermophilic acylphosphatase and by introducing the salt-bridge in the mesophilic homologue. The mutagenesis design was confirmed by x-ray crystallography. Removing the salt-bridge in the thermophilic enzyme lowered the activation energy that decreased the activation enthalpy and entropy. Conversely, the introduction of the salt-bridge to the mesophilic homologue increased the activation energy and resulted in increases in both activation enthalpy and entropy. Revealed by molecular dynamics simulations, the unrestrained arginine residue can populate more rotamer conformations, and the loss of this conformational freedom upon the formation of transition state justified the observed reduction in activation entropy. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the conclusion that restricting the active-site flexibility entropically favors the enzymatic activity at high temperatures. However, the accompanying enthalpy-entropy compensation leads to a stronger temperature-dependency of the enzymatic activity, which explains the less active nature of the thermophilic enzymes at low temperatures.

  16. Catalytic pathway, substrate binding and stability in SAICAR synthetase: A structure and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Kavyashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Sekar, Kanagaraj

    2015-07-01

    The de novo purine biosynthesis is one of the highly conserved pathways among all organisms and is essential for the cell viability. A clear understanding of the enzymes in this pathway would pave way for the development of antimicrobial and anticancer drugs. Phosphoribosylaminoimidazole-succinocarboxamide (SAICAR) synthetase is one of the enzymes in this pathway that catalyzes ATP dependent ligation of carboxyaminoimidazole ribotide (CAIR) with l-aspartate (ASP). Here, we describe eight crystal structures of this enzyme, in C2221 and H3 space groups, bound to various substrates and substrate mimics from a hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii along with molecular dynamics simulations of the structures with substrates. Complexes exhibit minimal deviation from its apo structure. The CAIR binding site displays a preference for pyrimidine nucleotides. In the ADP·TMP·ASP complex, the ASP binds at a position equivalent to that found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae structure (PDB: 2CNU) and thus, clears the ambiguity regarding ASP's position. A possible mode for the inhibition of the enzyme by CTP and UTP, observed earlier in the yeast enzyme, is clearly illustrated in the structures bound to CMP and UMP. The ADP.Mg(2+)·PO4·CD/MP complex having a phosphate ion between the ATP and CAIR sites strengthens one of the two probable pathways (proposed in Escherichia coli study) of catalytic mechanism and suggests the possibility of a phosphorylation taking place before the ASP's attack on CAIR. Molecular dynamic simulations of this enzyme along with its substrates at 90°C reveal the relative strengths of substrate binding, possible antagonism and the role of Mg(2+) ions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The CP2 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase is crucial for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Zhu, Bin; Wang, En-Duo

    2008-12-26

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has an insertion domain, called connective peptide 2 (CP2), either directly preceding or following the editing domain (CP1 domain), depending on the species. The global structures of the CP2 domains from all LeuRSs are similar. Although the CP1 domain has been extensively explored to be responsible for hydrolysis of mischarged tRNALeu, the role of the CP2 domain remains undefined. In the present work, deletion of the CP2 domain of Giardia lamblia LeuRS (GlLeuRS) showed that the CP2 domain is indispensable for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing and that it contributes to LeuRS-tRNALeu binding affinity. In addition, its functions are conserved in both eukaryotic/archaeal and prokaryotic LeuRSs from G. lamblia, Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhLeuRS), and Escherichia coli (EcLeuRS). Alanine scanning and site-directed mutagenesis assays of the CP2 domain identified several residues that are crucial for its various functions. Data from the chimeric mutants, which replaced the CP2 domain of GlLeuRS with either PhLeuRS or EcLeuRS, showed that the CP2 domain of PhLeuRS but not that of EcLeuRS can partially restore amino acid activation and post-transfer editing functions, suggesting that the functions of the CP2 domain are dependent on its location in the primary sequence of LeuRS.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of unusually thermostable CutA1 protein from human brain and its protease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Sawano, Masahide; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Takehira, Michiyo; Kunishima, Naoki; Katoh, Etsuko; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-03-01

    Unusually stable proteins are a disadvantage for the metabolic turnover of proteins in cells. The CutA1 proteins from Pyrococcus horikoshii and from Oryza sativa (OsCutA1) have unusually high denaturation temperatures (Td) of nearly 150 and 100 °C, respectively, at pH 7.0. It seemed that the CutA1 protein from the human brain (HsCutA1) also has a remarkably high stability. Therefore, the thermodynamic stabilities of HsCutA1 and its protease susceptibility were examined. The Td was remarkably high, being over 95 °C at pH 7.0. The unfolding Gibbs energy (ΔG(0)H2O) was 174 kJ/mol at 37 °C from the denaturant denaturation. The thermodynamic analysis showed that the unfolding enthalpy and entropy values of HsCutA1 were considerably lower than those of OsCutA1 with a similar stability to HsCutA1, which should be related to flexibility of the unstructured properties in both N- and C-terminals of HsCutA1. HsCutA1 was almost completely digested after 1-day incubation at 37 °C by subtilisin, although OsCutA1 was hardly digested at the same conditions. These results indicate that easily available fragmentation of HsCutA1 with remarkably high thermodynamic stability at the body temperature should be important for its protein catabolism in the human cells.

  19. Synthetic metabolic engineering-a novel, simple technology for designing a chimeric metabolic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Xiaoting

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of biotechnology into chemical manufacturing has been recognized as a key technology to build a sustainable society. However, the practical applications of biocatalytic chemical conversions are often restricted due to their complexities involving the unpredictability of product yield and the troublesome controls in fermentation processes. One of the possible strategies to overcome these limitations is to eliminate the use of living microorganisms and to use only enzymes involved in the metabolic pathway. Use of recombinant mesophiles producing thermophilic enzymes at high temperature results in denaturation of indigenous proteins and elimination of undesired side reactions; consequently, highly selective and stable biocatalytic modules can be readily prepared. By rationally combining those modules together, artificial synthetic pathways specialized for chemical manufacturing could be designed and constructed. Results A chimeric Embden-Meyerhof (EM pathway with balanced consumption and regeneration of ATP and ADP was constructed by using nine recombinant E. coli strains overproducing either one of the seven glycolytic enzymes of Thermus thermophilus, the cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase of Pyrococcus horikoshii, or the non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Thermococcus kodakarensis. By coupling this pathway with the Thermus malate/lactate dehydrogenase, a stoichiometric amount of lactate was produced from glucose with an overall ATP turnover number of 31. Conclusions In this study, a novel and simple technology for flexible design of a bespoke metabolic pathway was developed. The concept has been testified via a non-ATP-forming chimeric EM pathway. We designated this technology as “synthetic metabolic engineering”. Our technology is, in principle, applicable to all thermophilic enzymes as long as they can be functionally expressed in the host, and thus would be

  20. Synthetic metabolic engineering-a novel, simple technology for designing a chimeric metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaoting; Honda, Kohsuke; Sakai, Takaaki; Okano, Kenji; Omasa, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Ohtake, Hisao

    2012-09-06

    The integration of biotechnology into chemical manufacturing has been recognized as a key technology to build a sustainable society. However, the practical applications of biocatalytic chemical conversions are often restricted due to their complexities involving the unpredictability of product yield and the troublesome controls in fermentation processes. One of the possible strategies to overcome these limitations is to eliminate the use of living microorganisms and to use only enzymes involved in the metabolic pathway. Use of recombinant mesophiles producing thermophilic enzymes at high temperature results in denaturation of indigenous proteins and elimination of undesired side reactions; consequently, highly selective and stable biocatalytic modules can be readily prepared. By rationally combining those modules together, artificial synthetic pathways specialized for chemical manufacturing could be designed and constructed. A chimeric Embden-Meyerhof (EM) pathway with balanced consumption and regeneration of ATP and ADP was constructed by using nine recombinant E. coli strains overproducing either one of the seven glycolytic enzymes of Thermus thermophilus, the cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase of Pyrococcus horikoshii, or the non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Thermococcus kodakarensis. By coupling this pathway with the Thermus malate/lactate dehydrogenase, a stoichiometric amount of lactate was produced from glucose with an overall ATP turnover number of 31. In this study, a novel and simple technology for flexible design of a bespoke metabolic pathway was developed. The concept has been testified via a non-ATP-forming chimeric EM pathway. We designated this technology as "synthetic metabolic engineering". Our technology is, in principle, applicable to all thermophilic enzymes as long as they can be functionally expressed in the host, and thus would be potentially applicable to the biocatalytic manufacture of any chemicals

  1. Laboratory evolution of Pyrococcus furiosus alcohol dehydrogenase to improve the production of (2S,5S)-hexanediol at moderate temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Hendriks, A.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Hennemann, H.; Daussmann, T.; Oost, van der J.

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the use of enantioselective alcohol dehydrogenases for the production of enantio- and diastereomerically pure diols, which are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and fine chemicals. Due to the need for a stable alcohol dehydrogenase with

  2. Crystal structures of the all-cysteinyl-coordinated D14C variant of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin: [4Fe–4S] ↔ [3Fe–4S] cluster conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Martic, Maja; Windahl, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    molecules have different crystal packing and intramolecular disulfide bond conformation. The crystal packing reveals a β-sheet interaction between A molecules in adjacent asymmetric units, whereas B molecules are packed as monomers in a less rigid position next to the A–A extended β-sheet dimers...

  3. Cloning, expression, and purification of the His(6)-tagged hyper-thermostable dUTPase from Pyrococcus woesei in Escherichia coli: application in PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabrowski, Slawomir; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    LysS strain that contains plasmid encoding additional copies of rare E. coli tRNAs. E. coli Rosetta(pLysS) strain was found with two times higher expression yield of His(6)-tagged Pwo dUTPase than E. coli BL21(DE3)pLysS. The His(6)-tagged Pwo dUTPase was purified on Ni2+-IDA-Sepharose, dialyzed...

  4. The three-dimensional structure of TrmB, a transcriptional regulator of dual function in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus in complex with sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Michael; Lee, Sung-Jae; Boos, Winfried; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram

    2013-06-01

    TrmB is a repressor that binds maltose, maltotriose, and sucrose, as well as other α-glucosides. It recognizes two different operator sequences controlling the TM (Trehalose/Maltose) and the MD (Maltodextrin) operon encoding the respective ABC transporters and sugar-degrading enzymes. Binding of maltose to TrmB abrogates repression of the TM operon but maintains the repression of the MD operon. On the other hand, binding of sucrose abrogates repression of the MD operon but maintains repression of the TM operon. The three-dimensional structure of TrmB in complex with sucrose was solved and refined to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The structure shows the N-terminal DNA binding domain containing a winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain followed by an amphipathic helix with a coiled-coil motif. The latter promotes dimerization and places the symmetry mates of the putative recognition helix in the wHTH motif about 30 Å apart suggesting a canonical binding to two successive major grooves of duplex palindromic DNA. This suggests that the structure resembles the conformation of TrmB recognizing the pseudopalindromic TM promoter but not the conformation recognizing the nonpalindromic MD promoter.

  5. Structural ordering of disordered ligand-binding loops of biotin protein ligase into active conformations as a consequence of dehydration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibha Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, a dreaded pathogen, has a unique cell envelope composed of high fatty acid content that plays a crucial role in its pathogenesis. Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase (ACC, an important enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction of fatty acid biosynthesis, is biotinylated by biotin acetyl-CoA carboxylase ligase (BirA. The ligand-binding loops in all known apo BirAs to date are disordered and attain an ordered structure only after undergoing a conformational change upon ligand-binding. Here, we report that dehydration of Mtb-BirA crystals traps both the apo and active conformations in its asymmetric unit, and for the first time provides structural evidence of such transformation. Recombinant Mtb-BirA was crystallized at room temperature, and diffraction data was collected at 295 K as well as at 120 K. Transfer of crystals to paraffin and paratone-N oil (cryoprotectants prior to flash-freezing induced lattice shrinkage and enhancement in the resolution of the X-ray diffraction data. Intriguingly, the crystal lattice rearrangement due to shrinkage in the dehydrated Mtb-BirA crystals ensued structural order of otherwise flexible ligand-binding loops L4 and L8 in apo BirA. In addition, crystal dehydration resulted in a shift of approximately 3.5 A in the flexible loop L6, a proline-rich loop unique to Mtb complex as well as around the L11 region. The shift in loop L11 in the C-terminal domain on dehydration emulates the action responsible for the complex formation with its protein ligand biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP domain of ACCA3. This is contrary to the involvement of loop L14 observed in Pyrococcus horikoshii BirA-BCCP complex. Another interesting feature that emerges from this dehydrated structure is that the two subunits A and B, though related by a noncrystallographic twofold symmetry, assemble into an asymmetric dimer representing the ligand-bound and ligand-free states of the protein, respectively. In

  6. In silico analysis suggests that PH0702 and PH0208 encode for methylthioribose-1-phosphate isomerase and ribose-1,5-bisphosphate isomerase, respectively, rather than aIF2Bβ and aIF2Bδ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Prerana; Srivastava, Ambuj; Jayaprakash, Prajisha; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-01-01

    The overall process of protein biosynthesis across all domains of life is similar; however, detailed insights reveal a range of differences in the proteins involved. For decades, the process of protein translation in archaea has been considered to be closer to eukaryotes than to bacteria. In archaea, however, several homologues of eukaryotic proteins involved in translation initiation have not yet been identified; one of them being the initiation factor eIF2B consisting of five subunits (α, β, γ, δ and ε). Three open reading frames (PH0440, PH0702 and PH0208) in Pyrococcus horikoshii have been proposed to encode for the α-, β- and δ-subunits of aIF2B, respectively. The crystal structure of PH0440 shows similarity toward the α-subunit of eIF2B. However, the capability of PH0702 and PH0208 to function as the β- and δ-subunits of eIF2B, respectively, remains uncertain. In this study, we have taken up the task of annotating PH0702 and PH0208 using bioinformatics methods. The phylogenetic analysis of protein sequences belonging to IF2B-like family along with PH0702 and PH0208 revealed that PH0702 belonged to methylthioribose-1-phosphate isomerase (MTNA) group of proteins, whereas, PH0208 was found to be clustered in the group of ribose-1,5-bisphosphate isomerase (R15PI) proteins. A careful analysis of protein sequences and structures available for eIF2B, MTNA and R15PI confirms that PH0702 and PH0208 contain residues essential for the enzymatic activity of MTNA and R15PI, respectively. Additionally, the protein PH0208 comprises of the residues required for the dimer formation which is essential for the biological activity of R15PI. This prompted us to examine all eIF2B-like proteins from archaea and to annotate their function. The results reveal that majority of these proteins are homologues of the α-subunit of eIF2B, even though they lack the residues essential for their functional activity. A better understanding of the mechanism of GTP exchange during

  7. 4-Demethylwyosine Synthase from Pyrococcus abyssi Is a Radical-S-adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme with an Additional [4Fe-4S]+2 Cluster That Interacts with the Pyruvate Co-substrate*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche-Letuvée, Phanélie; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Berggren, Gustav; Clemancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Maurel, Vincent; Douki, Thierry; Armengaud, Jean; Mulliez, Etienne; Fontecave, Marc; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Gambarelli, Serge; Atta, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Wybutosine and its derivatives are found in position 37 of tRNA encoding Phe in eukaryotes and archaea. They are believed to play a key role in the decoding function of the ribosome. The second step in the biosynthesis of wybutosine is catalyzed by TYW1 protein, which is a member of the well established class of metalloenzymes called “Radical-SAM.” These enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster, chelated by three cysteines in a CX3CX2C motif, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to generate a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical that initiates various chemically challenging reactions. Sequence analysis of TYW1 proteins revealed, in the N-terminal half of the enzyme beside the Radical-SAM cysteine triad, an additional highly conserved cysteine motif. In this study we show by combining analytical and spectroscopic methods including UV-visible absorption, Mössbauer, EPR, and HYSCORE spectroscopies that these additional cysteines are involved in the coordination of a second [4Fe-4S] cluster displaying a free coordination site that interacts with pyruvate, the second substrate of the reaction. The presence of two distinct iron-sulfur clusters on TYW1 is reminiscent of MiaB, another tRNA-modifying metalloenzyme whose active form was shown to bind two iron-sulfur clusters. A possible role for the second [4Fe-4S] cluster in the enzyme activity is discussed. PMID:23043105

  8. Temperature-dependent structural and functional features of a hyperthermostable enzyme using elastic neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S; van der Oost, J; Norde, W

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated using elastic neutron scattering. The temperature dependence of the atomic motions was correlated with conformational. and functional characteristics of the enzyme. The onset of

  9. Temperature-dependent structural and functional features of a hyperthermostable enzyme using elastic neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S.; Oost, van der J.; Norde, W.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated using elastic neutron scattering. The temperature dependence of the atomic motions was correlated with conformational and functional characteristics of the enzyme. The onset of

  10. Microbial alcohol dehydrogenases: identification, characterization and engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords: alcohol dehydrogenase, laboratory evolution, rational protein engineering, Pyrococcus furiosus, biocatalysis, characterization, computational design, thermostability.   Alcohol dehydrogeases (ADHs) catalyze the interconversion of alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. They display a wide variety

  11. Maillard reactions and increased enzyme inactivation during oligosaccharide synthesis by a hyperthermophilic glycosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.E.; Hellemond, van E.W.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    The thermostable Pyrococcus furiosus beta-glycosidase was used for oligosaccharide production from lactose in a kinetically controlled reaction. Our experiments showed that higher temperatures are beneficial for the absolute as well as relative oligosaccharide yield. However, at reaction

  12. Kinetically controlled refolding of a heat-denatured hyperthermostable protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, Sotirios; van der Oost, John; Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    The thermal denaturation of endo-beta-1,3-glucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus was studied by calorimetry. The calorimetric profile revealed two transitions at 109 and 144 degrees C, corresponding to protein denaturation and complete unfolding, respectively, as

  13. Kinetically controlled refolding of a heat denatured hyperthermostable protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S.; Oost, van der J.; Norde, W.

    2007-01-01

    The thermal denaturation of endo-ß-1,3-glucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus was studied by calorimetry. The calorimetric profile revealed two transitions at 109 and 144¿°C, corresponding to protein denaturation and complete unfolding, respectively, as shown by

  14. Na+ : Aspartate Coupling Stoichiometry in the Glutamate Transporter Homologue Glt(Ph)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Maarten; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2010-01-01

    The Na+ aspartate symporter Glt(Ph) from Pyrococcus horikoshil is the only member of the glutamate transporter family for which crystal structures have been determined. The cation:aspartate coupling stoichiometry is unknown, thus hampering the elucidation of the ion coupling mechanism. Here we measu

  15. One- and two-electron reduction of molybdate reversibly bound to the archaeal tungstate/molybdate transporter WtpA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, L.E.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    Reversible binding of the tetrahedral oxoanions MoO4 2- and WO4 2- to two carboxylato ligands of the soluble scavenger protein WtpA from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus enforces a quasi-octahedral MO6 coordination in which the +VI oxidation state is destabilized.

  16. AcEST: DK946632 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ta OS=Methanobrevibacte... 42 0.001 sp|Q8C2K1|DEFI6_MOUSE Differentially expressed in FDCP 6 OS=Mus ... 42 0... subunit beta OS=Pyrococcus abyssi... 41 0.003 sp|Q9H4E7|DEFI6_HUMAN Differentially expressed in FDCP 6 homo

  17. Iron-Sulfur Proteins Investigated by EPR-, Moessbauer- and EXAFS-Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, P.; Bever, M.; Schuenemann, V.; Trautwein, A. X. [University of Luebeck, Institute of Physics (Germany); Schmidt, C. [University of Luebeck, Institute of Biochemistry (Germany); Boenisch, H. [Center for Structural Biochemistry, Karolinska Institutet, Dept. of Biosciences at NOVUM (Sweden); Gnida, M.; Meyer-Klaucke, W. [DESY, EMBL Outstation Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-12-15

    The structural and spectroscopic properties of the biologically active [Fe-4S] site of three different mutants of the wild-type rubredoxin from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi were investigated and compared with each other and additionally with those of the rubredoxin from the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum.

  18. AcEST: BP921295 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available B Rubredoxin OS=Pyrococcus abyssi GN=rub PE=1... 32 0.76 sp|P00267|RUBR_PEPAS Rubredoxin OS=Peptostreptoco...ccus asaccharol... 32 0.76 sp|P15412|RUBR_DESVM Rubredoxin OS=Desulfovibrio vulgari

  19. Na+ : Aspartate Coupling Stoichiometry in the Glutamate Transporter Homologue Glt(Ph)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Maarten; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2010-01-01

    The Na+ aspartate symporter Glt(Ph) from Pyrococcus horikoshil is the only member of the glutamate transporter family for which crystal structures have been determined. The cation:aspartate coupling stoichiometry is unknown, thus hampering the elucidation of the ion coupling mechanism. Here we measu

  20. A global transcriptional regulator in Thermococcus kodakaraensis controls the expression levels of both glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzyme-encoding genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanai, T.; Akerboom, A.P.; Takedomi, S.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Blombach, F.; Oost, van der J.; Murakami, T.; Atomi, H.; Imanaka, T.

    2007-01-01

    We identified a novel regulator, Thermococcales glycolytic regulator (Tgr), functioning as both an activator and a repressor of transcription in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. Tgr (TK1769) displays similarity (28% identical) to Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB (PF1743), a tr

  1. A Self-Assembling Protein Hydrogel Technology for Enzyme Incorporation onto Electrodes in Biofuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    is in preparation. Overall, we developed novel highly stable and flexible protein hydrogels, and applied these protein hydrogels in the synthesis of...punctiform (NpuN, NpuC) (Fig. 1). CutA is a small trimeric protein (12 kDa) from thermophilic bacteria pyrococcus horihoshhi4, 5 that exhibits ultrahigh...on graphene and application to glucose detection. Electrochim Acta 55, 8606-8614 (2010). 16. Zhang, J., Feng, M. & Tachikawa, H. Layer-by-layer

  2. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of macromolecular assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Kimberley

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to study the structure of three macromolecular assemblies: the two hemocyanin isoforms from Rapana thomasiana, the Pyrococcus furiosus chaperonin, and the ribosome from Escherichia coli. Hemocyanins are large respiratory proteins in arthropods and molluscs. Most molluscan hemocyanins exist as two distinct isoforms composed of related polypeptides. In most species the two isoforms differ in terms of their oligomeric st...

  3. Biogeography and evolution of Thermococcus isolates from hydrothermal vent systems of the Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Thomas Price

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermococcus is a genus of hyperthermophilic archaea that is ubiquitous in marine hydrothermal environments growing in anaerobic subsurface habitats but able to survive in cold oxygenated seawater. DNA analyses of Thermococcus isolates were applied to determine the relationship between geographic distribution and relatedness focusing primarily on isolates from the Juan de Fuca Ridge and South East Pacific Rise. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP analysis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST were used to resolve genomic differences in 90 isolates of Thermococcus, making biogeographic patterns and evolutionary relationships apparent. Isolates were differentiated into regionally endemic populations however there was also evidence in some lineages of cosmopolitan distribution. The biodiversity identified in Thermococcus isolates and presence of distinct lineages within the same vent site suggests the utilization of varying ecological niches in this genus. In addition to resolving biogeographic patterns in Thermococcus, this study has raised new questions about the closely related Pyrococcus genus. The phylogenetic placement of Pyrococcus type strains shows the close relationship between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus and the unresolved divergence of these two genera.

  4. NMR studies on mechanism of isomerisation of fructose 6-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Shahzada Nadeem; Mok, Kenneth Hun; Rashid, Naeem; Xie, Yongjing; Ruether, Manuel; O'Brien, John; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    The fate of hydrogen atoms at C-2 of glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) and C-1 of fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) was studied in the reaction catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis (TkPGI) through 1D and 2D NMR methods. When the reaction was performed in (2)H2O the hydrogen atoms in the aforementioned positions were exchanged with deuterons indicating that the isomerization occurred by a cis-enediol intermediate involving C-1 pro-R hydrogen of F6P. These features are similar to those described for phosphoglucose isomerases from rabbit muscle and Pyrococcus furiosus.

  5. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Danson, M. [Univ. of Bath (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based on the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with the continuous recycling of cofactor. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value chemical commodity. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  6. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  7. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Michael E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quantitatively assess the feasibility of these conformational changes. To perform the analysis, we begin with the energy-minimized X-ray structures. Normal modes are then calculated using an all-atom molecular mechanics force field. Results The analysis reveals low-frequency vibrations that facilitate the accommodation of RNA duplexes – an essential step in target recognition. The Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute proteins both exhibit low-frequency torsion and hinge motions; however, differences in the overall architecture of the proteins cause the detailed dynamics to be significantly different. Conclusion Overall, low-frequency vibrations of Argonaute are consistent with mechanisms within the current reaction cycle model for RNA interference.

  8. Identification of potential inhibitors for AIRS from de novo purine biosynthesis pathway through molecular modeling studies - a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Guru Raj; Biswal, Jayashree; Dhamodharan, Prabhu; Kanagarajan, Surekha; Jeyaraman, Jeyakanthan

    2016-10-01

    In cancer, de novo pathway plays an important role in cell proliferation by supplying huge demand of purine nucleotides. Aminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (AIRS) catalyzes the fifth step of de novo purine biosynthesis facilitating in the conversion of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide to aminoimidazole ribonucleotide. Hence, inhibiting AIRS is crucial due to its involvement in the regulation of uncontrollable cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of AIRS from P. horikoshii OT3 was constructed based on the crystal structure from E. coli and the modeled protein is verified for stability using molecular dynamics for a time frame of 100 ns. Virtual screening and induced fit docking were performed to identify the best antagonists based on their binding mode and affinity. Through mutational studies, the residues necessary for catalytic activity of AIRS were identified and among which the following residues Lys35, Asp103, Glu137, and Thr138 are important in determination of AIRS function. The mutational studies help to understand the structural and energetic characteristics of the specified residues. In addition to Molecular Dynamics, ADME properties, binding free-energy, and density functional theory calculations of the compounds were carried out to find the best lead molecule. Based on these analyses, the compound from the NCI database, NCI_121957 was adjudged as the best molecule and could be suggested as the suitable inhibitor of AIRS. In future studies, experimental validation of these ligands as AIRS inhibitors will be carried out.

  9. Formate production through carbon dioxide hydrogenation with recombinant whole cell biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alissandratos, Apostolos; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Easton, Christopher J

    2014-07-01

    The biological conversion of CO2 and H2 into formate offers a sustainable route to a valuable commodity chemical through CO2 fixation, and a chemical form of hydrogen fuel storage. Here we report the first example of CO2 hydrogenation utilising engineered whole-cell biocatalysts. Escherichia coli JM109(DE3) cells transformed for overexpression of either native formate dehydrogenase (FDH), the FDH from Clostridium carboxidivorans, or genes from Pyrococcus furiosus and Methanobacterium thermoformicicum predicted to express FDH based on their similarity to known FDH genes were all able to produce levels of formate well above the background, when presented with H2 and CO2, the latter in the form of bicarbonate. In the case of the FDH from P. furiosus the yield was highest, reaching more than 1 g L(-1)h(-1) when a hydrogen-sparging reactor design was used.

  10. Ni l-edge soft x-ray spectroscopy of ni-fe hydrogenases and modelcompounds--evidence for high-spin ni(ii) in the active enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongxin; Ralston, C.Y.; Patil, D.S.; Jones, R.M.; Gu, M.; Verhagen, M.; Adams, M.; Ge, P.; Riordan, C.; Marganian, C.A.; Mascharak,P.; Kovacs, J.; Miller, C.G.; Collins, T.J.; Brooker, S.; Croucher, P.D.; Wang, Kun; Stiefel, E.I.; Cramer, S.P.

    2000-03-15

    L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to study, under a variety of conditions, the electronic structure of Ni in the Ni-Fe hydrogenases from Desulfovibrio gigas, Desulfovibrio baculatus, and Pyrococcus furiosus. The status of the enzyme films used for these measurements was monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. The L-edge spectra were interpreted by ligand field multiplet simulations and by comparison with data for Ni model complexes. The spectrum for Ni in D. gigas enzyme ''form A'' is consistent with a covalent Ni(III) species. In contrast, all of the reduced enzyme samples exhibited high spin Ni(II) spectra. The significance of the Ni(II) spin state for the structure of the hydrogenase active site is discussed.

  11. DJ-1 family Maillard deglycases prevent acrylamide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richarme, Gilbert; Marguet, Evelyne; Forterre, Patrick; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-09-23

    The presence of acrylamide in food is a worldwide concern because it is carcinogenic, reprotoxic and neurotoxic. Acrylamide is generated in the Maillard reaction via condensation of reducing sugars and glyoxals arising from their decomposition, with asparagine, the amino acid forming the backbone of the acrylamide molecule. We reported recently the discovery of the Maillard deglycases (DJ-1/Park7 and its prokaryotic homologs) which degrade Maillard adducts formed between glyoxals and lysine or arginine amino groups, and prevent glycation damage in proteins. Here, we show that these deglycases prevent acrylamide formation, likely by degrading asparagine/glyoxal Maillard adducts. We also report the discovery of a deglycase from the hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus furiosus, which prevents acrylamide formation at 100 °C. Thus, Maillard deglycases constitute a unique enzymatic method to prevent acrylamide formation in food without depleting the components (asparagine and sugars) responsible for its formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from glucose and cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, S.M.; Woodward, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    An enzymatic process has been used to convert glucose to molecular hydrogen with the ultimate goal of converting cellulose to hydrogen. Two enzymes from the Archae, Thermoplasma acidophilium glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase, were used to oxidize glucose and NADPH respectively, resulting in the formation of molecular hydrogen. The stoichiometric yield of hydrogen from glucose was close to the theoretical maximum expected. Further, the molar amount of hydrogen produced was greater than the molar equivalent of NADP{sup +} present in the reaction mixture indicating that this GDH cofactor was regenerated throughout the course of the reaction. Hydrogen was also shown to be produced from cellulose if cellulase was included in the reaction mixture.

  13. Heterometallic [AgFe3S4] ferredoxin variants: synthesis, characterization, and the first crystal structure of an engineered heterometallic iron–sulfur protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martic, Maja; Simon, Ida Noemi; Haahr, Lærke Tvedebrink

    2013-01-01

    Heterometallic [AgFe3S4] iron–sulfur clusters assembled in wild-type Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin and two variants, D14C and D14H, are characterized. The crystal structure of the [AgFe3S4] D14C variant shows that the silver(I) ion is indeed part of the cluster and is coordinated to the thiolate...... group of residue 14. Cyclic voltammetry shows one redox pair with a reduction potential of +220 mV versus the standard hydrogen electrode which is assigned to the [AgFe3S4]2+/+ couple. The oxidized form of the [AgFe3S4] D14C variant is stable in the presence of dioxygen, whereas the oxidized forms...

  14. POLYPEPTIDE AND POLYSACCHARIDE PROCESSING IN HYPERTHERMOPHILIC MICROORGANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KELLY, ROBERT M.

    2008-12-22

    This project focused on the microbial physiology and biochemistry of heterotrophic hyperthermophiles with respect to mechanisms by which these organisms process polypeptides and polysaccharides under normal and stressed conditions. Emphasis is on two model organisms, for which completed genome sequences are available: Pyrococcus furiosus (growth Topt of 98°C), an archaeon, and Thermotoga maritima (growth Topt of 80°C), a bacterium. Both organisms are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs that reduce sulfur facultatively. Whole genome cDNA spotted microarrays were used to follow transcriptional response to a variety of environmental conditions in order to identify genes encoding proteins involved in the acquisition, synthesis, processing and utilization of polypeptides and polysaccharides. This project provided new insights into the physiological aspects of hyperthermophiles as these relate to microbial biochemistry and biological function in high temperature habitats. The capacity of these microorganisms to produce biohydrogen from renewable feedstocks makes them important for future efforts to develop biofuels.

  15. Programmable DNA-Guided Artificial Restriction Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enghiad, Behnam; Zhao, Huimin

    2017-02-06

    Restriction enzymes are essential tools for recombinant DNA technology that have revolutionized modern biological research. However, they have limited sequence specificity and availability. Here we report a Pyrococcus furiosus Argonaute (PfAgo) based platform for generating artificial restriction enzymes (AREs) capable of recognizing and cleaving DNA sequences at virtually any arbitrary site and generating defined sticky ends of varying length. Short DNA guides are used to direct PfAgo to target sites for cleavage at high temperatures (>87 °C) followed by reannealing of the cleaved single stranded DNAs. We used this platform to generate over 18 AREs for DNA fingerprinting and molecular cloning of PCR-amplified or genomic DNAs. These AREs work as efficiently as their naturally occurring counterparts, and some of them even do not have any naturally occurring counterparts, demonstrating easy programmability, generality, versatility, and high efficiency for this new technology.

  16. Investigating the mechanism of ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl P; Khan, Kirin; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl

    2017-02-01

    ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACD) catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetate. The related succinyl-CoA synthetase follows a three-step mechanism involving a single phosphoenzyme, but a novel four-step mechanism with two phosphoenzyme intermediates was proposed for Pyrococcus ACD. Characterization of enzyme variants of Entamoeba ACD in which the two proposed phosphorylated His residues were individually altered revealed that only His252 is essential for enzymatic activity. Analysis of variants altered at two residues proposed to interact with the phosphohistidine loop that swings between distinct parts of the active site are consistent with a mechanism involving a single phosphoenzyme intermediate. Our results suggest ACDs with different subunit structures may employ slightly different mechanisms to bridge the span between active sites I and II. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Electroanalytical determination of tungsten and molybdenum in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, P L; van't Slot, P; van Leeuwen, H P; Hagen, W R

    2001-10-01

    Recent crystal structure determinations accelerated the progress in the biochemistry of tungsten-containing enzymes. In order to characterize these enzymes, a sensitive determination of this metal in protein-containing samples is necessary. An electroanalytical tungsten determination has successfully been adapted to determine the tungsten and molybdenum content in enzymes. The tungsten and molybdenum content can be measured simultaneously from 1 to 10 microg of purified protein with little or no sample handling. More crude protein samples require precipitation of interfering surface active material with 10% perchloric acid. This method affords the isolation of novel molybdenum- and tungsten-containing proteins via molybdenum and tungsten monitoring of column fractions, without using radioactive isotopes. A screening of soluble proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus for tungsten, using anion-exchange column chromatography to separate the proteins, has been performed. The three known tungsten-containing enzymes from P. furiosus were recovered with this screening.

  18. AcEST: DK959559 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TST39A01NGRL0005_A12 632 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0005_A12. 5' end sequence. DK95...9559 CL61Contig1 Show DK959559 Clone id TST39A01NGRL0005_A12 Library TST39 Length 63...2 Definition Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0005_A12. 5' end sequence. Accession DK95955...pped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= DK9595...caldoc... 91 3e-18 sp|Q5JDH1|RL23_PYRKO 50S ribosomal protein L23P OS=Pyrococcus ko... 86 2e-16 sp|O74095

  19. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  20. Global transcriptional regulator TrmB family members in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minwook; Park, Soyoung; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2016-10-01

    Members of the TrmB family act as global transcriptional regulators for the activation or repression of sugar ABC transporters and central sugar metabolic pathways, including glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and other metabolic pathways, and also as chromosomal stabilizers in archaea. As a relatively newly classified transcriptional regulator family, there is limited experimental evidence for their role in Thermococcales, halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC1, and crenarchaea Sulfolobus strains, despite being one of the extending protein families in archaea. Recently, the protein structures of Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB and TrmBL2 were solved, and the transcriptomic data uncovered by microarray and ChIP-Seq were published. In the present review, recent evidence of the functional roles of TrmB family members in archaea is explained and extended to bacteria.

  1. Characterization of two members among the five ADP-forming acyl coenzyme A (Acyl-CoA) synthetases reveals the presence of a 2-(Imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase in Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awano, Tomotsugu; Wilming, Anja; Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Fukui, Toshiaki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Thermococcus kodakarensis, along with those of most Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species, harbors five paralogous genes encoding putative α subunits of nucleoside diphosphate (NDP)-forming acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases. The substrate specificities of the protein products for three of these paralogs have been clarified through studies on the individual enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus and T. kodakarensis. Here we have examined the biochemical properties of the remaining two acyl-CoA synthetase proteins from T. kodakarensis. The TK0944 and TK2127 genes encoding the two α subunits were each coexpressed with the β subunit-encoding TK0943 gene. In both cases, soluble proteins with an α2β2 structure were obtained and their activities toward various acids in the ADP-forming reaction were examined. The purified TK0944/TK0943 protein (ACS IIITk) accommodated a broad range of acids that corresponded to those generated in the oxidative metabolism of Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Met, Phe, and Cys. In contrast, the TK2127/TK0943 protein exhibited relevant levels of activity only toward 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate, a metabolite of His degradation, and was thus designated 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase (ICSTk), a novel enzyme. Kinetic analyses were performed on both proteins with their respective substrates. In T. kodakarensis, we found that the addition of histidine to the medium led to increases in intracellular ADP-forming 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase activity, and 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate was detected in the culture medium, suggesting that ICSTk participates in histidine catabolism. The results presented here, together with those of previous studies, have clarified the substrate specificities of all five known NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetase proteins in the Thermococcales.

  2. Bacillus mesophilus sp. nov., an alginate-degrading bacterium isolated from a soil sample collected from an abandoned marine solar saltern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-Xia; Liu, Guo-Hong; Liu, Bo; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2016-07-01

    A novel Gram-stain positive, endospore-forming bacterium, designated SA4(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from an abandoned marine solar saltern at Wendeng, Shandong Province, PR China. Cells were observed to be rod shaped, alginase positive, catalase positive and motile. The strain was found to grow at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 °C (optimum 35 °C), and pH 5.0-11.0 (optimum pH 8.0) with 0-7.0 % (w/v) NaCl concentration (optimum NaCl 3.0 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SA4(T) belongs to the genus Bacillus and exhibits 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 96.6, 96.5, 96.3 and 96.2 % with Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719(T), Bacillus acidicola 105-2(T), Bacillus shackletonii LMG 18435(T) and Bacillus pocheonensis Gsoil 420(T), respectively. The menaquinone was identified as MK-7 and the major polar lipids were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The major fatty acids detected were anteiso-C15:0 (22.3 %), iso-C15:0 (22.6 %), iso-C16:0 (14.8 %) and iso-C14:0 (14.7 %). The DNA G+C content was determined to be 42.4 mol %. Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic properties clearly indicated that isolate SA4(T) represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus mesophius sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SA4(T) (=DSM 101000(T)=CCTCC AB 2015209(T)).

  3. A Computational Framework for Proteome-Wide Pursuit and Prediction of Metalloproteins using ICP-MS and MS/MS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trauger Sunia A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metal-containing proteins comprise a diverse and sizable category within the proteomes of organisms, ranging from proteins that use metals to catalyze reactions to proteins in which metals play key structural roles. Unfortunately, reliably predicting that a protein will contain a specific metal from its amino acid sequence is not currently possible. We recently developed a generally-applicable experimental technique for finding metalloproteins on a genome-wide scale. Applying this metal-directed protein purification approach (ICP-MS and MS/MS based to the prototypical microbe Pyrococcus furiosus conclusively demonstrated the extent and diversity of the uncharacterized portion of microbial metalloproteomes since a majority of the observed metal peaks could not be assigned to known or predicted metalloproteins. However, even using this technique, it is not technically feasible to purify to homogeneity all metalloproteins in an organism. In order to address these limitations and complement the metal-directed protein purification, we developed a computational infrastructure and statistical methodology to aid in the pursuit and identification of novel metalloproteins. Results We demonstrate that our methodology enables predictions of metal-protein interactions using an experimental data set derived from a chromatography fractionation experiment in which 870 proteins and 10 metals were measured over 2,589 fractions. For each of the 10 metals, cobalt, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, tungsten, uranium, vanadium, and zinc, clusters of proteins frequently occurring in metal peaks (of a specific metal within the fractionation space were defined. This resulted in predictions that there are from 5 undiscovered vanadium- to 13 undiscovered cobalt-containing proteins in Pyrococcus furiosus. Molybdenum and nickel were chosen for additional assessment producing lists of genes predicted to encode metalloproteins or metalloprotein

  4. Comparative structural biology of eubacterial and archaeal oligosaccharyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maita, Nobuo; Nyirenda, James; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Kohda, Daisuke

    2010-02-12

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of an oligosaccharide from a lipid donor to an asparagine residue in nascent polypeptide chains. In the bacterium Campylobacter jejuni, a single-subunit membrane protein, PglB, catalyzes N-glycosylation. We report the 2.8 A resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of PglB and its comparison with the previously determined structure from the archaeon Pyrococcus AglB. The two distantly related oligosaccharyltransferases share unexpected structural similarity beyond that expected from the sequence comparison. The common architecture of the putative catalytic sites revealed a new catalytic motif in PglB. Site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed the contribution of this motif to the catalytic function. Bacterial PglB and archaeal AglB constitute a protein family of the catalytic subunit of OST along with STT3 from eukaryotes. A structure-aided multiple sequence alignment of the STT3/PglB/AglB protein family revealed three types of OST catalytic centers. This novel classification will provide a useful framework for understanding the enzymatic properties of the OST enzymes from Eukarya, Archaea, and Bacteria.

  5. New oligosaccharyltransferase assay method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Daisuke; Yamada, Masaki; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2007-11-01

    We developed a new in vitro assay for oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), which catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. The asparagine residues reside in the sequon, Asn-X-Thr/Ser, where X can be any amino acid residue except Pro. We demonstrate the potency of our assay using the OST from yeast. In our method, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is used to separate the glycopeptide products from the peptide substrates. The substrate peptide is fluorescently labeled and the formation of glycopeptides is analyzed by fluorescence gel imaging. Two in vitro OST assay methods are now widely used, but both the methods depend on previous knowledge of the oligosaccharide moiety: One method uses lectin binding as the separation mechanism and the other method uses biosynthetically or chemoenzymatically synthesized lipid-linked oligosaccharides as donors. N-linked protein glycosylation is found in all three domains of life, but little is known about the N-glycosylation in Archaea. Thus, our new assay, which does not require a priori knowledge of the oligosaccharides, will be useful in such cases. Indeed, we have detected the OST activity in the membrane fraction from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus.

  6. Selective control of oligosaccharide transfer efficiency for the N-glycosylation sequon by a point mutation in oligosaccharyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igura, Mayumi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2011-04-15

    Asn-linked glycosylation is the most ubiquitous posttranslational protein modification in eukaryotes and archaea, and in some eubacteria. Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. Inefficient oligosaccharide transfer results in glycoprotein heterogeneity, which is particularly bothersome in pharmaceutical glycoprotein production. Amino acid variation at the X position of the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon is known to modulate the glycosylation efficiency. The best amino acid at X is valine, for an archaeal Pyrococcus furiosus OST. We performed a systematic alanine mutagenesis study of the archaeal OST to identify the essential and dispensable amino acid residues in the three catalytic motifs. We then investigated the effects of the dispensable mutations on the amino acid preference in the N-glycosylation sequon. One residue position was found to selectively affect the amino acid preference at the X position. This residue is located within the recently identified DXXKXXX(M/I) motif, suggesting the involvement of this motif in N-glycosylation sequon recognition. In applications, mutations at this position may facilitate the design of OST variants adapted to particular N-glycosylation sites to reduce the heterogeneity of glycan occupancy. In fact, a mutation at this position led to 9-fold higher activity relative to the wild-type enzyme, toward a peptide containing arginine at X in place of valine. This mutational approach is potentially applicable to eukaryotic and eubacterial OSTs for the production of homogenous glycoproteins in engineered mammalian and Escherichia coli cells.

  7. A new thermophilic nitrilase from an antarctic hyperthermophilic microorganism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine V. Dennett

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Several environmental samples from Antarctica were collected and enriched to search for microorganisms with nitrilase activity. A new thermostable nitrilase from a novel hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus sp. M24D13 was purified and characterized. The activity of this enzyme increased as the temperatures rise from 70 up to 85 °C. Its optimal activity occurred at 85 °C and pH 7.5. This new enzyme shows a remarkable resistance to thermal inactivation retaining more than 50% of its activity even after 8 h of incubation at 85 °C.In addition, this nitrilase is highly versatile demonstrating activity towards different substrates such as benzonitrile (60 mM, aromatic nitrile and butyronitrile (60 mM, aliphatic nitrile, with a specific activity of 3286.7 U mg-1 of protein and 4008.2 U mg-1 of protein respectively. Moreover the enzyme NitM24D13 also presents cyanidase activity.The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km and Vmáx of this Nitrilase for benzonitrile were 0.3 mM and 333.3 µM min-1, respectively, and the specificity constant (kcat/Km for benzonitrile was 2.05×105 s-1 M-1.

  8. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Webb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  9. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang (Yale-MED); (Perutz Lab); (AS); (NTHU-Taiwan)

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  10. An archaeal immune system can detect multiple protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) to target invader DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Susan; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stoll, Britta; Brendel, Jutta; Fischer, Eike; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Marchfelder, Anita

    2012-09-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system provides adaptive and heritable immunity against foreign genetic elements in most archaea and many bacteria. Although this system is widespread and diverse with many subtypes, only a few species have been investigated to elucidate the precise mechanisms for the defense of viruses or plasmids. Approximately 90% of all sequenced archaea encode CRISPR/Cas systems, but their molecular details have so far only been examined in three archaeal species: Sulfolobus solfataricus, Sulfolobus islandicus, and Pyrococcus furiosus. Here, we analyzed the CRISPR/Cas system of Haloferax volcanii using a plasmid-based invader assay. Haloferax encodes a type I-B CRISPR/Cas system with eight Cas proteins and three CRISPR loci for which the identity of protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) was unknown until now. We identified six different PAM sequences that are required upstream of the protospacer to permit target DNA recognition. This is only the second archaeon for which PAM sequences have been determined, and the first CRISPR group with such a high number of PAM sequences. Cells could survive the plasmid challenge if their CRISPR/Cas system was altered or defective, e.g. by deletion of the cas gene cassette. Experimental PAM data were supplemented with bioinformatics data on Haloferax and Haloquadratum.

  11. IMAGINE: first neutron protein structure and new capabilities for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munshi, Parthapratim [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Stoica, Alexandru Dan [ORNL; Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y [ORNL; Koritsanszky, Tibor S [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Blessing, Robert [Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute; Meilleur, Flora [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We report the first high resolution neutron protein structure of perdeuterated rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfRd) determined using the new IMAGINE macromolecular neutron crystallography instrument at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Neutron diffraction data extending to 1.65 resolution were collected from a relatively small 0.7 mm3 PfRd crystal using 2.5 days (60 h) of beam time. The refined structure contains 371 out of 391, or 95%, of the deuterium atoms of the protein, and 58 solvent molecules. The IMAGINE instrument is designed to provide neutron data at or near atomic resolutions (1.5 ) from crystals with volume < 1.0 mm3 and with unit cell edges < 100 . Beam line features include elliptical focusing mirrors that deliver 3x107 n s-1 cm-2 into a 3.5 x 2.0 mm2 focal spot at the sample position, and variable short and long wavelength cutoff optics that provide automated exchange between multiple wavelength configurations ( min=2.0 , 2.8 , 3.3 - max =3.0 , 4.0 , 4.5 , ~20 ). Notably, the crystal used to collect this PfRd data is 5-10 times smaller than has been previously reported.

  12. Molecular basis of transcription initiation in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carlo, Sacha; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Taatjes, Dylan J; Hoenger, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Compared with eukaryotes, the archaeal transcription initiation machinery-commonly known as the Pre-Initiation Complex-is relatively simple. The archaeal PIC consists of the TFIIB ortholog TFB, TBP, and an 11-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP). The relatively small size of the entire archaeal PIC makes it amenable to structural analysis. Using purified RNAP, TFB, and TBP from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, we assembled the biochemically active PIC at 65ºC. The intact archaeal PIC was isolated by implementing a cross-linking technique followed by size-exclusion chromatography, and the structure of this 440 kDa assembly was determined using electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction techniques. Combining difference maps with crystal structure docking of various sub-domains, TBP and TFB were localized within the macromolecular PIC. TBP/TFB assemble near the large RpoB subunit and the RpoD/L "foot" domain behind the RNAP central cleft. This location mimics that of yeast TBP and TFIIB in complex with yeast RNAP II. Collectively, these results define the structural organization of the archaeal transcription machinery and suggest a conserved core PIC architecture.

  13. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

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    Cecilia R. Chambers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments. We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area.

  14. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

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    Mart Krupovic

    Full Text Available Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1, with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  15. Swimming behavior of selected species of Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Bastian; Wirth, Reinhard

    2012-03-01

    The swimming behavior of Bacteria has been studied extensively, at least for some species like Escherichia coli. In contrast, almost no data have been published for Archaea on this topic. In a systematic study we asked how the archaeal model organisms Halobacterium salinarum, Methanococcus voltae, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Methanocaldococcus villosus, Pyrococcus furiosus, and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius swim and which swimming behavior they exhibit. The two Euryarchaeota M. jannaschii and M. villosus were found to be, by far, the fastest organisms reported up to now, if speed is measured in bodies per second (bps). Their swimming speeds, at close to 400 and 500 bps, are much higher than the speed of the bacterium E. coli or of a very fast animal, like the cheetah, each with a speed of ca. 20 bps. In addition, we observed that two different swimming modes are used by some Archaea. They either swim very rapidly, in a more or less straight line, or they exhibit a slower kind of zigzag swimming behavior if cells are in close proximity to the surface of the glass capillary used for observation. We argue that such a "relocate-and-seek" behavior enables the organisms to stay in their natural habitat.

  16. Experimental fossilisation of viruses from extremophilic Archaea

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    F. Orange

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of viruses at different stages of the origin of life has recently been reconsidered. It appears that viruses may have accompanied the earliest forms of life, allowing the transition from an RNA to a DNA world and possibly being involved in the shaping of tree of life in the three domains that we know presently. In addition, a large variety of viruses has been recently identified in extreme environments, hosted by extremophilic microorganisms, in ecosystems considered as analogues to those of the early Earth. Traces of life on the early Earth were preserved by the precipitation of silica on the organic structures. We present the results of the first experimental fossilisation by silica of viruses from extremophilic Archaea (SIRV2 – Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2, TPV1 – Thermococcus prieurii virus 1, and PAV1 – Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1. Our results confirm that viruses can be fossilised, with silica precipitating on the different viral structures (proteins, envelope over several months in a manner similar to that of other experimentally and naturally fossilised microorganisms. This study thus suggests that viral remains or traces could be preserved in the rock record although their identification may be challenging due to the small size of the viral particles.

  17. Salt-mediated electrostatics in the association of TATA binding proteins to DNA: a combined molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredenberg, Johan H; Russo, Cristina; Fenley, Marcia O

    2008-06-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a key component of the archaea ternary preinitiation transcription assembly. The archaeon TBP, from the halophile/hyperthermophile organism Pyrococcus woesei, is adapted to high concentrations of salt and high-temperature environments. Although most eukaryotic TBPs are mesophilic and adapted to physiological conditions of temperature and salt, they are very similar to their halophilic counterparts in sequence and fold. However, whereas the binding affinity to DNA of halophilic TBPs increases with increasing salt concentration, the opposite is observed for mesophilic TBPs. We investigated these differences in nonspecific salt-dependent DNA-binding behavior of halophilic and mesophilic TBPs by using a combined molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann approach. Our results are qualitatively in good agreement with experimentally observed salt-dependent DNA-binding for mesophilic and halophilic TBPs, and suggest that the distribution and the total number of charged residues may be the main underlying contributor in the association process. Therefore, the difference in the salt-dependent binding behavior of mesophilic and halophilic TBPs to DNA may be due to the very unique charge and electrostatic potential distribution of these TBPs, which consequently alters the number of repulsive and attractive electrostatic interactions.

  18. Decarboxylation of Pyruvate to Acetaldehyde for Ethanol Production by Hyperthermophiles

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    Mohammad S. Eram

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC encoded by pdc is a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP-containing enzyme responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetaldehyde in many mesophilic organisms. However, no pdc/PDC homolog has yet been found in fully sequenced genomes and proteomes of hyper/thermophiles. The only PDC activity reported in hyperthermophiles was a bifunctional, TPP- and CoA-dependent pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR/PDC enzyme from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Another enzyme known to be involved in catalysis of acetaldehyde production from pyruvate is CoA-acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (AcDH encoded by mhpF and adhE. Pyruvate is oxidized into acetyl-CoA by either POR or pyruvate formate lyase (PFL, and AcDH catalyzes the reduction of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde in mesophilic organisms. AcDH is present in some mesophilic (such as clostridia and thermophilic bacteria (e.g., Geobacillus and Thermoanaerobacter. However, no AcDH gene or protein homologs could be found in the released genomes and proteomes of hyperthermophiles. Moreover, no such activity was detectable from the cell-free extracts of different hyperthermophiles under different assay conditions. In conclusion, no commonly-known PDCs was found in hyperthermophiles. Instead of the commonly-known PDC, it appears that at least one multifunctional enzyme is responsible for catalyzing the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde in hyperthermophiles.

  19. Comparative Genomic and Transcriptional Analyses of CRISPR Systems Across the Genus Pyrobaculum

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    David L Bernick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the domain Archaea, the CRISPR immune system appears to be nearly ubiquitous based on computational genome analyses. Initial studies in bacteria demonstrated that the CRISPR system targets invading plasmid and viral DNA. Recent experiments in the model archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus uncovered a novel RNA-targeting variant of the CRISPR system potentially unique to archaea. Because our understanding of CRISPR system evolution in other archaea is limited, we have taken a comparative genomic and transcriptomic view of the CRISPR arrays across six diverse species within the crenarchaeal genus Pyrobaculum. We present transcriptional data from each of four species in the genus (P. aerophilum, P. islandicum, P. calidifontis, P. arsenaticum, analyzing mature CRISPR-associated small RNA abundance from over 20 arrays. Within the genus, there is remarkable conservation of CRISPR array structure, as well as unique features that are have not been studied in other archaeal systems. These unique features include: a nearly invariant CRISPR promoter, conservation of direct repeat families, the 5' polarity of CRISPR-associated small RNA abundance, and a novel CRISPR-specific association with homologues of nurA and herA. These analyses provide a genus-level evolutionary perspective on archaeal CRISPR systems, broadening our understanding beyond existing non-comparative model systems.

  20. Structure of the Cmr2 Subunit of the CRISPR-Cas RNA Silencing Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Ramia, Nancy F.; Shao, Yaming; Hale, Caryn R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong (FSU); (Georgia)

    2012-08-10

    Cmr2 is the largest and an essential subunit of a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex (the Cmr complex) that cleaves foreign RNA to protect prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. Cmr2 is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the effector complex because of its N-terminal HD nuclease domain. Here, however, we report that the HD domain of Cmr2 is not required for cleavage by the complex in vitro. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2 (lacking the HD domain) reveals two adenylyl cyclase-like and two {alpha}-helical domains. The adenylyl cyclase-like domains are arranged as in homodimeric adenylyl cyclases and bind ADP and divalent metals. However, mutagenesis studies show that the metal- and ADP-coordinating residues of Cmr2 are also not critical for cleavage by the complex. Our findings suggest that another component provides the catalytic function and that the essential role by Cmr2 does not require the identified ADP- or metal-binding or HD domains in vitro.

  1. Cas6 is an endoribonuclease that generates guide RNAs for invader defense in prokaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carte, Jason; Wang, Ruiying; Li, Hong; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P. (FSU); (Georgia)

    2010-11-09

    An RNA-based gene silencing pathway that protects bacteria and archaea from viruses and other genome invaders is hypothesized to arise from guide RNAs encoded by CRISPR loci and proteins encoded by the cas genes. CRISPR loci contain multiple short invader-derived sequences separated by short repeats. The presence of virus-specific sequences within CRISPR loci of prokaryotic genomes confers resistance against corresponding viruses. The CRISPR loci are transcribed as long RNAs that must be processed to smaller guide RNAs. Here we identified Pyrococcus furiosus Cas6 as a novel endoribonuclease that cleaves CRISPR RNAs within the repeat sequences to release individual invader targeting RNAs. Cas6 interacts with a specific sequence motif in the 5{prime} region of the CRISPR repeat element and cleaves at a defined site within the 3{prime} region of the repeat. The 1.8 angstrom crystal structure of the enzyme reveals two ferredoxin-like folds that are also found in other RNA-binding proteins. The predicted active site of the enzyme is similar to that of tRNA splicing endonucleases, and concordantly, Cas6 activity is metal-independent. cas6 is one of the most widely distributed CRISPR-associated genes. Our findings indicate that Cas6 functions in the generation of CRISPR-derived guide RNAs in numerous bacteria and archaea.

  2. A Macrocyclic Peptide that Serves as a Cocrystallization Ligand and Inhibits the Function of a MATE Family Transporter

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    Hiroaki Suga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The random non-standard peptide integrated discovery (RaPID system has proven to be a powerful approach to discover de novo natural product-like macrocyclic peptides that inhibit protein functions. We have recently reported three macrocyclic peptides that bind to Pyrococcus furiosus multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (PfMATE transporter and inhibit the transport function. Moreover, these macrocyclic peptides were successfully employed as cocrystallization ligands of selenomethionine-labeled PfMATE. In this report, we disclose the details of the RaPID selection strategy that led to the identification of these three macrocyclic peptides as well as a fourth macrocyclic peptide, MaD8, which is exclusively discussed in this article. MaD8 was found to bind within the cleft of PfMATE’s extracellular side and blocked the path of organic small molecules being extruded. The results of an ethidium bromide efflux assay confirmed the efflux inhibitory activity of MaD8, whose behavior was similar to that of previously reported MaD5.

  3. Cleavage of model substrates by archaeal RNase P: role of protein cofactors in cleavage-site selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinapah, Sylvie; Wu, Shiying; Chen, Yu; Pettersson, B M Fredrik; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2011-02-01

    RNase P is a catalytic ribonucleoprotein primarily involved in tRNA biogenesis. Archaeal RNase P comprises a catalytic RNase P RNA (RPR) and at least four protein cofactors (RPPs), which function as two binary complexes (POP5•RPP30 and RPP21• RPP29). Exploiting the ability to assemble a functional Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RNase P in vitro, we examined the role of RPPs in influencing substrate recognition by the RPR. We first demonstrate that Pfu RPR, like its bacterial and eukaryal counterparts, cleaves model hairpin loop substrates albeit at rates 90- to 200-fold lower when compared with cleavage by bacterial RPR, highlighting the functionally comparable catalytic cores in bacterial and archaeal RPRs. By investigating cleavage-site selection exhibited by Pfu RPR (±RPPs) with various model substrates missing consensus-recognition elements, we determined substrate features whose recognition is facilitated by either POP5•RPP30 or RPP21•RPP29 (directly or indirectly via the RPR). Our results also revealed that Pfu RPR + RPP21•RPP29 displays substrate-recognition properties coinciding with those of the bacterial RPR-alone reaction rather than the Pfu RPR, and that this behaviour is attributable to structural differences in the substrate-specificity domains of bacterial and archaeal RPRs. Moreover, our data reveal a hierarchy in recognition elements that dictates cleavage-site selection by archaeal RNase P.

  4. Comparative analysis and "expression space" coverage of the production of prokaryotic membrane proteins for structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surade, Sachin; Klein, Markus; Stolt-Bergner, Peggy C; Muenke, Cornelia; Roy, Ankita; Michel, Hartmut

    2006-09-01

    Membrane proteins comprise up to one-third of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, but only a very small number of membrane protein structures are known. Membrane proteins are challenging targets for structural biology, primarily due to the difficulty in producing and purifying milligram quantities of these proteins. We are evaluating different methods to produce and purify large numbers of prokaryotic membrane proteins for subsequent structural and functional analysis. Here, we present the comparative expression data for 37 target proteins, all of them secondary transporters, from the mesophilic organism Salmonella typhimurium and the two hyperthermophilic organisms Aquifex aeolicus and Pyrococcus furiosus in three different Escherichia coli expression vectors. In addition, we study the use of Lactococcus lactis as a host for integral membrane protein expression. Overall, 78% of the targets were successfully produced under at least one set of conditions. Analysis of these results allows us to assess the role of different variables in increasing "expression space" coverage for our set of targets. This analysis implies that to maximize the number of nonhomologous targets that are expressed, orthologous targets should be chosen and tested in two vectors with different types of promoters, using C-terminal tags. In addition, E. coli is shown to be a robust host for the expression of prokaryotic transporters, and is superior to L. lactis. These results therefore suggest appropriate strategies for high-throughput heterologous overproduction of membrane proteins.

  5. Structural analysis of β-glucosidase mutants derived from a hyperthermophilic tetrameric structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakabayashi, Makoto; Kataoka, Misumi; Mishima, Yumiko; Maeno, Yuka; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kazu-ishikawa@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science, 3-11-32, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Substitutive mutations that convert a tetrameric β-glucosidase into a dimeric state lead to improvement of its crystal quality. β-Glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus (BGLPf) is a hyperthermophilic tetrameric enzyme which can degrade cellooligosaccharides to glucose under hyperthermophilic conditions and thus holds promise for the saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass at high temperature. Prior to the production of large amounts of this enzyme, detailed information regarding the oligomeric structure of the enzyme is required. Several crystals of BGLPf have been prepared over the past ten years, but its crystal structure had not been solved until recently. In 2011, the first crystal structure of BGLPf was solved and a model was constructed at somewhat low resolution (2.35 Å). In order to obtain more detailed structural data on BGLPf, the relationship between its tetrameric structure and the quality of the crystal was re-examined. A dimeric form of BGLPf was constructed and its crystal structure was solved at a resolution of 1.70 Å using protein-engineering methods. Furthermore, using the high-resolution crystal structural data for the dimeric form, a monomeric form of BGLPf was constructed which retained the intrinsic activity of the tetrameric form. The thermostability of BGLPf is affected by its oligomeric structure. Here, the biophysical and biochemical properties of engineered dimeric and monomeric BGLPfs are reported, which are promising prototype models to apply to the saccharification reaction. Furthermore, details regarding the oligomeric structures of BGLPf and the reasons why the mutations yielded improved crystal structures are discussed.

  6. Formation of the conserved pseudouridine at position 55 in archaeal tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roovers, Martine; Hale, Caryn; Tricot, Catherine; Terns, Michael P; Terns, Rebecca M; Grosjean, Henri; Droogmans, Louis

    2006-01-01

    Pseudouridine (Psi) located at position 55 in tRNA is a nearly universally conserved RNA modification found in all three domains of life. This modification is catalyzed by TruB in bacteria and by Pus4 in eukaryotes, but so far the Psi55 synthase has not been identified in archaea. In this work, we report the ability of two distinct pseudouridine synthases from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus to specifically modify U55 in tRNA in vitro. These enzymes are (pfu)Cbf5, a protein known to play a role in RNA-guided modification of rRNA, and (pfu)PsuX, a previously uncharacterized enzyme that is not a member of the TruB/Pus4/Cbf5 family of pseudouridine synthases. (pfu)PsuX is hereafter renamed (pfu)Pus10. Both enzymes specifically modify tRNA U55 in vitro but exhibit differences in substrate recognition. In addition, we find that in a heterologous in vivo system, (pfu)Pus10 efficiently complements an Escherichia coli strain deficient in the bacterial Psi55 synthase TruB. These results indicate that it is probable that (pfu)Cbf5 or (pfu)Pus10 (or both) is responsible for the introduction of pseudouridine at U55 in tRNAs in archaea. While we cannot unequivocally assign the function from our results, both possibilities represent unexpected functions of these proteins as discussed herein.

  7. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B.; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  8. Structure of the Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase Reveals a Novel Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher,D.; Smith, N.; Kim, S.; Heroux, A.; Robinson, H.; Reddy, P.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of the class IV adenylyl cyclase (AC) from Yersinia pestis (Yp) is reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The class IV AC fold is distinct from the previously described folds for class II and class III ACs. The dimeric AC-IV folds into an antiparallel eight-stranded barrel whose connectivity has been seen in only three previous structures: yeast RNA triphosphatase and two proteins of unknown function from Pyrococcus furiosus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Eight highly conserved ionic residues E10, E12, K14, R63, K76, K111, D126, and E136 lie in the barrel core and form the likely binding sites for substrate and divalent cations. A phosphate ion is observed bound to R63, K76, K111, and R113 near the center of the conserved cluster. Unlike the AC-II and AC-III active sites that utilize two-Asp motifs for cation binding, the AC-IV active site is relatively enriched in glutamate and features an ExE motif as its most conserved element. Homologs of Y. pestis AC-IV, including human thiamine triphosphatase, span the three kingdoms of life and delineate an ancient family of phosphonucleotide processing enzymes.

  9. RNase H-dependent PCR (rhPCR: improved specificity and single nucleotide polymorphism detection using blocked cleavable primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powers Kristy M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polymerase chain reaction (PCR is commonly used to detect the presence of nucleic acid sequences both in research and diagnostic settings. While high specificity is often achieved, biological requirements sometimes necessitate that primers are placed in suboptimal locations which lead to problems with the formation of primer dimers and/or misamplification of homologous sequences. Results Pyrococcus abyssi (P.a. RNase H2 was used to enable PCR to be performed using blocked primers containing a single ribonucleotide residue which are activated via cleavage by the enzyme (rhPCR. Cleavage occurs 5'-to the RNA base following primer hybridization to the target DNA. The requirement of the primer to first hybridize with the target sequence to gain activity eliminates the formation of primer-dimers and greatly reduces misamplification of closely related sequences. Mismatches near the scissile linkage decrease the efficiency of cleavage by RNase H2, further increasing the specificity of the assay. When applied to the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rhPCR was found to be far more sensitive than standard allele-specific PCR. In general, the best discrimination occurs when the mismatch is placed at the RNA:DNA base pair. Conclusion rhPCR eliminates the formation of primer dimers and markedly improves the specificity of PCR with respect to off-target amplification. These advantages of the assay should find utility in challenging qPCR applications such as genotyping, high level multiplex assays and rare allele detection.

  10. Thermostable enzymes of hyperthermophilic archaea; Chokonetsukin no tainetsusei koso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanaka, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Graduate School; Fujiwara, S. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    1997-05-20

    All known organisms are divided into three groups, eukaryote, eubacteria and archaea (archaebacteria) according to the phylogenic tree based on 16SrRNA or protein sequences. Archaea is considered to be closer to eukaryote than eubacteria, and particularly, hyperthermophilic archaea evolved most slowly in archaea domain remaining ancestral features of eukaryote. Pyrococcus sp. KOD 1, a hyperthermophilic archaeon were isolated from a solfatara at a wharf of Kodakara island, Kagoshima, Japan with 95degC of the optimum temperature for cell growth. Unusual characteristics of enzymes produced by KOD 1 are discussed. The structural features of protease, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthase and amylase of KOD 1 are close to corresponding eubacterial enzymes. DNA polymerase from KOD 1 shows a high rate of DNA synthesis and is used in PCR practically. Molecular chaperonin of KOD 1 has high similarity to TCP-1 of eukaryote and is expected for application to in vitro enzyme stabilization and in vivo solubilization of foreign proteins. 26 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ST1022, a putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators isolated from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Noboru; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri, E-mail: tskvel@spring8.or.jp; Matsunaga, Emiko; Shinkai, Akeo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kuramitsu, Seiki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Tayonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yokoyama, Shigeyuki, E-mail: tskvel@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama Institute, RIKEN, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2007-11-01

    A putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, ST1022 from S. tokodaii strain 7, has been purified and crystallized in the absence and presence of the effector l-glutamine. A molecular-replacement solution was found using the FL11 transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus sp. OT3 as a model and structural refinement is under way. The Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, also known as feast/famine transcriptional regulators, are widely distributed among bacteria and archaea. This family of proteins are likely to be involved in cellular metabolism, with exogenous amino acids functioning as effectors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of ST1022, a member of the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, is reported with and without exogenous glutamine as the effector molecule. The crystals of native ST1022 and of the putative complex belong to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.771, c = 73.297 Å and a = b = 103.846, c = 73.992 Å, respectively. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis and molecular-replacement solution revealed the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit.

  12. PDI improves secretion of redox-inactive beta-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Sara Lawrence; Robinson, Anne Skaja

    2007-01-01

    Although manipulation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) folding environment in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to increase the secretory productivity of recombinant proteins, the cellular interactions and processes of native enzymes and chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) are still unclear. Previously, we reported that overexpression of the ER chaperone PDI enabled up to a 3-fold increase in secretion levels of the Pyrococcus furiosus beta-glucosidase in the yeast S. cerevisiae. This result was surprising since beta-glucosidase contains only one cysteine per monomer and no disulfide bonds. Two possible mechanisms were proposed: PDI either forms a transient disulfide bond with the lone cysteine residue of the nascent beta-glucosidase during the folding and assembly process or acts as a chaperone to aid in proper folding. To discern between the two mechanisms, the single cysteine residue was mutated to serine, and the secretion of the two protein variants was determined. The serine mutant still showed increased secretion in vivo when PDI levels were elevated. When the folding bottleneck is removed by increasing expression temperatures to 37 degrees C rather than 30 degrees C, PDI no longer has an improvement on secretion. These results suggest that, unexpectedly, PDI acts in a chaperone-like capacity or possibly cooperates with the cell's folding or degradation mechanisms regardless of whether the protein is redox-active.

  13. Essential Structural and Functional Roles of the Cmr4 Subunit in RNA Cleavage by the Cmr CRISPR-Cas Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy F. Ramia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cmr complex is the multisubunit effector complex of the type III-B clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas immune system. The Cmr complex recognizes a target RNA through base pairing with the integral CRISPR RNA (crRNA and cleaves the target at multiple regularly spaced locations within the complementary region. To understand the molecular basis of the function of this complex, we have assembled information from electron microscopic and X-ray crystallographic structural studies and mutagenesis of a complete Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr complex. Our findings reveal that four helically packed Cmr4 subunits, which make up the backbone of the Cmr complex, act as a platform to support crRNA binding and target RNA cleavage. Interestingly, we found a hook-like structural feature associated with Cmr4 that is likely the site of target RNA binding and cleavage. Our results also elucidate analogies in the mechanisms of crRNA and target molecule binding by the distinct Cmr type III-A and Cascade type I-E complexes.

  14. Proton Inventory and Dynamics in the Nia-S to Nia-C Transition of a [NiFe] Hydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; Vansuch, Gregory E; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2016-03-29

    Hydrogenases (H2ases) represent one of the most striking examples of biological proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) chemistry, functioning in facile proton reduction and H2 oxidation involving long-range proton and electron transport. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies of the [NiFe] H2ases have identified several catalytic intermediates, but the details of their interconversion are still a matter of debate. Here we use steady state and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, sensitive to the CO ligand of the active site iron, as a probe of the proton inventory as well as electron and proton transfer dynamics in the soluble hydrogenase I from Pyrococcus furiosus. Subtle shifts in infrared signatures associated with the Nia-C and Nia-S states as a function of pH revealed an acid-base equilibrium associated with an ionizable amino acid near the active site. Protonation of this residue was found to correlate with the photoproduct distribution that results from hydride photolysis of the Nia-C state, in which one of the two photoproduct states becomes inaccessible at low pH. Additionally, the ability to generate Nia-S via PCET from Nia-C was weakened at low pH, suggesting prior protonation of the proton acceptor. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of electron and proton transfer with respect to the various proton inventories was utilized to develop a chemical model for reversible hydride oxidation involving two intermediates differing in their hydrogen bonding character.

  15. Cloning and Characterization of an Alpha-amylase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus Thioreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an extracellular a-amylase, TTA, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Primary structural analysis revealed high similarity with other a-amylases from the Thermococcus and Pyrococcus genera, as well as the four highly conserved regions typical for a-amylases. The 1374 bp gene encodes a protein of 457 amino acids, of which 435 constitute the mature protein preceded by a 22 amino acid signal peptide. The molecular weight of the purified recombinant enzyme was estimated to be 43 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Maximal enzymatic activity of recombinant TTA was observed at 90 C and pH 5.5 in the absence of exogenous Ca(2+), and the enzyme was considerably stable even after incubation at 90 C for 2 hours. The thermostability at 90 and 102 C was enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). The extraordinarily high specific activity (about 7.4 x 10(exp 3) U/mg protein at 90 C, pH 5.5 with soluble starch as substrate) together with its low pH optimum makes this enzyme an interesting candidate for starch processing applications.

  16. Coated-wall microreactor for continuous biocatalytic transformations using immobilized enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Malene S; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Microstructured flow reactors are emerging tools for biocatalytic process development. A compelling design is that of the coated-wall reactor where enzyme is present as a surface layer attached to microchannel walls. However, preparation of a highly active wall biocatalyst remains a problem. Here, a stainless steel microreactor was developed where covalent immobilization of the enzyme in multiple linear flow channels of the reaction plate was supported by a macroporous wash-coat layer of gamma-aluminum oxide. Using surface functionalization with aminopropyl triethoxysilane followed by activation with glutardialdehyde, the thermophilic beta-glycosidase CelB from Pyrococcus furiosus was bound with retention of half of the specific activity of the free enzyme (800 U/mg), yielding a high catalyst loading of about 500 U/mL. This microreactor was employed for the continuous hydrolysis of lactose (100 mM) at 80 degrees C, providing a space-time yield of 500 mg glucose/(mL h) at a stable conversion of > or =70%. The immobilized enzyme displayed a half-life of 15 days under the operational conditions. Due to the absence of hydrophobic solute-material interactions, which limit the scope of microstructures fabricated from poly(dimethylsiloxane) for biocatalytic applications, the new microreactor was fully compatible with the alternate enzyme substrate 2-nitro-phenyl-beta-D-galactoside and the 2-nitro-phenol product resulting from its hydrolysis catalyzed by CelB.

  17. Structures of an apo and a binary complex of an evolved archeal B family DNA polymerase capable of synthesising highly cy-dye labelled DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha A Wynne

    Full Text Available Thermophilic DNA polymerases of the polB family are of great importance in biotechnological applications including high-fidelity PCR. Of particular interest is the relative promiscuity of engineered versions of the exo- form of polymerases from the Thermo- and Pyrococcales families towards non-canonical substrates, which enables key advances in Next-generation sequencing. Despite this there is a paucity of structural information to guide further engineering of this group of polymerases. Here we report two structures, of the apo form and of a binary complex of a previously described variant (E10 of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu polymerase with an ability to fully replace dCTP with Cyanine dye-labeled dCTP (Cy3-dCTP or Cy5-dCTP in PCR and synthesise highly fluorescent "CyDNA" densely decorated with cyanine dye heterocycles. The apo form of Pfu-E10 closely matches reported apo form structures of wild-type Pfu. In contrast, the binary complex (in the replicative state with a duplex DNA oligonucleotide reveals a closing movement of the thumb domain, increasing the contact surface with the nascent DNA duplex strand. Modelling based on the binary complex suggests how bulky fluorophores may be accommodated during processive synthesis and has aided the identification of residues important for the synthesis of unnatural nucleic acid polymers.

  18. Transcription start site associated RNAs (TSSaRNAs are ubiquitous in all domains of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia S Zaramela

    Full Text Available A plethora of non-coding RNAs has been discovered using high-resolution transcriptomics tools, indicating that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation is much more complex than previously appreciated. Small RNAs associated with transcription start sites of annotated coding regions (TSSaRNAs are pervasive in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Here, we provide evidence for existence of TSSaRNAs in several archaeal transcriptomes including: Halobacterium salinarum, Pyrococcus furiosus, Methanococcus maripaludis, and Sulfolobus solfataricus. We validated TSSaRNAs from the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 by deep sequencing two independent small-RNA enriched (RNA-seq and a primary-transcript enriched (dRNA-seq strand-specific libraries. We identified 652 transcripts, of which 179 were shown to be primary transcripts (∼7% of the annotated genome. Distinct growth-associated expression patterns between TSSaRNAs and their cognate genes were observed, indicating a possible role in environmental responses that may result from RNA polymerase with varying pausing rhythms. This work shows that TSSaRNAs are ubiquitous across all domains of life.

  19. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  20. Cloning and Characterization of an Alpha-amylase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus Thioreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an extracellular a-amylase, TTA, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Primary structural analysis revealed high similarity with other a-amylases from the Thermococcus and Pyrococcus genera, as well as the four highly conserved regions typical for a-amylases. The 1374 bp gene encodes a protein of 457 amino acids, of which 435 constitute the mature protein preceded by a 22 amino acid signal peptide. The molecular weight of the purified recombinant enzyme was estimated to be 43 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Maximal enzymatic activity of recombinant TTA was observed at 90 C and pH 5.5 in the absence of exogenous Ca(2+), and the enzyme was considerably stable even after incubation at 90 C for 2 hours. The thermostability at 90 and 102 C was enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). The extraordinarily high specific activity (about 7.4 x 10(exp 3) U/mg protein at 90 C, pH 5.5 with soluble starch as substrate) together with its low pH optimum makes this enzyme an interesting candidate for starch processing applications.

  1. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ulrich, Luke [ORNL; Lupa, Boguslaw [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Susanti, Dwi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Porat, I. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hooper, Sean [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Whitman, William [ORNL; Woese, Carl [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Background Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  2. Transcription factor IID in the Archaea: sequences in the Thermococcus celer genome would encode a product closely related to the TATA-binding protein of eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, T. L.; Reich, C. I.; Whitelock, R. B.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The first step in transcription initiation in eukaryotes is mediated by the TATA-binding protein, a subunit of the transcription factor IID complex. We have cloned and sequenced the gene for a presumptive homolog of this eukaryotic protein from Thermococcus celer, a member of the Archaea (formerly archaebacteria). The protein encoded by the archaeal gene is a tandem repeat of a conserved domain, corresponding to the repeated domain in its eukaryotic counterparts. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the two halves of the repeat are consistent with the duplication occurring before the divergence of the archael and eukaryotic domains. In conjunction with previous observations of similarity in RNA polymerase subunit composition and sequences and the finding of a transcription factor IIB-like sequence in Pyrococcus woesei (a relative of T. celer) it appears that major features of the eukaryotic transcription apparatus were well-established before the origin of eukaryotic cellular organization. The divergence between the two halves of the archael protein is less than that between the halves of the individual eukaryotic sequences, indicating that the average rate of sequence change in the archael protein has been less than in its eukaryotic counterparts. To the extent that this lower rate applies to the genome as a whole, a clearer picture of the early genes (and gene families) that gave rise to present-day genomes is more apt to emerge from the study of sequences from the Archaea than from the corresponding sequences from eukaryotes.

  3. Genomic characterization of methanomicrobiales reveals three classes of methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-06-04

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  4. Bioenergetic and physiological studies of hyperthermophilic archaea. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    This project focuses on physiological and bioenergetic characteristics of two representative hyperthermophilic archaea: Thermococcus litoralis (T{sub opt} 88 C) and Pyrococcus furiosus (T{sub opt} 98 C). Both are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs which grow in the presence or absence of reducible sulfur compounds. T. litoralis was studied in relation to information previously developed for P. furiosus: effect of sulfur reduction on bioenergetics, preferred fermentation patterns, tungsten requirement, etc. A defined medium was developed for T. litoralis consisting of amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides. This serves as the basis for continuous culture studies probing metabolic response to media changes. P. furiosus and T. litoralis have also been found to produce a polysaccharide in the presence of maltose and yeast extract. The composition and chemical structure of this polysaccharide was investigated as well as the metabolic motivation for its production. A novel and, perhaps, primitive intracellular proteolytic complex (previously designated as protease S66) in P. furiosus was isolated and the gene encoding the subunit of the complex was cloned, sequenced and the protease expressed in active form in Eschericia coli. Among other issues, the role of this complex in protein turnover and stress response was examined in the context of this organism in addition to comparing it to other complexes in eubacterial and eukaryotic cells. Biochemical characteristics of the protease have been measured in addition to examining other proteolytic species in P. furiosus.

  5. Structure of the archaeal pab87 peptidase reveals a novel self-compartmentalizing protease family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Delfosse

    Full Text Available Self-compartmentalizing proteases orchestrate protein turnover through an original architecture characterized by a central catalytic chamber. Here we report the first structure of an archaeal member of a new self-compartmentalizing protease family forming a cubic-shaped octamer with D(4 symmetry and referred to as CubicO. We solved the structure of the Pyrococcus abyssi Pab87 protein at 2.2 A resolution using the anomalous signal of the high-phasing-power lanthanide derivative Lu-HPDO3A. A 20 A wide channel runs through this supramolecular assembly of 0.4 MDa, giving access to a 60 A wide central chamber holding the eight active sites. Surprisingly, activity assays revealed that Pab87 degrades specifically d-amino acid containing peptides, which have never been observed in archaea. Genomic context of the Pab87 gene showed that it is surrounded by genes involved in the amino acid/peptide transport or metabolism. We propose that CubicO proteases are involved in the processing of d-peptides from environmental origins.

  6. Structure of the EndoMS-DNA Complex as Mismatch Restriction Endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Setsu; Hijikata, Atsushi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Kouki; Kouyama, Ken-Ichi; Mayanagi, Kouta; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Archaeal NucS nuclease was thought to degrade the single-stranded region of branched DNA, which contains flapped and splayed DNA. However, recent findings indicated that EndoMS, the orthologous enzyme of NucS, specifically cleaves double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing mismatched bases. In this study, we determined the structure of the EndoMS-DNA complex. The complex structure of the EndoMS dimer with dsDNA unexpectedly revealed that the mismatched bases were flipped out into binding sites, and the overall architecture most resembled that of restriction enzymes. The structure of the apo form was similar to the reported structure of Pyrococcus abyssi NucS, indicating that movement of the C-terminal domain from the resting state was required for activity. In addition, a model of the EndoMS-PCNA-DNA complex was preliminarily verified with electron microscopy. The structures strongly support the idea that EndoMS acts in a mismatch repair pathway.

  7. Anaerobic High-Throughput Cultivation Method for Isolation of Thermophiles Using Biomass-Derived Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Elkins, James G [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) techniques have been developed for sorting mesophilic organisms, but the difficulty increases if the target microbes are thermophilic anaerobes. We demonstrate a reliable, high-throughput method of screening thermophilic anaerobic organisms using FCM and 96-well plates for growth on biomass-relevant substrates. The method was tested using the cellulolytic thermophiles Clostridium ther- mocellum (Topt = 55 C), Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis (Topt = 78 C) and the fermentative hyperthermo- philes, Pyrococcus furiosus (Topt = 100 C) and Thermotoga maritima (Topt = 80 C). Multi-well plates were incubated at various temperatures for approximately 72 120 h and then tested for growth. Positive growth resulting from single cells sorted into individual wells containing an anaerobic medium was verified by OD600. Depending on the growth substrate, up to 80 % of the wells contained viable cultures, which could be transferred to fresh media. This method was used to isolate thermophilic microbes from Rabbit Creek, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming. Substrates for enrichment cultures including crystalline cellulose (Avicel), xylan (from Birchwood), pretreated switchgrass and Populus were used to cultivate organisms that may be of interest to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  8. Cloning, sequencing and function of sanA, a gene involved in nikkomycin biosynthesis of Streptomyces ansochromogenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾君永[1; 李文利[2; 陈蔚[3; 聂丽平[4; 谭华荣[5

    2000-01-01

    Several genetically stable mutants blocked in nikkomycin biosynthesis were obtained after the slightly germinated spores of Streptomyces ansochromogenes, a nikkomycin producer, were treated with ultra violet radiation. One of the mutants is the same in morpholotical differentiation as the wild type strain and is designated as NBB19. A DMA library was constructed using plasmid plJ702 as cloning vector, NBB19 as cloning recipient. A 6 kb DNA fragment which can genetically complement NBB19 was cloned when screening the library for antifungal activity. Sequence analysis showed that the 3 kb Bgl II-Sal I fragment contains one complete ORF (ORF1) and one partial ORF (ORF2). ORF1 is designated as sanA. sanA is 1 365 bp, encoding a protein consisting of 454 amino acid residues. Database searching indicated that sanA is homologous to the hypothetical methyltransferase in Pyrococcus horikoshli with 25% identities and 41% positives. Disruptant of sanA lost the ability to synthesize nikkomycin. It indicated that sa

  9. Identification of archaeal proteins that affect the exosome function in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palhano Fernando L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The archaeal exosome is formed by a hexameric RNase PH ring and three RNA binding subunits and has been shown to bind and degrade RNA in vitro. Despite extensive studies on the eukaryotic exosome and on the proteins interacting with this complex, little information is yet available on the identification and function of archaeal exosome regulatory factors. Results Here, we show that the proteins PaSBDS and PaNip7, which bind preferentially to poly-A and AU-rich RNAs, respectively, affect the Pyrococcus abyssi exosome activity in vitro. PaSBDS inhibits slightly degradation of a poly-rA substrate, while PaNip7 strongly inhibits the degradation of poly-A and poly-AU by the exosome. The exosome inhibition by PaNip7 appears to depend at least partially on its interaction with RNA, since mutants of PaNip7 that no longer bind RNA, inhibit the exosome less strongly. We also show that FITC-labeled PaNip7 associates with the exosome in the absence of substrate RNA. Conclusions Given the high structural homology between the archaeal and eukaryotic proteins, the effect of archaeal Nip7 and SBDS on the exosome provides a model for an evolutionarily conserved exosome control mechanism.

  10. ATP-driven Rad50 conformations regulate DNA tethering, end resection, and ATM checkpoint signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Rajashree A; Williams, Gareth J; Limbo, Oliver; Williams, R Scott; Kuhnlein, Jeff; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Classen, Scott; Guenther, Grant; Russell, Paul; Tainer, John A; Paull, Tanya T

    2014-03-03

    The Mre11-Rad50 complex is highly conserved, yet the mechanisms by which Rad50 ATP-driven states regulate the sensing, processing and signaling of DNA double-strand breaks are largely unknown. Here we design structure-based mutations in Pyrococcus furiosus Rad50 to alter protein core plasticity and residues undergoing ATP-driven movements within the catalytic domains. With this strategy we identify Rad50 separation-of-function mutants that either promote or destabilize the ATP-bound state. Crystal structures, X-ray scattering, biochemical assays, and functional analyses of mutant PfRad50 complexes show that the ATP-induced 'closed' conformation promotes DNA end binding and end tethering, while hydrolysis-induced opening is essential for DNA resection. Reducing the stability of the ATP-bound state impairs DNA repair and Tel1 (ATM) checkpoint signaling in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, double-strand break resection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and ATM activation by human Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 in vitro, supporting the generality of the P. furiosus Rad50 structure-based mutational analyses. These collective results suggest that ATP-dependent Rad50 conformations switch the Mre11-Rad50 complex between DNA tethering, ATM signaling, and 5' strand resection, revealing molecular mechanisms regulating responses to DNA double-strand breaks.

  11. Generation of recombinant pestiviruses using a full genome amplification strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, Ilona; Uttenthal, Åse

    pestiviruses. Methods Pestivirus genomes were amplified from either total RNA preparations using long RT-PCR or from infectious cDNA clones using long PCR. Viral RNA was extracted from cell cultures inoculated with pestivirus (e.g. BDV “Gifhorn” or BVDV “CP7”) using a combined Trizol/RNeasy protocol. Total RNA...... was reverse transcribed to cDNA at 50C for 90 minutes using SuperScript III reverse transcriptase (Invitrogen). Full-length PCR amplification was performed using primers specific for the extreme 5’- and 3’-ends of the viral genomes. A T7 promoter was incorporated in the 5’-primers for direct in vitro...... transcription of the amplicons. Long (RT)-PCR was performed using Accuprime High Fidelity or Elongase enzyme mix (Invitrogen), which consists of mixtures of Taq and proofreading Pyrococcus GB-D DNA polymerases. Reactions containing 2 l cDNA were amplified using 94C for 30 seconds followed by 35 cycles of 94°C...

  12. Construction, Expression, and Characterization of Recombinant Pfu DNA Polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Wang, Qingsong; Bi, Qun

    2016-04-01

    Pfu DNA polymerase (Pfu) is a DNA polymerase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. With its excellent thermostability and high fidelity, Pfu is well known as one of the enzymes widely used in the polymerase chain reaction. In this study, the recombinant plasmid pLysS His6-tagged Pfu-pET28a was constructed. His-tagged Pfu was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) competent cells and then successfully purified with the ÄKTAprime plus compact one-step purification system by Ni(2+) chelating affinity chromatography after optimization of the purification conditions. The authenticity of the purified Pfu was further confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting. A bio-assay indicated that its activity in the polymerase chain reaction was equivalent to that of commercial Pfu and its isoelectric point was found to be between 6.85 and 7.35. These results will be useful for further studies on Pfu and its wide application in the future.

  13. A New Class of Tungsten-Containing Oxidoreductase in Caldicellulosiruptor, a Genus of Plant Biomass-Degrading Thermophilic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Israel M; Rubinstein, Gabe M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J; Rhaesa, Amanda M; Lancaster, W Andrew; Poole, Farris L; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2015-10-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor bescii grows optimally at 78°C and is able to decompose high concentrations of lignocellulosic plant biomass without the need for thermochemical pretreatment. C. bescii ferments both C5 and C6 sugars primarily to hydrogen gas, lactate, acetate, and CO2 and is of particular interest for metabolic engineering applications given the recent availability of a genetic system. Developing optimal strains for technological use requires a detailed understanding of primary metabolism, particularly when the goal is to divert all available reductant (electrons) toward highly reduced products such as biofuels. During an analysis of the C. bescii genome sequence for oxidoreductase-type enzymes, evidence was uncovered to suggest that the primary redox metabolism of C. bescii has a completely uncharacterized aspect involving tungsten, a rarely used element in biology. An active tungsten utilization pathway in C. bescii was demonstrated by the heterologous production of a tungsten-requiring, aldehyde-oxidizing enzyme (AOR) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Furthermore, C. bescii also contains a tungsten-based AOR-type enzyme, here termed XOR, which is phylogenetically unique, representing a completely new member of the AOR tungstoenzyme family. Moreover, in C. bescii, XOR represents ca. 2% of the cytoplasmic protein. XOR is proposed to play a key, but as yet undetermined, role in the primary redox metabolism of this cellulolytic microorganism.

  14. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  15. Production of chitooligosaccharides from Rhizopus oligosporus NRRL2710 cells by chitosanase digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, Maria; Shinya, Shoko; Masaki, Eiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Brzezinski, Ryszard; Mazumder, Tapan K; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Narihiro, Kazue; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2014-01-13

    The intact cells of Rhizopus oligosporus NRRL2710, whose cell walls are abundant source of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and glucosamine (GlcN), were digested with three chitinolytic enzymes, a GH-46 chitosanase from Streptomyces sp. N174 (CsnN174), a chitinase from Pyrococcus furiosus, and a chitinase from Trichoderma viride, respectively. Solubilization of the intact cells by CsnN174 was found to be the most efficient from solid state CP/MAS (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Chitosanase products from Rhizopus cells were purified by cation exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-25 and gel-filtration on Cellulofine Gcl-25m. NMR and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses of the purified products revealed that GlcN-GlcNAc, (GlcN)2-GlcNAc, and (GlcN)2 were produced by the enzymatic digestion of the intact cells. The chitosanase digestion of Rhizopus cells was found to be an excellent system for the conversion of fungal biomass without any environmental impact.

  16. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  17. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  18. Redox regulation of SurR by protein disulfide oxidoreductase in Thermococcus onnurineus NA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Jung, Hae-Chang; Kang, Sung Gyun; Lee, Hyun Sook

    2017-03-01

    Protein disulfide oxidoreductases are redox enzymes that catalyze thiol-disulfide exchange reactions. These enzymes include thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, protein disulfide isomerases, disulfide bond formation A (DsbA) proteins, and Pyrococcus furiosus protein disulfide oxidoreductase (PfPDO) homologues. In the genome of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus onnurineus NA1, the genes encoding one PfPDO homologue (TON_0319, Pdo) and three more thioredoxin- or glutaredoxin-like proteins (TON_0470, TON_0472, TON_0834) were identified. All except TON_0470 were recombinantly expressed and purified. Three purified proteins were reduced by a thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), indicating that each protein can form redox complex with TrxR. SurR, a transcription factor involved in the sulfur response, was tested for a protein target of a TrxR-redoxin system and only Pdo was identified to be capable of catalyzing the reduction of SurR. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated that SurR reduced by the TrxR-Pdo system could bind to the DNA probe with the SurR-binding motif, GTTttgAAC. In this study, we present the TrxR-Pdo couple as a redox-regulator for SurR in T. onnurineus NA1.

  19. Crystal structure of the sugar binding domain of the archaeal transcriptional regulator TrmB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Michael; Lee, Sung-Jae; Diederichs, Kay; Boos, Winfried; Welte, Wolfram

    2006-04-21

    TrmB is an alpha-glucoside-sensing transcriptional regulator controlling two operons encoding maltose/trehalose and maltodextrin ABC transporters of Pyrococcus furiosus. The crystal structure of an N-terminal truncated derivative of TrmB (amino acids 2-109 deleted; TrmB(delta2-109)) was solved at 1.5 A resolution. This protein has lost its DNA binding domain but has retained its sugar recognition site. The structure represents a novel sugar-binding fold. TrmB(delta2-109) bound maltose, glucose, sucrose, and maltotriose, exhibiting Kd values of 6.8, 25, 34, and 160 microM, respectively. TrmB(delta2-109) behaved as a monomer in dilute buffer solution in contrast to the full-length protein, which is a dimer. Co-crystallization with bound maltose identified a binding site involving seven amino acid residues: Ser229, Asn305, Gly320, Met321, Val324, Ile325, and Glu326. Six of these residues interact with the nonreducing glucosyl residue of maltose. The nonreducing glucosyl residue is shared by all substrates bound to TrmB, suggesting it as a common recognition motif.

  20. TrmB, a sugar-specific transcriptional regulator of the trehalose/maltose ABC transporter from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Engelmann, Afra; Horlacher, Reinhold; Qu, Qiuhao; Vierke, Gudrun; Hebbeln, Carina; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2003-01-10

    We report the characterization of TrmB, a protein of 38,800 apparent molecular weight, that is involved in the maltose-specific regulation of a gene cluster in Thermococcus litoralis, malE malF malG orf trmB malK, encoding a binding protein-dependent ABC transporter for trehalose and maltose. TrmB binds maltose and trehalose half-maximally at 20 microm and 0.5 mm sugar concentration, respectively. Binding of maltose but not of trehalose showed indications of sigmoidality and quenched the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence by 15%, indicating a conformational change on maltose binding. TrmB causes a shift in electrophoretic mobility of DNA fragments harboring the promoter and upstream regulatory motif identified by footprinting. Band shifting by TrmB can be prevented by maltose. In vitro transcription assays with purified components from Pyrococcus furiosus have been established to show pmalE promoter-dependent transcription at 80 degrees C. TrmB specifically inhibits transcription, and this inhibition is counteracted by maltose and trehalose. These data characterize TrmB as a maltose-specific repressor for the trehalose/maltose transport operon of Thermococcus litoralis.

  1. A First Analysis of Metallome Biosignatures of Hyperthermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyllinniskii Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, no experimental data has been reported for the metallome of hyperthermophilic microorganisms although their metal requirements for growth are known to be unique. Here, experiments were conducted to determine (i cellular trace metal concentrations of the hyperthermophilic Archaea Methanococcus jannaschii and Pyrococcus furiosus, and (ii a first estimate of the metallome for these hyperthermophilic species via ICP-MS. The metal contents of these cells were compared to parallel experiments using the mesophilic bacterium Escherichia coli grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Fe and Zn were typically the most abundant metals in cells. Metal concentrations for E. coli grown aerobically decreased in the order Fe > Zn > Cu > Mo > Ni > W > Co. In contrast, M. jannaschii and P. furiosus show almost the reverse pattern with elevated Ni, Co, and W concentrations. Of the three organisms, a biosignature is potentially demonstrated for the methanogen M. jannaschii that may, in part, be related to the metallome requirements of methanogenesis. The bioavailability of trace metals more than likely has varied through time. If hyperthermophiles are very ancient, then the trace metal patterns observed here may begin to provide some insights regarding Earth's earliest cells and in turn, early Earth chemistry.

  2. Assembly of the Complex between Archaeal RNase P Proteins RPP30 and Pop5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L. Crowe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RNase P is a highly conserved ribonucleoprotein enzyme that represents a model complex for understanding macromolecular RNA-protein interactions. Archaeal RNase P consists of one RNA and up to five proteins (Pop5, RPP30, RPP21, RPP29, and RPP38/L7Ae. Four of these proteins function in pairs (Pop5-RPP30 and RPP21–RPP29. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC to characterize the interaction between Pop5 and RPP30 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu. NMR backbone resonance assignments of free RPP30 (25 kDa indicate that the protein is well structured in solution, with a secondary structure matching that observed in a closely related crystal structure. Chemical shift perturbations upon the addition of Pop5 (14 kDa reveal its binding surface on RPP30. ITC experiments confirm a net 1 : 1 stoichiometry for this tight protein-protein interaction and exhibit complex isotherms, indicative of higher-order binding. Indeed, light scattering and size exclusion chromatography data reveal the complex to exist as a 78 kDa heterotetramer with two copies each of Pop5 and RPP30. These results will inform future efforts to elucidate the functional role of the Pop5-RPP30 complex in RNase P assembly and catalysis.

  3. A euryarchaeal histone modulates strand displacement synthesis by replicative DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Huang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, the two main lineages of the domain Archaea, encode different chromatin proteins and differ in the use of replicative DNA polymerases. Crenarchaea possess a single family B DNA polymerase (PolB), which is capable of strand displacement modulated by the chromatin proteins Cren7 and Sul7d. Euryarchaea have two distinct replicative DNA polymerases, PolB and PolD, a family D DNA polymerase. Here we characterized the strand displacement activities of PolB and PolD from the hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Pyrococcus furiosus and investigated the influence of HPfA1, a homolog of eukaryotic histones from P. furiosus, on these activities. We showed that both PolB and PolD were efficient in strand displacement. HPfA1 inhibited DNA strand displacement by both DNA polymerases but exhibited little effect on the displacement of a RNA strand annealed to single-stranded template DNA. This is consistent with the finding that HPfA1 bound more tightly to double-stranded DNA than to a RNA:DNA hybrid. Our results suggest that, although crenarchaea and euryarchaea differ in chromosomal packaging, they share similar mechanisms in modulating strand displacement by DNA polymerases during lagging strand DNA synthesis.

  4. Shared active site architecture between archaeal PolD and multi-subunit RNA polymerases revealed by X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauguet, Ludovic; Raia, Pierre; Henneke, Ghislaine; Delarue, Marc

    2016-08-22

    Archaeal replicative DNA polymerase D (PolD) constitute an atypical class of DNA polymerases made of a proofreading exonuclease subunit (DP1) and a larger polymerase catalytic subunit (DP2), both with unknown structures. We have determined the crystal structures of Pyrococcus abyssi DP1 and DP2 at 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, revealing a catalytic core strikingly different from all other known DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Rather, the PolD DP2 catalytic core has the same 'double-psi β-barrel' architecture seen in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) superfamily, which includes multi-subunit transcriptases of all domains of life, homodimeric RNA-silencing pathway RNAPs and atypical viral RNAPs. This finding bridges together, in non-viral world, DNA transcription and DNA replication within the same protein superfamily. This study documents further the complex evolutionary history of the DNA replication apparatus in different domains of life and proposes a classification of all extant DNAPs.

  5. Genomic characterization of methanomicrobiales reveals three classes of methanogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Anderson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II, and the Methanosarcinales (Class III.

  6. Evidence for a Xer/dif system for chromosome resolution in archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cortez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination events between circular chromosomes, occurring during or after replication, can generate dimers that need to be converted to monomers prior to their segregation at cell division. In Escherichia coli, chromosome dimers are converted to monomers by two paralogous site-specific tyrosine recombinases of the Xer family (XerC/D. The Xer recombinases act at a specific dif site located in the replication termination region, assisted by the cell division protein FtsK. This chromosome resolution system has been predicted in most Bacteria and further characterized for some species. Archaea have circular chromosomes and an active homologous recombination system and should therefore resolve chromosome dimers. Most archaea harbour a single homologue of bacterial XerC/D proteins (XerA, but not of FtsK. Therefore, the role of XerA in chromosome resolution was unclear. Here, we have identified dif-like sites in archaeal genomes by using a combination of modeling and comparative genomics approaches. These sites are systematically located in replication termination regions. We validated our in silico prediction by showing that the XerA protein of Pyrococcus abyssi specifically recombines plasmids containing the predicted dif site in vitro. In contrast to the bacterial system, XerA can recombine dif sites in the absence of protein partners. Whereas Archaea and Bacteria use a completely different set of proteins for chromosome replication, our data strongly suggest that XerA is most likely used for chromosome resolution in Archaea.

  7. Efficacy of pH elevation as a bactericidal strategy for treating ballast water of freight carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford E. Starliper

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of ship ballast water with sodium hydroxide (NaOH is one method currently being developed to minimize the risk to introduce aquatic invasive species. The bactericidal capability of sodium hydroxide was determined for 148 bacterial strains from ballast water collected in 2009 and 2010 from the M/V Indiana Harbor, a bulk-freight carrier plying the Laurentian Great Lakes, USA. Primary culture of bacteria was done using brain heart infusion agar and a developmental medium. Strains were characterized based on PCR amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequence similarities (99+ % were determined by comparison with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI GenBank catalog. Flavobacterium spp. were the most prevalent bacteria characterized in 2009, comprising 51.1% (24/47 of the total, and Pseudomonas spp. (62/101; 61.4% and Brevundimonas spp. (22/101; 21.8% were the predominate bacteria recovered in 2010; together, comprising 83.2% (84/101 of the total. Testing was done in tryptic soy broth (TSB medium adjusted with 5 N NaOH. Growth of each strain was evaluated at pH 10.0, pH 11.0 and pH 12.0, and 4 h up to 72 h. The median cell count at 0 h for 148 cultures was 5.20 × 106 cfu/mL with a range 1.02 × 105–1.60 × 108 cfu/mL. The TSB adjusted to pH 10.0 and incubation for less than 24 h was bactericidal to 52 (35.1% strains. Growth in pH 11.0 TSB for less than 4 h was bactericidal to 131 (88.5% strains and pH 11.0 within 12 h was bactericidal to 141 (95.3%. One strain, Bacillus horikoshii, survived the harshest treatment, pH 12.0 for 72 h.

  8. Crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of oligosaccharyltransferase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.75 Å resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Igura, Mayumi; Nyirenda, James; Matsumoto, Masaki; Yuzawa, Satoru; Noda, Nobuo; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kohda, Daisuke

    2012-05-22

    Protein N-glycosylation occurs in the three domains of life. Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) transfers glycan to asparagine in the N-glycosylation sequon. The catalytic subunit of OST is called STT3 in eukaryotes, AglB in archaea, and PglB in eubacteria. The genome of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, encodes three AglB paralogs. Two of them are the shortest AglBs across all domains of life. We determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of the smallest AglB to identify the minimal structural unit. The Archaeoglobus AglB lacked a β-barrel-like structure, which had been found in other AglB and PglB structures. In agreement, the deletion in a larger Pyrococcus AglB confirmed its dispensability for the activity. By contrast, the Archaeoglobus AglB contains a kinked helix bearing a conserved motif, called DK/MI motif. The lysine and isoleucine residues in the motif participate in the Ser/Thr recognition in the sequon. The Archaeoglobus AglB structure revealed that the kinked helix contained an unexpected insertion. A revised sequence alignment based on this finding identified a variant type of the DK motif with the insertion. A mutagenesis study of the Archaeoglobus AglB confirmed the contribution of this particular type of the DK motif to the activity. When taken together with our previous results, this study defined the classification of OST: one group consisting of eukaryotes and most archaea possesses the DK-type Ser/Thr pocket, and the other group consisting of eubacteria and the remaining archaea possesses the MI-type Ser/Thr pocket. This classification provides a useful framework for OST studies.

  9. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confalonieri, F; Sommer, S, E-mail: fabrice.confalonieri@u-psud.fr, E-mail: suzanne.sommer@u-psud.fr [University Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR8621, Institut de Genetique et Microbiologie, Batiments 400-409, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  10. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Keller, Matthew W.; Loder, Andrew J.; Straub, Christopher T.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

  11. Disruption of a sugar transporter gene cluster in a hyperthermophilic archaeon using a host-marker system based on antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumi, Rie; Manabe, Kenji; Fukui, Toshiaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a gene disruption system in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis using the antibiotic simvastatin and a fusion gene designed to overexpress the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase gene (hmg(Tk)) with the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter. With this system, we disrupted the T. kodakaraensis amylopullulanase gene (apu(Tk)) or a gene cluster which includes apu(Tk) and genes encoding components of a putative sugar transporter. Disruption plasmids were introduced into wild-type T. kodakaraensis KOD1 cells, and transformants exhibiting resistance to 4 microM simvastatin were isolated. The transformants exhibited growth in the presence of 20 microM simvastatin, and we observed a 30-fold increase in intracellular HMG-CoA reductase activity. The expected gene disruption via double-crossover recombination occurred at the target locus, but we also observed recombination events at the hmg(Tk) locus when the endogenous hmg(Tk) gene was used. This could be avoided by using the corresponding gene from Pyrococcus furiosus (hmg(Pf)) or by linearizing the plasmid prior to transformation. While both gene disruption strains displayed normal growth on amino acids or pyruvate, cells without the sugar transporter genes could not grow on maltooligosaccharides or polysaccharides, indicating that the gene cluster encodes the only sugar transporter involved in the uptake of these compounds. The Deltaapu(Tk) strain could not grow on pullulan and displayed only low levels of growth on amylose, suggesting that Apu(Tk) is a major polysaccharide-degrading enzyme in T. kodakaraensis.

  12. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  13. Unique fluorophores in the dimeric archaeal histones hMfB and hPyA1 reveal the impact of nonnative structure in a monomeric kinetic intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Matthew R; Gloss, Lisa M

    2008-02-01

    Homodimeric archaeal histones and heterodimeric eukaryotic histones share a conserved structure but fold through different kinetic mechanisms, with a correlation between faster folding/association rates and the population of kinetic intermediates. Wild-type hMfB (from Methanothermus fervidus) has no intrinsic fluorophores; Met35, which is Tyr in hyperthermophilic archaeal histones such as hPyA1 (from Pyrococcus strain GB-3A), was mutated to Tyr and Trp. Two Tyr-to-Trp mutants of hPyA1 were also characterized. All fluorophores were introduced into the long, central alpha-helix of the histone fold. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) indicated that the fluorophores did not significantly alter the helical content of the histones. The equilibrium unfolding transitions of the histone variants were two-state, reversible processes, with DeltaG degrees (H2O) values within 1 kcal/mol of the wild-type dimers. The hPyA1 Trp variants fold by two-state kinetic mechanisms like wild-type hPyA1, but with increased folding and unfolding rates, suggesting that the mutated residues (Tyr-32 and Tyr-36) contribute to transition state structure. Like wild-type hMfB, M35Y and M35W hMfB fold by a three-state mechanism, with a stopped-flow CD burst-phase monomeric intermediate. The M35 mutants populate monomeric intermediates with increased secondary structure and stability but exhibit decreased folding rates; this suggests that nonnative interactions occur from burial of the hydrophobic Tyr and Trp residues in this kinetic intermediate. These results implicate the long central helix as a key component of the structure in the kinetic monomeric intermediates of hMfB as well as the dimerization transition state in the folding of hPyA1.

  14. The key to the extraordinary thermal stability of P. furiosus holo-rubredoxin: iron binding-guided packing of a core aromatic cluster responsible for high kinetic stability of the native structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Satya; Sundd, Monica; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2014-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin (PfRd), a small, monomeric, 53 residues-long, iron-containing, electron-transfer protein of known structure is sometimes referred to as being the most structurally-stable protein known to man. Here, using a combination of mutational and spectroscopic (CD, fluorescence, and NMR) studies of differently made holo- and apo-forms of PfRd, we demonstrate that it is not the presence of iron, or even the folding of the PfRd chain into a compact well-folded structure that causes holo-PfRd to display its extraordinary thermal stability, but rather the correct iron binding-guided packing of certain residues (specifically, Trp3, Phe29, Trp36, and also Tyr10) within a tight aromatic cluster of six residues in PfRd's hydrophobic core. Binding of the iron atom appears to play a remarkable role in determining subtle details of residue packing, forcing the chain to form a hyper-thermally stable native structure which is kinetically stable enough to survive (subsequent) removal of iron. On the other hand, failure to bind iron causes the same chain to adopt an equally well-folded native-like structure which, however, has a differently-packed aromatic cluster in its core, causing it to be only as stable as any other ordinary mesophile-derived rubredoxin. Our studies demonstrate, perhaps for the very first time ever that hyperthermal stability in proteins can owe to subtle differences in residue packing vis a vis mesostable proteins, without there being any underlying differences in either amino acid sequence, or bound ligand status.

  15. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldes, Benjamin M; Keller, Matthew W; Loder, Andrew J; Straub, Christopher T; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

  16. Temperature, pressure, and electrochemical constraints on protein speciation: Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized unfolded proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Dick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic calculations can be used to quantify environmental constraints on the speciation of proteins, such as the pH and temperature dependence of ionization state, and the relative chemical stabilities of proteins in different biogeochemical settings. These calculations depend in part on values of the standard molal Gibbs energies of proteins and their ionization reactions as a function of temperature and pressure. Because these values are not generally available, we calculated values of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar as well as the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of neutral and charged zwitterionic reference model compounds including aqueous amino acids, polypeptides, and unfolded proteins. The experimental calorimetric and volumetric data for these species taken from the literature were combined with group additivity algorithms to calculate the properties and parameters of neutral and ionized sidechain and backbone groups in unfolded proteins. The resulting set of group contributions enables the calculation of the standard molal Gibbs energy, enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, and isothermal compressibility of unfolded proteins in a range of proton ionization states to temperatures and pressures exceeding 100°C and 1000 bar. This approach provides a useful frame of reference for thermodynamic studies of protein folding and complexation reactions. It can also be used to assign provisional values of the net charge and Gibbs energy of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pH. Using these values, an Eh-pH diagram for a reaction representing the speciation of extracellular proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus and Bacillus subtilis was generated. The predicted predominance limits of these proteins correspond with the different electrochemical conditions of hydrothermal vents and soils. More comprehensive calculations of this kind may reveal pervasive

  17. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  18. Enzymatic synthesis of beta-glucosylglycerol using a continuous-flow microreactor containing thermostable beta-glycoside hydrolase CelB immobilized on coated microchannel walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Thomsen, Malene S; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2009-08-01

    beta-Glucosylglycerol (betaGG) has potential applications as a moisturizing agent in cosmetic products. A stereochemically selective method of its synthesis is kinetically controlled enzymatic transglucosylation from a suitable donor substrate to glycerol as acceptor. Here, the thermostable beta-glycosidase CelB from Pyrococcus furiosus was used to develop a microstructured immobilized enzyme reactor for production of betaGG under conditions of continuous flow at 70 degrees C. Using CelB covalently attached onto coated microchannel walls to give an effective enzyme activity of 30 U per total reactor working volume of 25 microL, substrate conversion and formation of transglucosylation product was monitored in dependence of glucosyl donor (2-nitrophenyl-beta-D-glucoside (oNPGlc), 3.0 or 15 mM; cellobiose, 250 mM), the concentration of glycerol (0.25-1.0 M), and the average residence time (0.2-90 s). Glycerol caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the conversion of the glucosyl donor via hydrolysis and strongly suppressed participation of the substrate in the reaction as glucosyl acceptor. The yields of betaGG were > or =80% and approximately 60% based on oNPGlc and cellobiose converted, respectively, and maintained up to near exhaustion of substrate (> or =80%), giving about 120 mM (30 g/L) of betaGG from the reaction of cellobiose and 1 M glycerol. The structure of the transglucosylation products, 1-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-rac-glycerol (79%) and 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (21%), was derived from NMR analysis of the product mixture of cellobiose conversion. The microstructured reactor showed conversion characteristics similar to those for a batchwise operated stirred reactor employing soluble CelB. The advantage of miniaturization to the microfluidic format lies in the fast characterization of full reaction time courses for a range of process conditions using only a minimum amount of enzyme.

  19. Archaea box C/D enzymes methylate two distinct substrate rRNA sequences with different efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziadei, Andrea; Masiewicz, Pawel; Lapinaite, Audrone; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    RNA modifications confer complexity to the 4-nucleotide polymer; nevertheless, their exact function is mostly unknown. rRNA 2'-O-ribose methylation concentrates to ribosome functional sites and is important for ribosome biogenesis. The methyl group is transferred to rRNA by the box C/D RNPs: The rRNA sequence to be methylated is recognized by a complementary sequence on the guide RNA, which is part of the enzyme. In contrast to their eukaryotic homologs, archaeal box C/D enzymes can be assembled in vitro and are used to study the mechanism of 2'-O-ribose methylation. In Archaea, each guide RNA directs methylation to two distinct rRNA sequences, posing the question whether this dual architecture of the enzyme has a regulatory role. Here we use methylation assays and low-resolution structural analysis with small-angle X-ray scattering to study the methylation reaction guided by the sR26 guide RNA fromPyrococcus furiosus We find that the methylation efficacy at sites D and D' differ substantially, with substrate D' turning over more efficiently than substrate D. This observation correlates well with structural data: The scattering profile of the box C/D RNP half-loaded with substrate D' is similar to that of the holo complex, which has the highest activity. Unexpectedly, the guide RNA secondary structure is not responsible for the functional difference at the D and D' sites. Instead, this difference is recapitulated by the nature of the first base pair of the guide-substrate duplex. We suggest that substrate turnover may occur through a zip mechanism that initiates at the 5'-end of the product.

  20. Microbial Geochemistry in Shallow-Sea Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, J. P.; Pichler, T.

    2006-12-01

    Shallow-sea hydrothermal systems are far more ubiquitous than generally recognized. Approximately 50-60 systems are currently known, occurring world-wide in areas of high heat flow, such as, volcanic island arcs, near-surface mid-ocean ridges, and intraplate oceanic volcanoes. In contrast to deep-sea systems, shallow- sea vent fluids generally include a meteoric component, they experience phase separation near the sediment- water interface, and they discharge into the photic zone (type locality" for numerous cultured hyperthermophiles, including the bacteria Aquifex and Thermotoga, the crenarchaeon Pyrodictium, and the Euryarchaeota Archaeoglobus and Pyrococcus. Isotope-labeled incubation experiments of heated sediments and an array of culturing studies have shown that simple organic compounds are predominantly fermented or anaerobically respired with sulfate. 16S rRNA gene surveys, together with fluorescent in situ hybridization studies, demonstrated the dominance of key thermophilic bacteria and archaea (e.g., Aquificales, Thermotogales, Thermococcales, Archaeoglobales) in the sediments and the presence of a broad spectrum of mostly uncultured crenarchaeota in several vent waters, sediment samples, and geothermal wells. Thermodynamic modeling quantified potential energy yields from aerobic and anaerobic respiration reactions and fermentation reactions. In contrast to their deep-sea counterparts, shallow-sea hydrothermal systems are often characterized by high arsenic concentrations of more than 500-times seawater levels. The arsenic, generally present as arsenite (As^{III}) in the vent fluid, feeds local biogeochemical arsenic cycles. Thus, shallow sites are excellent hunting grounds for novel extremophiles that may gain metabolic energy by catalyzing arsenic redox reactions. Particularly the Ambitle site, where hydrothermal fluids contain up to 1,000 μg/L arsenite, has proven to be exceptional. There, the arsenic has a wide-ranging impact on micro-, meio-, and

  1. Intein-Promoted Cyclization of Aspartic Acid Flanking the Intein Leads to Atypical N-Terminal Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minteer, Christopher J; Siegart, Nicolle M; Colelli, Kathryn M; Liu, Xinyue; Linhardt, Robert J; Wang, Chunyu; Gomez, Alvin V; Reitter, Julie N; Mills, Kenneth V

    2017-02-28

    Protein splicing is a post-translational reaction facilitated by an intein, or intervening protein, which involves the removal of the intein and the ligation of the flanking polypeptides, or exteins. A DNA polymerase II intein from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab PolII intein) can promote protein splicing in vitro on incubation at high temperature. Mutation of active site residues Cys1, Gln185, and Cys+1 to Ala results in an inactive intein precursor, which cannot promote the steps of splicing, including cleavage of the peptide bond linking the N-extein and intein (N-terminal cleavage). Surprisingly, coupling the inactivating mutations to a change of the residue at the C-terminus of the N-extein (N-1 residue) from the native Asn to Asp reactivates N-terminal cleavage at pH 5. Similar "aspartic acid effects" have been observed in other proteins and peptides but usually only occur at lower pH values. In this case, however, the unusual N-terminal cleavage is abolished by mutations to catalytic active site residues and unfolding of the intein, indicating that this cleavage effect is mediated by the intein active site and the intein fold. We show via mass spectrometry that the reaction proceeds through cyclization of Asp resulting in anhydride formation coupled to peptide bond cleavage. Our results add to the richness of the understanding of the mechanism of protein splicing and provide insight into the stability of proteins at moderately low pH. The results also explain, and may help practitioners avoid, a side reaction that may complicate intein applications in biotechnology.

  2. Heterologous expression and maturation of an NADP-dependent [NiFe]-hydrogenase: a key enzyme in biofuel production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsong Sun

    Full Text Available Hydrogen gas is a major biofuel and is metabolized by a wide range of microorganisms. Microbial hydrogen production is catalyzed by hydrogenase, an extremely complex, air-sensitive enzyme that utilizes a binuclear nickel-iron [NiFe] catalytic site. Production and engineering of recombinant [NiFe]-hydrogenases in a genetically-tractable organism, as with metalloprotein complexes in general, has met with limited success due to the elaborate maturation process that is required, primarily in the absence of oxygen, to assemble the catalytic center and functional enzyme. We report here the successful production in Escherichia coli of the recombinant form of a cytoplasmic, NADP-dependent hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus, an anaerobic hyperthermophile. This was achieved using novel expression vectors for the co-expression of thirteen P. furiosus genes (four structural genes encoding the hydrogenase and nine encoding maturation proteins. Remarkably, the native E. coli maturation machinery will also generate a functional hydrogenase when provided with only the genes encoding the hydrogenase subunits and a single protease from P. furiosus. Another novel feature is that their expression was induced by anaerobic conditions, whereby E. coli was grown aerobically and production of recombinant hydrogenase was achieved by simply changing the gas feed from air to an inert gas (N2. The recombinant enzyme was purified and shown to be functionally similar to the native enzyme purified from P. furiosus. The methodology to generate this key hydrogen-producing enzyme has dramatic implications for the production of hydrogen and NADPH as vehicles for energy storage and transport, for engineering hydrogenase to optimize production and catalysis, as well as for the general production of complex, oxygen-sensitive metalloproteins.

  3. The enzymology of alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT) isoforms from Hordeum vulgare and other organisms, and the HvAlaAT crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Stephen M G; Rydel, Timothy J; McClerren, Amanda L; Zhang, Wenlan; Li, Jimmy Y; Sturman, Eric J; Halls, Coralie; Chen, Songyang; Zeng, Jiamin; Peng, Jiexin; Kretzler, Crystal N; Evdokimov, Artem

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we describe the expression, purification, kinetics and biophysical characterization of alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT) from the barley plant (Hordeum vulgare). This dimeric PLP-dependent enzyme is a pivotal element of several key metabolic pathways from nitrogen assimilation to carbon metabolism, and its introduction into transgenic plants results in increased yield. The enzyme exhibits a bi-bi ping-pong reaction mechanism with a K(m) for alanine, 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate and pyruvate of 3.8, 0.3, 0.8 and 0.2 mM, respectively. Barley AlaAT catalyzes the forward (alanine-forming) reaction with a k(cat) of 25.6 s(-1), the reverse (glutamate-forming) reaction with k(cat) of 12.1 s(-1) and an equilibrium constant of ~0.5. The enzyme is also able to utilize aspartate and oxaloacetate with ~10% efficiency as compared to the native substrates, which makes it much more specific than related bacterial/archaeal enzymes (that also have lower K(m) values). We have crystallized barley AlaAT in complex with PLP and l-cycloserine and solved the structure of this complex at 2.7 Å resolution. This is the first example of a plant AlaAT structure, and it reveals a canonical aminotransferase fold similar to structures of the Thermotoga maritima, Pyrococcus furiosus, and human enzymes. This structure bridges our structural understanding of AlaAT mechanism between three kingdoms of life and allows us to shed some light on the specifics of the catalysis performed by these proteins.

  4. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain J; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Rodriguez, Jason; Hooper, Sean; Porat, Iris; Ulrich, Luke E; Elkins, James G; Mavromatis, Kostas; Sun, Hui; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Huber, Harald; Zhulin, Igor B; Whitman, William B; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-04-02

    Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced -- Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  5. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lakshmi, Lakshmi Dharmarajan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Rodriquez, Jason [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Hooper, Sean [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Porat, I. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Ulrich, Luke [ORNL; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Woese, Carl [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Background Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. Results The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. Conclusion The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  6. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Kerrie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. Results The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced – Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. Conclusion The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  7. A c subunit with four transmembrane helices and one ion (Na+)-binding site in an archaeal ATP synthase: implications for c ring function and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Florian; Leone, Vanessa; Langer, Julian D; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Müller, Volker

    2012-11-16

    The ion-driven membrane rotors of ATP synthases consist of multiple copies of subunit c, forming a closed ring. Subunit c typically comprises two transmembrane helices, and the c ring features an ion-binding site in between each pair of adjacent subunits. Here, we use experimental and computational methods to study the structure and specificity of an archaeal c subunit more akin to those of V-type ATPases, namely that from Pyrococcus furiosus. The c subunit was purified by chloroform/methanol extraction and determined to be 15.8 kDa with four predicted transmembrane helices. However, labeling with DCCD as well as Na(+)-DCCD competition experiments revealed only one binding site for DCCD and Na(+), indicating that the mature c subunit of this A(1)A(O) ATP synthase is indeed of the V-type. A structural model generated computationally revealed one Na(+)-binding site within each of the c subunits, mediated by a conserved glutamate side chain alongside other coordinating groups. An intriguing second glutamate located in-between adjacent c subunits was ruled out as a functional Na(+)-binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the c ring of P. furiosus is highly Na(+)-specific under in vivo conditions, comparable with the Na(+)-dependent V(1)V(O) ATPase from Enterococcus hirae. Interestingly, the same holds true for the c ring from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, whose c subunits also feature a V-type architecture but carry two Na(+)-binding sites instead. These findings are discussed in light of their physiological relevance and with respect to the mode of ion coupling in A(1)A(O) ATP synthases.

  8. Extremely Thermophilic Microorganisms as Metabolic Engineering Platforms for Production of Fuels and Industrial Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Zeldes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye towards potential technological

  9. Temperature, pressure, and electrochemical constraints on protein speciation: Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized unfolded proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, J. M.; Larowe, D. E.; Helgeson, H. C.

    2006-07-01

    Thermodynamic calculations can be used to quantify environmental constraints on the speciation of proteins, such as the pH and temperature dependence of ionization state, and the relative chemical stabilities of proteins in different biogeochemical settings. These calculations depend in part on values of the standard molal Gibbs energies of proteins and their ionization reactions as a function of temperature and pressure. Because these values are not generally available, we calculated values of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar as well as the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of neutral and charged zwitterionic reference model compounds including aqueous amino acids, polypeptides, and unfolded proteins. The experimental calorimetric and volumetric data for these species taken from the literature were combined with group additivity algorithms to calculate the properties and parameters of neutral and ionized sidechain and backbone groups in unfolded proteins. The resulting set of group contributions enables the calculation of the standard molal Gibbs energy, enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, and isothermal compressibility of unfolded proteins in a range of proton ionization states to temperatures and pressures exceeding 100°C and 1000 bar. This approach provides a useful frame of reference for thermodynamic studies of protein folding and complexation reactions. It can also be used to assign provisional values of the net charge and Gibbs energy of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pH. Using these values, an Eh-pH diagram for a reaction representing the speciation of extracellular proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus and Bacillus subtilis was generated. The predicted predominance limits of these proteins correspond with the different electrochemical conditions of hydrothermal vents and soils. More comprehensive calculations of this kind may reveal pervasive chemical potential

  10. A global transcriptional regulator in Thermococcus kodakaraensis controls the expression levels of both glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzyme-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Akerboom, Jasper; Takedomi, Shogo; van de Werken, Harmen J G; Blombach, Fabian; van der Oost, John; Murakami, Taira; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2007-11-16

    We identified a novel regulator, Thermococcales glycolytic regulator (Tgr), functioning as both an activator and a repressor of transcription in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. Tgr (TK1769) displays similarity (28% identical) to Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB (PF1743), a transcriptional repressor regulating the trehalose/maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter genes, but is more closely related (67%) to a TrmB paralog in P. furiosus (PF0124). Growth of a tgr disruption strain (Deltatgr) displayed a significant decrease in growth rate under gluconeogenic conditions compared with the wild-type strain, whereas comparable growth rates were observed under glycolytic conditions. A whole genome microarray analysis revealed that transcript levels of almost all genes related to glycolysis and maltodextrin metabolism were at relatively high levels in the Deltatgr mutant even under gluconeogenic conditions. The Deltatgr mutant also displayed defects in the transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic genes under these conditions, indicating that Tgr functions as both an activator and a repressor. Genes regulated by Tgr contain a previously identified sequence motif, the Thermococcales glycolytic motif (TGM). The TGM was positioned upstream of the Transcription factor B-responsive element (BRE)/TATA sequence in gluconeogenic promoters and downstream of it in glycolytic promoters. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that recombinant Tgr protein specifically binds to promoter regions containing a TGM. Tgr was released from the DNA when maltotriose was added, suggesting that this sugar is most likely the physiological effector. Our results strongly suggest that Tgr is a global transcriptional regulator that simultaneously controls, in response to sugar availability, both glycolytic and gluconeogenic metabolism in T. kodakaraensis via its direct binding to the TGM.

  11. Evidence of Molecular Adaptation to Extreme Environments and Applicability to Space Environments

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    Filipović, M. D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: {it Escherichia coli (E. coli K12}, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0D C ({it Metarhizium frigidum (M.~frigidum} and {it Methanococcoides burtonii (M.~burtonii} and 110D C ({it Methanopyrus kandleri (M.~kandleri}. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the {it chaperones} known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved {it chaperons} found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique {it chaperone TF55}. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The followinghyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used forthese studies: {it Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M.~jannaschii, M.~kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A.~fulgidus} and threespecies of {it Pyrococcus}. Common genes were annotated and groupedaccording to their roles in cellular processes where such informationwas available and proteins not previously implicated in theheat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additionalexperimental data are needed in order to learn more about theseproteins. To address non-gene based components of thermaladaptation

  12. Evidence of molecular adaptation to extreme environments and applicability to space environments

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    Filipović M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: Escherichia coli (E. coli K12, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0ºC (Metarhizium frigidum (M. frigidum and Methanococcoides burtonii (M. burtonii and 110ºC (Methanopyrus kandleri (M. kandleri. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The following hyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used for these studies: Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M. jannaschii, M. kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A. fulgidus and three species of Pyrococcus. Common genes were annotated and grouped according to their roles in cellular processes where such information was available and proteins not previously implicated in the heat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additional experimental data are needed in order to learn more about these proteins. To address non-gene based components of thermal adaptation, all sequenced extremophiles were

  13. Differential interaction kinetics of a bipolar structure-specific endonuclease with DNA flaps revealed by single-molecule imaging.

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    Rachid Rezgui

    Full Text Available As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab on 5' and 3'-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5' or 3' extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases.

  14. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, iain J.; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Rodriguez, Jason; Hooper, Sean; Porat, Iris; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Sun, Hui; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Huber, Harald; Zhulin, Igor B.; Whitman, William B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-09-05

    Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced - Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  15. Linking genome content to biofuel production yields: a meta-analysis of major catabolic pathways among select H2 and ethanol-producing bacteria

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    Carere Carlo R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentative bacteria offer the potential to convert lignocellulosic waste-streams into biofuels such as hydrogen (H2 and ethanol. Current fermentative H2 and ethanol yields, however, are below theoretical maxima, vary greatly among organisms, and depend on the extent of metabolic pathways utilized. For fermentative H2 and/or ethanol production to become practical, biofuel yields must be increased. We performed a comparative meta-analysis of (i reported end-product yields, and (ii genes encoding pyruvate metabolism and end-product synthesis pathways to identify suitable biomarkers for screening a microorganism’s potential of H2 and/or ethanol production, and to identify targets for metabolic engineering to improve biofuel yields. Our interest in H2 and/or ethanol optimization restricted our meta-analysis to organisms with sequenced genomes and limited branched end-product pathways. These included members of the Firmicutes, Euryarchaeota, and Thermotogae. Results Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the absence of genes encoding acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE in Caldicellulosiruptor, Thermococcus, Pyrococcus, and Thermotoga species coincide with high H2 yields and low ethanol production. Organisms containing genes (or activities for both ethanol and H2 synthesis pathways (i.e. Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. tengcongensis, Ethanoligenens harbinense, and Clostridium species had relatively uniform mixed product patterns. The absence of hydrogenases in Geobacillus and Bacillus species did not confer high ethanol production, but rather high lactate production. Only Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus produced relatively high ethanol and low H2 yields. This may be attributed to the presence of genes encoding proteins that promote NADH production. Lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate:formate lyase are not conducive for ethanol and/or H2 production. While the type(s of

  16. Hydrogen production and enzyme activities in the hyperthermophile Thermococcus paralvinellae grown on maltose, tryptone and agricultural waste

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    Sarah A. Hensley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermococcus may be an important alternative source of H2 in the hot subseafloor in otherwise low H2 environments such as some hydrothermal vents and oil reservoirs. It may also be useful in industry for rapid agricultural waste treatment and concomitant H2 production. Thermococcus paralvinellae grown at 82°C without sulfur produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L-1 at rates of 5-36 fmol H2 cell-1 h-1 on 0.5% (wt vol-1 maltose, 0.5% (wt vol-1 tryptone, and 0.5% maltose + 0.05% tryptone media. Two potentially inhibiting conditions, the presence of 10 mM acetate and low pH (pH 5 in maltose-only medium, did not significantly affect growth or H2 production. Growth rates, H2 production rates, and cell yields based on H2 production were the same as those for Pyrococcus furiosus grown at 95°C on the same media for comparison. Acetate, butyrate, succinate, isovalerate and formate were also detected as end products. After 100 h, T. paralvinellae produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L-1 of medium when grown on up to 70% (vol vol-1 waste milk from cows undergoing treatment for mastitis with the bacterial antibiotic Ceftiofur and from untreated cows. The amount of H2 produced by T. paralvinellae increased with increasing waste concentrations, but decreased in P. furiosus cultures supplemented with waste milk above 1% concentration. All mesophilic bacteria from the waste milk that grew on Luria Bertani, Sheep’s Blood (selective for Staphylococcus, the typical cause of mastitis, and MacConkey (selective for Gram-negative enteric bacteria agar plates were killed by heat during incubation at 82°C. Ceftiofur, which is heat labile, was below the detection limit following incubation at 82°C. T. paralvinellae also produced up to 6 mmol of H2 L-1 of medium when grown on 0.1-10% (wt vol-1 spent brewery grain while P. furiosus produced < 1 mmol of H2 L-1. Twelve of 13 enzyme activities in T. paralvinellae showed significant (p<0.05 differences across six different growth conditions

  17. Comparative study of two box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine-synthases: relation between conformational dynamics of the guide RNA, enzyme assembly and activity.

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    Jean-Baptiste Fourmann

    Full Text Available Multiple RNA-guided pseudouridine synthases, H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs which contain a guide RNA and four proteins, catalyze site-specific post-transcriptional isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in substrate RNAs. In archaeal particles, the guide small RNA (sRNA is anchored by the pseudouridine synthase aCBF5 and the ribosomal protein L7Ae. Protein aNOP10 interacts with both aCBF5 and L7Ae. The fourth protein, aGAR1, interacts with aCBF5 and enhances catalytic efficiency. Here, we compared the features of two H/ACA sRNAs, Pab21 and Pab91, from Pyrococcus abyssi. We found that aCBF5 binds much more weakly to Pab91 than to Pab21. Surprisingly, the Pab91 sRNP exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency than the Pab21 sRNP. We thus investigated the molecular basis of the differential efficiencies observed for the assembly and catalytic activity of the two enzymes. For this, we compared profiles of the extent of lead-induced cleavages in these sRNAs during a stepwise reconstitution of the sRNPs, and analyzed the impact of the absence of the aNOP10-L7Ae interaction. Such probing experiments indicated that the sRNAs undergo a series of conformational changes upon RNP assembly. These changes were also evaluated directly by circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy, a tool highly adapted to analyzing RNA conformational dynamics. In addition, our results reveal that the conformation of helix P1 formed at the base of the H/ACA sRNAs is optimized in Pab21 for efficient aCBF5 binding and RNP assembly. Moreover, P1 swapping improved the assembly of the Pab91 sRNP. Nonetheless, efficient aCBF5 binding probably also relies on the pseudouridylation pocket which is not optimized for high activity in the case of Pab21.

  18. Comparative study of two box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine-synthases: relation between conformational dynamics of the guide RNA, enzyme assembly and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Tillault, Anne-Sophie; Blaud, Magali; Leclerc, Fabrice; Branlant, Christiane; Charpentier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Multiple RNA-guided pseudouridine synthases, H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) which contain a guide RNA and four proteins, catalyze site-specific post-transcriptional isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in substrate RNAs. In archaeal particles, the guide small RNA (sRNA) is anchored by the pseudouridine synthase aCBF5 and the ribosomal protein L7Ae. Protein aNOP10 interacts with both aCBF5 and L7Ae. The fourth protein, aGAR1, interacts with aCBF5 and enhances catalytic efficiency. Here, we compared the features of two H/ACA sRNAs, Pab21 and Pab91, from Pyrococcus abyssi. We found that aCBF5 binds much more weakly to Pab91 than to Pab21. Surprisingly, the Pab91 sRNP exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency than the Pab21 sRNP. We thus investigated the molecular basis of the differential efficiencies observed for the assembly and catalytic activity of the two enzymes. For this, we compared profiles of the extent of lead-induced cleavages in these sRNAs during a stepwise reconstitution of the sRNPs, and analyzed the impact of the absence of the aNOP10-L7Ae interaction. Such probing experiments indicated that the sRNAs undergo a series of conformational changes upon RNP assembly. These changes were also evaluated directly by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, a tool highly adapted to analyzing RNA conformational dynamics. In addition, our results reveal that the conformation of helix P1 formed at the base of the H/ACA sRNAs is optimized in Pab21 for efficient aCBF5 binding and RNP assembly. Moreover, P1 swapping improved the assembly of the Pab91 sRNP. Nonetheless, efficient aCBF5 binding probably also relies on the pseudouridylation pocket which is not optimized for high activity in the case of Pab21.

  19. Evolution of mal ABC transporter operons in the Thermococcales and Thermotogales

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    Gogarten J Peter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mal genes that encode maltose transporters have undergone extensive lateral transfer among ancestors of the archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus. Bacterial hyperthermophiles of the order Thermotogales live among these archaea and so may have shared in these transfers. The genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima bears evidence of extensive acquisition of archaeal genes, so its ancestors clearly had the capacity to do so. We examined deep phylogenetic relationships among the mal genes of these hyperthermophiles and their close relatives to look for evidence of shared ancestry. Results We demonstrate that the two maltose ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter operons now found in Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus (termed mal and mdx genes, respectively are not closely related to one another. The Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus mal genes are most closely related to bacterial mal genes while their respective mdx genes are archaeal. The genes of the two mal operons in Tt. maritima are not related to genes in either of these archaeal operons. They are highly similar to one another and belong to a phylogenetic lineage that includes mal genes from the enteric bacteria. A unique domain of the enteric MalF membrane spanning proteins found also in these Thermotogales MalF homologs supports their relatively close relationship with these enteric proteins. Analyses of genome sequence data from other Thermotogales species, Fervidobacterium nodosum, Thermosipho melanesiensis, Thermotoga petrophila, Thermotoga lettingae, and Thermotoga neapolitana, revealed a third apparent mal operon, absent from the published genome sequence of Tt. maritima strain MSB8. This third operon, mal3, is more closely related to the Thermococcales' bacteria-derived mal genes than are mal1 and mal2. F. nodosum, Ts. melanesiensis, and Tt. lettingae have only one of the mal1-mal2 paralogs. The mal2 operon from an unknown species of Thermotoga appears to

  20. Phylogenomic analysis of proteins that are distinctive of Archaea and its main subgroups and the origin of methanogenesis

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    Gupta Radhey S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Archaea are highly diverse in terms of their physiology, metabolism and ecology. Presently, very few molecular characteristics are known that are uniquely shared by either all archaea or the different main groups within archaea. The evolutionary relationships among different groups within the Euryarchaeota branch are also not clearly understood. Results We have carried out comprehensive analyses on each open reading frame (ORFs in the genomes of 11 archaea (3 Crenarchaeota – Aeropyrum pernix, Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius; 8 Euryarchaeota – Pyrococcus abyssi, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanopyrus kandleri, Methanococcoides burtonii, Halobacterium sp. NCR-1, Haloquadratum walsbyi, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Picrophilus torridus to search for proteins that are unique to either all Archaea or for its main subgroups. These studies have identified 1448 proteins or ORFs that are distinctive characteristics of Archaea and its various subgroups and whose homologues are not found in other organisms. Six of these proteins are unique to all Archaea, 10 others are only missing in Nanoarchaeum equitans and a large number of other proteins are specific for various main groups within the Archaea (e.g. Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Sulfolobales and Desulfurococcales, Halobacteriales, Thermococci, Thermoplasmata, all methanogenic archaea or particular groups of methanogens. Of particular importance is the observation that 31 proteins are uniquely present in virtually all methanogens (including M. kandleri and 10 additional proteins are only found in different methanogens as well as A. fulgidus. In contrast, no protein was exclusively shared by various methanogen and any of the Halobacteriales or Thermoplasmatales. These results strongly indicate that all methanogenic archaea form a monophyletic group exclusive of other archaea and that this lineage likely evolved from Archaeoglobus. In addition, 15 proteins

  1. Mössbauer characterization of an unusual high-spin side-on peroxo-Fe3+ species in the active site of superoxide reductase from Desulfoarculus Baarsii. Density functional calculations on related models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Oddou, Jean-Louis; Jeandey, Claudine; Nivière, Vincent; Mattioli, Tony A; Mathé, Christelle; Fontecave, Marc; Maldivi, Pascale; Bonville, Pierre; Halfen, Jason A; Latour, Jean-Marc

    2004-07-13

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is an Fe protein that catalyzes the reduction of superoxide to give H(2)O(2). Recently, the mutation of the Glu47 residue into alanine (E47A) in the active site of SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii has allowed the stabilization of an iron-peroxo species when quickly reacted with H(2)O(2) [Mathé et al. (2002) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124, 4966-4967]. To further investigate this non-heme peroxo-iron species, we have carried out a Mössbauer study of the (57)Fe-enriched E47A SOR from D. baarsii reacted quickly with H(2)O(2). Considering the Mössbauer data, we conclude, in conjunction with the other spectroscopic data available and with the results of density functional calculations on related models, that this species corresponds to a high-spin side-on peroxo-Fe(3+) complex. This is one of the first examples of such a species in a biological system for which Mössbauer parameters are now available: delta(/Fe) = 0.54 (1) mm/s, DeltaE(Q) = -0.80 (5) mm/s, and the asymmetry parameter eta = 0.60 (5) mm/s. The Mössbauer and spin Hamiltonian parameters have been evaluated on a model from the side-on peroxo complex (model 2) issued from the oxidized iron center in SOR from Pyrococcus furiosus, for which structural data are available in the literature [Yeh et al. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 2499-2508]. For comparison, similar calculations have been carried out on a model derived from 2 (model 3), where the [CH(3)-S](1)(-) group has been replaced by the neutral [NH(3)](0) group [Neese and Solomon (1998) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 12829-12848]. Both models 2 and 3 contain a formally high-spin Fe(3+) ion (i.e., with empty minority spin orbitals). We found, however, a significant fraction ( approximately 0.6 for 2, approximately 0.8 for 3) of spin (equivalently charge) spread over two occupied (minority spin) orbitals. The quadrupole splitting value for 2 is found to be negative and matches quite well the experimental value. The computed quadrupole tensors are

  2. Community Response to a Heavy Precipitation Event in High Temperature, Chemosynthetic Biofilms and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Loiacono, S. T.; Shock, E.

    2012-12-01

    Coordinated analysis of the "Bison Pool" (BP) Environmental Genome and a complementary contextual geochemical dataset of ~75 parameters revealed biogeochemical cycling and metabolic and microbial community shifts in a Yellowstone National Park hot spring ecosystem (1). The >22m outflow of BP is a gradient of decreasing temperature, increasing dissolved oxygen, and changing availability of nutrients. Microbial life at BP transitions from a 92°C chemosynthetic community in the BP source pool to a 56°C photosynthetic mat community. Metagenomic data at BP showed the potential for both heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon metabolism (rTCA and acetyl-CoA cycles) in the highest temperature, chemosynthetic regions (1). This region of the outflow is dominated by Aquificales and Pyrococcus relatives, with smaller contributions of heterotrophic Bacteria. Following a 2h heavy precipitation event we observed an influx of exogenous organic material into the source pool supplied from the meadow surrounding the BP area. We sampled biomass and fluid at several locations within the outflow immediately following the event, and on several occasions for the next eight days. Elemental analysis and carbon and nitrogen isotopic analyses were conducted on biomass and sediment, and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon content and δ13C of fluids were analyzed. DNA and RNA were extracted, and following RT-PCR, nitrogen cycle functional gene expression was evaluated. Previous work at BP has shown that chemosynthetic biomass may carry isotopic signatures of fractionation during carbon fixation, via the acetyl-CoA and rTCA cycles (2). However, the addition of exogenous organic carbon during the rain event had an immediate and dramatic effect on the sediments and biofilms in the chemosynthetic zone of the outflow. Dissolved organic carbon was the highest measured in six years. Chemosynthetic biomass responded by incorporating the organic carbon. Carbon isotopic signatures in chemosynthetic

  3. Molecular Assemblies, Genes and Genomics Integrated Efficiently (MAGGIE)

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    Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-05-26

    Final report on MAGGIE. We set ambitious goals to model the functions of individual organisms and their community from molecular to systems scale. These scientific goals are driving the development of sophisticated algorithms to analyze large amounts of experimental measurements made using high throughput technologies to explain and predict how the environment influences biological function at multiple scales and how the microbial systems in turn modify the environment. By experimentally evaluating predictions made using these models we will test the degree to which our quantitative multiscale understanding wilt help to rationally steer individual microbes and their communities towards specific tasks. Towards this end we have made substantial progress towards understanding evolution of gene families, transcriptional structures, detailed structures of keystone molecular assemblies (proteins and complexes), protein interactions, biological networks, microbial interactions, and community structure. Using comparative analysis we have tracked the evolutionary history of gene functions to understand how novel functions evolve. One level up, we have used proteomics data, high-resolution genome tiling microarrays, and 5' RNA sequencing to revise genome annotations, discover new genes including ncRNAs, and map dynamically changing operon structures of five model organisms: For Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, Pyrococcus furiosis, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Methanococcus maripaludis and Haiobacterium salinarum NROL We have developed machine learning algorithms to accurately identify protein interactions at a near-zero false positive rate from noisy data generated using tagfess complex purification, TAP purification, and analysis of membrane complexes. Combining other genome-scale datasets produced by ENIGMA (in particular, microarray data) and available from literature we have been able to achieve a true positive rate as high as 65% at almost zero false positives