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Sample records for pyrococcus horikoshii ot3

  1. Characterization of the archaeal ribonuclease P proteins from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Atsushi; Honda, Takashi; Fukuhara, Hideo; Hada, Kazumasa; Kimura, Makoto

    2006-08-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is a ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA). Our earlier study revealed that RNase P RNA (pRNA) and five proteins (PhoPop5, PhoRpp38, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, and PhoRpp30) in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 reconstituted RNase P activity that exhibits enzymatic properties like those of the authentic enzyme. In present study, we investigated involvement of the individual proteins in RNase P activity. Two particles (R-3Ps), in which pRNA was mixed with three proteins, PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38 or PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp21 showed a detectable RNase P activity, and five reconstituted particles (R-4Ps) composed of pRNA and four proteins exhibited RNase P activity, albeit at reduced level compared to that of the reconstituted particle (R-5P) composed of pRNA and five proteins. Time-course analysis of the RNase P activities of R-4Ps indicated that the R-4Ps lacking PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, or PhoRpp30 had virtually reduced activity, while omission of PhoRpp29 or PhoRpp38 had a slight effect on the activity. The results indicate that the proteins contribute to RNase P activity in order of PhoPop5 > PhoRpp30 > PhoRpp21 > PhoRpp29 > PhoRpp38. It was further found that R-4Ps showed a characteristic Mg2+ ion dependency approximately identical to that of R-5P. However, R-4Ps had optimum temperature of around at 55 degrees C which is lower than 70 degrees C for R-5P. Together, it is suggested that the P. horikoshii RNase P proteins are predominantly involved in optimization of the pRNA conformation, though they are individually dispensable for RNase P activity in vitro.

  2. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a hyperthermophilic adenylosuccinate synthetase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoying; Akasaka, Ryogo; Takemoto, Chie; Morita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Machiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirozu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Chen, Shilin; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2011-01-01

    A hyperthermophilic adenylosuccinate synthetase from P. horikoshii OT3, which is 90–120 amino acids shorter than those from the vast majority of organisms, was expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step in the conversion of inosine monophosphate (IMP) to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) in the purine-biosynthetic pathway. Although AdSS from the vast majority of organisms is 430–457 amino acids in length, AdSS sequences isolated from thermophilic archaea are 90–120 amino acids shorter. In this study, crystallographic studies of a short AdSS sequence from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PhAdSS) were performed in order to reveal the unusual structure of AdSS from thermophilic archaea. Crystals of PhAdSS were obtained by the microbatch-under-oil method and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.50 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the trigonal space group P3 2 12, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.2, c = 107.9 Å. There was one molecule per asymmetric unit, giving a Matthews coefficient of 2.17 Å 3 Da −1 and an approximate solvent content of 43%. In contrast, the results of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical ultracentrifugation showed that the recombinant PhAdSS formed a dimer in solution

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokane, Michio; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2007-01-01

    PH1010, a DUF54-family protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon P. horikoshii OT3, was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution. PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins, was expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was performed by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The space group of the crystal was determined to be P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 49.5, c = 132.7 Å. The crystal contained two PH1010 molecules in the asymmetric unit (V M = 2.4 Å 3 Da −1 ) and had a solvent content of 48%

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirokane, Michio; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru, E-mail: amtanok@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2007-06-01

    PH1010, a DUF54-family protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon P. horikoshii OT3, was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution. PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins, was expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was performed by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The space group of the crystal was determined to be P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 49.5, c = 132.7 Å. The crystal contained two PH1010 molecules in the asymmetric unit (V{sub M} = 2.4 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}) and had a solvent content of 48%.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the archaeal phosphoglycerate mutase PH0037 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

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    Lokanath, Neratur K.; Kunishima, Naoki, E-mail: kunisima@spring8.or.jp [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2006-08-01

    The archaeal phosphoglycerate mutase PH0037 from P. horikoshii OT3 has been crystallized in space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = 155.62, c = 230.35 Å. A 2.2 Å resolution data was collected at SPring-8 beamline BL26B1. Phosphoglycerate mutases catalyze the interconversion of 2-phosphoglycerate and 3-phosphoglycerate in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways. The archaeal phosphoglycerate mutase PH0037 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals were obtained using the oil-microbatch method at 291 K. A native data set extending to a resolution of 2.2 Å has been collected and processed in space group R32. Assuming the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the V{sub M} value is calculated to be 3.0 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, consistent with the dynamic light-scattering experiment result, which shows a dimeric state of the protein in solution. Molecular-replacement trials using the crystal structure of Bacilllus stearothermophilus phosphoglycerate mutase as a search model did not provide a satisfactory solution, indicating substantially different structures of these two phophoglycerate mutases.

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a putative UDP-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

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    Lokanath, Neratur K.; Pampa, Kudigana J.; Kamiya, Toshimi; Kunishima, Naoki, E-mail: kunisima@spring8.or.jp [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2007-05-01

    A putative UDP-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase from P. horikoshii OT3 has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.28, b = 69.24, c = 83.10 Å, β = 114.4°. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.80 Å resolution. A putative UDP-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, an essential enzyme for polysaccharide biosynthesis, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals were obtained using the oil-microbatch method at 291 K. A native data set extending to 1.8 Å resolution has been collected and processed in space group P2{sub 1}. Assuming the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the V{sub M} value is calculated to be 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, which is consistent with the result of a dynamic light-scattering experiment that shows a dimeric state of the protein in solution.

  7. Crystal structure of product-bound complex of UDP-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampa, K J; Lokanath, N K; Girish, T U; Kunishima, N; Rai, V R

    2014-10-24

    UDP-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase (UDP-d-ManNAcDH) belongs to UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose dehydrogenase family and catalyzes Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine (UDP-d-ManNAc) to Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-d-mannosaminuronic acid (UDP-d-ManNAcA) through twofold oxidation of NAD(+). In order to reveal the structural features of the Pyrococcus horikoshii UDP-d-ManNAcADH, we have determined the crystal structure of the product-bound enzyme by X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.55Å. The protomer folds into three distinct domains; nucleotide binding domain (NBD), substrate binding domain (SBD) and oligomerization domain (OD, involved in the dimerization). The clear electron density of the UDP-d-ManNAcA is observed and the residues binding are identified for the first time. Crystal structures reveal a tight dimeric polymer chains with product-bound in all the structures. The catalytic residues Cys258 and Lys204 are conserved. The Cys258 acts as catalytic nucleophile and Lys204 as acid/base catalyst. The product is directly interacts with residues Arg211, Thr249, Arg244, Gly255, Arg289, Lys319 and Arg398. In addition, the structural parameters responsible for thermostability and oligomerization of the three dimensional structure are analyzed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of a novel amino acid racemase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 induced by D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Ohmori, Taketo; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    To date, there have been few reports analyzing the amino acid requirement for growth of hyperthermophilic archaea. We here found that the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 requires Thr, Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, Trp, His and Arg in the medium for growth, and shows slow growth in medium lacking Met or Ile. This largely corresponds to the presence, or absence, of genes related to amino acid biosynthesis in its genome, though there are exceptions. The amino acid requirements were dramatically lost by addition of D-isomers of Met, Leu, Val, allo-Ile, Phe, Tyr, Trp and Arg. Tracer analysis using (14)C-labeled D-Trp showed that D-Trp in the medium was used as a protein component in the cells, suggesting the presence of D-amino acid metabolic enzymes. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent racemase activity toward Met, Leu and Phe was detected in crude extract of P. horikoshii and was enhanced in cells grown in the medium supplemented with D-amino acids, especially D-allo-Ile. The gene encoding the racemase was narrowed down to one open reading frame on the basis of enzyme purification from P. horikoshii cells, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited PLP-dependent racemase activity toward several amino acids, including Met, Leu and Phe, but not Pro, Asp or Glu. This is the first report showing the presence in a hyperthermophilic archaeon of a PLP-dependent amino acid racemase with broad substrate specificity that is likely responsible for utilization of D-amino acids for growth.

  9. Crystal structure of product-bound complex of UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampa, K.J., E-mail: sagarikakj@gmail.com [Department of Studies in Microbiology, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Lokanath, N.K. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Girish, T.U. [Department of General Surgery, JSS Medical College and Hospital, JSS University, Mysore 570 015 (India); Kunishima, N. [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Rai, V.R. [Department of Studies in Microbiology, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Determined the structure of UDP-D-ManNAcADH to a resolution of 1.55 Å. • First complex structure of PhUDP-D-ManNAcADH with UDP-D-ManMAcA. • The monomeric structure consists of three distinct domains. • Cys258 acting as catalytic nucleophilic and Lys204 acts as acid/base catalyst. • Oligomeric state plays an important role for the catalytic function. - Abstract: UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase (UDP-D-ManNAcDH) belongs to UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose dehydrogenase family and catalyzes Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (UDP-D-ManNAc) to Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid (UDP-D-ManNAcA) through twofold oxidation of NAD{sup +}. In order to reveal the structural features of the Pyrococcus horikoshii UDP-D-ManNAcADH, we have determined the crystal structure of the product-bound enzyme by X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.55 Å. The protomer folds into three distinct domains; nucleotide binding domain (NBD), substrate binding domain (SBD) and oligomerization domain (OD, involved in the dimerization). The clear electron density of the UDP-D-ManNAcA is observed and the residues binding are identified for the first time. Crystal structures reveal a tight dimeric polymer chains with product-bound in all the structures. The catalytic residues Cys258 and Lys204 are conserved. The Cys258 acts as catalytic nucleophile and Lys204 as acid/base catalyst. The product is directly interacts with residues Arg211, Thr249, Arg244, Gly255, Arg289, Lys319 and Arg398. In addition, the structural parameters responsible for thermostability and oligomerization of the three dimensional structure are analyzed.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein and biotin protein ligase complex from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Bagautdinova, Svetlana; Kunishima, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    A truncated form of biotin carboxyl carrier protein containing the C-terminal half fragment (BCCPΔN76) and the biotin protein ligase (BPL) with the mutation R48A (BPL*) or the double mutation R48A K111A (BPL**) were successfully cocrystallized in the presence of ATP and biotin. The BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals belong to space group P2 1 and diffract X-rays to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Biotin protein ligase (BPL) catalyses the biotinylation of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. To elucidate the exact details of the protein–protein interactions in the biotinylation function, the C-terminal half fragment of BCCP (BCCPΔN76), the R48A mutant of BPL (BPL*) and the R48A K111A double mutant of BPL (BPL**), all of which are from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, have been expressed, purified and successfully cocrystallized. Cocrystals of the BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 complexes as well as crystals of BPL*, BPL** and BCCPΔN76 were obtained by the oil-microbatch method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant at 295 K. Complete X-ray diffraction data sets for BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals were collected at 100 K to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. They belong to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with similar unit-cell parameters a = 69.85, b = 63.12, c = 75.64 Å, β = 95.9°. Assuming two subunits of the complex per asymmetric unit gives a V M value of 2.45 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 50%

  11. Crystal structure of the regulatory subunit of archaeal initiation factor 2B (aIF2B) from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3: a proposed structure of the regulatory subcomplex of eukaryotic IF2B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Tahara, Maino; Maetani, Shigehiro; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao; Kimura, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) is the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2). eIF2B is a heteropentameric protein composed of α-ε subunits. The α, β, and δ subunits form a regulatory subcomplex, while the γ and ε form a catalytic subcomplex. Archaea possess homologues of α, β, and δ subunits of eIF2B. Here, we report the three-dimensional structure of an archaeal regulatory subunit (aIF2Bα) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 A resolution. aIF2Bα consists of two subdomains, an N-domain (residues 1-95) and a C-domain (residues 96-276), connected by a long α-helix (α5: 78-106). The N-domain contains a five helix bundle structure, while the C-domain folds into the α/β structure, thus showing similarity to D-ribose-5-phosphate isomerase structure. The presence of two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit and the gel filtration analysis suggest a dimeric structure of aIF2Bα in solution, interacting with each other by C-domains. Furthermore, the crystallographic 3-fold symmetry generates a homohexameric structure of aIF2Bα; the interaction is primarily mediated by the long α-helix at the N-domains. This structure suggests an architecture of the three subunits, α, β, and δ, in the regulatory subcomplex within eIF2B

  12. Structure of PIN-domain protein PH0500 from Pyrococcus horikoshii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Inagaki, Eiji; Kuroishi, Chizu; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of P. horikoshii OT3 protein PH0500 was determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method and refined in two crystal forms. The protein is a dimer and has a PIN-domain fold. The Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 protein PH0500 is highly conserved within the Pyrococcus genus of hyperthermophilic archaea and shows low amino-acid sequence similarity with a family of PIN-domain proteins. The protein has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms: PH0500-I and PH0500-II. The structure was determined at 2.0 Å by the multiple anomalous dispersion method using a selenomethionyl derivative of crystal form PH0500-I (PH0500-I-Se). The structure of PH0500-I has been refined at 1.75 Å resolution to an R factor of 20.9% and the structure of PH0500-II has been refined at 2.0 Å resolution to an R factor of 23.4%. In both crystal forms as well as in solution the molecule appears to be a dimer. Searches of the databases for protein-fold similarities confirmed that the PH0500 protein is a PIN-domain protein with possible exonuclease activity and involvement in DNA or RNA editing

  13. A novel carbohydrate-binding surface layer protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Shuichiro; Koga, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Kuriura, Ryo; Ueda, Toshifumi

    2018-04-08

    In Archaea and Bacteria, surface layer (S-layer) proteins form the cell envelope and are involved in cell protection. In the present study, a putative S-layer protein was purified from the crude extract of Pyrococcus horikoshii using affinity chromatography. The S-layer gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses showed that the S-layer protein bound N-acetylglucosamine and induced agglutination of the gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus lysodeikticus. The protein comprised a 21-mer structure, with a molecular mass of 1,340 kDa, as determined using small-angle X-ray scattering. This protein showed high thermal stability, with a midpoint of thermal denaturation of 79 °C in dynamic light scattering experiments. This is the first description of the carbohydrate-binding archaeal S-layer protein and its characteristics.

  14. Improving the Catalytic Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii Prolidase for Detoxification of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents over a Broad Range of Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    affinity for metal, and increased thermostability compared to P. furiosus prolidase, Pf prol (PF1343). To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent...decontamination and to investigate the structural factors that may influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated Ph1prol enzymes ...Introduction Pyrococcus horikoshii and Pyrococcus furiosus are both hyper- thermophilic archaea, growing optimally at 98 –100◦C that were isolated from a

  15. Crystallization of leucyl-tRNA synthetase complexed with tRNALeu from the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Ryuya; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2004-01-01

    The leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) from P. horikoshii has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified, and cocrystallizations with each of the tRNA Leu isoacceptors have been attempted. Cocrystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, but only when the tRNA Leu isoacceptor with the anticodon CAA was used. All five tRNA Leu isoacceptors from the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii have been transcribed in vitro and purified. The leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) from P. horikoshii was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified, and cocrystallizations with each of the tRNA Leu isoacceptors were attempted. Cocrystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, but only when the tRNA Leu isoacceptor with the anticodon CAA was used. Electrophoretic analyses revealed that the crystals contain both LeuRS and tRNA Leu , suggesting that they are LeuRS–tRNA Leu complex crystals. A data set diffracting to 3.3 Å resolution was collected from a single crystal at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 118.18, b = 120.55, c = 231.13 Å. The asymmetric unit is expected to contain two complexes of LeuRS–tRNA Leu , with a corresponding crystal volume per protein weight of 2.9 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 57.3%

  16. Heterologous Expression Of Two Putative Glutamate Synthase Subunits From Pyrococcus Horikoshii

    OpenAIRE

    Akçe, Hande

    2006-01-01

    Glutamat sentaz (GOGAT), bakteri, alg ve bitkilerde amonyak asimilasyonun ilk basamaklarında görev alan ve glutaminin amido azotunun 2-okzoglutarata transamidasyonu sonucu iki molekül glutamat oluşumunu katalizleyen önemli bir enzimdir. GOGAT tarafından kullanılan amonyak, bitkilerde fotorespirasyon, amino acid yıkımı gibi metabolik işlemler sonucu sağlanabildiği gibi, nitrat ve atmosferik diazot gibi dış azot kaynaklarının indirgenmesi yoluyla da sağlanabilir. Pyrococcus cinsinden olan P. ho...

  17. Molecular evolution of the hyperthermophilic archaea of the Pyrococcus genus: analysis of adaptation to different environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonnikov Dmitry A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prokaryotic microorganisms are able to survive and proliferate in severe environmental conditions. The increasing number of complete sequences of prokaryotic genomes has provided the basis for studying the molecular mechanisms of their adaptation at the genomic level. We apply here a computer-based approach to compare the genomes and proteomes from P. furiosus, P. horikoshii, and P. abyssi to identify features of their molecular evolution related to adaptation strategy to diverse environmental conditions. Results Phylogenetic analysis of rRNA genes from 26 Pyrococcus strains suggested that the divergence of P. furiosus, P. horikoshii and P. abyssi might have occurred from ancestral deep-sea organisms. It was demonstrated that the function of genes that have been subject to positive Darwinian selection is closely related to abiotic and biotic conditions to which archaea managed to become adapted. Divergence of the P. furiosus archaea might have been due to loss of some genes involved in cell motility or signal transduction, and/or to evolution under positive selection of the genes for translation machinery. In the course of P. horikoshii divergence, positive selection was found to operate mainly on the transcription machinery; divergence of P. abyssi was related with positive selection for the genes mainly involved in inorganic ion transport. Analysis of radical amino acid replacement rate in evolving P. furiosus, P. horikoshii and P. abyssi showed that the fixation rate was higher for radical substitutions relative to the volume of amino acid side-chain. Conclusions The current results give due credit to the important role of hydrostatic pressure as a cause of variability in the P. furiosus, P. horikoshii and P. abyssi genomes evolving in different habitats. Nevertheless, adaptation to pressure does not appear to be the sole factor ensuring adaptation to environment. For example, at the stage of the divergence of P

  18. Structure of Quinolinate Synthase from Pyrococcus horikoshii in the Presence of Its Product, Quinolinic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga A; Silakov, Alexey; Grove, Tyler L; Saunders, Allison H; McLaughlin, Martin I; Yennawar, Neela H; Booker, Squire J

    2016-06-15

    Quinolinic acid (QA) is a common intermediate in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its derivatives in all organisms that synthesize the molecule de novo. In most prokaryotes, it is formed from the condensation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and aspartate-enamine by the action of quinolinate synthase (NadA). NadA contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster cofactor with a unique, non-cysteinyl-ligated, iron ion (Fea), which is proposed to bind the hydroxyl group of a postulated intermediate in the last step of the reaction to facilitate a dehydration. However, direct evidence for this role in catalysis has yet to be provided. Herein, we present the structure of NadA in the presence of the product of its reaction, QA. We find that N1 and the C7 carboxylate group of QA ligate to Fea in a bidentate fashion, which is confirmed by Hyperfine Sublevel Correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy. This binding mode would place the C5 hydroxyl group of the postulated final intermediate distal to Fea and virtually incapable of coordinating to it. The structure shows that three strictly conserved amino acids, Glu198, Tyr109, and Tyr23, are in close proximity to the bound product. Substitution of these amino acids with Gln, Phe, and Phe, respectively, leads to complete loss of activity.

  19. A proposal to rename the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus woesei as Pyrococcus furiosus subsp. woesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoksilapatham, Wirojne; González, Juan M; Maeder, Dennis L; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne; Robb, Frank T

    2004-10-01

    Pyrococcus species are hyperthermophilic members of the order Thermococcales, with optimal growth temperatures approaching 100 degrees C. All species grow heterotrophically and produce H2 or, in the presence of elemental sulfur (S(o)), H2S. Pyrococcus woesei and P. furiosus were isolated from marine sediments at the same Vulcano Island beach site and share many morphological and physiological characteristics. We report here that the rDNA operons of these strains have identical sequences, including their intergenic spacer regions and part of the 23S rRNA. Both species grow rapidly and produce H2 in the presence of 0.1% maltose and 10-100 microM sodium tungstate in S(o)-free medium. However, P. woesei shows more extensive autolysis than P. furiosus in the stationary phase. Pyrococcus furiosus and P. woesei share three closely related families of insertion sequences (ISs). A Southern blot performed with IS probes showed extensive colinearity between the genomes of P. woesei and P. furiosus. Cloning and sequencing of ISs that were in different contexts in P. woesei and P. furiosus revealed that the napA gene in P. woesei is disrupted by a type III IS element, whereas in P. furiosus, this gene is intact. A type I IS element, closely linked to the napA gene, was observed in the same context in both P. furiosus and P. woesei genomes. Our results suggest that the IS elements are implicated in genomic rearrangements and reshuffling in these closely related strains. We propose to rename P. woesei a subspecies of P. furiosus based on their identical rDNA operon sequences, many common IS elements that are shared genomic markers, and the observation that all P. woesei nucleotide sequences deposited in GenBank to date are > 99% identical to P. furiosus sequences.

  20. Aromatic residues located close to the active center are essential for the catalytic reaction of flap endonuclease-1 from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Eriko; Abe, Junko; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-04-16

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN-1) possessing 5'-flap endonuclease and 5'-->3' exonuclease activity plays important roles in DNA replication and repair. In this study, the kinetic parameters of mutants at highly conserved aromatic residues, Tyr33, Phe35, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279, in the vicinity of the catalytic centers of FEN-1 were examined. The substitution of these aromatic residues with alanine led to a large reduction in kcat values, although these mutants retained Km values similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. Notably, the kcat of Y33A and F79A decreased 333-fold and 71-fold, respectively, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. The aromatic residues Tyr33 and Phe79, and the aromatic cluster Phe278-Phe279 mainly contributed to the recognition of the substrates without the 3' projection of the upstream strand (the nick, 5'-recess-end, single-flap, and pseudo-Y substrates) for the both exo- and endo-activities, but played minor roles in recognizing the substrates with the 3' projection (the double flap substrate and the nick substrate with the 3' projection). The replacement of Tyr33, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279, with non-charged aromatic residues, but not with aliphatic hydrophobic residues, recovered the kcat values almost fully for the substrates without the 3' projection of the upstream strand, suggesting that the aromatic groups of Tyr33, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279 might be involved in the catalytic reaction, probably via multiple stacking interactions with nucleotide bases. The stacking interactions of Tyr33 and Phe79 might play important roles in fixing the template strand and the downstream strand, respectively, in close proximity to the active center to achieve the productive transient state leading to the hydrolysis.

  1. Enhanced production of subtilisin of Pyrococcus furiosus expressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A subtilisin gene identified in the reported genome sequence of Pyrococcus furiosus was amplified and inserted in pET-22b(+) vector to produce the recombinant plasmid pET-SB. Escherichia coli BL-21 (DE3) CodonPlus was transformed with this plasmid and the enzyme was expressed up to 30% of the total cell protein on ...

  2. A proposal to rename the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus woesei as Pyrococcus furiosus subsp. woesei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirojne Kanoksilapatham

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus species are hyperthermophilic members of the order Thermococcales, with optimal growth temperatures approaching 100 °C. All species grow heterotrophically and produce H2 or, in the presence of elemental sulfur (S°, H2S. Pyrococcus woesei and P. furiosus were isolated from marine sediments at the same Vulcano Island beach site and share many morphological and physiological characteristics. We report here that the rDNA operons of these strains have identical sequences, including their intergenic spacer regions and part of the 23S rRNA. Both species grow rapidly and produce H2 in the presence of 0.1% maltose and 10–100 µM sodium tungstate in S°-free medium. However,P. woesei shows more extensive autolysis than P. furiosus in the stationary phase. Pyrococcusfuriosus and P. woesei share three closely related families of insertion sequences (ISs. A Southern blot performed with IS probes showed extensive colinearity between the genomes of P. woesei and P. furiosus. Cloning and sequencing of ISs that were in different contexts in P. woesei and P. furiosus revealed that the napA gene in P. woesei is disrupted by a type III IS element, whereas in P. furiosus, this gene is intact. A type I IS element, closely linked to the napA gene, was observed in the same context in both P. furiosus and P. woesei genomes. Our results suggest that the IS elements are implicated in genomic rearrangements and reshuffling in these closely related strains. We propose to rename P. woesei a subspecies of P. furiosus based on their identical rDNA operon sequences, many common IS elements that are shared genomic markers, and the observation that all P. woesei nucleotide sequences deposited in GenBank to date are > 99% identical to P. furiosus sequences.

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crytallographic analysis of phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, A.P.; Turnbull, A.P.; Hargreaves, D.; Fischer, M.; Geus, de D.; Sedelnikova, S.E.; Berrisford, J.M.; Baker, P.J.; Verhees, C.H.; Oost, van der J.; Rice, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase catalyses the reversible isomerization of glucose 6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate. The phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which shows no sequence similarity to any known bacterial or eukaryotic

  4. Phosphate and arsenate removal efficiency by thermostable ferritin enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus using radioisotopes

    KAUST Repository

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria; Paravidino, Monica; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Wolterbeek, Hubert Th.; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Oxo-anion binding properties of the thermostable enzyme ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus were characterized with radiography. Radioisotopes 32P and 76As present as oxoanions were used to measure the extent and the rate of their absorption

  5. Oligosaccharide synthesis by the hyperthermostable b-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus: kinetics and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.E.; Strubel, M.; Lieshout, van J.F.T.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Oligosaccharides can be synthesised from monosaccharides or disaccharides, using glycosidases as a catalyst. To investigate the potential of this synthesis with beta-glycosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus we determined kinetic parameters for substrate conversion and product formation from cellobiose,

  6. Extensive Genome Rearrangements and Multiple Horizontal Gene Transfers in a Population of Pyrococcus Isolates from Vulcano Island, Italy▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James R.; Escobar-Paramo, Patricia; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Nelson, Karen E.; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2008-01-01

    The extent of chromosome rearrangements in Pyrococcus isolates from marine hydrothermal vents in Vulcano Island, Italy, was evaluated by high-throughput genomic methods. The results illustrate the dynamic nature of the genomes of the genus Pyrococcus and raise the possibility of a connection between rapidly changing environmental conditions and adaptive genomic properties. PMID:18723649

  7. Extensive genome rearrangements and multiple horizontal gene transfers in a population of pyrococcus isolates from Vulcano Island, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James R; Escobar-Paramo, Patricia; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Nelson, Karen E; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2008-10-01

    The extent of chromosome rearrangements in Pyrococcus isolates from marine hydrothermal vents in Vulcano Island, Italy, was evaluated by high-throughput genomic methods. The results illustrate the dynamic nature of the genomes of the genus Pyrococcus and raise the possibility of a connection between rapidly changing environmental conditions and adaptive genomic properties.

  8. Expression, Purification, and Characterisation of Dehydroquinate Synthase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Negron

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dehydroquinate synthase (DHQS catalyses the second step of the shikimate pathway to aromatic compounds. DHQS from the archaeal hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was insoluble when expressed in Escherichia coli but was partially solubilised when KCl was included in the cell lysis buffer. A purification procedure was developed, involving lysis by sonication at 30∘C followed by a heat treatment at 70∘C and anion exchange chromatography. Purified recombinant P. furiosus DHQS is a dimer with a subunit Mr of 37,397 (determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and is active over broad pH and temperature ranges. The kinetic parameters are KM (3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate 3.7 μM and kcat 3.0 sec-1 at 60∘C and pH 6.8. EDTA inactivates the enzyme, and enzyme activity is restored by several divalent metal ions including (in order of decreasing effectiveness Cd2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Mn2+. High activity of a DHQS in the presence of Cd2+ has not been reported for enzymes from other sources, and may be related to the bioavailability of Cd2+ for P. furiosus. This study is the first biochemical characterisation of a DHQS from a thermophilic source. Furthermore, the characterisation of this hyperthermophilic enzyme was carried out at elevated temperatures using an enzyme-coupled assay.

  9. Exploring the reductive capacity of Pyrococcus furiosus : the reduction of carboxylic acids and pyridine nucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ban, van den E.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    This Ph.D. project started in 1997 and its main goal was to obtain insight in the reductive capacity of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus . The research was focused on the biocatalytic reduction of carboxylic

  10. Crystallization of [Fe4S3]-ferredoxin from the hyperthermophile archaeon pyrococcus furiosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Ericsson Skovbo; Harris, Pernille; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin with a [Fe3S4]-cluster was crystallized through steps of optimization and X-ray diffraction data were collected from several crystal forms. Flat plate-like crystals were grown by hanging-drop vapour diffusion. The precipitant used was 30% PEG 400; the p...

  11. Crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus phosphoglucose isomerase: Implications for substrate binding and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrisford, J.M.; Akerboom, A.P.; Turnbull, A.P.; Geus, de D.; Sedelnikova, S.E.; Staton, I.; McLeod, C.W.; Verhees, C.H.; Oost, van der J.; Rice, D.W.; Baker, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) catalyzes the reversible isomerization between D-fructose 6-phosphate and D-glucose 6-phosphate as part of the glycolytic pathway. PGI from the Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) was crystallized, and its structure was determined by x-ray diffraction to a 2-Angstrom

  12. Improved oligosaccharide synthesis by protein engineering of b-glucosidase from hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, T.; Kaper, T.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Enzymatic transglycosylation of lactose into oligosaccharides was studied using wild-type -glucosidase (CelB) and active site mutants thereof (M424K, F426Y, M424K/F426Y) and wild-type -mannosidase (BmnA) of the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus. The effects of the mutations on kinetics, enzyme

  13. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    KAUST Repository

    Michoud, Gregoire

    2016-06-02

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins.

  14. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    KAUST Repository

    Michoud, Gregoire; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins.

  15. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, Grégoire; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins. PMID:27250364

  16. Biochemical properties and base excision repair complex formation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease from Pyrococcus furiosus

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyonari, Shinichi; Tahara, Saki; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Iwai, Shigenori; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2009-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are the most frequently found mutagenic lesions in DNA, and they arise mainly from spontaneous base loss or modified base removal by damage-specific DNA glycosylases. AP sites are cleaved by AP endonucleases, and the resultant gaps in the DNA are repaired by DNA polymerase/DNA ligase reactions. We identified the gene product that is responsible for the AP endonuclease activity in the hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus. Furthermore, we detected...

  17. Intermolecular ion pairs maintain the toroidal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus PCNA

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumiya, Shigeki; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2003-01-01

    Two mutant proliferating cell nuclear antigens from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, PfuPCNA(D143A) and PfuPCNA(D143A/D147A), were prepared by site-specific mutagenesis. The results from gel filtration showed that mutations at D143 and D147 drastically affect the stability of the trimeric structure of PfuPCNA. The PfuPCNA(D143A) still retained the activity to stimulate the DNA polymerase reaction, but PfuPCNA(D143A/D147A) lost the activity. Crystal structures of the mutant ...

  18. Phosphate and arsenate removal efficiency by thermostable ferritin enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus using radioisotopes

    KAUST Repository

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-13

    Oxo-anion binding properties of the thermostable enzyme ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus were characterized with radiography. Radioisotopes 32P and 76As present as oxoanions were used to measure the extent and the rate of their absorption by the ferritin. Thermostable ferritin proved to be an excellent system for rapid phosphate and arsenate removal from aqueous solutions down to residual concentrations at the picomolar level. These very low concentrations make thermostable ferritin a potential tool to considerably mitigate industrial biofouling by phosphate limitation or to remove arsenate from drinking water.

  19. Crystal structure of a family 16 endoglucanase from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus--structural basis of substrate recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilari, A.; Fiorillo, A.; Angelaccio, S.; Florio, R.; Chiaraluce, R.; Oost, van der J.; Consalvi, V.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial and archaeal endo-beta-1,3-glucanases that belong to glycoside hydrolase family 16 share a beta-jelly-roll fold, but differ significantly in sequence and in substrate specificity. The crystal structure of the laminarinase (EC 3.2.1.39) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus

  20. Crystallization and quaternary structure analysis of an Lrp-like regulatory protein from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedelnikova, S.E.; Smits, S.H.J.; Leonard, P.M.; Brinkman, A.B.; Oost, van der J.; Rafferty, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    The LrpA transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) family, has been crystallized by the hanging-drop method of vapour diffusion using ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals belong to the tetragonal system and are in

  1. Structural Analysis and Bioengineering of Thermostable Pyrococcus furiosus Prolidase for the Optimization of Organophosphorus Nerve Agent Detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    organophosphorus acid anhydrase from a halophilic bacterial isolate. J Bacteriol, 173, 1938-1943. Du, X., Tove, S., Kast -Hutcheson, K. & Grunden, A. M...1938-1943. Du, X., Tove, S., Kast -Hutcheson, K. & Grunden, A. M. 2005. Characterization of the dinuclear metal center of Pyrococcus furiosus

  2. Accurate Computation of Reduction Potentials of 4Fe−4S Clusters Indicates a Carboxylate Shift in Pyrococcus furiosus Ferredoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Ooi, Bee Lean; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the computation and accurate reproduction of subtle shifts in reduction potentials for two mutants of the iron-sulfur protein Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin. The computational models involved only first-sphere ligands and differed with respect to one ligand, either acetate (as...

  3. Replication slippage of the thermophilic DNA polymerases B and D from the Euryarchaeota Pyrococcus abyssi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa G. eCastillo-Lizardo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Replication slippage or slipped-strand mispairing involves the misalignment of DNA strands during the replication of repeated DNA sequences, and can lead to genetic rearrangements such as microsatellite instability. Here, we show that PolB and PolD replicative DNA polymerases from the archaeal model Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab slip in vitro during replication of a single-stranded DNA template carrying a hairpin structure and short direct repeats. We find that this occurs in both their wild-type (exo+ and exonuclease deficient (exo- forms. The slippage behavior of PabPolB and PabPolD, probably due to limited strand displacement activity, resembles that observed for the high fidelity Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu DNA polymerase. The presence of PabPCNA inhibited PabPolB and PabPolD slippage. We propose a model whereby PabPCNA stimulates strand displacement activity and polymerase progression through the hairpin, thus permitting the error-free replication of repetitive sequences.

  4. Mechanism of protein splicing of the Pyrococcus abyssi lon protease intein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, Kevin M.; Schufreider, Ann K.; McGill, Melissa A.; O'Brien, Kathryn M.; Reitter, Julie N.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The Pyrococcus abyssi lon protease intein promotes efficient protein splicing. → Inteins with mutations that interfere with individual steps of splicing do not promote unproductive side reactions. → The intein splices with Lys in place of the highly conserved penultimate His. → The intein is flanked by a Gly-rich region at its C terminus that may increase the efficiency of the third step of splicing, Asn cyclization coupled to peptide bond cleavage. -- Abstract: Protein splicing is a post-translational process by which an intervening polypeptide, the intein, excises itself from the flanking polypeptides, the exteins, coupled to ligation of the exteins. The lon protease of Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) is interrupted by an intein. When over-expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli, the Pab lon protease intein can promote efficient protein splicing. Mutations that block individual steps of splicing generally do not lead to unproductive side reactions, suggesting that the intein tightly coordinates the splicing process. The intein can splice, although it has Lys in place of the highly conserved penultimate His, and mutants of the intein in the C-terminal region lead to the accumulation of stable branched-ester intermediate.

  5. Proteomics of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu): Identification of Extracted Proteins by Three Independent Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Catherine C L; Cociorva, Daniel; Miller, Christine A; Schmidt, Alexander; Monell, Craig; Aebersold, Ruedi; Yates, John R

    2013-02-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) is an excellent organism to generate reference samples for proteomics laboratories because of its moderately sized genome and very little sequence duplication within the genome. We demonstrated a stable and consistent method to prepare proteins in bulk that eliminates growth and preparation as a source of uncertainty in the standard. We performed several proteomic studies in different laboratories using each laboratory's specific workflow as well as separate and integrated data analysis. This study demonstrated that a Pfu whole cell lysate provides suitable protein sample complexity to not only validate proteomic methods, work flows, and benchmark new instruments but also to facilitate comparison of experimental data generated over time and across instruments or laboratories.

  6. Determinació de l'estructura tridimensional de la glicogen sintasa de "Pyrococcus abyssi"

    OpenAIRE

    Horcajada Garro, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Les glicogen i midó sintases són glicosiltransferases que catalitzen la transferència de residus glucosil a l'extrem no reductor d'una cadena creixent d'un glucà α-1,4, retenint la configuració del carboni anomèric del sucre transferit. Aquest procès és central en el metabolisme energètic de la majoria d'èssers vius.En aquest treball presentem l'estructura cristal·logràfica de la glicogen sintasa de Pyrococcus abyssi (PaGS). Aquest enzim és termoestable i presenta una activitat màxima a ...

  7. Cloning, characterization and sequence comparison of the gene coding for IMP dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collart, F R; Osipiuk, J; Trent, J; Olsen, G J; Huberman, E

    1996-10-03

    We have cloned and characterized the gene encoding inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf), a hyperthermophillic archeon. Sequence analysis of the Pf gene indicated an open reading frame specifying a protein of 485 amino acids (aa) with a calculated M(r) of 52900. Canonical Archaea promoter elements, Box A and Box B, are located -49 and -17 nucleotides (nt), respectively, upstream of the putative start codon. The sequence of the putative active-site region conforms to the IMPDH signature motif and contains a putative active-site cysteine. Phylogenetic relationships derived by using all available IMPDH sequences are consistent with trees developed for other molecules; they do not precisely resolve the history of Pf IMPDH but indicate a close similarity to bacterial IMPDH proteins. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that a gene duplication occurred prior to the division between rodents and humans, accounting for the Type I and II isoforms identified in mice and humans.

  8. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Jan Schut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally-relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.

  9. Crystal structure of Pfu, the high fidelity DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhng Wook; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Jin Kwang; Kang, Lin-Woo; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2008-05-01

    We have determined a 2.6A resolution crystal structure of Pfu DNA polymerase, the most commonly used high fidelity PCR enzyme, from Pyrococcus furiosus. Although the structures of Pfu and KOD1 are highly similar, the structure of Pfu elucidates the electron density of the interface between the exonuclease and thumb domains, which has not been previously observed in the KOD1 structure. The interaction of these two domains is known to coordinate the proofreading and polymerization activity of DNA polymerases, especially via H147 that is present within the loop (residues 144-158) of the exonuclease domain. In our structure of Pfu, however, E148 rather than H147 is located at better position to interact with the thumb domain. In addition, the structural analysis of Pfu and KOD1 shows that both the Y-GG/A and beta-hairpin motifs of Pfu are found to differ with that of KOD1, and may explain differences in processivity. This information enables us to better understand the mechanisms of polymerization and proofreading of DNA polymerases.

  10. Cloning, purification and crystallization of a Walker-type Pyrococcus abyssi ATPase family member

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhring, Muriel; Bey, Gilbert; Lecompte, Odile; Cavarelli, Jean; Moras, Dino; Poch, Olivier, E-mail: poch@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [Département de Biologie et Génomiques Structurales, UMR 7104, Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/ULP Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 64404 Illkirch (France)

    2005-10-01

    The Walker-type ATPase PABY2304 of P. abyssi has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data from selenomethionine-derivative crystals have been collected to 2.6 Å. The structure has been solved by MAD techniques. Several ATPase proteins play essential roles in the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in archaea. Walker-type ATPases are defined by their conserved Walker A and B motifs, which are associated with nucleotide binding and ATP hydrolysis. A family of 28 ATPase proteins with non-canonical Walker A sequences has been identified by a bioinformatics study of comparative genomics in Pyrococcus genomes. A high-throughput structural study on P. abyssi has been started in order to establish the structure of these proteins. 16 genes have been cloned and characterized. Six out of the seven soluble constructs were purified in Escherichia coli and one of them, PABY2304, has been crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from selenomethionine-derivative crystals using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.41, b = 48.63, c = 108.77 Å, and diffract to beyond 2.6 Å resolution.

  11. Cloning, purification and crystallization of a Walker-type Pyrococcus abyssi ATPase family member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhring, Muriel; Bey, Gilbert; Lecompte, Odile; Cavarelli, Jean; Moras, Dino; Poch, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    The Walker-type ATPase PABY2304 of P. abyssi has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data from selenomethionine-derivative crystals have been collected to 2.6 Å. The structure has been solved by MAD techniques. Several ATPase proteins play essential roles in the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in archaea. Walker-type ATPases are defined by their conserved Walker A and B motifs, which are associated with nucleotide binding and ATP hydrolysis. A family of 28 ATPase proteins with non-canonical Walker A sequences has been identified by a bioinformatics study of comparative genomics in Pyrococcus genomes. A high-throughput structural study on P. abyssi has been started in order to establish the structure of these proteins. 16 genes have been cloned and characterized. Six out of the seven soluble constructs were purified in Escherichia coli and one of them, PABY2304, has been crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from selenomethionine-derivative crystals using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.41, b = 48.63, c = 108.77 Å, and diffract to beyond 2.6 Å resolution

  12. Random mutagenesis of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using in vitro mariner transposition and natural transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guschinskaya, Natalia; Brunel, Romain; Tourte, Maxime; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Michael W W; Oger, Philippe; Charpentier, Xavier

    2016-11-08

    Transposition mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify the function of genes, reveal essential genes and generally to unravel the genetic basis of living organisms. However, transposon-mediated mutagenesis has only been successfully applied to a limited number of archaeal species and has never been reported in Thermococcales. Here, we report random insertion mutagenesis in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The strategy takes advantage of the natural transformability of derivatives of the P. furiosus COM1 strain and of in vitro Mariner-based transposition. A transposon bearing a genetic marker is randomly transposed in vitro in genomic DNA that is then used for natural transformation of P. furiosus. A small-scale transposition reaction routinely generates several hundred and up to two thousands transformants. Southern analysis and sequencing showed that the obtained mutants contain a single and random genomic insertion. Polyploidy has been reported in Thermococcales and P. furiosus is suspected of being polyploid. Yet, about half of the mutants obtained on the first selection are homozygous for the transposon insertion. Two rounds of isolation on selective medium were sufficient to obtain gene conversion in initially heterozygous mutants. This transposition mutagenesis strategy will greatly facilitate functional exploration of the Thermococcales genomes.

  13. Domains of Pyrococcus furiosus L-asparaginase fold sequentially and assemble through strong intersubunit associative forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Dushyant K; Tomar, Rachana; Dhoke, Reema R; Srivastava, Ankit; Kundu, Bishwajit

    2015-05-01

    Here, we report the folding and assembly of a Pyrococcus furiosus-derived protein, L-asparaginase (PfA). PfA functions as a homodimer, with each monomer made of distinct N- and C-terminal domains. The purified individual domains as well as single Trp mutant of each domain were subjected to chemical denaturation/renaturation and probed by combination of spectroscopic, chromatographic, quenching and scattering techniques. We found that the N-domain acts like a folding scaffold and assists the folding of remaining polypeptide. The domains displayed sequential folding with the N-domain having higher thermodynamic stability. We report that the extreme thermal stability of PfA is due to the presence of high intersubunit associative forces supported by extensive H-bonding and ionic interactions network. Our results proved that folding cooperativity in a thermophilic, multisubunit protein is dictated by concomitant folding and association of constituent domains directly into a native quaternary structure. This report gives an account of the factors responsible for folding and stability of a therapeutically and industrially important protein.

  14. Structural studies of the toxin-antitoxin proteins RelE and RelB from E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Overgaard, Martin; Gerdes, Kenn

    the special tRNA-mRNA mimic, tmRNA [1]. Questions to be addressed Many questions remain to be answered in the bacterial toxin-antitoxin system. The crystal structure of RelBE from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was previously solved at 2.3Å [2]. This structure shows the molecule in an inactive state, but OT3......The bacterial toxin-antitoxin system The relBE operon in E. coli encodes two small proteins: A toxin, RelE (12 kDa) and an antitoxin, RelB (9 kDa). RelE is activated under nutritional stress and is able to inhibit protein synthesis by cleaving the mRNA in the ribosomal A-site. This stress response...... serves to down-regulate metabolism in the cell when growth conditions are limited. RelB is expressed in excess over RelE during balanced growth, and inhibits the toxicity of RelE by forming an extremely stable toxin-antitoxin complex. The activation of RelE is induced when the labile RelB protein...

  15. Two functionally distinct NADP+-dependent ferredoxin oxidoreductases maintain the primary redox balance of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Diep M N; Schut, Gerrit J; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Poudel, Saroj; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Leslie A; Dinsmore, Jessica T; Nixon, William J; Boyd, Eric S; Bothner, Brian; Peters, John W; Adams, Michael W W

    2017-09-01

    Electron bifurcation has recently gained acceptance as the third mechanism of energy conservation in which energy is conserved through the coupling of exergonic and endergonic reactions. A structure-based mechanism of bifurcation has been elucidated recently for the flavin-based enzyme NADH-dependent ferredoxin NADP + oxidoreductase I (NfnI) from the hyperthermophillic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. NfnI is thought to be involved in maintaining the cellular redox balance, producing NADPH for biosynthesis by recycling the two other primary redox carriers, NADH and ferredoxin. The P. furiosus genome encodes an NfnI paralog termed NfnII, and the two are differentially expressed, depending on the growth conditions. In this study, we show that deletion of the genes encoding either NfnI or NfnII affects the cellular concentrations of NAD(P)H and particularly NADPH. This results in a moderate to severe growth phenotype in deletion mutants, demonstrating a key role for each enzyme in maintaining redox homeostasis. Despite their similarity in primary sequence and cofactor content, crystallographic, kinetic, and mass spectrometry analyses reveal that there are fundamental structural differences between the two enzymes, and NfnII does not catalyze the NfnI bifurcating reaction. Instead, it exhibits non-bifurcating ferredoxin NADP oxidoreductase-type activity. NfnII is therefore proposed to be a bifunctional enzyme and also to catalyze a bifurcating reaction, although its third substrate, in addition to ferredoxin and NADP(H), is as yet unknown. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Characterization of sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant proteolytic activity in the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumentals, I.I.; Robinson, A.S.; Kelly, R.M. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Cell extracts from Pyrococcus furiosus were found to contain five proteases, two of which (S66 and S102) are resistant to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) denaturation. Cell extracts incubated at 98{degree}C in the presence of 1% SDS for 24 h exhibited substantial cellular proteolysis such that only four proteins could be visualized by amido black-Coomassie brilliant blue staining of SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The SDS-treated extract retained 19% of the initial proteolytic activity as represented by two proteases, S66 (66 kilodaltons (kDa)) and S102 (102 kDa). Immunoblot analysis with guinea pig sera containing antibodies against protease S66 indicated that S66 is related neither to S102 nor to the other proteases. The results of this analysis also suggest that S66 might be the hydrolysis product of a 200-kDa precursor which does not have proteolytic activity. The 24-h SDS-treated extract showed unusually thermostable proteolytic activity; the measured half-life at 98{degree}C was found to be 33 h. Proteases S66 and S102 were also resistant to denaturation by 8 M urea, 80 mM dithiothreitol, and 5% {beta}-mercaptoethanol. Purified protease S66 was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate but not by EDTA, ethylene glycol-bis({beta}-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetraacetic acid, or iodoacetic acid. These results indicate that S66 is a serine protease. Amino acid ester hydrolysis studies showed that protease S66 was hydrolytically active towards N-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester.

  17. Tertiary structure in 7.9 M guanidinium chloride: the role of Glu-53 and Asp-287 in Pyrococcus furiosus endo-beta-1,3-glucanase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiaraluce, R.; Florio, R.; Angelaccio, S.; Gianese, G.; Lieshout, van J.F.T.; Oost, van der J.; Consalvi, V.

    2007-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of family 16 endo-ß-1,3-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.39) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is decreased upon single (D287A, E53A) and double (E53A/D287A) mutation of Asp287 and Glu53. In accordance with the homology model prediction, both carboxylic acids are

  18. Calcium-induced tertiary structure modifications of endo-B-1,3-glucanase form Pyrococcus furiosus in 7.9 M guanidinium chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiaraluce, R.; Gianese, G.; Angelaccio, S.; Florio, R.; Lieshout, van J.F.T.; Oost, van der J.; Consalvi, V.

    2005-01-01

    The family 16 endo-b-1,3 glucanase from the extremophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a laminarinase, which in 7.9 M GdmCl (guanidinium chloride) maintains a significant amount of tertiary structure without any change of secondary structure. The addition of calcium to the enzyme in 7.9 M GdmCl

  19. Crystal Structure of PAV1-137: A Protein from the Virus PAV1 That Infects Pyrococcus abyssi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Leulliot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1 was the first virus particle infecting a hyperthermophilic Euryarchaeota (Pyrococcus abyssi strain GE23 that has been isolated and characterized. It is lemon shaped and is decorated with a short fibered tail. PAV1 morphologically resembles the fusiform members of the family Fuselloviridae or the genus Salterprovirus. The 18 kb dsDNA genome of PAV1 contains 25 predicted genes, most of them of unknown function. To help assigning functions to these proteins, we have initiated structural studies of the PAV1 proteome. We determined the crystal structure of a putative protein of 137 residues (PAV1-137 at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The protein forms dimers both in solution and in the crystal. The fold of PAV1-137 is a four-α-helical bundle analogous to those found in some eukaryotic adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase, suggesting that PAV1-137 is involved in protein-protein interactions.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a RecB-family nuclease from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Bin, E-mail: ren@csb.ki.se [Center for Structural Biochemistry, Karolinska Institute, NOVUM, S-141 57 Huddinge (Sweden); Kuhn, Joëlle; Meslet-Cladiere, Laurence; Myllykallio, Hannu [Université Paris-Sud, Institut de Génétique et Microbiologie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Unité Mixte de Recherche 8621, F-91405 Orsay CEDEX (France); Ladenstein, Rudolf [Center for Structural Biochemistry, Karolinska Institute, NOVUM, S-141 57 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    A RecB-like nuclease from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1} with a = 81.5, b = 159.8, c = 100.8 Å, and a native data set was collected to 2.65 Å resolution. Nucleases are required to process and repair DNA damage in living cells. One of the best studied nucleases is the RecB protein, which functions in Escherichia coli as a component of the RecBCD enzyme complex that amends double-strand breaks in DNA. Although archaea do not contain the RecBCD complex, a RecB-like nuclease from Pyrococcus abyssi has been cloned, expressed and purified. The protein was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.5, b = 159.8, c = 100.8 Å. Self-rotation function and native Patterson map calculations revealed that there is a dimer in the asymmetric unit with its local twofold axis running parallel to the crystallographic twofold screw axis. The crystals diffracted to about 2 Å and a complete native data set was collected to 2.65 Å resolution.

  1. Modulation of the Pyrococcus abyssi NucS endonuclease activity by replication clamp at functional and structural levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creze, Christophe; Ligabue, Alessio; Laurent, Sébastien; Lestini, Roxane; Laptenok, Sergey P; Khun, Joelle; Vos, Marten H; Czjzek, Mirjam; Myllykallio, Hannu; Flament, Didier

    2012-05-04

    Pyrococcus abyssi NucS is the founding member of a new family of structure-specific DNA endonucleases that interact with the replication clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Using a combination of small angle x-ray scattering and surface plasmon resonance analyses, we demonstrate the formation of a stable complex in solution, in which one molecule of the PabNucS homodimer binds to the outside surface of the PabPCNA homotrimer. Using fluorescent labels, PCNA is shown to increase the binding affinity of NucS toward single-strand/double-strand junctions on 5' and 3' flaps, as well as to modulate the cleavage specificity on the branched DNA structures. Our results indicate that the presence of a single major contact between the PabNucS and PabPCNA proteins, together with the complex-induced DNA bending, facilitate conformational flexibility required for specific cleavage at the single-strand/double-strand DNA junction.

  2. Structure of a double hexamer of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance protein N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Martin; Enemark, Eric J.

    2016-06-22

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of thePyrococcus furiosusminichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein as a double hexamer is described. The MCM complex is a ring-shaped helicase that unwinds DNA at the replication fork of eukaryotes and archaea. Prior to replication initiation, the MCM complex assembles as an inactive double hexamer at specific sites of DNA. The presented structure is highly consistent with previous MCM double-hexamer structures and shows two MCM hexamers with a head-to-head interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain. Minor differences include a diminished head-to-head interaction and a slightly reduced inter-hexamer rotation.

  3. Modulation of the Pyrococcus abyssi NucS Endonuclease Activity by Replication Clamp at Functional and Structural Levels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creze, Christophe; Ligabue, Alessio; Laurent, Sébastien; Lestini, Roxane; Laptenok, Sergey P.; Khun, Joelle; Vos, Marten H.; Czjzek, Mirjam; Myllykallio, Hannu; Flament, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Pyrococcus abyssi NucS is the founding member of a new family of structure-specific DNA endonucleases that interact with the replication clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Using a combination of small angle x-ray scattering and surface plasmon resonance analyses, we demonstrate the formation of a stable complex in solution, in which one molecule of the PabNucS homodimer binds to the outside surface of the PabPCNA homotrimer. Using fluorescent labels, PCNA is shown to increase the binding affinity of NucS toward single-strand/double-strand junctions on 5′ and 3′ flaps, as well as to modulate the cleavage specificity on the branched DNA structures. Our results indicate that the presence of a single major contact between the PabNucS and PabPCNA proteins, together with the complex-induced DNA bending, facilitate conformational flexibility required for specific cleavage at the single-strand/double-strand DNA junction. PMID:22431731

  4. DNA targeting by the type I-G and type I-A CRISPR–Cas systems of Pyrococcus furiosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Joshua; Deighan, Trace; Westpheling, Jan; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems silence plasmids and viruses in prokaryotes. CRISPR–Cas effector complexes contain CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that include sequences captured from invaders and direct CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to destroy corresponding invader nucleic acids. Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) harbors three CRISPR–Cas immune systems: a Cst (Type I-G) system with an associated Cmr (Type III-B) module at one locus, and a partial Csa (Type I-A) module (lacking known invader sequence acquisition and crRNA processing genes) at another locus. The Pfu Cmr complex cleaves complementary target RNAs, and Csa systems have been shown to target DNA, while the mechanism by which Cst complexes silence invaders is unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of the Cst as well as Csa system in Pfu strains harboring a single CRISPR–Cas system. Plasmid transformation assays revealed that the Cst and Csa systems both function by DNA silencing and utilize similar flanking sequence information (PAMs) to identify invader DNA. Silencing by each system specifically requires its associated Cas3 nuclease. crRNAs from the 7 shared CRISPR loci in Pfu are processed for use by all 3 effector complexes, and Northern analysis revealed that individual effector complexes dictate the profile of mature crRNA species that is generated. PMID:26519471

  5. Improving the Thermostability and Optimal Temperature of a Lipase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by Covalent Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta V. Branco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A recombinant thermostable lipase (Pf2001Δ60 from the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PFUL was immobilized by hydrophobic interaction on octyl-agarose (octyl PFUL and by covalent bond on aldehyde activated-agarose in the presence of DTT at pH = 7.0 (one-point covalent attachment (glyoxyl-DTT PFUL and on glyoxyl-agarose at pH 10.2 (multipoint covalent attachment (glyoxyl PFUL. The enzyme’s properties, such as optimal temperature and pH, thermostability, and selectivity, were improved by covalent immobilization. The highest enzyme stability at 70°C for 48 h incubation was achieved for glyoxyl PFUL (around 82% of residual activity, whereas glyoxyl-DTT PFUL maintained around 69% activity, followed by octyl PFUL (27% remaining activity. Immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose improved the optimal temperature to 90°C, while the optimal temperature of octyl PFUL was 70°C. Also, very significant changes in activity with different substrates were found. In general, the covalent bond derivatives were more active than octyl PFUL. The E value also depended substantially on the derivative and the conditions used. It was observed that the reaction of glyoxyl-DTT PFUL using methyl mandelate as a substrate at pH 7 presented the best results for enantioselectivity E=22 and enantiomeric excess (ee (% = 91.

  6. In situ STM imaging and direct electrochemistry of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin assembled on thiolate-modified Au(111) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Ooi, Bee Lean

    2004-01-01

    We have addressed here electron transfer (ET) of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin (PfFd, 7.5 kDa) in both homogeneous solution using edge plane graphite (EPG) electrodes and in the adsorbed state by electrochemistry on surface-modified single-crystal Au(111) electrodes, This has been supported...... by surface microscopic structures of PfFd monolayers, as revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy under potential control (in situ STM). Direct ET between PfFd in phosphate buffer solution, pH 7.9, and EPG electrodes is observed in the presence of promoters. Neomycin gives rise to a pair of redox peaks...... with a formal potential of ca -430 mV (vs SCE), corresponding to [3Fe-4S](1+/0). The presence of an additional promoter, which can be propionic acid, alanine, or cysteine, induces a second pair of redox peaks at similar to-900 mV (vs SCE) arising from [3Fe-4S](0/1-). A robust neomycin-PfFd complex was detected...

  7. A hyper-thermostable α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus accumulates in Nicotiana tabacum as functional aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Reynolds, L Bruce; Menassa, Rima

    2017-06-19

    Alpha amylase hydrolyzes α-bonds of polysaccharides such as starch and produces malto-oligosaccharides. Its starch saccharification applications make it an essential enzyme in the textile, food and brewing industries. Commercially available α-amylase is mostly produced from Bacillus or Aspergillus. A hyper-thermostable and Ca 2++ independent α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PFA) expressed in E.coli forms insoluble inclusion bodies and thus is not feasible for industrial applications. We expressed PFA in Nicotiana tabacum and found that plant-produced PFA forms functional aggregates with an accumulation level up to 3.4 g/kg FW (fresh weight) in field conditions. The aggregates are functional without requiring refolding and therefore have potential to be applied as homogenized plant tissue without extraction or purification. PFA can also be extracted from plant tissue upon dissolution in a mild reducing buffer containing SDS. Like the enzyme produced in P. furiosus and in E. coli, plant produced PFA preserves hyper-thermophilicity and hyper-thermostability and has a long shelf life when stored in lyophilized leaf tissue. With tobacco's large biomass and high yield, hyper-thermostable α-amylase was produced at a scale of 42 kg per hectare. Tobacco may be a suitable bioreactor for industrial production of active hyperthermostable alpha amylase.

  8. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a penicillin-binding protein homologue from Pyrococcus abyssi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Mayer, Claudine

    2005-01-01

    The crystallization of a hypothetical penicillin-binding protein from the archaeon P. abyssi in space group C2 by hanging-drop vapour diffusion is reported. The genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains a gene (pab0087) encoding a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) homologue. This sequence consists of 447 residues and shows significant sequence similarity to low-molecular-weight PBPs and class C β-lactamases. The Pab0087 protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data from two different crystal forms were collected to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution. Both crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 160.59, b = 135.74, c = 113.02 Å, β = 117.36° and a = 166.97, b = 131.25, c = 189.39 Å, β = 113.81°, respectively. The asymmetric unit contains four and eight molecules, respectively, with fourfold non-crystallographic symmetry

  9. An Integrative Genomic Island Affects the Adaptations of Piezophilic Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus yayanosii to High Temperature and High Hydrostatic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments are characterized by high hydrostatic pressure and sharp temperature and chemical gradients. Horizontal gene transfer is thought to play an important role in the microbial adaptation to such an extreme environment. In this study, a 21.4-kb DNA fragment was identified as a genomic island, designated PYG1, in the genomic sequence of the piezophilic hyperthermophile Pyrococcus yayanosii. According to the sequence alignment and functional annotation, the genes in PYG1 could tentatively be divided into five modules, with functions related to mobility, DNA repair, metabolic processes and the toxin-antitoxin system. Integrase can mediate the site-specific integration and excision of PYG1 in the chromosome of P. yayanosii A1. Gene replacement of PYG1 with a SimR cassette was successful. The growth of the mutant strain ∆PYG1 was compared with its parent strain P. yayanosii A2 under various stress conditions, including different pH, salinity, temperature and hydrostatic pressure. The ∆PYG1 mutant strain showed reduced growth when grown at 100 °C, while the biomass of ∆PYG1 increased significantly when cultured at 80 MPa. Differential expression of the genes in module Ⅲ of PYG1 was observed under different temperature and pressure conditions. This study demonstrates the first example of an archaeal integrative genomic island that could affect the adaptation of the hyperthermophilic piezophile P. yayanosii to high temperature and high hydrostatic pressure.

  10. The L7Ae protein binds to two kink-turns in the Pyrococcus furiosus RNase P RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Stella M.; Lai, Lien B.; Foster, Mark P.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein L7Ae, known for its role in translation (as part of ribosomes) and RNA modification (as part of sn/oRNPs), has also been identified as a subunit of archaeal RNase P, a ribonucleoprotein complex that employs an RNA catalyst for the Mg2+-dependent 5′ maturation of tRNAs. To better understand the assembly and catalysis of archaeal RNase P, we used a site-specific hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting strategy to pinpoint the binding sites of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) L7Ae on its cognate RNase P RNA (RPR). L7Ae derivatives with single-Cys substitutions at residues in the predicted RNA-binding interface (K42C/C71V, R46C/C71V, V95C/C71V) were modified with an iron complex of EDTA-2-aminoethyl 2-pyridyl disulfide. Upon addition of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate, these L7Ae-tethered nucleases were expected to cleave the RPR at nucleotides proximal to the EDTA-Fe–modified residues. Indeed, footprinting experiments with an enzyme assembled with the Pfu RPR and five protein cofactors (POP5, RPP21, RPP29, RPP30 and L7Ae–EDTA-Fe) revealed specific RNA cleavages, localizing the binding sites of L7Ae to the RPR's catalytic and specificity domains. These results support the presence of two kink-turns, the structural motifs recognized by L7Ae, in distinct functional domains of the RPR and suggest testable mechanisms by which L7Ae contributes to RNase P catalysis. PMID:25361963

  11. Preparation of lactose-free pasteurized milk with a recombinant thermostable β-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactose intolerance is a common health concern causing gastrointestinal symptoms and avoidance of dairy products by afflicted individuals. Since milk is a primary source of calcium and vitamin D, lactose intolerant individuals often obtain insufficient amounts of these nutrients which may lead to adverse health outcomes. Production of lactose-free milk can provide a solution to this problem, although it requires use of lactase from microbial sources and increases potential for contamination. Use of thermostable lactase enzymes can overcome this issue by functioning under pasteurization conditions. Results A thermostable β-glucosidase gene from Pyrococcus furiosus was cloned in frame with the Saccharomyces cerecisiae a-factor secretory signal and expressed in Pichia pastoris strain X-33. The recombinant enzyme was purified by a one-step method of weak anion exchange chromatography. The optimum temperature and pH for this β-glucosidase activity was 100°C and pH 6.0, respectively. The enzyme activity was not significantly inhibited by Ca2+. We tested the additive amount, hydrolysis time, and the influence of glucose on the enzyme during pasteurization and found that the enzyme possessed a high level of lactose hydrolysis in milk that was not obviously influenced by glucose. Conclusions The thermostablity of this recombinant β-glucosidase, combined with its neutral pH activity and favorable temperature activity optima, suggest that this enzyme is an ideal candidate for the hydrolysis of lactose in milk, and it would be suitable for application in low-lactose milk production during pasteurization. PMID:24053641

  12. Structural basis of thermal stability of the tungsten cofactor synthesis protein MoaB from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastassia Havarushka

    Full Text Available Molybdenum and tungsten cofactors share a similar pterin-based scaffold, which hosts an ene-dithiolate function being essential for the coordination of either molybdenum or tungsten. The biosynthesis of both cofactors involves a multistep pathway, which ends with the activation of the metal binding pterin (MPT by adenylylation before the respective metal is incorporated. In the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus, the hexameric protein MoaB (PfuMoaB has been shown to catalyse MPT-adenylylation. Here we determined the crystal structure of PfuMoaB at 2.5 Å resolution and identified key residues of α3-helix mediating hexamer formation. Given that PfuMoaB homologues from mesophilic organisms form trimers, we investigated the impact on PfuMoaB hexamerization on thermal stability and activity. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we successfully disrupted the hexamer interface in PfuMoaB. The resulting PfuMoaB-H3 variant formed monomers, dimers and trimers as determined by size exclusion chromatography. Circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry confirmed a wild-type-like fold of the protomers as well as inter-subunits contacts. The melting temperature of PfuMoaB-H3 was found to be reduced by more than 15 °C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, thus demonstrating hexamerization as key determinant for PfuMoaB thermal stability. Remarkably, while a loss of activity at temperatures higher than 50 °C was observed in the PfuMoaB-H3 variant, at lower temperatures, we determined a significantly increased catalytic activity. The latter suggests a gain in conformational flexibility caused by the disruption of the hexamerization interface.

  13. Electronic, Magnetic, and Redox Properties of [MFe(3)S(4)] Clusters (M = Cd, Cu, Cr) in Pyrococcus furiosus Ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Christopher R.; Dhawan, Ish K.; Finnegan, Michael G.; Dwinell, Derek A.; Zhou, Zhi Hao; Huang, Heshu; Verhagen, Marc F. J. M.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Johnson, Michael K.

    1997-12-03

    The ground- and excited-state properties of heterometallic [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), and [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) cubane clusters assembled in Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin have been investigated by the combination of EPR and variable-temperature/variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies. The results indicate Cd(2+) incorporation into [Fe(3)S(4)](0,-) cluster fragments to yield S = 2 [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+) and S = (5)/(2) [CdFe(3)S(4)](+) clusters and Cu(+) incorporation into [Fe(3)S(4)](+,0) cluster fragments to yield S = (1)/(2) [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+) and S = 2 [CuFe(3)S(4)](+) clusters. This is the first report of the preparation of cubane type [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) clusters, and the combination of EPR and MCD results indicates S = 0 and S = (3)/(2) ground states for the oxidized and reduced forms, respectively. Midpoint potentials for the [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), and [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) couples, E(m) = -470 +/- 15, -440 +/- 10, and +190 +/- 10 mV (vs NHE), respectively, were determined by EPR-monitored redox titrations or direct electrochemistry at a glassy carbon electrode. The trends in redox potential, ground-state spin, and electron delocalization of [MFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) clusters in P. furiosus ferredoxin are discussed as a function of heterometal (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Tl).

  14. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. [University of Georgia; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and

  15. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Cellulose Nanofibril Films from Bleached Eucalyptus Pulp by Endoglucanase Treatment and Microfluidization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangxia Wang; Ronald C. Sabo; Michael D. Mozuch; Phil Kersten; J. Y. Zhu; Yongcan Jin

    2015-01-01

    A GH5 hyperthermostable endoglucanase (Ph-GH5) from the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii and a commercial endoglucanase (FR) were used to treat bleached eucalyptus pulp (BEP) fibers to produce cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and subsequently to CNF films. TEM imaging indicated that Ph-GH5 produced longer and more entangled CNF than FR with the same number...

  16. PI-PfuI and PI-PfuII, intein-coded homing endonucleases from Pyrococcus furiosus. II. Characterization Of the binding and cleavage abilities by site-directed mutagenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Komori, K; Ichiyanagi, K; Morikawa, K; Ishino, Y

    1999-01-01

    PI- Pfu I and PI- Pfu II from Pyrococcus furiosus are homing endonucleases, as shown in the accompanying paper. These two endonucleases are produced by protein splicing from the precursor protein including ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). We show here that both enzymes specifically interact with their substrate DNA and distort the DNA strands by 73 degrees and 67 degrees, respectively. They have two copies of the amino acid sequence motif LAGLIDADG, which is present in the majority of homing e...

  17. Crystal structures of the all-cysteinyl-coordinated D14C variant of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin: [4Fe–4S] ↔ [3Fe–4S] cluster conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Martic, Maja; Windahl, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the all-cysteinyl-coordinated D14C variant of [4Fe–4S] ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group C2221 with two types of molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit. A and B...... molecules have different crystal packing and intramolecular disulfide bond conformation. The crystal packing reveals a β-sheet interaction between A molecules in adjacent asymmetric units, whereas B molecules are packed as monomers in a less rigid position next to the A–A extended β-sheet dimers...... and purification are carried out at pH 5.8, only the monomer is obtained. The crystal structure of D14C [3Fe–4S] P. furiosus ferredoxin monomer was determined to 2.8 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group P212121 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The molecules resemble molecule A of D14C [4...

  18. Tungsten transport protein A (WtpA) in Pyrococcus furiosus: the first member of a new class of tungstate and molybdate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Krijger, Gerard C; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2006-09-01

    A novel tungstate and molybdate binding protein has been discovered from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This tungstate transport protein A (WtpA) is part of a new ABC transporter system selective for tungstate and molybdate. WtpA has very low sequence similarity with the earlier-characterized transport proteins ModA for molybdate and TupA for tungstate. Its structural gene is present in the genome of numerous archaea and some bacteria. The identification of this new tungstate and molybdate binding protein clarifies the mechanism of tungstate and molybdate transport in organisms that lack the known uptake systems associated with the ModA and TupA proteins, like many archaea. The periplasmic protein of this ABC transporter, WtpA (PF0080), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, WtpA was observed to bind tungstate (dissociation constant [K(D)] of 17 +/- 7 pM) and molybdate (K(D) of 11 +/- 5 nM) with a stoichiometry of 1.0 mol oxoanion per mole of protein. These low K(D) values indicate that WtpA has a higher affinity for tungstate than do ModA and TupA and an affinity for molybdate similar to that of ModA. A displacement titration of molybdate-saturated WtpA with tungstate showed that the tungstate effectively replaced the molybdate in the binding site of the protein.

  19. DNA polymerase hybrids derived from the family-B enzymes of Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermococcus kodakarensis: improving performance in the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshawadfy, Ashraf M; Keith, Brian J; Ee Ooi, H'Ng; Kinsman, Thomas; Heslop, Pauline; Connolly, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is widely applied across the biosciences, with archaeal Family-B DNA polymerases being preferred, due to their high thermostability and fidelity. The enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu-Pol) is more frequently used than the similar protein from Thermococcus kodakarensis (Tkod-Pol), despite the latter having better PCR performance. Here the two polymerases have been comprehensively compared, confirming that Tkod-Pol: (1) extends primer-templates more rapidly; (2) has higher processivity; (3) demonstrates superior performance in normal and real time PCR. However, Tkod-Pol is less thermostable than Pfu-Pol and both enzymes have equal fidelities. To understand the favorable properties of Tkod-Pol, hybrid proteins have been prepared. Single, double and triple mutations were used to site arginines, present at the "forked-point" (the junction of the exonuclease and polymerase channels) of Tkod-Pol, at the corresponding locations in Pfu-Pol, slightly improving PCR performance. The Pfu-Pol thumb domain, responsible for double-stranded DNA binding, has been entirely replaced with that from Tkod-Pol, again giving better PCR properties. Combining the "forked-point" and thumb swap mutations resulted in a marked increase in PCR capability, maintenance of high fidelity and retention of the superior thermostability associated with Pfu-Pol. However, even the arginine/thumb swap mutant falls short of Tkod-Pol in PCR, suggesting further improvement within the Pfu-Pol framework is attainable. The significance of this work is the observation that improvements in PCR performance are easily attainable by blending elements from closely related archaeal polymerases, an approach that may, in future, be extended by using more polymerases from these organisms.

  20. Deletion of acetyl-CoA synthetases I and II increases production of 3-hydroxypropionate by the metabolically-engineered hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorgersen, Michael P; Lipscomb, Gina L; Schut, Gerrit J; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2014-03-01

    The heterotrophic, hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a new addition to the growing list of genetically-tractable microorganisms suitable for metabolic engineering to produce liquid fuels and industrial chemicals. P. furiosus was recently engineered to generate 3-hydroxypropionate (3-HP) from CO₂ and acetyl-CoA by the heterologous-expression of three enzymes from the CO₂ fixation cycle of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula using a thermally-triggered induction system. The acetyl-CoA for this pathway is generated from glucose catabolism that in wild-type P. furiosus is converted to acetate with concurrent ATP production by the heterotetrameric (α₂β₂) acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS). Hence ACS in the engineered 3-HP production strain (MW56) competes with the heterologous pathway for acetyl-CoA. Herein we show that strains of MW56 lacking the α-subunit of either of the two ACSs previously characterized from P. furiosus (ACSI and ACSII) exhibit a three-fold increase in specific 3-HP production. The ΔACSIα strain displayed only a minor defect in growth on either maltose or peptides, while no growth defect on these substrates was observed with the ΔACSIIα strain. Deletion of individual and multiple ACS subunits was also shown to decrease CoA release activity for several different CoA ester substrates in addition to acetyl-CoA, information that will be extremely useful for future metabolic engineering endeavors in P. furiosus. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Structures of SRP54 and SRP19, the two proteins that organize the ribonucleic core of the signal recognition particle from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal F Egea

    Full Text Available In all organisms the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP, binds to signal sequences of proteins destined for secretion or membrane insertion as they emerge from translating ribosomes. In Archaea and Eucarya, the conserved ribonucleoproteic core is composed of two proteins, the accessory protein SRP19, the essential GTPase SRP54, and an evolutionarily conserved and essential SRP RNA. Through the GTP-dependent interaction between the SRP and its cognate receptor SR, ribosomes harboring nascent polypeptidic chains destined for secretion are dynamically transferred to the protein translocation apparatus at the membrane. We present here high-resolution X-ray structures of SRP54 and SRP19, the two RNA binding components forming the core of the signal recognition particle from the hyper-thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu. The 2.5 A resolution structure of free Pfu-SRP54 is the first showing the complete domain organization of a GDP bound full-length SRP54 subunit. In its ras-like GTPase domain, GDP is found tightly associated with the protein. The flexible linker that separates the GTPase core from the hydrophobic signal sequence binding M domain, adopts a purely alpha-helical structure and acts as an articulated arm allowing the M domain to explore multiple regions as it scans for signal peptides as they emerge from the ribosomal tunnel. This linker is structurally coupled to the GTPase catalytic site and likely to propagate conformational changes occurring in the M domain through the SRP RNA upon signal sequence binding. Two different 1.8 A resolution crystal structures of free Pfu-SRP19 reveal a compact, rigid and well-folded protein even in absence of its obligate SRP RNA partner. Comparison with other SRP19*SRP RNA structures suggests the rearrangement of a disordered loop upon binding with the RNA through a reciprocal induced-fit mechanism and supports the idea that SRP19 acts as a molecular scaffold and a chaperone, assisting the SRP

  2. Ancillary contributions of heterologous biotin protein ligase and carbonic anhydrase for CO2 incorporation into 3-hydroxypropionate by metabolically engineered Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Hong; Zeldes, Benjamin M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Hawkins, Aaron B; Han, Yejun; Loder, Andrew J; Nishiyama, Declan; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2016-12-01

    Acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), malonyl-CoA reductase (MCR), and malonic semialdehyde reductase (MRS) convert HCO 3 - and acetyl-CoA into 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP) in the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate carbon fixation cycle resident in the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula. These three enzymes, when introduced into the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, enable production of 3HP from maltose and CO 2 . Sub-optimal function of ACC was hypothesized to be limiting for production of 3HP, so accessory enzymes carbonic anhydrase (CA) and biotin protein ligase (BPL) from M. sedula were produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli to assess their function. P. furiosus lacks a native, functional CA, while the M. sedula CA (Msed_0390) has a specific activity comparable to other microbial versions of this enzyme. M. sedula BPL (Msed_2010) was shown to biotinylate the β-subunit (biotin carboxyl carrier protein) of the ACC in vitro. Since the native BPLs in E. coli and P. furiosus may not adequately biotinylate the M. sedula ACC, the carboxylase was produced in P. furiosus by co-expression with the M. sedula BPL. The baseline production strain, containing only the ACC, MCR, and MSR, grown in a CO 2 -sparged bioreactor reached titers of approximately 40 mg/L 3HP. Strains in which either the CA or BPL accessory enzyme from M. sedula was added to the pathway resulted in improved titers, 120 or 370 mg/L, respectively. The addition of both M. sedula CA and BPL, however, yielded intermediate titers of 3HP (240 mg/L), indicating that the effects of CA and BPL on the engineered 3HP pathway were not additive, possible reasons for which are discussed. While further efforts to improve 3HP production by regulating gene dosage, improving carbon flux and optimizing bioreactor operation are needed, these results illustrate the ancillary benefits of accessory enzymes for incorporating CO 2 into 3HP production in metabolically engineered P

  3. Molecular characterization of glycolysis in Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    In the last few decades microorganisms have been isolated from rather unknown and hostile locations, such as those with high salt concentrations, an extreme pH, or low or high temperatures. Microorganisms isolated from these environments are referred to as extremophiles (1). The most

  4. Fiscal 1999 R and D project report on intellectual base creation and use technology. Development of the efficient expression system of proteins. Part 1 (Development of the system for hyperthermophilic proteins); 1999 nendo kokoritsu tanpakushitsu hatsugen system no kaihatsu gyomu seika hokokusho. 1. Chokonetsukin yurai tanpakushitsu wo kokoritsu ni hatsugensuru system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    R and D were made on the efficient expression system of hyperthermophilic proteins. Hyperthermophilic strains living in the limited tropical zone of the earth can produce heat- resistant enzyme group with activity even at more than 90 degrees C. To utilize the effective information obtained from analysis of these genomes for industries, the base arrangement of all genomes of P.horikoshii OT3 has been opened. For the efficient expression of hyperthermophilic proteins in Escherichia coli, enzyme PhFEN was improved. For Bacillus strains, new host strains were screened. Expression of several genes from hyperthermophile, P.horikoshii OT3 was tried to be expressed in T.thermophilus using expression vector pTEV131. 8 genes were selected to be expressed using T.thermophilus as a host for independent insertion of every gene. 7 genes except the gene encoding DNA polymerase I were introduced into T.thermophilus as expression plasmid, and 5 genes were also expressed active oxygen. This R and D can largely contribute to development of genome informatics technology based on DNA analysis data. (NEDO)

  5. Enhanced production of subtilisin of Pyrococcus furiosus expressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... on SDS-PAGE as compared to theoretical molecular mass of 17.6 kDa. This aberrant electrophoresis mobility could be .... analyze protein expression by 12% SDS-PAGE (Laemmli, 1970). To analyze the expression of .... pellet washed with buffer containing Triton X; lane 4, refolded subtilisin. subjected to ...

  6. Diphthamide biosynthesis requires an organic radical generated by an iron-sulphur enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Xuling; Torelli, Andrew T; Lee, Michael; Dzikovski, Boris; Koralewski, Rachel M; Wang, Eileen; Freed, Jack; Krebs, Carsten; Ealick, Steve E; Lin, Hening [Cornell; (Penn)

    2010-08-30

    Archaeal and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 contain a unique post-translationally modified histidine residue called diphthamide, which is the target of diphtheria toxin. The biosynthesis of diphthamide was proposed to involve three steps, with the first being the formation of a C-C bond between the histidine residue and the 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl group of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). However, further details of the biosynthesis remain unknown. Here we present structural and biochemical evidence showing that the first step of diphthamide biosynthesis in the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii uses a novel iron-sulphur-cluster enzyme, Dph2. Dph2 is a homodimer and each of its monomers can bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Biochemical data suggest that unlike the enzymes in the radical SAM superfamily, Dph2 does not form the canonical 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Instead, it breaks the Cγ,Met-S bond of SAM and generates a 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl radical. Our results suggest that P. horikoshii Dph2 represents a previously unknown, SAM-dependent, [4Fe-4S]-containing enzyme that catalyses unprecedented chemistry.

  7. Experimental study of isospin mixing in 12C + n → 13C(T = 3/2) and 16O + n → 17O(T = 3/2) resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierjacks, S.; Schmalz, G.; Hinterberger, F.; Rossen, P. v.

    1981-12-01

    Narrow resonances of 13 C and 17 O have been studied by a measurement of the total neutron cross sections of carbon and oxygen between 3 and 30 MeV. Employing the improved time-of-flight spectrometer at the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron and precise calibration methods, resonance cross sections were measured with an energy resolution of 1:2100 at 10 MeV and energy accuracies between 10 -4 and 10 -5 . Resonance analysis of the measured data provided parameters for numerous narrow states of both isospins, T = 1/2 and T = 3/2. These data in conjunction with information from broad T = 1/2 resonances provided a good means to experimentally determine isospin mixing matrix elements. Results were obtained for the first five T = 3/2 resonances in 17 O and the first T = 3/2 resonance in 13 C. The obtained mixing matrix elements are compared with previous experimental results and shell-modell predictions of this quantity. (orig.) [de

  8. Using lanthanoid complexes to phase large macromolecular assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talon, Romain; Kahn, Richard; Durá, M. Asunción; Maury, Olivier; Vellieux, Frédéric M. D.; Franzetti, Bruno; Girard, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A lanthanoid complex, [Eu(DPA) 3 ] 3− , was used to obtain experimental phases at 4.0 Å resolution of PhTET1-12s, a large self-compartmentalized homo-dodecameric protease complex of 444 kDa. Lanthanoid ions exhibit extremely large anomalous X-ray scattering at their L III absorption edge. They are thus well suited for anomalous diffraction experiments. A novel class of lanthanoid complexes has been developed that combines the physical properties of lanthanoid atoms with functional chemical groups that allow non-covalent binding to proteins. Two structures of large multimeric proteins have already been determined by using such complexes. Here the use of the luminescent europium tris-dipicolinate complex [Eu(DPA) 3 ] 3− to solve the low-resolution structure of a 444 kDa homododecameric aminopeptidase, called PhTET1-12s from the archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii, is reported. Surprisingly, considering the low resolution of the data, the experimental electron density map is very well defined. Experimental phases obtained by using the lanthanoid complex lead to maps displaying particular structural features usually observed in higher-resolution maps. Such complexes open a new way for solving the structure of large molecular assemblies, even with low-resolution data

  9. Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Deng, Jiao-Yu; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xian-En

    2008-02-01

    The nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase (PncA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is involved in the activation of the important front-line antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide by converting it into the active form, pyrazinoic acid. Mutations in the pncA gene cause pyrazinamide resistance in M. tuberculosis. The properties of M. tuberculosis PncA were characterized in this study. The enzyme was found to be a 20.89 kDa monomeric protein. The optimal pH and temperature of enzymatic activity were pH 7.0 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry revealed that the enzyme was an Mn(2+)/Fe(2+)-containing protein with a molar ratio of [Mn(2+)] to [Fe(2+)] of 1 : 1; furthermore, the external addition of either type of metal ion had no apparent effect on the wild-type enzymatic activity. The activity of the purified enzyme was determined by HPLC, and it was shown that it possessed similar pyrazinamidase and nicotinamidase activity, by contrast with previous reports. Nine PncA mutants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. Determination of the enzymatic activity and metal ion content suggested that Asp8, Lys96 and Cys138 were key residues for catalysis, and Asp49, His51, His57 and His71 were essential for metal ion binding. Our data show that M. tuberculosis PncA may bind metal ions in a manner different from that observed in the case of Pyrococcus horikoshii PncA.

  10. Direct visualization of glutamate transporter elevator mechanism by high-speed AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yi; Miyagi, Atsushi; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chami, Mohamed; Boudker, Olga; Scheuring, Simon

    2017-02-14

    Glutamate transporters are essential for recovery of the neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Crystal structures in the outward- and inward-facing conformations of a glutamate transporter homolog from archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii , sodium/aspartate symporter Glt Ph , suggested the molecular basis of the transporter cycle. However, dynamic studies of the transport mechanism have been sparse and indirect. Here we present high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) observations of membrane-reconstituted Glt Ph at work. HS-AFM movies provide unprecedented real-space and real-time visualization of the transport dynamics. Our results show transport mediated by large amplitude 1.85-nm "elevator" movements of the transport domains consistent with previous crystallographic and spectroscopic studies. Elevator dynamics occur in the absence and presence of sodium ions and aspartate, but stall in sodium alone, providing a direct visualization of the ion and substrate symport mechanism. We show unambiguously that individual protomers within the trimeric transporter function fully independently.

  11. Crystal structures of type IIIH NAD-dependent D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase from two thermophiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.M.; Pampa, K.J.; Manjula, M.; Hemantha Kumar, G.; Kunishima, Naoki; Lokanath, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determined the crystal structures of PGDH from two thermophiles. • Monomer is composed of nucleotide binding domain and substrate binding domain. • Crystal structures of type III H PGDH. - Abstract: In the L-Serine biosynthesis, D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH) catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-3-phosphoglycerate to phosphohydroxypyruvate. PGDH belongs to 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases family. We have determined the crystal structures of PGDH from Sulfolobus tokodaii (StPGDH) and Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhPGDH) using X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.77 Å and 1.95 Å, respectively. The PGDH protomer from both species exhibits identical structures, consisting of substrate binding domain and nucleotide binding domain. The residues and water molecules interacting with the NAD are identified. The catalytic triad residues Glu-His-Arg are highly conserved. The residues involved in the dimer interface and the structural features responsible for thermostability are evaluated. Overall, structures of PGDHs with two domains and histidine at the active site are categorized as type III H and such PGDHs structures having this type are reported for the first time

  12. Induction of Apoptotic Effects of Antiproliferative Protein from the Seeds of Borreria hispida on Lung Cancer (A549 and Cervical Cancer (HeLa Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rupachandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35 KDa protein referred to as F3 was purified from the seeds of Borreria hispida by precipitation with 80% ammonium sulphate and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 column. RP-HPLC analysis of protein fraction (F3 on an analytical C-18 column produced a single peak, detected at 220 nm. F3 showed an apparent molecular weight of 35 KDa by SDS PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis of F3 showed the closest homology with the sequence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase of Pyrococcus horikoshii. The protein (F3 exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against lung (A549 and cervical (HeLa cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations ranging from 10 µg to 1000 µg/mL, as revealed by the MTT assay. Cell cycle analysis revealed the increased growth of sub-G0 population in both cell lines exposed to a concentration of 1000 µg/mL of protein fraction F3 as examined from flow cytometry. This is the first report of a protein from the seeds of Borreria hispida with antiproliferative and apoptotic activity in lung (A549 and cervical (HeLa cancer cells.

  13. Biosynthesis of ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate in archaea: a phylogenetic analysis of archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Soderberg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A phylogenetic analysis of the genes encoding enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP pathway, and the chorismate pathway of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, employing data from 13 complete archaeal genomes, provides a potential explanation for the enigmatic phylogenetic patterns of the PPP genes in archaea. Genomic and biochemical evidence suggests that three archaeal species (Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Thermoplasma volcanium produce ribose-5-phosphate via the nonoxidative PPP (NOPPP, whereas nine species apparently lack an NOPPP but may employ a reverse RuMP pathway for pentose synthesis. One species (Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 lacks both the NOPPP and the RuMP pathway but may possess a modified oxidative PPP (OPPP, the details of which are not yet known. The presence of transketolase in several archaeal species that are missing the other two NOPPP genes can be explained by the existence of differing requirements for erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P among archaea: six species use transketolase to make E4P as a precursor to aromatic amino acids, six species apparently have an alternate biosynthetic pathway and may not require the ability to make E4P, and one species (Pyrococcus horikoshii probably does not synthesize aromatic amino acids at all.

  14. The C-terminal helix of ribosomal P stalk recognizes a hydrophobic groove of elongation factor 2 in a novel fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzawa, Takehito; Kato, Koji; Girodat, Dylan; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kumakura, Yuki; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Uchiumi, Toshio; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2018-04-06

    Archaea and eukaryotes have ribosomal P stalks composed of anchor protein P0 and aP1 homodimers (archaea) or P1•P2 heterodimers (eukaryotes). These P stalks recruit translational GTPases to the GTPase-associated center in ribosomes to provide energy during translation. The C-terminus of the P stalk is known to selectively recognize GTPases. Here we investigated the interaction between the P stalk and elongation factor 2 by determining the structures of Pyrococcus horikoshii EF-2 (PhoEF-2) in the Apo-form, GDP-form, GMPPCP-form (GTP-form), and GMPPCP-form bound with 11 C-terminal residues of P1 (P1C11). Helical structured P1C11 binds to a hydrophobic groove between domain G and subdomain G' of PhoEF-2, where is completely different from that of aEF-1α in terms of both position and sequence, implying that such interaction characteristic may be requested by how GTPases perform their functions on the ribosome. Combining PhoEF-2 P1-binding assays with a structural comparison of current PhoEF-2 structures and molecular dynamics model of a P1C11-bound GDP form, the conformational changes of the P1C11-binding groove in each form suggest that in response to the translation process, the groove has three states: closed, open, and release for recruiting and releasing GTPases.

  15. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of galactokinase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geus, de D.; Hartley, A.P.; Sedelnikova, S.E.; Glynn, S.E.; Baker, P.J.; Verhees, C.H.; Oost, van der J.; Rice, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Galactokinase catalyses the conversion of galactose to galactose-1-phosphate as the first step in the Leloir pathway, a metabolic route that eventually enables the degradation of galactose via the glycolytic pathway. Galactokinases have been isolated from a wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic

  16. The ABC of ABC-transport in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, S

    2003-01-01

    Living organisms of our earth can be divided into two groups, the prokaryotes and the eukaryotes. Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, a special compartment in the cell, where the genetic material, the DNA is located. The DNA in the prokaryotic cell is floating freely in the cell. The eukaryotes, that

  17. Fiscal 2000 achievement report on project for research and development of technologies for intelligent infrastructure creation and utilization. 'Development of high-efficiency protein expression system - 1 Development of system capable of high-efficiency expression of hyperthermophile-derived protein'; 2000 nendo chiteki kiban sose riyo gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu gyomu seika hokokusho. Kokoritsu tanpakushitsu hatsugen system no kaihatsu -1 (Cho konetsukin yurai tanpakushitsu wo kokoritsu ni hatsugen suru system no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Research and development was conducted aiming at the establishment of a system to enable the high-efficiency expression of the gene products of P. horikoshii OT3 and A. pernix K1. In an effort to develop a high-efficiency protein expression system with Escherichia coli acting as the host, studies were made about the expression of hyperthermophile protein by arginine rare codon elimination, and Ph FEN (flap endonuclease) was successfully overexpressed. In the development of Bacillus strains, screening was conducted for novel hosts, and a library was constructed for a screening task suitable for hyperthermophile-derived protein production. A system was also constructed capable of the high-throughput expression of various kinds of genes using Bacillus brevis. In the study of the expression of hyperthermophile-derived genes using T. thermophilus, promoter replacement resulted in an approximately 2-fold increase in representation at the maximum. Moreover, studies were made about the length at which foreign genes were efficiently incorporated into the T. thermophilus genome. (NEDO)

  18. Synthetic metabolic engineering-a novel, simple technology for designing a chimeric metabolic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Xiaoting

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of biotechnology into chemical manufacturing has been recognized as a key technology to build a sustainable society. However, the practical applications of biocatalytic chemical conversions are often restricted due to their complexities involving the unpredictability of product yield and the troublesome controls in fermentation processes. One of the possible strategies to overcome these limitations is to eliminate the use of living microorganisms and to use only enzymes involved in the metabolic pathway. Use of recombinant mesophiles producing thermophilic enzymes at high temperature results in denaturation of indigenous proteins and elimination of undesired side reactions; consequently, highly selective and stable biocatalytic modules can be readily prepared. By rationally combining those modules together, artificial synthetic pathways specialized for chemical manufacturing could be designed and constructed. Results A chimeric Embden-Meyerhof (EM pathway with balanced consumption and regeneration of ATP and ADP was constructed by using nine recombinant E. coli strains overproducing either one of the seven glycolytic enzymes of Thermus thermophilus, the cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase of Pyrococcus horikoshii, or the non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Thermococcus kodakarensis. By coupling this pathway with the Thermus malate/lactate dehydrogenase, a stoichiometric amount of lactate was produced from glucose with an overall ATP turnover number of 31. Conclusions In this study, a novel and simple technology for flexible design of a bespoke metabolic pathway was developed. The concept has been testified via a non-ATP-forming chimeric EM pathway. We designated this technology as “synthetic metabolic engineering”. Our technology is, in principle, applicable to all thermophilic enzymes as long as they can be functionally expressed in the host, and thus would be

  19. The quaternary structure of the amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8 is revealed by its crystal packing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Kimani, Serah W.; Cowan, Donald A.; Sayed, Muhammed F.-R.; Sewell, B. Trevor

    2006-01-01

    The amidase from G. pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned, expressed and purified, and then crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, is a member of the nitrilase enzyme superfamily. It converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and has been purified by heat treatment and a number of chromatographic steps. The enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals produced in the presence of 1.2 M sodium citrate, 400 mM NaCl, 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.6 were selected for X-ray diffraction studies. A data set having acceptable statistics to 1.96 Å resolution was collected under cryoconditions using an in-house X-ray source. The space group was determined to be primitive cubic P4 2 32, with unit-cell parameter a = 130.49 (±0.05) Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the backbone of the hypothetical protein PH0642 from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PDB code 1j31) with all non-identical side chains substituted with alanine as a probe. There is one subunit per asymmetric unit. The subunits are packed as trimers of dimers with D3 point-group symmetry around the threefold axis in such a way that the dimer interface seen in the homologues is preserved

  20. A rigidifying salt-bridge favors the activity of thermophilic enzyme at high temperatures at the expense of low-temperature activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sonia Y; Yeung, Rachel C Y; Yu, Tsz-Ha; Sze, Kong-Hung; Wong, Kam-Bo

    2011-03-01

    Thermophilic enzymes are often less active than their mesophilic homologues at low temperatures. One hypothesis to explain this observation is that the extra stabilizing interactions increase the rigidity of thermophilic enzymes and hence reduce their activity. Here we employed a thermophilic acylphosphatase from Pyrococcus horikoshii and its homologous mesophilic acylphosphatase from human as a model to study how local rigidity of an active-site residue affects the enzymatic activity. Acylphosphatases have a unique structural feature that its conserved active-site arginine residue forms a salt-bridge with the C-terminal carboxyl group only in thermophilic acylphosphatases, but not in mesophilic acylphosphatases. We perturbed the local rigidity of this active-site residue by removing the salt-bridge in the thermophilic acylphosphatase and by introducing the salt-bridge in the mesophilic homologue. The mutagenesis design was confirmed by x-ray crystallography. Removing the salt-bridge in the thermophilic enzyme lowered the activation energy that decreased the activation enthalpy and entropy. Conversely, the introduction of the salt-bridge to the mesophilic homologue increased the activation energy and resulted in increases in both activation enthalpy and entropy. Revealed by molecular dynamics simulations, the unrestrained arginine residue can populate more rotamer conformations, and the loss of this conformational freedom upon the formation of transition state justified the observed reduction in activation entropy. Our results support the conclusion that restricting the active-site flexibility entropically favors the enzymatic activity at high temperatures. However, the accompanying enthalpy-entropy compensation leads to a stronger temperature-dependency of the enzymatic activity, which explains the less active nature of the thermophilic enzymes at low temperatures.

  1. A rigidifying salt-bridge favors the activity of thermophilic enzyme at high temperatures at the expense of low-temperature activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Y Lam

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic enzymes are often less active than their mesophilic homologues at low temperatures. One hypothesis to explain this observation is that the extra stabilizing interactions increase the rigidity of thermophilic enzymes and hence reduce their activity. Here we employed a thermophilic acylphosphatase from Pyrococcus horikoshii and its homologous mesophilic acylphosphatase from human as a model to study how local rigidity of an active-site residue affects the enzymatic activity.Acylphosphatases have a unique structural feature that its conserved active-site arginine residue forms a salt-bridge with the C-terminal carboxyl group only in thermophilic acylphosphatases, but not in mesophilic acylphosphatases. We perturbed the local rigidity of this active-site residue by removing the salt-bridge in the thermophilic acylphosphatase and by introducing the salt-bridge in the mesophilic homologue. The mutagenesis design was confirmed by x-ray crystallography. Removing the salt-bridge in the thermophilic enzyme lowered the activation energy that decreased the activation enthalpy and entropy. Conversely, the introduction of the salt-bridge to the mesophilic homologue increased the activation energy and resulted in increases in both activation enthalpy and entropy. Revealed by molecular dynamics simulations, the unrestrained arginine residue can populate more rotamer conformations, and the loss of this conformational freedom upon the formation of transition state justified the observed reduction in activation entropy.Our results support the conclusion that restricting the active-site flexibility entropically favors the enzymatic activity at high temperatures. However, the accompanying enthalpy-entropy compensation leads to a stronger temperature-dependency of the enzymatic activity, which explains the less active nature of the thermophilic enzymes at low temperatures.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a ferritin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon and anaerobe Pyrococcus furiosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matias, Pedro M.; Tatur, Jana; Carrondo, Maria Arménia; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2005-01-01

    Ferritin from P. furiosus crystallizes in space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 258.1, b = 340.1, c = 266.5 Å and 36 monomers in the asymmetric unit, corresponding to one and a half 24-mers. Crystals of the title protein have been produced and preliminary structural analysis has been carried out. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 258.1, b = 340.1, c = 266.5 Å. The protein forms a 24-mer of 20 kDa subunits, which assemble with 432 non-crystallographic symmetry. A total of 36 monomers are found in the asymmetric unit, corresponding to one and a half 24-mers

  3. Archease from Pyrococcus abyssi improves substrate specificity and solubility of a tRNA m5C methyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auxilien, Sylvie; El Khadali, Fatima; Rasmussen, Anette

    2007-01-01

    Members of the archease superfamily of proteins are represented in all three domains of life. Archease genes are generally located adjacent to genes encoding proteins involved in DNA or RNA processing. Archease have therefore been predicted to play a modulator or chaperone role in selected steps...

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Nip7 proteins from the marine deep- and shallow-water Pyrococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Kirill E; Alemasov, Nikolay A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Boldyreva, Elena V; Kolchanov, Nikolay A; Afonnikov, Dmitry A

    2014-10-15

    The identification of the mechanisms of adaptation of protein structures to extreme environmental conditions is a challenging task of structural biology. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Nip7 protein involved in RNA processing from the shallow-water (P. furiosus) and the deep-water (P. abyssi) marine hyperthermophylic archaea at different temperatures (300 and 373 K) and pressures (0.1, 50 and 100 MPa). The aim was to disclose similarities and differences between the deep- and shallow-sea protein models at different temperatures and pressures. The current results demonstrate that the 3D models of the two proteins at all the examined values of pressures and temperatures are compact, stable and similar to the known crystal structure of the P. abyssi Nip7. The structural deviations and fluctuations in the polypeptide chain during the MD simulations were the most pronounced in the loop regions, their magnitude being larger for the C-terminal domain in both proteins. A number of highly mobile segments the protein globule presumably involved in protein-protein interactions were identified. Regions of the polypeptide chain with significant difference in conformational dynamics between the deep- and shallow-water proteins were identified. The results of our analysis demonstrated that in the examined ranges of temperatures and pressures, increase in temperature has a stronger effect on change in the dynamic properties of the protein globule than the increase in pressure. The conformational changes of both the deep- and shallow-sea protein models under increasing temperature and pressure are non-uniform. Our current results indicate that amino acid substitutions between shallow- and deep-water proteins only slightly affect overall stability of two proteins. Rather, they may affect the interactions of the Nip7 protein with its protein or RNA partners.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ST1022, a putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators isolated from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Noboru; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri, E-mail: tskvel@spring8.or.jp; Matsunaga, Emiko; Shinkai, Akeo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kuramitsu, Seiki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Tayonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yokoyama, Shigeyuki, E-mail: tskvel@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama Institute, RIKEN, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2007-11-01

    A putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, ST1022 from S. tokodaii strain 7, has been purified and crystallized in the absence and presence of the effector l-glutamine. A molecular-replacement solution was found using the FL11 transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus sp. OT3 as a model and structural refinement is under way. The Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, also known as feast/famine transcriptional regulators, are widely distributed among bacteria and archaea. This family of proteins are likely to be involved in cellular metabolism, with exogenous amino acids functioning as effectors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of ST1022, a member of the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, is reported with and without exogenous glutamine as the effector molecule. The crystals of native ST1022 and of the putative complex belong to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.771, c = 73.297 Å and a = b = 103.846, c = 73.992 Å, respectively. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis and molecular-replacement solution revealed the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit.

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ST1022, a putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators isolated from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Noboru; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Matsunaga, Emiko; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    A putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, ST1022 from S. tokodaii strain 7, has been purified and crystallized in the absence and presence of the effector l-glutamine. A molecular-replacement solution was found using the FL11 transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus sp. OT3 as a model and structural refinement is under way. The Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, also known as feast/famine transcriptional regulators, are widely distributed among bacteria and archaea. This family of proteins are likely to be involved in cellular metabolism, with exogenous amino acids functioning as effectors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of ST1022, a member of the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, is reported with and without exogenous glutamine as the effector molecule. The crystals of native ST1022 and of the putative complex belong to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.771, c = 73.297 Å and a = b = 103.846, c = 73.992 Å, respectively. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis and molecular-replacement solution revealed the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003413 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ure Analysis Of Pyrococcus Furiosus Cell ... Division Atpase Mind pdb|1G3Q|A Chain A, Crystal ... ... ... Structure Analysis Of Pyrococcus Furiosus Cell Division ... Atpase Mind ... Length = 231 ...

  8. Structural ordering of disordered ligand-binding loops of biotin protein ligase into active conformations as a consequence of dehydration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibha Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, a dreaded pathogen, has a unique cell envelope composed of high fatty acid content that plays a crucial role in its pathogenesis. Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase (ACC, an important enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction of fatty acid biosynthesis, is biotinylated by biotin acetyl-CoA carboxylase ligase (BirA. The ligand-binding loops in all known apo BirAs to date are disordered and attain an ordered structure only after undergoing a conformational change upon ligand-binding. Here, we report that dehydration of Mtb-BirA crystals traps both the apo and active conformations in its asymmetric unit, and for the first time provides structural evidence of such transformation. Recombinant Mtb-BirA was crystallized at room temperature, and diffraction data was collected at 295 K as well as at 120 K. Transfer of crystals to paraffin and paratone-N oil (cryoprotectants prior to flash-freezing induced lattice shrinkage and enhancement in the resolution of the X-ray diffraction data. Intriguingly, the crystal lattice rearrangement due to shrinkage in the dehydrated Mtb-BirA crystals ensued structural order of otherwise flexible ligand-binding loops L4 and L8 in apo BirA. In addition, crystal dehydration resulted in a shift of approximately 3.5 A in the flexible loop L6, a proline-rich loop unique to Mtb complex as well as around the L11 region. The shift in loop L11 in the C-terminal domain on dehydration emulates the action responsible for the complex formation with its protein ligand biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP domain of ACCA3. This is contrary to the involvement of loop L14 observed in Pyrococcus horikoshii BirA-BCCP complex. Another interesting feature that emerges from this dehydrated structure is that the two subunits A and B, though related by a noncrystallographic twofold symmetry, assemble into an asymmetric dimer representing the ligand-bound and ligand-free states of the protein, respectively. In

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003413 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein ... [Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638] ... Length = 233 ... Query: 63 ... LMKISDLYPGMDPHEVNIVGRIL...KKYPPREYTKKDGSIGRVASLVIYDDTGRARVVLWDS 122 ... LMKISDLYPGMDPHEVNIVGRILKKYPP...REYTKKDGSIGRVASLVIYDDTGRARVVLWDS Sbjct: 1 ... LMKISDLYPGMDPHEVNIVGRILKKYPPREYTKKDGSIGRVASLVIYDDTGRARVVLWDS 60

  10. 4-Demethylwyosine Synthase from Pyrococcus abyssi Is a Radical-S-adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme with an Additional [4Fe-4S]+2 Cluster That Interacts with the Pyruvate Co-substrate*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche-Letuvée, Phanélie; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Berggren, Gustav; Clemancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Maurel, Vincent; Douki, Thierry; Armengaud, Jean; Mulliez, Etienne; Fontecave, Marc; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Gambarelli, Serge; Atta, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Wybutosine and its derivatives are found in position 37 of tRNA encoding Phe in eukaryotes and archaea. They are believed to play a key role in the decoding function of the ribosome. The second step in the biosynthesis of wybutosine is catalyzed by TYW1 protein, which is a member of the well established class of metalloenzymes called “Radical-SAM.” These enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster, chelated by three cysteines in a CX3CX2C motif, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to generate a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical that initiates various chemically challenging reactions. Sequence analysis of TYW1 proteins revealed, in the N-terminal half of the enzyme beside the Radical-SAM cysteine triad, an additional highly conserved cysteine motif. In this study we show by combining analytical and spectroscopic methods including UV-visible absorption, Mössbauer, EPR, and HYSCORE spectroscopies that these additional cysteines are involved in the coordination of a second [4Fe-4S] cluster displaying a free coordination site that interacts with pyruvate, the second substrate of the reaction. The presence of two distinct iron-sulfur clusters on TYW1 is reminiscent of MiaB, another tRNA-modifying metalloenzyme whose active form was shown to bind two iron-sulfur clusters. A possible role for the second [4Fe-4S] cluster in the enzyme activity is discussed. PMID:23043105

  11. Maillard reactions and increased enzyme inactivation during oligosaccharide synthesis by a hyperthermophilic glycosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.E.; Hellemond, van E.W.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    The thermostable Pyrococcus furiosus beta-glycosidase was used for oligosaccharide production from lactose in a kinetically controlled reaction. Our experiments showed that higher temperatures are beneficial for the absolute as well as relative oligosaccharide yield. However, at reaction

  12. RNAi: prokaryotes get in on the act

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oost, van der J.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    The small CRISPR-derived RNAs of bacteria and archaea provide adaptive immunity by targeting the DNA of invading viruses and plasmids. Hale et al. (2009) now report on a new variant CRISPR/Cas complex in the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus that uses guide RNAs to specifically target and cleave RNA not

  13. ADP-dependent Phosphofructokinases in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Methanogenic Archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, C.H.; Tuininga, J.E.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) is a key enzyme of the glycolytic pathway in all domains of life. Two related PFKs, ATP-dependent and PPi-dependent PFK, have been distinguished in bacteria and eucarya, as well as in some archaea. Hyperthermophilic archaea of the order Thermococcales, including Pyrococcus

  14. Production of cellulose nanofibrils from bleached eucalyptus fibers by hyperthermostable endoglucanase treatment and subsequent microfluidization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangxia Wang; Michael D. Mozuch; Ronald C. Sabo; Phil Kersten; J.Y. Zhu; Yongcan Jin

    2015-01-01

    A GH5 hyperthermostable endoglucanase from the archaeon Pyrococcus honkoshii (ph-GH5) and a commercial endoglucanase FR were used to treat bleached eucalyptus pulp (BEP) fibers to produce cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) through subsequent microfluidization Enzymatic treatments facilitated CNF production due to the reduced degree of polymerization (DP)...

  15. Stabilization of enzymes against thermal stress and freeze-drying by mannosylglycerate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, A.; Raven, N.; Sharp, R.J.; Bartolucci, S.; Rossi, M.; Cannio, R.; Lebbink, J.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.; Santos, H.

    1997-01-01

    2-O-(beta)-Mannosylglycerate, a solute that accumulates in some (hyper)thermophilic organisms, was purified from Pyrococcus furiosus cells, and its effect on enzyme stabilization in vitro was assessed. Enzymes from hyperthermophilic, thermophilic, and mesophilic sources were examined. The

  16. Production and characterization of a thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase that belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.; Uria, A.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding a novel alcohol dehydrogenase that belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily has been identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The gene, referred to as adhD, was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified to homogeneity. The

  17. Investigation of Jet Noise Using Optical Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-04-01

    Holographic interferograms have been made of cold, laboratory scale, supersonic air and nitrogen jet in the mach number range of 2.1 ot 3.4, and of helium jets in the mach number range of 1.5 to 2.95. These holograms demonstrate that the acoustic fie...

  18. Cell architecture and flagella of hyperthermophilic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Bellack, Annett

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies indicated that flagella might play a crucial role in motility, adhesion, and cell-cell contacts of Archaea. Thus, the ultrastructural and functional characterization of flagella and their anchoring in the cell are crucial for understanding the archaeal cell organization in general. To address this topic, Pyrococcus furiosus was chosen as a suitable model organism. However, in the course of this study, morphological changes of this strain, cultured continuously for several y...

  19. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The corresponding gene revealed that the act...

  20. Engineering of an Extremely Thermostable Alpha/Beta Barrel Scaffold to Serve as a High Affinity Molecular Recognition Element for Use in Sensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-23

    Molecular Recognition Element For Use in Sensor Applications Report Title The overall goal of the project was to evolve a highly thermostable enzyme ( alcohol ...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The overall goal of the project was to evolve a highly thermostable enzyme ( alcohol dehydrogenase D (AdhD) from Pyrococcus...furiosus) to bind an explosive molecule, RDX. The enzyme naturally catalyzes the nicotinamide cofactor-dependent oxidation or reduction of alcohols

  1. Effects of Guided Imagery on Postoperative Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Same-Day Surgical Procedures: A Randomized, Single-Blind Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    2O0O;9Ot3):706-712. 20. Bertrand P, Maye J. A description of the indices of heart rate variabil- ity in orofacial pain paticnis. Bcihcsda, MD: National...neck proce- dures were randomly assigned into 2 groups for this single-blind investigation. Anxiety and baseline pain levels were documented...control group patients received no intervention. Data were collected on pain and nar- cotic consumption at 7- and 2-hour postoperative inter- vals. In

  2. The Carboxy-Terminal ?N Helix of the Archaeal XerA Tyrosine Recombinase Is a Molecular Switch to Control Site-Specific Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Serre, Marie-Claude; El Arnaout, Toufic; Brooks, Mark A.; Durand, Dominique; Lisboa, Johnny; Lazar, Noureddine; Raynal, Bertrand; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine recombinases are conserved in the three kingdoms of life. Here we present the first crystal structure of a full-length archaeal tyrosine recombinase, XerA from Pyrococcus abyssi, at 3.0 Å resolution. In the absence of DNA substrate XerA crystallizes as a dimer where each monomer displays a tertiary structure similar to that of DNA-bound Tyr-recombinases. Active sites are assembled in the absence of dif except for the catalytic Tyr, which is extruded and located equidistant from each ...

  3. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  4. Processivity and Subcellular Localization of Glycogen Synthase Depend on a Non-catalytic High Affinity Glycogen-binding Site*

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Adelaida; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Fita, Ignacio; Ferrer, Juan C.; Guinovart, Joan J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen synthase, a central enzyme in glucose metabolism, catalyzes the successive addition of α-1,4-linked glucose residues to the non-reducing end of a growing glycogen molecule. A non-catalytic glycogen-binding site, identified by x-ray crystallography on the surface of the glycogen synthase from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, has been found to be functionally conserved in the eukaryotic enzymes. The disruption of this binding site in both the archaeal and the human muscle glycogen synth...

  5. Shared active site architecture between archaeal PolD and multi-subunit RNA polymerases revealed by X-ray crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Sauguet , Ludovic; Raia , Pierre; Henneke , Ghislaine; Delarue , Marc

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Archaeal replicative DNA polymerase D (PolD) constitute an atypical class of DNA polymerases made of a proofreading exonuclease subunit (DP1) and a larger polymerase catalytic subunit (DP2), both with unknown structures. We have determined the crystal structures of Pyrococcus abyssi DP1 and DP2 at 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, revealing a catalytic core strikingly different from all other known DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Rather, the PolD DP2 catalytic core has ...

  6. A study on ovine tick-borne hemoprotozoan parasites (Theileria and Babesia) in the East Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Kursat; Dumanli, Nazir; Aktas, Munir

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the frequency of Theileria and Babesia species was assessed via reverse line blotting and blood smear-based diagnostic methods in small ruminants. A total of 201 apparently healthy animals from 26 randomly selected herds located in 4 locations (Artvin, Giresun, Gumushane, and Tokat) of East Black Sea Region of Turkey were investigated for the blood protozoans. In a polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the hypervariable V4 region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified with a set of general primers specific for all Theileria and Babesia species. The PCR products were hybridized against catchall and species-specific (Theileria spp., Theileria lestoquardi, Theileria ovis, Theileria sp. OT1, Theileria sp., OT3, Theileria sp., MK, Theileria luwenshuni, Theileria uilenbergi, Babesia spp., Babesia ovis, Babesia motasi, and Babesia crassa) probes. Theileria piroplasms were identified in nine (4.47%) samples by microscopic examination. Reverse line blotting (RLB) detected the infection in 19.90% of the samples. The infection rate of sheep (28.90%) was higher than goats (4.10%). T. ovis, Theileria sp., MK, and Theileria sp. OT3 were detected by RLB. The most prevalent Theileria species was T. ovis (18.90%) followed by Theileria sp. MK (0.99%). Theileria sp. OT3 was detected in one sample (0.43%). A single animal was infected as mix with T. ovis and Theileria sp. MK. The other Theileria (T. lestoquardi, Theileria sp. OT1, T. luwenshuni, and T. uilenbergi) and Babesia (B. ovis, B. motasi, and B. crassa) species were not detected. This study is the first molecular survey on ovine tick-borne protozoans in East Black Sea Region of Turkey.

  7. Experience of Client-centered Practice amongst Danish Occupational Therapists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anette Enemark

    A client-centered approach is on the health care agenda in many European countries (1), and amongst these Denmark (2). It is described as the foundation for Occupational Therapy (OT) (3), a code of professional conduct (4,5), and defined as a partnership between client and therapist (3). The goal...... is to empower a client to fulfil his/her occupational roles in a variety of environments, leading to an increase in intervention efficacy and client perception of intervention quality (3). However, it is known to be challenging (1,3). Given the importance of this approach, there has been limited exploration...

  8. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Michael E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quantitatively assess the feasibility of these conformational changes. To perform the analysis, we begin with the energy-minimized X-ray structures. Normal modes are then calculated using an all-atom molecular mechanics force field. Results The analysis reveals low-frequency vibrations that facilitate the accommodation of RNA duplexes – an essential step in target recognition. The Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute proteins both exhibit low-frequency torsion and hinge motions; however, differences in the overall architecture of the proteins cause the detailed dynamics to be significantly different. Conclusion Overall, low-frequency vibrations of Argonaute are consistent with mechanisms within the current reaction cycle model for RNA interference.

  9. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation study of archaeal leucyl-tRNA synthetase in complex with different mischarged tRNA in editing conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayevsky, A V; Sharifi, M; Tukalo, M A

    2017-09-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play important roles in maintaining the accuracy of protein synthesis. Some aaRSs accomplish this via editing mechanisms, among which leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) edits non-cognate amino acid norvaline mainly by post-transfer editing. However, the molecular basis for this pathway for eukaryotic and archaeal LeuRS remain unclear. In this study, a complex of archaeal P. horikoshii LeuRS (PhLeuRS) with misacylated tRNA Leu was modeled wherever tRNA's acceptor stem was oriented directly into the editing site. To understand the distinctive features of organization we reconstructed a complex of PhLeuRS with tRNA and visualize post-transfer editing interactions mode by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. To study molecular basis for substrate selectivity by PhLeuRS's editing site we utilized MD simulation of the entire LeuRS complexes using a diverse charged form of tRNAs, namely norvalyl-tRNA Leu and isoleucyl-tRNA Leu . In general, the editing site organization of LeuRS from P.horikoshii has much in common with bacterial LeuRS. The MD simulation results revealed that the post-transfer editing substrate norvalyl-A76, binds more strongly than isoleucyl-A76. Moreover, the branched side chain of isoleucine prevents water molecules from being closer and hence the hydrolysis reaction slows significantly. To investigate a possible mechanism of the post-transfer editing reaction, by PhLeuRS we have determined that two water molecules (the attacking and assisting water molecules) are localized near the carbonyl group of the amino acid to be cleaved off. These water molecules approach the substrate from the opposite side to that observed for Thermus thermophilus LeuRS (TtLeuRS). Based on the results obtained, it was suggested that the post-transfer editing mechanism of PhLeuRS differs from that of prokaryotic TtLeuRS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald E. Ward

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic microorganisms from the euryarchaeotal genus Pyrococcus, the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus, and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima. An overview of the proteases in these organisms is given based on those proteases that have been characterized and on putative proteases that have been identified from genomic sequences, but have yet to be characterized. The analysis revealed both similarities and differences in the mechanisms utilized for proteolysis by each of these hyperthermophiles and indicated how these mechanisms relate to proteolysis in less thermophilic cells and organisms.

  11. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  12. Thermostability in rubredoxin and its relationship to mechanical rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, A. J.

    2010-03-01

    The source of increased stability in proteins from organisms that thrive in extreme thermal environments is not well understood. Previous experimental and theoretical studies have suggested many different features possibly responsible for such thermostability. Many of these thermostabilizing mechanisms can be accounted for in terms of structural rigidity. Thus a plausible hypothesis accounting for this remarkable stability in thermophilic enzymes states that these enzymes have enhanced conformational rigidity at temperatures below their native, functioning temperature. Experimental evidence exists to both support and contradict this supposition. We computationally investigate the relationship between thermostability and rigidity using rubredoxin as a case study. The mechanical rigidity is calculated using atomic models of homologous rubredoxin structures from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus and mesophile Clostridium pasteurianum using the FIRST software. A global increase in structural rigidity (equivalently a decrease in flexibility) corresponds to an increase in thermostability. Locally, rigidity differences (between mesophilic and thermophilic structures) agree with differences in protection factors.

  13. Thermostability in rubredoxin and its relationship to mechanical rigidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rader, A J

    2010-01-01

    The source of increased stability in proteins from organisms that thrive in extreme thermal environments is not well understood. Previous experimental and theoretical studies have suggested many different features possibly responsible for such thermostability. Many of these thermostabilizing mechanisms can be accounted for in terms of structural rigidity. Thus a plausible hypothesis accounting for this remarkable stability in thermophilic enzymes states that these enzymes have enhanced conformational rigidity at temperatures below their native, functioning temperature. Experimental evidence exists to both support and contradict this supposition. We computationally investigate the relationship between thermostability and rigidity using rubredoxin as a case study. The mechanical rigidity is calculated using atomic models of homologous rubredoxin structures from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus and mesophile Clostridium pasteurianum using the FIRST software. A global increase in structural rigidity (equivalently a decrease in flexibility) corresponds to an increase in thermostability. Locally, rigidity differences (between mesophilic and thermophilic structures) agree with differences in protection factors

  14. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-04-20

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5'-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Phylogenetic and Comparative Sequence Analysis of Thermostable Alpha Amylases of kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huma, Tayyaba; Maryam, Arooma; Rehman, Shahid Ur; Qamar, Muhammad Tahir Ul; Shaheen, Tayyaba; Haque, Asma; Shaheen, Bushra

    2014-01-01

    Alpha amylase family is generally defined as a group of enzymes that can hydrolyse and transglycosylase α-(1, 4) or α-(1, 6) glycosidic bonds along with the preservation of anomeric configuration. For the comparative analysis of alpha amylase family, nucleotide sequences of seven thermo stable organisms of Kingdom Archea i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Kingdom Prokaryotes i.e. Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C), Bacillus subtilis (70°C) and Bacillus KSM K38 (55°C) and Eukaryotes i.e. Aspergillus oryzae (60°C) were selected from NCBI. Primary structure composition analysis and Conserved sequence analysis were conducted through Bio Edit tools. Results from BioEdit shown only three conserved regions of base pairs and least similarity in MSA of the above mentioned alpha amylases. In Mega 5.1 Phylogeny of thermo stable alpha amylases of Kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryote was handled by Neighbor-Joining (NJ) algorithm. Mega 5.1 phylogenetic results suggested that alpha amylases of thermo stable organisms i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C) are more distantly related as compared to less thermo stable organisms. By keeping in mind the characteristics of most thermo stable alpha amylases novel and improved features can be introduced in less thermo stable alpha amylases so that they become more thermo tolerant and productive for industry.

  16. Production of High Density Aviation Fuels via Novel Zeolite Catalyst Routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-23

    108. 325 144. Scherzer, J., "The Preparation and Characterization of Aluminum- deficient Zeolites," in Catalytic Materials: Relationship between...10),TIC(100),TFC(100),TI(100),TF(100) 4 DIMENSION Ti(iO),T2(1O),T3(1O),TK1(1O), TK2 (1O),TK3(O) 5 DIMENSION DPISOF(100),TIT2(80,5),DPISOI(IOO),NVSB(100...0CP3(N))/1O.O 32 RSC(N) - (CPI(N)/TK1(N)-CP2(N)/ TK2 (N))* TK2 (N)/CP2(N) 33 RCELL(N)-(CP2(N)/ TK2 (N)-CP3(N)/TK3(N))*TC/CP3(N) 34 ARSC-ARSC+RSC(N) 35

  17. Environmental Investigation and Risk Assessment. Phase 1 Report Tacony Warehouse, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-24

    63.3 9.4 12.5 S1,300 3,100 0,300 1.100 25O0 OT 3.400 3.800 S160 510 1 210 250 210 170 Nikel LT 4.13 LT LT 20.1 4.02 LT SIKe NO NO 0.144 NO L&5 ND ND...Additionally, the site is encircled with cyclone fencing topped with barbed wire . However, some vandalism has occurred on the site as evidenced by graffiti on...month, or 24 days per year, was developed for the trespasser based on the site-specific factors (e.g., cyclone fencing topped with barbed wire and a 24

  18. Molecular detection of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa in cervids and wild boars from Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, André; Parreira, Ricardo; Nunes, Mónica; Casadinho, Afonso; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Campino, Lenea; Maia, Carla

    2016-05-10

    Wildlife can act as reservoir of different tick-borne pathogens, such as bacteria, parasites and viruses. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa with veterinary and zoonotic importance in cervids and wild boars from the Centre and South of Portugal. One hundred and forty one blood samples from free-ranging ungulates including 73 red deer (Cervus elaphus), 65 wild boars (Sus scrofa) and three fallow deer (Dama dama) were tested for the presence of Anaplasma marginale/A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, Anaplasma/Ehrlichia spp., Babesia/Theileria spp., Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato) (s.l.), and Rickettsia spp. DNA by PCR. Anaplasma spp. DNA was detected in 33 (43.4 %) cervids (31 red deer and two fallow deer) and in two (3.1 %) wild boars while Theileria spp. were found in 34 (44.7 %) cervids (32 red deer and two fallow deer) and in three (4.6 %) wild boar blood samples. Sequence analysis of msp4 sequences identified A. marginale, A. ovis, while the analysis of rDNA sequence data disclosed the presence of A. platys and A. phagocytophilum and T. capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3. Anaplasma spp./Theileria spp. mixed infections were found in 17 cervids (22.4 %) and in two wild boars (3.1 %). All samples were negative for Babesia sp., B. burgdorferi (s.l.), Ehrlichia sp. or Rickettsia sp. This is the first detection of Anaplasma marginale, A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, A. platys, Theileria capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3 in cervids and wild boars from Portugal. Further studies concerning the potential pathogenicity of the different species of  Anaplasma and Theileria infecting wild ungulates, the identification of their vector range, and their putative infectivity to domestic livestock and humans should be undertaken.

  19. Molecular identification of Theileria and Babesia in sheep and goats in the Black Sea Region in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Mehmet Fatih; Aktas, Munir; Dumanli, Nazir

    2013-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate presence and distribution of Theileria and Babesia species via microscopic examination and reverse line blotting (RLB) techniques in sheep and goats in the Black Sea region of Turkey. For this purpose, 1,128 blood samples (869 sheep and 259 goats) were collected by active surveillance from sheep and goats in different provinces of various cities in the region in the years 2010 and 2011. Smears were prepared from the blood samples, stained with Giemsa, and examined under the light microscope for Theileria and Babesia piroplasms. The genomic DNAs were extracted from blood samples. The length of 360-430-bp fragment in the variable V4 region of 18S SSU rRNA gene of Theileria and Babesia species was amplified using the gDNAs. The polymerase chain reaction products were hybridized to the membrane-connected species-specific probes. A total of 38 animals (3.37%) including 34 sheep (3.91%) and 4 goats (1.54%) were found to be positive for Theileria spp. piroplasms in microscopic examination of smears while Babesia spp. piroplasm could not detected. Infection rates were 34.64% in sheep, 10.04% in goats, and totally 28.99% for Theileria ovis while 0.58% in sheep and totally 0.44% for Babesia ovis. However, Theileria sp. OT3 was detected in 2.65% of sheep and 2.04% of all animals; besides Theileria sp., MK had 0.58% prevalence in sheep and 0.77% in goats, with a total 0.62% with RLB. Although T. ovis and Theileria sp. MK were determined in both sheep and goats, B. ovis and Theileria sp. OT3 were observed only in the sheep. These results provide the first detailed molecular data for sheep and goat theileriosis and babesiosis in the region.

  20. Substrate specificity and catalysis by the editing active site of alanyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasman, Zvi; Robey-Bond, Susan; Mirando, Adam C.; Smith, Gregory J.; Lague, Astrid; Francklyn, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) enhance the fidelity of protein synthesis through multiple mechanisms, including hydrolysis of the adenylate and cleavage of misacylated tRNA. Alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) limits misacylation with glycine and serine by use of a dedicated editing domain, and a mutation in this activity has been genetically linked to a mouse model of a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Using the free standing P. horikoshii AlaX editing domain complexed with serine as a model and both Ser-tRNAAla and Ala-tRNAAla as substrates, the deacylation activities of the wild type and five different E. coli AlaRS editing site substitution mutants were characterized. The wild type AlaRS editing domain deacylated Ser-tRNAAla with a kcat/KM of 6.6 × 105 M−1 s−1, equivalent to a rate enhancement of 6000 over the rate of enzyme-independent deacylation, but only 12.2-fold greater than the rate with Ala-tRNAAla. While the E664A and T567G substitutions only minimally decreased kcat/KM, Q584H, I667E, and C666A AlaRS were more compromised in activity, with decreases in kcat/KM in the range of 6-, 7.3-, and 15-fold. C666A AlaRS was 1.4-fold more active on Ala-tRNAAla relative to Ser-tRNAAla, providing the only example of a true reversal of substrate specificity and highlighting a potential role of the coordinated zinc in editing substrate specificity. Along with the potentially serious physiological consequences of serine mis-incorporation, the relatively modest specificity of the AlaRS editing domain may provide a rationale for the widespread phylogenetic distribution of AlaX free standing editing domains, thereby contributing a further mechanism to lower concentrations of misacylated tRNAAla. PMID:21241052

  1. A Computational Framework for Proteome-Wide Pursuit and Prediction of Metalloproteins using ICP-MS and MS/MS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trauger Sunia A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metal-containing proteins comprise a diverse and sizable category within the proteomes of organisms, ranging from proteins that use metals to catalyze reactions to proteins in which metals play key structural roles. Unfortunately, reliably predicting that a protein will contain a specific metal from its amino acid sequence is not currently possible. We recently developed a generally-applicable experimental technique for finding metalloproteins on a genome-wide scale. Applying this metal-directed protein purification approach (ICP-MS and MS/MS based to the prototypical microbe Pyrococcus furiosus conclusively demonstrated the extent and diversity of the uncharacterized portion of microbial metalloproteomes since a majority of the observed metal peaks could not be assigned to known or predicted metalloproteins. However, even using this technique, it is not technically feasible to purify to homogeneity all metalloproteins in an organism. In order to address these limitations and complement the metal-directed protein purification, we developed a computational infrastructure and statistical methodology to aid in the pursuit and identification of novel metalloproteins. Results We demonstrate that our methodology enables predictions of metal-protein interactions using an experimental data set derived from a chromatography fractionation experiment in which 870 proteins and 10 metals were measured over 2,589 fractions. For each of the 10 metals, cobalt, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, tungsten, uranium, vanadium, and zinc, clusters of proteins frequently occurring in metal peaks (of a specific metal within the fractionation space were defined. This resulted in predictions that there are from 5 undiscovered vanadium- to 13 undiscovered cobalt-containing proteins in Pyrococcus furiosus. Molybdenum and nickel were chosen for additional assessment producing lists of genes predicted to encode metalloproteins or metalloprotein

  2. Physiological and molecular studies of the resistance to ionizing radiations of hyper-thermophilic archaea isolated from deep ocean hydrothermal sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolivet, E.

    2002-10-01

    In this study, we have first tested in vivo the effect of gamma irradiation on Pyrococcus abyssi, a hyper-thermophilic archaeon, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. We have shown that this strain was as radioresistant as P. furiosus but less than Deinococcus radiodurans. The rates of double stranded breaks provoked into DNA following irradiation were monitored by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis technique (P.F.G.E.) with P. abyssi, P. furiosus, D. radiodurans and Escherichia coli. Results clearly showed that all these rates were similar suggesting that no specific DNA protection system exits in Pyrococcus species. The growth of P. abyssi was efficiently recovered within two hours following the exposure to 2.5 kGy of gamma irradiation. As revealed by P.F.G.E., genomic DNA of P. abyssi totally fragmented after irradiation was efficiently restored within two hours presumably by inter chromosomal homologous recombination. The DNA replication in P. abyssi cells following irradiation at 2.5 kGy was blocked for 90 minutes that corresponds to the decay for repairing damaged DNA. Moreover, following irradiation P. abyssi actively expulse damaged DNA material before DNA replication resumes, preventing the amplification of genetic mutations. We have also showed that at least a subset cf P. abyssi DNA repair and replication proteins, such as RadA, RPA-41 and RFC-S. were constitutively expressed in chromatin bound forms in stationary phase cells. Our results were in agreement with the view that P. abyssi contains a very efficient DNA repair system, which is continuously ready to counteract the DNA damaged caused by the high temperature and/or ionizing radiation. For the first time, three novel hyper-thermophilic archaea species from deep-sea hydrothermal vents more radioresistant than P. abyssi were isolated and characterized, after 'y-irradiation exposures of some enrichment cultures. Thermococcus marinus, Thermococcus radiophilus and Thermococcus gammafolerans

  3. Solution Structure of Pfu RPP21, a Component of the Archaeal RNase P Holoenzyme, and Interactions with its RPP29 Protein Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amero, Carlos D; Boomershine, William P; Xu, Yiren; Foster, Mark

    2009-01-01

    RNase P is the ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein metalloenzyme responsible for cleaving the 5′-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs during their maturation. While the RNA subunit is catalytically active on its own at high monovalent and divalent ion concentration, four proteins subunits are associated with archaeal RNase P activity in vivo: RPP21, RPP29, RPP30 and POP5. These proteins have been shown to function in pairs: RPP21-RPP29 and POP5-RPP30. We have determined the solution structure of RPP21 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) using conventional and paramagnetic NMR techniques. Pfu RPP21 in solution consists of an unstructured N-terminus, two alpha helices, a zinc binding motif, and an unstructured C-terminus. Moreover, we have used chemical shift perturbations to characterize the interaction of RPP21 with Pfu RPP29. The data show that the primary contact with RPP29 is localized to the two helices of RPP21. This information represents a fundamental step towards understanding structure-function relationships of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme. PMID:18922021

  4. Structures of an Apo and a Binary Complex of an Evolved Archeal B Family DNA Polymerase Capable of Synthesising Highly Cy-Dye Labelled DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Samantha A.; Pinheiro, Vitor B.; Holliger, Philipp; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2013-01-01

    Thermophilic DNA polymerases of the polB family are of great importance in biotechnological applications including high-fidelity PCR. Of particular interest is the relative promiscuity of engineered versions of the exo- form of polymerases from the Thermo- and Pyrococcales families towards non-canonical substrates, which enables key advances in Next-generation sequencing. Despite this there is a paucity of structural information to guide further engineering of this group of polymerases. Here we report two structures, of the apo form and of a binary complex of a previously described variant (E10) of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) polymerase with an ability to fully replace dCTP with Cyanine dye-labeled dCTP (Cy3-dCTP or Cy5-dCTP) in PCR and synthesise highly fluorescent “CyDNA” densely decorated with cyanine dye heterocycles. The apo form of Pfu-E10 closely matches reported apo form structures of wild-type Pfu. In contrast, the binary complex (in the replicative state with a duplex DNA oligonucleotide) reveals a closing movement of the thumb domain, increasing the contact surface with the nascent DNA duplex strand. Modelling based on the binary complex suggests how bulky fluorophores may be accommodated during processive synthesis and has aided the identification of residues important for the synthesis of unnatural nucleic acid polymers. PMID:23940661

  5. Engineered split in Pfu DNA polymerase fingers domain improves incorporation of nucleotide γ-phosphate derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Connie J.; Wu, Lydia; Fox, Jeffrey D.; Arezi, Bahram; Hogrefe, Holly H.

    2011-01-01

    Using compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), we evolved a version of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) DNA polymerase that tolerates modification of the γ-phosphate of an incoming nucleotide. A Q484R mutation in α-helix P of the fingers domain, coupled with an unintended translational termination-reinitiation (split) near the finger tip, dramatically improve incorporation of a bulky γ-phosphate-O-linker-dabcyl substituent. Whether synthesized by coupled translation from a bicistronic (−1 frameshift) clone, or reconstituted from separately expressed and purified fragments, split Pfu mutant behaves identically to wild-type DNA polymerase with respect to chromatographic behavior, steady-state kinetic parameters (for dCTP), and PCR performance. Although naturally-occurring splits have been identified previously in the finger tip region of T4 gp43 variants, this is the first time a split (in combination with a point mutation) has been shown to broaden substrate utilization. Moreover, this latest example of a split hyperthermophilic archaeal DNA polymerase further illustrates the modular nature of the Family B DNA polymerase structure. PMID:21062827

  6. Construction, Expression, and Characterization of Recombinant Pfu DNA Polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Wang, Qingsong; Bi, Qun

    2016-04-01

    Pfu DNA polymerase (Pfu) is a DNA polymerase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. With its excellent thermostability and high fidelity, Pfu is well known as one of the enzymes widely used in the polymerase chain reaction. In this study, the recombinant plasmid pLysS His6-tagged Pfu-pET28a was constructed. His-tagged Pfu was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) competent cells and then successfully purified with the ÄKTAprime plus compact one-step purification system by Ni(2+) chelating affinity chromatography after optimization of the purification conditions. The authenticity of the purified Pfu was further confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting. A bio-assay indicated that its activity in the polymerase chain reaction was equivalent to that of commercial Pfu and its isoelectric point was found to be between 6.85 and 7.35. These results will be useful for further studies on Pfu and its wide application in the future.

  7. Structural analysis of β-glucosidase mutants derived from a hyperthermophilic tetrameric structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakabayashi, Makoto; Kataoka, Misumi; Mishima, Yumiko; Maeno, Yuka; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Substitutive mutations that convert a tetrameric β-glucosidase into a dimeric state lead to improvement of its crystal quality. β-Glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus (BGLPf) is a hyperthermophilic tetrameric enzyme which can degrade cellooligosaccharides to glucose under hyperthermophilic conditions and thus holds promise for the saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass at high temperature. Prior to the production of large amounts of this enzyme, detailed information regarding the oligomeric structure of the enzyme is required. Several crystals of BGLPf have been prepared over the past ten years, but its crystal structure had not been solved until recently. In 2011, the first crystal structure of BGLPf was solved and a model was constructed at somewhat low resolution (2.35 Å). In order to obtain more detailed structural data on BGLPf, the relationship between its tetrameric structure and the quality of the crystal was re-examined. A dimeric form of BGLPf was constructed and its crystal structure was solved at a resolution of 1.70 Å using protein-engineering methods. Furthermore, using the high-resolution crystal structural data for the dimeric form, a monomeric form of BGLPf was constructed which retained the intrinsic activity of the tetrameric form. The thermostability of BGLPf is affected by its oligomeric structure. Here, the biophysical and biochemical properties of engineered dimeric and monomeric BGLPfs are reported, which are promising prototype models to apply to the saccharification reaction. Furthermore, details regarding the oligomeric structures of BGLPf and the reasons why the mutations yielded improved crystal structures are discussed

  8. Experimental fossilisation of viruses from extremophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Orange

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of viruses at different stages of the origin of life has recently been reconsidered. It appears that viruses may have accompanied the earliest forms of life, allowing the transition from an RNA to a DNA world and possibly being involved in the shaping of tree of life in the three domains that we know presently. In addition, a large variety of viruses has been recently identified in extreme environments, hosted by extremophilic microorganisms, in ecosystems considered as analogues to those of the early Earth. Traces of life on the early Earth were preserved by the precipitation of silica on the organic structures. We present the results of the first experimental fossilisation by silica of viruses from extremophilic Archaea (SIRV2 – Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2, TPV1 – Thermococcus prieurii virus 1, and PAV1 – Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1. Our results confirm that viruses can be fossilised, with silica precipitating on the different viral structures (proteins, envelope over several months in a manner similar to that of other experimentally and naturally fossilised microorganisms. This study thus suggests that viral remains or traces could be preserved in the rock record although their identification may be challenging due to the small size of the viral particles.

  9. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Webb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  10. An archaebacterial homologue of the essential eubacterial cell division protein FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, P; Jackson, S P

    1996-06-25

    Life falls into three fundamental domains--Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya (formerly archaebacteria, eubacteria, and eukaryotes,. respectively). Though Archaea lack nuclei and share many morphological features with Bacteria, molecular analyses, principally of the transcription and translation machineries, have suggested that Archaea are more related to Eucarya than to Bacteria. Currently, little is known about the archaeal cell division apparatus. In Bacteria, a crucial component of the cell division machinery is FtsZ, a GTPase that localizes to a ring at the site of septation. Interestingly, FtsZ is distantly related in sequence to eukaryotic tubulins, which also interact with GTP and are components of the eukaryotic cell cytoskeleton. By screening for the ability to bind radiolabeled nucleotides, we have identified a protein of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus woesei that interacts tightly and specifically with GTP. Furthermore, through screening an expression library of P. woesei genomic DNA, we have cloned the gene encoding this protein. Sequence comparisons reveal that the P. woesei GTP-binding protein is strikingly related in sequence to eubacterial FtsZ and is marginally more similar to eukaryotic tubulins than are bacterial FtsZ proteins. Phylogenetic analyses reinforce the notion that there is an evolutionary linkage between FtsZ and tubulins. These findings suggest that the archaeal cell division apparatus may be fundamentally similar to that of Bacteria and lead us to consider the evolutionary relationships between Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the CRISPR-Cas RNA-silencing Cmr complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Takuo; Inanaga, Hideko; Numata, Tomoyuki

    2015-06-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-derived RNA (crRNA) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute a prokaryotic adaptive immune system (CRISPR-Cas system) that targets and degrades invading genetic elements. The type III-B CRISPR-Cas Cmr complex, composed of the six Cas proteins (Cmr1-Cmr6) and a crRNA, captures and cleaves RNA complementary to the crRNA guide sequence. Here, a Cmr1-deficient functional Cmr (CmrΔ1) complex composed of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2-Cmr3, Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cmr4-Cmr5-Cmr6 and the 39-mer P. furiosus 7.01-crRNA was prepared. The CmrΔ1 complex was cocrystallized with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) complementary to the crRNA guide by the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory. The crystals belonged to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.5, b = 76.2, c = 139.2 Å, α = 90.3, β = 104.8, γ = 118.6°. The asymmetric unit of the crystals is expected to contain one CmrΔ1-ssDNA complex, with a Matthews coefficient of 2.03 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 39.5%.

  12. Essential Structural and Functional Roles of the Cmr4 Subunit in RNA Cleavage by the Cmr CRISPR-Cas Complex

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    Nancy F. Ramia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The Cmr complex is the multisubunit effector complex of the type III-B clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas immune system. The Cmr complex recognizes a target RNA through base pairing with the integral CRISPR RNA (crRNA and cleaves the target at multiple regularly spaced locations within the complementary region. To understand the molecular basis of the function of this complex, we have assembled information from electron microscopic and X-ray crystallographic structural studies and mutagenesis of a complete Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr complex. Our findings reveal that four helically packed Cmr4 subunits, which make up the backbone of the Cmr complex, act as a platform to support crRNA binding and target RNA cleavage. Interestingly, we found a hook-like structural feature associated with Cmr4 that is likely the site of target RNA binding and cleavage. Our results also elucidate analogies in the mechanisms of crRNA and target molecule binding by the distinct Cmr type III-A and Cascade type I-E complexes. : Ramia et al. show that the helical core of the type III-B Cmr CRISPR-Cas effector complex, made up of multiple Cmr4 subunits, forms the platform for a corresponding number of cleavages of the target RNA. Comparison with the type I-E Cascade structure reveals strikingly similar mechanisms of crRNA and target binding.

  13. Engineered split in Pfu DNA polymerase fingers domain improves incorporation of nucleotide gamma-phosphate derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Connie J; Wu, Lydia; Fox, Jeffrey D; Arezi, Bahram; Hogrefe, Holly H

    2011-03-01

    Using compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), we evolved a version of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) DNA polymerase that tolerates modification of the γ-phosphate of an incoming nucleotide. A Q484R mutation in α-helix P of the fingers domain, coupled with an unintended translational termination-reinitiation (split) near the finger tip, dramatically improve incorporation of a bulky γ-phosphate-O-linker-dabcyl substituent. Whether synthesized by coupled translation from a bicistronic (-1 frameshift) clone, or reconstituted from separately expressed and purified fragments, split Pfu mutant behaves identically to wild-type DNA polymerase with respect to chromatographic behavior, steady-state kinetic parameters (for dCTP), and PCR performance. Although naturally-occurring splits have been identified previously in the finger tip region of T4 gp43 variants, this is the first time a split (in combination with a point mutation) has been shown to broaden substrate utilization. Moreover, this latest example of a split hyperthermophilic archaeal DNA polymerase further illustrates the modular nature of the Family B DNA polymerase structure.

  14. Shared active site architecture between archaeal PolD and multi-subunit RNA polymerases revealed by X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauguet, Ludovic; Raia, Pierre; Henneke, Ghislaine; Delarue, Marc

    2016-08-22

    Archaeal replicative DNA polymerase D (PolD) constitute an atypical class of DNA polymerases made of a proofreading exonuclease subunit (DP1) and a larger polymerase catalytic subunit (DP2), both with unknown structures. We have determined the crystal structures of Pyrococcus abyssi DP1 and DP2 at 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, revealing a catalytic core strikingly different from all other known DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Rather, the PolD DP2 catalytic core has the same 'double-psi β-barrel' architecture seen in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) superfamily, which includes multi-subunit transcriptases of all domains of life, homodimeric RNA-silencing pathway RNAPs and atypical viral RNAPs. This finding bridges together, in non-viral world, DNA transcription and DNA replication within the same protein superfamily. This study documents further the complex evolutionary history of the DNA replication apparatus in different domains of life and proposes a classification of all extant DNAPs.

  15. A functional endonuclease Q exists in the bacterial domain: identification and characterization of endonuclease Q from Bacillus pumilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Miyako; Ishino, Sonoko; Cann, Isaac; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2017-05-01

    DNA base deamination occurs spontaneously under physiological conditions and is promoted by high temperature. Therefore, hyperthermophiles are expected to have efficient repair systems of the deaminated bases in their genomes. Endonuclease Q (EndoQ) was originally identified from the hyperthermophlic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, as a hypoxanthine-specific endonuclease recently. Further biochemical analyses revealed that EndoQ also recognizes uracil, xanthine, and the AP site in DNA, and is probably involved in a specific repair process for damaged bases. Initial phylogenetic analysis showed that an EndoQ homolog is found only in the Thermococcales and some of the methanogens in Archaea, and is not present in most members of the domains Bacteria and Eukarya. A better understanding of the distribution of the EndoQ-mediated repair system is, therefore, of evolutionary interest. We showed here that an EndoQ-like polypeptide from Bacillus pumilus, belonging to the bacterial domain, is functional and has similar properties with the archaeal EndoQs.

  16. Role of Mn2+ and compatible solutes in the radiation resistance of thermophilic bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Kimberly M; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn(2+)-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  17. Novel Bioengineered Cassava Expressing an Archaeal Starch Degradation System and a Bacterial ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase for Starch Self-Digestibility and Yield Increase

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    Ayalew Ligaba-Osena

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To address national and global low-carbon fuel targets, there is great interest in alternative plant species such as cassava (Manihot esculenta, which are high-yielding, resilient, and are easily converted to fuels using the existing technology. In this study the genes encoding hyperthermophilic archaeal starch-hydrolyzing enzymes, α-amylase and amylopullulanase from Pyrococcus furiosus and glucoamylase from Sulfolobus solfataricus, together with the gene encoding a modified ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (glgC from Escherichia coli, were simultaneously expressed in cassava roots to enhance starch accumulation and its subsequent hydrolysis to sugar. A total of 13 multigene expressing transgenic lines were generated and characterized phenotypically and genotypically. Gene expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR showed that the microbial genes are expressed in the transgenic roots. Multigene-expressing transgenic lines produced up to 60% more storage root yield than the non-transgenic control, likely due to glgC expression. Total protein extracted from the transgenic roots showed up to 10-fold higher starch-degrading activity in vitro than the protein extracted from the non-transgenic control. Interestingly, transgenic tubers released threefold more glucose than the non-transgenic control when incubated at 85°C for 21-h without exogenous application of thermostable enzymes, suggesting that the archaeal enzymes produced in planta maintain their activity and thermostability.

  18. High-level expression of soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli using an HE-maltotriose-binding protein fusion tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingqian; Guo, Wanying; Su, Bingqian; Guo, Yujie; Wang, Jiang; Chu, Beibei; Yang, Guoyu

    2018-02-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in prokaryotic expression systems for large-scale production. The use of genetically engineered affinity and solubility enhancing fusion proteins has increased greatly in recent years, and there now exists a considerable repertoire of these that can be used to enhance the expression, stability, solubility, folding, and purification of their fusion partner. Here, a modified histidine tag (HE) used as an affinity tag was employed together with a truncated maltotriose-binding protein (MBP; consisting of residues 59-433) from Pyrococcus furiosus as a solubility enhancing tag accompanying a tobacco etch virus protease-recognition site for protein expression and purification in Escherichia coli. Various proteins tagged at the N-terminus with HE-MBP(Pyr) were expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells to determine expression and solubility relative to those tagged with His6-MBP or His6-MBP(Pyr). Furthermore, four HE-MBP(Pyr)-fused proteins were purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography to assess the affinity of HE with immobilized Ni 2+ . Our results showed that HE-MBP(Pyr) represents an attractive fusion protein allowing high levels of soluble expression and purification of recombinant protein in E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hierarchically Ordered Supramolecular Protein-Polymer Composites with Thermoresponsive Properties

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    Salla Välimäki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic macromolecules that can bind and co-assemble with proteins are important for the future development of biohybrid materials. Active systems are further required to create materials that can respond and change their behavior in response to external stimuli. Here we report that stimuli-responsive linear-branched diblock copolymers consisting of a cationic multivalent dendron with a linear thermoresponsive polymer tail at the focal point, can bind and complex Pyrococcus furiosus ferritin protein cages into crystalline arrays. The multivalent dendron structure utilizes cationic spermine units to bind electrostatically on the surface of the negatively charged ferritin cage and the in situ polymerized poly(di(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate linear block enables control with temperature. Cloud point of the final product was determined with dynamic light scattering (DLS, and it was shown to be approximately 31 °C at a concentration of 150 mg/L. Complexation of the polymer binder and apoferritin was studied with DLS, small-angle X-ray scattering, and transmission electron microscopy, which showed the presence of crystalline arrays of ferritin cages with a face-centered cubic (fcc, \\( Fm\\overline{3}m \\ Bravais lattice where lattice parameter a = 18.6 nm. The complexation process was not temperature dependent but the final complexes had thermoresponsive characteristics with negative thermal expansion.

  20. Structure of a hexameric form of RadA recombinase from Methanococcus voltae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Liqin; Luo, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Hexameric rings of RadA recombinase from M. voltae have been crystallized. Structural comparisons suggest that homologues of RadA tend to form double-ringed assemblies. Archaeal RadA proteins are close homologues of eukaryal Rad51 and DMC1 proteins and are remote homologues of bacterial RecA proteins. For the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA, these recombinases promote a pivotal strand-exchange reaction between homologous single-stranded and double-stranded DNA substrates. This DNA-repair function also plays a key role in the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and in the resistance of bacterial cells to antibiotics. A hexameric form of a truncated Methanococcus voltae RadA protein devoid of its small N-terminal domain has been crystallized. The RadA hexamers further assemble into two-ringed assemblies. Similar assemblies can be observed in the crystals of Pyrococcus furiosus RadA and Homo sapiens DMC1. In all of these two-ringed assemblies the DNA-interacting L1 region of each protomer points inward towards the centre, creating a highly positively charged locus. The electrostatic characteristics of the central channels can be utilized in the design of novel recombinase inhibitors

  1. Accurate placement of substrate RNA by Gar1 in H/ACA RNA-guided pseudouridylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2015-09-03

    H/ACA RNA-guided ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), the most complicated RNA pseudouridylase so far known, uses H/ACA guide RNA for substrate capture and four proteins (Cbf5, Nop10, L7Ae and Gar1) for pseudouridylation. Although it was shown that Gar1 not only facilitates the product release, but also enhances the catalytic activity, the chemical role that Gar1 plays in this complicated machinery is largely unknown. Kinetics measurement on Pyrococcus furiosus RNPs at different temperatures making use of fluorescence anisotropy showed that Gar1 reduces the catalytic barrier through affecting the activation entropy instead of enthalpy. Site-directed mutagenesis combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that V149 in the thumb loop of Cbf5 is critical in placing the target uridine to the right position toward catalytic D85 of Cbf5. The enzyme elegantly aligns the position of uridine in the catalytic site with the help of Gar1. In addition, conversion of uridine to pseudouridine results in a rigid syn configuration of the target nucleotide in the active site and causes Gar1 to pull out the thumb. Both factors guarantee the efficient release of the product. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. A new thermophilic nitrilase from an antarctic hyperthermophilic microorganism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine V. Dennett

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Several environmental samples from Antarctica were collected and enriched to search for microorganisms with nitrilase activity. A new thermostable nitrilase from a novel hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus sp. M24D13 was purified and characterized. The activity of this enzyme increased as the temperatures rise from 70 up to 85 °C. Its optimal activity occurred at 85 °C and pH 7.5. This new enzyme shows a remarkable resistance to thermal inactivation retaining more than 50% of its activity even after 8 h of incubation at 85 °C.In addition, this nitrilase is highly versatile demonstrating activity towards different substrates such as benzonitrile (60 mM, aromatic nitrile and butyronitrile (60 mM, aliphatic nitrile, with a specific activity of 3286.7 U mg-1 of protein and 4008.2 U mg-1 of protein respectively. Moreover the enzyme NitM24D13 also presents cyanidase activity.The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km and Vmáx of this Nitrilase for benzonitrile were 0.3 mM and 333.3 µM min-1, respectively, and the specificity constant (kcat/Km for benzonitrile was 2.05×105 s-1 M-1.

  3. Cloning and Characterization of an Alpha-amylase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus Thioreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an extracellular a-amylase, TTA, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Primary structural analysis revealed high similarity with other a-amylases from the Thermococcus and Pyrococcus genera, as well as the four highly conserved regions typical for a-amylases. The 1374 bp gene encodes a protein of 457 amino acids, of which 435 constitute the mature protein preceded by a 22 amino acid signal peptide. The molecular weight of the purified recombinant enzyme was estimated to be 43 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Maximal enzymatic activity of recombinant TTA was observed at 90 C and pH 5.5 in the absence of exogenous Ca(2+), and the enzyme was considerably stable even after incubation at 90 C for 2 hours. The thermostability at 90 and 102 C was enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). The extraordinarily high specific activity (about 7.4 x 10(exp 3) U/mg protein at 90 C, pH 5.5 with soluble starch as substrate) together with its low pH optimum makes this enzyme an interesting candidate for starch processing applications.

  4. Dissimilatory oxidation and reduction of elemental sulfur in thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzin, Arnulf; Urich, Tim; Müller, Fabian; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2004-02-01

    The oxidation and reduction of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur species are some of the most important energy-yielding reactions for microorganisms living in volcanic hot springs, solfataras, and submarine hydrothermal vents, including both heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and chemolithoautotrophic, carbon dioxide-fixing species. Elemental sulfur is the electron donor in aerobic archaea like Acidianus and Sulfolobus. It is oxidized via sulfite and thiosulfate in a pathway involving both soluble and membrane-bound enzymes. This pathway was recently found to be coupled to the aerobic respiratory chain, eliciting a link between sulfur oxidation and oxygen reduction at the level of the respiratory heme copper oxidase. In contrast, elemental sulfur is the electron acceptor in a short electron transport chain consisting of a membrane-bound hydrogenase and a sulfur reductase in (facultatively) anaerobic chemolithotrophic archaea Acidianus and Pyrodictium species. It is also the electron acceptor in organoheterotrophic anaerobic species like Pyrococcus and Thermococcus, however, an electron transport chain has not been described as yet. The current knowledge on the composition and properties of the aerobic and anaerobic pathways of dissimilatory elemental sulfur metabolism in thermophilic archaea is summarized in this contribution.

  5. Hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea: mechanisms for reductant disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaart, Marcel R A; Bielen, Abraham A M; van der Oost, John; Stams, Alfons J M; Kengen, Servé W M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from biomass by bacteria and archaea is an attractive renewable energy source. However, to make its application more feasible, microorganisms are needed with high hydrogen productivities. For several reasons, hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are promising is this respect. In addition to the high polysaccharide-hydrolysing capacities of many of these organisms, an important advantage is their ability to use most of the reducing equivalents (e.g. NADH, reduced ferredoxin) formed during glycolysis for the production of hydrogen, enabling H2/hexose ratios of between 3.0 and 4.0. So, despite the fact that the hydrogen-yielding reactions, especially the one from NADH, are thermodynamically unfavourable, high hydrogen yields are obtained. In this review we focus on three different mechanisms that are employed by a few model organisms, viz. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, Thermotoga maritima, and Pyrococcus furiosus, to efficiently produce hydrogen. In addition, recent developments to improve hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are discussed.

  6. Comparative Genomic and Transcriptional Analyses of CRISPR Systems Across the Genus Pyrobaculum

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    David L Bernick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the domain Archaea, the CRISPR immune system appears to be nearly ubiquitous based on computational genome analyses. Initial studies in bacteria demonstrated that the CRISPR system targets invading plasmid and viral DNA. Recent experiments in the model archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus uncovered a novel RNA-targeting variant of the CRISPR system potentially unique to archaea. Because our understanding of CRISPR system evolution in other archaea is limited, we have taken a comparative genomic and transcriptomic view of the CRISPR arrays across six diverse species within the crenarchaeal genus Pyrobaculum. We present transcriptional data from each of four species in the genus (P. aerophilum, P. islandicum, P. calidifontis, P. arsenaticum, analyzing mature CRISPR-associated small RNA abundance from over 20 arrays. Within the genus, there is remarkable conservation of CRISPR array structure, as well as unique features that are have not been studied in other archaeal systems. These unique features include: a nearly invariant CRISPR promoter, conservation of direct repeat families, the 5' polarity of CRISPR-associated small RNA abundance, and a novel CRISPR-specific association with homologues of nurA and herA. These analyses provide a genus-level evolutionary perspective on archaeal CRISPR systems, broadening our understanding beyond existing non-comparative model systems.

  7. A conserved MCM single-stranded DNA binding element is essential for replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froelich, Clifford A; Kang, Sukhyun; Epling, Leslie B; Bell, Stephen P; Enemark, Eric J

    2014-04-01

    The ring-shaped MCM helicase is essential to all phases of DNA replication. The complex loads at replication origins as an inactive double-hexamer encircling duplex DNA. Helicase activation converts this species to two active single hexamers that encircle single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The molecular details of MCM DNA interactions during these events are unknown. We determined the crystal structure of the Pyrococcus furiosus MCM N-terminal domain hexamer bound to ssDNA and define a conserved MCM-ssDNA binding motif (MSSB). Intriguingly, ssDNA binds the MCM ring interior perpendicular to the central channel with defined polarity. In eukaryotes, the MSSB is conserved in several Mcm2-7 subunits, and MSSB mutant combinations in S. cerevisiae Mcm2-7 are not viable. Mutant Mcm2-7 complexes assemble and are recruited to replication origins, but are defective in helicase loading and activation. Our findings identify an important MCM-ssDNA interaction and suggest it functions during helicase activation to select the strand for translocation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01993.001.

  8. Analysis of the crystal structure of an active MCM hexamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Justin M; Arachea, Buenafe T; Epling, Leslie B; Enemark, Eric J

    2014-09-29

    In a previous Research article (Froelich et al., 2014), we suggested an MCM helicase activation mechanism, but were limited in discussing the ATPase domain because it was absent from the crystal structure. Here we present the crystal structure of a nearly full-length MCM hexamer that is helicase-active and thus has all features essential for unwinding DNA. The structure is a chimera of Sulfolobus solfataricus N-terminal domain and Pyrococcus furiosus ATPase domain. We discuss three major findings: 1) a novel conformation for the A-subdomain that could play a role in MCM regulation; 2) interaction of a universally conserved glutamine in the N-terminal Allosteric Communication Loop with the AAA+ domain helix-2-insert (h2i); and 3) a recessed binding pocket for the MCM ssDNA-binding motif influenced by the h2i. We suggest that during helicase activation, the h2i clamps down on the leading strand to facilitate strand retention and regulate ATP hydrolysis.

  9. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

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    Mart Krupovic

    Full Text Available Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1, with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  10. A Macrocyclic Peptide that Serves as a Cocrystallization Ligand and Inhibits the Function of a MATE Family Transporter

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    Hiroaki Suga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The random non-standard peptide integrated discovery (RaPID system has proven to be a powerful approach to discover de novo natural product-like macrocyclic peptides that inhibit protein functions. We have recently reported three macrocyclic peptides that bind to Pyrococcus furiosus multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (PfMATE transporter and inhibit the transport function. Moreover, these macrocyclic peptides were successfully employed as cocrystallization ligands of selenomethionine-labeled PfMATE. In this report, we disclose the details of the RaPID selection strategy that led to the identification of these three macrocyclic peptides as well as a fourth macrocyclic peptide, MaD8, which is exclusively discussed in this article. MaD8 was found to bind within the cleft of PfMATE’s extracellular side and blocked the path of organic small molecules being extruded. The results of an ethidium bromide efflux assay confirmed the efflux inhibitory activity of MaD8, whose behavior was similar to that of previously reported MaD5.

  11. Structure of the Cmr2 Subunit of the CRISPR-Cas RNA Silencing Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Ramia, Nancy F.; Shao, Yaming; Hale, Caryn R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong (FSU); (Georgia)

    2012-08-10

    Cmr2 is the largest and an essential subunit of a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex (the Cmr complex) that cleaves foreign RNA to protect prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. Cmr2 is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the effector complex because of its N-terminal HD nuclease domain. Here, however, we report that the HD domain of Cmr2 is not required for cleavage by the complex in vitro. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2 (lacking the HD domain) reveals two adenylyl cyclase-like and two {alpha}-helical domains. The adenylyl cyclase-like domains are arranged as in homodimeric adenylyl cyclases and bind ADP and divalent metals. However, mutagenesis studies show that the metal- and ADP-coordinating residues of Cmr2 are also not critical for cleavage by the complex. Our findings suggest that another component provides the catalytic function and that the essential role by Cmr2 does not require the identified ADP- or metal-binding or HD domains in vitro.

  12. The carboxy-terminal αN helix of the archaeal XerA tyrosine recombinase is a molecular switch to control site-specific recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serre, Marie-Claude; El Arnaout, Toufic; Brooks, Mark A; Durand, Dominique; Lisboa, Johnny; Lazar, Noureddine; Raynal, Bertrand; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine recombinases are conserved in the three kingdoms of life. Here we present the first crystal structure of a full-length archaeal tyrosine recombinase, XerA from Pyrococcus abyssi, at 3.0 Å resolution. In the absence of DNA substrate XerA crystallizes as a dimer where each monomer displays a tertiary structure similar to that of DNA-bound Tyr-recombinases. Active sites are assembled in the absence of dif except for the catalytic Tyr, which is extruded and located equidistant from each active site within the dimer. Using XerA active site mutants we demonstrate that XerA follows the classical cis-cleavage reaction, suggesting rearrangements of the C-terminal domain upon DNA binding. Surprisingly, XerA C-terminal αN helices dock in cis in a groove that, in bacterial tyrosine recombinases, accommodates in trans αN helices of neighbour monomers in the Holliday junction intermediates. Deletion of the XerA C-terminal αN helix does not impair cleavage of suicide substrates but prevents recombination catalysis. We propose that the enzymatic cycle of XerA involves the switch of the αN helix from cis to trans packing, leading to (i) repositioning of the catalytic Tyr in the active site in cis and (ii) dimer stabilisation via αN contacts in trans between monomers.

  13. The carboxy-terminal αN helix of the archaeal XerA tyrosine recombinase is a molecular switch to control site-specific recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude Serre

    Full Text Available Tyrosine recombinases are conserved in the three kingdoms of life. Here we present the first crystal structure of a full-length archaeal tyrosine recombinase, XerA from Pyrococcus abyssi, at 3.0 Å resolution. In the absence of DNA substrate XerA crystallizes as a dimer where each monomer displays a tertiary structure similar to that of DNA-bound Tyr-recombinases. Active sites are assembled in the absence of dif except for the catalytic Tyr, which is extruded and located equidistant from each active site within the dimer. Using XerA active site mutants we demonstrate that XerA follows the classical cis-cleavage reaction, suggesting rearrangements of the C-terminal domain upon DNA binding. Surprisingly, XerA C-terminal αN helices dock in cis in a groove that, in bacterial tyrosine recombinases, accommodates in trans αN helices of neighbour monomers in the Holliday junction intermediates. Deletion of the XerA C-terminal αN helix does not impair cleavage of suicide substrates but prevents recombination catalysis. We propose that the enzymatic cycle of XerA involves the switch of the αN helix from cis to trans packing, leading to (i repositioning of the catalytic Tyr in the active site in cis and (ii dimer stabilisation via αN contacts in trans between monomers.

  14. Transcription factor IID in the Archaea: sequences in the Thermococcus celer genome would encode a product closely related to the TATA-binding protein of eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, T. L.; Reich, C. I.; Whitelock, R. B.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The first step in transcription initiation in eukaryotes is mediated by the TATA-binding protein, a subunit of the transcription factor IID complex. We have cloned and sequenced the gene for a presumptive homolog of this eukaryotic protein from Thermococcus celer, a member of the Archaea (formerly archaebacteria). The protein encoded by the archaeal gene is a tandem repeat of a conserved domain, corresponding to the repeated domain in its eukaryotic counterparts. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the two halves of the repeat are consistent with the duplication occurring before the divergence of the archael and eukaryotic domains. In conjunction with previous observations of similarity in RNA polymerase subunit composition and sequences and the finding of a transcription factor IIB-like sequence in Pyrococcus woesei (a relative of T. celer) it appears that major features of the eukaryotic transcription apparatus were well-established before the origin of eukaryotic cellular organization. The divergence between the two halves of the archael protein is less than that between the halves of the individual eukaryotic sequences, indicating that the average rate of sequence change in the archael protein has been less than in its eukaryotic counterparts. To the extent that this lower rate applies to the genome as a whole, a clearer picture of the early genes (and gene families) that gave rise to present-day genomes is more apt to emerge from the study of sequences from the Archaea than from the corresponding sequences from eukaryotes.

  15. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B.; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  16. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  17. A First Analysis of Metallome Biosignatures of Hyperthermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyllinniskii Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, no experimental data has been reported for the metallome of hyperthermophilic microorganisms although their metal requirements for growth are known to be unique. Here, experiments were conducted to determine (i cellular trace metal concentrations of the hyperthermophilic Archaea Methanococcus jannaschii and Pyrococcus furiosus, and (ii a first estimate of the metallome for these hyperthermophilic species via ICP-MS. The metal contents of these cells were compared to parallel experiments using the mesophilic bacterium Escherichia coli grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Fe and Zn were typically the most abundant metals in cells. Metal concentrations for E. coli grown aerobically decreased in the order Fe > Zn > Cu > Mo > Ni > W > Co. In contrast, M. jannaschii and P. furiosus show almost the reverse pattern with elevated Ni, Co, and W concentrations. Of the three organisms, a biosignature is potentially demonstrated for the methanogen M. jannaschii that may, in part, be related to the metallome requirements of methanogenesis. The bioavailability of trace metals more than likely has varied through time. If hyperthermophiles are very ancient, then the trace metal patterns observed here may begin to provide some insights regarding Earth's earliest cells and in turn, early Earth chemistry.

  18. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  19. Anion binding in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiters, Martin C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Kuepper, Frithjof C; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P; Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2009-01-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L 3 (2p 3/2 ) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  20. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  1. Efficacy of pH elevation as a bactericidal strategy for treating ballast water of freight carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford E. Starliper

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of ship ballast water with sodium hydroxide (NaOH is one method currently being developed to minimize the risk to introduce aquatic invasive species. The bactericidal capability of sodium hydroxide was determined for 148 bacterial strains from ballast water collected in 2009 and 2010 from the M/V Indiana Harbor, a bulk-freight carrier plying the Laurentian Great Lakes, USA. Primary culture of bacteria was done using brain heart infusion agar and a developmental medium. Strains were characterized based on PCR amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequence similarities (99+ % were determined by comparison with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI GenBank catalog. Flavobacterium spp. were the most prevalent bacteria characterized in 2009, comprising 51.1% (24/47 of the total, and Pseudomonas spp. (62/101; 61.4% and Brevundimonas spp. (22/101; 21.8% were the predominate bacteria recovered in 2010; together, comprising 83.2% (84/101 of the total. Testing was done in tryptic soy broth (TSB medium adjusted with 5 N NaOH. Growth of each strain was evaluated at pH 10.0, pH 11.0 and pH 12.0, and 4 h up to 72 h. The median cell count at 0 h for 148 cultures was 5.20 × 106 cfu/mL with a range 1.02 × 105–1.60 × 108 cfu/mL. The TSB adjusted to pH 10.0 and incubation for less than 24 h was bactericidal to 52 (35.1% strains. Growth in pH 11.0 TSB for less than 4 h was bactericidal to 131 (88.5% strains and pH 11.0 within 12 h was bactericidal to 141 (95.3%. One strain, Bacillus horikoshii, survived the harshest treatment, pH 12.0 for 72 h.

  2. Efficacy of pH elevation as a bactericidal strategy for treating ballast water of freight carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starliper, Clifford E; Watten, Barnaby J; Iwanowicz, Deborah D; Green, Phyllis A; Bassett, Noel L; Adams, Cynthia R

    2015-05-01

    Treatment of ship ballast water with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is one method currently being developed to minimize the risk to introduce aquatic invasive species. The bactericidal capability of sodium hydroxide was determined for 148 bacterial strains from ballast water collected in 2009 and 2010 from the M/V Indiana Harbor, a bulk-freight carrier plying the Laurentian Great Lakes, USA. Primary culture of bacteria was done using brain heart infusion agar and a developmental medium. Strains were characterized based on PCR amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequence similarities (99+ %) were determined by comparison with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) GenBank catalog. Flavobacterium spp. were the most prevalent bacteria characterized in 2009, comprising 51.1% (24/47) of the total, and Pseudomonas spp. (62/101; 61.4%) and Brevundimonas spp. (22/101; 21.8%) were the predominate bacteria recovered in 2010; together, comprising 83.2% (84/101) of the total. Testing was done in tryptic soy broth (TSB) medium adjusted with 5 N NaOH. Growth of each strain was evaluated at pH 10.0, pH 11.0 and pH 12.0, and 4 h up to 72 h. The median cell count at 0 h for 148 cultures was 5.20 × 10(6) cfu/mL with a range 1.02 × 10(5)-1.60 × 10(8) cfu/mL. The TSB adjusted to pH 10.0 and incubation for less than 24 h was bactericidal to 52 (35.1%) strains. Growth in pH 11.0 TSB for less than 4 h was bactericidal to 131 (88.5%) strains and pH 11.0 within 12 h was bactericidal to 141 (95.3%). One strain, Bacillus horikoshii, survived the harshest treatment, pH 12.0 for 72 h.

  3. Difficulties Review Atlas Booster Airborne and Ground Support Systems. Book 2. General Information. Volume 7. Hydraulic System Airborne Difficulties Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-08-15

    4 NoOKf 6- p It -: a. ow "IIn$-m j j Ad x V i w’ p. S . J S- w IV- ; I p.. S. . W Cu . VC CE K4 .9 w I Ut I OPm so 4 go le * *2oIt c:~ V hh at ~ tD a...04 v ~ 49 he 44 w.9 . j -j Z; U op 9- ii fI U Sb td a .10 6S* be es1 A a I 2I6 0 1 21ý ii 0 a 4 hi J - o 49w b. X U,1 U U b.- a W b- V -dI v *2 ot 3...0 %all 0 Id .400 c3£~ ’ 7-W .4 0. W Id IN .4151ith 4~I I WX. U3 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ 6 143 . aId £ - 4bd 1 00 a:as 141 -v . -~ ~I& ;: . me le le v IWO. bi 0 O SI

  4. Bucharest urban seismology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balan, Stefan Florin; Ritter, Joachim R.R.

    2005-01-01

    An important project was carried out in Bucharest area by the National Institute of Research-Development for Earth Physics and Collaborative Research Center 461 (CRC 461) Geophysical Institute from the University of Karlsruhe (Germany) in the period October 2003 - August 2004. The project consists of an array of 33 stations, uniformly arranged in the city of Bucharest and in the outskirts (Magurele, Voluntari, Otopeni, Buftea, etc). The station functioned 24 h/day for a period of 10 months. The number of functioning stations had a little variation in time, some of them had to be moved because some sites became improper in time. The sensors used by the stations were of the type: STS - 2, LE - 3D, 4OT, 3ESP and KS2000. The performance of continuous recording was possible by using on each station a hard disk drive of 120 Gb, which gives independence of 3 month. For preventing some accidental electric power stops a rechargeable battery on each station was used . A service was performed for each station every month to avoid accidental stops, which consisted usually of mechanical bumps. All the recorded data by the stations was saved on DVSs, the final number being around 140. This project helped gathering a large number of seismological data for the city of Bucharest and outskirts from seismic events of magnitude of 4, 3, 2 and ambient noise. (authors)

  5. Molecular Detection of Theileria spp. in Livestock on Five Caribbean Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theileria spp. are tick-transmitted, intracellular apicomplexan protozoan parasites infecting a wide range of animals. As there is very limited information on the prevalence of Theileria spp. in the Caribbean we used the recently described genus-specific pan-Theileria FRET-qPCR to identify infected animals in the region and a standard 18S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing to determine the species involved. We found Theileria spp. in 9% of the convenience samples of animals (n=752 studied from five Caribbean islands. Donkeys (20.0%: 5/25 were most commonly infected, followed by sheep (17.4%, 25/144, cattle (6.8%; 22/325, goats (5.0%; 12/238, and horses (5.0%; 1/20. Six species of Theileria were identified: T. equi (donkeys, cattle, goats, and sheep, Theileria sp. OT3 (sheep and goats, Theileria sp. NG-2013a (cattle, Theileria sp. YW-2014 (donkeys, Theileria sp. B15a (goats, and Babesia vulpes or a closely related organism (sheep and goats. Only T. equi has been previously reported in the Caribbean. Our findings expand the known host ranges of Theileria spp. and the known distribution of the organisms around the world.

  6. Cooperative RNP assembly: Complementary rescue of structural defects by protein and RNA subunits of archaeal RNase P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Yi; Xu, Yiren; Cho, I-Ming; Oruganti, Sri Vidya; Foster, Mark P.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2011-01-01

    RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that utilizes a Mg2+-dependent RNA catalyst to cleave the 5′-leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs) and generate mature tRNAs. The bacterial RNase P protein (RPP) aids RNase P RNA (RPR) catalysis by promoting substrate binding, Mg2+ coordination, and product release. Archaeal RNase P comprises an RPR and at least four RPPs, which have eukaryal homologs and function as two binary complexes (POP5•RPP30 and RPP21•RPP29). In this study, we employed a previously characterized substrate-enzyme conjugate [pre-tRNATyr-Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (Mja) RPR] to investigate the functional role of a universally conserved uridine in a bulge-helix structure in archaeal RPRs. Deletion of this bulged uridine resulted in an 80-fold decrease in the self-cleavage rate of pre-tRNATyr-MjaΔU RPR compared to the wildtype, and this defect was partially ameliorated upon addition of either RPP pair. The catalytic defect in the archaeal mutant RPR mirrors that reported in a bacterial RPR and highlights a parallel in their active sites. Furthermore, an N-terminal deletion mutant of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RPP29 that is defective in assembling with its binary partner RPP21, as assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy, is functional when reconstituted with the cognate Pfu RPR. Collectively, these results indicate that archaeal RPPs are able to compensate for structural defects in their cognate RPR and vice-versa, and provide striking examples of the cooperative subunit interactions critical for driving archaeal RNase P towards its functional conformation. (236 words) PMID:21683084

  7. Optimal conditions to use Pfu exo(-) DNA polymerase for highly efficient ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angers, M; Cloutier, J F; Castonguay, A; Drouin, R

    2001-08-15

    Ligation-Mediated Polymerase Chain Reaction (LMPCR) is the most sensitive sequencing technique available to map single-stranded DNA breaks at the nucleotide level of resolution using genomic DNA. LMPCR has been adapted to map DNA damage and reveal DNA-protein interactions inside living cells. However, the sequence context (GC content), the global break frequency and the current combination of DNA polymerases used in LMPCR affect the quality of the results. In this study, we developed and optimized an LMPCR protocol adapted for Pyrococcus furiosus exo(-) DNA polymerase (Pfu exo(-)). The relative efficiency of Pfu exo(-) was compared to T7-modified DNA polymerase (Sequenase 2.0) at the primer extension step and to Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase (Taq) at the PCR amplification step of LMPCR. At all break frequencies tested, Pfu exo(-) proved to be more efficient than Sequenase 2.0. During both primer extension and PCR amplification steps, the ratio of DNA molecules per unit of DNA polymerase was the main determinant of the efficiency of Pfu exo(-), while the efficiency of Taq was less affected by this ratio. Substitution of NaCl for KCl in the PCR reaction buffer of Taq strikingly improved the efficiency of the DNA polymerase. Pfu exo(-) was clearly more efficient than Taq to specifically amplify extremely GC-rich genomic DNA sequences. Our results show that a combination of Pfu exo(-) at the primer extension step and Taq at the PCR amplification step is ideal for in vivo DNA analysis and DNA damage mapping using LMPCR.

  8. Nucleotide-mimetic synthetic ligands for DNA-recognizing enzymes One-step purification of Pfu DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissis, S; Labrou, N E; Clonis, Y D

    2006-07-28

    The commercial availability of DNA polymerases has revolutionized molecular biotechnology and certain sectors of the bio-industry. Therefore, the development of affinity adsorbents for purification of DNA polymerases is of academic interest and practical importance. In the present study we describe the design, synthesis and evaluation of a combinatorial library of novel affinity ligands for the purification of DNA polymerases (Pols). Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase (Pfu Pol) was employed as a proof-of-principle example. Affinity ligand design was based on mimicking the natural interactions between deoxynucleoside-triphosphates (dNTPs) and the B-motif, a conserved structural moiety found in Pol-I and Pol-II family of enzymes. Solid-phase 'structure-guided' combinatorial chemistry was used to construct a library of 26 variants of the B-motif-binding 'lead' ligand X-Trz-Y (X is a purine derivative and Y is an aliphatic/aromatic sulphonate or phosphonate derivative) using 1,3,5-triazine (Trz) as the scaffold for assembly. The 'lead' ligand showed complementarity against a Lys and a Tyr residue of the polymerase B-motif. The ligand library was screened for its ability to bind and purify Pfu Pol from Escherichia coli extract. One immobilized ligand (oABSAd), bearing 9-aminoethyladenine (AEAd) and sulfanilic acid (oABS) linked on the triazine scaffold, displayed the highest purifying ability and binding capacity (0,55 mg Pfu Pol/g wet gel). Adsorption equilibrium studies with this affinity ligand and Pfu Pol determined a dissociation constant (K(D)) of 83 nM for the respective complex. The oABSAd affinity adsorbent was exploited in the development of a facile Pfu Pol purification protocol, affording homogeneous enzyme (>99% purity) in a single chromatography step. Quality control tests showed that Pfu Pol purified on the B-motif-complementing ligand is free of nucleic acids and contaminating nuclease activities, therefore, suitable for experimental use.

  9. Fidelity and mutational spectrum of Pfu DNA polymerase on a human mitochondrial DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, P; Kim, A; Khrapko, K; Thilly, W G

    1997-08-01

    The study of rare genetic changes in human tissues requires specialized techniques. Point mutations at fractions at or below 10(-6) must be observed to discover even the most prominent features of the point mutational spectrum. PCR permits the increase in number of mutant copies but does so at the expense of creating many additional mutations or "PCR noise". Thus, each DNA sequence studied must be characterized with regard to the DNA polymerase and conditions used to avoid interpreting a PCR-generated mutation as one arising in human tissue. The thermostable DNA polymerase derived from Pyrococcus furiosus designated Pfu has the highest fidelity of any DNA thermostable polymerase studied to date, and this property recommends it for analyses of tissue mutational spectra. Here, we apply constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE) to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification. This new strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by Pfu DNA polymerase in a 96-bp low melting domain of a human mitochondrial sequence despite the very low mutant fractions generated in the PCR process. This sequence, containing part of the tRNA glycine and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 genes, is the target of our studies of mitochondrial mutagenesis in human cells and tissues. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes by sequential enrichment on CDCE. An artificially constructed mutant was used as an internal standard to permit calculation of the mutant fraction. Our study found that the average error rate (mutations per base pair duplication) of Pfu was 6.5 x 10(-7), and five of its more frequent mutations (hot spots) consisted of three transversions (GC-->TA, AT-->TA, and AT-->CG), one transition (AT-->GC), and one 1-bp deletion (in an AAAAAA sequence). To achieve an even higher sensitivity, the amount of Pfu-induced mutants must be reduced.

  10. Temperature, pressure, and electrochemical constraints on protein speciation: Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized unfolded proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Dick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic calculations can be used to quantify environmental constraints on the speciation of proteins, such as the pH and temperature dependence of ionization state, and the relative chemical stabilities of proteins in different biogeochemical settings. These calculations depend in part on values of the standard molal Gibbs energies of proteins and their ionization reactions as a function of temperature and pressure. Because these values are not generally available, we calculated values of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar as well as the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of neutral and charged zwitterionic reference model compounds including aqueous amino acids, polypeptides, and unfolded proteins. The experimental calorimetric and volumetric data for these species taken from the literature were combined with group additivity algorithms to calculate the properties and parameters of neutral and ionized sidechain and backbone groups in unfolded proteins. The resulting set of group contributions enables the calculation of the standard molal Gibbs energy, enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, and isothermal compressibility of unfolded proteins in a range of proton ionization states to temperatures and pressures exceeding 100°C and 1000 bar. This approach provides a useful frame of reference for thermodynamic studies of protein folding and complexation reactions. It can also be used to assign provisional values of the net charge and Gibbs energy of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pH. Using these values, an Eh-pH diagram for a reaction representing the speciation of extracellular proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus and Bacillus subtilis was generated. The predicted predominance limits of these proteins correspond with the different electrochemical conditions of hydrothermal vents and soils. More comprehensive calculations of this kind may reveal pervasive

  11. Unambiguous determination of H-atom positions: comparing results from neutron and high-resolution X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardberg, Anna S; Del Castillo, Alexis Rae; Weiss, Kevin L; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew P; Myles, Dean A A

    2010-05-01

    The locations of H atoms in biological structures can be difficult to determine using X-ray diffraction methods. Neutron diffraction offers a relatively greater scattering magnitude from H and D atoms. Here, 1.65 A resolution neutron diffraction studies of fully perdeuterated and selectively CH(3)-protonated perdeuterated crystals of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin (D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively) at room temperature (RT) are described, as well as 1.1 A resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the same protein at both RT and 100 K. The two techniques are quantitatively compared in terms of their power to directly provide atomic positions for D atoms and analyze the role played by atomic thermal motion by computing the sigma level at the D-atom coordinate in simulated-annealing composite D-OMIT maps. It is shown that 1.65 A resolution RT neutron data for perdeuterated rubredoxin are approximately 8 times more likely overall to provide high-confidence positions for D atoms than 1.1 A resolution X-ray data at 100 K or RT. At or above the 1.0sigma level, the joint X-ray/neutron (XN) structures define 342/378 (90%) and 291/365 (80%) of the D-atom positions for D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively. The X-ray-only 1.1 A resolution 100 K structures determine only 19/388 (5%) and 8/388 (2%) of the D-atom positions above the 1.0sigma level for D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively. Furthermore, the improved model obtained from joint XN refinement yielded improved electron-density maps, permitting the location of more D atoms than electron-density maps from models refined against X-ray data only.

  12. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confalonieri, F; Sommer, S, E-mail: fabrice.confalonieri@u-psud.fr, E-mail: suzanne.sommer@u-psud.fr [University Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR8621, Institut de Genetique et Microbiologie, Batiments 400-409, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  13. Geochemical Constraints on Archaeal Diversity in the Vulcano Hydrothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K. L.; Amend, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    The shallow marine hydrothermal system of Vulcano, Italy hosts a wide diversity of cultured thermophilic Archaea, including Palaeococcus helgesonii, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyrococcus furiosus, to name a few. However, recent studies have revealed a plethora of uncultured archaeal lineages in the Vulcano system. For example, a 16S rRNA gene survey of an onshore geothermal well identified a diverse archaeal community including deeply-branching uncultured Crenarchaeota, Korarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota. Additionally, culture-independent hybridization techniques suggested that Archaea account for nearly half of the microbial community in the Vulcano system. Furthermore, geochemical characterization of fluids revealed numerous lithotrophic and heterotrophic exergonic reactions that could support as yet uncultured organisms. Archaeal diversity throughout the Vulcano hydrothermal system was investigated using 16S rRNA gene surveys at five submarine vents and an onshore sediment seep. Overall, archaeal diversity was higher (10 groups) at submarine vents with moderate temperatures (59°C) compared with higher temperature (94°C) vents (4 groups). Archaeal communities at the moderately thermal vents were dominated by Thermococcales and also contained Archaeoglobales, Thermoproteales, and uncultured archaea among the Korarchaeota, Marine Group I, and the Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota (DHVE). Fluid composition also affects the microbial community structure. At two high-temperature sites variations in archaeal diversity can be attributed to differences in iron and hydrogen concentrations, and pH. Comparing sites with similar temperature and pH conditions suggests that the presence of Desulfurococcales is limited to sites at which metabolic energy yields exceed 10 kJ per mole of electrons transferred. The Vulcano hydrothermal system hosts diverse archaeal communities, containing both cultured and uncultured species, whose distribution appears to be constrained by

  14. Extremely Thermophilic Microorganisms as Metabolic Engineering Platforms for Production of Fuels and Industrial Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Zeldes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye towards potential technological

  15. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  16. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Keller, Matthew W.; Loder, Andrew J.; Straub, Christopher T.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

  17. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, iain J.; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Rodriguez, Jason; Hooper, Sean; Porat, Iris; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Sun, Hui; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Huber, Harald; Zhulin, Igor B.; Whitman, William B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-09-05

    Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced - Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  18. Evidence of Molecular Adaptation to Extreme Environments and Applicability to Space Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović, M. D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: {it Escherichia coli (E. coli K12}, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0D C ({it Metarhizium frigidum (M.~frigidum} and {it Methanococcoides burtonii (M.~burtonii} and 110D C ({it Methanopyrus kandleri (M.~kandleri}. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the {it chaperones} known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved {it chaperons} found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique {it chaperone TF55}. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The followinghyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used forthese studies: {it Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M.~jannaschii, M.~kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A.~fulgidus} and threespecies of {it Pyrococcus}. Common genes were annotated and groupedaccording to their roles in cellular processes where such informationwas available and proteins not previously implicated in theheat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additionalexperimental data are needed in order to learn more about theseproteins. To address non-gene based components of thermaladaptation

  19. Evidence of molecular adaptation to extreme environments and applicability to space environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: Escherichia coli (E. coli K12, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0ºC (Metarhizium frigidum (M. frigidum and Methanococcoides burtonii (M. burtonii and 110ºC (Methanopyrus kandleri (M. kandleri. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The following hyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used for these studies: Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M. jannaschii, M. kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A. fulgidus and three species of Pyrococcus. Common genes were annotated and grouped according to their roles in cellular processes where such information was available and proteins not previously implicated in the heat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additional experimental data are needed in order to learn more about these proteins. To address non-gene based components of thermal adaptation, all sequenced extremophiles were

  20. DNA of Piroplasms of Ruminants and Dogs in Ixodid Bat Ticks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor Hornok

    Full Text Available In this study 308 ticks (Ixodes ariadnae: 26 larvae, 14 nymphs, five females; I. vespertilionis: 89 larvae, 27 nymphs, eight females; I. simplex: 80 larvae, 50 nymphs, nine females have been collected from 200 individuals of 17 bat species in two countries, Hungary and Romania. After DNA extraction these ticks were molecularly analysed for the presence of piroplasm DNA. In Hungary I. ariadnae was most frequently identified from bat species in the family Vespertilionidae, whereas I. vespertilionis was associated with Rhinolophidae. Ixodes ariadnae was not found in Romania. Four, four and one new bat host species of I. ariadnae, I. vespertilionis and I. simplex were identified, respectively. DNA sequences of piroplasms were detected in 20 bat ticks (15 larvae, four nymphs and one female. I. simplex carried piroplasm DNA sequences significantly more frequently than I. vespertilionis. In I. ariadnae only Babesia vesperuginis DNA was detected, whereas in I. vespertilionis sequences of both B. vesperuginis and B. crassa. From I. simplex the DNA of B. canis, Theileria capreoli, T. orientalis and Theileria sp. OT3 were amplified, as well as a shorter sequence of the zoonotic B. venatorum. Bat ticks are not known to infest dogs or ruminants, i.e. typical hosts and reservoirs of piroplasms molecularly identified in I. vespertilionis and I. simplex. Therefore, DNA sequences of piroplasms detected in these bat ticks most likely originated from the blood of their respective bat hosts. This may indicate either that bats are susceptible to a broader range of piroplasms than previously thought, or at least the DNA of piroplasms may pass through the gut barrier of bats during digestion of relevant arthropod vectors. In light of these findings, the role of bats in the epidemiology of piroplasmoses deserves further investigation.

  1. The hypoxic microenvironment upgrades stem-like properties of ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Dongming

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study whether hypoxia influences the stem-like properties of ovarian cancer cells and their biological behavior under hypoxia. Method Ovarian cancer cell lines ES-2 and OVCAR-3 were cultivated in different oxygen tensions for proliferation, cell cycling and invasion analyses. The clonogenic potential of cells was examined by colony formation and sphere formation assays. Stem cell surface markers, SP and CD44bright and CD44dim cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Protein expression of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, Ot3/4 and Sox2 were investigated by Western blotting. Results Both cell lines cultivated at hypoxic condition grew relatively slowly with extended G0/G1 phase. However, if the cells were pre-treated under 1% O2 for 48 hrs before brought back to normoxia, the cells showed significantly higher proliferation rate with higher infiltration capability, and significant more colonies and spheres, in comparison to the cells always cultivated under normoxia. CD44bright cells expressed significantly higher levels of Oct3/4 and Sox2 than the CD44dim cells and formed significantly more clones and spheres examined in vitro. Hypoxic treatment of the cells resulted in stronger CD44 expression in both cell lines, and stronger CD133 expression in the OVCAR-3 cell line. In parallel with these findings, significantly increased number of side population (SP cells and up-regulated expression of Oct3/4 and Sox2 in both ES-2 and OVCAR-3 cell lines were observed. Conclusion We conclude that ovarian cancer cells survive hypoxia by upgrading their stem-like properties through up-regulation of stemness-related factors and behave more aggressively when brought back to higher oxygen environment.

  2. Virtual Reality and Active Videogame-Based Practice, Learning Needs, and Preferences: A Cross-Canada Survey of Physical Therapists and Occupational Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle; Glegg, Stephanie; Colquhoun, Heather; Miller, Patricia; Noubary, Farzad

    2017-08-01

    Describe the clinical use of virtual reality (VR)/active videogaming (AVG) by physical therapists (PTs) and occupational therapists (OTs) in Canada, identify usage barriers and facilitators, evaluate factors that predict intention to use VR/AVGs, and determine therapists' learning needs. Cross-sectional survey. Online survey of therapists in Canada who were members of 1 of 26 professional PT or OT colleges or associations using the Assessing Determinants Of Prospective Take-up of Virtual Reality (ADOPT-VR2) Instrument. We received 1071 (506 PTs, 562 OTs, 3 dual-trained) responses. Forty-six percent had clinical VR/AVG experience; only 12% reported current use, with the Wii being the most clinically accessible (41%) system. Therapists used VR/AVGs primarily in rehabilitation (32%) and hospital (29%) settings, preferentially targeting balance (39.3%) and physical activity (19.8%) outcomes. Stroke (25.8%), brain injury (15.3%), musculoskeletal (14.9%), and cerebral palsy (10.5%) populations were most frequently treated. Therapists with VR/AVG experience rated all ADOPT-VR2 constructs more highly than did those without experience (P < 0.001). Factors predictive of intention to use VR included the technology's perceived usefulness and therapist self-efficacy in VR/AVG use (P < 0.001). Highest-rated barriers to VR/AVG use were lack of funds, space, time, support staff, and appropriate clients, whereas facilitators included client motivation, therapist knowledge, and management support. Most (76%) respondents were interested in learning more. Understanding use, predictors of use, and learning needs is essential for developing knowledge translation initiatives to support clinical integration of VR/AVGs. Results of this first national survey will inform the creation of resources to support therapists in this field.

  3. DNA of Piroplasms of Ruminants and Dogs in Ixodid Bat Ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornok, Sándor; Szőke, Krisztina; Kováts, Dávid; Estók, Péter; Görföl, Tamás; Boldogh, Sándor A; Takács, Nóra; Kontschán, Jenő; Földvári, Gábor; Barti, Levente; Corduneanu, Alexandra; Sándor, Attila D

    2016-01-01

    In this study 308 ticks (Ixodes ariadnae: 26 larvae, 14 nymphs, five females; I. vespertilionis: 89 larvae, 27 nymphs, eight females; I. simplex: 80 larvae, 50 nymphs, nine females) have been collected from 200 individuals of 17 bat species in two countries, Hungary and Romania. After DNA extraction these ticks were molecularly analysed for the presence of piroplasm DNA. In Hungary I. ariadnae was most frequently identified from bat species in the family Vespertilionidae, whereas I. vespertilionis was associated with Rhinolophidae. Ixodes ariadnae was not found in Romania. Four, four and one new bat host species of I. ariadnae, I. vespertilionis and I. simplex were identified, respectively. DNA sequences of piroplasms were detected in 20 bat ticks (15 larvae, four nymphs and one female). I. simplex carried piroplasm DNA sequences significantly more frequently than I. vespertilionis. In I. ariadnae only Babesia vesperuginis DNA was detected, whereas in I. vespertilionis sequences of both B. vesperuginis and B. crassa. From I. simplex the DNA of B. canis, Theileria capreoli, T. orientalis and Theileria sp. OT3 were amplified, as well as a shorter sequence of the zoonotic B. venatorum. Bat ticks are not known to infest dogs or ruminants, i.e. typical hosts and reservoirs of piroplasms molecularly identified in I. vespertilionis and I. simplex. Therefore, DNA sequences of piroplasms detected in these bat ticks most likely originated from the blood of their respective bat hosts. This may indicate either that bats are susceptible to a broader range of piroplasms than previously thought, or at least the DNA of piroplasms may pass through the gut barrier of bats during digestion of relevant arthropod vectors. In light of these findings, the role of bats in the epidemiology of piroplasmoses deserves further investigation.

  4. Angular distributions of fast neutrons scattered by Al, Si, P, S and Zn; Distributions angulaires des neutrons rapides diffuses par Al, Si, P, S et Zn; Usloviya raspredeleniya bystrykh nejtronov, rasseyannykh alyuminiem, kremniem, fosforom i tsinkom; Distribuciones angulares de neutrones rapidos dispersados por Al, Si, P, S y Zn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tstjkaija, K; Tanaka, S; Maeuyama, M; Tomita, Y [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-Mtjea (Japan)

    1962-03-15

    Differential scattering cross-sections of Al, Si, P, S and Zn for fast neutrons have been measured in an energy range of 3.4 to 4.6 MeV by using the time-of-flight method. Angular distributions of the inelastically scattered neutrons are nearly isotropic in all cases. These results are discussed on the basis of the Hauser-Feshbach theory. (author) [French] Les sections efficaces differentielles de diffusion de Al, Si, P, S et Zn pour des neutrons rapides ont ete mesurees dans la gamme d'energies de 3,4 a 4,6 MeV, en employant la methode du temps de vol. Les distributions angulaires des neutrons diffuses inelastiquement sont presque isotropes dans tous les cas. Les auteurs analysent ces resultats en se fondant sur la theorie de Hauser-Feshbach. (author) [Spanish] Los autores han medido por el metodo del tiempo de vuelo las secciones eficaces diferenciales de dispersion del Al, Si, P, S y Zn para neutrones rapidos de energia comprendida entre 3,4 y 4,6 MeV. Las distribuciones angulares de los neutrones dispersados inelasticamente son casi isotropicas en todos los casos. Los autores analizan los resultados obtenidos basandose en la teoria de Hauser-Feshbach . (author) [Russian] Differentsial'no e sechenie rasseyaniya alyuminiya, kremniya, fosfora, sery i tsinka dlya bystrykh nejtronov izmereno v diapazone ehnergii ot 3,4 do 4,6 Megaehlektronvol't ispol'zovanie m metoda vremeni proleta. Uglovye raspredeleniya neuprugo rasseyannykh nejtronov yavlyayutsya pochti vo vsekh sluchayakh izotropnymi. Jeti rezul'taty obsuzhdayutsya na osnove teorii Hauzera-Feshbakha. (author)

  5. Rheumatology education for undergraduate nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy students in the UK: standards, challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, S; Clarke, B; O'Brien, A; Hammond, A; Ryan, S; Kay, L; Richards, P; Almeida, C

    2008-07-01

    Rheumatological conditions are common, thus nurses (Ns) occupational therapists (OTs) and physiotherapists (PTs) require at least basic rheumatology knowledge upon qualifying. The aim of this study was to develop a core set of teaching topics and potential ways of delivering them. A modified Delphi technique was used for clinicians to develop preliminary core sets of teaching topics for each profession. Telephone interviews with educationalists explored their views on these, and challenges and solutions for delivering them. Inter-professional workshops enabled clinicians and educationalists to finalize the core set together, and generate methods for delivery. Thirty-nine rheumatology clinicians (12N, 14OT, 13PT) completed the Delphi consensus, proposing three preliminary core sets (N71 items, OT29, PT26). Nineteen educationalists (6N, 7OT, 6PT) participated in telephone interviews, raising concerns about disease-specific vs generic teaching and proposing many methods for delivery. Three inter-professional workshops involved 34 participants (clinicians: N12, OT9, PT5; educationalists: N2, OT3, PT2; Patient 1) who reached consensus on a single core set comprising six teaching units: Anatomy and Physiology; Assessment; Management and Intervention; Psychosocial Issues; Patient Education; and the Multi-disciplinary Team, recommending some topics within the units receive greater depth for some professions. An innovative range of delivery options was generated plus two brief interventions: a Rheumatology Chat Show and a Rheumatology Road Show. Working together, clinicians and educationalists proposed a realistic core set of rheumatology topics for undergraduate health professionals. They proposed innovative delivery methods, with collaboration between educationalists, clinicians and patients strongly recommended. These potential interventions need testing.

  6. Fidelity and Mutational Spectrum of Pfu DNA Polymerase on a Human Mitochondrial DNA Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Paulo; Kim, Andrea; Khrapko, Konstantin; Thilly, William G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of rare genetic changes in human tissues requires specialized techniques. Point mutations at fractions at or below 10−6 must be observed to discover even the most prominent features of the point mutational spectrum. PCR permits the increase in number of mutant copies but does so at the expense of creating many additional mutations or “PCR noise”. Thus, each DNA sequence studied must be characterized with regard to the DNA polymerase and conditions used to avoid interpreting a PCR-generated mutation as one arising in human tissue. The thermostable DNA polymerase derived from Pyrococcus furiosus designated Pfu has the highest fidelity of any DNA thermostable polymerase studied to date, and this property recommends it for analyses of tissue mutational spectra. Here, we apply constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE) to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification. This new strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by Pfu DNA polymerase in a 96-bp low melting domain of a human mitochondrial sequence despite the very low mutant fractions generated in the PCR process. This sequence, containing part of the tRNA glycine and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 genes, is the target of our studies of mitochondrial mutagenesis in human cells and tissues. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes by sequential enrichment on CDCE. An artificially constructed mutant was used as an internal standard to permit calculation of the mutant fraction. Our study found that the average error rate (mutations per base pair duplication) of Pfu was 6.5 × 10−7, and five of its more frequent mutations (hot spots) consisted of three transversions (GC → TA, AT → TA, and AT → CG), one transition (AT → GC), and one 1-bp deletion (in an AAAAAA sequence). To achieve an even higher sensitivity, the amount of Pfu-induced mutants must be

  7. Development of an ultrahigh-temperature process for the enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose. IV. Immobilization of two thermostable beta-glycosidases and optimization of a packed-bed reactor for lactose conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzelbauer, Inge; Kuhn, Bernhard; Splechtna, Barbara; Kulbe, Klaus D; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2002-03-20

    Recombinant hyperthermostable beta-glycosidases from the archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus (Ss beta Gly) and Pyrococcus furiosus (CelB) were covalently attached onto the insoluble carriers chitosan, controlled pore glass (CPG), and Eupergit C. For each enzyme/carrier pair, the protein-binding capacity, the immobilization yield, the pH profiles for activity and stability, the activity/temperature profile, and the kinetic constants for lactose hydrolysis at 70 degrees C were determined. Eupergit C was best among the carriers in regard to retention of native-like activity and stability of Ss beta Gly and CelB over the pH range 3.0-7.5. Its protein binding capacity of approximately 0.003 (on a mass basis) was one-third times that of CPG, while immobilization yields were typically 80% in each case. Activation energies for lactose conversion by the immobilized enzymes at pH 5.5 were in the range 50-60 kJ/mol. This is compared to values of approximately 75 kJ/mol for the free enzymes. Immobilization expands the useful pH range for CelB and Ss beta Gly by approximately 1.5 pH units toward pH 3.5 and pH 4.5, respectively. A packed-bed enzyme reactor was developed for the continuous conversion of lactose in different media, including whey and milk, and operated over extended reaction times of up to 14 days. The productivities of the Eupergit C-immobilized enzyme reactor were determined at dilution rates between 1 and 12 h(-1), and using 45 and 170 g/L initial lactose. Results of kinetic modeling for the same reactor, assuming plug flow and steady state, suggest the presence of mass-transfer limitation of the reaction rate under the conditions used. Formation of galacto-oligosaccharides in the continuous packed-bed reactor and in the batch reactor using free enzyme was closely similar in regard to yield and individual saccharide components produced. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 77: 619-631, 2002; DOI 10.1002/bit.10110

  8. Microbial Geochemistry in Shallow-Sea Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, J. P.; Pichler, T.

    2006-12-01

    Shallow-sea hydrothermal systems are far more ubiquitous than generally recognized. Approximately 50-60 systems are currently known, occurring world-wide in areas of high heat flow, such as, volcanic island arcs, near-surface mid-ocean ridges, and intraplate oceanic volcanoes. In contrast to deep-sea systems, shallow- sea vent fluids generally include a meteoric component, they experience phase separation near the sediment- water interface, and they discharge into the photic zone (thermophilic bacteria and archaea. Perhaps because deep-sea smokers and continental hot springs are visually more stunning, shallow-sea systems are often overlooked study sites. We will discuss their particular features that afford unique opportunities in microbial geochemistry. Two of the better studied examples are at Vulcano Island (Italy) and Ambitle Island (Papua New Guinea). The vents and sediment seeps at Vulcano are the "type locality" for numerous cultured hyperthermophiles, including the bacteria Aquifex and Thermotoga, the crenarchaeon Pyrodictium, and the Euryarchaeota Archaeoglobus and Pyrococcus. Isotope-labeled incubation experiments of heated sediments and an array of culturing studies have shown that simple organic compounds are predominantly fermented or anaerobically respired with sulfate. 16S rRNA gene surveys, together with fluorescent in situ hybridization studies, demonstrated the dominance of key thermophilic bacteria and archaea (e.g., Aquificales, Thermotogales, Thermococcales, Archaeoglobales) in the sediments and the presence of a broad spectrum of mostly uncultured crenarchaeota in several vent waters, sediment samples, and geothermal wells. Thermodynamic modeling quantified potential energy yields from aerobic and anaerobic respiration reactions and fermentation reactions. In contrast to their deep-sea counterparts, shallow-sea hydrothermal systems are often characterized by high arsenic concentrations of more than 500-times seawater levels. The arsenic

  9. Marine Subsurface Microbial Communities Across a Hydrothermal Gradient in Okinawa Trough Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, L. D.; Hser Wah Saw, J.; Ettema, T.; House, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 331 to the Okinawa backarc basin provided an opportunity to study the microbial stratigraphy within the sediments surrounding a hydrothermal vent. The Okinawa backarc basin is a sedimented region of the seafloor located on a continental margin, and also hosts a hydrothermal network within the subsurface. Site C0014 within the Iheya North hydrothermal field is located 450 m east of the active vent and has a surface temperature of 5°C with no evidence of hydrothermal alteration within the top 10 meters below sea floor (mbsf). Temperature increases with depth at an estimated rate of 3°C/m and transitions from non-hydrothermal margin sediments to a hydrothermally altered regime below 10 mbsf. In this study, we utilized deep 16S rRNA sequencing of DNA from IODP Expedition 331 Site C0014 sediment horizons in order to assess diversity throughout the sediment column as well as determine the potential limits of the biosphere. Analysis of the amplicon data shows a shift over 15 mbsf from a heterogeneous community of cosmopolitan marine subsurface taxa toward an archaeal-dominated community in the deepest horizons of the predicted biosphere. Notably, the phylum Chloroflexi represents a substantial taxon through most horizons, where it appears to be replaced below 10 mbsf by punctuations of thermophilic and methanotrophic Archaea and Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group abundances. DNA from the aforementioned transition horizons was further analyzed using metagenomic sequencing. Preliminary taxonomic analysis of the metagenomic data agrees well with amplicon data in capturing the shift in relative abundance of Archaea increasing with depth. Additionally, reverse gyrase, a gene found exclusively in hyperthermophilic microorganisms, was recovered only in the metagenome of the deepest horizon. A BLAST search of this protein sequence against the GenBank non-redudnant protein database produced top hits with reverse gyrase from Thermococcus and Pyrococcus, which are

  10. Hydrogen production and enzyme activities in the hyperthermophile Thermococcus paralvinellae grown on maltose, tryptone and agricultural waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Hensley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermococcus may be an important alternative source of H2 in the hot subseafloor in otherwise low H2 environments such as some hydrothermal vents and oil reservoirs. It may also be useful in industry for rapid agricultural waste treatment and concomitant H2 production. Thermococcus paralvinellae grown at 82°C without sulfur produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L-1 at rates of 5-36 fmol H2 cell-1 h-1 on 0.5% (wt vol-1 maltose, 0.5% (wt vol-1 tryptone, and 0.5% maltose + 0.05% tryptone media. Two potentially inhibiting conditions, the presence of 10 mM acetate and low pH (pH 5 in maltose-only medium, did not significantly affect growth or H2 production. Growth rates, H2 production rates, and cell yields based on H2 production were the same as those for Pyrococcus furiosus grown at 95°C on the same media for comparison. Acetate, butyrate, succinate, isovalerate and formate were also detected as end products. After 100 h, T. paralvinellae produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L-1 of medium when grown on up to 70% (vol vol-1 waste milk from cows undergoing treatment for mastitis with the bacterial antibiotic Ceftiofur and from untreated cows. The amount of H2 produced by T. paralvinellae increased with increasing waste concentrations, but decreased in P. furiosus cultures supplemented with waste milk above 1% concentration. All mesophilic bacteria from the waste milk that grew on Luria Bertani, Sheep’s Blood (selective for Staphylococcus, the typical cause of mastitis, and MacConkey (selective for Gram-negative enteric bacteria agar plates were killed by heat during incubation at 82°C. Ceftiofur, which is heat labile, was below the detection limit following incubation at 82°C. T. paralvinellae also produced up to 6 mmol of H2 L-1 of medium when grown on 0.1-10% (wt vol-1 spent brewery grain while P. furiosus produced < 1 mmol of H2 L-1. Twelve of 13 enzyme activities in T. paralvinellae showed significant (p<0.05 differences across six different growth conditions

  11. Evolution of mal ABC transporter operons in the Thermococcales and Thermotogales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogarten J Peter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mal genes that encode maltose transporters have undergone extensive lateral transfer among ancestors of the archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus. Bacterial hyperthermophiles of the order Thermotogales live among these archaea and so may have shared in these transfers. The genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima bears evidence of extensive acquisition of archaeal genes, so its ancestors clearly had the capacity to do so. We examined deep phylogenetic relationships among the mal genes of these hyperthermophiles and their close relatives to look for evidence of shared ancestry. Results We demonstrate that the two maltose ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter operons now found in Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus (termed mal and mdx genes, respectively are not closely related to one another. The Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus mal genes are most closely related to bacterial mal genes while their respective mdx genes are archaeal. The genes of the two mal operons in Tt. maritima are not related to genes in either of these archaeal operons. They are highly similar to one another and belong to a phylogenetic lineage that includes mal genes from the enteric bacteria. A unique domain of the enteric MalF membrane spanning proteins found also in these Thermotogales MalF homologs supports their relatively close relationship with these enteric proteins. Analyses of genome sequence data from other Thermotogales species, Fervidobacterium nodosum, Thermosipho melanesiensis, Thermotoga petrophila, Thermotoga lettingae, and Thermotoga neapolitana, revealed a third apparent mal operon, absent from the published genome sequence of Tt. maritima strain MSB8. This third operon, mal3, is more closely related to the Thermococcales' bacteria-derived mal genes than are mal1 and mal2. F. nodosum, Ts. melanesiensis, and Tt. lettingae have only one of the mal1-mal2 paralogs. The mal2 operon from an unknown species of Thermotoga appears to

  12. Towards understanding the first genome sequence of a crenarchaeon by genome annotation using clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, D A; Shankavaram, U T; Galperin, M Y; Wolf, Y I; Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    2000-01-01

    Standard archival sequence databases have not been designed as tools for genome annotation and are far from being optimal for this purpose. We used the database of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) to reannotate the genomes of two archaea, Aeropyrum pernix, the first member of the Crenarchaea to be sequenced, and Pyrococcus abyssi. A. pernix and P. abyssi proteins were assigned to COGs using the COGNITOR program; the results were verified on a case-by-case basis and augmented by additional database searches using the PSI-BLAST and TBLASTN programs. Functions were predicted for over 300 proteins from A. pernix, which could not be assigned a function using conventional methods with a conservative sequence similarity threshold, an approximately 50% increase compared to the original annotation. A. pernix shares most of the conserved core of proteins that were previously identified in the Euryarchaeota. Cluster analysis or distance matrix tree construction based on the co-occurrence of genomes in COGs showed that A. pernix forms a distinct group within the archaea, although grouping with the two species of Pyrococci, indicative of similar repertoires of conserved genes, was observed. No indication of a specific relationship between Crenarchaeota and eukaryotes was obtained in these analyses. Several proteins that are conserved in Euryarchaeota and most bacteria are unexpectedly missing in A. pernix, including the entire set of de novo purine biosynthesis enzymes, the GTPase FtsZ (a key component of the bacterial and euryarchaeal cell-division machinery), and the tRNA-specific pseudouridine synthase, previously considered universal. A. pernix is represented in 48 COGs that do not contain any euryarchaeal members. Many of these proteins are TCA cycle and electron transport chain enzymes, reflecting the aerobic lifestyle of A. pernix. Special-purpose databases organized on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and carefully curated with respect to known and

  13. Análisis de transferencia horizontal de genes en ensayos de biorremediación con grasas recalcitrantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Rozo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El empleo de microorganismos como herramienta para la mineralización de contaminantes orgánicos es una práctica que ha tomado mucha fuerza gracias a su eficiencia y bajo costo. La transferencia horizontal vía conjugación de genes es un requerimiento básico para optimizar procesos de biorremediación, por esta razón, además de conocer la diversidad metabólica es fundamental entender las interacciones que ocurren en una comunidad bacteriana para potenciar los procesos de biorremediación en campo. En este estudio se busca evaluar el potencial de transferencia horizontal (TH, tanto in vitro como en microcosmos de suelo, de aislamientos de bacterias obtenidas de un pasivo ambiental de grasas provenientes de la explotación carbonífera del Cerrejón. Inicialmente se agruparon los aislamientos de acuerdo con sus patrones de resistencia a antibióticos: ampicilina, cloramfenicol, gentamicina, tetraciclina y kanamicina. El potencial de TH de las cepas Vlf4, Ot3, Ot6, Pgt4, Blf11 y Vlf13 fue evaluado in vitro en medio sólido Luria-Bertani (LB donde se obtuvieron nuevos fenotipos a partir de los cruces Vlf13xOt6 y Pgt4xOt6, el nuevo fenotipo indica resistencia a los dos marcadores (ampR, kanR y su morfología sugiere que el receptor, en los dos casos, es la cepa Ot6. Los parentales Vlf13, Pgt4 y Ot6 fueron identificados por amplificación del gen RNAr 16S como Pseudomonas sp., Pseudomonas sp. y Chryseobacterium sp., respectivamente, y los transconjugantes como Chryseobacterium sp. Posteriormente, estos dos cruces fueron sometidos a ensayos de transferencia horizontal en microcosmos de suelos, donde se hizo evidente nuevamente la presencia de TH a una menor tasa. Los resultados obtenidos indican la posibilidad de un potencial de transferencia horizontal de genes entre los aislamientos seleccionados, dando lugar a la probabilidad de formular en futuros estudios un consorcio de bacterias que demuestran tener esta ventaja adaptativa.

  14. Vitreous Anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) at High Pressure: A First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, D. B.; Karki, B. B.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the high abundance of silicates and aluminosilicates inside the earth, their corresponding melts are likely to be one of the key transport agents in the chemical and thermal evolution of our planet and therefore, have long been the subject of investigations. Experimentally, in-situ melt properties of these materials, particularly at high pressure-temperature conditions are extremely difficult to constrain and the corresponding glass phases are considered as analogs. This, however, prohibits one-to-one comparison between the properties of silicate melt and its corresponding glass. With the aim to enable such comparison, we investigate the equation of state and structural properties of CaAl2Si2O8 glass at 300 K as a function of pressure up to 160 GPa from first principles molecular dynamics simulation results. Our results show that at ambient pressure: (i) Si's remain mostly (> 95%) under tetrahedral oxygen surroundings, (ii) unlike anorthite crystal, presence of high coordination (> 4) Al's with 30% abundance, (iii) and significant presence of both non bridging (8%) and triply (17%) coordinated oxygen. In the 0-10 GPa interval, mainly topological changes occur in the Si-O (also Al-O to some extent) surroundings in the cold compressed case in comparison to smooth increase in the average bond distance and coordination in the hot compressed case. Further compression results in gradual increases in: mean coordination, proportion of O-triclusters and increasing appearance of tetrahedral oxgyens, with Si-O (Al-O) reaching 6 (6.5) and O-T > 3 (T=Si and Al) at the highest compression. Due to the absence of kinetic barrier, the hot compressed glasses consistently produce greater densities and higher coordination numbers than the cold compression cases. Decompressed glasses show irreversible compaction along with retention of high coordination species when decompressed from > 10 GPa and degree of irreversibility depends on the peak pressure of decompression. These structural details suggest that the pressure response of the cold compressed glasses are not only inherently different in the 0 - 10 GPa interval, the density and the average coordination are consistently lower than the hot compressed glasses. Hot-compressed glasses may therefore be the better analog in the study of high-pressure silicate melts.

  15. A Scalable Gaussian Process Analysis Algorithm for Biomass Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Biomass monitoring is vital for studying the carbon cycle of earth's ecosystem and has several significant implications, especially in the context of understanding climate change and its impacts. Recently, several change detection methods have been proposed to identify land cover changes in temporal profiles (time series) of vegetation collected using remote sensing instruments, but do not satisfy one or both of the two requirements of the biomass monitoring problem, i.e., {\\em operating in online mode} and {\\em handling periodic time series}. In this paper, we adapt Gaussian process regression to detect changes in such time series in an online fashion. While Gaussian process (GP) have been widely used as a kernel based learning method for regression and classification, their applicability to massive spatio-temporal data sets, such as remote sensing data, has been limited owing to the high computational costs involved. We focus on addressing the scalability issues associated with the proposed GP based change detection algorithm. This paper makes several significant contributions. First, we propose a GP based online time series change detection algorithm and demonstrate its effectiveness in detecting different types of changes in {\\em Normalized Difference Vegetation Index} (NDVI) data obtained from a study area in Iowa, USA. Second, we propose an efficient Toeplitz matrix based solution which significantly improves the computational complexity and memory requirements of the proposed GP based method. Specifically, the proposed solution can analyze a time series of length $t$ in $O(t^2)$ time while maintaining a $O(t)$ memory footprint, compared to the $O(t^3)$ time and $O(t^2)$ memory requirement of standard matrix manipulation based methods. Third, we describe a parallel version of the proposed solution which can be used to simultaneously analyze a large number of time series. We study three different parallel implementations: using threads, MPI, and a hybrid implementation using threads and MPI. Experimental results show that the hybrid implementation scales better than the multi-threaded and MPI based implementations. The application of the proposed scalable algorithm is demonstrated in analyzing massive remote sensing observation data. The hybrid implementation, using 1536 computing cores, can analyze an NDVI data set for the Iowa study area in nearly 5 seconds, while a serial algorithm, using standard Cholesky decomposition based routines, takes several days to process the same data set.

  16. Transmission of the PabI family of restriction DNA glycosylase genes: mobility and long-term inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kenji K; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2015-10-19

    R.PabI is an exceptional restriction enzyme that functions as a DNA glycosylase. The enzyme excises an unmethylated base from its recognition sequence to generate apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, and also displays AP lyase activity, cleaving the DNA backbone at the AP site to generate the 3'-phospho alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehyde end in addition to the 5'-phosphate end. The resulting ends are difficult to religate with DNA ligase. The enzyme was originally isolated in Pyrococcus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, and additional homologs subsequently identified in the epsilon class of the Gram-negative bacterial phylum Proteobacteria, such as Helicobacter pylori. Systematic analysis of R.PabI homologs and their neighboring genes in sequenced genomes revealed co-occurrence of R.PabI with M.PabI homolog methyltransferase genes. R.PabI and M.PabI homolog genes are occasionally found at corresponding (orthologous) loci in different species, such as Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter acinonychis and Helicobacter cetorum, indicating long-term maintenance of the gene pair. One R.PabI and M.PabI homolog gene pair is observed immediately after the GMP synthase gene in both Campylobacter and Helicobacter, representing orthologs beyond genera. The mobility of the PabI family of restriction-modification (RM) system between genomes is evident upon comparison of genomes of sibling strains/species. Analysis of R.PabI and M.PabI homologs in H. pylori revealed an insertion of integrative and conjugative elements (ICE), and replacement with a gene of unknown function that may specify a membrane-associated toxin (hrgC). In view of the similarity of HrgC with toxins in type I toxin-antitoxin systems, we addressed the biological significance of this substitution. Our data indicate that replacement with hrgC occurred in the common ancestor of hspAmerind and hspEAsia. Subsequently, H. pylori with and without hrgC were intermixed at this locus, leading to complex distribution of hrgC in East

  17. Community Response to a Heavy Precipitation Event in High Temperature, Chemosynthetic Biofilms and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Loiacono, S. T.; Shock, E.

    2012-12-01

    Coordinated analysis of the "Bison Pool" (BP) Environmental Genome and a complementary contextual geochemical dataset of ~75 parameters revealed biogeochemical cycling and metabolic and microbial community shifts in a Yellowstone National Park hot spring ecosystem (1). The >22m outflow of BP is a gradient of decreasing temperature, increasing dissolved oxygen, and changing availability of nutrients. Microbial life at BP transitions from a 92°C chemosynthetic community in the BP source pool to a 56°C photosynthetic mat community. Metagenomic data at BP showed the potential for both heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon metabolism (rTCA and acetyl-CoA cycles) in the highest temperature, chemosynthetic regions (1). This region of the outflow is dominated by Aquificales and Pyrococcus relatives, with smaller contributions of heterotrophic Bacteria. Following a 2h heavy precipitation event we observed an influx of exogenous organic material into the source pool supplied from the meadow surrounding the BP area. We sampled biomass and fluid at several locations within the outflow immediately following the event, and on several occasions for the next eight days. Elemental analysis and carbon and nitrogen isotopic analyses were conducted on biomass and sediment, and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon content and δ13C of fluids were analyzed. DNA and RNA were extracted, and following RT-PCR, nitrogen cycle functional gene expression was evaluated. Previous work at BP has shown that chemosynthetic biomass may carry isotopic signatures of fractionation during carbon fixation, via the acetyl-CoA and rTCA cycles (2). However, the addition of exogenous organic carbon during the rain event had an immediate and dramatic effect on the sediments and biofilms in the chemosynthetic zone of the outflow. Dissolved organic carbon was the highest measured in six years. Chemosynthetic biomass responded by incorporating the organic carbon. Carbon isotopic signatures in chemosynthetic

  18. Molecular Assemblies, Genes and Genomics Integrated Efficiently (MAGGIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-05-26

    Final report on MAGGIE. We set ambitious goals to model the functions of individual organisms and their community from molecular to systems scale. These scientific goals are driving the development of sophisticated algorithms to analyze large amounts of experimental measurements made using high throughput technologies to explain and predict how the environment influences biological function at multiple scales and how the microbial systems in turn modify the environment. By experimentally evaluating predictions made using these models we will test the degree to which our quantitative multiscale understanding wilt help to rationally steer individual microbes and their communities towards specific tasks. Towards this end we have made substantial progress towards understanding evolution of gene families, transcriptional structures, detailed structures of keystone molecular assemblies (proteins and complexes), protein interactions, biological networks, microbial interactions, and community structure. Using comparative analysis we have tracked the evolutionary history of gene functions to understand how novel functions evolve. One level up, we have used proteomics data, high-resolution genome tiling microarrays, and 5' RNA sequencing to revise genome annotations, discover new genes including ncRNAs, and map dynamically changing operon structures of five model organisms: For Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, Pyrococcus furiosis, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Methanococcus maripaludis and Haiobacterium salinarum NROL We have developed machine learning algorithms to accurately identify protein interactions at a near-zero false positive rate from noisy data generated using tagfess complex purification, TAP purification, and analysis of membrane complexes. Combining other genome-scale datasets produced by ENIGMA (in particular, microarray data) and available from literature we have been able to achieve a true positive rate as high as 65% at almost zero false positives

  19. Os{sup 187}-isotope abundances in terrestrial and meteoritic osmium and an attempt to determine Re/Os-ages of iron meteorites; Anomalies dans l'abondance isotopique de l'osmium-187 dans l'osmium terrestre et meteoritique - Essai de determination de l'age des meteorites de fer au moyen du rapport Re/Os; Anomalii v rasprostranennosti izotopa osmiya-187 v zemnom i meteoritnom osmie i popytka opredeleniya vozrastov reniya/osmiya v zheleznykh meteoritakh; Anomalias en la abundancia isotopica del {sup 187}Os en el osmio terrestre y meteoritico. Ensayo para determinar la edad de los meteoritos de hierro por medio de la razon Re Os

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, W; Hoffmeister, W; Langhoff, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut) Mainz, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Geiss, J; Hirt, B; Houtermans, F G [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bern (Switzerland)

    1962-01-15

    kolichestvakh. Tak kak opredelenie vozrasta ehtikh tel obychnymi metodami predstavlyaet ochen' bol'shie zatrudneniya, byl izuchen metod ispol'zovaniya reniya/osmiya. Iz nashikh issledovanij bylo vyvedeno preobladayushchee sootnoshenie mezhdu osmiem-187 i osmiem-186; obsuzhdaetsya ikh ''minimal'nyj vozrast''. EHtot vozrast izmenyaetsya v znachitel'nykh predelakh i veroyatno zaklyuchaetsya v intervale ot 3,7-109 do 5,6-109 let. (author)

  20. Liquid scintillators for radiocarbon dating in archaeology; Scintillateurs liquides pour l'evaluation de Page au moyen du radiocarbone en archeologie; Zhidkie stsintillyatory dlya radiouglerodnogo datirovaniya v arkheologii; Centelladores liquidos para la determinacion de edades con carbono-14 en arqueologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starik, I E; Rudenko, S I; Artem' ev, V V; Butomo, S V; Drozhzhin, V M; Romanova, E N

    1962-01-15

    5500 ans represente, pour des quantites de 40 et 70 ml de scintillateur, 65 et 25 ans respectivement. Les auteurs ont effectue des mesures sur des specimens archeologiques provenant de diverses regions de l'URSS. (author) [Spanish] Con el objeto de determinar mediante carbono radiactivo la edad absoluta de muestras arqueologicas, los autores utilizan un contador de centelleo sencillo con un fotomultiplicador, sin refrigeracion. Consiguen reducir la actividad de fondo empleando un blindaje formado por laminas de acero y de plomo, procediendo a una seleccion de los impulsos segun su amplitud y construyendo el detector con materiales seleccionados y ''purificados''. A partir del carbono contenido en la muestra arqueologica, se sintetiza etil benceno. Para efectuar las mediciones, se han utilizado de 18 a 72 ml de centelleador liquido, cantidad que corresponde de 3 a 12 g de carbono en la muestra. Empleando 40 ml de centelleador, la velocidad de recuento de la actividad de fondo y la del carbono contemporaneo (sin fondo) fueron respectivamente de 23,5 y 37 impulsos/min; con 70 ml, estas velocidades fueron de 28 y 57 impulsos/min. El error estadistico correspondiente a mediciones de 48 horas de duracion de muestras de 5500 anos de edad asciende a 65 y 35 anos cuando se emplean 40 ml y 70 ml de centelleador, respectivamente. Se midieron muestras arqueologicas procedentes de diversas regiones de la Union Sovietica. (author) [Russian] Dlya opredeleniya absolyutnogo vozrasta arkheologicheskikh obraztsov po radiouglerodu ispol'zuetsya prostoj stsintillyatsionnyj schetchik s odnim fotoumnozhitelem bez okhlazhdeniya. Snizhenie fona dostigaetsya primeneniem zashchity iz sloev stali i svintsa, amplitudnoj selektsii impul'sov i vyborom ''chistykh'' materialov dlya izgotovleniya detektora. Iz ugleroda, soderzhashchegosya v arkheologicheskom obraztse, sinteziruetsya ehtilbenzol. Pri izmereniyakh ispol'zovalos' ot 18 do 72 ml zhidkogo stsintillyatora, chto sootvetstvovalo vvedeniyu ot 3

  1. Automatic Inspection of Co-Laminated Elements; Controle Automatique d'Elements Colamines; Avtomaticheskij kontrol' ul'trazvukom sovmestno prokatannykh ehlementov; Metodo para la Verificacion Automatica de Elementos Colaminados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destribats, Marie-Therese [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France); Dory, J. [Realisations Ultrasoniques Meaux (S. et M.) (France)

    1965-09-15

    'nuju bumagu). Na poluchennoj takim obrazom zjopisi defekty vystupajut v vide temnyh pjaten. Ustrojstvo mozhet rabotat' s pomoshh'ju rychaga otmykanija pri zaranee zadannom markirovochnom poroge, libo na polutenjah. Preobrazovateli, chastota kotoryh mozhet kolebat'sja ot 3 do 15 Mgc, vozbuzhdajutsja korotkimi impul'sami. Primenjaemye preobrazovateli na titanate barija imejut diametr 3 mm. Shag razvertki sostavljaet 0,3 - 0,6 mm, a linejnaja skorost' -5 - 20 mm/sek. Ustrojstvo mozhet izuchat' jelementy sledujushhih maksimal'nyh razmerov: shirina - 150, dlina - 2000 i tolshhina - 25 mm. Provedennye do sih por opyty pozvolili ustanovit' otsloennye uchastki diametrom 0,5 mm v jelementah s tolshhinoj 2 mm. (author)

  2. Radioactive Metrology Methods in the USSR; Methodes de metrologie de la radioactivite en URSS; Metody metrologii radioaktivnosti v SSSR; Metodos de Metrologia de la Radiactividad Aplicados en la Union de Republicas Socialistas Sovieticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aglintsev, K K; Bochkarev, V V; Grablevskij, V N; Karavaev, F M

    1960-06-15

    actividad de estos patrones son 10{sup -11} y 5 equivalentes gramo del Ra, respectivamente . Las fuentes {gamma} de control se preparan partiendo de los mismos radionuclidos que las fuentes y modelo. Sus actividades abarcan un intervalo muy amplio y las fuentes presentan formas y dimensiones sumamente diversas. Por ultimo, se utilizan dos clases de fuentes neutronicas modelo Ra-{alpha}-Be (con un contenido de 1 a 1000 mg de Ra) y Pu-{alpha}-Be (conteniendo de 0.01 a 15 g de Pu). Las fuentes Ra-{alpha}-Be consisten en una mezcla comprimida de RaBr{sub 2} y de Be en polvo, siendo la razon ponderal Ra/Be igual a 1/6. En cuanto a las fuentes Pu-{alpha}-Be, se preparan con una aleacion (PuBe{sub 13}) de estos dos metales. (author) [Russian] Avtory opisyvayut metody, primenyaemye v SSSR, i, v chastnosti, v institute metrologii im. Mendeleeva (Leningrad) dlya vosproizvodstv a pri pomoshchi standartnykh apparatov edinits izmereniya, ispol'zuemykh v radioaktivnosti (kyuri, gramm-ehkvivalen t radiya, rentgen, rad). Dlya radionuklido v v Sovetskom Soyuze proizvodyatsya istochnikiehtalony dvukh vidov: 1. Model'nye istochniki dlya sravnitel'nog o ehtalonirovani ya drugikh radioaktivnykh preparatov, a takzhe dlya kalibrovki radiometricheski kh priborov i kontrol'nykh priborov za izlucheniem; 2. Kontrol'nye istochniki, sluzhashchie isklyuchitel'n o dlya proverki raboty i kontrolya za vosproizvodimost' yu ukazanij izmeritel'ny kh priborov. Model'nye a-istochniki prigotovlyayuts ya pri pomoshchi ehlektrolitiche - skogo osazhdeniya na platine dolzhnym obrazom vybrannykh izluchatelej (estestvennyj uran, uran-233, plutonij-239, ameritsij-241). EHti istochniki mogut obespechivat' aktivnost' ot do 10{sup 6} raspadov v minutu. Kontrol'nye {alpha}-istochniki prigotovlyayuts ya putem ehlektroliticheskog o osazhdeniya plutoniya-239 v vide sloya s plotnost'yu ot 3 X 10-{sup 9} do 0,7 mg/em2, chto sootvetstvuet aktivnosti ot 10 do 10{sup 8} raspadov v minutu. Model'nye {beta

  3. New Instruments and Principles for the Dimensional Measurement and Measurement of Spacing of Reactor Components; Nouveaux Instruments et Procedes de Mesure des Dimensions et de l'Espacement des Elements d'un Reacteur; Novye pribory i printsipy izmereniya razmerov i raspolozheniya komponentov reaktora; Nuevos Instrumentos y Principios para Medir las Dimensiones y la Separacion Entre Componentes de Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, P. [Institut Dr. Foerster, Reutlingen, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1965-09-15

    vihrevyh tokov dlja izmerenija tolshhiny listov i kontejnerov iz cvetnyh i austenitnyh metallov s pomoshh'ju perehodnyh katushek; b) metod vihrevyh tokov dlja izmerenija tolshhiny stenok trub s pomoshh'ju prohodnyh katushek. Opisyvajutsja prigodnye dlja jetogo pribory i ih primenenie. Izmerenie tolshhiny stenok uzlov reaktora iz cvetnyh metallov po 'metodu magnitnogo sharai . Ob'jasnjaetsja princip jetogo novogo vida izmerenij, oblast' ego primenenija (osobenno dlja tochechnyh izmerenij) i opisyvaetsja primenjaemyj na praktike pribor. Izmerenie materialov nemagnitnyh pokrytij na magnitnoj osnove. Ob'jasnjajutsja principy izmerenij (metody magnitnogo polja postojannogo toka i peremennogo toka) i opisyvajutsja pribory dlja izmerenija nemagnitnyh pokrytij tolshhinoj ot 3 mikron do 20 mm. Osobo rassmatrivaetsja problema otlozhenija stellita na ferritnyh stenkah korpusov reaktorov. Izmerenie pokrytij, neprovodjashhih jelektrichestvo,-na materialah iz cvetnyh metallov. Ob'jasnjaetsja princip takogo izmerenija (vihrevye toki). Opisyvaetsja pribor dlja .takih izmerenij i tipichnye primery izmerenij. Privodjatsja beskontaktnye tehnologicheskie izmerenija fizicheskih razmerov metallicheskih komponentov reaktora. Ob{sup j}asnjajutsja razlichnye metody izmerenija chernyh i cvetnyh metallov (metod magnitnogo polja postojannogo toka i peremennogo toka, metody vihrevyh tokov). Opisyvajutsja pribory i primery distancionnogo izmerenija diametra oval'nosti, iskazhenija i t.d. komponentov reaktora. Opisyvajutsja metody opredelenija raspolozhenija takih komponentov v 'gorjachej' zone reaktora. ' Opisyvaetsja pribor dlja registracii profilja poverhnosti i neposredstvennogo opredelenija haraktera nerovnosti (''Rauhtiefe'', ''Glaettungstiefe'', GLA value i RMS value). Rassmatrivajutsja tipichnye primery ispol'zovanija jetogo pribora opredelenija nerovnostej komponentov reaktora. Osoboe vnimanie udeljaetsja vozmozhnosti ispol'zovanija nebol'shogo universal'nogo datchika v ''gorjachih'' zonah i