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Sample records for pyrimidine catabolic pathway

  1. A previously undescribed pathway for pyrimidine catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kevin D; Gyaneshwar, Prasad; Markenscoff Papadimitriou, Eirene; Fong, Rebecca; Kim, Kwang-Seo; Parales, Rebecca; Zhou, Zhongrui; Inwood, William; Kustu, Sydney

    2006-03-28

    The b1012 operon of Escherichia coli K-12, which is composed of seven unidentified ORFs, is one of the most highly expressed operons under control of nitrogen regulatory protein C. Examination of strains with lesions in this operon on Biolog Phenotype MicroArray (PM3) plates and subsequent growth tests indicated that they failed to use uridine or uracil as the sole nitrogen source and that the parental strain could use them at room temperature but not at 37 degrees C. A strain carrying an ntrB(Con) mutation, which elevates transcription of genes under nitrogen regulatory protein C control, could also grow on thymidine as the sole nitrogen source, whereas strains with lesions in the b1012 operon could not. Growth-yield experiments indicated that both nitrogens of uridine and thymidine were available. Studies with [(14)C]uridine indicated that a three-carbon waste product from the pyrimidine ring was excreted. After trimethylsilylation and gas chromatography, the waste product was identified by mass spectrometry as 3-hydroxypropionic acid. In agreement with this finding, 2-methyl-3-hydroxypropionic acid was released from thymidine. Both the number of available nitrogens and the waste products distinguished the pathway encoded by the b1012 operon from pyrimidine catabolic pathways described previously. We propose that the genes of this operon be named rutA-G for pyrimidine utilization. The product of the divergently transcribed gene, b1013, is a tetracycline repressor family regulator that controls transcription of the b1012 operon negatively.

  2. Catabolism of pyrimidines in yeast: a tool to understand degradation of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, G; Merico, A; Björnberg, O;

    2006-01-01

    The pyrimidine catabolic pathway is of crucial importance in cancer patients because it is involved in degradation of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil; it also is important in plants, unicellular eukaryotes, and bacteria for the degradation of pyrimidine-based biocides....../antibiotics. During the last decade we have developed a yeast species, Saccharomyces kluyveri, as a model and tool to study the genes and enzymes of the pyrimidine catabolic pathway. In this report, we studied degradation of uracil and its putative degradation products in 38 yeasts and showed that this pathway...

  3. Catabolism of pyrimidines in yeast: A tool to understand degradation of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Merico, A.; Bjornberg, O.

    2006-01-01

    The pyrimidine catabolic pathway is of crucial importance in cancer patients because it is involved in degradation of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil; it also is important in plants, unicellular eukaryotes, and bacteria for the degradation of pyrimidine-based biocides....../antibiotics. During the last decade we have developed a yeast species, Saccharomyces kluyveri, as a model and tool to study the genes and enzymes of the pyrimidine catabolic pathway. In this report, we studied degradation of uracil and its putative degradation products in 38 yeasts and showed that this pathway...

  4. A second pathway to degrade pyrimidine nucleic acid precursors in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Bjornberg, Olof; Polakova, Silvia;

    2008-01-01

    Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces kluyv...

  5. Novel inositol catabolic pathway in Thermotoga maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Irina A; Leyn, Semen A; Burkart, Michael D; Boucher, Nathalie; Noll, Kenneth M; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-08-01

    myo-inositol (MI) is a key sugar alcohol component of various metabolites, e.g. phosphatidylinositol-based phospholipids that are abundant in animal and plant cells. The seven-step pathway of MI degradation was previously characterized in various soil bacteria including Bacillus subtilis. Through a combination of bioinformatics and experimental techniques we identified a novel variant of the MI catabolic pathway in the marine hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. By using in vitro biochemical assays with purified recombinant proteins we characterized four inositol catabolic enzymes encoded in the TM0412-TM0416 chromosomal gene cluster. The novel catabolic pathway in T. maritima starts as the conventional route using the myo-inositol dehydrogenase IolG followed by three novel reactions. The first 2-keto-myo-inositol intermediate is oxidized by another, previously unknown NAD-dependent dehydrogenase TM0412 (named IolM), and a yet unidentified product of this reaction is further hydrolysed by TM0413 (IolN) to form 5-keto-l-gluconate. The fourth step involves epimerization of 5-keto-l-gluconate to d-tagaturonate by TM0416 (IolO). T. maritima is unable to grow on myo-inositol as a single carbon source. The determined in vitro specificity of the InoEFGK (TM0418-TM0421) transporter to myo-inositol-phosphate suggests that the novel pathway in Thermotoga utilizes a phosphorylated derivative of inositol.

  6. Arginine Catabolism and the Arginine Succinyltransferase Pathway in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Barbara L.; Kiupakis, Alexandros K.; Reitzer, Lawrence J.

    1998-01-01

    Arginine catabolism produces ammonia without transferring nitrogen to another compound, yet the only known pathway of arginine catabolism in Escherichia coli (through arginine decarboxylase) does not produce ammonia. Our aims were to find the ammonia-producing pathway of arginine catabolism in E. coli and to examine its function. We showed that the only previously described pathway of arginine catabolism, which does not produce ammonia, accounted for only 3% of the arginine consumed. A search...

  7. Pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Baccillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, B W; Kelleher, R J; Gooder, H

    1975-08-01

    Biochemical and genetic data were obtained from a series of 51 Pyr- strains of Bacillus subtilis. The observed enzymatic deficiencies allowed the mutants to be placed into 12 clases, some of which represent defects in more than one of the six known pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes. Mapping analysis by transformation has shown that all the Pyr- mutations are located in a single small area of the B. subtilis genome. A correlation of the biochemical defects and the genetic data has been made. Those mutations conferring similar enzymatic deficiencies were found to be contiguous on the B. subtilis map. Regulatory aspects of the pyrimidine pathway have also been investigated and are compared to previously reported results from other organisms. Evidence is presented which bears upon the possible physical association of the first three enzymes and the association of at least some of the enzymes of this pathway with particulate elements of the cell. A model for the organization of the enzymes is presented with dihydroorotate dehydrogenase as the central enzyme in a proposed aggregate.

  8. Pathway and Enzyme Redundancy in Putrescine Catabolism in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Barbara L.; Reitzer, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Putrescine as the sole carbon source requires a novel catabolic pathway with glutamylated intermediates. Nitrogen limitation does not induce genes of this glutamylated putrescine (GP) pathway but instead induces genes for a putrescine catabolic pathway that starts with a transaminase-dependent deamination. We determined pathway utilization with putrescine as the sole nitrogen source by examining mutants with defects in both pathways. Blocks in both the GP and transaminase pathways were requir...

  9. Nucleotide metabolism in Lactococcus lactis: Salvage pathways of exogenous pyrimidines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hammer, Karin

    1994-01-01

    By measuring enzyme activities in crude extracts and studying the effect of toxic analogs (5-fluoropyrimidines) on cell growth, the metabolism of pyrimidines in Lactococcus lactis was analyzed. Pathways by which uracil, uridine, deoxyuridine, cytidine, and deoxycytidine are metabolized in L. lact...

  10. Pathway and enzyme redundancy in putrescine catabolism in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Barbara L; Reitzer, Larry

    2012-08-01

    Putrescine as the sole carbon source requires a novel catabolic pathway with glutamylated intermediates. Nitrogen limitation does not induce genes of this glutamylated putrescine (GP) pathway but instead induces genes for a putrescine catabolic pathway that starts with a transaminase-dependent deamination. We determined pathway utilization with putrescine as the sole nitrogen source by examining mutants with defects in both pathways. Blocks in both the GP and transaminase pathways were required to prevent growth with putrescine as the sole nitrogen source. Genetic and biochemical analyses showed redundant enzymes for γ-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase (PatD/YdcW and PuuC), γ-aminobutyrate transaminase (GabT and PuuE), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD and PuuC). PuuC is a nonspecific aldehyde dehydrogenase that oxidizes all the aldehydes in putrescine catabolism. A puuP mutant failed to use putrescine as the nitrogen source, which implies one major transporter for putrescine as the sole nitrogen source. Analysis of regulation of the GP pathway shows induction by putrescine and not by a product of putrescine catabolism and shows that putrescine accumulates in puuA, puuB, and puuC mutants but not in any other mutant. We conclude that two independent sets of enzymes can completely degrade putrescine to succinate and that their relative importance depends on the environment.

  11. Privileged substructure-based diversity-oriented synthesis pathway for diverse pyrimidine-embedded polyheterocycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Heejun; Thanh Tung, Truong; Park, Seung Bum

    2013-01-01

    A new diversity-oriented synthesis pathway for the fabrication of a pyrimidine-embedded polyheterocycles library was developed for potential interactions with diverse biopolymers. Five different pyrimidine-embedded core skeletons were synthesized from ortho-alkynylpyrimidine carbaldehydes...

  12. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Grishin, Andrey M.; Miroslaw Cygler

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA) utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compo...

  13. The D-galacturonic acid catabolic pathway in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisha; Thiewes, Harry; van Kan, Jan A L

    2011-10-01

    D-galacturonic acid is the most abundant component of pectin, one of the major polysaccharide constituents of plant cell walls. Galacturonic acid potentially is an important carbon source for microorganisms living on (decaying) plant material. A catabolic pathway was proposed in filamentous fungi, comprising three enzymatic steps, involving D-galacturonate reductase, L-galactonate dehydratase, and 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-galactonate aldolase. We describe the functional, biochemical and genetic characterization of the entire D-galacturonate-specific catabolic pathway in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. The B. cinerea genome contains two non-homologous galacturonate reductase genes (Bcgar1 and Bcgar2), a galactonate dehydratase gene (Bclgd1), and a 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-galactonate aldolase gene (Bclga1). Their expression levels were highly induced in cultures containing GalA, pectate, or pectin as the sole carbon source. The four proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and their enzymatic activity was characterized. Targeted gene replacement of all four genes in B. cinerea, either separately or in combinations, yielded mutants that were affected in growth on D-galacturonic acid, pectate, or pectin as the sole carbon source. In Aspergillus nidulans and A. niger, the first catabolic conversion only involves the Bcgar2 ortholog, while in Hypocrea jecorina, it only involves the Bcgar1 ortholog. In B. cinerea, however, BcGAR1 and BcGAR2 jointly contribute to the first step of the catabolic pathway, albeit to different extent. The virulence of all B. cinerea mutants in the D-galacturonic acid catabolic pathway on tomato leaves, apple fruit and bell peppers was unaltered.

  14. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey M. Grishin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism—coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  15. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Andrey M; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2015-06-12

    Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA) utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism-coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  16. Cysteine catabolism: a novel metabolic pathway contributing to glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Antony; Sarcar, Bhaswati; Kahali, Soumen; Yuan, Zhigang; Johnson, Joseph J; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Kensicki, Elizabeth; Chinnaiyan, Prakash

    2014-02-01

    The relevance of cysteine metabolism in cancer has gained considerable interest in recent years, largely focusing on its role in generating the antioxidant glutathione. Through metabolomic profiling using a combination of high-throughput liquid and gas chromatography-based mass spectrometry on a total of 69 patient-derived glioma specimens, this report documents the discovery of a parallel pathway involving cysteine catabolism that results in the accumulation of cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA) in glioblastoma. These studies identified CSA to rank as one of the top metabolites differentiating glioblastoma from low-grade glioma. There was strong intratumoral concordance of CSA levels with expression of its biosynthetic enzyme cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1). Studies designed to determine the biologic consequence of this metabolic pathway identified its capacity to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation in glioblastoma cells, which was determined by decreased cellular respiration, decreased ATP production, and increased mitochondrial membrane potential following pathway activation. CSA-induced attenuation of oxidative phosphorylation was attributed to inhibition of the regulatory enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase. Studies performed in vivo abrogating the CDO1/CSA axis using a lentiviral-mediated short hairpin RNA approach resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition in a glioblastoma mouse model, supporting the potential for this metabolic pathway to serve as a therapeutic target. Collectively, we identified a novel, targetable metabolic pathway involving cysteine catabolism contributing to the growth of aggressive high-grade gliomas. These findings serve as a framework for future investigations designed to more comprehensively determine the clinical application of this metabolic pathway and its contributory role in tumorigenesis.

  17. The EGF repeat-specific O-GlcNAc-transferase Eogt interacts with notch signaling and pyrimidine metabolism pathways in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Müller

    Full Text Available The O-GlcNAc transferase Eogt modifies EGF repeats in proteins that transit the secretory pathway, including Dumpy and Notch. In this paper, we show that the Notch ligands Delta and Serrate are also substrates of Eogt, that mutation of a putative UDP-GlcNAc binding DXD motif greatly reduces enzyme activity, and that Eogt and the cytoplasmic O-GlcNAc transferase Ogt have distinct substrates in Drosophila larvae. Loss of Eogt is larval lethal and disrupts Dumpy functions, but does not obviously perturb Notch signaling. To identify novel genetic interactions with eogt, we investigated dominant modification of wing blister formation caused by knock-down of eogt. Unexpectedly, heterozygosity for several members of the canonical Notch signaling pathway suppressed wing blister formation. And importantly, extensive genetic interactions with mutants in pyrimidine metabolism were identified. Removal of pyrimidine synthesis alleles suppressed wing blister formation, while removal of uracil catabolism alleles was synthetic lethal with eogt knock-down. Therefore, Eogt may regulate protein functions by O-GlcNAc modification of their EGF repeats, and cellular metabolism by affecting pyrimidine synthesis and catabolism. We propose that eogt knock-down in the wing leads to metabolic and signaling perturbations that increase cytosolic uracil levels, thereby causing wing blister formation.

  18. Characterization of purine catabolic pathway genes in coelacanths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forconi, Mariko; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Barucca, Marco; Buonocore, Francesco; De Moro, Gianluca; Fausto, Anna Maria; Gerdol, Marco; Pallavicini, Alberto; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Schartl, Manfred; Olmo, Ettore; Canapa, Adriana

    2014-09-01

    Coelacanths are a critically valuable species to explore the gene changes that took place in the transition from aquatic to terrestrial life. One interesting and biologically relevant feature of the genus Latimeria is ureotelism. However not all urea is excreted from the body; in fact high concentrations are retained in plasma and seem to be involved in osmoregulation. The purine catabolic pathway, which leads to urea production in Latimeria, has progressively lost some steps, reflecting an enzyme loss during diversification of terrestrial species. We report the results of analyses of the liver and testis transcriptomes of the Indonesian coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis and of the genome of Latimeria chalumnae, which has recently been fully sequenced in the framework of the coelacanth genome project. We describe five genes, uricase, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, parahox neighbor B, allantoinase, and allantoicase, each coding for one of the five enzymes involved in urate degradation to urea, and report the identification of a putative second form of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase that is characteristic of the genus Latimeria. The present data also highlight the activity of the complete purine pathway in the coelacanth liver and suggest its involvement in the maintenance of high plasma urea concentrations.

  19. The Atg1-Tor pathway regulates yolk catabolism in Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Hallie; Sopko, Richelle; Coughlin, Margaret; Perrimon, Norbert; Mitchison, Tim

    2015-11-15

    Yolk provides an important source of nutrients during the early development of oviparous organisms. It is composed mainly of vitellogenin proteins packed into membrane-bound compartments called yolk platelets. Catabolism of yolk is initiated by acidification of the yolk platelet, leading to the activation of Cathepsin-like proteinases, but it is unknown how this process is triggered. Yolk catabolism initiates at cellularization in Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Using maternal shRNA technology we found that yolk catabolism depends on the Tor pathway and on the autophagy-initiating kinase Atg1. Whereas Atg1 was required for a burst of spatially regulated autophagy during late cellularization, autophagy was not required for initiating yolk catabolism. We propose that the conserved Tor metabolic sensing pathway regulates yolk catabolism, similar to Tor-dependent metabolic regulation on the lysosome.

  20. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Liu., S; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria....

  1. Blockage of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway affects riboflavin production in Ashbya gossypii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rui; Aguiar, Tatiana Q; Domingues, Lucília

    2015-01-10

    The Ashbya gossypii riboflavin biosynthetic pathway and its connection with the purine pathway have been well studied. However, the outcome of genetic alterations in the pyrimidine pathway on riboflavin production by A. gossypii had not yet been assessed. Here, we report that the blockage of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in the recently generated A. gossypii Agura3 uridine/uracil auxotrophic strain led to improved riboflavin production on standard agar-solidified complex medium. When extra uridine/uracil was supplied, the production of riboflavin by this auxotroph was repressed. High concentrations of uracil hampered this (and the parent) strain growth, whereas excess uridine favored the A. gossypii Agura3 growth. Considering that the riboflavin and the pyrimidine pathways share the same precursors and that riboflavin overproduction may be triggered by nutritional stress, we suggest that overproduction of riboflavin by the A. gossypii Agura3 may occur as an outcome of a nutritional stress response and/or of an increased availability in precursors for riboflavin biosynthesis, due to their reduced consumption by the pyrimidine pathway.

  2. Xylan catabolism is improved by blending bioprospecting and metabolic pathway engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2015-04-01

    Complete utilization of all available carbon sources in lignocellulosic biomass still remains a challenge in engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Even with efficient heterologous xylose catabolic pathways, S. cerevisiae is unable to utilize xylose in lignocellulosic biomass unless xylan is depolymerized to xylose. Here we demonstrate that a blended bioprospecting approach along with pathway engineering and evolutionary engineering can be used to improve xylan catabolism in S. cerevisiae. Specifically, we perform whole genome sequencing-based bioprospecting of a strain with remarkable pentose catabolic potential that we isolated and named Ustilago bevomyces. The heterologous expression of xylan catabolic genes enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on xylan as a single carbon source in minimal medium. A combination of bioprospecting and metabolic pathway evolution demonstrated that the xylan catabolic pathway could be further improved. Ultimately, engineering efforts were able to achieve xylan conversion into ethanol of up to 0.22 g/L on minimal medium compositions with xylan. This pathway provides a novel starting point for improving lignocellulosic conversion by yeast.

  3. The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway modulates production of biofilm determinants in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Garavaglia

    Full Text Available Bacteria are often found in multicellular communities known as biofilms, which constitute a resistance form against environmental stresses. Extracellular adhesion and cell aggregation factors, responsible for bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance, are tightly regulated in response to physiological and environmental cues. We show that, in Escherichia coli, inactivation of genes belonging to the de novo uridine monophosphate (UMP biosynthetic pathway impairs production of curli fibers and cellulose, important components of the bacterial biofilm matrix, by inhibiting transcription of the csgDEFG operon, thus preventing production of the biofilm master regulator CsgD protein. Supplementing growth media with exogenous uracil, which can be converted to UMP through the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway, restores csgDEFG transcription and curli production. In addition, however, exogenous uracil triggers cellulose production, particularly in strains defective in either carB or pyrB genes, which encode enzymes catalyzing the first steps of de novo UMP biosynthesis. Our results indicate the existence of tight and complex links between pyrimidine metabolism and curli/cellulose production: transcription of the csgDEFG operon responds to pyrimidine nucleotide availability, while cellulose production is triggered by exogenous uracil in the absence of active de novo UMP biosynthesis. We speculate that perturbations in the UMP biosynthetic pathways allow the bacterial cell to sense signals such as starvation, nucleic acids degradation, and availability of exogenous pyrimidines, and to adapt the production of the extracellular matrix to the changing environmental conditions.

  4. Inhibition of pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway suppresses viral growth through innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Lucas-Hourani

    Full Text Available Searching for stimulators of the innate antiviral response is an appealing approach to develop novel therapeutics against viral infections. Here, we established a cell-based reporter assay to identify compounds stimulating expression of interferon-inducible antiviral genes. DD264 was selected out of 41,353 compounds for both its immuno-stimulatory and antiviral properties. While searching for its mode of action, we identified DD264 as an inhibitor of pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway. This metabolic pathway was recently identified as a prime target of broad-spectrum antiviral molecules, but our data unraveled a yet unsuspected link with innate immunity. Indeed, we showed that DD264 or brequinar, a well-known inhibitor of pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway, both enhanced the expression of antiviral genes in human cells. Furthermore, antiviral activity of DD264 or brequinar was found strictly dependent on cellular gene transcription, nuclear export machinery, and required IRF1 transcription factor. In conclusion, the antiviral property of pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors is not a direct consequence of pyrimidine deprivation on the virus machinery, but rather involves the induction of cellular immune response.

  5. Prediction and Biochemical Demonstration of a Catabolic Pathway for the Osmoprotectant Proline Betaine

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ritesh; Zhao, Suwen; Vetting, Matthew W.; Wood, B. McKay; Sakai, Ayano; Cho, Kyuil; Solbiati, José; Steven C Almo; Jonathan V Sweedler; Matthew P Jacobson; Gerlt, John A.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Through the use of genetic, enzymatic, metabolomic, and structural analyses, we have discovered the catabolic pathway for proline betaine, an osmoprotectant, in Paracoccus denitrificans and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Genetic and enzymatic analyses showed that several of the key enzymes of the hydroxyproline betaine degradation pathway also function in proline betaine degradation. Metabolomic analyses detected each of the metabolic intermediates of the pathway. The proline betaine catab...

  6. Powerful methods to establish chromosomal markers in Lactococcus lactis: an analysis of pyrimidine salvage pathway mutants obtained by positive selections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1995-01-01

    phosphoribosyltransferase (upp), uridindcytidine kinase (udk), pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase (pdp), cytidine/deoxycytidine deaminase (dd), thymidine kinase (tdk) and purine nucleoride phosphorylase (pup). Based on an analysis of the mutants obtained, the pathways by which L. lactis metabolizes uracil...

  7. Insights into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum as chemotherapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Artemisinins remain as the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria although drug resistance has already emerged and spread in Southeast Asia. Thus, to fight this disease, there is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs for malaria chemotherapy. Unlike human host cells, P. falciparum cannot salvage preformed pyrimidine bases or nucleosides from the extracellular environment and relies solely on nucleotides synthesized through the de novo biosynthetic pathway. This review presents significant progress on understanding the de novo pyrimidine pathway and the functional enzymes in the human parasite P. falciparum. Current knowledge in genomics and metabolomics are described, particularly focusing on the parasite purine and pyrimidine nucleotide metabolism. These include gene annotation, characterization and molecular mechanism of the enzymes that are different from the human host pathway. Recent elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structures and the catalytic reactions of three enzymes: dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, as well as their inhibitors are reviewed in the context of their therapeutic potential against malaria.

  8. Phosphoketolase pathway for xylose catabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum revealed by 13C metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixia; Zhang, Lei; Tang, Wei; Gu, Yang; Hua, Qiang; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Yang, Chen

    2012-10-01

    Solvent-producing clostridia are capable of utilizing pentose sugars, including xylose and arabinose; however, little is known about how pentose sugars are catabolized through the metabolic pathways in clostridia. In this study, we identified the xylose catabolic pathways and quantified their fluxes in Clostridium acetobutylicum based on [1-(13)C]xylose labeling experiments. The phosphoketolase pathway was found to be active, which contributed up to 40% of the xylose catabolic flux in C. acetobutylicum. The split ratio of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway was markedly increased when the xylose concentration in the culture medium was increased from 10 to 20 g liter(-1). To our knowledge, this is the first time that the in vivo activity of the phosphoketolase pathway in clostridia has been revealed. A phosphoketolase from C. acetobutylicum was purified and characterized, and its activity with xylulose-5-P was verified. The phosphoketolase was overexpressed in C. acetobutylicum, which resulted in slightly increased xylose consumption rates during the exponential growth phase and a high level of acetate accumulation.

  9. Formaldehyde catabolism is essential in cells deficient for the Fanconi anemia DNA-repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Ivan V; Langevin, Frédéric; Crossan, Gerry P; Takata, Minoru; Patel, Ketan J

    2011-11-13

    Metabolism is predicted to generate formaldehyde, a toxic, simple, reactive aldehyde that can damage DNA. Here we report a synthetic lethal interaction in avian cells between ADH5, encoding the main formaldehyde-detoxifying enzyme, and the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA-repair pathway. These results define a fundamental role for the combined action of formaldehyde catabolism and DNA cross-link repair in vertebrate cell survival.

  10. Activation and Inactivation of Pseudomonas stutzeri Methylbenzene Catabolism Pathways Mediated by a Transposable Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognese, Fabrizio; di Lecce, Cinzia; Galli, Enrica; Barbieri, Paola

    1999-01-01

    The arrangement of the genes involved in o-xylene, m-xylene, and p-xylene catabolism was investigated in three Pseudomonas stutzeri strains: the wild-type strain OX1, which is able to grow on o-xylene but not on the meta and para isomers; the mutant M1, which grows on m-xylene and p-xylene but is unable to utilize the ortho isomer; and the revertant R1, which can utilize all the three isomers of xylene. A 3-kb insertion sequence (IS) termed ISPs1, which inactivates the m-xylene and p-xylene catabolic pathway in P. stutzeri OX1 and the o-xylene catabolic genes in P. stutzeri M1, was detected. No IS was detected in the corresponding catabolic regions of the P. stutzeri R1 genome. ISPs1 is present in several copies in the genomes of the three strains. It is flanked by 24-bp imperfect inverted repeats, causes the direct duplication of 8 bp in the target DNA, and seems to be related to the ISL3 family. PMID:10223973

  11. Consortium analysis of gene and gene–folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelemen, Linda E; Terry, Kathryn L; Goodman, Marc T

    2014-01-01

    SCOPE: We reevaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (1-C) (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. METHODS AND RESULTS: Odds rat...

  12. Critical importance of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway for Trypanosoma cruzi growth in the mammalian host cell cytoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki, E-mail: muneaki@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Morales, Jorge; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Inoue, Syou [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Inoue, Masayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kita, Kiyoshi [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Harada, Shigeharu [Department of Applied Biology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Tanaka, Akiko [Systems and Structural Biology Center, RIKEN, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Aoki, Takashi [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Nara, Takeshi, E-mail: tnara@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the gene for carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the cpsII gene significantly reduced the growth of epimastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In particular, the CPSII-null mutant severely retarded intracellular growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The de novo pyrimidine pathway is critical for the parasite growth in the host cell. -- Abstract: The intracellular parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In general, pyrimidine nucleotides are supplied by both de novo biosynthesis and salvage pathways. While epimastigotes-an insect form-possess both activities, amastigotes-an intracellular replicating form of T. cruzi-are unable to mediate the uptake of pyrimidine. However, the requirement of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis for parasite growth and survival has not yet been elucidated. Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo biosynthetic pathway, and increased CPSII activity is associated with the rapid proliferation of tumor cells. In the present study, we showed that disruption of the T. cruzicpsII gene significantly reduced parasite growth. In particular, the growth of amastigotes lacking the cpsII gene was severely suppressed. Thus, the de novo pyrimidine pathway is important for proliferation of T. cruzi in the host cell cytoplasm and represents a promising target for chemotherapy against Chagas disease.

  13. Adaptation of phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolic pathway to hibernation in bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Pan

    Full Text Available Some mammals hibernate in response to harsh environments. Although hibernating mammals may metabolize proteins, the nitrogen metabolic pathways commonly activated during hibernation are not fully characterized. In contrast to the hypothesis of amino acid preservation, we found evidence of amino acid metabolism as three of five key enzymes, including phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH, homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD, fumarylacetoacetase (FAH, involved in phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolism were co-upregulated during hibernation in two distantly related species of bats, Myotis ricketti and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. In addition, the levels of phenylalanine in the livers of these bats were significantly decreased during hibernation. Because phenylalanine and tyrosine are both glucogenic and ketogenic, these results indicate the role of this catabolic pathway in energy supply. Since any deficiency in the catabolism of these two amino acids can cause accumulations of toxic metabolites, these results also suggest the detoxification role of these enzymes during hibernation. A higher selective constraint on PAH, HPD, and HGD in hibernators than in non-hibernators was observed, and hibernators had more conserved amino acid residues in each of these enzymes than non-hibernators. These conserved amino acid residues are mostly located in positions critical for the structure and activity of the enzymes. Taken together, results of this work provide novel insights in nitrogen metabolism and removal of harmful metabolites during bat hibernation.

  14. Adaptation of phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolic pathway to hibernation in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi-Hsuan; Zhang, Yijian; Cui, Jie; Liu, Yang; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Liao, Chen-Chung; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-01-01

    Some mammals hibernate in response to harsh environments. Although hibernating mammals may metabolize proteins, the nitrogen metabolic pathways commonly activated during hibernation are not fully characterized. In contrast to the hypothesis of amino acid preservation, we found evidence of amino acid metabolism as three of five key enzymes, including phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), fumarylacetoacetase (FAH), involved in phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolism were co-upregulated during hibernation in two distantly related species of bats, Myotis ricketti and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. In addition, the levels of phenylalanine in the livers of these bats were significantly decreased during hibernation. Because phenylalanine and tyrosine are both glucogenic and ketogenic, these results indicate the role of this catabolic pathway in energy supply. Since any deficiency in the catabolism of these two amino acids can cause accumulations of toxic metabolites, these results also suggest the detoxification role of these enzymes during hibernation. A higher selective constraint on PAH, HPD, and HGD in hibernators than in non-hibernators was observed, and hibernators had more conserved amino acid residues in each of these enzymes than non-hibernators. These conserved amino acid residues are mostly located in positions critical for the structure and activity of the enzymes. Taken together, results of this work provide novel insights in nitrogen metabolism and removal of harmful metabolites during bat hibernation.

  15. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell)

    2010-09-03

    Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

  16. Characterization of a Unique Pathway for 4-Cresol Catabolism Initiated by Phosphorylation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Ma, Li; Qi, Feifei; Zheng, Xianliang; Jiang, Chengying; Li, Ailei; Wan, Xiaobo; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-18

    4-Cresol is not only a significant synthetic intermediate for production of many aromatic chemicals, but also a priority environmental pollutant because of its toxicity to higher organisms. In our previous studies, a gene cluster implicated to be involved in 4-cresol catabolism, creCDEFGHIR, was identified in Corynebacterium glutamicum and partially characterized in vivo. In this work, we report on the discovery of a novel 4-cresol biodegradation pathway that employs phosphorylated intermediates. This unique pathway initiates with the phosphorylation of the hydroxyl group of 4-cresol, which is catalyzed by a novel 4-methylbenzyl phosphate synthase, CreHI. Next, a unique class I P450 system, CreJEF, specifically recognizes phosphorylated intermediates and successively oxidizes the aromatic methyl group into carboxylic acid functionality via alcohol and aldehyde intermediates. Moreover, CreD (phosphohydrolase), CreC (alcohol dehydrogenase), and CreG (aldehyde dehydrogenase) were also found to be required for efficient oxidative transformations in this pathway. Steady-state kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) for each catabolic step were determined, and these results suggest that kinetic controls serve a key role in directing the metabolic flux to the most energy effective route.

  17. Enzymology of Pyrimidine Metabolism and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzetti, Silvia; Polzonetti, Valeria; Micozzi, Daniela; Pucciarelli, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that disorders of pyrimidine pathways may lead to neurological, hematological, immunological diseases, renal impairments, and association with malignancies. Nucleotide homeostasis depends on the three stages of pyrimidine metabolism: de novo synthesis, catabolism and recycling of these metabolites. Cytidine and uridine, in addition to be used as substrates for pyrimidine nucleotide salvaging, also act as the precursors of cytidine triphosphate used in the biosynthetic pathway of both brain's phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine via the Kennedy cycle. The synthesis in the brain of phosphatidylcholine and other membrane phosphatides can utilize, in addition to glucose, three compounds present in the blood stream: choline, uridine, and a polyunsaturated fatty acids like docosahexaenoic acid. Some authors, using rat models, found that oral administration of two phospholipid precursors such as uridine and omega-3 fatty acids, along with choline from the diet, can increase the amount of synaptic membrane generated by surviving striatal neurons in rats with induced Parkinson's disease. Other authors found that in hypertensive rat fed with uridine and choline, cognitive deficit resulted improved. Uridine has also been recently considered as a neuroactive molecule, because of its involvement in important neurological functions by improving memory, sleep disorders, anti-epileptic effects, as well as neuronal plasticity. Cytidine and uridine are uptaken by the brain via specific receptors and successively salvaged to the corresponding nucleotides. The present review is devoted to the enzymology of pyrimidine pathways whose importance has attracted the attention of several researchers investigating on the mechanisms underlying the physiopathology of brain.

  18. Elucidation of the flavonoid catabolism pathway in Pseudomonas putida PML2 by comparative metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Bhinu V S; Swarup, Sanjay

    2002-01-01

    Flavonoids are 15-carbon plant secondary metabolites exuded in the rhizosphere that hosts several flavonoid-degrading bacteria. We studied flavonoid catabolism in a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterial strain of Pseudomonas by using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches. Transposants carrying mini-Tn5gfp insertions were screened for flavonoid auxotrophy, and these mutant strains were found to be unable to grow in the flavonols naringenin and quercetin, while their growth in glycerol was comparable to that of the parental strain. In order to understand flavonoid catabolism, culture supernatants, whole-cell fractions, cell lysate, and cell debris of the wild-type and mutant strains were analyzed. Intermediates that accumulated intracellularly and those secreted in the medium were identified by a combination of reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Structures of four key intermediates were confirmed by one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Comparative metabolic profiling of the compounds in the wild-type and mutant strains allowed us to understand the degradation events and to identify six metabolic intermediates. The first step in the pathway involves 3,3'-didehydroxylation, followed by hydrolysis and cleavage of the C-ring, leading via subsequent oxidations to the formation of protocatechuate. This is the first report on quercetin dehydroxylation in aerobic conditions leading to naringenin accumulation.

  19. Transfer of a Catabolic Pathway for Chloromethane in Methylobacterium Strains Highlights Different Limitations for Growth with Chloromethane or with Dichloromethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Michener

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chloromethane is an ozone-depleting gas, produced predominantly from natural sources, that provides an important carbon source for microbes capable of consuming it. Chloromethane catabolism has been difficult to study owing to the challenging genetics of its native microbial hosts. Since the pathways for chloromethane catabolism show evidence of horizontal gene transfer, we reproduced this transfer process in the laboratory to generate new chloromethane-catabolizing strains in tractable hosts. We demonstrate that six putative accessory genes improve chloromethane catabolism, though heterologous expression of only one of the six is strictly necessary for growth on chloromethane. In contrast to growth of Methylobacterium strains with the closely-related compound dichloromethane, we find that chloride export does not limit growth on chloromethane and, in general, that the ability of a strain to grow on dichloromethane is uncorrelated with its ability to grow on chloromethane. This heterologous expression system allows us to investigate the components required for effective chloromethane catabolism and the factors that limit effective catabolism after horizontal transfer.

  20. White-to-brite conversion in human adipocytes promotes metabolic reprogramming towards fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barquissau

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Conversion of human white fat cells into brite adipocytes results in a major metabolic reprogramming inducing fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways. PDK4 redirects glucose from oxidation towards triglyceride synthesis and favors the use of fatty acids as energy source for uncoupling mitochondria.

  1. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations.

  2. Experimental evidence of a xylose-catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Mihasan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pAO1 megaplasmid of A. nicotinovorans consists of 165 ORF's related mainly to nicotine degradation, uptake and utilization of carbohydrates, amino acids and sarcosine. A putative sugar catabolic pathway consisting of 11 ORF's organized as a single operon were previously described. The current work brings experimental data supporting the existence of a D-Xylose catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid. When grown on D-xylose containing media, the cells harboring the pAO1 megaplasmid grow to higher cell densities and also express the OxRe protein coded by the megaplasmid. A putative pathway similar to Weimberg pentose pathway is postulated, in which D-xylose is transported in the cell by the ABC-type transport system and then transformed using the putative sugar-dehidrogenase OxRe to D-xylonate, which is further degrated to 2-ketoglutarate and integrated into the general metabolism of the cell

  3. Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Webb, Penelope M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; McGuire, Valerie; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wang, Qinggang; Dicks, Ed; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Song, Honglin; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Timorek, Agnieszka; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Narod, Steven A.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K. H.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Cramer, Daniel W.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Claus K.; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Leminen, Arto; Thompson, Pamela J.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Beesley, Jonathan; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Stram, Daniel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Kellar, Melissa; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Whittemore, Alice S.; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Goode, Ellen L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.

    2014-01-01

    Scope We re-evaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. Methods and Results Odds ratios (OR) for 446 genetic variants were estimated among 13,410 OC cases and 22,635 controls and among 2,281 cases and 3,444 controls with folate information. Following multiple testing correction, the most significant main effect associations were for DPYD variants rs11587873 (OR=0.92, P=6x10−5) and rs828054 (OR=1.06, P=1x10−4). Thirteen variants in the pyrimidine metabolism genes, DPYD, DPYS, PPAT and TYMS, also interacted significantly with folate in a multi-variant analysis (corrected P=9.9x10−6) but collectively explained only 0.2% of OC risk. Although no other associations were significant after multiple testing correction, variants in SHMT1 in one-carbon transfer, previously reported with OC, suggested lower risk at higher folate (Pinteraction=0.03-0.006). Conclusions Variation in pyrimidine metabolism genes, particularly DPYD, which was previously reported to be associated with OC, may influence risk; however, stratification by folate intake is unlikely to modify disease risk appreciably in these women. SHMT1 SNP-byfolate interactions are plausible but require further validation. Polymorphisms in selected genes in purine metabolism were not associated with OC. PMID:25066213

  4. Importance of the pentose phosphate pathway for D-glucose catabolism in the obligatory aerobic yeast Rhodotorula gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, M; Brand, K; Deckner, K; Becker, J U

    1971-08-01

    d-Glucose catabolism of a phosphofructokinase-deficient yeast Rhodotorula gracilis has been studied. By using d-glucose specifically (14)C-labelled at different positions and measuring the distribution of the label in various fractions of cell metabolism, the following results were found. 1. The pentose phosphate pathway, being the main pathway of d-glucose catabolism, simultaneously converts glucose molecules into pentose phosphates oxidatively by using two NADP-linked dehydrogenases and via the non-oxidative transketolase-transaldolase pathway. 2. From the correlation of the (14)CO(2) liberation and the d-glucose consumption and from the fact that the pentose phosphate moiety in nucleic acids is almost equally labelled from d-[1-(14)C]- and d-[6-(14)C]-glucose, it is concluded that of the glucose utilized about 80% undergoes transformation via the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Only about 20% of glucose is directly decarboxylated to pentose phosphate. 3. For further degradation it is postulated that the pentose phosphates are split into C(2) fragments and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates. 4. All three loci of oxidative decarboxylation appear to be effective in Rh. gracilis, the oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway, the decarboxylation of pyruvate in the later part of the glycolytic pathway as well as the oxidation in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. 5. d-Glucose molecules taken up are only partially oxidized to CO(2): about four-fifths of each glucose molecule metabolized is incorporated into cell constituents. 6. The quantitative interrelations of the fluxes of d-glucose subunits along the catabolic pathways have been estimated and are discussed.

  5. The steroid catabolic pathway of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi is important for pathogenesis and a target for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R van der Geize

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551, ipdB (rv3552, fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD and 3aα-H-4α(3'-propionic acid-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP. Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections.

  6. The steroid catabolic pathway of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi is important for pathogenesis and a target for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R van der Geize

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551, ipdB (rv3552, fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD and 3aα-H-4α(3'-propionic acid-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP. Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections.

  7. The steroid catabolic pathway of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi is important for pathogenesis and a target for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geize, R; Grommen, A W F; Hessels, G I; Jacobs, A A C; Dijkhuizen, L

    2011-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551), ipdB (rv3552), fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD) and 3aα-H-4α(3'-propionic acid)-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP). Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections.

  8. The old 3-oxoadipate pathway revisited: new insights in the catabolism of aromatics in the saprophytic fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Tiago M; Hartmann, Diego O; Planchon, Sébastien; Martins, Isabel; Renaut, Jenny; Silva Pereira, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Aspergilli play major roles in the natural turnover of elements, especially through the decomposition of plant litter, but the end catabolism of lignin aromatic hydrocarbons remains largely unresolved. The 3-oxoadipate pathway of their degradation combines the catechol and the protocatechuate branches, each using a set of specific genes. However, annotation for most of these genes is lacking or attributed to poorly- or un-characterised families. Aspergillus nidulans can utilise as sole carbon/energy source either benzoate or salicylate (upstream aromatic metabolites of the protocatechuate and the catechol branches, respectively). Using this cultivation strategy and combined analyses of comparative proteomics, gene mining, gene expression and characterisation of particular gene-replacement mutants, we precisely assigned most of the steps of the 3-oxoadipate pathway to specific genes in this fungus. Our findings disclose the genetically encoded potential of saprophytic Ascomycota fungi to utilise this pathway and provide means to untie associated regulatory networks, which are vital to heightening their ecological significance.

  9. The role of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in Cryptococcus neoformans high temperature growth and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gontijo, Fabiano Assis; Pascon, Renata C.; Fernandes, Larissa; Machado, Joel; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Vallim, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are often difficult to treat due to the inherent similarities between fungal and animal cells and the resulting host toxicity from many antifungal compounds. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans that causes life-threatening disease, primarily in immunocompromised patients. Since antifungal therapy for this microorganism is limited, many investigators have explored novel drug targets aim at virulence factors, such as the ability to grow at mammalian physiological temperature (37°C). To address this issue, we used the Agrobacterium tumefaciens gene delivery system to create a random insertion mutagenesis library that was screened for altered growth at elevated temperatures. Among several mutants unable to grow at 37°C, we explored one bearing an interruption in the URA4 gene. This gene encodes dihydroorotase (DHOase) that is involved in the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Loss of the C. neoformans Ura4 protein, by targeted gene interruption, resulted in an expected uracil/uridine auxotrophy and an unexpected high temperature growth defect. In addition, the ura4 mutant displayed phenotypic defects in other prominent virulence factors (melanin, capsule and phospholipase) and reduced stress response compared to wild type and reconstituted strains. Accordingly, this mutant had a decreased survival rate in macrophages and attenuated virulence in a murine model of cryptococcal infection. Quantitative PCR analysis suggests that this biosynthetic pathway is induced during the transition from 30°C to 37°C, and that transcriptional regulation of de novo and salvage pyrimidine pathway are under the control of the Ura4 protein. PMID:25011011

  10. Pathway-level acceleration of glycogen catabolism by a response regulator in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Oikawa, Akira; Numata, Keiji; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2014-04-01

    Response regulators of two-component systems play pivotal roles in the transcriptional regulation of responses to environmental signals in bacteria. Rre37, an OmpR-type response regulator, is induced by nitrogen depletion in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that genes related to sugar catabolism and nitrogen metabolism were up-regulated by rre37 overexpression. Protein levels of GlgP(slr1367), one of the two glycogen phosphorylases, in the rre37-overexpressing strain were higher than those of the parental wild-type strain under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. Glycogen amounts decreased to less than one-tenth by rre37 overexpression under nitrogen-replete conditions. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites of the sugar catabolic pathway and amino acids were altered in the rre37-overexpressing strain after nitrogen depletion. These results demonstrate that Rre37 is a pathway-level regulator that activates the metabolic flow from glycogen to polyhydroxybutyrate and the hybrid tricarboxylic acid and ornithine cycle, unraveling the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of primary metabolism in this unicellular cyanobacterium.

  11. The transcriptional activators AraR and XlnR from Aspergillus niger regulate expression of pentose catabolic and pentose phosphate pathway genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, Evy; Zhou, M.; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    The pentose catabolic pathway (PCP) and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) are required for the conversion of pentose sugars in fungi and are linked via d-xylulose-5-phosphate. Previously, it was shown that the PCP is regulated by the transcriptional activators XlnR and AraR in Aspergillus niger. H

  12. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA.

  13. De novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis mainly occurs outside of plastids, but a previously undiscovered nucleobase importer provides substrates for the essential salvage pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, Sandra; Jung, Benjamin; Fürst, Sarah; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2012-04-01

    Nucleotide de novo synthesis is highly conserved among organisms and represents an essential biochemical pathway. In plants, the two initial enzymatic reactions of de novo pyrimidine synthesis occur in the plastids. By use of green fluorescent protein fusions, clear support is provided for a localization of the remaining reactions in the cytosol and mitochondria. This implies that carbamoyl aspartate, an intermediate of this pathway, must be exported and precursors of pyrimidine salvage (i.e., nucleobases or nucleosides) are imported into plastids. A corresponding uracil transport activity could be measured in intact plastids isolated from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) buds. PLUTO (for plastidic nucleobase transporter) was identified as a member of the Nucleobase:Cation-Symporter1 protein family from Arabidopsis thaliana, capable of transporting purine and pyrimidine nucleobases. A PLUTO green fluorescent protein fusion was shown to reside in the plastid envelope after expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Heterologous expression of PLUTO in an Escherichia coli mutant lacking the bacterial uracil permease uraA allowed a detailed biochemical characterization. PLUTO transports uracil, adenine, and guanine with apparent affinities of 16.4, 0.4, and 6.3 μM, respectively. Transport was markedly inhibited by low concentrations of a proton uncoupler, indicating that PLUTO functions as a proton-substrate symporter. Thus, a protein for the absolutely required import of pyrimidine nucleobases into plastids was identified.

  14. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara, Takeshi, E-mail: tnara@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Liao, Chien-Wei [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Department of Parasitology, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Xing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan, ROC (China); Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko [Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, Biomedical Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Fan, Chia-Kwung [Department of Parasitology, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Xing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan, ROC (China); Inaoka, Daniel Ken [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inoue, Masayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Tanaka, Akiko [Systems and Structural Biology Center, RIKEN, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Harada, Shigeharu [Department of Applied Biology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Kita, Kiyoshi [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded-and led to-gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  15. Genetic and metabolic analysis of the carbofuran catabolic pathway in Novosphingobium sp. KN65.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Phi Oanh; Helbling, Damian E; Bers, Karolien; Fida, Tekle Tafese; Wattiez, Ruddy; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Springael, Dirk; De Mot, René

    2014-10-01

    The widespread agricultural application of carbofuran and concomitant contamination of surface and ground waters has raised health concerns due to the reported toxic effects of this insecticide and its degradation products. Most bacteria that degrade carbofuran only perform partial degradation involving carbamate hydrolysis without breakdown of the resulting phenolic metabolite. The capacity to mineralize carbofuran beyond the benzofuran ring has been reported for some bacterial strains, especially sphingomonads, and some common metabolites, including carbofuran phenol, were identified. In the current study, the catabolism of carbofuran by Novosphingobium sp. KN65.2 (LMG 28221), a strain isolated from a carbofuran-exposed Vietnamese soil and utilizing the compound as a sole carbon and nitrogen source, was studied. Several KN65.2 plasposon mutants with diminished or abolished capacity to degrade and mineralize carbofuran were generated and characterized. Metabolic profiling of representative mutants revealed new metabolic intermediates, in addition to the initial hydrolysis product carbofuran phenol. The promiscuous carbofuran-hydrolyzing enzyme Mcd, which is present in several bacteria lacking carbofuran ring mineralization capacity, is not encoded by the Novosphingobium sp. KN65.2 genome. An alternative hydrolase gene required for this step was not identified, but the constitutively expressed genes of the unique cfd operon, including the oxygenase genes cfdC and cfdE, could be linked to further degradation of the phenolic metabolite. A third involved oxygenase gene, cfdI, and the transporter gene cftA, encoding a TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor with potential regulatory function, are located outside the cfd cluster. This study has revealed the first dedicated carbofuran catabolic genes and provides insight in the early steps of benzofuran ring degradation.

  16. Rhodococcus erythropolis and Its γ-Lactone Catabolic Pathway: An Unusual Biocontrol System That Disrupts Pathogen Quorum Sensing Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Latour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus erythropolis is an environmental Gram-positive Actinobacterium with a versatile metabolism involved in various bioconversions and degradations. Rhodococci are best known for their great potential in numerous decontamination and industrial processes. However, they can also prevent plant disease by disrupting quorum sensing-based communication of Gram-negative soft-rot bacteria, by degrading N-acyl-homoserine lactone signaling molecules. Such biocontrol activity results partly from the action of the γ-lactone catabolic pathway. This pathway is responsible for cleaving the lactone bond of a wide range of compounds comprising a γ-butyrolactone ring coupled to an alkyl or acyl chain. The aliphatic products of this hydrolysis are then activated and enter fatty acid metabolism. This short pathway is controlled by the presence of the γ-lactone, presumably sensed by a TetR-like transcriptional regulator, rather than the presence of the pathogen or the plant-host in the environment of the Rhodococci. Both the density and biocontrol activity of R. erythropolis may be boosted in crop systems. Treatment with a cheap γ-lactone stimulator, for example, the food flavoring γ-caprolactone, induces the activity in the biocontrol agent, R. erythropolis, of the pathway degrading signaling molecules; such treatments thus promote plant protection.

  17. Bioinformatic evaluation of L-arginine catabolic pathways in 24 cyanobacteria and transcriptional analysis of genes encoding enzymes of L-arginine catabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Elfriede K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far very limited knowledge exists on L-arginine catabolism in cyanobacteria, although six major L-arginine-degrading pathways have been described for prokaryotes. Thus, we have performed a bioinformatic analysis of possible L-arginine-degrading pathways in cyanobacteria. Further, we chose Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for a more detailed bioinformatic analysis and for validation of the bioinformatic predictions on L-arginine catabolism with a transcript analysis. Results We have evaluated 24 cyanobacterial genomes of freshwater or marine strains for the presence of putative L-arginine-degrading enzymes. We identified an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway in all 24 strains. In addition, cyanobacteria have one or two further pathways representing either an arginase pathway or L-arginine deiminase pathway or an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. An L-arginine amidinotransferase pathway as a major L-arginine-degrading pathway is not likely but can not be entirely excluded. A rather unusual finding was that the cyanobacterial L-arginine deiminases are substantially larger than the enzymes in non-photosynthetic bacteria and that they are membrane-bound. A more detailed bioinformatic analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 revealed that three different L-arginine-degrading pathways may in principle be functional in this cyanobacterium. These are (i an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway, (ii an L-arginine deiminase pathway, and (iii an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. A transcript analysis of cells grown either with nitrate or L-arginine as sole N-source and with an illumination of 50 μmol photons m-2 s-1 showed that the transcripts for the first enzyme(s of all three pathways were present, but that the transcript levels for the L-arginine deiminase and the L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase were substantially higher than that of the three isoenzymes of L-arginine decarboxylase. Conclusion The evaluation of 24

  18. γ-Resorcylate Catabolic-Pathway Genes in the Soil Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Daisuke; Araki, Naoto; Motoi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Shota; Iino, Toju; Imai, Shunsuke; Masai, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 gene cluster required for γ-resorcylate (GRA) catabolism was characterized. The cluster includes tsdA, tsdB, tsdC, tsdD, tsdR, tsdT, and tsdX, which encode GRA decarboxylase, resorcinol 4-hydroxylase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylacetate reductase, an IclR-type regulator, a major facilitator superfamily transporter, and a putative hydrolase, respectively. The tsdA gene conferred GRA decarboxylase activity on Escherichia coli. Purified TsdB oxidized NADH in the presence of resorcinol, suggesting that tsdB encodes a unique NADH-specific single-component resorcinol 4-hydroxylase. Mutations in either tsdA or tsdB resulted in growth deficiency on GRA. The tsdC and tsdD genes conferred hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and maleylacetate reductase activities, respectively, on E. coli. Inactivation of tsdT significantly retarded the growth of RHA1 on GRA. The growth retardation was partially suppressed under acidic conditions, suggesting the involvement of tsdT in GRA uptake. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the tsd genes constitute three transcriptional units, the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons and tsdR. Transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons was induced during growth on GRA. Inactivation of tsdR derepressed transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons in the absence of GRA, suggesting that tsd gene transcription is negatively regulated by the tsdR-encoded regulator. Binding of TsdR to the tsdR-tsdB and tsdT-tsdR intergenic regions was inhibited by the addition of GRA, indicating that GRA interacts with TsdR as an effector molecule. PMID:26319878

  19. D-galactose catabolism in Penicillium chrysogenum: Expression analysis of the structural genes of the Leloir pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónás, Ágota; Fekete, Erzsébet; Németh, Zoltán; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we analyzed the expression of the structural genes encoding the five enzymes comprising the Leloir pathway of D-galactose catabolism in the industrial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum on various carbon sources. The genome of P. chrysogenum contains a putative galactokinase gene at the annotated locus Pc13g10140, the product of which shows strong structural similarity to yeast galactokinase that was expressed on lactose and D-galactose only. The expression profile of the galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase gene at annotated locus Pc15g00140 was essentially similar to that of galactokinase. This is in contrast to the results from other fungi such as Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma reesei and A. niger, where the ortholog galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase genes were constitutively expressed. As for the UDP-galactose-4-epimerase encoding gene, five candidates were identified. We could not detect Pc16g12790, Pc21g12170 and Pc20g06140 expression on any of the carbon sources tested, while for the other two loci (Pc21g10370 and Pc18g01080) transcripts were clearly observed under all tested conditions. Like the 4-epimerase specified at locus Pc21g10370, the other two structural Leloir pathway genes - UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (Pc21g12790) and phosphoglucomutase (Pc18g01390) - were expressed constitutively at high levels as can be expected from their indispensable function in fungal cell wall formation.

  20. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Bergeau, Dorian; Ouchiha, Asma; Mijouin, Lily; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Dufour, Alain; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection.

  1. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Barbey

    Full Text Available The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection.

  2. Development of catabolic pathways in insect flight muscles. A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenakkers, A.M.Th.; Broek, A.Th.M. van den; Ronde, Th.J.A. de

    1975-01-01

    Activities of enzymes representative of glycolytic and β-oxidative pathways and citric acid and glycerophosphate cycles were measured in the developing flight muscles of three species: Calliphora erythrocephala, Locusta migratoria, and Philosamia cynthia. The activities were measured in vitro under

  3. Purification and characterization of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase, an enzyme in the inducible quinic acid catabolic pathway of Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøman, P; Reinert, W R; Giles, N H

    1978-07-10

    3-Dehydroshikimate dehydratase catalyzes the third reaction in the inducible quinic acid catabolic pathway of Neurospora crassa and is encoded in the qa-4 gene of the qa gene cluster. As part of continuing genetic and biochemical studies concerning the organization and regulation of this gene cluster, 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase has been purified and characterized biochemically. The enzyme was purified 1650-fold using the following techniques: 1) (NH4)2SO4 fractionation; 2) ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose; 3) gel filtration on Sephadex G-100; 4) ion exchange chromatography on Cellex QAE (quaternary aminoethyl); and 5) hydroxylapatite chromatography. 3-Dehydroshikimate dehydratase is a monomer with a molecular weight of about 37,000 and a sedimentation coefficient of 3.27 S. It has a Km value of 5.9 X 10(-4) and an average isoelectric point of 4.92. The purified enzyme is extremely sensitive to thermal denaturation but can be significantly stabilized by Mg2+ ions. The purified enzyme also exhibits maximal catalytic activity only when assayed in the presence of certain divalent cations, e.g. magnesium. The NH2-terminal residue of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase is proline, and its alpha-amino group is unblocked.

  4. Heat Stress Modulates Both Anabolic and Catabolic Signaling Pathways Preventing Dexamethasone-Induced Muscle Atrophy In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Wakako; Iwata, Masahiro; Akimoto, Takayuki; Matsuo, Shingo; Asai, Yuji; Suzuki, Shigeyuki

    2017-03-01

    It is generally recognized that synthetic glucocorticoids induce skeletal muscle weakness, and endogenous glucocorticoid levels increase in patients with muscle atrophy. It is reported that heat stress attenuates glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy; however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Therefore, we examined the mechanisms underlying the effects of heat stress against glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy using C2C12 myotubes in vitro, focusing on expression of key molecules and signaling pathways involved in regulating protein synthesis and degradation. The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone decreased myotube diameter and protein content, and heat stress prevented the morphological and biochemical glucocorticoid effects. Heat stress also attenuated increases in mRNAs of regulated in development and DNA damage responses 1 (REDD1) and Kruppel-like factor 15 (KLF15). Heat stress recovered the dexamethasone-induced inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling. These data suggest that changes in anabolic and catabolic signals are involved in heat stress-induced protection against glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. These results have a potentially broad clinical impact because elevated glucocorticoid levels are implicated in a wide range of diseases associated with muscle wasting. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 650-664, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Identification of the para-nitrophenol catabolic pathway, and characterization of three enzymes involved in the hydroquinone pathway, in pseudomonas sp. 1-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shuangyu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background para-Nitrophenol (PNP, a priority environmental pollutant, is hazardous to humans and animals. However, the information relating to the PNP degradation pathways and their enzymes remain limited. Results Pseudomonas sp.1-7 was isolated from methyl parathion (MP-polluted activated sludge and was shown to degrade PNP. Two different intermediates, hydroquinone (HQ and 4-nitrocatechol (4-NC were detected in the catabolism of PNP. This indicated that Pseudomonas sp.1-7 degraded PNP by two different pathways, namely the HQ pathway, and the hydroxyquinol (BT pathway (also referred to as the 4-NC pathway. A gene cluster (pdcEDGFCBA was identified in a 10.6 kb DNA fragment of a fosmid library, which cluster encoded the following enzymes involved in PNP degradation: PNP 4-monooxygenase (PdcA, p-benzoquinone (BQ reductase (PdcB, hydroxyquinol (BT 1,2-dioxygenase (PdcC, maleylacetate (MA reductase (PdcF, 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde (4-HS dehydrogenase (PdcG, and hydroquinone (HQ 1,2-dioxygenase (PdcDE. Four genes (pdcDEFG were expressed in E. coli and the purified pdcDE, pdcG and pdcF gene products were shown to convert HQ to 4-HS, 4-HS to MA and MA to β-ketoadipate respectively by in vitro activity assays. Conclusions The cloning, sequencing, and characterization of these genes along with the functional PNP degradation studies identified 4-NC, HQ, 4-HS, and MA as intermediates in the degradation pathway of PNP by Pseudomonas sp.1-7. This is the first conclusive report for both 4-NC and HQ- mediated degradation of PNP by one microorganism.

  6. Combined fluxomics and transcriptomics analysis of glucose catabolism via a partially cyclic pentose phosphate pathway in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Tanja; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan; Polen, Tino; Bringer, Stephanie; Sahm, Hermann; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Bott, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the distribution and regulation of periplasmic and cytoplasmic carbon fluxes in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H with glucose were studied by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) in combination with transcriptomics and enzyme assays. For (13)C-MFA, cells were cultivated with specifically (13)C-labeled glucose, and intracellular metabolites were analyzed for their labeling pattern by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In growth phase I, 90% of the glucose was oxidized periplasmically to gluconate and partially further oxidized to 2-ketogluconate. Of the glucose taken up by the cells, 9% was phosphorylated to glucose 6-phosphate, whereas 91% was oxidized by cytoplasmic glucose dehydrogenase to gluconate. Additional gluconate was taken up into the cells by transport. Of the cytoplasmic gluconate, 70% was oxidized to 5-ketogluconate and 30% was phosphorylated to 6-phosphogluconate. In growth phase II, 87% of gluconate was oxidized to 2-ketogluconate in the periplasm and 13% was taken up by the cells and almost completely converted to 6-phosphogluconate. Since G. oxydans lacks phosphofructokinase, glucose 6-phosphate can be metabolized only via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) or the Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP). (13)C-MFA showed that 6-phosphogluconate is catabolized primarily via the oxidative PPP in both phases I and II (62% and 93%) and demonstrated a cyclic carbon flux through the oxidative PPP. The transcriptome comparison revealed an increased expression of PPP genes in growth phase II, which was supported by enzyme activity measurements and correlated with the increased PPP flux in phase II. Moreover, genes possibly related to a general stress response displayed increased expression in growth phase II.

  7. Metabolic and endocrine modulation of anabolic and catabolic pathways of glucose and fatty acids. I. Chemical anatomy of the major metabolic pathways of the energogenic general function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloiu, D D; Belloiu, I

    1986-01-01

    This study is an attempt to integrate the intermediary metabolism of energogenic substrates--glucose and fatty acids--within the framework of the energogenic general function (EGF), which is active in two distinct phases: anabolic and catabolic. EGF is a component of the metabolic general function (MGF), which together with the reproductive general function and the adaptation general function may be taken to represent three main "general functions of organisms" common to all beings, whether animal or vegetal. This initial paper presents, descriptively and graphically, the main anabolic functions and pathways of glucose and fatty acids and, separately, the main catabolic ones, in other words, the "chemical anatomy" of EGF. The study begins with the anabolic "digestive" function of the digestive tract, concerning the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and proteins. Conversion of the non-absorbable macromolecules of ingested carbohydrates into absorbable micromolecules of glucose, is shown to enable the latter, after absorption, to carry out the two characteristic anabolic processes: transmembrane "transport" and "condensation". Absorption and vehiculation of hydrophobic lipids is carried out by means of the major function of intestinal cells: synthesis of chylomicrons. Chylomicrons are hydrophilic special lipoprotein particles which are able to transport fats to the adipose tissue and cholesterol to the liver. In the liver the anabolic aspects of EGF are represented by two main functions: glycogeno-genesis, i.e. "non-reductive" condensation of glucose into glycogen stores, and lipoproteino-genesis, i.e. "reductive" condensation of glucose into lipoproteins or VLDL (very low density lipoproteins). VLDL are hydrophilic (vehiculable) spheric particles (containing triacylglycerols and cholesteryl esters in their core, and phospholipids, cholesterol and apolipoprotein-B at their surface), which are to be released into the general circulation. The anabolic phase in

  8. Anabolic and Catabolic Signaling Pathways in mouse Longissimus Dorsi after 30-day BION-M1 Spaceflight and Subsequent Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoev, Timur; Blottner, Dieter; Shenkman, Boris; Lomonosova, Yulia; Vilchinskaya, Natalia; Nemirovskaya, Tatiana; Salanova, Michele

    The aim of the study was to analyze some of the key markers regulating anabolic and catabolic processes in mouse m. longissimus dorsi, an important back muscle system for trunk stabilization, following 30-day spaceflight and 8-day recovery period. C57/black mice were divided into 3 groups: 1) Vivarium Control (n=7), 2) Flight (n=5), 3) Recovery (n=5). The experiment was carried out in accordance with the rules of biomedical ethics certified by the Russian Academy of Sciences Committee on Bioethics. Using Western-blotting analysis we determined the content of IRS-1, p-AMPK, MURF-1 and eEF2 in m. longissimus dorsi. The content of IRS-1 in mice m. longissimus dorsi after the 30-day flight did not differ from the control group, however, in the Recovery group IRS-1 level was 80% higher (p<0.05) as compared to Control. Phospho-AMPK content remained unchanged. In the Recovery group there was an increase of eEF2 by 75% compared to the Control (p<0.05). After spaceflight MuRF-1 content was increased more than 2 times compared to the control animals. Thus, our findings showed that the work of the IRS-1 - dependent signaling pathway is only active in the recovery period. The content of the ubiquitin-ligase MURF-1 that takes parts in degrading myosin heavy chain was increased after the spaceflight, however, after 8-day recovery period MURF-1 level did not exceed the control indicating normalization of protein degradation in m. longissimus dorsi. The work was supported by the program of basic research of RAS and Federal Space Program of Russia for the period of 2006-2015.

  9. Simultaneous quantification of salivary 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, 3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate, and 2-hydroxybutyrate as possible markers of amino acid and fatty acid catabolic pathways by LC–ESI–MS/MS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miyazaki, Teruo; Honda, Akira; Ikegami, Tadashi; Iwamoto, Junichi; Monma, Tadakuni; Hirayama, Takeshi; Saito, Yoshifumi; Yamashita, Kouwa; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    ...), 3-hydroxyisobutyrate (3HIB), 3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate (3HMB) and 2-hydroxybutyrate (2HB), which could be new non-invasive biomarkers for catabolic pathways of fatty acids/ketogenic amino acids, valine, leucine, and methionine/threonine/α...

  10. Glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase and other enzyme activities related to the pyrimidine pathway in spleen of Squalus acanthias (spiny dogfish).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P M

    1989-07-15

    The first two steps of urea synthesis in liver of marine elasmobranchs involve formation of glutamine from ammonia and of carbamoyl phosphate from glutamine, catalysed by glutamine synthetase and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, respectively [Anderson & Casey (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 456-462]; both of these enzymes are localized exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix. The objective of this study was to establish the enzymology of carbamoyl phosphate formation and utilization for pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis in Squalus acanthias (spiny dogfish), a representative elasmobranch. Aspartate carbamoyltransferase could not be detected in liver of dogfish. Spleen extracts, however, had glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate carbamoyltransferase, dihydro-orotase, and glutamine synthetase activities, all localized in the cytosol; dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine-5'-decarboxylase activities were also present. Except for glutamine synthetase, the levels of all activities were very low. The carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity is inhibited by UTP and is activated by 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. The first three enzyme activities of the pyrimidine pathway were eluted in distinctly different positions during gel filtration chromatography under a number of different conditions; although complete proteolysis of inter-domain regions of a multifunctional complex during extraction cannot be excluded, the evidence suggests that in dogfish, in contrast to mammalian species, these three enzymes of the pyrimidine pathway exist as individual polypeptide chains. These results: (1) establish that dogfish express two different glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activities, (2) confirm the report [Smith, Ritter & Campbell (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 198-202] that dogfish express two different glutamine synthetases, and (3) provide indirect evidence that glutamine may not be available in liver for

  11. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöllner, N

    1982-09-01

    The pathways of purine biosynthesis and degradation have been elucidated during the last 30 years; the regulation of the mechanisms involved is not yet fully understood, particularly with respect to quantitative aspects. Research into inborn errors of purine metabolism has provided valuable insights into purine synthesis and salvage pathways. Nutrition experiments using purine-free formula diets and supplements with defined purine sources permit precise descriptions of the influence of various dietary purines on uric acid formation. Supplements of dietary purines produce dose-proportional increases in plasma uric acid concentrations, uric acid pool size and renal uric acid excretion. The magnitude of these increases depends on the type of purine compound administered, which may limit the value of food tables for human dietetics. Purine content of food must be related not only to weight but also to energy and to protein, particularly if new foodstuffs or a vegetarian diet are ingested. Dietary purines appear to influence the biosynthesis of pyrimidines. In contrast to dietary purines, pyrimidines in the diet, if administered as nucleosides or nucleotides, are utilized in animals for the synthesis of nucleic acids. Much further work is necessary for a better understanding of the inter-relationships of purine and pyrimidine metabolism.

  12. A Two-Component para-Nitrophenol Monooxygenase Initiates a Novel 2-Chloro-4-Nitrophenol Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jun; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2015-11-13

    Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300 (DSM 45091) grows on 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) and para-nitrophenol (PNP) as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. In this study, by genetic and biochemical analyses, a novel 2C4NP catabolic pathway different from those of all other 2C4NP utilizers was identified with hydroxyquinol (hydroxy-1,4-hydroquinone or 1,2,4-benzenetriol [BT]) as the ring cleavage substrate. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the pnp cluster located in three operons is likely involved in the catabolism of both 2C4NP and PNP. The oxygenase component (PnpA1) and reductase component (PnpA2) of the two-component PNP monooxygenase were expressed and purified to homogeneity, respectively. The identification of chlorohydroquinone (CHQ) and BT during 2C4NP degradation catalyzed by PnpA1A2 indicated that PnpA1A2 catalyzes the sequential denitration and dechlorination of 2C4NP to BT and catalyzes the conversion of PNP to BT. Genetic analyses revealed that pnpA1 plays an essential role in both 2C4NP and PNP degradations by gene knockout and complementation. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of CHQ to BT, PnpA1A2 was also found to be able to catalyze the hydroxylation of hydroquinone (HQ) to BT, revealing the probable fate of HQ that remains unclear in PNP catabolism by Gram-positive bacteria. This study fills a gap in our knowledge of the 2C4NP degradation mechanism in Gram-positive bacteria and also enhances our understanding of the genetic and biochemical diversity of 2C4NP catabolism.

  13. Molecular characterization of PauR and its role in control of putrescine and cadaverine catabolism through the γ-glutamylation pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Han Ting; Li, Jeng-Yi; Peng, Yu-Chih; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 grows on a variety of polyamines as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Catabolism of polyamines is mediated by the γ-glutamylation pathway, which is complicated by the existence of multiple homologous enzymes with redundant specificities toward different polyamines for a more diverse metabolic capacity in this organism. Through a series of markerless gene knockout mutants and complementation tests, specific combinations of pauABCD (polyamine utilization) genes were deciphered for catabolism of different polyamines. Among six pauA genes, expression of pauA1, pauA2, pauA4, and pauA5 was found to be inducible by diamines putrescine (PUT) and cadaverine (CAD) but not by diaminopropane. Activation of these promoters was regulated by the PauR repressor, as evidenced by constitutively active promoters in the pauR mutant. The activities of these promoters were further enhanced by exogenous PUT or CAD in the mutant devoid of all six pauA genes. The recombinant PauR protein with a hexahistidine tag at its N terminus was purified, and specific bindings of PauR to the promoter regions of most pau operons were demonstrated by electromobility shift assays. Potential interactions of PUT and CAD with PauR were also suggested by chemical cross-linkage analysis with glutaraldehyde. In comparison, growth on PUT was more proficient than that on CAD, and this observed growth phenotype was reflected in a strong catabolite repression of pauA promoter activation by CAD but was completely absent as reflected by activation by PUT. In summary, this study clearly establishes the function of PauR in control of pau promoters in response to PUT and CAD for their catabolism through the γ-glutamylation pathway.

  14. New insights in the removal of the hydantoins, oxidation product of pyrimidines, via the base excision and nucleotide incision repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Couve, Sophie; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Gasparutto, Didier; Saparbaev, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA, if not repaired, can be both miscoding and blocking. These genetic alterations can lead to mutations and/or cell death, which in turn cause cancer and aging. Oxidized DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: base excision (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR). Hydantoin derivatives such as 5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-Hyd) and 5-methyl-5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-5Me-Hyd), major products of cytosine and thymine oxidative degradation pathways, respectively, have been detected in cancer cells and ancient DNA. Hydantoins are blocking lesions for DNA polymerases and excised by bacterial and yeast DNA glycosylases in the BER pathway. However little is known about repair of pyrimidine-derived hydantoins in human cells. Here, using both denaturing PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS analyses we report that the bacterial, yeast and human AP endonucleases can incise duplex DNA 5' next to 5OH-Hyd and 5OH-5Me-Hyd thus initiating the NIR pathway. We have fully reconstituted the NIR pathway for these lesions in vitro using purified human proteins. Depletion of Nfo in E. coli and APE1 in HeLa cells abolishes the NIR activity in cell-free extracts. Importantly, a number of redundant DNA glycosylase activities can excise hydantoin residues, including human NTH1, NEIL1 and NEIL2 and the former protein being a major DNA glycosylase activity in HeLa cells extracts. This study demonstrates that both BER and NIR pathways can compete and/or back-up each other to remove hydantoin DNA lesions in vivo.

  15. New insights in the removal of the hydantoins, oxidation product of pyrimidines, via the base excision and nucleotide incision repair pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto Redrejo-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative damage to DNA, if not repaired, can be both miscoding and blocking. These genetic alterations can lead to mutations and/or cell death, which in turn cause cancer and aging. Oxidized DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: base excision (BER and nucleotide incision repair (NIR. Hydantoin derivatives such as 5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-Hyd and 5-methyl-5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-5Me-Hyd, major products of cytosine and thymine oxidative degradation pathways, respectively, have been detected in cancer cells and ancient DNA. Hydantoins are blocking lesions for DNA polymerases and excised by bacterial and yeast DNA glycosylases in the BER pathway. However little is known about repair of pyrimidine-derived hydantoins in human cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, using both denaturing PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS analyses we report that the bacterial, yeast and human AP endonucleases can incise duplex DNA 5' next to 5OH-Hyd and 5OH-5Me-Hyd thus initiating the NIR pathway. We have fully reconstituted the NIR pathway for these lesions in vitro using purified human proteins. Depletion of Nfo in E. coli and APE1 in HeLa cells abolishes the NIR activity in cell-free extracts. Importantly, a number of redundant DNA glycosylase activities can excise hydantoin residues, including human NTH1, NEIL1 and NEIL2 and the former protein being a major DNA glycosylase activity in HeLa cells extracts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that both BER and NIR pathways can compete and/or back-up each other to remove hydantoin DNA lesions in vivo.

  16. Genomic and functional analyses of the 2-aminophenol catabolic pathway and partial conversion of its substrate into picolinic acid in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardita Chirino

    Full Text Available 2-aminophenol (2-AP is a toxic nitrogen-containing aromatic pollutant. Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 possess an amn gene cluster that encodes the 2-AP catabolic pathway. In this report, the functionality of the 2-aminophenol pathway of B. xenovorans strain LB400 was analyzed. The amnRJBACDFEHG cluster located at chromosome 1 encodes the enzymes for the degradation of 2-aminophenol. The absence of habA and habB genes in LB400 genome correlates with its no growth on nitrobenzene. RT-PCR analyses in strain LB400 showed the co-expression of amnJB, amnBAC, amnACD, amnDFE and amnEHG genes, suggesting that the amn cluster is an operon. RT-qPCR showed that the amnB gene expression was highly induced by 2-AP, whereas a basal constitutive expression was observed in glucose, indicating that these amn genes are regulated. We propose that the predicted MarR-type transcriptional regulator encoded by the amnR gene acts as repressor of the amn gene cluster using a MarR-type regulatory binding sequence. This report showed that LB400 resting cells degrade completely 2-AP. The amn gene cluster from strain LB400 is highly identical to the amn gene cluster from P. knackmussi strain B13, which could not grow on 2-AP. However, we demonstrate that B. xenovorans LB400 is able to grow using 2-AP as sole nitrogen source and glucose as sole carbon source. An amnBA (- mutant of strain LB400 was unable to grow with 2-AP as nitrogen source and glucose as carbon source and to degrade 2-AP. This study showed that during LB400 growth on 2-AP this substrate was partially converted into picolinic acid (PA, a well-known antibiotic. The addition of PA at lag or mid-exponential phase inhibited LB400 growth. The MIC of PA for strain LB400 is 2 mM. Overall, these results demonstrate that B. xenovorans strain LB400 posses a functional 2-AP catabolic central pathway, which could lead to the production of picolinic acid.

  17. The transcriptional activators AraR and XlnR from Aspergillus niger regulate expression of pentose catabolic and pentose phosphate pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Evy; Zhou, Miaomiao; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-09-01

    The pentose catabolic pathway (PCP) and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) are required for the conversion of pentose sugars in fungi and are linked via d-xylulose-5-phosphate. Previously, it was shown that the PCP is regulated by the transcriptional activators XlnR and AraR in Aspergillus niger. Here we assessed whether XlnR and AraR also regulate the PPP. Expression of two genes, rpiA and talB, was reduced in the ΔaraR/ΔxlnR strain and increased in the xylulokinase negative strain (xkiA1) on d-xylose and/or l-arabinose. Bioinformatic analysis of the 1 kb promoter regions of rpiA and talB showed the presence of putative XlnR binding sites. Combining all results in this study, it strongly suggests that these two PPP genes are under regulation of XlnR in A. niger.

  18. Linking genome content to biofuel production yields: a meta-analysis of major catabolic pathways among select H2 and ethanol-producing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carere Carlo R

    2012-12-01

    encoded hydrogenases appear to have little impact on H2 production in organisms that do not encode ethanol producing pathways, they do influence reduced end-product yields in those that do. Conclusions Here we show that composition of genes encoding pathways involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis pathways can be used to approximate potential end-product distribution patterns. We have identified a number of genetic biomarkers for streamlining ethanol and H2 producing capabilities. By linking genome content, reaction thermodynamics, and end-product yields, we offer potential targets for optimization of either ethanol or H2 yields through metabolic engineering.

  19. Magnolol Affects Cellular Proliferation, Polyamine Biosynthesis and Catabolism-Linked Protein Expression and Associated Cellular Signaling Pathways in Human Prostate Cancer Cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan T. McKeown

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men in Canada and the United States. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development and progression of many cancers, including prostate cancer. Context and purpose of this study: This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on cellular proliferation and proliferation-linked activities of PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Results: PC3 cells exposed to magnolol at a concentration of 80 μM for 6 hours exhibited decreased protein expression of ornithine decarboxylase, a key regulator in polyamine biosynthesis, as well as affecting the expression of other proteins involved in polyamine biosynthesis and catabolism. Furthermore, protein expression of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, a key regulatory protein associated with DNA synthesis, was significantly decreased. Finally, the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, NFκB (nuclear factor of kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and AP-1 (activator protein 1 cellular signaling pathways were assayed to determine which, if any, of these pathways magnolol exposure would alter. Protein expressions of p-JNK-1 and c-jun were significantly increased while p-p38, JNK-1/2, PI3Kp85, p-PI3Kp85, p-Akt, NFκBp65, p-IκBα and IκBα protein expressions were significantly decreased. Conclusions: These alterations further support the anti-proliferative effects of magnolol on PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggest that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  20. Activity of two catabolic enzymes of the phosphogluconate pathway in mesquite roots inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense Cd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Luis A; Bashan, Yoav

    2008-10-01

    The mesquite amargo (Prosopis articulate), one of the main nurse trees of the Sonoran Desert in Mexico, is responsible for major, natural re-vegetation processes. It exudes gluconic acid in root exudates, a favorite carbon source for the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. Two enzymes, gluconokinase (EC 2.7.1.12) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.44), participating in the phosphogluconate pathway, are active in the bacteria. Bacterial 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is a constitutive enzyme, while gluconokinase is induced upon exposure to gluconic acid. Both enzymes are active in young, non-inoculated mesquite seedlings growing under hydroponic conditions. When A. brasilense Cd bacteria are inoculated on the root system, the roots exhibit much higher activity of gluconokinase, but not 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Mesquite roots exhibit high levels of root colonization by the inoculating bacteria. At the same time, and also for plants growing under sand culture conditions, the seedlings grew taller, greener, had longer leaves, and were heavier.

  1. Investigating the physiological roles of low-efficiency D-mannonate and D-gluconate dehydratases in the enolase superfamily: pathways for the catabolism of L-gulonate and L-idonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelecki, Daniel J; Vendiola, Jean Alyxa Ferolin; Jones, Amy M; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2014-09-09

    The sequence/function space in the D-mannonate dehydratase subgroup (ManD) of the enolase superfamily was investigated to determine how enzymatic function diverges as sequence identity decreases [Wichelecki, D. J., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 2722-2731]. That study revealed that members of the ManD subgroup vary in substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency: high-efficiency (kcat/KM = 10(3)-10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) for dehydration of D-mannonate, low-efficiency (kcat/KM = 10-10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) for dehydration of D-mannonate and/or D-gluconate, and no activity. Characterization of high-efficiency members revealed that these are ManDs in the D-glucuronate catabolic pathway {analogues of UxuA [Wichelecki, D. J., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 4087-4089]}. However, the genomes of organisms that encode low-efficiency members of the ManDs subgroup encode UxuAs; therefore, these must have divergent physiological functions. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of three low-efficiency members of the ManD subgroup and identified a novel physiologically relevant pathway for L-gulonate catabolism in Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM3043 as well as cryptic pathways for L-gulonate catabolism in Escherichia coli CFT073 and L-idonate catabolism in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis str. P125109. However, we could not identify physiological roles for the low-efficiency members of the ManD subgroup, allowing the suggestion that these pathways may be either evolutionary relics or the starting points for new metabolic potential.

  2. Metabolomic profiling of permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster identifies a role for tryptophan catabolism in insecticide survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinzer, Robert A; Henderson, Louise; Marchiondo, Alan A; Woods, Debra J; Davies, Shireen A; Dow, Julian A T

    2015-12-01

    Insecticides and associated synergists are rapidly losing efficacy in target insect pest populations making the discovery of alternatives a priority. To discover novel targets for permethrin synergists, metabolomics was performed on permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster. Changes were observed in several metabolic pathways including those for amino acids, glycogen, glycolysis, energy, nitrogen, NAD(+), purine, pyrimidine, lipids and carnitine. Markers for acidosis, ammonia stress, oxidative stress and detoxification responses were also observed. Many of these changes had not been previously characterized after permethrin exposure. From the altered pathways, tryptophan catabolism was selected for further investigation. The knockdown of some tryptophan catabolism genes (vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950) in the whole fly and in specific tissues including fat body, midgut and Malpighian tubules using targeted RNAi resulted in altered survival phenotypes against acute topical permethrin exposure. The knockdown of vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950 in the whole fly also altered survival phenotypes against chronic oral permethrin, fenvalerate, DDT, chlorpyriphos and hydramethylnon exposure. Thus tryptophan catabolism has a previously uncharacterized role in defence against insecticides, and shows that metabolomics is a powerful tool for target identification in pesticide research.

  3. Patchwork assembly of nag-like nitroarene dioxygenase genes and the 3-chlorocatechol degradation cluster for evolution of the 2-chloronitrobenzene catabolism pathway in Pseudomonas stutzeri ZWLR2-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Shu-Jun; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Dai, Hui; Tang, Huiru; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri ZWLR2-1 utilizes 2-chloronitrobenzene (2CNB) as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. To identify genes involved in this pathway, a 16.2-kb DNA fragment containing putative 2CNB dioxygenase genes was cloned and sequenced. Of the products from the 19 open reading frames that resulted from this fragment, CnbAc and CnbAd exhibited striking identities to the respective α and β subunits of the Nag-like ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases involved in the metabolism of nitrotoluene, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene. The encoding genes were also flanked by two copies of insertion sequence IS6100. CnbAa and CnbAb are similar to the ferredoxin reductase and ferredoxin for anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia DBO1. Escherichia coli cells expressing cnbAaAbAcAd converted 2CNB to 3-chlorocatechol with concomitant nitrite release. Cell extracts of E. coli/pCNBC exhibited chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity. The cnbCDEF gene cluster, homologous to a 3-chlorocatechol degradation cluster in Sphingomonas sp. strain TFD44, probably contains all of the genes necessary for the conversion of 3-chlorocatechol to 3-oxoadipate. The patchwork-like structure of this catabolic cluster suggests that the cnb cluster for 2CNB degradation evolved by recruiting two catabolic clusters encoding a nitroarene dioxygenase and a chlorocatechol degradation pathway. This provides another example to help elucidate the bacterial evolution of catabolic pathways in response to xenobiotic chemicals.

  4. Amino Acid Catabolism in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Nunes Nesi, Adriano; Araújo, Wagner L; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2015-11-02

    Amino acids have various prominent functions in plants. Besides their usage during protein biosynthesis, they also represent building blocks for several other biosynthesis pathways and play pivotal roles during signaling processes as well as in plant stress response. In general, pool sizes of the 20 amino acids differ strongly and change dynamically depending on the developmental and physiological state of the plant cell. Besides amino acid biosynthesis, which has already been investigated in great detail, the catabolism of amino acids is of central importance for adjusting their pool sizes but so far has drawn much less attention. The degradation of amino acids can also contribute substantially to the energy state of plant cells under certain physiological conditions, e.g. carbon starvation. In this review, we discuss the biological role of amino acid catabolism and summarize current knowledge on amino acid degradation pathways and their regulation in the context of plant cell physiology.

  5. Molecular characterization of arginine deiminase pathway in Laribacter hongkongensis and unique regulation of arginine catabolism and anabolism by multiple environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Lifeng; Teng, Jade L L; Watt, Rory M; Liu, Cuihua; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-11-01

    The betaproteobacterium Laribacter hongkongensis is associated with invasive bacteremic infections and gastroenteritis. Its genome contains two adjacent arc gene cassettes (arc1 and arc2) under independent transcriptional control, which are essential for acid resistance. Laribacter hongkongensis also encodes duplicate copies of the argA and argB genes from the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We show that arginine enhances the transcription of arcA2 but suppresses arcA1 expression. We demonstrate that ArgR acts as a transcriptional regulator of the two arc operons through binding to ARG operator sites (ARG boxes). Upon temperature shift from 20°C to 37°C, arcA1 transcription is upregulated while arcA2, argA2, argB2 and argG are downregulated. The transcription of arcA1 and arcA2 are augmented under anaerobic and acidic conditions. The transcription levels of argA1, argA2, argB1, argB2 and argG are significantly increased under anaerobic and acidic conditions but are repressed by the addition of arginine. Deletion of argR significantly decreases bacterial survival in macrophages, while expression of both arc operons, argR and all five of the anabolic arg genes increases 8 h post-infection. Our results show that arginine catabolism in L. hongkongensis is finely regulated by controlling the transcription of two arc operons, whereas arginine anabolism is controlled by two copies of argA and argB.

  6. Physiological Role of phnP-specified Phosphoribosyl Cyclic Phosphodiesterase in Catabolism of Organophosphonic Acids by the Carbon−Phosphorus Lyase Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; McSorley, Fern R.; Zechel, David L.

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli , internalization and catabolism of organophosphonicacids are governed by the 14-cistron phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP operon. The phnP gene product was previously shown to encode a phosphodiesterase with unusual specificity toward ribonucleoside 2',3'-cyclic phosphates. Furthermore, phnP...

  7. Pyrimidine-pyridine ring interconversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, van der H.C.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discusses the pyrimidine-to-pyridine ring transformation and pyridine-to-pyrimidine ring transformation. In nucleophile-induced pyrimidine-to-pyridine rearrangements, two types of reactions can be distinguished depending on the structure of the nucleophile: (1) reactions in which the ni

  8. Prebiotic syntheses of purines and pyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, B; Lazcano, A; Oró, J

    1984-01-01

    The work done in many laboratories during the last two decades has confirmed that hydrogen cyanide and cyanoacetylene are the two major precursors for the prebiotic synthesis of purines and pyrimidines, respectively. Although several different pathways for the synthesis of purines have been described, they are all variations of the initial mechanism proposed by Oró and Kimball, where hydrogen cyanide leads first to the formation of a 4,5-di-substituted imidazole derivative, and then to the closing of the purine ring with a C1 compound. A number of experiments have shown that purines and pyrimidines can also be obtained from methane, ammonia (nitrogen), and water mixtures, provided an activating source of energy (radiation, electric discharges, etc.) is available. However, in this case the yields are lower by about two orders of magnitude because of the intermediate formation of hydrogen cyanide and cyanoacetylene. The latter two compounds have been found in interstellar space, Titan and other bodies of the solar system. They were probably present in the primordial parent bodies from the solar nebula in concentrations of 10(-2) to 10(-3) M as inferred from recent calculations by Miller and coworkers obtained for the Murchison meteorite. These concentrations should have been sufficient to generate relatively large amounts of purine and pyrimidine bases on the primitive Earth.

  9. Polyamine catabolism and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, Robert A; Pegg, Anthony E

    2009-07-15

    In addition to polyamine homoeostasis, it has become increasingly clear that polyamine catabolism can play a dominant role in drug response, apoptosis and the response to stressful stimuli, and contribute to the aetiology of several pathological states, including cancer. The highly inducible enzymes SSAT (spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase) and SMO (spermine oxidase) and the generally constitutively expressed APAO (N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase) appear to play critical roles in many normal and disease processes. The dysregulation of polyamine catabolism frequently accompanies several disease states and suggests that such dysregulation may both provide useful insight into disease mechanism and provide unique druggable targets that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. Each of these enzymes has the potential to alter polyamine homoeostasis in response to multiple cell signals and the two oxidases produce the reactive oxygen species H2O2 and aldehydes, each with the potential to produce pathological states. The activity of SSAT provides substrates for APAO or substrates for the polyamine exporter, thus reducing the intracellular polyamine concentration, the net effect of which depends on the magnitude and rate of any increase in SSAT. SSAT may also influence cellular metabolism via interaction with other proteins and by perturbing the content of acetyl-CoA and ATP. The goal of the present review is to cover those aspects of polyamine catabolism that have an impact on disease aetiology or treatment and to provide a solid background in this ever more exciting aspect of polyamine biology.

  10. Identification of the First Riboflavin Catabolic Gene Cluster Isolated from Microbacterium maritypicum G10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Chakrabarty, Yindrila; Philmus, Benjamin; Mehta, Angad P; Bhandari, Dhananjay; Hohmann, Hans-Peter; Begley, Tadhg P

    2016-11-04

    Riboflavin is a common cofactor, and its biosynthetic pathway is well characterized. However, its catabolic pathway, despite intriguing hints in a few distinct organisms, has never been established. This article describes the isolation of a Microbacterium maritypicum riboflavin catabolic strain, and the cloning of the riboflavin catabolic genes. RcaA, RcaB, RcaD, and RcaE were overexpressed and biochemically characterized as riboflavin kinase, riboflavin reductase, ribokinase, and riboflavin hydrolase, respectively. Based on these activities, a pathway for riboflavin catabolism is proposed.

  11. Catabolism of host-derived compounds during extracellular bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Jamie A; Wargo, Matthew J

    2014-02-01

    Efficient catabolism of host-derived compounds is essential for bacterial survival and virulence. While these links in intracellular bacteria are well studied, such studies in extracellular bacteria lag behind, mostly for technical reasons. The field has identified important metabolic pathways, but the mechanisms by which they impact infection and in particular, establishing the importance of a compound's catabolism versus alternate metabolic roles has been difficult. In this review we will examine evidence for catabolism during extracellular bacterial infections in animals and known or potential roles in virulence. In the process, we point out key gaps in the field that will require new or newly adapted techniques.

  12. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic model for xylose catabolism in Aspergillus is proposed. From a thermodynamic analysis it was found that the intermediate xylitol will accumulate during xylose catabolism. Use of the kinetic model allowed metabolic control analysis (MCA) of the xylose catabolic pathway to be carried out...... specifying that flux control often resides at the step following an intermediate present at high concentrations was, therefore, shown not to hold. The intracellular xylitol concentration was measured in batch cultivations of two different strains of Aspergillus niger and two different strains of Aspergillus...

  13. A Search for Interstellar Pyrimidine

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Y J; Charnley, S B; Kisiel, Z; Ehrenfreund, P; Huang, H C; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Yan, Chi-Hung; Charnley, Steven B.; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Huang, Hui-Chun

    2003-01-01

    We have searched three hot molecular cores for submillimeter emission from the nucleic acid building-block pyrimidine. We obtain upper limits to the total pyrimidine (beam-averaged) column densities towards Sgr B2(N), Orion KL and W51 e1/e2 of 1.7E+14 cm^{-2}, 2.4E+14 cm^{-2} and 3.4E+14 cm^{-2}, respectively. The associated upper limits to the pyrimidine fractional abundances lie in the range (0.3-3)E-10. Implications of this result for interstellar organic chemistry, and for the prospects of detecting nitrogen heterocycles in general, are briefly discussed.

  14. Polyamine catabolism in carcinogenesis: potential targets for chemotherapy and chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Valentina; DeStefano Shields, Christina; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Casero, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Polyamines, including spermine, spermidine, and the precursor diamine, putrescine, are naturally occurring polycationic alkylamines that are required for eukaryotic cell growth, differentiation, and survival. This absolute requirement for polyamines and the need to maintain intracellular levels within specific ranges require a highly regulated metabolic pathway primed for rapid changes in response to cellular growth signals, environmental changes, and stress. Although the polyamine metabolic pathway is strictly regulated in normal cells, dysregulation of polyamine metabolism is a frequent event in cancer. Recent studies suggest that the polyamine catabolic pathway may be involved in the etiology of some epithelial cancers. The catabolism of spermine to spermidine utilizes either the one-step enzymatic reaction of spermine oxidase (SMO) or the two-step process of spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) coupled with the peroxisomal enzyme N (1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase. Both catabolic pathways produce hydrogen peroxide and a reactive aldehyde that are capable of damaging DNA and other critical cellular components. The catabolic pathway also depletes the intracellular concentrations of spermidine and spermine, which are free radical scavengers. Consequently, the polyamine catabolic pathway in general and specifically SMO and SSAT provide exciting new targets for chemoprevention and/or chemotherapy.

  15. Phenylbutyrate improves nitrogen disposal via alternative pathway without eliciting an increase in protein breakdown and catabolism in control and ornithine transcarbamylace-deficient patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenylbutyrate (PB) is a drug used in urea cycle disorder patients to elicit alternative pathways for nitrogen disposal. However, PB decreases plasma branched chain amino acid (BCAA) concentrations and prior research suggests that PB may increase leucine oxidation, indicating increased protein degra...

  16. Transport of pyrimidine nucleosides in cells of Escherichia coli K 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mygind, B; Munch-Petersen

    1975-11-15

    1. The transport of pyrimidine mucleosides into cells of Escherichis coli has been investigated in mutant strains which cannot metabolize these nucleosides. Such cells transport and concentrate purimidine mucleosides several hindredfold. 2. The transport is inhibited by energy poisons and by sulfhydryl reagents. 3. Pyrimidine mucleosides compete mutually for transport. Adenosine is also a strong competitor while guanosine and inosine are weak competitors. 4. The rate of pyrimidine mucleoside transport is shown to be under control of the cytR and deoR gene products, which are also known to regulate the synthesis of nucleoside-catabolizing enzymes. The transport system is repressed by growth on glucose, as is the synthesis of the enzymes.

  17. Control of hydroxyproline catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Catharine E; Gavina, Jennilee M A; Morton, Richard; Britz-McKibbin, Philip; Finan, Turlough M

    2012-09-01

    Hydroxyproline (Hyp) in decaying organic matter is a rich source of carbon and nitrogen for microorganisms. A bacterial pathway for Hyp catabolism is known; however, genes and function relationships are not established. In the pathway, trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (4-L-Hyp) is epimerized to cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline (4-D-Hyp), and then, in three enzymatic reactions, the D-isomer is converted via Δ-pyrroline-4-hydroxy-2-carboxylate (HPC) and α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde (KGSA) to α-ketoglutarate (KG). Here a transcriptional analysis of cells growing on 4-L-Hyp, and the regulation and functions of genes from a Hyp catabolism locus of the legume endosymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti are reported. Fourteen hydroxyproline catabolism genes (hyp), in five transcripts hypR, hypD, hypH, hypST and hypMNPQO(RE)XYZ, were negatively regulated by hypR. hypRE was shown to encode 4-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase and a hypRE mutant grew with 4-D-Hyp but not 4-L-Hyp. hypO, hypD and hypH are predicted to encode 4-D-Hyp oxidase, HPC deaminase and α-KGSA dehydrogenase respectively. The functions for hypS, hypT, hypX, hypY and hypZ remain to be determined. The data suggest 4-Hyp is converted to the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate via the pathway established biochemically for Pseudomonas. This report describes the first molecular characterization of a Hyp catabolism locus.

  18. Divergent Functions Through Alternative Splicing: The Drosophila CRMP Gene in Pyrimidine Metabolism, Brain, and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Deanna H.; Dubnau, Josh; Park, Jae H.; Rawls, John M.

    2012-01-01

    DHP and CRMP proteins comprise a family of structurally similar proteins that perform divergent functions, DHP in pyrimidine catabolism in most organisms and CRMP in neuronal dynamics in animals. In vertebrates, one DHP and five CRMP proteins are products of six genes; however, Drosophila melanogaster has a single CRMP gene that encodes one DHP and one CRMP protein through tissue-specific, alternative splicing of a pair of paralogous exons. The proteins derived from the fly gene are identical over 90% of their lengths, suggesting that unique, novel functions of these proteins derive from the segment corresponding to the paralogous exons. Functional homologies of the Drosophila and mammalian CRMP proteins are revealed by several types of evidence. Loss-of-function CRMP mutation modifies both Ras and Rac misexpression phenotypes during fly eye development in a manner that is consistent with the roles of CRMP in Ras and Rac signaling pathways in mammalian neurons. In both mice and flies, CRMP mutation impairs learning and memory. CRMP mutant flies are defective in circadian activity rhythm. Thus, DHP and CRMP proteins are derived by different processes in flies (tissue-specific, alternative splicing of paralogous exons of a single gene) and vertebrates (tissue-specific expression of different genes), indicating that diverse genetic mechanisms have mediated the evolution of this protein family in animals. PMID:22649077

  19. p-Cymene Promotes Its Catabolism through the p-Cymene and the p-Cumate Pathways, Activates a Stress Response and Reduces the Biofilm Formation in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Mirian; Seeger, Michael

    2017-01-01

    p-Cymene is an aromatic terpene that is present in diverse plant species. The aims of this study were to study the p-cymene metabolism in the model aromatic-degrading bacterium Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, and its response to p-cymene. The catabolic p-cymene (cym) and p-cumate (cmt) genes are clustered on the LB400 major chromosome. B. xenovorans LB400 was able to grow on p-cymene as well as on p-cumate as a sole carbon and energy sources. LB400 growth attained higher cell concentration at stationary phase on p-cumate than on p-cymene. The transcription of the key cymAb and cmtAb genes, and p-cumate dioxygenase activity were observed in LB400 cells grown on p-cymene and on p-cumate, but not in glucose-grown cells. Diverse changes on LB400 proteome were observed in p-cymene-grown cells compared to glucose-grown cells. An increase of the molecular chaperones DnaK, GroEL and ClpB, the organic hydroperoxide resistance protein Ohr, the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase AhpC and the copper oxidase CopA during growth on p-cymene strongly suggests that the exposure to p-cymene constitutes a stress condition for strain LB400. Diverse proteins of the energy metabolism such as enolase, pyruvate kinase, aconitase AcnA, succinyl-CoA synthetase beta subunit and ATP synthase beta subunit were induced by p-cymene. Electron microscopy showed that p-cymene-grown cells exhibited fuzzy outer and inner membranes and an increased periplasm. p-Cymene induced diverse membrane and transport proteins including the p-cymene transporter CymD. Biofilm formation was reduced during growth in p-cymene in strain LB400 compared to glucose-grown cells that may be associated with a decrease of diguanylate cyclase protein levels. Overall, these results indicate active p-cymene and p-cumate catabolic pathways in B. xenovorans LB400. In addition, this study showed that p-cymene activated a stress response in strain LB400 and reduced its biofilm formation. PMID:28072820

  20. Metabolic engineering of Pediococcus acidilactici BD16 for production of vanillin through ferulic acid catabolic pathway and process optimization using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Baljinder; Chakraborty, Debkumar; Kumar, Balvir

    2014-10-01

    Occurrence of feruloyl-CoA synthetase (fcs) and enoyl-CoA hydratase (ech) genes responsible for the bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin have been reported and characterized from Amycolatopsis sp., Streptomyces sp., and Pseudomonas sp. Attempts have been made to express these genes in Escherichia coli DH5α, E. coli JM109, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. However, none of the lactic acid bacteria strain having GRAS status was previously proposed for heterologous expression of fcs and ech genes for production of vanillin through biotechnological process. Present study reports heterologous expression of vanillin synthetic gene cassette bearing fcs and ech genes in a dairy isolate Pediococcus acidilactici BD16. After metabolic engineering, statistical optimization of process parameters that influence ferulic acid to vanillin biotransformation in the recombinant strain was carried out using central composite design of response surface methodology. After scale-up of the process, 3.14 mM vanillin was recovered from 1.08 mM ferulic acid per milligram of recombinant cell biomass within 20 min of biotransformation. From LCMS-ESI spectral analysis, a metabolic pathway of phenolic biotransformations was predicted in the recombinant P. acidilactici BD16 (fcs (+)/ech (+)).

  1. Metabolic engineering of E. coli top 10 for production of vanillin through FA catabolic pathway and bioprocess optimization using RSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debkumar; Gupta, Gaganjot; Kaur, Baljinder

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic engineering and construction of recombinant Escherichia coli strains carrying feruloyl-CoA synthetase and enoyl-CoA hydratase genes for the bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin offers an alternative way to produce vanillin. Isolation and designing of fcs and ech genes was carried out using computer assisted protocol and the designed vanillin biosynthetic gene cassette was cloned in pCCIBAC expression vector for introduction in E. coli top 10. Recombinant strain was implemented for the statistical optimization of process parameters influencing F A to vanillin biotransformation. CCD matrix constituted of process variables like FA concentration, time, temperature and biomass with intracellular, extracellular and total vanillin productions as responses. Production was scaled up and 68 mg/L of vanillin was recovered from 10 mg/L of FA using cell extracts from 1 mg biomass within 30 min. Kinetic activity of enzymes were characterized. From LCMS-ESI analysis a metabolic pathway of FA degradation and vanillin production was predicted.

  2. Pyrimidine as antiinflammatory agent: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrimidine nucleus exhibited remarkable pharmacological activities. Literature indicates that compounds having pyrimidine nucleus have wide range of therapeutic uses that include antiinflammatory, antibacterial, anticancer, antiviral, antiHIV, antimalarial, antihypertensive, sedatives and hypnotics, anticonvulsant and antihistaminic. The present review provides a broad view of the antiinflammatory activity possessed by compounds having a pyrimidine nucleus.

  3. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic model for xylose catabolism in Aspergillus is proposed. From a thermodynamic analysis it was found that the intermediate xylitol will accumulate during xylose catabolism. Use of the kinetic model allowed metabolic control analysis (MCA) of the xylose catabolic pathway to be carried out......, and flux control was shown to be dependent on the metabolite levels. Due to thermodynamic constraints, flux control may reside at the first step in the pathway, i.e., at the xylose reductase, even when the intracellular xylitol concentration is high. On the basis of the kinetic analysis, the general dogma...... specifying that flux control often resides at the step following an intermediate present at high concentrations was, therefore, shown not to hold. The intracellular xylitol concentration was measured in batch cultivations of two different strains of Aspergillus niger and two different strains of Aspergillus...

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Three β-Lactam-Catabolizing Soil Proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Spivak, Aaron; Gianoulis, Tara A.; Forsberg, Kevin J.; Gibson, Molly K.; Johnsky, Lauren A.; Broomall, Stacey M.; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Skowronski, Evan W.; Gibbons, Henry S.; Sommer, Morten O. A.; Dantas, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most antibiotics are derived from the soil, but their catabolism there, which is necessary to close the antibiotic carbon cycle, remains uncharacterized. We report the first draft genome sequences of soil Proteobacteria identified for subsisting solely on β-lactams as their carbon sources. The genomes encode multiple β-lactamases, although their antibiotic catabolic pathways remain enigmatic. PMID:28798166

  5. Adaptive Reprogramming of De Novo Pyrimidine Synthesis Is a Metabolic Vulnerability in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kristin K; Spinelli, Jessica B; Asara, John M; Toker, Alex

    2017-04-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is a major barrier to the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and strategies to circumvent resistance are required. Using in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling of TNBC cells, we show that an increase in the abundance of pyrimidine nucleotides occurs in response to chemotherapy exposure. Mechanistically, elevation of pyrimidine nucleotides induced by chemotherapy is dependent on increased activity of the de novo pyrimidine synthesis pathway. Pharmacologic inhibition of de novo pyrimidine synthesis sensitizes TNBC cells to genotoxic chemotherapy agents by exacerbating DNA damage. Moreover, combined treatment with doxorubicin and leflunomide, a clinically approved inhibitor of the de novo pyrimidine synthesis pathway, induces regression of TNBC xenografts. Thus, the increase in pyrimidine nucleotide levels observed following chemotherapy exposure represents a metabolic vulnerability that can be exploited to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy for the treatment of TNBC.Significance: The prognosis for patients with TNBC with residual disease after chemotherapy is poor. We find that chemotherapy agents induce adaptive reprogramming of de novo pyrimidine synthesis and show that this response can be exploited pharmacologically, using clinically approved inhibitors of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, to sensitize TNBC cells to chemotherapy. Cancer Discov; 7(4); 391-9. ©2017 AACR.See related article by Mathur et al., p. 380This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 339.

  6. Tryptophan catabolizing enzymes – party of three

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen J Ball

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway. The depletion of tryptophan and formation of kynurenine pathway metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties and biological functions. This review analyses the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system.

  7. The 3-ureidopropionase of Caenorhabditis elegans, an enzyme involved in pyrimidine degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowitz, Tim; Ajonina, Irene; Perbandt, Markus; Woltersdorf, Christian; Hertel, Patrick; Liebau, Eva; Gigengack, Ulrike

    2010-10-01

    Pyrimidines are important metabolites in all cells. Levels of cellular pyrimidines are controlled by multiple mechanisms, with one of these comprising the reductive degradation pathway. In the model invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans, two of the three enzymes of reductive pyrimidine degradation have previously been characterized. The enzyme catalysing the final step of pyrimidine breakdown, 3-ureidopropionase (β-alanine synthase), had only been identified based on homology. We therefore cloned and functionally expressed the 3-ureidopropionase of C. elegans as hexahistidine fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme readily converted the two pyrimidine degradation products: 3-ureidopropionate and 2-methyl-3-ureidopropionate. The enzyme showed a broad pH optimum between pH 7.0 and 8.0. Activity was highest at approximately 40 °C, although the half-life of activity was only 65 s at that temperature. The enzyme showed clear Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a K(m) of 147 ± 26 μM and a V(max) of 1.1 ± 0.1 U·mg protein(-1). The quaternary structure of the recombinant enzyme was shown to correspond to a dodecamer by 'blue native' gel electrophoresis and gel filtration. The organ specific and subcellular localization of the enzyme was determined using a translational fusion to green fluorescent protein and high expression was observed in striated muscle cells. With the characterization of the 3-ureidopropionase, the reductive pyrimidine degradation pathway in C. elegans has been functionally characterized.

  8. De novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bayona, Leonor; Garavito, Manuel F; Lozano, Gabriel L; Vasquez, Juan J; Myers, Kevin; Fry, William E; Bernal, Adriana; Zimmermann, Barbara H; Restrepo, Silvia

    2014-03-10

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans, causal agent of the tomato and potato late blight, generates important economic and environmental losses worldwide. As current control strategies are becoming less effective, there is a need for studies on oomycete metabolism to help identify promising and more effective targets for chemical control. The pyrimidine pathways are attractive metabolic targets to combat tumors, virus and parasitic diseases but have not yet been studied in Phytophthora. Pyrimidines are involved in several critical cellular processes and play structural, metabolic and regulatory functions. Here, we used genomic and transcriptomic information to survey the pyrimidine metabolism during the P. infestans life cycle. After assessing the putative gene machinery for pyrimidine salvage and de novo synthesis, we inferred genealogies for each enzymatic domain in the latter pathway, which displayed a mosaic origin. The last two enzymes of the pathway, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and orotidine-5-monophosphate decarboxylase, are fused in a multi-domain enzyme and are duplicated in some P. infestans strains. Two splice variants of the third gene (dihydroorotase) were identified, one of them encoding a premature stop codon generating a non-functional truncated protein. Relative expression profiles of pyrimidine biosynthesis genes were evaluated by qRT-PCR during infection in Solanum phureja. The third and fifth genes involved in this pathway showed high up-regulation during biotrophic stages and down-regulation during necrotrophy, whereas the uracil phosphoribosyl transferase gene involved in pyrimidine salvage showed the inverse behavior. These findings suggest the importance of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis during the fast replicative early infection stages and highlight the dynamics of the metabolism associated with the hemibiotrophic life style of pathogen.

  9. Reprogramming amino acid catabolism in CHO cells with CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing improves cell growth and reduces by-product secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Daniel; Pereira, Sara; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup

    2017-01-01

    CHO cells primarily utilize amino acids for three processes: biomass synthesis, recombinant protein production and catabolism. In this work, we disrupted 9 amino acid catabolic genes participating in 7 dierent catabolic pathways, to increase synthesis of biomass and recombinant protein, while red...

  10. Small-molecule inhibition of choline catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic choline-catabolizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Liam F; Flemer, Stevenson; Wurthmann, A Sandy; Deker, P Bruce; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Wargo, Matthew J

    2011-07-01

    Choline is abundant in association with eukaryotes and plays roles in osmoprotection, thermoprotection, and membrane biosynthesis in many bacteria. Aerobic catabolism of choline is widespread among soil proteobacteria, particularly those associated with eukaryotes. Catabolism of choline as a carbon, nitrogen, and/or energy source may play important roles in association with eukaryotes, including pathogenesis, symbioses, and nutrient cycling. We sought to generate choline analogues to study bacterial choline catabolism in vitro and in situ. Here we report the characterization of a choline analogue, propargylcholine, which inhibits choline catabolism at the level of Dgc enzyme-catalyzed dimethylglycine demethylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used genetic analyses and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to demonstrate that propargylcholine is catabolized to its inhibitory form, propargylmethylglycine. Chemically synthesized propargylmethylglycine was also an inhibitor of growth on choline. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that there are genes encoding DgcA homologues in a variety of proteobacteria. We examined the broader utility of propargylcholine and propargylmethylglycine by assessing growth of other members of the proteobacteria that are known to grow on choline and possess putative DgcA homologues. Propargylcholine showed utility as a growth inhibitor in P. aeruginosa but did not inhibit growth in other proteobacteria tested. In contrast, propargylmethylglycine was able to inhibit choline-dependent growth in all tested proteobacteria, including Pseudomonas mendocina, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Sinorhizobium meliloti. We predict that chemical inhibitors of choline catabolism will be useful for studying this pathway in clinical and environmental isolates and could be a useful tool to study proteobacterial choline catabolism in situ.

  11. Pyridine metabolism in tea plants: salvage, conjugate formation and catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Deng, Wei-Wei

    2012-11-01

    Pyridine compounds, including nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, are key metabolites of both the salvage pathway for NAD and the biosynthesis of related secondary compounds. We examined the in situ metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide, [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid and [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid riboside in tissue segments of tea (Camellia sinensis) plants, and determined the activity of enzymes involved in pyridine metabolism in protein extracts from young tea leaves. Exogenously supplied (14)C-labelled nicotinamide was readily converted to nicotinic acid, and some nicotinic acid was salvaged to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and then utilized for the synthesis of NAD and NADP. The nicotinic acid riboside salvage pathway discovered recently in mungbean cotyledons is also operative in tea leaves. Nicotinic acid was converted to nicotinic acid N-glucoside, but not to trigonelline (N-methylnicotinic acid), in any part of tea seedlings. Active catabolism of nicotinic acid was observed in tea leaves. The fate of [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid indicates that glutaric acid is a major catabolite of nicotinic acid; it was further metabolised, and carbon atoms were finally released as CO(2). The catabolic pathway observed in tea leaves appears to start with the nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation; this pathway differs from catabolic pathways observed in microorganisms. Profiles of pyridine metabolism in tea plants are discussed.

  12. Breakdown of the regulatory control of pyrimidine biosynthesis in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigoillot, Frederic D; Sigoillot, Severine M; Guy, Hedeel I

    2004-04-20

    The activity of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in the MCF7 breast cancer cells was 4.4-fold higher than that in normal MCF10A breast cells. Moreover, while pyrimidine biosynthesis in MCF10A was tightly regulated, increasing as the culture matured and subsequently down-regulated in confluency, the biosynthetic rate in MCF7 cells remained elevated and invariant in all growth phases. The flux through the pathway is regulated by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, a component of the multifunctional protein, CAD. The intracellular CAD concentration was 3.5- to 4-fold higher in MCF7 cells, an observation that explains the high rate of pyrimidine biosynthesis but cannot account for the lack of growth-dependent regulation. In MCF10A cells, up-regulation of the pathway in the exponential growth phase resulted from MAP kinase phosphorylation of CAD Thr456. The pathway was subsequently down-regulated by dephosphorylation of P approximately Thr456 and the phosphorylation of CAD by PKA. In contrast, the CAD P approximately Thr456 was persistently phosphorylated in MCF7 cells, while the PKA site remained unphosphorylated and consequently the activity of the pathway was elevated in all growth phases. In support of this interpretation, inhibition of MAP kinase in MCF7 cells decreased CAD P approximately Thr456, increased PKA phosphorylation and decreased pyrimidine biosynthesis. Conversely, transfection of MCF10A with constructs that elevated MAP kinase activity increased CAD P approximately Thr456 and the pyrimidine biosynthetic rate. The differences in the CAD phosphorylation state responsible for unregulated pyrimidine biosynthesis in MCF7 cells are likely to be a consequence of the elevated MAP kinase activity and the antagonism between MAP kinase- and PKA-mediated phosphorylations.

  13. Polyurethane Foams with Pyrimidine Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kania Ewelina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligoetherols based on pyrimidine ring were obtained upon reaction of barbituric acid with glycidol and alkylene carbonates. These oligoetherols were then used to obtain polyurethane foams in the reaction of oligoetherols with isocyanates and water. The protocol of foam synthesis was optimized by the choice of proper kind of oligoetherol and synthetic composition. The thermal resistance was studied by dynamic and static methods with concomitant monitoring of compressive strength. The polyurethane foams have similar physical properties as the classic ones except their enhanced thermal resistance. They stand long-time heating even at 200°C. Moreover thermal exposition of foams results generally in increase of their compressive strength.

  14. A previously unknown oxalyl-CoA synthetase is important for oxalate catabolism in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxalate is produced by several catabolic pathways in plants. The best characterized pathway for subsequent oxalate degradation is via oxalate oxidase, but some species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, have no oxalate oxidase activity. Previously, an alternative pathway was proposed in which oxalyl-CoA...

  15. beta-Ureidopropionase deficiency: an inborn error of pyrimidine degradation associated with neurological abnormalities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuilenburg, A.B.P. van; Meinsma, R.; Beke, E.; Assmann, B.; Ribes, A.; Lorente, I.; Busch, R.; Mayatepek, E.; Abeling, N.G.G.M.; Cruchten, A.C. van; Stroomer, A.E.; Lenthe, H. van; Zoetekouw, L.; Kulik, W.; Hoffmann, G.F.; Voit, T.; Wevers, R.A.; Rutsch, F.; Gennip, A.H. van

    2004-01-01

    beta-Ureidopropionase deficiency is an inborn error of the pyrimidine degradation pathway, affecting the cleavage of N-carbamyl-beta-alanine and N-carbamyl-beta-aminoisobutyric acid. In this study, we report the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying a beta-ureidopropionase deficiency in four p

  16. Photochemistry of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices: Formation of Nucleobases and Other Prebiotic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuevo, Michel; Sandford, Scott A.; Materese, Christopher K.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleobases are N-heterocycles that are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. They are divided into two molecular groups: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites, and their extraterrestrial origin confirmed by isotopic measurements. Although no N-heterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM, the positions of the 6.2- m interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in ices of astrophysical relevance such as H2O, NH3, CH3OH, CH4, CO, or combinations of these at low temperature (less than or equal to 20 K) leads to the formation of several pyrimidine derivatives including the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as precursors such as 4(3H)-pyrimidone and 4-aminopyrimidine. Quantum calculations on the formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil from the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices are in agreement with their experimental formation pathways.10 In those residues, other species of prebiotic interest such as urea as well as the amino acids glycine and alanine could also be identified. However, only very small amounts of pyrimidine derivatives containing CH3 groups could be detected, suggesting that the addition of methyl groups to pyrimidine is not an efficient process. For this reason, the nucleobase thymine was not observed in any of the samples. In this work, we study the formation of nucleobases and other photo-products of prebiotic interest from the UV irradiation of pyrimidine in ices containing H2O, NH3, CH3OH, and CO, mixed in astrophysical proportions.

  17. The use of pyr-mutations to modify pyrimidine pools in Lactococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Lyders Lerche; Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1999-01-01

    . By combining the two described mutations, with a cdd mutation, we will be able to construct strains in which pyrimidine pools can be manipulated by adding different pyrimidine-sources at variable concentrations to the growth media. Since nucleotides are central metabolites, many physiological parameters may......The specific engineering of organisms used for startercultures has become an effective way of improving and developing new products in the dairy industry. In order to obtain strains with specific characteristics, it is imperative to have a good understanding of the central biochemical pathways...

  18. The use of Pyr-mutants to modify pyrimidine metabolism in lactococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Lyders Lerche; Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    . By combining the two described mutations, with a cdd mutation, we will be able to construct strains in which pyrimidine pools can be manipulated by adding different pyrimidine-sources at variable concentrations to the growth media. Since nucleotides are central metabolites, many physiological parameters may......The specific engineering of organisms used for startercultures has become an effective way of improving and developing new products in the dairy industry. In order to obtain strains with specific characteristics, it is imperative to have a good understanding of the central biochemical pathways...

  19. Design, synthesis and cytotoxic activity of some novel compounds containing pyrazolo[3,4-]pyrimidines nucleus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manal M Kandeel; Sameha M Roshdy; Eman K A Abdelall; Mohamed A Abdelgawad; Phoebe F Lamie

    2013-09-01

    Novel pyrazolo[3,4-]pyrimidines were designed and synthesized as antitumour agents against human breast cancer adenoma (MCF-7). Molecular modelling and pharmacological screening were performed against breast cancer cell line and also certain synthetic pathways were developed in order to introduce functionality onto C6 and N5 positions of pyrimidine moiety. Surprisingly, all the test compounds showed IC50 lower than that of the standard olomoucine I, especially compounds 4b, 8a, 10b, 11a and b, which showed IC50 between 0.009 and 0.004 M.

  20. The Role of Placental Tryptophan Catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayr, Peter; Blaschitz, Astrid; Stocker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the mechanisms and consequences of degradation of tryptophan (Trp) in the placenta, focusing mainly on the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), one of three enzymes catalyzing the first step of the kynurenine pathway of Trp degradation. IDO1 has been implicated in regulation of feto-maternal tolerance in the mouse. Local depletion of Trp and/or the presence of metabolites of the kynurenine pathway mediate immunoregulation and exert antimicrobial functions. In addition to the decidual glandular epithelium, IDO1 is localized in the vascular endothelium of the villous chorion and also in the endothelium of spiral arteries of the decidua. Possible consequences of IDO1-mediated catabolism of Trp in the endothelium encompass antimicrobial activity and immunosuppression, as well as relaxation of the placental vasotonus, thereby contributing to placental perfusion and growth of both placenta and fetus. It remains to be evaluated whether other enzymes mediating Trp oxidation, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2, Trp 2,3-dioxygenase, and Trp hydroxylase-1 are of relevance to the biology of the placenta. PMID:24904580

  1. Anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds: a genetic and genomic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F; Valderrama, J Andrés; Barragán, María J L; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach.

  2. The effects of acetaldehyde and acrolein on muscle catabolism in C2 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Kaisari, Sharon; Aizenbud, Dror; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2013-12-01

    The toxic aldehydes acetaldehyde and acrolein were previously suggested to damage skeletal muscle. Several conditions in which exposure to acetaldehyde and acrolein is increased were associated with muscle wasting and dysfunction. These include alcoholic myopathy, renal failure, oxidative stress, and inflammation. A main exogenous source of both acetaldehyde and acrolein is cigarette smoking, which was previously associated with increased muscle catabolism. Recently, we have shown that exposure of skeletal myotubes to cigarette smoke stimulated muscle catabolism via increased oxidative stress, activation of p38 MAPK, and upregulation of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of acetaldehyde and acrolein on catabolism of skeletal muscle. Skeletal myotubes differentiated from the C2 myoblast cell line were exposed to acetaldehyde or acrolein and their effects on signaling pathways related to muscle catabolism were studied. Exposure of myotubes to acetaldehyde did not promote muscle catabolism. However, exposure to acrolein caused increased generation of free radicals, activation of p38 MAPK, upregulation of the muscle-specific E3 ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1, degradation of myosin heavy chain, and atrophy of myotubes. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB203580 abolished acrolein-induced muscle catabolism. Our findings demonstrate that acrolein but not acetaldehyde activates a signaling cascade resulting in muscle catabolism in skeletal myotubes. Although within the limitations of an in vitro study, these findings indicate that acrolein may promote muscle wasting in conditions of increased exposure to this aldehyde.

  3. Neanderthal ancestry drives evolution of lipid catabolism in contemporary Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Bozek, Katarzyna; He, Liu; Yan, Zheng; Jiang, Xi; Wei, Yuning; Tang, Kun; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Prufer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Paabo, Svante; Giavalisco, Patrick; Lachmann, Michael; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    Although Neanderthals are extinct, fragments of their genomes persist in contemporary humans. Here we show that while the genome-wide frequency of Neanderthal-like sites is approximately constant across all contemporary out-of-Africa populations, genes involved in lipid catabolism contain more than threefold excess of such sites in contemporary humans of European descent. Evolutionally, these genes show significant association with signatures of recent positive selection in the contemporary European, but not Asian or African populations. Functionally, the excess of Neanderthal-like sites in lipid catabolism genes can be linked with a greater divergence of lipid concentrations and enzyme expression levels within this pathway, seen in contemporary Europeans, but not in the other populations. We conclude that sequence variants that evolved in Neanderthals may have given a selective advantage to anatomically modern humans that settled in the same geographical areas.

  4. Aerobic bacterial catabolism of persistent organic pollutants - potential impact of biotic and abiotic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Baldrian, Petr; Schmidt, Stefan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Several aerobic bacteria possess unique catabolic pathways enabling them to degrade persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The catabolic activity of aerobic bacteria employed for removal of POPs in the environment may be modulated by several biotic (i.e. fungi, plants, algae, earthworms, and other bacteria) and abiotic (i.e. zero-valent iron, advanced oxidation, and electricity) agents. This review describes the basic biochemistry of the aerobic bacterial catabolism of selected POPs and discusses how biotic and abiotic agents enhance or inhibit the process. Solutions allowing biotic and abiotic agents to exert physical and chemical assistance to aerobic bacterial catabolism of POPs are also discussed.

  5. Mammalian polyamine catabolism: a therapeutic target, a pathological problem, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlin; Casero, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    With the recent discovery of the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermine oxidase (SMO/PAOh1), the apparent complexity of the polyamine metabolic pathway has increased considerably. Alone or in combination with the two other known members of human polyamine catabolism, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase, and N(1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase (PAO), SMO/PAOh1 expression has the potential to alter polyamine homeostasis in response to normal cellular signals, drug treatment and environmental and/or cellular stressors. The activity of the oxidases producing toxic aldehydes and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) H(2)O(2), suggest a mechanism by which these oxidases can be exploited as an antineoplastic drug target. However, inappropriate activation of the pathways may also lead to pathological outcomes, including DNA damage that can lead to cellular transformation. The most recent data suggest that the two polyamine catabolic pathways exhibit distinct properties and understanding these properties should aid in their exploitation for therapeutic and/or chemopreventive strategies.

  6. Amino acid catabolism: a pivotal regulator of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaha, Tracy L; Huang, Lei; Lemos, Henrique; Metz, Richard; Mautino, Mario; Prendergast, George C; Mellor, Andrew L

    2012-09-01

    Enhanced amino acid catabolism is a common response to inflammation, but the immunologic significance of altered amino acid consumption remains unclear. The finding that tryptophan catabolism helped maintain fetal tolerance during pregnancy provided novel insights into the significance of amino acid metabolism in controlling immunity. Recent advances in identifying molecular pathways that enhance amino acid catabolism and downstream mechanisms that affect immune cells in response to inflammatory cues support the notion that amino acid catabolism regulates innate and adaptive immune cells in pathologic settings. Cells expressing enzymes that degrade amino acids modulate antigen-presenting cell and lymphocyte functions and reveal critical roles for amino acid- and catabolite-sensing pathways in controlling gene expression, functions, and survival of immune cells. Basal amino acid catabolism may contribute to immune homeostasis that prevents autoimmunity, whereas elevated amino acid catalytic activity may reinforce immune suppression to promote tumorigenesis and persistence of some pathogens that cause chronic infections. For these reasons, there is considerable interest in generating novel drugs that inhibit or induce amino acid consumption and target downstream molecular pathways that control immunity. In this review, we summarize recent developments and highlight novel concepts and key outstanding questions in this active research field.

  7. Nucleobases and other Prebiotic Species from the Ultraviolet Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, S. A.; Nuevo, M.; Materese, C. K.; Milam, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleobases are N-heterocycles that are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, and are divided into two families: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origin confirmed by isotope measurement. Although no Nheterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM, the positions of the 6.2-m interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present. In this work we study the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including nucleobases, as well as other species of prebiotic interest, from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in combinations of H2O, NH3, CH3OH, and CH4 ices at low temperature, in order to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the interstellar medium and icy bodies of the Solar System. Experimental: Gas mixtures are prepared in a glass mixing line (background pressure approx. 10(exp -6)-10(exp -5) mbar). Relative proportions between mixture components are determined by their partial pressures. Gas mixtures are then deposited on an aluminum foil attached to a cold finger (15-20 K) and simultaneously irradiated with an H2 lamp emitting UV photons (Lyman and a continuum at approx.160 nm). After irradiation samples are warmed to room temperature, at which time the remaining residues are recovered to be analyzed with liquid and gas chromatographies. Results: These experiments showed that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine mixed in these ices at low temperature leads to the formation of several photoproducts derived from pyrimidine, including the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as their precursors 4(3H)-pyrimidone and 4-aminopyrimidine (Fig. 1). Theoretical quantum calculations on the formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil from the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices are in agreement with their experimental formation pathways. In

  8. Metabolic control analysis of Aspergillus niger L-arabinose catabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, M.J.L.; Prathumpai, Wai; Visser, J.

    2005-01-01

    -arabinose, a level that resulted in realistic intermediate concentrations in the model, flux control coefficients for L-arabinose reductase, L-arabitol dehydrogenase and L-xylulose reductase were 0.68, 0.17 and 0.14, respectively. The analysis can be used as a guide to identify targets for metabolic engineering......, and their kinetic properties were characterized. For the other enzymes of the pathway the kinetic data were available from the literature. The metabolic model was used to analyze flux and metabolite concentration control of the L-arabinose catabolic pathway. The model demonstrated that flux control does not reside...... at the enzyme following the intermediate with the highest concentration, L-arabitol, but is distributed over the first three steps in the pathway, preceding and following L-arabitol. Flux control appeared to be strongly dependent on the intracellular L-arabinose concentration. At 5 mM intracellular L...

  9. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism: Convergent evidence on chronic antidepressant treatment response in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Ik; Dournes, Carine; Sillaber, Inge; Uhr, Manfred; Asara, John M.; Gassen, Nils C.; Rein, Theo; Ising, Marcus; Webhofer, Christian; Filiou, Michaela D.; Müller, Marianne B.; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of psychiatric diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). For unknown reasons a substantial number of patients do not show any improvement during or after SSRI treatment. We treated DBA/2J mice for 28 days with paroxetine and assessed their behavioral response with the forced swim test (FST). Paroxetine-treated long-time floating (PLF) and paroxetine-treated short-time floating (PSF) groups were stratified as proxies for drug non-responder and responder mice, respectively. Proteomics and metabolomics profiles of PLF and PSF groups were acquired for the hippocampus and plasma to identify molecular pathways and biosignatures that stratify paroxetine-treated mouse sub-groups. The critical role of purine and pyrimidine metabolisms for chronic paroxetine treatment response in the mouse was further corroborated by pathway protein expression differences in both mice and patients that underwent chronic antidepressant treatment. The integrated -omics data indicate purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathway activity differences between PLF and PSF mice. Furthermore, the pathway protein levels in peripheral specimens strongly correlated with the antidepressant treatment response in patients. Our results suggest that chronic SSRI treatment differentially affects purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, which may explain the heterogeneous antidepressant treatment response and represents a potential biosignature. PMID:27731396

  10. Mutation of glutamic acid 103 of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase as a means to control the catabolic efficiency of a recombinant upper pathway for degradation of methylated aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio; Capasso, Paola; Di Donato, Alberto

    2005-08-01

    Toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) and phenol hydroxylase (PH) of Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 act sequentially in a recombinant upper pathway for the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. The catalytic efficiency and regioselectivity of these enzymes optimize the degradation of growth substrates like toluene and o-xylene. For example, the sequential monooxygenation of o-xylene by ToMO and PH leads to almost exclusive production of 3,4-dimethylcatechol (3,4-DMC), the only isomer that can be further metabolized by the P. stutzeri meta pathway. We investigated the possibility of producing ToMO mutants with modified regioselectivity compared with the regioselectivity of the wild-type protein in order to alter the ability of the recombinant upper pathway to produce methylcatechol isomers from toluene and to produce 3,4-DMC from o-xylene. The combination of mutant (E103G)-ToMO and PH increased the production of 4-methylcatechol from toluene and increased the formation of 3,4-DMC from o-xylene. These data strongly support the idea that the products and efficiency of the metabolic pathway can be controlled not only through mutations that increase the catalytic efficiency of the enzymes involved but also through tuning the substrate specificity and regioselectivity of the enzymes. These findings are crucial for the development of future metabolic engineering strategies.

  11. Genetic factors influencing pyrimidine-antagonist chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maring, JG; Groen, HJM; Wachters, FM; Uges, DRA; de Vries, EGE

    2005-01-01

    Pyrimidine antagonists, for example, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cytarabine (ara-C) and gemcitabine (dFdC), are widely used in chemotherapy regimes for colorectal, breast, head and neck, non-small-cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukaemias. Extensive metabolism is a prerequisite for conversion of

  12. Biological consequences of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, A.A.; Roza, L.

    2001-01-01

    In the skin many molecules may absorb ultraviolet (UV) radiation upon exposure. In particular, cellular DNA strongly absorbs shorter wavelength solar UV radiation, resulting in various types of DNA damage. Among the DNA photoproducts produced the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are predominant.

  13. A convenient four-component one-pot strategy toward the synthesis of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An efficient one-pot synthesis of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives by the four-component condensation of hydrazines, methylenemalononitriles, aldehydes and alcohols has been developed via two different reaction pathways. The structures of target products were characterized by IR spectroscopy, NMR (1H and 13C spectroscopy and HRMS (ESI spectrometry. The crystal structure of 4-ethoxy-6-(2-nitrophenyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  14. Regulation and evolution of malonate and propionate catabolism in proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, I A; Ravcheev, D A; Gelfand, M S

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria catabolize malonate via two pathways, encoded by the mdc and mat genes. In various bacteria, transcription of these genes is controlled by the GntR family transcription factors (TFs) MatR/MdcY and/or the LysR family transcription factor MdcR. Propionate is metabolized via the methylcitrate pathway, comprising enzymes encoded by the prp and acn genes. PrpR, the Fis family sigma 54-dependent transcription factor, is known to be a transcriptional activator of the prp genes. Here, we report a detailed comparative genomic analysis of malonate and propionate metabolism and its regulation in proteobacteria. We characterize genomic loci and gene regulation and identify binding motifs for four new TFs and also new regulon members, in particular, tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters. We describe restructuring of the genomic loci and regulatory interactions during the evolution of proteobacteria.

  15. Isolation of a mutation resulting in constitutive synthesis of L-fucose catabolic enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bartkus, J. M.; Mortlock, R P

    1986-01-01

    A ribitol-positive transductant of Escherichia coli K-12, JM2112, was used to facilitate the isolation and identification of mutations affecting the L-fucose catabolic pathway. Analysis of L-fucose-negative mutants of JM2112 enabled us to confirm that L-fucose-1-phosphate is the apparent inducer of the fucose catabolic enzymes. Plating of an L-fuculokinase-negative mutant of JM2112 on D-arabinose yielded an isolate containing a second fucose mutation which resulted in the constitutive synthes...

  16. Phenylalanine induces Burkholderia cenocepacia phenylacetic acid catabolism through degradation to phenylacetyl-CoA in synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudistira, Harry; McClarty, Leigh; Bloodworth, Ruhi A M; Hammond, Sydney A; Butcher, Haley; Mark, Brian L; Cardona, Silvia T

    2011-09-01

    Synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium (SCFM) is rich in amino acids and supports robust growth of Burkholderia cenocepacia, a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Previous work demonstrated that B. cenocepacia phenylacetic acid (PA) catabolic genes are up-regulated during growth in SCFM and are required for full virulence in a Caenorhabditis elegans host model. In this work, we investigated the role of phenylalanine, one of the aromatic amino acids present in SCFM, as an inducer of the PA catabolic pathway. Phenylalanine degradation intermediates were used as sole carbon sources for growth and gene reporter experiments. In addition to phenylalanine and PA, phenylethylamine, phenylpyruvate, and 2-phenylacetamide were usable as sole carbon sources by wild type B. cenocepacia K56-2, but not by a PA catabolism-defective mutant. EMSA analysis showed that the binding of PaaR, the negative regulator protein of B. cenocepacia PA catabolism, to PA regulatory DNA could only be relieved by phenylacetyl-Coenzyme A (PA-CoA), but not by any of the putative phenylalanine degradation intermediates. Taken together, our results show that in B. cenocepacia, phenylalanine is catabolized to PA and induces PA catabolism through PA activation to PA-CoA. Thus, PaaR shares the same inducer with PaaX, the regulator of PA catabolism in Escherichia coli, despite belonging to a different protein family.

  17. Putrescine catabolism is a metabolic response to several stresses in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Barbara L; Hernandez, V James; Reitzer, Larry

    2013-05-01

    Genes whose products degrade arginine and ornithine, precursors of putrescine synthesis, are activated by either regulators of the nitrogen-regulated (Ntr) response or σ(S) -RNA polymerase. To determine if dual control regulates a complete putrescine catabolic pathway, we examined expression of patA and patD, which specify the first two enzymes of one putrescine catabolic pathway. Assays of PatA (putrescine transaminase) activity and β-galactosidase from cells with patA-lacZ transcriptional and translational fusions indicate dual control of patA transcription and putrescine-stimulated patA translation. Similar assays for PatD indicate that patD transcription required σ(S) -RNA polymerase, and Nac, an Ntr regulator, enhanced the σ(S) -dependent transcription. Since Nac activation via σ(S) -RNA polymerase is without precedent, transcription with purified components was examined and the results confirmed this conclusion. This result indicates that the Ntr regulon can intrude into the σ(S) regulon. Strains lacking both polyamine catabolic pathways have defective responses to oxidative stress, high temperature and a sublethal concentration of an antibiotic. These defects and the σ(S) -dependent expression indicate that polyamine catabolism is a core metabolic response to stress.

  18. Amino acid catabolism by Lactobacillus helveticus in cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kananen, Soila Kaarina

    Amino acid catabolism is the final step in the conversion of caseins to flavour compounds and a part of a complex combination of biochemical pathways in cheese flavour formation. Lactobacillus helveticus is a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium that is used in cheese manufacture as a primary starter...... for developing new cheese products with enhanced flavour. The aim of this Ph.D. study was to investigate the importance of strain variation of Lb. helveticus in relation flavour formation in cheese related to amino acid catabolism. Aspects of using Lb. helveticus as starter as well as adjunct culture in cheese...... manufacture were studied. Amino acid catabolism related enzyme activities were studied in vitro from eight out of 39 Lb. helveticus strains selected based on different pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles. Amino acids can be initially converted into a-keto acids by transamination reaction. Lb helveticus...

  19. Substrate uptake and subcellular compartmentation of anoxic cholesterol catabolism in Sterolibacterium denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Wen; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Ismail, Wael; Tsai, Yu-Wen; El Nayal, Ashraf; Yang, Chia-Ying; Yang, Fu-Chun; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2015-01-09

    Cholesterol catabolism by actinobacteria has been extensively studied. In contrast, the uptake and catabolism of cholesterol by Gram-negative species are poorly understood. Here, we investigated microbial cholesterol catabolism at the subcellular level. (13)C metabolomic analysis revealed that anaerobically grown Sterolibacterium denitrificans, a β-proteobacterium, adopts an oxygenase-independent pathway to degrade cholesterol. S. denitrificans cells did not produce biosurfactants upon growth on cholesterol and exhibited high cell surface hydrophobicity. Moreover, S. denitrificans did not produce extracellular catabolic enzymes to transform cholesterol. Accordingly, S. denitrificans accessed cholesterol by direction adhesion. Cholesterol is imported through the outer membrane via a putative FadL-like transport system, which is induced by neutral sterols. The outer membrane steroid transporter is able to selectively import various C27 sterols into the periplasm. S. denitrificans spheroplasts exhibited a significantly higher efficiency in cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid uptake than in cholesterol uptake. We separated S. denitrificans proteins into four fractions, namely the outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, and cytoplasm, and we observed the individual catabolic reactions within them. Our data indicated that, in the periplasm, various periplasmic and peripheral membrane enzymes transform cholesterol into cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid. The C27 acidic steroid is then transported into the cytoplasm, in which side-chain degradation and the subsequent sterane cleavage occur. This study sheds light into microbial cholesterol metabolism under anoxic conditions.

  20. Regulation of carbon catabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrzak, T; Kowalczyk, M; Kok, J; Bardowski, J; Bielecki, S; Tramper, J; Polak, J

    2000-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis IL1403 is a lactose negative, plasmid free strain. Nevertheless, it is able to hydrolyze lactose in the presence of cellobiose. In this work we describe identification of a gene involved in this process. The gene was found to be homologous to the sugar catabolism regulator, cc

  1. Regulation of carbon catabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrzak, T; Kowalczyk, M; Kok, J; Bardowski, J; Bielecki, S; Tramper, J; Polak, J

    2000-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis IL1403 is a lactose negative, plasmid free strain. Nevertheless, it is able to hydrolyze lactose in the presence of cellobiose. In this work we describe identification of a gene involved in this process. The gene was found to be homologous to the sugar catabolism regulator,

  2. Catabolism and detoxification of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; McSorley, Fern R.; Zechel, David L.

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli uptake and catabolism of organophosphonates are governed by the phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP operon. The phnO cistron is shown to encode aminoalkylphosphonate N-acetyltransferase, which utilizes acetylcoenzyme A as acetyl donor and aminomethylphosphonate, (S)- and (R)-1-aminoethylphospho...

  3. Body weight independently affects articular cartilage catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Winward, Jason G; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J Ty; Seeley, Matthew K

    2015-06-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key pointsWalking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration.Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  4. Catabolism and safety of supplemental L-arginine in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Bazer, Fuller W; Meininger, Cynthia J; McNeal, Catherine J; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-07-01

    L-arginine (Arg) is utilized via multiple pathways to synthesize protein and low-molecular-weight bioactive substances (e.g., nitric oxide, creatine, and polyamines) with enormous physiological importance. Furthermore, Arg regulates cell signaling pathways and gene expression to improve cardiovascular function, augment insulin sensitivity, enhance lean tissue mass, and reduce obesity in humans. Despite its versatile roles, the use of Arg as a dietary supplement is limited due to the lack of data to address concerns over its safety in humans. Data from animal studies are reviewed to assess arginine catabolism and the safety of long-term Arg supplementation. The arginase pathway was responsible for catabolism of 76-85 and 81-96 % Arg in extraintestinal tissues of pigs and rats, respectively. Dietary supplementation with Arg-HCl or the Arg base [315- and 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for 91 d] had no adverse effects on male or female pigs. Similarly, no safety issues were observed for male or female rats receiving supplementation with 1.8- and 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) for at least 91 d. Intravenous administration of Arg-HCl to gestating sheep at 81 and 180 mg Arg/(kg BW d) is safe for at least 82 and 40 d, respectively. Animals fed conventional diets can well tolerate large amounts of supplemental Arg [up to 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) in pigs or 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) in rats] for 91 d, which are equivalent to 573-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for humans. Collectively, these results can help guide studies to determine the safety of long-term oral administration of Arg in humans.

  5. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons: catabolic genes, microbial communities, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Sebastián; Méndez, Valentina; Aguila, Patricia; Seeger, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Bioremediation is an environmental sustainable and cost-effective technology for the cleanup of hydrocarbon-polluted soils and coasts. In spite of that longer times are usually required compared with physicochemical strategies, complete degradation of the pollutant can be achieved, and no further confinement of polluted matrix is needed. Microbial aerobic degradation is achieved by the incorporation of molecular oxygen into the inert hydrocarbon molecule and funneling intermediates into central catabolic pathways. Several families of alkane monooxygenases and ring hydroxylating dioxygenases are distributed mainly among Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Fungi strains. Catabolic routes, regulatory networks, and tolerance/resistance mechanisms have been characterized in model hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria to understand and optimize their metabolic capabilities, providing the basis to enhance microbial fitness in order to improve hydrocarbon removal. However, microbial communities taken as a whole play a key role in hydrocarbon pollution events. Microbial community dynamics during biodegradation is crucial for understanding how they respond and adapt to pollution and remediation. Several strategies have been applied worldwide for the recovery of sites contaminated with persistent organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and petroleum derivatives. Common strategies include controlling environmental variables (e.g., oxygen availability, hydrocarbon solubility, nutrient balance) and managing hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, in order to overcome the rate-limiting factors that slow down hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  6. Diversion of aspartate in ASS1-deficient tumours fosters de novo pyrimidine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Shiran; Adler, Lital; Yizhak, Keren; Sarver, Alona; Silberman, Alon; Agron, Shani; Stettner, Noa; Sun, Qin; Brandis, Alexander; Helbling, Daniel; Korman, Stanley; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Dimmock, David; Ulitsky, Igor; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Ruppin, Eytan; Erez, Ayelet

    2015-11-19

    Cancer cells hijack and remodel existing metabolic pathways for their benefit. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1) is a urea cycle enzyme that is essential in the conversion of nitrogen from ammonia and aspartate to urea. A decrease in nitrogen flux through ASS1 in the liver causes the urea cycle disorder citrullinaemia. In contrast to the well-studied consequences of loss of ASS1 activity on ureagenesis, the purpose of its somatic silencing in multiple cancers is largely unknown. Here we show that decreased activity of ASS1 in cancers supports proliferation by facilitating pyrimidine synthesis via CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase complex) activation. Our studies were initiated by delineating the consequences of loss of ASS1 activity in humans with two types of citrullinaemia. We find that in citrullinaemia type I (CTLN I), which is caused by deficiency of ASS1, there is increased pyrimidine synthesis and proliferation compared with citrullinaemia type II (CTLN II), in which there is decreased substrate availability for ASS1 caused by deficiency of the aspartate transporter citrin. Building on these results, we demonstrate that ASS1 deficiency in cancer increases cytosolic aspartate levels, which increases CAD activation by upregulating its substrate availability and by increasing its phosphorylation by S6K1 through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Decreasing CAD activity by blocking citrin, the mTOR signalling, or pyrimidine synthesis decreases proliferation and thus may serve as a therapeutic strategy in multiple cancers where ASS1 is downregulated. Our results demonstrate that ASS1 downregulation is a novel mechanism supporting cancerous proliferation, and they provide a metabolic link between the urea cycle enzymes and pyrimidine synthesis.

  7. Neutral pyrimidine C-H donor as anion receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁迎雪; 吴娜娜; 韩逸飞; 宋相志; 王洪波

    2016-01-01

    Anion receptors including pyrimidine subunit were designed and synthesized and their binding abilities with various anions were investigated by fluorescence and 1H NMR titration experiments. DFT calculations provided some information for anion recognition. It is confirmed that both of two new pyrimidine anion receptors have the selectivity for Cl−.

  8. Oxygen and nitrate in utilization by Bacillus licheniformis of the arginase and arginine deiminase routes of arginine catabolism and other factors affecting their syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, K; Lauwers, N; Stalon, V; Wiame, J M

    1978-09-01

    Bacillus licheniformis has two pathways of arginine catabolism. In well-aerated cultures, the arginase route is present, and levels of catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase were low. An arginase pathway-deficient mutant, BL196, failed to grow on arginine as a nitrogen source under these conditions. In anaerobiosis, the wild type contained very low levels of arginase and ornithine transaminase. BL196 grew normally on glucose plus arginine in anaerobiosis and, like the wild type, had appreciable levels of catabolic transferase. Nitrate, like oxygen, repressed ornithine carbamoyltransferase and stimulated arginase synthesis. In aerobic cultures, arginase was repressed by glutamine in the presence of glucose, but not when the carbon-energy source was poor. In anaerobic cultures, ammonia repressed catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase, but glutamate and glutamine stimulated its synthesis. A second mutant, derived from BL196, retained the low arginase and ornithine transaminase levels of BL196 but produced high levels of deiminase pathway enzymes in the presence of oxygen.

  9. Identification of a gene cluster associated with triclosan catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagle, Jeanne M; Paxson, Clayton; Johnstone, Precious; Hay, Anthony G

    2015-06-01

    Aerobic degradation of bis-aryl ethers like the antimicrobial triclosan typically proceeds through oxygenase-dependent catabolic pathways. Although several studies have reported on bacteria capable of degrading triclosan aerobically, there are no reports describing the genes responsible for this process. In this study, a gene encoding the large subunit of a putative triclosan oxygenase, designated tcsA was identified in a triclosan-degrading fosmid clone from a DNA library of Sphingomonas sp. RD1. Consistent with tcsA's similarity to two-part dioxygenases, a putative FMN-dependent ferredoxin reductase, designated tcsB was found immediately downstream of tcsA. Both tcsAB were found in the midst of a putative chlorocatechol degradation operon. We show that RD1 produces hydroxytriclosan and chlorocatechols during triclosan degradation and that tcsA is induced by triclosan. This is the first study to report on the genetics of triclosan degradation.

  10. Actinobacterial acyl coenzyme A synthetases involved in steroid side-chain catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M; Eltis, Lindsay D; Mohn, William W

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 10(5) ± 0.03 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2'-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 10(5) ± 0.1 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.2 × 10(5) ± 0.3 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid

  11. Alternative lactose catabolic pathway in Lactococcus lactis IL1403

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, T; Kok, J; Renault, P; Bardowski, J

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 beta-galactosidase phenotype-negative mutants isolated by negative selection on solid media containing cellobiose or lactose and X-Gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside), and we identif

  12. The RpiR-like repressor IolR regulates inositol catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Petra R A; Choong, Ee-Leng; Rossbach, Silvia

    2011-10-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of alfalfa, has the ability to catabolize myo-, scyllo-, and D-chiro-inositol. Functional inositol catabolism (iol) genes are required for growth on these inositol isomers, and they play a role during plant-bacterium interactions. The inositol catabolism genes comprise the chromosomally encoded iolA (mmsA) and the iolY(smc01163)RCDEB genes, as well as the idhA gene located on the pSymB plasmid. Reverse transcriptase assays showed that the iolYRCDEB genes are transcribed as one operon. The iol genes were weakly expressed without induction, but their expression was strongly induced by myo-inositol. The putative transcriptional regulator of the iol genes, IolR, belongs to the RpiR-like repressor family. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that IolR recognized a conserved palindromic sequence (5'-GGAA-N6-TTCC-3') in the upstream regions of the idhA, iolY, iolR, and iolC genes. Complementation assays found IolR to be required for the repression of its own gene and for the downregulation of the idhA-encoded myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity in the presence and absence of inositol. Further expression studies indicated that the late pathway intermediate 2-keto-5-deoxy-D-gluconic acid 6-phosphate (KDGP) functions as the true inducer of the iol genes. The iolA (mmsA) gene encoding methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase was not regulated by IolR. The S. meliloti iolA (mmsA) gene product seems to be involved in more than only the inositol catabolic pathway, since it was also found to be essential for valine catabolism, supporting its more recent annotation as mmsA.

  13. Targeting Tryptophan Catabolism: A Novel Method to Block Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    on the beginnings of this work in http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-12/uocd-ptd121014. php What do you plan to do during the next reporting...14). The essential amino acid tryptophan is required for protein synthesis and is a precursor for the formation of multiple signaling molecules...including serotonin (15). The majority of tryptophan catabolism occurs via the kynurenine pathway, leading to synthesis of NADþ along with intermediate

  14. Genetic Interaction of Aspergillus nidulans galR, xlnR and araR in Regulating D-Galactose and L-Arabinose Release and Catabolism Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Joanna E; Gruben, Birgit S; Battaglia, Evy; Wiebenga, Ad; Majoor, Eline; de Vries, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, the xylanolytic regulator XlnR and the arabinanolytic regulator AraR co-regulate pentose catabolism. In nature, the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose are both main building blocks of the polysaccharide arabinoxylan. In pectin and arabinogalactan, these two monosaccharides are found in combination with D-galactose. GalR, the regulator that responds to the presence of D-galactose, regulates the D-galactose catabolic pathway. In this study we investigated the possible interaction between XlnR, AraR and GalR in pentose and/or D-galactose catabolism in A. nidulans. Growth phenotypes and metabolic gene expression profiles were studied in single, double and triple disruptant A. nidulans strains of the genes encoding these paralogous transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that AraR and XlnR not only control pentose catabolic pathway genes, but also genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway. This suggests an interaction between three transcriptional regulators in D-galactose catabolism. Conversely, GalR is not involved in regulation of pentose catabolism, but controls only genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway.

  15. Genetic Interaction of Aspergillus nidulans galR, xlnR and araR in Regulating D-Galactose and L-Arabinose Release and Catabolism Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Kowalczyk

    Full Text Available In Aspergillus nidulans, the xylanolytic regulator XlnR and the arabinanolytic regulator AraR co-regulate pentose catabolism. In nature, the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose are both main building blocks of the polysaccharide arabinoxylan. In pectin and arabinogalactan, these two monosaccharides are found in combination with D-galactose. GalR, the regulator that responds to the presence of D-galactose, regulates the D-galactose catabolic pathway. In this study we investigated the possible interaction between XlnR, AraR and GalR in pentose and/or D-galactose catabolism in A. nidulans. Growth phenotypes and metabolic gene expression profiles were studied in single, double and triple disruptant A. nidulans strains of the genes encoding these paralogous transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that AraR and XlnR not only control pentose catabolic pathway genes, but also genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway. This suggests an interaction between three transcriptional regulators in D-galactose catabolism. Conversely, GalR is not involved in regulation of pentose catabolism, but controls only genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway.

  16. Potential formation of three pyrimidine bases in interstellar regions

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K

    2015-01-01

    Work on the chemical evolution of pre-biotic molecules remains incomplete since the major obstacle is the lack of adequate knowledge of rate coefficients of various reactions which take place in interstellar conditions. In this work, we study the possibility of forming three pyrimidine bases, namely, cytosine, uracil and thymine in interstellar regions. Our study reveals that the synthesis of uracil from cytosine and water is quite impossible under interstellar circumstances. For the synthesis of thymine, reaction between uracil and :CH2 is investigated. Since no other relevant pathways for the formation of uracil and thymine were available in the literature, we consider a large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution of cytosine in gas and ice phases. Our modeling result shows that cytosine would be produced in cold, dense interstellar conditions. However, presence of cytosine is yet to be established. We propose that a new molecule, namely, C4N3OH5 could be observable in the interstellar ...

  17. Characterization of genes for chitin catabolism in Haloferax mediterranei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Han, Jing; Cai, Lei; Zhou, Jian; Lü, Yang; Jin, Cheng; Liu, Jingfang; Xiang, Hua

    2014-02-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant natural polysaccharide after cellulose. But degradation of chitin has never been reported in haloarchaea. In this study, we revealed that Haloferax mediterranei, a metabolically versatile haloarchaeon, could utilize colloidal or powdered chitin for growth and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) accumulation, and the gene cluster (HFX_5025-5039) for the chitin catabolism pathway was experimentally identified. First, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results showed that the expression of the genes encoding the four putative chitinases (ChiAHme, ChiBHme, ChiCHme, and ChiDHme, HFX_5036-5039), the LmbE-like deacetylase (DacHme, HFX_5027), and the glycosidase (GlyAHme, HFX_5029) was induced by colloidal or powdered chitin, and chiA Hme, chiB Hme, and chiC Hme were cotranscribed. Knockout of chiABC Hme or chiD Hme had a significant effect on cell growth and PHBV production when chitin was used as the sole carbon source, and the chiABCD Hme knockout mutant lost the capability to utilize chitin. Knockout of dac Hme or glyA Hme also decreased PHBV accumulation on chitin. These results suggested that ChiABCDHme, DacHme, and GlyAHme were indeed involved in chitin degradation in H. mediterranei. Additionally, the chitinase assay showed that each chitinase possessed hydrolytic activity toward colloidal or powdered chitin, and the major product of colloidal chitin hydrolysis by ChiABCDHme was diacetylchitobiose, which was likely further degraded to monosaccharides by DacHme, GlyAHme, and other related enzymes for both cell growth and PHBV biosynthesis. Taken together, this study revealed the genes and enzymes involved in chitin catabolism in haloarchaea for the first time and indicated the potential of H. mediterranei as a whole-cell biocatalyst in chitin bioconversion.

  18. Catabolism of volatile organic compounds influences plant survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Patricia Y; Lerdau, Manuel T

    2013-12-01

    Plants emit a diverse array of phytogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The production and emission of VOCs has been an important area of research for decades. However, recent research has revealed the importance of VOC catabolism by plants and VOC degradation in the atmosphere for plant growth and survival. Specifically, VOC catabolism and degradation have implications for plant C balance, tolerance to environmental stress, plant signaling, and plant-atmosphere interactions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of VOC catabolism and degradation, propose experiments for investigating VOC catabolism, and suggest ways to incorporate catabolism into VOC emission models. Improving our knowledge of VOC catabolism and degradation is crucial for understanding plant metabolism and predicting plant survival in polluted environments.

  19. Catabolism of hyaluronan: involvement of transition metals

    OpenAIRE

    Šoltés, Ladislav; Kogan, Grigorij

    2009-01-01

    One of the very complex structures in the vertebrates is the joint. The main component of the joint is the synovial fluid with its high-molar-mass glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, which turnover is approximately twelve hours. Since the synovial fluid does not contain any hyaluronidases, the fast hyaluronan catabolism is caused primarily by reductive-oxidative processes. Eight transition metals – V23, Mn25, Fe26, Co27, Ni28, Cu29, Zn30, and Mo42 – naturally occurring in living organism are essent...

  20. Synthesis of novel chiral compounds of purine and pyrimidine bases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪毓海; 陈庆华

    1999-01-01

    The physiologically active groups such as purine and pyrimidine bases are introduced to the asymmetric ynthesis. The optically pure compounds bearing purine and pyrimidine bases (5a—5e) were prepared via the asymetric Michael addition reaction of purines and pyrimidines as Michael donators with the chiral source 5-(R)-[(1R, 2S, 5R)-menthyloxy]-2(5H)-furanone (3a), which was prepared from the natural chiral auxiliary (-)-menthol. The synthetic method was studied in detail and the new compounds were identified on the basis of their analytical data and spectroscopic data, such as [α]D20, IR, UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and MS. The absolute configuration of 5a was established by X-ray crystallography. The results provided an efficient synthetic route to chiral purines and pyrimidine analogues, and offered chiral sources for further research on the physiologically active compounds of chiral nucleotides.

  1. Synthesis of Polyfunctionally Substituted Fused Pyrimidine Derivatives as Antimicrobial Agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EISSA, Abd EI-Monem Mohamed Farag

    2008-01-01

    A variety of pyrimidine derivatives 2--4 and annulated pyrimidine derivatives 5-17 have been synthesized via a sequence of heterocyclization reaction of readily available 6-naphthyl-4-oxo-2-thioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroprimi-dine-5-carbonitrile (1) with different acidic and basic reagents. The new compounds were synthesized with the aim of study of their antimicrobial activity. The structures of all synthesized compounds were elucidated by elemental analysis and spectroscopic studies.

  2. Contribution of Asparagine Catabolism to Salmonella Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Patrick A; McClelland, Michael; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Porwollik, Steffen; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Chen, Juei-Suei; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; van der Velden, Adrianus W M

    2017-02-01

    Salmonellae are pathogenic bacteria that cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Salmonellae establish infection and avoid clearance by the immune system by mechanisms that are not well understood. We previously showed that l-asparaginase II produced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S Typhimurium) inhibits T cell responses and mediates virulence. In addition, we previously showed that asparagine deprivation such as that mediated by l-asparaginase II of S Typhimurium causes suppression of activation-induced T cell metabolic reprogramming. Here, we report that STM3997, which encodes a homolog of disulfide bond protein A (dsbA) of Escherichia coli, is required for l-asparaginase II stability and function. Furthermore, we report that l-asparaginase II localizes primarily to the periplasm and acts together with l-asparaginase I to provide S Typhimurium the ability to catabolize asparagine and assimilate nitrogen. Importantly, we determined that, in a murine model of infection, S Typhimurium lacking both l-asparaginase I and II genes competes poorly with wild-type S Typhimurium for colonization of target tissues. Collectively, these results indicate that asparagine catabolism contributes to S Typhimurium virulence, providing new insights into the competition for nutrients at the host-pathogen interface.

  3. Defective tryptophan catabolism underlies inflammation in mouse chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Luigina; Fallarino, Francesca; De Luca, Antonella; Montagnoli, Claudia; D'Angelo, Carmen; Zelante, Teresa; Vacca, Carmine; Bistoni, Francesco; Fioretti, Maria C; Grohmann, Ursula; Segal, Brahm H; Puccetti, Paolo

    2008-01-10

    Half a century ago, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) was first described as a disease fatally affecting the ability of children to survive infections. Various milestone discoveries have since been made, from an insufficient ability of patients' leucocytes to kill microbes to the underlying genetic abnormalities. In this inherited disorder, phagocytes lack NADPH oxidase activity and do not generate reactive oxygen species, most notably superoxide anion, causing recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Patients with CGD also suffer from chronic inflammatory conditions, most prominently granuloma formation in hollow viscera. The precise mechanisms of the increased microbial pathogenicity have been unclear, and more so the reasons for the exaggerated inflammatory response. Here we show that a superoxide-dependent step in tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway is blocked in CGD mice with lethal pulmonary aspergillosis, leading to unrestrained Vgamma1(+) gammadelta T-cell reactivity, dominant production of interleukin (IL)-17, defective regulatory T-cell activity and acute inflammatory lung injury. Although beneficial effects are induced by IL-17 neutralization or gammadelta T-cell contraction, complete cure and reversal of the hyperinflammatory phenotype are achieved by replacement therapy with a natural kynurenine distal to the blockade in the pathway. Effective therapy, which includes co-administration of recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), restores production of downstream immunoactive metabolites and enables the emergence of regulatory Vgamma4(+) gammadelta and Foxp3(+) alphabeta T cells. Therefore, paradoxically, the lack of reactive oxygen species contributes to the hyperinflammatory phenotype associated with NADPH oxidase deficiencies, through a dysfunctional kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism. Yet, this condition can be reverted by reactivating the pathway downstream of the superoxide-dependent step.

  4. Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 path-ways mediate effect of leptin on expression of catabolic genes in rat nu-cleus pulposus cells%瘦素通过 JAK2/STAT3途径调控椎间盘髓核细胞的分解代谢

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛恩兴; 张雪; 陈成旺; 张宇; 张凌洲

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To explore the effect of leptin on the expression of degeneration-related genes in rat nucleus pulposus ( NP) cells and to detect the possible mechanism .METHODS:The normal NP cells isolated from SD rats were analyzed by immunochemistry and immunofluorescence for the collagen II and cytokeratin 19 expression.The NP cells were treated with leptin and/or interleukin-1β( IL-β).The mRNA expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5, aggrecan and COL2A1 in the cells was detected by real-time PCR.Alcian blue staining and im-munochemistry were used to examine the expression of proteoglycan and collagen II .Activation of involved pathways was studied by Western blot .The inhibitors of the pathways were used to reveal the effect of these pathways on NP cells .RE-SULTS:The results of real-time PCR revealed that leptin alone up-regulated the mRNA expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5 and COL2A1.The synergy of leptin and IL-βwas found in the increased expression of MMP-1, MMP-3 and ADAMTS-5.The NP cells treated with leptin showed less expression of collagen II .Both PI3K/Akt and JAK2/SATA3 pathways were activated by leptin , whereas only inhibitor of JAK 2/SATA3 pathway reversed the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-13.CONCLUSION:Leptin may promote catabolism in rat NP cells via JAK2/SATA3 pathways, which may be the mechanism mediating the association between obesity and intervertebral disc degeneration .%目的:探讨瘦素对椎间盘髓核细胞中退行性变相关分解代谢基因的影响,并探讨其机制。方法:培养SD大鼠髓核细胞,行cytokeratin 19和II型胶原免疫组化进行鉴定。使用瘦素和(或)白细胞介素1β( IL-1β)作用于髓核细胞,real-time PCR分析MMP-1、MMP-3、MMP-9、MMP-13、ADAMTS-4、ADAMTS-5、aggrecan 和COL2A1的表达水平。阿利辛蓝染色和免疫组化分析II型胶原和蛋白多糖的生成。 Western blot 分析激活的信号通路,并使用不同

  5. Sesamin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and extracellular matrix catabolism in rat intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang; Li, Yan; Xu, Bo; Mao, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration contributes to most spinal degenerative diseases, while treatment inhibiting IVD degeneration is still in the experimental stage. Sesamin, a bioactive component extracted from sesame, has been reported to exert chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we analyzed the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects of sesamin on rat IVD in vitro and ex vivo. Results show that sesamin significantly inhibits the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of catabolic enzymes (MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5) and inflammation factors (IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, NO, COX-2, PGE2) in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. It is also proven that migration of macrophages induced by LPS can be inhibited by treatment with sesamin. Organ culture experiments demonstrate that sesamin protects the IVD from LPS-induced depletion of the extracellular matrix ex vivo. Moreover, sesamin suppresses LPS-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway through inhibiting phosphorylation of JNK, the common downstream signaling pathway of LPS and IL-1β, which may be the potential mechanism of the effects of sesamin. In light of our results, sesamin protects the IVD from inflammation and extracellular matrix catabolism, presenting positive prospects in the treatment of IVD degenerative diseases.

  6. Exercise promotes BCAA catabolism: effects of BCAA supplementation on skeletal muscle during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Murakami, Taro; Nakai, Naoya; Nagasaki, Masaru; Harris, Robert A

    2004-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are essential amino acids that can be oxidized in skeletal muscle. It is known that BCAA oxidation is promoted by exercise. The mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is attributed to activation of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex, which catalyzes the second-step reaction of the BCAA catabolic pathway and is the rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway. This enzyme complex is regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. The BCKDH kinase is responsible for inactivation of the complex by phosphorylation, and the activity of the kinase is inversely correlated with the activity state of the BCKDH complex, which suggests that the kinase is the primary regulator of the complex. We found recently that administration of ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) in rats caused activation of the hepatic BCKDH complex in association with a decrease in the kinase activity, which suggests that promotion of fatty acid oxidation upregulates the BCAA catabolism. Long-chain fatty acids are ligands for PPARalpha, and the fatty acid oxidation is promoted by several physiological conditions including exercise. These findings suggest that fatty acids may be one of the regulators of BCAA catabolism and that the BCAA requirement is increased by exercise. Furthermore, BCAA supplementation before and after exercise has beneficial effects for decreasing exercise-induced muscle damage and promoting muscle-protein synthesis; this suggests the possibility that BCAAs are a useful supplement in relation to exercise and sports.

  7. Roles of a sustained activation of NCED3 and the synergistic regulation of ABA biosynthesis and catabolism in ABA signal production in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN HuiBo; JIA WenSuo; FAN YiJian; GAO ZhiHui; WEI KaiFa; LI GuiFen; LIU Jing; CHEN Lin; LI BingBing; HU JianFang

    2007-01-01

    ABA, acting as a stress signal, plays crucial roles in plant resistance to water stress. Because ABA signal production is based on ABA biosynthesis, the regulation of NCED, a key enzyme in the ABA biosynthesis pathway, is normally thought of as the sole factor controlling ABA signal production. Here we demonstrate that ABA catabolism in combination with a synergistic regulation of ABA biosynthesis plays a crucial role in governing ABA signal production. Water stress induced a significant accumulation of ABA, which exhibited different patterns in detached and attached leaves. ABA catabolism followed a temporal trend of exponential decay for both basic and stress ABA, and there was little difference in the catabolic half-lives of basic ABA and stress ABA. Thus, the absolute rate of ABA catabolism, i.e. the amount of ABA catabolized per unit time, increases with increased ABA accumulation. From the dynamic processes of ABA biosynthesis and catabolism, it can be inferred that stress ABA accumulation may be governed by a synergistic regulation of all the steps in the ABA biosynthesis pathway. Moreover, to maintain an elevated level of stress ABA sustained activation of NCED3 should be required. This inference was supported by further findings that the genes encoding major enzymes in the ABA biosynthesis pathway, e.g. NCED3, AAO3 and ABA3 were all activated by water stress, and with ABA accumulation progressing, the expressions of NCED3, AAO3 and ABA3 remained activated. Data on ABA catabolism and gene expression jointly indicate that ABA signal production is controlled by a sustained activation of NCED3 and the synergistic regulation of ABA biosynthesis and catabolism.

  8. [Production and study of Bacillus subtilis mutants for genes involved in nucleoside catabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiantseva, E V; Sukhodolets, V V; Smirnov, Iu V

    1979-01-01

    By means of selection for a low thymine requirement the mutants fo thymine auxotrophs for deoxyriboaldolase (dra) and phosphodeoxyribomutase (drm) genes were obtained. Besides the mutants for pyrimidinenucleoside phosphorylase gene (pdp) were olso isolated using selection on the fluorodeoxyuridine resistance. The latter enzyme provides for pyrimidine nucleosides catabolism (thymidine, uridine) in Bacilli, as well as the conversion of exogenous thymine to thymidine in thymine auxotrophs. The data obtained when studying the deo-enzymes activities in various types of the mutants and also under the condition of induction by thymidine and acetoaldehyde are in accordance with the assumption that deoxyriboso-5-phosphate is an inductor of the deo-enzymes in Bacillus subtilis. The genes dra and pdp were tightly linked as it had been shown by the transformation experiments; in contrast, no linkage was revealed between dra and drm or pdp and drm. A secondary mutation (adn), not linked with dra and blocking the ability of bacteria to catabolise adenosine (purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity remains constant) was found in some dra-mutants.

  9. Amino Acid Catabolism in Staphylococcus aureus and the Function of Carbon Catabolite Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Cortney R.; Lei, Shulei; Wax, Jacqueline K.; Lehman, Mckenzie K.; Nuxoll, Austin S.; Steinke, Laurey; Sadykov, Marat

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus must rapidly adapt to a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources during invasion of a host. Within a staphylococcal abscess, preferred carbon sources such as glucose are limiting, suggesting that S. aureus survives through the catabolism of secondary carbon sources. S. aureus encodes pathways to catabolize multiple amino acids, including those that generate pyruvate, 2-oxoglutarate, and oxaloacetate. To assess amino acid catabolism, S. aureus JE2 and mutants were grown in complete defined medium containing 18 amino acids but lacking glucose (CDM). A mutation in the gudB gene, coding for glutamate dehydrogenase, which generates 2-oxoglutarate from glutamate, significantly reduced growth in CDM, suggesting that glutamate and those amino acids generating glutamate, particularly proline, serve as the major carbon source in this medium. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies confirmed this supposition. Furthermore, a mutation in the ackA gene, coding for acetate kinase, also abrogated growth of JE2 in CDM, suggesting that ATP production from pyruvate-producing amino acids is also critical for growth. In addition, although a functional respiratory chain was absolutely required for growth, the oxygen consumption rate and intracellular ATP concentration were significantly lower during growth in CDM than during growth in glucose-containing media. Finally, transcriptional analyses demonstrated that expression levels of genes coding for the enzymes that synthesize glutamate from proline, arginine, and histidine are repressed by CcpA and carbon catabolite repression. These data show that pathways important for glutamate catabolism or ATP generation via Pta/AckA are important for growth in niches where glucose is not abundant, such as abscesses within skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:28196956

  10. Bone marrow: its contribution to heme catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mähönen, Y; Anttinen, M; Vuopio, P; Tenhunen, R

    1976-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) and biliverdin reductase (BR), the two NADPH-dependent enzymes involved in the degradation of hemoglobin and its derivatives, were measured in bone marrow aspirates from 5 hematologically normal persons, 4 patients with chronic leucemia (CL), 11 patients with acute leucemia (AL), 8 patients with refractory sideroblastic anemia (RA), 7 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IA), 5 patients with hemolytic anemia (HA), and 7 patients with secondary anemia (SA) to determine the enzymatic capacity of the bone marrow in different hematologic disorders for heme catabolism. HO activity in the bone marrow of normal persons was 0.42 +/- 0.28 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 2.15 +/- 1.34; in AL, 0.39 +/- 0.25; in RA, 0.58 +/- 0.37; in IA, 0.41 +/- 0.28; in HA, 2.56 +/- 1.40; and in SA, 1.72 +/- 1.06. BR activity, respectively, was in normal persons 8.7 +/- 2.4 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 13.6 +/- 9.1; in AL, 3.8 +/- 3.1 in RA, 5.1 +/- 2.7; in IA, 5.5 +/- 3.7; in HA, 17.0 +/- 7.2; and in SA, 10.5 +/- 4.2. On the basis of these findings it seems evident that both oxygenase and biliverdin reductase activities of the bone marrow are capable of adaptive regulation. The physiologic role of bone marrow in heme catabolism seems to be of significant importance.

  11. Low-energy positron scattering by pyrimidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Pastega, Diego F.; Bettega, Márcio H. F., E-mail: bettega@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil)

    2015-12-28

    This work reports elastic integral and differential cross sections for positron collisions with pyrimidine, for energies up to 20 eV. The cross sections were computed with the Schwinger multichannel method in the static plus polarization approximation. We also employed the Born closure procedure to account for the long range potential due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. Our results are compared with the experimental total cross section of Zecca et al. [J. Phys. B 43, 215204 (2010)], the experimental grand-total, quasi-elastic integral and differential cross section of Palihawadana et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 12717 (2013)]. We also compare our results with theoretical integral and differential cross sections obtained by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 62704 (2013)] with the R-matrix and the independent atom model with screening-corrected additivity rule methods, and with the results computed by Franz and Gianturco [Phys. Rev. A 88, 042711 (2013)] using model correlation-polarization potentials. The agreement between the theory and the experiment is encouraging.

  12. Development of a series of aryl pyrimidine kynurenine monooxygenase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Sherman, Leticia M; Prime, Michael E; Mrzljak, Ladislav; Beconi, Maria G; Beresford, Alan; Brookfield, Frederick A; Brown, Christopher J; Cardaun, Isabell; Courtney, Stephen M; Dijkman, Ulrike; Hamelin-Flegg, Estelle; Johnson, Peter D; Kempf, Valerie; Lyons, Kathy; Matthews, Kimberly; Mitchell, William L; O'Connell, Catherine; Pena, Paula; Powell, Kendall; Rassoulpour, Arash; Reed, Laura; Reindl, Wolfgang; Selvaratnam, Suganathan; Friley, Weslyn Ward; Weddell, Derek A; Went, Naomi E; Wheelan, Patricia; Winkler, Christin; Winkler, Dirk; Wityak, John; Yarnold, Christopher J; Yates, Dawn; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Dominguez, Celia

    2015-02-12

    We report on the development of a series of pyrimidine carboxylic acids that are potent and selective inhibitors of kynurenine monooxygenase and competitive for kynurenine. We describe the SAR for this novel series and report on their inhibition of KMO activity in biochemical and cellular assays and their selectivity against other kynurenine pathway enzymes. We describe the optimization process that led to the identification of a program lead compound with a suitable ADME/PK profile for therapeutic development. We demonstrate that systemic inhibition of KMO in vivo with this lead compound provides pharmacodynamic evidence for modulation of kynurenine pathway metabolites both in the periphery and in the central nervous system.

  13. Identification of possible cigarette smoke constituents responsible for muscle catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Kaisari, Sharon; Aizenbud, Dror; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2012-08-01

    The age-related loss of muscle mass and strength also known as sarcopenia is significantly influenced by life style factors such as physical inactivity and impaired nutrition. Cigarette smoking is another life style habit that has been shown to be associated with sarcopenia and to affect skeletal muscle. Even today, smoking is still prevalent worldwide and is probably the most significant source of toxic chemicals exposure to humans. Cigarette smoke (CS) is a complex aerosol consisting of thousands of various constituents including reactive oxygen and nitrogen free radicals, toxic aldehydes and more. Previous epidemiological studies have identified tobacco smoking as a risk factor for sarcopenia. Clinical, in vivo and in vitro studies have revealed CS-induced skeletal muscle damage due to impaired muscle metabolism, increased inflammation and oxidative stress, over-expression of atrophy related genes and activation of various intracellular signaling pathways. This review aims to discuss and identify the components of CS that may promote catabolism of skeletal muscle.

  14. Tryptophan and tyrosine catabolic pattern in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, A; Deepadevi, K V; Arun, P; Manojkumar, V; Kurup, P A

    2000-09-01

    Catabolism of tryptophan and tyrosine in relation to the isoprenoid pathway was studied in neurological and psychiatric disorders. The concentration of trytophan, quinolinic acid, kynurenic acid, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid was found to be higher in the plasma of patients with all these disorders; while that of tyrosine, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine was lower. There was increase in free fatty acids and decrease in albumin (factors modulating tryptophan transport) in the plasma of these patients. Concentration of digoxin, a modulator of amino acid transport, and the activity of HMG CoA reductase, which synthesizes digoxin, were higher in these patients; while RBC membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity showed a decrease. Concentration of plasma ubiquinone (part of which is synthesised from tyrosine) and magnesium was also lower in these patients. No morphine could be detected in the plasma of these patients except in MS. On the other hand, strychnine and nicotine were detectable. These results indicate hypercatabolism of tryptophan and hypocatabolism of tyrosine in these disorders, which could be a consequence of the modulating effect of hypothalamic digoxin on amino acid transport.

  15. Tryptophan and tyrosine catabolic pattern in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Catabolism of tryptophan and tyrosine in relation to the isoprenoid pathway was studied in neurological and psychiatric disorders. The concentration of trytophan, quinolinic acid, kynurenic acid, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid was found to be higher in the plasma of patients with all these disorders; while that of tyrosine, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine was lower. There was increase in free fatty acids and decrease in albumin (factors modulating tryptophan transport in the plasma of these patients. Concentration of digoxin, a modulator of amino acid transport, and the activity of HMG CoA reductase, which synthesizes digoxin, were higher in these patients; while RBC membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity showed a decrease. Concentration of plasma ubiquinone (part of which is synthesised from tyrosine and magnesium was also lower in these patients. No morphine could be detected in the plasma of these patients except in MS. On the other hand, strychnine and nicotine were detectable. These results indicate hypercatabolism of tryptophan and hypocatabolism of tyrosine in these disorders, which could be a consequence of the modulating effect of hypothalamic digoxin on amino acid transport.

  16. Allantoin catabolism influences the production of antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navone, Laura; Casati, Paula; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtémoc; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purines are a primary source of carbon and nitrogen in soil; however, their metabolism is poorly understood in Streptomyces. Using a combination of proteomics, metabolomics, and metabolic engineering, we characterized the allantoin pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor. When cells grew in glucose minimal medium with allantoin as the sole nitrogen source, quantitative proteomics identified 38 enzymes upregulated and 28 downregulated. This allowed identifying six new functional enzymes involved in allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. From those, using a combination of biochemical and genetic engineering tools, it was found that allantoinase (EC 3.5.2.5) and allantoicase (EC 3.5.3.4) are essential for allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. Metabolomics showed that under these growth conditions, there is a significant intracellular accumulation of urea and amino acids, which eventually results in urea and ammonium release into the culture medium. Antibiotic production of a urease mutant strain showed that the catabolism of allantoin, and the subsequent release of ammonium, inhibits antibiotic production. These observations link the antibiotic production impairment with an imbalance in nitrogen metabolism and provide the first evidence of an interaction between purine metabolism and antibiotic biosynthesis.

  17. Catabolism of coffee chlorogenic acids by human colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Iziar A; Paz de Peña, Maria; Concepción, Cid; Alan, Crozier

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated potential health benefits associated with coffee consumption. These benefits might be ascribed in part to the chlorogenic acids (CGAs), the main (poly)phenols in coffee. The impact of these dietary (poly)phenols on health depends on their bioavailability. As they pass along the gastrointestinal tract, CGAs are metabolized extensively and it is their metabolites rather than the parent compounds that predominate in the circulatory system. This article reports on a study in which after incubation of espresso coffee with human fecal samples, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to monitor CGA breakdown and identify and quantify the catabolites produced by the colonic microflora. The CGAs were rapidly degraded by the colonic microflora and over the 6-h incubation period, 11 catabolites were identified and quantified. The appearance of the initial degradation products, caffeic and ferulic acids, was transient, with maximum quantities at 1 h. Dihydrocaffeic acid, dihydroferulic acid, and 3-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid were the major end products, comprising 75-83% of the total catabolites, whereas the remaining 17-25% consisted of six minor catabolites. The rate and extent of the degradation showed a clear influence of the composition of the gut microbiota of individual volunteers. Pathways involved in colonic catabolism of CGAs are proposed and comparison with studies on the bioavailability of coffee CGAs ingested by humans helped distinguish between colonic catabolites and phase II metabolites of CGAs.

  18. Catabolism of citronellol and related acyclic terpenoids in pseudomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster-Fromme, Karin; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2010-07-01

    Terpenes are a huge group of natural compounds characterised by their predominantly pleasant smell. They are built up by isoprene units in cyclic or acyclic form and can be functionalised by carbonyl, hydroxyl or carboxyl groups and by presence of additional carbon-carbon double bonds (terpenoids). Currently, much more than 10,000 terpenoid compounds are known, and many thereof are present in different iso- and stereoforms. Terpenoids are secondary metabolites and can have important biological functions in living organisms. In many cases, the biological functions of terpenoids are not known at all. Nevertheless, terpenoids are used in large quantities as perfumes and aroma compounds for food additives. Terpenoids can be also precursors and building blocks for synthesis of complex chiral compounds in chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Unfortunately, only few terpenoids are available in large quantities at reasonable costs. Therefore, characterisation of suited biocatalysts specific for terpenoid compounds and development of biotransformation processes of abundant terpenoids to commercially interesting derivates becomes more and more important. This minireview summarises knowledge on catabolic pathways and biotransformations of acyclic monoterpenes that have received only little attention. Terpenoids with 20 or more carbon atoms are not a subject of this study.

  19. Amino Acid Catabolism in Alzheimer's Disease Brain: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    There is a dire need to discover new targets for Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug development. Decreased neuronal glucose metabolism that occurs in AD brain could play a central role in disease progression. Little is known about the compensatory neuronal changes that occur to attempt to maintain energy homeostasis. In this review using the PubMed literature database, we summarize evidence that amino acid oxidation can temporarily compensate for the decreased glucose metabolism, but eventually altered amino acid and amino acid catabolite levels likely lead to toxicities contributing to AD progression. Because amino acids are involved in so many cellular metabolic and signaling pathways, the effects of altered amino acid metabolism in AD brain are far-reaching. Possible pathological results from changes in the levels of several important amino acids are discussed. Urea cycle function may be induced in endothelial cells of AD patient brains, possibly to remove excess ammonia produced from increased amino acid catabolism. Studying AD from a metabolic perspective provides new insights into AD pathogenesis and may lead to the discovery of dietary metabolite supplements that can partially compensate for alterations of enzymatic function to delay AD or alleviate some of the suffering caused by the disease. PMID:28261376

  20. Crystal structure of the nucleosome containing ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kagawa, Wataru; Osakabe, Akihisa; Matsumoto, Syota; Iwai, Shigenori; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-26

    The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) is induced in genomic DNA by ultraviolet (UV) light. In mammals, this photolesion is primarily induced within nucleosomal DNA, and repaired exclusively by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. However, the mechanism by which the CPD is accommodated within the nucleosome has remained unknown. We now report the crystal structure of a nucleosome containing CPDs. In the nucleosome, the CPD induces only limited local backbone distortion, and the affected bases are accommodated within the duplex. Interestingly, one of the affected thymine bases is located within 3.0 Å from the undamaged complementary adenine base, suggesting the formation of complementary hydrogen bonds in the nucleosome. We also found that UV-DDB, which binds the CPD at the initial stage of the NER pathway, also efficiently binds to the nucleosomal CPD. These results provide important structural and biochemical information for understanding how the CPD is accommodated and recognized in chromatin.

  1. Insulin signaling regulates fatty acid catabolism at the level of CoA activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS. We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis.

  2. SKN-1 and Nrf2 couples proline catabolism with lipid metabolism during nutrient deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shanshan; Lynn, Dana A; Lo, Jacqueline Y; Paek, Jennifer; Curran, Sean P

    2014-10-06

    Mechanisms that coordinate different metabolic pathways, such as glucose and lipid, have been recognized. However, a potential interaction between amino acid and lipid metabolism remains largely elusive. Here we show that during starvation of Caenorhabditis elegans, proline catabolism is coupled with lipid metabolism by SKN-1. Mutation of alh-6, a conserved proline catabolic enzyme, accelerates fat mobilization, enhances the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and reduces survival in response to fasting. This metabolic coordination is mediated by the activation of the transcription factor SKN-1/Nrf2, possibly due to the accumulation of the alh-6 substrate P5C, and also requires the transcriptional co-regulator MDT-15. Constitutive activation of SKN-1 induces a similar transcriptional response, which protects animals from fat accumulation when fed a high carbohydrate diet. In human cells, an orthologous alh-6 enzyme, ALDH4A1, is also linked to the activity of Nrf2, the human orthologue of SKN-1, and regulates the expression of lipid metabolic genes. Our findings identify a link between proline catabolism and lipid metabolism, and uncover a physiological role for SKN-1 in metabolism.

  3. Novel Route for Agmatine Catabolism in Aspergillus niger Involves 4-Guanidinobutyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Saragadam, Tejaswani; Punekar, Narayan S

    2015-08-15

    Agmatine, a significant polyamine in bacteria and plants, mostly arises from the decarboxylation of arginine. The functional importance of agmatine in fungi is poorly understood. The metabolism of agmatine and related guanidinium group-containing compounds in Aspergillus niger was explored through growth, metabolite, and enzyme studies. The fungus was able to metabolize and grow on l-arginine, agmatine, or 4-guanidinobutyrate as the sole nitrogen source. Whereas arginase defined the only route for arginine catabolism, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches suggested the absence of arginine decarboxylase in A. niger. Efficient utilization by the parent strain and also by its arginase knockout implied an arginase-independent catabolic route for agmatine. Urea and 4-guanidinobutyrate were detected in the spent medium during growth on agmatine. The agmatine-grown A. niger mycelia contained significant levels of amine oxidase, 4-guanidinobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-guanidinobutyrase (GBase), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, but no agmatinase activity was detected. Taken together, the results support a novel route for agmatine utilization in A. niger. The catabolism of agmatine by way of 4-guanidinobutyrate to 4-aminobutyrate into the Krebs cycle is the first report of such a pathway in any organism. A. niger GBase peptide fragments were identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding open reading frame from the A. niger NCIM 565 genome was located and cloned. Subsequent expression of GBase in both Escherichia coli and A. niger along with its disruption in A. niger functionally defined the GBase locus (gbu) in the A. niger genome.

  4. The effect of CreA in glucose and xylose catabolism in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The catabolism of glucose and xylose was studied in a wild type and creA deleted (carbon catabolite de-repressed) strain of Aspergillus nidulans. Both strains were cultivated in bioreactors with either glucose or xylose as the sole carbon source, or in the presence of both sugars. In the cultivat......The catabolism of glucose and xylose was studied in a wild type and creA deleted (carbon catabolite de-repressed) strain of Aspergillus nidulans. Both strains were cultivated in bioreactors with either glucose or xylose as the sole carbon source, or in the presence of both sugars...... of key enzymes in the xylose utilisation pathway revealed that xylose metabolism was occurring in the creA deleted strain, even at high glucose concentrations. Conversely, in the wild type strain, activities of the key enzymes for xylose metabolism increased only when the effects of glucose repression...... had been relieved. Xylose was both a repressor and an inducer of xylanases at the same time. The creA mutation seemed to have pleiotropic effects on carbohydratases and carbon catabolism....

  5. Reverse cholesterol transport: its contribution to cholesterol catabolism in normal and disease states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, K C; Tan, M H

    1996-10-01

    To review the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) model and its contribution to cholesterol catabolism in normal and disease states. Pertinent articles were identified through a MEDLINE search of the English language literature from 1983 to 1995, followed by a manual search of the bibliographies of pertinent articles. Review articles, laboratory and clinical studies and case reports. The physiology of the RCT pathway as well as alterations observed in individuals with diseases or lifestyle changes were reviewed. Data were derived mainly from laboratory studies and clinical observations. The RCT model is proposed to explain the removal of excess cholesterol from extrahepatic tissues and its delivery to liver for catabolism. This involves several regulated steps mediated by the plasma apolipoproteins and two key enzymes, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). In essence free cholesterol in peripheral tissues is taken up by nascent high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles, converted to cholesteryl esters (by LCAT), and then transferred to apo B-containing lipoproteins (by CETP) for hepatic removal. Altered cholesterol catabolism may occur in individuals with disorders of a genetic or acquired nature as well as lifestyle changes, as a result of alterations in one of several of the putative steps or enzymes involved in RCT. The proposed antiatherogenic role of RCT remains to be validated as a review of the possible alterations noted in various disorders showed conflicting results in atherogenic propensity.

  6. Enzyme IIANtr Regulates Salmonella Invasion Via 1,2-Propanediol And Propionate Catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Woongjae; Kim, Dajeong; Yoon, Hyunjin; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-01-01

    Many Proteobacteria possess a nitrogen-metabolic phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) consisting of EINtr, NPr, and EIIANtr (encoded by ptsP, ptsO, and ptsN, respectively). The PTSNtr plays diverse regulatory roles, but the substrate phosphorylated by EIIANtr and its primary functions have not yet been identified. To comprehensively understand the roles of PTSNtr in Salmonella Typhimurium, we compared the whole transcriptomes of wild-type and a ΔptsN mutant. Genome-wide RNA sequencing revealed that 3.5% of the annotated genes were up- or down-regulated by three-fold or more in the absence of EIIANtr. The ΔptsN mutant significantly down-regulated the expression of genes involved in vitamin B12 synthesis, 1,2-propanediol utilization, and propionate catabolism. Moreover, the invasiveness of the ΔptsN mutant increased about 5-fold when 1,2-propanediol or propionate was added, which was attributable to the increased stability of HilD, the transcriptional regulator of Salmonella pathogenicity island-1. Interestingly, an abundance of 1,2-propanediol or propionate promoted the production of EIIANtr, suggesting the possibility of a positive feedback loop between EIIANtr and two catabolic pathways. These results demonstrate that EIIANtr is a key factor for the utilization of 1,2-propanediol and propionate as carbon and energy sources, and thereby modulates the invasiveness of Salmonella via 1,2-propanediol or propionate catabolism. PMID:28333132

  7. Salicylic acid 3-hydroxylase regulates Arabidopsis leaf longevity by mediating salicylic acid catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Halitschke, Rayko; Yin, Changxi; Liu, Chang-Jun; Gan, Su-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) plays critical roles in plant defense, stress responses, and senescence. Although SA biosynthesis is well understood, the pathways by which SA is catabolized remain elusive. Here we report the identification and characterization of an SA 3-hydroxylase (S3H) involved in SA catabolism during leaf senescence. S3H is associated with senescence and is inducible by SA and is thus a key part of a negative feedback regulation system of SA levels during senescence. The enzyme converts SA (with a Km of 58.29 µM) to both 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and 2,5-DHBA in vitro but only 2,3-DHBA in vivo. The s3h knockout mutants fail to produce 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates, accumulate very high levels of SA and its sugar conjugates, and exhibit a precocious senescence phenotype. Conversely, the gain-of-function lines contain high levels of 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates and extremely low levels of SA and its sugar conjugates and display a significantly extended leaf longevity. This research reveals an elegant SA catabolic mechanism by which plants regulate SA levels by converting it to 2,3-DHBA to prevent SA overaccumulation. The research also provides strong molecular genetic evidence for an important role of SA in regulating the onset and rate of leaf senescence.

  8. Uptake and incorporation of pyrimidines in Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasternack, C H

    1976-08-01

    In photoorganotrophically grown cells of Euglena gracilis the uptake and incorporation degree of 12 different pyrimidines were tested. The rate of uptake of pyrimidines has distinct maxima in the late log phase and in the stationary phase of cell multiplication. The kinetics of uptake are linear in the first 2 h, do not show saturation at various concentrations and increase with the concetrations. No accumulation of the pyrimidines at various concentrations could be observed in the first 2 h of incubation. Membrane inhibitors as uranyl acetate inhibit the uptake of the reference substance alpha-AIB, which is wellknown transported by an active transport mechanism, but have no effect on uptake rate of uracil and cytosine. It could not be observed an energy requirement tested in temperature dependence and with electron transport inhibitors. Uptake of uridine, uracil, barbituric acid and alpha-AIB is inhibited by cycloheximide in a different manner after 5 - 10 min.

  9. Significance and Biological Importance of Pyrimidine in the Microbial World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are unique creatures that adapt to varying lifestyles and environment resistance in extreme or adverse conditions. The genetic architecture of microbe may bear a significant signature not only in the sequences position, but also in the lifestyle to which it is adapted. It becomes a challenge for the society to find new chemical entities which can treat microbial infections. The present review aims to focus on account of important chemical moiety, that is, pyrimidine and its various derivatives as antimicrobial agents. In the current studies we represent more than 200 pyrimidines as antimicrobial agents with different mono-, di-, tri-, and tetrasubstituted classes along with in vitro antimicrobial activities of pyrimidines derivatives which can facilitate the development of more potent and effective antimicrobial agents.

  10. Summer-to-Winter Phenotypic Flexibility of Fatty Acid Transport and Catabolism in Skeletal Muscle and Heart of Small Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa O; Harmon, Erin; Swanson, David L

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged shivering in birds is mainly fueled by lipids. Consequently, lipid transport and catabolism are vital for thermogenic performance and could be upregulated along with thermogenic capacity as part of the winter phenotype. We investigated summer-to-winter variation in lipid transport and catabolism by measuring mRNA expression, protein levels, and enzyme activities for several key steps of lipid transport and catabolic pathways in pectoralis muscle and heart in two small temperate-zone resident birds, American goldfinches (Spinus tristis) and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). Cytosolic fatty acid binding protein (FABPc; a key component of intramyocyte lipid transport) mRNA and/or protein levels were generally higher in winter for pectoralis muscle and heart for both species. However, seasonal variation in plasma membrane lipid transporters, fatty acyl translocase, and plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein in pectoralis and heart differed between the two species, with winter increases for chickadees and seasonal stability or summer increases for goldfinches. Catabolic enzyme activities generally showed limited seasonal differences for both tissues and both species. These data suggest that FABPc is an important target of upregulation for the winter phenotype in pectoralis and heart of both species. Plasma membrane lipid transporters and lipid catabolic capacity were also elevated in winter for chickadees but not for goldfinches. Because the two species show differential regulation of distinct aspects of lipid transport and catabolism, these data are consistent with other recent studies documenting that different bird species or populations employ a variety of strategies to promote elevated winter thermogenic capacity.

  11. Purine and pyrimidine nucleosides preserve human astrocytoma cell adenylate energy charge under ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestri, Francesco; Giannecchini, Michela; Sgarrella, Francesco; Carta, Maria Caterina; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Camici, Marcella

    2007-02-01

    The brain depends on both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for maintenance of ATP pools. Astrocytes play an integral role in brain functions providing trophic supports and energy substrates for neurons. In this paper, we report that human astrocytoma cells (ADF) undergoing ischemic conditions may use both purine and pyrimidine nucleosides as energy source to slow down cellular damage. The cells are subjected to metabolic stress conditions by exclusion of glucose and incubation with oligomycin (an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation). This treatment brings about a depletion of the ATP pool, with a concomitant increase in the AMP levels, which results in a significant decrease of the adenylate energy charge. The presence of purine nucleosides in the culture medium preserves the adenylate energy charge, and improves cell viability. Besides purine nucleosides, also pyrimidine nucleosides, such as uridine and, to a lesser extent, cytidine, are able to preserve the ATP pool. The determination of lactate in the incubation medium indicates that nucleosides can preserve the ATP pool through anaerobic glycolysis, thus pointing to a relevant role of the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of nucleosides which generates, without energy expense, the phosphorylated pentose, which through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis can be converted to energetic intermediates also in the absence of oxygen. In fact, ADF cells possess both purine nucleoside phosphorylase and uridine phosphorylase activities.

  12. OCLI-023, a Novel Pyrimidine Compound, Suppresses Osteoclastogenesis In Vitro and Alveolar Bone Resorption In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Ang; Lee, Doohyun; Kim, Nam Doo; Shin, Hong-In; Bae, Yong Chul; Park, Eui Kyun

    2017-01-01

    An abnormal increase in osteoclast differentiation and activation results in various bone-resorptive diseases, including periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoporosis. Chemical compounds containing pyrimidine ring have been shown to regulate a variety of biological processes. Therefore, in order to identify an antiresorptive agent, we synthesized a series of pyrimidine ring-containing chemical compounds, and found that OCLI-023 suppressed the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts in vitro. OCLI-023 directly inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced differentiation of bone marrow macrophages into osteoclasts, without a cytotoxic response. OCLI-023 also downregulated the RANKL-induced mRNA expression of osteoclast markers as well as inhibited the formation of actin rings and resorption pits. OCLI-023 attenuated the RANKL-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell signaling pathways. In a mouse model of periodontitis, ligature induced an increase of distance between cementoenamel junction (CEJ) and alveolar bone crest (ABC) in the second molar, and OCLI-023 significantly reduced it. Histological analysis showed ligature-induced increase of osteoclast numbers was also significantly reduced by OCLI-023. These data demonstrated the inhibitory effect of OCLI-023 on osteoclast differentiation and activity of osteoclasts in vitro, as well as on ligature-induced bone loss in vivo, and OCLI-023 can be proposed as a novel anti-resorptive compound. PMID:28085946

  13. Primary Metabolic Pathways and Metabolic Flux Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    his chapter introduces the metabolic flux analysis (MFA) or stoichiometry-based MFA, and describes the quantitative basis for MFA. It discusses the catabolic pathways in which free energy is produced to drive the cell-building anabolic pathways. An overview of these primary pathways provides...

  14. Basal autophagy is required for the efficient catabolism of sialyloligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Junichi; Wang, Li; Harada, Yoichiro; Huang, Chengcheng; Ishii, Kumiko; Mizushima, Noboru; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2013-09-13

    Macroautophagy is an essential, homeostatic process involving degradation of a cell's own components; it plays a role in catabolizing cellular components, such as protein or lipids, and damaged or excess organelles. Here, we show that in Atg5(-/-) cells, sialyloligosaccharides specifically accumulated in the cytosol. Accumulation of these glycans was observed under non-starved conditions, suggesting that non-induced, basal autophagy is essential for their catabolism. Interestingly, once accumulated in the cytosol, sialylglycans cannot be efficiently catabolized by resumption of the autophagic process, suggesting that functional autophagy is important for preventing sialyloligosaccharides from accumulating in the cytosol. Moreover, knockdown of sialin, a lysosomal transporter of sialic acids, resulted in a significant reduction of sialyloligosaccharides, implying that autophagy affects the substrate specificity of this transporter. This study thus provides a surprising link between basal autophagy and catabolism of N-linked glycans.

  15. Genetic dissection of methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase indicates a complex role for mitochondrial leucine catabolism during seed development and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Geng; Che, Ping; Ilarslan, Hilal; Wurtele, Eve S; Nikolau, Basil J

    2012-05-01

    3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase (MCCase) is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial-localized biotin-containing enzyme. The reaction catalyzed by this enzyme is required for leucine (Leu) catabolism, and it may also play a role in the catabolism of isoprenoids and the mevalonate shunt. In Arabidopsis, two MCCase subunits (the biotinylated MCCA subunit and the non-biotinylated MCCB subunit) are each encoded by single genes (At1g03090 and At4g34030, respectively). A reverse genetic approach was used to assess the physiological role of MCCase in plants. We recovered and characterized T-DNA and transposon-tagged knockout alleles of the MCCA and MCCB genes. Metabolite profiling studies indicate that mutations in either MCCA or MCCB block mitochondrial Leu catabolism, as inferred from the increased accumulation of Leu. Under light deprivation conditions, the hyper-accumulation of Leu, 3-methylcrotonyl CoA and isovaleryl CoA indicates that mitochondrial and peroxisomal Leu catabolism pathways are independently regulated. This biochemical block in mitochondrial Leu catabolism is associated with an impaired reproductive growth phenotype, which includes aberrant flower and silique development and decreased seed germination. The decreased seed germination phenotype is only observed for homozygous mutant seeds collected from a parent plant that is itself homozygous, but not from a parent plant that is heterozygous. These characterizations may shed light on the role of catabolic processes in growth and development, an area of plant biology that is poorly understood.

  16. Catabolism and Deactivation of the Lipid-derived Hormone Jasmonoyl-isoleucine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham JK Koo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The oxylipin hormone jasmonate controls myriad processes involved in plant growth, development and immune function. The discovery of jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile as the major bioactive form of the hormone highlights the need to understand biochemical and cell biological processes underlying JA-Ile homeostasis. Among the major metabolic control points governing the accumulation of JA-Ile in plant tissues are the availability of jasmonic acid, the immediate precursor of JA-Ile, and oxidative enzymes involved in catabolism and deactivation of the hormone. Recent studies indicate that JA-Ile turnover is mediated by a ω-oxidation pathway involving members of the CYP94 family of cytochromes P450. This discovery opens new opportunities to genetically manipulate JA-Ile levels for enhanced resistance to environmental stress, and further highlights ω-oxidation as a conserved pathway for catabolism of lipid-derived signals in plants and animals. Functional characterization of the full complement of CYP94 P450s promises to reveal new pathways for jasmonate metabolism and provide insight into the evolution of oxylipin signaling in land plants.

  17. High-resolution phenotypic profiling defines genes essential for mycobacterial growth and cholesterol catabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Griffin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathways that comprise cellular metabolism are highly interconnected, and alterations in individual enzymes can have far-reaching effects. As a result, global profiling methods that measure gene expression are of limited value in predicting how the loss of an individual function will affect the cell. In this work, we employed a new method of global phenotypic profiling to directly define the genes required for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A combination of high-density mutagenesis and deep-sequencing was used to characterize the composition of complex mutant libraries exposed to different conditions. This allowed the unambiguous identification of the genes that are essential for Mtb to grow in vitro, and proved to be a significant improvement over previous approaches. To further explore functions that are required for persistence in the host, we defined the pathways necessary for the utilization of cholesterol, a critical carbon source during infection. Few of the genes we identified had previously been implicated in this adaptation by transcriptional profiling, and only a fraction were encoded in the chromosomal region known to encode sterol catabolic functions. These genes comprise an unexpectedly large percentage of those previously shown to be required for bacterial growth in mouse tissue. Thus, this single nutritional change accounts for a significant fraction of the adaption to the host. This work provides the most comprehensive genetic characterization of a sterol catabolic pathway to date, suggests putative roles for uncharacterized virulence genes, and precisely maps genes encoding potential drug targets.

  18. The abundant marine bacterium Pelagibacter simultaneously catabolizes dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the gases dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jing; Todd, Jonathan D.; Thrash, J. Cameron; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C.; Temperton, Ben; Guo, Jiazhen; Fowler, Emily K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; De Leenheer, Patrick; Payne, Samuel H.; Johnston, Andrew W. B.; Davie-Martin, Cleo L.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2016-05-16

    Marine phytoplankton produce ~109 tons of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) per year1,2, an estimated 10% of which is catabolized by bacteria through the DMSP cleavage pathway to the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS)3,4. SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria (order Pelagibacterales), the most abundant chemoorganotrophic bacteria in the oceans, have been shown to assimilate DMSP into biomass, thereby supplying this cell’s unusual requirement for reduced sulfur5,6. Here we report that Pelagibacter HTCC1062 produces the gas methanethiol (MeSH) and that simultaneously a second DMSP catabolic pathway, mediated by a DMSP lyase, shunts as much as 59% of DMSP uptake to DMS production. We propose a model in which the allocation of DMSP between these pathways is kinetically controlled to release increasing amounts of DMS as the supply of DMSP exceeds cellular sulfur demands for biosynthesis. These findings suggest that DMSP supply and demand relationships in Pelagibacter metabolism are important to determining rates of oceanic DMS production.

  19. Sugar catabolism in Aspergillus and other fungi related to the utilization of plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Claire; Benocci, Tiziano; Battaglia, Evy; Benoit, Isabelle; de Vries, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are found in all natural and artificial biotopes and can use highly diverse carbon sources. They play a major role in the global carbon cycle by decomposing plant biomass and this biomass is the main carbon source for many fungi. Plant biomass is composed of cell wall polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin) and lignin. To degrade cell wall polysaccharides to different monosaccharides, fungi produce a broad range of enzymes with a large variety in activities. Through a series of enzymatic reactions, sugar-specific and central metabolic pathways convert these monosaccharides into energy or metabolic precursors needed for the biosynthesis of biomolecules. This chapter describes the carbon catabolic pathways that are required to efficiently use plant biomass as a carbon source. It will give an overview of the known metabolic pathways in fungi, their interconnections, and the differences between fungal species.

  20. Intramolecular inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reactions of pyrimidines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frissen, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis deals with the intramolecular inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction of pyrimidines. The main objective of the study was to investigate the synthetic applicability of this reaction and to get more insight in the electronic and steric effects which determine the reactivity of compou

  1. Nucleobases and Prebiotic Molecules in Organic Residues Produced from the Ultraviolet Photo-Irradiation of Pyrimidine in NH3 and H2O+NH3 Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuevo, Michel; Milam, Stefanie N.; Sandford, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Although not yet identified in the interstellar medium (ISM), N-heterocycles including nucleobases the information subunits of DNA and RNA are present in carbonaceous chondrites, which indicates that molecules of biological interest can be formed in non-terrestrial environments via abiotic pathways. Recent laboratory experiments and ab-initio calculations have already shown that the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices leads to the formation of a suite of oxidized pyrimidine derivatives, including the nucleobase uracil. In the present work, NH3:pyrimidine and H2O:NH3:pyrimidine ice mixtures with different relative proportions were irradiated with UV photons under astrophysically relevant conditions. Liquid- and gas-chromatography analysis of the resulting organic residues has led to the detection of the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as other species of prebiotic interest such as urea and small amino acids. The presence of these molecules in organic residues formed under abiotic conditions supports scenarios in which extraterrestrial organics that formed in space and were subsequently delivered to telluric planets via comets and meteorites could have contributed to the inventory of molecules that triggered the first biological reactions on their surfaces.

  2. VUV photophysics and dissociative photoionization of pyrimidine, purine, imidazole and benzimidazole in the 7-18 eV photon energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwell, Martin [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques (LISA), CNRS-UMR 7583, Universite Paris 7 and 12, 61 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil (France)], E-mail: schwell@lisa.univ-paris12.fr; Jochims, Hans-Werner; Baumgaertel, Helmut [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie der Freien Universitaet Berlin, Takustr. 3, Berlin 14195 (Germany); Leach, Sydney [Laboratoire d' Etude du Rayonnement et de la Matiere en Astrophysique (LERMA), CNRS-UMR 8112, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 Place Jules-Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France)], E-mail: Sydney.Leach@obspm.fr

    2008-11-03

    Photoionization mass spectrometry is used to study ionization processes and fragmentation pathways of four prebiotic species, pyrimidine, purine, imidazole and benzimidazole, in the 7-18 eV photon energy region, with synchrotron radiation as excitation source. These molecules are possible precursors of the nucleic acid bases that occur in DNA and RNA. Ionization energies and ion appearance energies are reported. They are compared with electron impact and other studies and are discussed in terms of the electronic and nuclear structures of these species and their cations. The ion appearance energies, in conjunction with thermochemical data, were used to propose dissociative photoionization pathways, principally involving loss of HCN molecules in each of the four species. Astrophysical implications of the results concern the prospects for observation and survival of these molecules in the interstellar medium, in comets and in meteorites. Suggestions are made concerning suitable sites for radioastronomical searches for these purines and pyrimidines.

  3. Functional myo-inositol catabolic genes of Bacillus subtilis Natto are involved in depletion of pinitol in Natto (fermented soybean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Tetsuro; Yamaguchi, Masanori; Makino, Yuki; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Fujio; Ashida, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2006-08-01

    Soybeans are rich in pinitol (PI; 3-O-methyl-D-chiro-inositol), which improves health by treating conditions associated with insulin resistance, such as diabetes mellitus and obesity. Natto is a food made from soybeans fermented by strains of Bacillus subtilis natto. In the chromosome of natto strain OK2, there is a putative promoter region almost identical to the iol promoter for myo-inositol (MI) catabolic genes of B. subtilis 168. In the presence of MI, the putative iol promoter functioned to induce inositol dehydrogenase, the enzyme for the first-step reaction in the MI catabolic pathway. PI also induced inositol dehydrogenase and the promoter was indispensable for the utilization of PI as well as MI, suggesting that PI might be an alternative carbon source metabolized in a way involving the MI catabolic genes. Natto fermentation studies have revealed that the parental natto strain consumed PI while a mutant defective in the iol promoter did not do so at all. These results suggest that inactivating the MI catabolic genes might prevent PI consumption, retaining it in natto for enrichment of possible health-promoting properties.

  4. Annellation of Triazole and Tetrazole Systems onto Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines: Synthesis of Tetrazolo[1,5-c]-pyrrolo[3,2-e]-pyrimidines and Triazolo[1,5-c]pyrrolo-[3,2-e]pyrimidines as Potential Antibacterial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina D. Shah

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Syntheses of several novel 4-chloropyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines (1, 4-hydrazinopyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines (2 and 3-amino-4-iminopyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines (7 and their use in the synthesis of tetrazolo[1,5-c]pyrrolo[3,2-e]pyrimidines (3 and triazolo[1,5-c]pyrrolo[3,2-e]pyrimidines (4 required for biological screening are reported.

  5. The growth rate of pyrimidine auxotrophic mutants of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 is reduced in the presence of exogenous aspartate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Lyders Lerche; Martinussen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    encoding enzymes in the distal part of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of L. lactis MG1363, results in reduction of the growth rate if exogenous aspartate is supplied to the growth medium. This observation can be explained by an increased accumulation of a toxic intermediate, most likely carbamoyl......Nucleotide metabolism is important for all cells as supplier of building blocks for the synthesis of nucleic acids and coenzymes. Furthermore, they act as intracellular energy carriers and allosteric effectors in a large number of enzymatic reactions. Nucleotides can either be made de novo or from...

  6. [Biochemical methods for the determination of a clinical protein catabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, E; Funovics, J; Schulz, F; Karner, J

    1980-12-01

    1. 20 patients before surgery received enteral nutrition for three days (12 g nitrogen, 1800 Kcal). Nitrogen and urea excretions in urine during the second and third day were determined. Eleven patients had a negative nitrogen balance (-2,7 and -2,4 g/day). In these patients urea production rates were 21,1 and 20,1 g/day. An urea production rate exceeding 15 g urea/day is probable an indication for a protein catabolism. The reason for this catabolic state seems to be a decreased protein utilisation (49 and 47 percent) as the result of a metabolic stress situation. This metabolic stress was determined according the stress index (Bistrian). The patients were in a stress situation comparable to postoperative stress (+3,7 and +3,9). The determination of urea production rate and catabolic index seems a suitable tool for defining a catabolic state. 2. 3-met-histidine excretion in urine were measured in seven patients postoperatively. In different periods saline or aminoacids solutions (5% alanine) were infused. During alanine administration protein (+49%)--and 3-met-histidine excretions (+50%) increased. It is not possible to state a catabolic situation out of the 3-met-histidine excretion, because an increased excretion may result from a stimulated protein synthesis in muscle tissue or from an increased muscleprotein wasting. 3. Free amino acid pools in plasma and muscle tissue were analysed in patients with severe illness of liver and pancreas. The free amino acid pattern differed from healthy volunteers. In patients with liver disease significantly increased concentrations of phenylalanine, tyrosine and methionine were found. In patients with acute pancreatitis highly abnormal pattern of intracellular amino acids occurred with decreased concentrations of glutamine, cysteine, histidine, lysine, arginine and ornithine. The highly significant decreased concentrations of glutamine (p less than 0,01) indicate a catabolic situation of these patients. A quantification of the

  7. Expression of the pyr operon of Lactobacillus plantarum is regulated by inorganic carbon availability through a second regulator, PyrR2, homologous to the pyrimidine-dependent regulator PyrR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Valérie Kugler, Valérie; Martinussen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    (HCR) prototrophy. IC enrichment significantly decreased the amounts of the enzymes in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway encoded by the pyrR1BCAa1Ab1DFE operon, as demonstrated by proteomic analysis. Northern blot and reverse transcription-PCR experiments demonstrated that IC levels regulated pyr...

  8. Bioprospecting and evolving alternative xylose and arabinose pathway enzymes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2016-03-01

    Bioprospecting is an effective way to find novel enzymes from strains with desirable phenotypes. Such bioprospecting has enabled organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize nonnative pentose sugars. Yet, the efficiency of this pentose catabolism (especially for the case of arabinose) remains suboptimal. Thus, further pathway optimization or identification of novel, optimal pathways is needed. Previously, we identified a novel set of xylan catabolic pathway enzymes from a superior pentose-utilizing strain of Ustilago bevomyces. These enzymes were used to successfully engineer a xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae through a blended approach of bioprospecting and evolutionary engineering. Here, we expanded this approach to xylose and arabinose catabolic pathway engineering and demonstrated that bioprospected xylose and arabinose catabolic pathways from U. bevomyces offer alternative choices for enabling efficient pentose catabolism in S. cerevisiae. By introducing a novel set of xylose catabolic genes from U. bevomyces, growth rates were improved up to 85 % over a set of traditional Scheffersomyces stipitis pathway genes. In addition, we suggested an alternative arabinose catabolic pathway which, after directed evolution and pathway engineering, enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on arabinose as a sole carbon source in minimal medium with growth rates upwards of 0.05 h(-1). This pathway represents the most efficient growth of yeast on pure arabinose minimal medium. These pathways provide great starting points for further strain development and demonstrate the utility of bioprospecting from U. bevomyces.

  9. Mitochondrial Carriers Link the Catabolism of Hydroxyaromatic Compounds to the Central Metabolism in Candida parapsilosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Igor; Neboháčová, Martina; Gérecová, Gabriela; Katonová, Kornélia; Jánošíková, Eva; Jakúbková, Michaela; Centárová, Ivana; Dunčková, Ivana; Tomáška, L'ubomír; Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis metabolizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene and benzoic acid to compounds channeled into central metabolism, including the mitochondrially localized tricarboxylic acid cycle, via the 3-oxoadipate and gentisate pathways. The orchestration of both catabolic pathways with mitochondrial metabolism as well as their evolutionary origin is not fully understood. Our results show that the enzymes involved in these two pathways operate in the cytoplasm with the exception of the mitochondrially targeted 3-oxoadipate CoA-transferase (Osc1p) and 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase (Oct1p) catalyzing the last two reactions of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The cellular localization of the enzymes indicates that degradation of hydroxyaromatic compounds requires a shuttling of intermediates, cofactors, and products of the corresponding biochemical reactions between cytosol and mitochondria. Indeed, we found that yeast cells assimilating hydroxybenzoates increase the expression of genes SFC1, LEU5, YHM2, and MPC1 coding for succinate/fumarate carrier, coenzyme A carrier, oxoglutarate/citrate carrier, and the subunit of pyruvate carrier, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis uncovered distinct evolutionary trajectories for sparsely distributed gene clusters coding for enzymes of both pathways. Whereas the 3-oxoadipate pathway appears to have evolved by vertical descent combined with multiple losses, the gentisate pathway shows a striking pattern suggestive of horizontal gene transfer to the evolutionarily distant Mucorales. PMID:27707801

  10. Streptococcus pyogenes arginine and citrulline catabolism promotes infection and modulates innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, Zachary T; Watson, Michael E; Caparon, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    A bacterium's ability to acquire nutrients from its host during infection is an essential component of pathogenesis. For the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, catabolism of the amino acid arginine via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway supplements energy production and provides protection against acid stress in vitro. Its expression is enhanced in murine models of infection, suggesting an important role in vivo. To gain insight into the function of the ADI pathway in pathogenesis, the virulence of mutants defective in each of its enzymes was examined. Mutants unable to use arginine (ΔArcA) or citrulline (ΔArcB) were attenuated for carriage in a murine model of asymptomatic mucosal colonization. However, in a murine model of inflammatory infection of cutaneous tissue, the ΔArcA mutant was attenuated but the ΔArcB mutant was hyperattenuated, revealing an unexpected tissue-specific role for citrulline metabolism in pathogenesis. When mice defective for the arginine-dependent production of nitric oxide (iNOS(-/-)) were infected with the ΔArcA mutant, cutaneous virulence was rescued, demonstrating that the ability of S. pyogenes to utilize arginine was dispensable in the absence of nitric oxide-mediated innate immunity. This work demonstrates the importance of arginine and citrulline catabolism and suggests a novel mechanism of virulence by which S. pyogenes uses its metabolism to modulate innate immunity through depletion of an essential host nutrient.

  11. A novel and convenient synthesis of thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-7-ones and pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-2-ones using Vilsmeier reagent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Yi Weng; Lei Ming Ying; Qi Xu Chen; Wei Ke Su

    2012-01-01

    A novel route for the synthesis of thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-7-ones and pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-2-ones from acetylated 2-aminothiazoles and 2-aminopyridines under Vilsmeier conditions has been developed.The plausible mechanism has also been proposed.

  12. Expression of the pyr operon of Lactobacillus plantarum is regulated by inorganic carbon availability through a second regulator, PyrR2, homologous to the pyrimidine-dependent regulator PyrR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Valérie Kugler, Valérie; Martinussen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic carbon (IC), such as bicarbonate or carbon dioxide, stimulates the growth of Lactobacillus plantarum. At low IC levels, one-third of natural isolated L. plantarum strains are nutritionally dependent on exogenous arginine and pyrimidine, a phenotype previously defined as high-CO2-requiring...... (HCR) prototrophy. IC enrichment significantly decreased the amounts of the enzymes in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway encoded by the pyrR1BCAa1Ab1DFE operon, as demonstrated by proteomic analysis. Northern blot and reverse transcription-PCR experiments demonstrated that IC levels regulated pyr...... genes mainly at the level of transcription or RNA stability. Two putative PyrR regulators with 62% amino acid identity are present in the L. plantarum genome. PyrR1 is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the pyr genes in response to pyrimidine availability by a mechanism of transcriptional attenuation...

  13. Bioanalytical approaches for characterizing catabolism of antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Ola M; Shen, Ben-Quan; Xu, Keyang; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Girish, Sandhya; Kaur, Surinder

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo stability and catabolism of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) directly impact their PK, efficacy and safety, and metabolites of the cytotoxic or small molecule drug component of an ADC can further complicate these factors. This perspective highlights the importance of understanding ADC catabolism and the associated bioanalytical challenges. We evaluated different bioanalytical approaches to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize ADC catabolites. Here we review and discuss the rationale and experimental strategies used to design bioanalytical assays for characterization of ADC catabolism and supporting ADME studies during ADC clinical development. This review covers both large and small molecule approaches, and uses examples from Kadcyla® (T-DM1) and a THIOMAB™ antibody-drug conjugate to illustrate the process.

  14. Renal catabolism of albumin – current views and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Gburek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Albumin is the main protein of blood plasma, lymph, cerebrospinal fluid and interstitial fluid. The protein assists in many important body functions, including maintenance of proper colloidal osmotic pressure, transport of important metabolites and antioxidant action. Synthesis of albumin takes place mainly in the liver, and its catabolism occurs mostly in vascular endothelium of muscle, skin and liver as well as in the kidney tubular epithelium. Renal catabolism of albumin consists of glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption. The tubular processes include endocytosis via the multiligand scavenger receptor tandem megalin and cubilin-amnionless complex. Possible ways of further catabolism of this protein are lysosomal proteolysis to amino acids and short peptides, recycling of degradation products into the bloodstream and tubular lumen or transcytosis of whole molecules. The article discusses the molecular aspects of these processes and presents the controversies arising in the light of the last decade of research.

  15. Thiamin Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Candida albicans: A Remarkable Reaction between Histidine and Pyridoxal Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Rung-Yi; Huang, Siyu; Fenwick, Michael K.; Hazra, Amrita; Zhang, Yang; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Philmus, Benjamin; Kinsland, Cynthia; Sanders, Jennie Mansell; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P. (Cornell); (TAM)

    2012-06-26

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thiamin pyrimidine is formed from histidine and pyridoxal phosphate (PLP). The origin of all of the pyrimidine atoms has been previously determined using labeling studies and suggests that the pyrimidine is formed using remarkable chemistry that is without chemical or biochemical precedent. Here we report the overexpression of the closely related Candida albicans pyrimidine synthase (THI5p) and the reconstitution and preliminary characterization of the enzymatic activity. A structure of the C. albicans THI5p shows PLP bound at the active site via an imine with Lys62 and His66 in close proximity to the PLP. Our data suggest that His66 of the THI5 protein is the histidine source for pyrimidine formation and that the pyrimidine synthase is a single-turnover enzyme.

  16. Tetraoxane-pyrimidine nitrile hybrids as dual stage antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rudi; Guedes, Rita C; Meireles, Patrícia; Albuquerque, Inês S; Gonçalves, Lídia M; Pires, Elisabete; Bronze, Maria Rosário; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J; Prudêncio, Miguel; Moreira, Rui; O'Neill, Paul M; Lopes, Francisca

    2014-06-12

    The use of artemisinin or other endoperoxides in combination with other drugs is a strategy to prevent development of resistant strains of Plasmodium parasites. Our previous work demonstrated that hybrid compounds, comprising endoperoxides and vinyl sulfones, were capable of high activity profiles comparable to artemisinin and chloroquine while acting through two distinct mechanisms of action: oxidative stress and falcipain inhibition. In this study, we adapted this approach to a novel class of falcipain inhibitors: peptidomimetic pyrimidine nitriles. Pyrimidine tetraoxane hybrids displayed potent nanomolar activity against three strains of Plasmodium falciparum and falcipain-2, combined with low cytotoxicity. In vivo, a decrease in parasitemia and an increase in survival of mice infected with Plasmodium berghei was observed when compared to control. All tested compounds combined good blood stage activity with significant effects on liver stage parasitemia, a most welcome feature for any new class of antimalarial drug.

  17. 5-Benzothiazole substituted pyrimidine derivatives as HCV replication (replicase) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasappan, Ashok; Bennett, Frank; Girijavallabhan, Vinay; Huang, Yuhua; Huelgas, Regina; Alvarez, Carmen; Chen, Lei; Gavalas, Stephen; Kim, Seong-Heon; Kosinski, Aneta; Pinto, Patrick; Rizvi, Razia; Rossman, Randall; Shankar, Bandarpalle; Tong, Ling; Velazquez, Francisco; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Verma, Vishal A; Kozlowski, Joseph; Shih, Neng-Yang; Piwinski, John J; MacCoss, Malcolm; Kwong, Cecil D; Clark, Jeremy L; Fowler, Anita T; Geng, Feng; Kezar, Hollis S; Roychowdhury, Abhijit; Reynolds, Robert C; Maddry, Joseph A; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Secrist, John A; Li, Cheng; Chase, Robert; Curry, Stephanie; Huang, Hsueh-Cheng; Tong, Xiao; Njoroge, F George

    2012-05-01

    Based on a previously identified HCV replication (replicase) inhibitor 1, SAR efforts were conducted around the pyrimidine core to improve the potency and pharmacokinetic profile of the inhibitors. A benzothiazole moiety was found to be the optimal substituent at the pyrimidine 5-position. Due to potential reactivity concern, the 4-chloro residue was replaced by a methyl group with some loss in potency and enhanced rat in vivo profile. Extensive investigations at the C-2 position resulted in identification of compound 16 that demonstrated very good replicon potency, selectivity and rodent plasma/target organ concentration. Inhibitor 16 also demonstrated good plasma levels and oral bioavailability in dogs, while monkey exposure was rather low. Chemistry optimization towards a practical route to install the benzothiazole moiety resulted in an efficient direct C-H arylation protocol.

  18. Pyrimidine Nucleobase Radical Reactivity in DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marc M

    2016-11-01

    Nucleobase radicals are major products of the reactions between nucleic acids and hydroxyl radical, which is produced via the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. The nucleobase radicals also result from hydration of cation radicals that are produced via the direct effect of ionizing radiation. The role that nucleobase radicals play in strand scission has been investigated indirectly using ionizing radiation to generate them. More recently, the reactivity of nucleobase radicals resulting from formal hydrogen atom or hydroxyl radical addition to pyrimidines has been studied by independently generating the reactive intermediates via UV-photolysis of synthetic precursors. This approach has provided control over where the reactive intermediates are produced within biopolymers and facilitated studying their reactivity. The contributions to our understanding of pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity by this approach are summarized.

  19. Pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity in DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-11-01

    Nucleobase radicals are major products of the reactions between nucleic acids and hydroxyl radical, which is produced via the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. The nucleobase radicals also result from hydration of cation radicals that are produced via the direct effect of ionizing radiation. The role that nucleobase radicals play in strand scission has been investigated indirectly using ionizing radiation to generate them. More recently, the reactivity of nucleobase radicals resulting from formal hydrogen atom or hydroxyl radical addition to pyrimidines has been studied by independently generating the reactive intermediates via UV-photolysis of synthetic precursors. This approach has provided control over where the reactive intermediates are produced within biopolymers and facilitated studying their reactivity. The contributions to our understanding of pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity by this approach are summarized.

  20. Molecular characterization of lysR-lysXE, gcdR-gcdHG and amaR-amaAB operons for lysine export and catabolism: a comprehensive lysine catabolic network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuri Indurthi, Sai; Chou, Han-Ting; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-05-01

    Among multiple interconnected pathways for l-Lysine catabolism in pseudomonads, it has been reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 employs the decarboxylase and the transaminase pathways. However, up until now, knowledge of several genes involved in operation and regulation of these pathways was still missing. Transcriptome analyses coupled with promoter activity measurements and growth phenotype analyses led us to identify new members in l-Lys and d-Lys catabolism and regulation, including gcdR-gcdHG for glutarate utilization, dpkA, amaR-amaAB and PA2035 for d-Lys catabolism, lysR-lysXE for putative l-Lys efflux and lysP for putative l-Lys uptake. The gcdHG operon encodes an acyl-CoA transferase (gcdG) and glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (gcdH) and is under the control of the transcriptional activator GcdR. Growth on l-Lys was enhanced in the mutants of lysX and lysE, supporting the operation of l-Lys efflux. The transcriptional activator LysR is responsible for l-Lys specific induction of lysXE and the PA4181-82 operon of unknown function. The putative operator sites of GcdR and LysR were deduced from serial deletions and comparative genomic sequence analyses, and the formation of nucleoprotein complexes was demonstrated with purified His-tagged GcdR and LysR. The amaAB operon encodes two enzymes to convert pipecolate to 2-aminoadipate. Induction of the amaAB operon by l-Lys, d-Lys and pipecolate requires a functional AmaR, supporting convergence of Lys catabolic pathways to pipecolate. Growth on pipecolate was retarded in the gcdG and gcdH mutants, suggesting the importance of glutarate in pipecolate and 2-aminoadipate utilization. Furthermore, this study indicated links in the control of interconnected networks of lysine and arginine catabolism in P. aeruginosa.

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of some New pyrimidine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firyal Weli Askar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available New pyrimidine derivatives comprising azo, schiff's bases, chalcones, and chromene ring moieties were prepared.The newly synthesized compounds have been established on the basis of their m.p., TLC, FT-IR, UV-Vis ,¹H-NMR data and element analysis. These compounds were screened for their antimicrobial and in vitro antioxidant properties. The results of this investigation revealed that these compounds are potent antimicrobial and antioxidant agent.

  2. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Chalcones and Pyrimidine-2-ones

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Some new chalcones have been prepared by Claisen-schmidt condensation of ketone and different aromatic aldehydes. These chalcones on condensation with urea in presence of acid gave Pyrimidine-2-ones. The synthesized compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR and 1H NMR spectral data. They have been screened for their antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria B. subtillis & S. aureus and Gram negative bacteria E. coli & S. typhi.

  3. Evolutionary Diversification of Alanine Transaminases in Yeast: Catabolic Specialization and Biosynthetic Redundancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Escalera-Fanjul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication is one of the major evolutionary mechanisms providing raw material for the generation of genes with new or modified functions. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae originated after an allopolyploidization event, which involved mating between two different ancestral yeast species. ScALT1 and ScALT2 codify proteins with 65% identity, which were proposed to be paralogous alanine transaminases. Further analysis of their physiological role showed that while ScALT1 encodes an alanine transaminase which constitutes the main pathway for alanine biosynthesis and the sole pathway for alanine catabolism, ScAlt2 does not display alanine transaminase activity and is not involved in alanine metabolism. Moreover, phylogenetic studies have suggested that ScALT1 and ScALT2 come from each one of the two parental strains which gave rise to the ancestral hybrid. The present work has been aimed to the understanding of the properties of the ancestral type Lacchancea kluyveri LkALT1 and Kluyveromyces lactis KlALT1, alanine transaminases in order to better understand the ScALT1 and ScALT2 evolutionary history. These ancestral -type species were chosen since they harbor ALT1 genes, which are related to ScALT2. Presented results show that, although LkALT1 and KlALT1 constitute ScALT1 orthologous genes, encoding alanine transaminases, both yeasts display LkAlt1 and KlAlt1 independent alanine transaminase activity and additional unidentified alanine biosynthetic and catabolic pathway(s. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of null mutants uncovered the fact that KlAlt1 and LkAlt1 have an additional role, not related to alanine metabolism but is necessary to achieve wild type growth rate. Our study shows that the ancestral alanine transaminase function has been retained by the ScALT1 encoded enzyme, which has specialized its catabolic character, while losing the alanine independent role observed in the ancestral type enzymes. The fact that ScAlt2 conserves 64

  4. A mass spectrometric method to determine activities of enzymes involved in polyamine catabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Kaori [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Samejima, Keijiro, E-mail: samejima-kj@igakuken.or.jp [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Takao, Koichi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai University, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0295 (Japan); Kohda, Kohfuku [Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Hiramatsu, Kyoko; Kawakita, Masao [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2012-10-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds in polyamine catabolic pathway were determined by a column-free ESI-TOF MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sup 1}- and N{sup 8}-acetylspermidine were determined by a column-free ESI-MS/MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was applied to determine activities of APAO, SMO, and SSAT in the pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assay method contained stable isotope-labeled natural substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is applicable to biological samples containing natural substrate and product. - Abstract: An analytical method for the determination of three polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) and five acetylpolyamines [N{sup 1}-acetylspermidine (N{sup 1}AcSpd), N{sup 8}-acetylspermidine (N{sup 8}AcSpd), N{sup 1}-acetylspermine, N{sup 1},N{sup 8}-diacetylspermidine, and N{sup 1},N{sup 12}-diacetylspermine] involved in the polyamine catabolic pathway has been developed using a hybrid tandem mass spectrometer. Heptafluorobutyryl (HFB) derivatives of these compounds and respective internal standards labeled with stable isotopes were analyzed simultaneously by TOF MS, based on peak areas appearing at appropriate m/z values. The isomers, N{sup 1}AcSpd and N{sup 8}AcSpd were determined from their fragment ions, the acetylamidopropyl and acetylamidobutyl groups, respectively, using MS/MS with {sup 13}C{sub 2}-N{sup 1}AcSpd and {sup 13}C{sub 2}-N{sup 8}AcSpd which have the {sup 13}C{sub 2}-acetyl group as an internal standard. The TOF MS method was successfully applied to measure the activity of enzymes involved in polyamine catabolic pathways, namely N{sup 1}-acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO), spermine oxidase (SMO), and spermidine/spermine N{sup 1}-acetyltransferase (SSAT). The following natural substrates and products labeled with stable isotopes considering the application to biological samples were identified; for APAO, [4,9,12-{sup 15}N{sub 3}]-N{sup 1}-acetylspermine and [1,4,8-{sup 15}N{sub 3

  5. [Retarded excision of pyrimidine dimers in human unstimulated lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snopov, S A; Roza, L; de Gruijl, F R

    2006-01-01

    Using immuno-labelling of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in nuclei of peripheral lymphocytes after their UVC-irradiation and cultivation, we have found that within the first four hours of cultivation the CPD-specific fluorescent signal from cell nuclei increased. Earlier, a similar increase in binding of antibody specific for pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts to undenatured DNA isolated from UV-irradiated Chinese hamster ovary cells was reported (Mitchell et al., 1986). Our experiments showed that nucleotide excision repair enzyme might induce such of DNA modification in lymphocyte nuclei that increased specific antibody binding to DNA fragments with lesions. We suggest that enzymatic formation of open structures in DNA predominated qualitatively over dual-incision and excision of these fragments, and resulted in the enhanced exposure of the pyrimidine dimers in nuclei to specific antibodies. The results evidence that nucleotid excision repair in unstimualted human lymphocytes being deficient in dual incision and removal of UV-induced DNA lesions appear to be capable of performing chromatin relaxation and pre-incision uncoiling of DNA fragments with lesions.

  6. Gene Cluster Encoding Cholate Catabolism in Rhodococcus spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn, William W.; Wilbrink, Maarten H.; Casabon, Israel; Stewart, Gordon R.; Liu, Jie; van der Geize, Robert; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are highly abundant steroids with important functions in vertebrate digestion. Their catabolism by bacteria is an important component of the carbon cycle, contributes to gut ecology, and has potential commercial applications. We found that Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 grows well on cholate, as

  7. The Oxylipin Pathway in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Creelman, Robert A.; Mulpuri, Rao

    2002-01-01

    Oxylipins are acyclic or cyclic oxidation products derived from the catabolism of fatty acids which regulate many defense and developmental pathways in plants. The dramatic increase in the volume of publications and reviews on these compounds since 1997 documents the increasing interest in this compound and its role in plants. Research on this topic has solidified our understanding of the chemistry and biosynthetic pathways for oxylipin production. However, more information is still needed on...

  8. Indolizines and pyrrolo[1,2-c]pyrimidines decorated with a pyrimidine and a pyridine unit respectively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Mirel Popa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The three possible structural isomers of 4-(pyridylpyrimidine were employed for the synthesis of new pyrrolo[1,2-c]pyrimidines and new indolizines, by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of their corresponding N-ylides generated in situ from their corresponding cycloimmonium bromides. In the case of 4-(3-pyridylpyrimidine and 4-(4-pyridylpyrimidine the quaternization reactions occur as expected at the pyridine nitrogen atom leading to pyridinium bromides and consequently to new indolizines via the corresponding pyridinium N-ylides. However, in the case of 4-(2-pyridylpyrimidine the steric hindrance directs the reaction to the pyrimidinium N-ylides and, subsequently, to the formation of the pyrrolo[1,2-c]pyrimidines. The new pyrrolo[1,2-c]pyrimidines and the new indolizines were structurally characterized through NMR spectroscopy. The X-ray structures of two of the starting materials, 4-(2-pyridylpyrimidine and 4-(4-pyridylpyrimidine, are also reported.

  9. Central Role of Pyruvate Kinase in Carbon Co-catabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Tahel; Vergnolle, Olivia; Hartman, Travis E; Rhee, Kyu Y; Jacobs, William R; Berney, Michael; Blanchard, John S

    2016-03-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) displays a high degree of metabolic plasticity to adapt to challenging host environments. Genetic evidence suggests thatMtbrelies mainly on fatty acid catabolism in the host. However,Mtbalso maintains a functional glycolytic pathway and its role in the cellular metabolism ofMtbhas yet to be understood. Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the last and rate-limiting step in glycolysis and theMtbgenome harbors one putative pyruvate kinase (pykA, Rv1617). Here we show thatpykAencodes an active pyruvate kinase that is allosterically activated by glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Deletion ofpykApreventsMtbgrowth in the presence of fermentable carbon sources and has a cidal effect in the presence of glucose that correlates with elevated levels of the toxic catabolite methylglyoxal. Growth attenuation was also observed in media containing a combination of short chain fatty acids and glucose and surprisingly, in media containing odd and even chain fatty acids alone. Untargeted high sensitivity metabolomics revealed that inactivation of pyruvate kinase leads to accumulation of phosphoenolpyruvate (P-enolpyruvate), citrate, and aconitate, which was consistent with allosteric inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase by P-enolpyruvate. This metabolic block could be relieved by addition of the α-ketoglutarate precursor glutamate. Taken together, our study identifies an essential role of pyruvate kinase in preventing metabolic block during carbon co-catabolism inMtb.

  10. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism.

  11. In vitro catabolism of rutin by human fecal bacteria and the antioxidant capacity of its catabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganath, Indu B; Mullen, William; Lean, Michael E J; Edwards, Christine A; Crozier, Alan

    2009-10-15

    The role of colonic microflora in the breakdown of quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (rutin) was investigated. An in vitro fermentation model was used and (i) 28 micromol of rutin and (ii) 55 micromol of quercetin plus 18 x 10(6) dpm of [4-(14)C]quercetin (60 nmol) were incubated with fresh fecal samples from three human volunteers, in the presence and absence of glucose. The accumulation of quercetin during in vitro fermentation demonstrated that deglycosylation is the initial step in the breakdown of rutin. The subsequent degradation of quercetin was dependent upon the interindividual composition of the bacterial microflora and was directed predominantly toward the production of either hydroxyphenylacetic acid derivatives or hydroxybenzoic acids. Possible catabolic pathways for these conversions are proposed. The presence of glucose as a carbon source stimulated the growth and production of bacterial microflora responsible for both the deglycosylation of rutin and the catabolism of quercetin. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid accumulated in large amounts in the fecal samples and was found to possess significant reducing power and free radical scavenging activity. This catabolite may play a key role in the overall antioxidant capacity of the colonic lumen after the ingestion of quercetin-rich foods.

  12. Glibenclamide Induces Collagen IV Catabolism in High Glucose-Stimulated Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown the full prevention of mesangial expansion in insulin-deficient diabetic rats by treatment with clinically-relevant dosages of glibenclamide (Glib. Studies in mesangial cells (MCs also demonstrated reduction in the high glucose (HG-induced accumulation of collagens, proposing that this was due to increased catabolism. In the present study, we investigated the signaling pathways that may be implicated in Glib action. Rat primary MCs were exposed to HG for 8 weeks with or without Glib in therapeutic (0.01 μM or supratherapeutic (1.0 μM concentrations. We found that HG increased collagen IV protein accumulation and PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression, in association with decreased cAMP generating capacity and decreased PKA activity. Low Glib increased collagen IV mRNA but fully prevented collagen IV protein accumulation and PAI-1 overexpression while enhancing cAMP formation and PKA activity. MMP2 mRNA, protein expression and gelatinolytic activity were also enhanced. High Glib was, overall, ineffective. In conclusion, low dosage/concentration Glib prevents HG-induced collagen accumulation in MC by enhancing collagen catabolism in a cAMP-PKA-mediated PAI-1 inhibition.

  13. Ergosteryl-β-glucosidase (Egh1) involved in sterylglucoside catabolism and vacuole formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Tani, Motohiro; Ishibashi, Yohei; Endo, Ikumi; Okino, Nozomu; Ito, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Sterylglucosides (SGs) are composed of a glucose and sterol derivatives, and are distributed in fungi, plants and mammals. We recently identified EGCrP1 and EGCrP2 (endoglycoceramidase-related proteins 1 and 2) as a β-glucocerebrosidase and steryl-β-glucosidase, respectively, in Cryptococcus neoformans. We herein describe an EGCrP2 homologue (Egh1; ORF name, Yir007w) involved in SG catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The purified recombinant Egh1 hydrolyzed various β-glucosides including ergosteryl β-glucoside (EG), cholesteryl β-glucoside, sitosteryl β-glucoside, para-nitrophenyl β-glucoside, 4-methylumberifellyl β-glucoside and glucosylceramide. The disruption of EGH1 in S. cerevisiae BY4741 (egh1Δ) resulted in the accumulation of EG and fragmentation of vacuoles. The expression of EGH1 in egh1Δ (revertant) reduced the accumulation of EG, and restored the morphology of vacuoles. The accumulation of EG was not detected in EGH1 and UGT51(ATG26) double-disrupted mutants (ugt51Δegh1Δ), indicating that EG was synthesized by Ugt51(Atg26) and degraded by Egh1 in vivo. These results clearly demonstrated that Egh1 is an ergosteryl-β-glucosidase that is functionally involved in the EG catabolic pathway and vacuole formation in S. cerevisiae.

  14. Catabolism of Exogenous Lactate Reveals It as a Legitimate Metabolic Substrate in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kelly M.; Scarbrough, Peter M.; Ribeiro, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Sonveaux, Pierre; Landon, Chelsea D.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Pizzo, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Lactate accumulation in tumors has been associated with metastases and poor overall survival in cancer patients. Lactate promotes angiogenesis and metastasis, providing rationale for understanding how it is processed by cells. The concentration of lactate in tumors is a balance between the amount produced, amount carried away by vasculature and if/how it is catabolized by aerobic tumor or stromal cells. We examined lactate metabolism in human normal and breast tumor cell lines and rat breast cancer: 1. at relevant concentrations, 2. under aerobic vs. hypoxic conditions, 3. under conditions of normo vs. hypoglucosis. We also compared the avidity of tumors for lactate vs. glucose and identified key lactate catabolites to reveal how breast cancer cells process it. Lactate was non-toxic at clinically relevant concentrations. It was taken up and catabolized to alanine and glutamate by all cell lines. Kinetic uptake rates of lactate in vivo surpassed that of glucose in R3230Ac mammary carcinomas. The uptake appeared specific to aerobic tumor regions, consistent with the proposed “metabolic symbiont” model; here lactate produced by hypoxic cells is used by aerobic cells. We investigated whether treatment with alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (CHC), a MCT1 inhibitor, would kill cells in the presence of high lactate. Both 0.1 mM and 5 mM CHC prevented lactate uptake in R3230Ac cells at lactate concentrations at ≤20 mM but not at 40 mM. 0.1 mM CHC was well-tolerated by R3230Ac and MCF7 cells, but 5 mM CHC killed both cell lines ± lactate, indicating off-target effects. This study showed that breast cancer cells tolerate and use lactate at clinically relevant concentrations in vitro (± glucose) and in vivo. We provided additional support for the metabolic symbiont model and discovered that breast cells prevailingly take up and catabolize lactate, providing rationale for future studies on manipulation of lactate catabolism pathways for therapy. PMID:24069390

  15. Osthole Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Catabolism in Rat Chondrocytes and Cartilage Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Du

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cartilage destruction is thought to be the major mediator of osteoarthritis. Recent studies suggest that inhibition of subchrondral bone loss by anti-osteoporosis (OP drug can protect cartilige erosion. Osthole, as a promising agent for treating osteoporosis, may show potential in treating osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Osthole affects the proliferation and catabolism of rat chondrocytes, and the degeneration of cartilage explants. Methods: Rat chondrocytes were treated with Osthole (0 μM, 6.25 μM, 12.5 μM, and 25 μM with or without IL1-β (10ng/ml for 24 hours. The expression levels of type II collagen and MMP13 were detected by western Blot. Marker genes for chondrocytes (A-can and Sox9, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, aggrecanases (ADAMTS5 and genes implicated in extracellular matrix catabolism were evaluated by qPCR. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA expression and fluorescence activated cell sorter. Wnt7b/β-catenin signaling was also investigated. Cartilage explants from two-week old SD rats were cultured with IL-1β, Osthole and Osthole plus IL-1β for four days and glycosaminoglycan (GAG synthesis was assessed with toluidine blue staining and Safranine O/Fast Green FCF staining, collagen type II expression was detected by immunofuorescence. Results: Osthole reduced expression of chondrocyte markers and increased expression of MMP13, ADAMTS5 and MMP9 in a dose-dependent manner. Catabolic gene expression levels were further improved by Osthole plus IL-1β. Osthole inhibited chondrocyte proliferation. GAG synthesis and type II collagen were decreased in both the IL-1β groups and the Osthole groups, and significantly reduced by Osthole plus IL-1β. Conclusions: Our data suggested that Osthole increases the catabolism of rat chondrocytes and cartilage explants, this effect might be mediated through inhibiting Wnt7b

  16. Catabolism of exogenous lactate reveals it as a legitimate metabolic substrate in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kelly M; Scarbrough, Peter M; Ribeiro, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Sonveaux, Pierre; Landon, Chelsea D; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Pizzo, Salvatore; Schroeder, Thies; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Lactate accumulation in tumors has been associated with metastases and poor overall survival in cancer patients. Lactate promotes angiogenesis and metastasis, providing rationale for understanding how it is processed by cells. The concentration of lactate in tumors is a balance between the amount produced, amount carried away by vasculature and if/how it is catabolized by aerobic tumor or stromal cells. We examined lactate metabolism in human normal and breast tumor cell lines and rat breast cancer: 1. at relevant concentrations, 2. under aerobic vs. hypoxic conditions, 3. under conditions of normo vs. hypoglucosis. We also compared the avidity of tumors for lactate vs. glucose and identified key lactate catabolites to reveal how breast cancer cells process it. Lactate was non-toxic at clinically relevant concentrations. It was taken up and catabolized to alanine and glutamate by all cell lines. Kinetic uptake rates of lactate in vivo surpassed that of glucose in R3230Ac mammary carcinomas. The uptake appeared specific to aerobic tumor regions, consistent with the proposed "metabolic symbiont" model; here lactate produced by hypoxic cells is used by aerobic cells. We investigated whether treatment with alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (CHC), a MCT1 inhibitor, would kill cells in the presence of high lactate. Both 0.1 mM and 5 mM CHC prevented lactate uptake in R3230Ac cells at lactate concentrations at ≤ 20 mM but not at 40 mM. 0.1 mM CHC was well-tolerated by R3230Ac and MCF7 cells, but 5 mM CHC killed both cell lines ± lactate, indicating off-target effects. This study showed that breast cancer cells tolerate and use lactate at clinically relevant concentrations in vitro (± glucose) and in vivo. We provided additional support for the metabolic symbiont model and discovered that breast cells prevailingly take up and catabolize lactate, providing rationale for future studies on manipulation of lactate catabolism pathways for therapy.

  17. Variable carbon catabolism among Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Ching Chai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi is strictly a human intracellular pathogen. It causes acute systemic (typhoid fever and chronic infections that result in long-term asymptomatic human carriage. S. Typhi displays diverse disease manifestations in human infection and exhibits high clonality. The principal factors underlying the unique lifestyle of S. Typhi in its human host during acute and chronic infections remain largely unknown and are therefore the main objective of this study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain insight into the intracellular lifestyle of S. Typhi, a high-throughput phenotypic microarray was employed to characterise the catabolic capacity of 190 carbon sources in S. Typhi strains. The success of this study lies in the carefully selected library of S. Typhi strains, including strains from two geographically distinct areas of typhoid endemicity, an asymptomatic human carrier, clinical stools and blood samples and sewage-contaminated rivers. An extremely low carbon catabolic capacity (27% of 190 carbon substrates was observed among the strains. The carbon catabolic profiles appeared to suggest that S. Typhi strains survived well on carbon subtrates that are found abundantly in the human body but not in others. The strains could not utilise plant-associated carbon substrates. In addition, α-glycerolphosphate, glycerol, L-serine, pyruvate and lactate served as better carbon sources to monosaccharides in the S. Typhi strains tested. CONCLUSION: The carbon catabolic profiles suggest that S. Typhi could survive and persist well in the nutrient depleted metabolic niches in the human host but not in the environment outside of the host. These findings serve as caveats for future studies to understand how carbon catabolism relates to the pathogenesis and transmission of this pathogen.

  18. Hormonal regulation of leucine catabolism in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jian; Feng, Dingyuan; Zhang, Yongliang; Dahanayaka, Sudath; Li, Xilong; Yao, Kang; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are actively taken up and catabolized by the mammary gland during lactation for syntheses of glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. Available evidence shows that the onset of lactation is associated with increases in circulating levels of cortisol, prolactin and glucagon, but decreases in insulin and growth hormone. This study determined the effects of physiological concentrations of these hormones on the catabolism of leucine (a representative BCAA) in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Cells were incubated at 37 °C for 2 h in Krebs buffer containing 3 mM D-glucose, 0.5 mM L-leucine, L-[1-14C]leucine or L-[U-14C]leucine, and 0-50 μU/mL insulin, 0-20 ng/mL growth hormone 0-200 ng/mL prolactin, 0-150 nM cortisol or 0-300 pg/mL glucagon. Increasing extracellular concentrations of insulin did not affect leucine transamination or oxidative decarboxylation, but decreased the rate of oxidation of leucine carbons 2-6. Elevated levels of growth hormone dose dependently inhibited leucine catabolism, α-ketoisocaproate (KIC) production and the syntheses of glutamate plus glutamine. In contrast, cortisol and glucagon increased leucine transamination, leucine oxidative decarboxylation, KIC production, the oxidation of leucine 2-6 carbons and the syntheses of glutamate plus glutamine. Prolactin did not affect leucine catabolism in the cells. The changes in leucine degradation were consistent with alterations in abundances of BCAA transaminase and phosphorylated levels of branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase. Reductions in insulin and growth hormone but increases in cortisol and glucagon with lactation act in concert to stimulate BCAA catabolism for glutamate and glutamine syntheses. These coordinated changes in hormones may facilitate milk production in lactating mammals.

  19. An efficient synthesis of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and evaluation of their antimicrobial activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SOMESHWAR DESHMUKH; KUNAL DINGORE; VISHWAS GAIKWAD; MADHUKAR JACHAK

    2016-09-01

    A series of new pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine derivatives has been synthesized by using 7-hydrazinyl- 5-methylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3-carbonitrile 1 and 7-amino-5-methylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3-carbonitrile 2 as precursors. The pyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidines 3a–b have been synthesized by a three-step reactionstarting with 1. Compound 1 was utilized for the synthesis of dioxopyrrolidindolinylamio-pyrazolo-pyrimidines 4a–b, and dioxoisoindolin-pyrazolo-pyrimidines 4c–d. Also, compounds 4a-d were synthesized using deepeutectic solvents (DES). This method using DES provides several advantages such as benign environment, high yield, scalable and simple work-up procedure. Similarly, the cyclocondensation of 2 with α-acetyl- γ -butyrolactone afforded pyrazolo-pyrido-pyrimidine 5 and dihydrofuro-pyrido-pyrazolo-pyrimidine 6. All synthesized compounds were screened for antimicrobial activity.

  20. Simultaneous catabolism of plant-derived aromatic compounds results in enhanced growth for members of the Roseobacter lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulvik, Christopher A; Buchan, Alison

    2013-06-01

    Plant-derived aromatic compounds are important components of the dissolved organic carbon pool in coastal salt marshes, and their mineralization by resident bacteria contributes to carbon cycling in these systems. Members of the roseobacter lineage of marine bacteria are abundant in coastal salt marshes, and several characterized strains, including Sagittula stellata E-37, utilize aromatic compounds as primary growth substrates. The genome sequence of S. stellata contains multiple, potentially competing, aerobic ring-cleaving pathways. Preferential hierarchies in substrate utilization and complex transcriptional regulation have been demonstrated to be the norm in many soil bacteria that also contain multiple ring-cleaving pathways. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether substrate preference exists in S. stellata when the organism is provided a mixture of aromatic compounds that proceed through different ring-cleaving pathways. We focused on the protocatechuate (pca) and the aerobic benzoyl coenzyme A (box) pathways and the substrates known to proceed through them, p-hydroxybenzoate (POB) and benzoate, respectively. When these two substrates were provided at nonlimiting carbon concentrations, temporal patterns of cell density, gene transcript abundance, enzyme activity, and substrate concentrations indicated that S. stellata simultaneously catabolized both substrates. Furthermore, enhanced growth rates were observed when S. stellata was provided both compounds simultaneously compared to the rates of cells grown singly with an equimolar concentration of either substrate alone. This simultaneous-catabolism phenotype was also demonstrated in another lineage member, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. These findings challenge the paradigm of sequential aromatic catabolism reported for soil bacteria and contribute to the growing body of physiological evidence demonstrating the metabolic versatility of roseobacters.

  1. Palladium-catalyzed regioselective arylation of imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjie; Nelson, Dorian P; Jensen, Mark S; Hoerrner, R Scott; Javadi, Gary J; Cai, Dongwei; Larsen, Robert D

    2003-12-11

    Imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine can be arylated at the 3-position with aryl bromides in the presence of base and a catalytic amount of palladium. This provides an efficient one-step synthesis of 3-arylimidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidines from the unsubstituted heterocycle. [reaction: see text

  2. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage Reaction: Synthesis of Multisubstituted Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Pallabi; Gogoi, Sanjib; Boruah, Romesh C

    2015-07-02

    A new carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction was developed for the efficient synthesis of multisubstituted pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines. This base induced reaction of 1,3,5-trisubstituted pentane-1,5-diones and substituted pyrazoles afforded good yields of the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines.

  3. Novel insights into the diversity of catabolic metabolism from ten haloarchaeal genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Anderson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. CONCLUSIONS: These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  4. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Goker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-05-03

    The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  5. Products of Leishmania braziliensis glucose catabolism: release of D-lactate and, under anaerobic conditions, glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, T.N.; Davis, D.G.; London, R.E.; Blum, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    Leishmania braziliensis panamensis promastigotes were incubated with glucose as the sole carbon source. About one-fifth of the glucose consumed under aerobic conditions was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies with (1-/sup 13/C)glucose showed that the other products released were succinate, acetate, alanine, pyruvate, and lactate. Under anaerobic conditions, lactate output increased, glycerol became a major product, and, surprisingly, glucose consumption decreased. Enzymatic assays showed that the lactate formed was D(-)-lactate. The release of alanine during incubation with glucose as the sole carbon source suggested that appreciable proteolysis occurred, consistent with our observation that a large amount of ammonia was released under these conditions. The discoveries that D-lactate is a product of L. braziliensis glucose catabolism, that glycerol is produced under anaerobic conditions, and that the cells exhibit a reverse Pasteur effect open the way for detailed studies of the pathways of glucose metabolism and their regulation in this organism.

  6. Serine one-carbon catabolism with formate overflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Johannes; Tumanov, Sergey; Maddocks, Oliver; Labuschagne, Christiaan Fred; Athineos, Dimitris; Van Den Broek, Niels; Mackay, Gillian M.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Serine catabolism to glycine and a one-carbon unit has been linked to the anabolic requirements of proliferating mammalian cells. However, genome-scale modeling predicts a catabolic role with one-carbon release as formate. We experimentally prove that in cultured cancer cells and nontransformed fibroblasts, most of the serine-derived one-carbon units are released from cells as formate, and that formate release is dependent on mitochondrial reverse 10-CHO-THF synthetase activity. We also show that in cancer cells, formate release is coupled to mitochondrial complex I activity, whereas in nontransformed fibroblasts, it is partially insensitive to inhibition of complex I activity. We demonstrate that in mice, about 50% of plasma formate is derived from serine and that serine starvation or complex I inhibition reduces formate synthesis in vivo. These observations transform our understanding of one-carbon metabolism and have implications for the treatment of diabetes and cancer with complex I inhibitors.

  7. Threshold Acetate Concentrations for Acetate Catabolism by Aceticlastic Methanogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Westermann, Peter; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Mah, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Marked differences were found for minimum threshold concentrations of acetate catabolism by Methanosarcina barkeri 227 (1.180 mM), Methanosarcina mazei S-6 (0.396 mM), and a Methanothrix sp. (0.069 mM). This indicates that the aceticlastic methanogens responsible for the conversion of acetate to methane in various ecosystems might be different, depending on the prevailing in situ acetate concentrations.

  8. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  9. The dominant mutation Suppressor of black indicates that de novo pyrimindine biosynthesis is involved in the Drosophila tan pigmentation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Kolbak, D.; Søndergaard, Leif

    1993-01-01

    Pyrimidines, beta-alanine, cuticle, drosophila, pyrimidine analogs, molecular genetics, rudimentary......Pyrimidines, beta-alanine, cuticle, drosophila, pyrimidine analogs, molecular genetics, rudimentary...

  10. Geochemical Energy for Catabolism and Anabolism in Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, J. P.; McCollom, T. M.; Bach, W.

    2008-12-01

    Chemically reduced deep-sea vent fluids mixed with oxidized seawater can generate redox disequilibria that serve as energy sources for chemolithoautotrophic (catabolism) and biomass synthesis (anabolism) reactions. Numerical models can be used to evaluate Gibbs energies of such processes on the early Earth and in present-day systems. Here, geochemical data from compositionally diverse vent fluids (Lost City, Rainbow, Logatchev, TAG, 21 °N EPR) are combined with several seawater chemistries to yield a wide range of mixed hydrothermal solutions; this is the starting point for our thermodynamic calculations. In ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, such as Rainbow or Lost City, aerobic chemolithotrophic catabolisms (oxidation of H2, FeII, CH4) are the most energy-yielding at low temperatures (catabolic reaction energetics can then be used to put constraints on the amount of primary biomass production. Under putative early Earth conditions, for example, the net chemoautotrophic synthesis of cellular building blocks is thermodynamically most favorable at moderate temperatures (~50°C), where the energy contributions from HCO3- and H+ in cool seawater coupled to the reducing power in hot vent fluid are optimized. At these conditions, and counter to conventional wisdom, the synthesis of amino acids may even yield small amounts of energy.

  11. NahY, a Catabolic Plasmid-Encoded Receptor Required for Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida to the Aromatic Hydrocarbon Naphthalene

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida G7 exhibits chemotaxis to naphthalene, but the molecular basis for this was not known. A new gene, nahY, was found to be cotranscribed with meta cleavage pathway genes on the NAH7 catabolic plasmid for naphthalene degradation. The nahY gene encodes a 538-amino-acid protein with a membrane topology and a C-terminal region that resemble those of chemotaxis transducer proteins. A P. putida G7 nahY mutant grew on naphthalene but was not chemotactic to this aromatic hydrocarbon....

  12. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKouzuma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs, as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the extracellular electron-transfer processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extra-cellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological bases for MFCs.

  13. Inhibition of arenavirus by A3, a pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Ngo, Nhi; Devito, Stefanie; Eggink, Dirk; Munger, Joshua; Shaw, Megan L; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Arenaviruses merit significant interest as important human pathogens, since several of them cause severe hemorrhagic fever disease that is associated with high morbidity and significant mortality. Currently, there are no FDA-licensed arenavirus vaccines available, and current antiarenaviral therapy is limited to an off-labeled use of the nucleoside analog ribavirin, which has limited prophylactic efficacy. The pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitor A3, which was identified in a high-throughput screen for compounds that blocked influenza virus replication, exhibits a broad-spectrum antiviral activity against negative- and positive-sense RNA viruses, retroviruses, and DNA viruses. In this study, we evaluated the antiviral activity of A3 against representative Old World (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus) and New World (Junin virus) arenaviruses in rodent, monkey, and human cell lines. We show that A3 is significantly more efficient than ribavirin in controlling arenavirus multiplication and that the A3 inhibitory effect is in part due to its ability to interfere with viral RNA replication and transcription. We document an additive antiarenavirus effect of A3 and ribavirin, supporting the potential combination therapy of ribavirin and pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors for the treatment of arenavirus infections.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of novel Schiff bases containing pyrimidine unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumbad H. Tomma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The work involves synthesis of novel Schiff base derivatives containing a pyrimidine unit starting with chalcones. 4-Aminoacetophenone was reacted with 4-nitrobenzaldehyde or 4-chlorobenzaldehyde in basic medium giving chalcones, [I]a and [I]b, respectively, by Claisen-Schemidt reaction. The chalcones [I]a and [I]b were reacted with urea in HCl medium giving oxopyrimidines, [II]a and [II]b. They were also reacted with thiourea in basic medium to give thioxopyrimidines, [III]a and [III]b. The novel mono and bis Schiff bases, [VIII]na, [VIII]nb, [IX]na, [IX]nb, [X]na, [X]nb, [XI]na, and [XI]nb were synthesized by the reaction of pyrimidine derivatives; oxopyrimdines, [II]a and [II]b and thioxopyrimidines, [III]a and [III]b with 4-(4′-n-alkoxybenzoloxybenzaldehyde [VI] and polymethylene-α,ω-bis-4-oxybenzaldehydes [VII]m, respectively, in dry benzene using drops of glacial acetic acid as a catalyst. The synthesized compounds were characterized by melting points, elemental analysis, FTIR, and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  15. Stopping power for electrons in pyrimidine in the energy range 20-3000 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, R; Sanz, A G; Fuss, M C; Blanco, F; García, G

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present new experimental electron energy loss distribution functions for pyrimidine (C4H4N2) measured for the incident energy range 30-2000 eV. Theoretical total and elastic cross sections for electron scattering from pyrimidine were calculated using the screening-corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) method. Based on the mean energy loss observed in the experiment and the theoretical integral inelastic cross section, the stopping power for electrons in pyrimidine is calculated in the energy range 20-3000 eV.

  16. An Efficient, Clean, and Catalyst-Free Synthesis of Fused Pyrimidines Using Sonochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mamaghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, synthesis of indenopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine and pyrimido[4,5-b]quinoline derivatives was investigated via one-pot three-component reaction between 6-amino-2-(alkylthio-pyrimidin-4(3Hone, 1,3-indanedione, or 1,3-cyclohexadione and arylaldehyde under ultrasonic irradiation in ethylene glycol as solvent at 65°C. In these reactions fused pyrimidine derivatives were synthesized with high to excellent yields (82–97% and short reaction times (10–33 min.

  17. An Efficient, Clean, and Catalyst-Free Synthesis of Fused Pyrimidines Using Sonochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this report, synthesis of indenopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine and pyrimido[4,5-b]quinoline derivatives was investigated via one-pot three-component reaction between 6-amino-2-(alkylthio)-pyrimidin-4(3H)one, 1,3-indanedione, or 1,3-cyclohexadione and arylaldehyde under ultrasonic irradiation in ethylene glycol as solvent at 65°C. In these reactions fused pyrimidine derivatives were synthesized with high to excellent yields (82–97%) and short reaction times (10–33 min).

  18. Homeostatic imbalance of purine catabolism in first-episode neuroleptic-naive patients with schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Purine catabolism may be an unappreciated, but important component of the homeostatic response of mitochondria to oxidant stress. Accumulating evidence suggests a pivotal role of oxidative stress in schizophrenia pathology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with a coulometric multi-electrode array system, we compared 6 purine metabolites simultaneously in plasma between first-episode neuroleptic-naïve patients with schizophrenia (FENNS, n = 25 and healthy controls (HC, n = 30, as well as between FENNS at baseline (BL and 4 weeks (4w after antipsychotic treatment. Significantly higher levels of xanthosine (Xant and lower levels of guanine (G were seen in both patient groups compared to HC subjects. Moreover, the ratios of G/guanosine (Gr, uric acid (UA/Gr, and UA/Xant were significantly lower, whereas the ratio of Xant/G was significantly higher in FENNS-BL than in HC. Such changes remained in FENNS-4w with exception that the ratio of UA/Gr was normalized. All 3 groups had significant correlations between G and UA, and Xan and hypoxanthine (Hx. By contrast, correlations of UA with each of Xan and Hx, and the correlation of Xan with Gr were all quite significant for the HC but not for the FENNS. Finally, correlations of Gr with each of UA and G were significant for both HC and FENNS-BL but not for the FENNS-4w. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During purine catabolism, both conversions of Gr to G and of Xant to Xan are reversible. Decreased ratios of product to precursor suggested a shift favorable to Xant production from Xan, resulting in decreased UA levels in the FENNS. Specifically, the reduced UA/Gr ratio was nearly normalized after 4 weeks of antipsychotic treatment. In addition, there are tightly correlated precursor and product relationships within purine pathways; although some of these correlations persist across disease or medication status, others appear to be lost among FENNS

  19. Isomeric signatures in the fragmentation of pyridazine and pyrimidine induced by fast ion impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Wania, E-mail: wania@if.ufrj.br; Luna, Hugo; Montenegro, Eduardo C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-28

    We present fast proton impact induced fragmentations of pyrimidine and pyridazine as an experimental resource to investigate isomeric signatures. Major isomeric imprints are identified for few fragment ions and differences of more than an order of magnitude for the cross sections of fragments of the same mass were measured. The observation of the molecular structure of these isomers gives no apparent indication for the reasons for such substantial differences. It is verified that the simple displacement of the position of one nitrogen atom strongly inhibits or favors the production of some ionic fragment species. The dependency of the fragmentation cross sections on the proton impact energy, investigated by means of time of flight mass spectroscopy and of a model calculation based in first order perturbation theory, allows us to disentangle the complex collision dynamics of the ionic fragments. The proton-induced fragmentation discriminates rather directly the association between a molecular orbital ionization and the fragment-ions creation and abundance, as well as how the redistribution of the energy imparted to the molecules takes place, triggering not only single but also double vacancy and leads to specific fragmentation pathways.

  20. The coupling of the plant and microbial catabolisms of phenanthrene in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratova, Anna; Dubrovskaya, Ekaterina; Golubev, Sergey; Grinev, Vyacheslav; Chernyshova, Marina; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2015-09-01

    We studied the catabolism of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene by four rhizobacterial strains and the possibility of enzymatic oxidation of this compound and its microbial metabolites by the root exudates of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in order to detect the possible coupling of the plant and microbial metabolisms under the rhizospheric degradation of the organic pollutant. A comparative study of phenanthrene degradation pathways in the PAH-degrading rhizobacteria Ensifer meliloti, Pseudomonas kunmingensis, Rhizobium petrolearium, and Stenotrophomonas sp. allowed us to identify the key metabolites from the microbial transformation of phenanthrene, including 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, 2-carboxybenzaldehyde, and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic, salicylic, and o-phthalic acids. Sterile alfalfa plants were grown in the presence and absence of phenanthrene (0.03 g kg(-1)) in quartz sand under controlled environmental conditions to obtain plant root exudates. The root exudates were collected, concentrated by ultrafiltration, and the activity of oxidoreductases was detected spectrophotometrically by the oxidation rate for various substrates. The most marked activity was that of peroxidase, whereas the presence of oxidase and tyrosinase was detected on the verge of the assay sensitivity. Using alfalfa root exudates as a crude enzyme preparation, we found that in the presence of the synthetic mediator, the plant peroxidase could oxidize phenanthrene and its microbial metabolites. The results indicate the possibility of active participation of plants in the rhizospheric degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their microbial metabolites, which makes it possible to speak about the coupling of the plant and microbial catabolisms of these contaminants in the rhizosphere.

  1. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  2. Synthesis and comparing the antibacterial activities of pyrimidine derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B ANDREWS; K KOMATHI; S MOHAN

    2017-03-01

    A series of 10 derivatives of 5-(5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-yl)-3,4-dihydro-6-methyl-4-phenylpyrimidin-2(1H)-one and 10 derivatives of 3,4-dihydro-5-(5-mercapto-4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)-6-methyl-4-phenyl pyrimidin-2(1H)-one have been synthesized. Among the synthesized derivatives, triazole substitutedcompounds have shown higher antibacterial inhibition when compared to the thiadiazole derivatives. All the structures of the newly synthesized compounds have been characterized by IR, 1H and 13C NMR, GC-MS and CHN analysis. Most of the compounds have shown promising antibacterial activity when compared with the standard drug ciprofloxacin.

  3. New insights on pyrimidine signalling within the arterial vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Spray, Stine; Syberg, Susanne;

    2016-01-01

    and relaxation in the coronary circulation and to establish whether P2Y receptors have different functions along the mouse coronary vascular tree. We tested stable pyrimidine analogues on isolated coronary arteries from P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptor KO mice in a myograph setup. In larger diameter segments of the left...... descending coronary artery (LAD) (lumen diameter~150μm) P2Y6 is the predominant contractile receptor for both UTP (uridine triphosphate) and UDP (uridine diphosphate) induced contraction. In contrast, P2Y2 receptors mediate endothelial-dependent relaxation. However, in smaller diameter LAD segments (lumen...... diameter~50μm), the situation is opposite, with P2Y2 being the contractile receptor and P2Y6 functioning as a relaxant receptor along with P2Y2. Immunohistochemistry was used to confirm smooth muscle and endothelial localization of the receptors. In vivo measurements of blood pressure in WT mice revealed...

  4. 1,4-Bis(pyrimidin-2-ylsulfanylbutane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akbar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The –SCH2CH2CH2CH2S– portion of the title compound, C12H14N2S2, adopts an extended zigzag conformation. The angles at the tetrahedral carbon atoms are marginally increased [113.63 (12° and 111.38 (17° for S—C—C and C—C—C respectively] from the idealized tetrahedral angle. The molecule lies on an inversion center located at the mid-point of the butyl chain. In the crystal, there is a π–π stacking interaction between inversion-related pyrimidine rings with mean interplanar spacing of 3.494 (2 Å.

  5. Bis(pyrimidine-2-carboxylato-κ2N,Ocopper(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Yu Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Cu(C5H3N2O22], was prepared in a water–ethanol solution containing 2-cyanopyrimidine, malonic acid and copper(II nitrate trihydrate. The CuII ion, located on an inversion center, is chelated by two pyrimidine-2-carboxylate anions in a CuO2N2 square-planar geometry. The uncoordinated carboxylate O atom and pyrimidine N atoms are linked to adjacent pyrimidine rings via weak C—H...O and C—H...N hydrogen bonding. π–π Stacking is observed between nearly parallel pyrimidine rings, the centroid-to-centroid separation being 3.8605 (13 Å.

  6. divalent metal complexes of 4-amino-n-pyrimidin-2-ylbenzene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    use of metal complexes as chemotherapeutic drugs has become a vibrant and growing area of ..... through the pyrimidine nitrogen atom [17]. ... binding can take place by the acceptance of a one pair of electron from the donor nitrogen atom.

  7. Absorption and Intermediary Metabolism of Purines and Pyrimidines in Lactating Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Stentoft; Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2015-01-01

    About 20 % of ruminal microbial N in dairy cows derives from purines and pyrimidines; however, their intermediary metabolism and contribution to the overall N metabolism has sparsely been described. In the present study, the postprandial patterns of net portal-drained viscera (PDV) and hepatic...... metabolism were assessed to evaluate purine and pyrimidine N in dairy cows. Blood was sampled simultaneously from four veins with eight hourly samples from four multi-catheterised Holstein cows. Quantification of twenty purines and pyrimidines was performed with HPLC–MS/MS, and net fluxes were estimated...... across the PDV, hepatic tissue and total splanchnic tissue (TSP). Concentration differences between veins of fifteen purine and pyrimidine nucleosides (NS), bases (BS) and degradation products (DP) were different from zero (P≤ 0·05), resulting in the net PDV releases of purine NS (0·33–1·3 mmol...

  8. Synthesis of 2-Arylimidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidines in Ionic Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Qian XU; Bao You LIU; Zhen Yuan XU

    2003-01-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids were used as a "green" recyclable alternative toconventional solvents in the synthesis of pharmaceutically useful compounds 2-arylimidazo[1, 2-a]pyrimidines through Tschotschibabin reaction of α-bromoacetophenones with 2-aminopyfinidinein good yields.

  9. The pyrimidine operon pyrRPB-carA from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Schallert, J.; Andersen, Birgit;

    2001-01-01

    The four genes pyrR, pyrP, pyrB, and carA were found to constitute an operon in Lactococcus lactis subsp, lactis MG1363. The functions of the different genes were established by mutational analysis. The first gene in the operon is the pyrimidine regulatory gene, pyrR, which is responsible...... for the regulation of the expression of the pyrimidine biosynthetic genes leading to UMP formation. The second gene encodes a membrane-bound high-affinity uracil permease, required for utilization of exogenous uracil. The last two genes in the operon, pyrB and carA, encode pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes; aspartate....... The expression of the pyrimidine biosynthetic genes including the pyrRPB-carA operon is subject to control at the transcriptional level, most probably by an attenuator mechanism in which PyrR acts as the regulatory protein....

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of chalcone analogues based pyrimidines as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, S N A; Butt, A M; Amjad, M W B; Ahmad, W; Shah, V H; Trivedi, A R

    2013-11-01

    Hypertension is a widespread and frequently progressive ailment that imparts a foremost threat for cardiovascular and renal disorders. Mammoth efforts are needed for the synthesis of innovative antihypertensive agents to combat this lethal disease. Chalcones have shown antihypertensive activity through inhibition of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE). Hence, a series of chalcone analogues is synthesized and used as precursor for the synthesis of novel series of pyrimidines. Precursor chalcones were prepared by reacting aldehydes and ketones in presence of sodium hydroxide followed by synthesis of corresponding pyrimidines by reaction with urea in presence of potassium hydroxide. Both groups were then evaluated for their effects on ACE. The results depicted that pyrimidines were more active than chalcones with methoxy (C5 and P5) substitution showing best results to inhibit ACE. Given that chalcone analogues and pyrimidines show a potential as the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

  11. Novel pyrimidine-2,4-dione-1,2,3-triazole and furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2-one-1,2,3-triazole hybrids as potential anti-cancer agents: Synthesis, computational and X-ray analysis and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorić, Tomislav; Sedić, Mirela; Grbčić, Petra; Tomljenović Paravić, Andrea; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Cetina, Mario; Vianello, Robert; Raić-Malić, Silvana

    2017-01-05

    Regioselective 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole tethered pyrimidine-2,4-dione derivatives (5-23) were successfully prepared by the copper(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. While known palladium/copper-cocatalyzed method based on Sonogashira cross-coupling followed by the intramolecular 5-endo-dig ring closure generated novel 6-alkylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2-one-1,2,3-triazole hybrids (24b-37b), a small library of their 5-alkylethynyl analogs (24a-37a) was synthesized and described for the first time by tandem terminal alkyne dimerization and subsequent 5-endo-trig cyclization, which was additionally corroborated with computational and X-ray crystal structure analyses. The nature of substituents on alkynes and thereof homocoupled 1,3-diynes predominantly influenced the ratio of the formed products in both pathways. In vitro antiproliferative activity of prepared compounds evaluated on five human cancer cell lines revealed that N,N-1,3-bis-(1,2,3-triazole)-5-bromouracil (5-7) and 5,6-disubstituted furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2-one-1,2,3-triazole 34a hybrids exhibited the most pronounced cytostatic acitivities against hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) and cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells with higher potencies than the reference drug 5-fluorouracil. Cytostatic effect of pyrimidine-2,4-dione-1,2,3-triazole hybrid 7 in HepG2 cells could be attributed to the Wee-1 kinase inhibition and abolishment of sphingolipid signaling mediated by acid ceramidase and sphingosine kinase 1. Importantly, this compound proved to be a non-mitochondrial toxicant, which makes it a promising candidate for further lead optimization and development of a new and more efficient agent for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  12. Engineering Bacteria to Catabolize the Carbonaceous Component of Sarin: Teaching E. coli to Eat Isopropanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Margaret E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Keasling, Jay D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Horsholm (Denmark)

    2016-07-12

    In this paper, we report an engineered strain of Escherichia coli that catabolizes the carbonaceous component of the extremely toxic chemical warfare agent sarin. Enzymatic decomposition of sarin generates isopropanol waste that, with this engineered strain, is then transformed into acetyl-CoA by enzymatic conversion with a key reaction performed by the acetone carboxylase complex (ACX). We engineered the heterologous expression of the ACX complex from Xanthobacter autotrophicus PY2 to match the naturally occurring subunit stoichiometry and purified the recombinant complex from E. coli for biochemical analysis. Incorporating this ACX complex and enzymes from diverse organisms, we introduced an isopropanol degradation pathway in E. coli, optimized induction conditions, and decoupled enzyme expression to probe pathway bottlenecks. Our engineered E. coli consumed 65% of isopropanol compared to no-cell controls and was able to grow on isopropanol as a sole carbon source. Finally, in the process, reconstitution of this large ACX complex (370 kDa) in a system naïve to its structural and mechanistic requirements allowed us to study this otherwise cryptic enzyme in more detail than would have been possible in the less genetically tractable native Xanthobacter system.

  13. Redundancy in putrescine catabolism in solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandounas, Luaine; Ballerstedt, Hendrik; de Winde, Johannes H; Ruijssenaars, Harald J

    2011-06-10

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is a promising platform organism for the biological production of substituted aromatic compounds due to its extreme tolerance towards toxic chemicals. Solvent or aromatic stress tolerance may be due to membrane modifications and efflux pumps; however in general, polyamines have also been implicated in stressed cells. Previous transcriptomics results of P. putida strains producing an aromatic compound, or being exposed to the solvent toluene, indicated differentially expressed genes involved in polyamine transport and metabolism. Therefore, the metabolism of the polyamine, putrescine was investigated in P. putida S12, as no putrescine degradation pathways have been described for this strain. Via transcriptome analysis various, often redundant, putrescine-induced genes were identified as being potentially involved in putrescine catabolism via oxidative deamination and transamination. A series of knockout mutants were constructed in which up to six of these genes were sequentially deleted, and although putrescine degradation was affected in some of these mutants, complete elimination of putrescine degradation in P. putida S12 was not achieved. Evidence was found for the presence of an alternative pathway for putrescine degradation involving γ-glutamylation. The occurrence of multiple putrescine degradation routes in the solvent-tolerant P. putida S12 is indicative of the importance of controlling polyamine homeostasis, as well as of the high metabolic flexibility exhibited by this microorganism.

  14. Engineering Bacteria to Catabolize the Carbonaceous Component of Sarin: Teaching E. coli to Eat Isopropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Margaret E; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-12-16

    We report an engineered strain of Escherichia coli that catabolizes the carbonaceous component of the extremely toxic chemical warfare agent sarin. Enzymatic decomposition of sarin generates isopropanol waste that, with this engineered strain, is then transformed into acetyl-CoA by enzymatic conversion with a key reaction performed by the acetone carboxylase complex (ACX). We engineered the heterologous expression of the ACX complex from Xanthobacter autotrophicus PY2 to match the naturally occurring subunit stoichiometry and purified the recombinant complex from E. coli for biochemical analysis. Incorporating this ACX complex and enzymes from diverse organisms, we introduced an isopropanol degradation pathway in E. coli, optimized induction conditions, and decoupled enzyme expression to probe pathway bottlenecks. Our engineered E. coli consumed 65% of isopropanol compared to no-cell controls and was able to grow on isopropanol as a sole carbon source. In the process, reconstitution of this large ACX complex (370 kDa) in a system naïve to its structural and mechanistic requirements allowed us to study this otherwise cryptic enzyme in more detail than would have been possible in the less genetically tractable native Xanthobacter system.

  15. Lipolysis - a highly regulated multi-enzyme complex mediates the catabolism of cellular fat stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert; Oberer, Monika; Zechner, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in cellular lipid droplets. The hydrolytic cleavage of TAG generates non-esterified fatty acids, which are subsequently used as energy substrates, essential precursors for lipid and membrane synthesis, or mediators in cell signaling processes. Consistent with its central importance in lipid and energy homeostasis, lipolysis occurs in essentially all tissues and cell types, it is most abundant, however, in white and brown adipose tissue. Over the last 5years, important enzymes and regulatory protein factors involved in lipolysis have been identified. These include an essential TAG hydrolase named adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) [annotated as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein A2], the ATGL activator comparative gene identification-58 [annotated as α/β hydrolase containing protein 5], and the ATGL inhibitor G0/G1 switch gene 2. Together with the established hormone-sensitive lipase [annotated as lipase E] and monoglyceride lipase, these proteins constitute the basic "lipolytic machinery". Additionally, a large number of hormonal signaling pathways and lipid droplet-associated protein factors regulate substrate access and the activity of the "lipolysome". This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the enzymes and regulatory processes governing lipolysis of fat stores in adipose and non-adipose tissues. Special emphasis will be given to ATGL, its regulation, and physiological function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Lipolysis – A highly regulated multi-enzyme complex mediates the catabolism of cellular fat stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert; Oberer, Monika; Zechner, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in cellular lipid droplets. The hydrolytic cleavage of TAG generates non-esterified fatty acids, which are subsequently used as energy substrates, essential precursors for lipid and membrane synthesis, or mediators in cell signaling processes. Consistent with its central importance in lipid and energy homeostasis, lipolysis occurs in essentially all tissues and cell types, it is most abundant, however, in white and brown adipose tissue. Over the last 5 years, important enzymes and regulatory protein factors involved in lipolysis have been identified. These include an essential TAG hydrolase named adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) [annotated as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein A2], the ATGL activator comparative gene identification-58 [annotated as α/β hydrolase containing protein 5], and the ATGL inhibitor G0/G1 switch gene 2. Together with the established hormone-sensitive lipase [annotated as lipase E] and monoglyceride lipase, these proteins constitute the basic “lipolytic machinery”. Additionally, a large number of hormonal signaling pathways and lipid droplet-associated protein factors regulate substrate access and the activity of the “lipolysome”. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the enzymes and regulatory processes governing lipolysis of fat stores in adipose and non-adipose tissues. Special emphasis will be given to ATGL, its regulation, and physiological function. PMID:21087632

  17. Pyrimidine non-nucleoside analogs: A direct synthesis of a novel class of N-substituted amino and N-sulfonamide derivatives of pyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgemeie, Galal H; Salah, Ali M; Abbas, Nermeen S; Hussein, Hoda A; Mohamed, Reham A

    2017-03-04

    A convenient method for the regioselective synthesis of pyrimidine non-nucleoside analogs was developed. This study reports a novel and efficient method for the synthesis of a new type of N-substituted amino methylsulfanylpyrimidines and the corresponding pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines. This series of compounds was designed through the reaction of dimethyl N-cyanodithioiminocarbonate with 2-cyano-N'-(thiophen-2-yl-, furan-2-yl- and pyridin-4-ylmethylene)acetohydrazide and N'-(2-cyanoacetyl)arylsulfonohydrazides. The scope and limitation of the method are demonstrated. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized compounds were also evaluated.

  18. XacR - a novel transcriptional regulator of D-xylose and L-arabinose catabolism in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Ulrike; Sutter, Jan-Moritz; Schulz, Anne-Christine; Tästensen, Julia-Beate; Schönheit, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii degrades D-xylose and L-arabinose via oxidative pathways to α-ketoglutarate. The genes involved in these pathways are clustered and were transcriptionally upregulated by both D-xylose and L-arabinose suggesting a common regulator. Adjacent to the gene cluster, a putative IclR-like transcriptional regulator, HVO_B0040, was identified. It is shown that HVO_B0040, designated xacR, encodes an activator of both D-xylose and L-arabinose catabolism: in ΔxacR cells, transcripts of genes involved in pentose catabolism could not be detected; transcript formation could be recovered by complementation, indicating XacR dependent transcriptional activation. Upstream activation promoter regions and nucleotide sequences that were essential for XacR-mediated activation of pentose-specific genes were identified by in vivo deletion and scanning mutagenesis. Besides its activator function XacR acted as repressor of its own synthesis: xacR deletion resulted in an increase of xacR promoter activity. A palindromic sequence was identified at the operator site of xacR promoter, and mutation of this sequence also resulted in an increase and thus derepression of xacR promoter activity. It is concluded that the palindromic sequence represents the binding site of XacR as repressor. This is the first report of a transcriptional regulator of pentose catabolism in the domain of archaea.

  19. Location and PCR analysis of catabolic genes in a novel Streptomyces sp. DUT_AHX capable of degrading nitrobenzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Haixin; ZHOU Jiti; LV Hong; WANG Jing; GUO Jianbo; LIU Guangfei; QU Yuanyuan

    2008-01-01

    A novel strain of Streptomyces sp. DUT_AHX was isolated from sludge contaminated with nitrobenzene and identified on the basis of physiological and biochemical tests and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis. The optimal degradation conditions were as follows: temperature 30℃, pH 7.0-8.0, shaking speed 150-180 r/min and inocula 10% (V/V). The strain, which possessed a partial reductive pathway with the release of ammonia, was also able to grow on mineral salts basal (MSB) medium plates with 2-aminophenol, phenol, or toluene as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, the enzyme activity tests showed crude extracts of nitrobenzene-grown DUT_AHX contained 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase activity. The 17-kb plasmid was isolated by the modified alkaline lysis method and was further cured by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) together with 37℃. As a result, the cured derivative strain DUT_AHX-4 lost the 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase activity. The results suggested that the catabolic genes encoding the nitrobenzene-degrading enzymes were plasmid-associated. Moreover, the plasmid DNA was amplified with degenerate primers by touchdown PCR and an expected size fragment (471 bp) was generated. The Blast results revealed that the gene encoding a 157 amino acid polypeptide was 39% to 76% identical to YHS domain protein. The further examination of the plasmid would demonstrate the molecular basis of nitrobenzene catabolism in Streptomyces, such as regulation and genetic organization of the catabolic genes.

  20. Insights into the evolution of sialic acid catabolism among bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almagro-Moreno Salvador

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sialic acids comprise a family of nine-carbon amino sugars that are prevalent in mucus rich environments. Sialic acids from the human host are used by a number of pathogens as an energy source. Here we explore the evolution of the genes involved in the catabolism of sialic acid. Results The cluster of genes encoding the enzymes N-acetylneuraminate lyase (NanA, epimerase (NanE, and kinase (NanK, necessary for the catabolism of sialic acid (the Nan cluster, are confined 46 bacterial species, 42 of which colonize mammals, 33 as pathogens and 9 as gut commensals. We found a putative sialic acid transporter associated with the Nan cluster in most species. We reconstructed the phylogenetic history of the NanA, NanE, and NanK proteins from the 46 species and compared them to the species tree based on 16S rRNA. Within the NanA phylogeny, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria do not form distinct clades. NanA from Yersinia and Vibrio species was most closely related to the NanA clade from eukaryotes. To examine this further, we reconstructed the phylogeny of all NanA homologues in the databases. In this analysis of 83 NanA sequences, Bacteroidetes, a human commensal group formed a distinct clade with Verrucomicrobia, and branched with the Eukaryotes and the Yersinia/Vibrio clades. We speculate that pathogens such as V. cholerae may have acquired NanA from a commensal aiding their colonization of the human gut. Both the NanE and NanK phylogenies more closely represented the species tree but numerous incidences of incongruence are noted. We confirmed the predicted function of the sialic acid catabolism cluster in members the major intestinal pathogens Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, V. vulnificus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pestis. Conclusion The Nan cluster among bacteria is confined to human pathogens and commensals conferring them the ability to utilize a ubiquitous carbon source in mucus rich surfaces of the human body

  1. Synthesis of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine derivatives and their antifungal activities against phytopathogenic fungi in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Peng, Ju-Fang; Bai, Yu-Bin; Wang, Ping; Wang, Tao; Gao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Zun-Ting

    2016-11-01

    5,6-Diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines (3) and 6,7-diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines (4) were chemoselectively synthesized by the condensation of isoflavone (1) and 3-aminopyrazole (2). 5,6-Diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines (3) were obtained via microwave irradiation, and 6,7-diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines (4) were obtained via conventional heating. In addition, the pyrimidine derivatives 3 and 4 were evaluated against five phytopathogenic fungi (Cytospora sp., Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, and Fusarium solani) using the mycelium growth rate method. Some of them were effective in inhibiting the growth of the five phytopathogenic fungi. For instance, 6,7-diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines (4j) inhibited the growth of A. solani with an [Formula: see text] value of 17.11 [Formula: see text], and 6,7-diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines (4h) inhibited the growth of both Cytospora sp. and F. solani with [Formula: see text] values of 27.32 and 21.04 [Formula: see text], respectively. A chemoselective synthesis of 5,6-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines 3 derivatives in excellent yields was performed under microwave irradiation and 6,7-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines 4 were also prepared using heating method. The antifungal properties of 3 and 4 were tested against Cytospora sp., Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, and Fusarium solani.

  2. Distinct Tryptophan Catabolism and Th17/Treg Balance in HIV Progressors and Elite Controllers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Patel, Mital; Kema, Ido; Kanagaratham, Cynthia; Radzioch, Danuta; Thebault, Pamela; Lapointe, Rejean; Tremblay, Cecile; Gilmore, Norbert; Ancuta, Petronela; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) catabolism into immunosuppressive kynurenine (Kyn) by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) was previously linked to Th17/Treg differentiation and immune activation. Here we examined Trp catabolism and its impact on Th17/Treg balance in uninfected healthy subjects (HS) and a large cohor

  3. Epigenetic Regulation of Chondrocyte Catabolism and Anabolism in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeonkyeong; Kang, Donghyun; Cho, Yongsik; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent forms of joint disorder, associated with a tremendous socioeconomic burden worldwide. Various non-genetic and lifestyle-related factors such as aging and obesity have been recognized as major risk factors for OA, underscoring the potential role for epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of the disease. OA-associated epigenetic aberrations have been noted at the level of DNA methylation and histone modification in chondrocytes. These epigenetic regulations are implicated in driving an imbalance between the expression of catabolic and anabolic factors, leading eventually to osteoarthritic cartilage destruction. Cellular senescence and metabolic abnormalities driven by OA-associated risk factors appear to accompany epigenetic drifts in chondrocytes. Notably, molecular events associated with metabolic disorders influence epigenetic regulation in chondrocytes, supporting the notion that OA is a metabolic disease. Here, we review accumulating evidence supporting a role for epigenetics in the regulation of cartilage homeostasis and OA pathogenesis.

  4. CPU-12, a novel synthesized oxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine derivative, showed superior anti-angiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiping; Deng, Ya-Hui; Yang, Ling; Chen, Yijuan; Lawali, Manzo; Sun, Li-Ping; Liu, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a crucial requirement for malignant tumor growth, progression and metastasis. Tumor-derived factors stimulate formation of new blood vessels which actively support tumor growth and spread. Various of drugs have been applied to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. CPU-12, 4-chloro-N-(4-((2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyloxazolo[5,4-d] pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)phenyl)benzamide, is a novel oxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine derivative that showed potent activity in inhibiting VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and ex-vivo. In cell toxicity experiments, CPU-12 significantly inhibited the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation in a dose-dependent manner with a low IC50 value at 9.30 ± 1.24 μM. In vitro, CPU-12 remarkably inhibited HUVEC's migration, chemotactic invasion and capillary-like tube formation in a dose-dependent manner. In ex-vivo, CPU-12 effectively inhibited new microvessels sprouting from the rat aortic ring. In addition, the downstream signalings of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), including the phosphorylation of PI3K, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, were effectively down-regulated by CPU-12. These evidences suggested that angiogenic response via the induction of VEGFR through distinct signal transduction pathways regulating proliferation, migration and tube formation of endothelial cells was significantly inhibited by the novel small molecule compound CPU-12 in vitro and ex-vivo. In conclusion, CPU-12 showed superior anti-angiogenic activity in vitro. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in rabbit eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Justin D; Rochette, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    Sunlight exposure of the eye leads to pathologies including photokeratitis, cortical cataracts, pterygium, actinic conjunctivitis and age-related macular degeneration. It is well established that exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiations leads to DNA damage, mainly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). CPD formation is the principal factor involved in skin cancer. However, the exact mechanism by which sunlight induces ocular pathologies is not well understood. To shed light on this issue, we quantified the CPD formation onto DNA of rabbit ocular cells following UVB exposure. We found that CPDs were induced only in the structures of the ocular anterior chamber (cornea, iris and lens) and were more concentrated in the corneal epithelium. Residual UVB that pass through the cornea are completely absorbed by the anterior layers of the iris. CPDs were also detected in the central portion of the lens that is not protected by the iris (pupil). By determining the UV-induced DNA damage formation in eyes, we showed that anterior ocular structures are a reliable physical barrier that protects the subjacent structures from the toxic effects of UV. Although the corneal epithelium is the structure where most of the CPDs were detected, no cancer is related to solar exposure.

  6. Fenarimol, a Pyrimidine-Type Fungicide, Inhibits Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keimei Oh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The plant steroid hormone brassinosteroids (BRs are important signal mediators that regulate broad aspects of plant growth and development. With the discovery of brassinoazole (Brz, the first specific inhibitor of BR biosynthesis, several triazole-type BR biosynthesis inhibitors have been developed. In this article, we report that fenarimol (FM, a pyrimidine-type fungicide, exhibits potent inhibitory activity against BR biosynthesis. FM induces dwarfism and the open cotyledon phenotype of Arabidopsis seedlings in the dark. The IC50 value for FM to inhibit stem elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the dark was approximately 1.8 ± 0.2 μM. FM-induced dwarfism of Arabidopsis seedlings could be restored by brassinolide (BL but not by gibberellin (GA. Assessment of the target site of FM in BR biosynthesis by feeding BR biosynthesis intermediates indicated that FM interferes with the side chain hydroxylation of BR biosynthesis from campestanol to teasterone. Determination of the binding affinity of FM to purified recombinant CYP90D1 indicated that FM induced a typical type II binding spectrum with a Kd value of approximately 0.79 μM. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the expression level of the BR responsive gene in Arabidopsis seedlings indicated that FM induces the BR deficiency in Arabidopsis.

  7. Biodegradation Ability and Catabolic Genes of Petroleum-Degrading Sphingomonas koreensis Strain ASU-06 Isolated from Egyptian Oily Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Latif Hesham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are serious pollutants and health hazards. In this study, 15 PAHs-degrading bacteria were isolated from Egyptian oily soil. Among them, one Gram-negative strain (ASU-06 was selected and biodegradation ability and initial catabolic genes of petroleum compounds were investigated. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain ASU-06 to published sequences in GenBank database as well as phylogenetic analysis identified ASU-06 as Sphingomonas koreensis. Strain ASU-06 degraded 100, 99, 98, and 92.7% of 100 mg/L naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene within 15 days, respectively. When these PAHs present in a mixed form, the enhancement phenomenon appeared, particularly in the degradation of pyrene, whereas the degradation rate was 98.6% within the period. This is the first report showing the degradation of different PAHs by this species. PCR experiments with specific primers for catabolic genes alkB, alkB1, nahAc, C12O, and C23O suggested that ASU-06 might possess genes for aliphatic and PAHs degradation, while PAH-RHDαGP gene was not detected. Production of biosurfactants and increasing cell-surface hydrophobicity were investigated. GC/MS analysis of intermediate metabolites of studied PAHs concluded that this strain utilized these compounds via two main pathways, and phthalate was the major constant product that appeared in each day of the degradation period.

  8. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses identify a role for chlorophyll catabolism and phytoalexin during Medicago nonhost resistance against Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Gill, Upinder S; Huhman, David; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-08-12

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating foliar disease affecting soybean production worldwide. Understanding nonhost resistance against ASR may provide an avenue to engineer soybean to confer durable resistance against ASR. We characterized a Medicago truncatula-ASR pathosystem to study molecular mechanisms of nonhost resistance. Although urediniospores formed appressoria and penetrated into epidermal cells of M. truncatula, P. pachyrhizi failed to sporulate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the induction of phenylpropanoid, flavonoid and isoflavonoid metabolic pathway genes involved in the production of phytoalexin medicarpin in M. truncatula upon infection with P. pachyrhizi. Furthermore, genes involved in chlorophyll catabolism were induced during nonhost resistance. We further characterized one of the chlorophyll catabolism genes, Stay-green (SGR), and demonstrated that the M. truncatula sgr mutant and alfalfa SGR-RNAi lines showed hypersensitive-response-like enhanced cell death upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. Consistent with transcriptomic analysis, metabolomic analysis also revealed the accumulation of medicarpin and its intermediate metabolites. In vitro assay showed that medicarpin inhibited urediniospore germination and differentiation. In addition, several triterpenoid saponin glycosides accumulated in M. truncatula upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. In summary, using multi-omic approaches, we identified a correlation between phytoalexin production and M. truncatula defense responses against ASR.

  9. Biodegradation ability and catabolic genes of petroleum-degrading Sphingomonas koreensis strain ASU-06 isolated from Egyptian oily soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesham, Abd El-Latif; Mawad, Asmaa M M; Mostafa, Yasser M; Shoreit, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are serious pollutants and health hazards. In this study, 15 PAHs-degrading bacteria were isolated from Egyptian oily soil. Among them, one Gram-negative strain (ASU-06) was selected and biodegradation ability and initial catabolic genes of petroleum compounds were investigated. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain ASU-06 to published sequences in GenBank database as well as phylogenetic analysis identified ASU-06 as Sphingomonas koreensis. Strain ASU-06 degraded 100, 99, 98, and 92.7% of 100 mg/L naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene within 15 days, respectively. When these PAHs present in a mixed form, the enhancement phenomenon appeared, particularly in the degradation of pyrene, whereas the degradation rate was 98.6% within the period. This is the first report showing the degradation of different PAHs by this species. PCR experiments with specific primers for catabolic genes alkB, alkB1, nahAc, C12O, and C23O suggested that ASU-06 might possess genes for aliphatic and PAHs degradation, while PAH-RHDαGP gene was not detected. Production of biosurfactants and increasing cell-surface hydrophobicity were investigated. GC/MS analysis of intermediate metabolites of studied PAHs concluded that this strain utilized these compounds via two main pathways, and phthalate was the major constant product that appeared in each day of the degradation period.

  10. Ectoine-induced proteins in Sinorhizobium meliloti include an Ectoine ABC-type transporter involved in osmoprotection and ectoine catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebbar, Mohamed; Sohn-Bösser, Linda; Bremer, Erhard; Bernard, Théophile; Blanco, Carlos

    2005-02-01

    To understand the mechanisms of ectoine-induced osmoprotection in Sinorhizobium meliloti, a proteomic examination of S. meliloti cells grown in minimal medium supplemented with ectoine was undertaken. This revealed the induction of 10 proteins. The protein products of eight genes were identified by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Five of these genes, with four other genes whose products were not detected on two-dimensional gels, belong to the same gene cluster, which is localized on the pSymB megaplasmid. Four of the nine genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter that was named ehu, for ectoine/hydroxyectoine uptake. This transporter was encoded by four genes (ehuA, ehuB, ehuC, and ehuD) that formed an operon with another gene cluster that contains five genes, named eutABCDE for ectoine utilization. On the basis of sequence homologies, eutABCDE encode enzymes with putative and hypothetical functions in ectoine catabolism. Analysis of the properties of ehuA and eutA mutants suggests that S. meliloti possesses at least one additional ectoine catabolic pathway as well as a lower-affinity transport system for ectoine and hydroxyectoine. The expression of ehuB, as determined by measurements of UidA activity, was shown to be induced by ectoine and hydroxyectoine but not by glycine betaine or by high osmolality.

  11. Molecular characterization of LhpR in control of hydroxyproline catabolism and transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-07-01

    Utilization of hydroxy-l-proline (l-Hyp) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires conversion of l-Hyp to d-Hyp followed by the d-Hyp dehydrogenase pathway; however, the molecular mechanism in control of l-Hyp catabolism and transport was not clear. DNA microarray analysis revealed twelve genes in two adjacent loci that were induced by exogenous l-Hyp and d-Hyp. The first locus includes lhpABFE encoding a Hyp epimerase (LhpA) and d-Hyp dehydrogenase (LhpBEF), while the second locus codes for a putative ABC transporter (LhpPMNO), a protein of unknown function (LhpH), Hyp/Pro racemase (LhpK) and two enzymes in l-Hyp catabolism (LhpC and LhpG). Proximal to these two loci, lhpR encodes a transcriptional regulator of the AraC family. The importance of these genes on l-Hyp catabolism was supported by growth phenotype analysis on knockout mutants. Induction of the lhpA and lhpP promoters by exogenous l-Hyp and d-Hyp was demonstrated by the measurement of β-galactosidase activities from promoter-lacZ fusions in PAO1, and no induction could be detected in the ΔlhpR mutant. Induction of the lhpA promoter by d-Hyp was completely abolished in the lhpA lhpK double mutant devoid of two epimerases, while the induction effect of l-Hyp remained unchanged. The purified His-tagged LhpR binds specifically to the lhp promoter regions, and formation of nucleoprotein complexes is affected by the presence of l-Hyp but not d-Hyp. Putative LhpR binding sites were deduced from serial deletions and comparative genomic sequence analysis. In summary, expression of lhp genes for Hyp catabolism and uptake requires the transcriptional activator LhpR and l-Hyp as the signalling compound.

  12. Catabolism of biomass-derived sugars in fungi and metabolic engineering as a tool for organic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivistoinen, O.

    2013-11-01

    The use of metabolic engineering as a tool for production of biochemicals and biofuels requires profound understanding of cell metabolism. The pathways for the most abundant and most important hexoses have already been studied quite extensively but it is also important to get a more complete picture of sugar catabolism. In this thesis, catabolic pathways of L-rhamnose and D-galactose were studied in fungi. Both of these hexoses are present in plant biomass, such as in hemicellulose and pectin. Galactoglucomannan, a type of hemicellulose that is especially rich in softwood, is an abundant source of D-galactose. As biotechnology is moving from the usage of edible and easily metabolisable carbon sources towards the increased use of lignocellulosic biomass, it is important to understand how the different sugars can be efficiently turned into valuable biobased products. Identification of the first fungal L-rhamnose 1-dehydrogenase gene, which codes for the first enzyme of the fungal catabolic L-rhamnose pathway, showed that the protein belongs to a protein family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. Sugar dehydrogenases oxidising a sugar to a sugar acid are not very common in fungi and thus the identification of the L-rhamnose dehydrogenase gene provides more understanding of oxidative sugar catabolism in eukaryotic microbes. Further studies characterising the L-rhamnose cluster in the yeast Scheffersomyces stipitis including the expression of the L-rhamnonate dehydratase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae finalised the biochemical characterisation of the enzymes acting on the pathway. In addition, more understanding of the regulation and evolution of the pathway was gained. D-Galactose catabolism was studied in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. Two genes coding for the enzymes of the oxido-reductive pathway were identified. Galactitol dehydrogenase is the second enzyme of the pathway converting galactitol to L-xylo-3-hexulose. The galactitol dehydrogenase encoding

  13. Light-induced activation of class II cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafuji, Asako; Biskup, Till; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Kaiser, Gebhard; Batschauer, Alfred; Bacher, Adelbert; Hidema, Jun; Teranishi, Mika; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Schleicher, Erik; Weber, Stefan

    2010-05-04

    Light-induced activation of class II cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyases of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa has been examined by UV/Vis and pulsed Davies-type electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy, and the results compared with structure-known class I enzymes, CPD photolyase and (6-4) photolyase. By ENDOR spectroscopy, the local environment of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor is probed by virtue of proton hyperfine couplings that report on the electron-spin density at the positions of magnetic nuclei. Despite the amino-acid sequence dissimilarity as compared to class I enzymes, the results indicate similar binding motifs for FAD in the class II photolyases. Furthermore, the photoreduction kinetics starting from the FAD cofactor in the fully oxidized redox state, FAD(ox), have been probed by UV/Vis spectroscopy. In Escherichia coli (class I) CPD photolyase, light-induced generation of FADH from FAD(ox), and subsequently FADH(-) from FADH, proceeds in a step-wise fashion via a chain of tryptophan residues. These tryptophans are well conserved among the sequences and within all known structures of class I photolyases, but completely lacking from the equivalent positions of class II photolyase sequences. Nevertheless, class II photolyases show photoreduction kinetics similar to those of the class I enzymes. We propose that a different, but also effective, electron-transfer cascade is conserved among the class II photolyases. The existence of such electron transfer pathways is supported by the observation that the catalytically active fully reduced flavin state obtained by photoreduction is maintained even under oxidative conditions in all three classes of enzymes studied in this contribution.

  14. Catabolism of Branched Chain Amino Acids Supports Respiration but Not Volatile Synthesis in Tomato Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrej Kochevenko; Wagner L.Araújo; Gregory S.Maloney; Denise M.Tieman; Phuc Thi Do; Mark G.Taylor; Harry J.Klee; Alisdair R.Fernie

    2012-01-01

    The branched-chain amino acid transaminases (BCATs) have a crucial role in metabolism of the branched-chain amino acids leucine,isoleucine,and valine.These enzymes catalyze the last step of synthesis and the initial step of degradation of these amino acids.Although the biosynthetic pathways of branched chain amino acids in plants have been extensively investigated and a number of genes have been characterized,their catabolism in plants is not yet completely understood.We previously characterized the branched chain amino acid transaminase gene family in tomato,revealing both the subcellular localization and kinetic properties of the enzymes encoded by six genes.Here,we examined possible functions of the enzymes during fruit development.We further characterized transgenic plants differing in the expression of branched chain amino acid transaminases 1 and 3,evaluating the rates of respiration in fruits deficient in BCAT1 and the levels of volatiles in lines overexpressing either BCAT1 or BCAT3.We quantitatively tested,via precursor and isotope feeding experiments,the importance of the branched chain amino acids and their corresponding keto acids in the formation of fruit volatiles.Our results not only demonstrate for the first time the importance of branched chain amino acids in fruit respiration,but also reveal that keto acids,rather than amino acids,are the likely precursors for the branched chain flavor volatiles.

  15. Distribution of glyphosate and methylphosphonate catabolism systems in soil bacteria Ochrobactrum anthropi and Achromobacter sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, Alexey V; Shushkova, Tatyana V; Zelenkova, Nina F; Vinokurova, Natalya G; Morgunov, Igor G; Ermakova, Inna T; Leontievsky, Alexey A

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial strains capable of utilizing methylphosphonic acid (MP) or glyphosate (GP) as the sole sources of phosphorus were isolated from soils contaminated with these organophosphonates. The strains isolated from MP-contaminated soils grew on MP and failed to grow on GP. One group of the isolates from GP-contaminated soils grew only on MP, while the other one grew on MP and GP. Strains Achromobacter sp. MPS 12 (VKM B-2694), MP degraders group, and Ochrobactrum anthropi GPK 3 (VKM B-2554D), GP degraders group, demonstrated the best degradative capabilities towards MP and GP, respectively, and were studied for the distribution of their organophosphonate catabolism systems. In Achromobacter sp. MPS 12, degradation of MP was catalyzed by C-P lyase incapable of degrading GP (C-P lyase I). Adaptation to growth on GP yielded the strain Achromobacter sp. MPS 12A, which retained its ability to degrade MP via C-P lyase I and was capable of degrading GP with formation of sarcosine, thus suggesting the involvement of a GP-specific C-P lyase II. O. anthropi GPK 3 also degraded MP via C-P lyase I, but degradation of GP in it was initiated by glyphosate oxidoreductase, which was followed by product transformation via the phosphonatase pathway.

  16. Phenomenological model for predicting the catabolic potential of an arbitrary nutrient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaver, Samuel M D; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Guimerà, Roger; Amaral, Luís A Nunes

    2012-01-01

    The ability of microbial species to consume compounds found in the environment to generate commercially-valuable products has long been exploited by humanity. The untapped, staggering diversity of microbial organisms offers a wealth of potential resources for tackling medical, environmental, and energy challenges. Understanding microbial metabolism will be crucial to many of these potential applications. Thermodynamically-feasible metabolic reconstructions can be used, under some conditions, to predict the growth rate of certain microbes using constraint-based methods. While these reconstructions are powerful, they are still cumbersome to build and, because of the complexity of metabolic networks, it is hard for researchers to gain from these reconstructions an understanding of why a certain nutrient yields a given growth rate for a given microbe. Here, we present a simple model of biomass production that accurately reproduces the predictions of thermodynamically-feasible metabolic reconstructions. Our model makes use of only: i) a nutrient's structure and function, ii) the presence of a small number of enzymes in the organism, and iii) the carbon flow in pathways that catabolize nutrients. When applied to test organisms, our model allows us to predict whether a nutrient can be a carbon source with an accuracy of about 90% with respect to in silico experiments. In addition, our model provides excellent predictions of whether a medium will produce more or less growth than another (p<10(-6)) and good predictions of the actual value of the in silico biomass production.

  17. Phenomenological model for predicting the catabolic potential of an arbitrary nutrient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel M D Seaver

    Full Text Available The ability of microbial species to consume compounds found in the environment to generate commercially-valuable products has long been exploited by humanity. The untapped, staggering diversity of microbial organisms offers a wealth of potential resources for tackling medical, environmental, and energy challenges. Understanding microbial metabolism will be crucial to many of these potential applications. Thermodynamically-feasible metabolic reconstructions can be used, under some conditions, to predict the growth rate of certain microbes using constraint-based methods. While these reconstructions are powerful, they are still cumbersome to build and, because of the complexity of metabolic networks, it is hard for researchers to gain from these reconstructions an understanding of why a certain nutrient yields a given growth rate for a given microbe. Here, we present a simple model of biomass production that accurately reproduces the predictions of thermodynamically-feasible metabolic reconstructions. Our model makes use of only: i a nutrient's structure and function, ii the presence of a small number of enzymes in the organism, and iii the carbon flow in pathways that catabolize nutrients. When applied to test organisms, our model allows us to predict whether a nutrient can be a carbon source with an accuracy of about 90% with respect to in silico experiments. In addition, our model provides excellent predictions of whether a medium will produce more or less growth than another (p<10(-6 and good predictions of the actual value of the in silico biomass production.

  18. Effects of a block in cysteine catabolism on energy balance and fat metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomski, Julie; Zhou, James Q; Roman, Heather B; Liu, Xiaojing; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Locasale, Jason W; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insights into the effects of elevated cysteine levels on energy metabolism and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects, we conducted studies in cysteine dioxygenase (Cdo1)-null mice. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the first step of the major pathway for cysteine catabolism. When CDO is absent, tissue and plasma cysteine levels are elevated, resulting in enhanced flux of cysteine through desulfhydration reactions. When Cdo1-null mice were fed a high-fat diet, they gained more weight than their wild-type controls, regardless of whether the diet was supplemented with taurine. Cdo1-null mice had markedly lower leptin levels, higher feed intakes, and markedly higher abundance of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) compared to wild-type control mice, and these differences were not affected by the fat or taurine content of the diet. Thus, reported associations of elevated cysteine levels with greater weight gain and with elevated hepatic Scd1 expression are also seen in the Cdo1-null mouse model. Hepatic accumulation of acylcarnitines suggests impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids in Cdo1-null mice. The strong associations of elevated cysteine levels with excess H2 S production and impairments in energy metabolism suggest that H2 S signaling could be involved.

  19. Lead optimization through VLAK protocol: new annelated pyrrolo-pyrimidine derivatives as antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauria, Antonino; Patella, Chiara; Abbate, Ilenia; Martorana, Annamaria; Almerico, Anna Maria

    2012-09-01

    The chemometric protocol VLAK was applied to predict improvement of the biological activity of pyrrolo-pyrimidine derivatives as anticancer agents, by using the NCI ACAM Database as depository of antitumor drugs with a known mechanism of action. Among the selected compounds two of these showed a good increase in the antitumor activity. These new pyrrolo-pyrimidine compounds were demonstrated effective against the full panels of NCI DTP tumour human cell lines. The derivative 8-[3-(piperidino)propyl]-4,10-dimethyl-9-phenyl-6-(methylsulfanyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimido[1,2-c]pyrrolo[3,2-e]pyrimidin-2(8H)-one reveled efficacious against the leukemia subpanel, in particular the RPMI cell line resulted the most sensitive (pGI(50) = 6.68). Moreover the derivative 7-(3-Chloropropyl)-9-methyl-5-(methylsulfanyl)-8-phenyl-3H-imidazo[1,2-c]pyrrolo[3,2-e]pyrimidin-2(7H)-one showed a good antitumor activity against the leukemia subpanel with a low cytotoxic activity, above all against the HCT11 human tumour cell line. The VLAK protocol revealed a good method to design new molecules with good antitumor activity, starting from low active compounds. Moreover this protocol focused on the pyrrolo-pyrimidine derivatives as useful starting point for further development to obtain more potent antitumor agents.

  20. Chemical modification of the third strand: differential effects on purine and pyrimidine triple helix formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Martin; Arimondo, Paola B; Lacroix, Laurent; Garestier, Thérèse; Klump, Horst; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2002-01-08

    DNA triple helices offer exciting perspectives toward oligonucleotide-directed control of gene expression. Oligonucleotide analogues are routinely used with modifications in either the backbone or the bases to form more stable triple-helical structures or to prevent their degradation in cells. In this article, different chemical modifications are tested in a model system, which sets up a competition between the purine and pyrimidine motifs. For most modifications, the DeltaH degrees of purine triplex formation is close to zero, implying a nearly temperature-independent affinity constant. In contrast, the pyrimidine triplex is strongly favored at lower temperatures. The stabilization induced by modifications previously known to be favorable to the pyrimidine motif was quantified. Interestingly, modifications favorable to the GT motif (propynyl-U and dU replacing T) were also discovered. In a system where two third strands compete for triplex formation, replacement of the GA or GT strand by a pyrimidine strand may be observed at neutral pH upon lowering the temperature. This purine-to-pyrimidine triplex conversion depends on the chemical nature of the triplex-forming strands and the stability of the corresponding triplexes.

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, characterization and antifungal activity of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Peng, Ju-Fang; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zun-Ting

    2016-09-01

    Under microwave radiation, isomers 2-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5-yl)phenols (3) and 2-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)phenols (4) were simultaneously obtained by the condensation of chromones and 3-aminopyrazoles. These two isomers were fully characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and HRMS. In addition, a representative product 5-chloro-2-(2-methyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidin-5-yl)phenol (3e) was further conformed by the single crystal X-ray diffraction. The antifungal abilities of the obtained products 3 and 4 were evaluated against five phytopathogenic fungi (Cytospora sp., Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani and Fusarium solani). The results revealed that 2-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5-yl)phenol (3a) and 4-chloro-2-(2-methylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)phenol (4e) exhibited good antifungal abilities against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides with the IC50 values of 24.90 and 28.28 μg/mL, respectively.

  2. Divergent prebiotic synthesis of pyrimidine and 8-oxo-purine ribonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, Shaun; Nikmal, Arif; Bučar, Dejan-Krešimir; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Szostak, Jack W.; Powner, Matthew W.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding prebiotic nucleotide synthesis is a long standing challenge thought to be essential to elucidating the origins of life on Earth. Recently, remarkable progress has been made, but to date all proposed syntheses account separately for the pyrimidine and purine ribonucleotides; no divergent synthesis from common precursors has been proposed. Moreover, the prebiotic syntheses of pyrimidine and purine nucleotides that have been demonstrated operate under mutually incompatible conditions. Here, we tackle this mutual incompatibility by recognizing that the 8-oxo-purines share an underlying generational parity with the pyrimidine nucleotides. We present a divergent synthesis of pyrimidine and 8-oxo-purine nucleotides starting from a common prebiotic precursor that yields the β-ribo-stereochemistry found in the sugar phosphate backbone of biological nucleic acids. The generational relationship between pyrimidine and 8-oxo-purine nucleotides suggests that 8-oxo-purine ribonucleotides may have played a key role in primordial nucleic acids prior to the emergence of the canonical nucleotides of biology.

  3. Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum by sporulation abolishment and carbon alleviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Xu, Tao [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. However, the cellulose utilization efficiency of C. cellulolyticum still remains very low, impeding its application in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. In this study, two metabolic engineering strategies were exploited to improve cellulose utilization efficiency, including sporulation abolishment and carbon overload alleviation. Results The spo0A gene at locus Ccel_1894, which encodes a master sporulation regulator was inactivated. The spo0A mutant abolished the sporulation ability. In a high concentration of cellulose (50 g/l), the performance of the spo0A mutant increased dramatically in terms of maximum growth, final concentrations of three major metabolic products, and cellulose catabolism. The microarray and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis pathways were up-regulated in the spo0A mutant. Based on this information, a partial isobutanol producing pathway modified from valine biosynthesis was introduced into C. cellulolyticum strains to further increase cellulose consumption by alleviating excessive carbon load. The introduction of this synthetic pathway to the wild-type strain improved cellulose consumption from 17.6 g/l to 28.7 g/l with a production of 0.42 g/l isobutanol in the 50 g/l cellulose medium. However, the spo0A mutant strain did not appreciably benefit from introduction of this synthetic pathway and the cellulose utilization efficiency did not further increase. A technical highlight in this study was that an in vivo promoter strength evaluation protocol was developed using anaerobic fluorescent protein and flow cytometry for C. cellulolyticum. Conclusions In this study, we inactivated the spo0A gene and introduced a heterologous synthetic pathway to manipulate the stress

  4. Common catabolic enzyme patterns in a microplankton community of the Humboldt Current System off northern and central-south Chile: Malate dehydrogenase activity as an index of water-column metabolism in an oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    An extensive subsurface oxygen minimum zone off northern and central-south Chile, associated with the Peru-Chile undercurrent, has important effects on the metabolism of the organisms inhabiting therein. Planktonic species deal with the hypoxic and anoxic environments by relying on biochemical as well as physiological processes related to their anaerobic metabolisms. Here we characterize, for the first time, the potential enzymatic activities involved in the aerobic and anaerobic energy production pathways of microplanktonic organisms (catabolic pathways in the oxygen minimum zone. Malate dehydrogenase had the highest oxidizing activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) in the batch of catabolic enzymatic activities assayed, including potential pyruvate oxidoreductases activity, the electron transport system, and dissimilatory nitrate reductase. Malate dehydrogenase correlated significantly with almost all the enzymes analyzed within and above the oxygen minimum zone, and also with the oxygen concentration and microplankton biomass in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone off Iquique. These results suggest a possible specific pattern for the catabolic activity of the microplanktonic realm associated with the oxygen minimum zone spread along the Humboldt Current System off Chile. We hypothesize that malate dehydrogenase activity could be an appropriate indicator of microplankton catabolism in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas.

  5. Effect of dietary fat saturation and cholesterol on LDL composition and metabolism. In vivo studies of receptor and nonreceptor-mediated catabolism of LDL in cebus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi, R J; Stucchi, A F; Kowala, M C; Hennessy, L K; Hegsted, D M; Schaefer, E J

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which polyunsaturated fats reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) B were investigated in 20 cebus monkeys (Cebus albifrons) fed diets containing corn oil or coconut oil as fat (31% of calories) with or without dietary cholesterol (0.1% by weight) for 3 to 10 years. Coconut-oil feeding compared to corn-oil feeding resulted in significant increases in levels of plasma total cholesterol (176%), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-LDL cholesterol (236%), high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (148%), apo B (78%), and apo A-I (112%). The addition of dietary cholesterol to corn oil compared to corn oil alone resulted in smaller, but significant, increases in levels of total cholesterol (44%), HDL cholesterol (40%), and apo A-I (33%). Although the increases in VLDL-LDL cholesterol were of similar magnitude (52%), they barely failed to reach statistical significance (p less than 0.08), while the changes in apo B levels were negligible. The addition of dietary cholesterol to coconut oil, compared to coconut oil alone, resulted in no significant changes in lipoprotein cholesterol or apoproteins, although levels of VLDL-LDL cholesterol and apo B values increased 22% and 16%, respectively. Although hepatic free cholesterol content was not altered by diet, coconut-oil compared to corn-oil feeding resulted in significant increases in hepatic cholesteryl esters (236%) and triglycerides (325%), the latter increasing still further when dietary cholesterol was added to coconut oil (563%). To further assess the effects of these dietary changes on LDL metabolism, radioiodinated normal and glucosylated LDL kinetics were performed. The production rate of LDL apo B was not altered by diet. With corn-oil feeding, 63% of LDL catabolism was via the receptor-mediated pathway. Coconut-oil compared to corn-oil feeding resulted in a 50% decrease in receptor-mediated LDL apo B fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and a 27% reduction in

  6. Substrate specificity of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases of NP-II family probed by X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Prokofev, I. I.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases, which are widely used in the biotechnological production of nucleosides, have different substrate specificity for pyrimidine nucleosides. An interesting feature of these enzymes is that the three-dimensional structure of thymidine-specific nucleoside phosphorylase is similar to the structure of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase. The three-dimensional structures of thymidine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium and nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis in complexes with a sulfate anion were determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography. An analysis of the structural differences between these enzymes demonstrated that Lys108, which is involved in the phosphate binding in pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, corresponds to Met111 in thymidine phosphorylases. This difference results in a decrease in the charge on one of the hydroxyl oxygens of the phosphate anion in thymidine phosphorylase and facilitates the catalysis through SN2 nucleophilic substitution. Based on the results of X-ray crystallography, the virtual screening was performed for identifying a potent inhibitor (anticancer agent) of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, which does not bind to thymidine phosphorylase. The molecular dynamics simulation revealed the stable binding of the discovered compound—2-pyrimidin-2-yl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid—to the active site of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  7. Engineering a catabolic pathway in plants for the degradation of 1,2-dichloroethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Benitez, Gilda L; Gandia-Herrero, Fernando; Graham, Stuart; Larson, Tony R; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; French, Christopher E; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Bruce, Neil C

    2008-07-01

    Plants are increasingly being employed to clean up environmental pollutants such as heavy metals; however, a major limitation of phytoremediation is the inability of plants to mineralize most organic pollutants. A key component of organic pollutants is halogenated aliphatic compounds that include 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA). Although plants lack the enzymatic activity required to metabolize this compound, two bacterial enzymes, haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA) and haloacid dehalogenase (DhlB) from the bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, have the ability to dehalogenate a range of halogenated aliphatics, including 1,2-DCA. We have engineered the dhlA and dhlB genes into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'Xanthi') plants and used 1,2-DCA as a model substrate to demonstrate the ability of the transgenic tobacco to remediate a range of halogenated, aliphatic hydrocarbons. DhlA converts 1,2-DCA to 2-chloroethanol, which is then metabolized to the phytotoxic 2-chloroacetaldehyde, then chloroacetic acid, by endogenous plant alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, respectively. Chloroacetic acid is dehalogenated by DhlB to produce the glyoxylate cycle intermediate glycolate. Plants expressing only DhlA produced phytotoxic levels of chlorinated intermediates and died, while plants expressing DhlA together with DhlB thrived at levels of 1,2-DCA that were toxic to DhlA-expressing plants. This represents a significant advance in the development of a low-cost phytoremediation approach toward the clean-up of halogenated organic pollutants from contaminated soil and groundwater.

  8. Uracil and beta-alanine degradation in Saccharomyces Kluyveri - discovery of a novel catabolic pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm

    2006-01-01

    ’en i gær og de genetiske forudsætninger for uracil og beta-alanine (BAL) katabolisme i S. kluyveri undersøgt. Evnen til at bruge uracil, dihydrouracil (DHU), beta-ureidopropionate (BUP) og BAL som nitrogenkilde blev studeret i 38 gær arter. Disse var udvalgt, så de dækkede “Saccharomyces komplekset...

  9. Acetone Formation in the Vibrio Family: a New Pathway for Bacterial Leucine Catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek-Marshall, Michele; Wojciechowski, Cheryl; William P. Wagner; Fall, Ray

    1999-01-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of l-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed...

  10. The phn island: A new genomic island encoding catabolism of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William James Hickey

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are key in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, which are widespread environmental pollutants. At least six genotypes of PAH-degraders are distinguishable via phylogenies of the ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (RHD that initiates bacterial PAH metabolism, and a given genotype has a characteristic taxonomic distribution. The latter pattern implies each genotype may have distinct pathways for horizontal gene transfer (HGT. But, while such processes are important in the function of PAH-degrader communities, mechanisms of HGT for most RHD genotypes are unknown. Here, we report in silico and functional analyses of the phenanthrene-degrader Delftia sp. Cs1-4, a representative of the phnAFK2 RHD group. The phnAFK2 genotype predominates PAH degrader communities in some soils and sediments, but, until now, their genomic biology has not been explored. In the present studies, genes for the entire phenanthrene catabolic pathway were discovered on a novel ca. 232 kb genomic island (GEI, now termed the phn island. This GEI had characteristics of an integrative and conjugative element with a mobilization/stabilization system similar to that of SXT/R391-type GEI. But, it could not be grouped with any known GEI, and was the first member of a new GEI class. The island also carried genes predicted to encode: synthesis of quorum sensing signal molecules, fatty acid/polyhydroxyalkonate biosynthesis, a type IV secretory system, a PRTRC system, DNA mobilization functions and > 50 hypothetical proteins. The 50% G+C content of the phn gene cluster differed significantly from the 66.7% G+C level of the island as a whole and the strain Cs1-4 chromosome, indicating a divergent phylogenetic origin for the phn genes. Collectively, these studies added new insights into the genetic elements affecting the PAH biodegradation capacity of microbial communities specifically, and the potential vehicles of HGT in general.

  11. A balanced pyrimidine pool is required for optimal Chk1 activation to prevent ultrafine anaphase bridge formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemble, Simon; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Biard, Denis; Lambert, Sarah; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2016-08-15

    Cytidine deaminase (CDA) deficiency induces an excess of cellular dCTP, which reduces basal PARP-1 activity, thereby compromising complete DNA replication, leading to ultrafine anaphase bridge (UFB) formation. CDA dysfunction has pathological implications, notably in cancer and in Bloom syndrome. It remains unknown how reduced levels of PARP-1 activity and pyrimidine pool imbalance lead to the accumulation of unreplicated DNA during mitosis. We report that a decrease in PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells impairs DNA-damage-induced Chk1 activation, and, thus, the downstream checkpoints. Chemical inhibition of the ATR-Chk1 pathway leads to UFB accumulation, and we found that this pathway was compromised in CDA-deficient cells. Our data demonstrate that ATR-Chk1 acts downstream from PARP-1, preventing the accumulation of unreplicated DNA in mitosis, and, thus, UFB formation. Finally, delaying entry into mitosis is sufficient to prevent UFB formation in both CDA-deficient and CDA-proficient cells, suggesting that both physiological and pathological UFBs are derived from unreplicated DNA. Our findings demonstrate an unsuspected requirement for a balanced nucleotide pool for optimal Chk1 activation both in unchallenged cells and in response to genotoxic stress.

  12. Pyrimidine pool imbalance induced by BLM helicase deficiency contributes to genetic instability in Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabosseau, Pauline; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Lambert, Sarah; Debatisse, Michelle; Brison, Olivier; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2011-06-28

    Defects in DNA replication are associated with genetic instability and cancer development, as illustrated in Bloom syndrome. Features of this syndrome include a slowdown in replication speed, defective fork reactivation and high rates of sister chromatid exchange, with a general predisposition to cancer. Bloom syndrome is caused by mutations in the BLM gene encoding a RecQ helicase. Here we report that BLM deficiency is associated with a strong cytidine deaminase defect, leading to pyrimidine pool disequilibrium. In BLM-deficient cells, pyrimidine pool normalization leads to reduction of sister chromatid exchange frequency and is sufficient for full restoration of replication fork velocity but not the fork restart defect, thus identifying the part of the Bloom syndrome phenotype because of pyrimidine pool imbalance. This study provides new insights into the molecular basis of control of replication speed and the genetic instability associated with Bloom syndrome. Nucleotide pool disequilibrium could be a general phenomenon in a large spectrum of precancerous and cancer cells.

  13. Thiolated pyrimidine nucleotides may interfere thiol groups concentrated at lipid rafts of HIV-1 infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanizsai, Szilvia; Ongrádi, Joseph; Aradi, János; Nagy, Károly

    2014-12-01

    Upon HIV infection, cells become activated and cell surface thiols are present in increased number. Earlier we demonstrated in vitro anti-HIV effect of thiolated pyrimidine nucleotide UD29, which interferes thiol function. To further analyse the redox processes required for HIV-1 entry and infection, toxicity assays were performed using HIV-1 infected monolayer HeLaCD4-LTR/ β-gal cells and suspension H9 T cells treated with several thiolated nucleotide derivatives of UD29. Selective cytotoxicity of thiolated pyrimidines on HIV-1 infected cells were observed. Results indicate that thiolated pyrimidine derivates may interfere with -SH (thiol) groups concentrated in lipid rafts of cell membrane and interacts HIV-1 infected (activated) cells resulting in a selective cytotoxicity of HIV-1 infected cells, and reducing HIV-1 entry.

  14. Nucleobases and Other Prebiotic Species from the UV Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott; Materese, Christopher; Nuevo, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Nucleobases are aromatic N-heterocycles that constitute the informational subunits of DNA and RNA and are divided into two families: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origin confirmed by isotope measurement. Although no N-heterocycles have been individually identified in the ISM, the 6.2-micron interstellar emission feature seen towards many astronomical objects suggests a population of such molecules is likely present. We report on a study of the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including nucleobases and other species of prebiotic interest, from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in low temperature ices containing H2O, NH3, C3OH, and CH4, to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the Solar System.

  15. Microwave assisted synthesis and antimicrobial activity of some novel pyrimidine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. VAGHASIA

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of thiazolo [5,4-d]pyrimidines can be achieved from different 5-thiazolidinones, 2-butyl-1H-imidazole-5-carbaldehyde and thiourea using microwave irradiation within 5 min. The structures of the products were supported by FTIR, PMR and mass spectral data. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the synthesized thiazolo [5,4-d]pyrimidines 1a-j, having substituents at the 1- and 3-positions, were determined by the cup-plate method against several standard strains chosen to define the spectrum and potency of the new compounds. The antimicrobial activities of the thiazolo [5,4-d]pyrimidines 1a-j are compared with those of known chosen standard drugs, viz. ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and griseofulvin.

  16. Arabidopsis CYP94B3 encodes jasmonyl-L-isoleucine 12-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in the oxidative catabolism of jasmonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, Naoki; Matsubara, Takuya; Sato, Michio; Takahashi, Kosaku; Wakuta, Shinji; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hirokazu; Nabeta, Kensuke; Matsuura, Hideyuki

    2011-10-01

    The hormonal action of jasmonate in plants is controlled by the precise balance between its biosynthesis and catabolism. It has been shown that jasmonyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile) is the bioactive form involved in the jasmonate-mediated signaling pathway. However, the catabolism of JA-Ile is poorly understood. Although a metabolite, 12-hydroxyJA-Ile, has been characterized, detailed functional studies of the compound and the enzyme that produces it have not been conducted. In this report, the kinetics of wound-induced accumulation of 12-hydroxyJA-Ile in plants were examined, and its involvement in the plant wound response is described. Candidate genes for the catabolic enzyme were narrowed down from 272 Arabidopsis Cyt P450 genes using Arabidopsis mutants. The candidate gene was functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris to reveal that CYP94B3 encodes JA-Ile 12-hydroxylase. Expression analyses demonstrate that expression of CYP94B3 is induced by wounding and shows specific activity toward JA-Ile. Plants grown in medium containing JA-Ile show higher sensitivity to JA-Ile in cyp94b3 mutants than in wild-type plants. These results demonstrate that CYP94B3 plays a major regulatory role in controlling the level of JA-Ile in plants.

  17. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Studies of Pyrimidine Pyrazole Heterocycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prompted from the diversity of the wider use and being an integral part of genetic material, an effort was made to synthesize pyrimidine pyrazole derivatives of pharmaceutical interest by oxidative cyclization of chalcones with satisfactory yield and purity. A novel series of 1,3-dimethyl-6-hydroxy-2,4-dioxo-5-(1′-phenyl-3′-aryl-1H-pyrazol-5′-yl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidines (5a–d and 1,3-diaryl-6-hydroxy-4-oxo-2-thioxo-5-(1′-phenyl-3′-aryl-1H-pyrazol-5′-yl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidines (5e–l has been synthesized. The structures of these compounds were established on the basis of FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and mass spectral analysis. All the synthesized compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activity against bacteria and fungi. Among all the compounds, 5g was found to be the most active as its MIC was 31.25 µg/mL against S. aureus and B. cereus. The compounds 5h, 5c, and 5e also possess antibacterial activity with MIC values as 62.50, 125.00, and 500.00 µg/mL, respectively. The compounds 5c and 5j were found to have antifungal activity against Aspergillus spp. As antifungal drugs lag behind the antibacterial drugs, therefore we tried in vitro combination of these two compounds with standard antifungal drugs (polyene and azole against Aspergillus spp. The combination of ketoconazole with 5c and 5j showed synergy at 1 : 8 (6.25 : 50.00 µg/mL and 1 : 4 (25 : 100 µg/mL against A. fumigatus (ITCC 4517 and A. fumigatus (VPCI 190/96, respectively.

  18. Identification of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in an antibiotic-producing actinomycete species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Nina; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Sosio, M.

    2004-01-01

    the primary metabolic pathways of the poorly characterized antibiotic-producing actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727. Surprisingly, it was found that Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39272 predominantly metabolizes glucose via the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. This represents the first time that the ED pathway has been...... recognized as the main catabolic pathway in an actinomycete. The Nonomuraea genes encoding the key enzymes of the ED pathway were subsequently identified, sequenced and functionally described....

  19. Catabolism of indole-3-acetic acid and 4- and 5-chloroindole-3-acetic acid in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Egsgaard, H; Van Onckelen, H

    1995-01-01

    Some strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum have the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid. Indoleacetic acid (IAA), 4-chloro-IAA (4-Cl-IAA), and 5-Cl-IAA were metabolized to different extents by strains 61A24 and 110. Metabolites were isolated and analyzed by high-performance liquid...... chromatography and conventional mass spectrometry (MS) methods, including MS-mass spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography-MS. The identified products indicate a novel metabolic pathway in which IAA is metabolized via dioxindole-3-acetic acid, dioxindole, isatin, and 2......-aminophenyl glyoxylic acid (isatinic acid) to anthranilic acid, which is further metabolized. Degradation of 4-Cl-IAA apparently stops at the 4-Cl-dioxindole step in contrast to 5-Cl-IAA which is metabolized to 5-Cl-anthranilic acid. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Oct...

  20. Poly[tetrakis(selenocyanato-κNbis(methanol-κOtris(μ-pyrimidine-κ2N:N′dicobalt(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Wriedt

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Co2(NCSe4(C4H4N23(CH3OH2]n, the CoII ion is coordinated by three N-bonded pyrimidine ligands, two N-bonded selenocyanate anions and one O-bonded methanol molecule in an octahedral coordination mode. The asymmetric unit consists of one CoII ion, one pyrimidine ligand, two selenocyanate anions and one methanol molecule in general positions as well as one pyrimidine ligand located around a twofold rotation axis. In the crystal structure, the pyrimidine ligands bridge [Co(CNSe2(CH3OH] units into zigzag-like chains, which are further connected by pyrimidine ligands into layers parallel to (010.

  1. Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant causes fire blight despite pyrimidine auxotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, L S; Sinn, J P; Lehman, B L; Pfeufer, E E; Peter, K A; McNellis, T W

    2015-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteria cause fire blight disease, which affects apple and pear production worldwide. The Erw. amylovora pyrC gene encodes a predicted dihydroorotase enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here, we discovered that the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant was a uracil auxotroph. Unexpectedly, the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant grew as well as the wild-type in detached immature apple and pear fruits. Fire blight symptoms caused by the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant in immature apple and pear fruits were attenuated compared to those caused by the wild-type. The pyrC244::Tn5 mutant also caused severe fire blight symptoms in apple tree shoots. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type pyrC gene restored prototrophy and symptom induction in apple and pear fruit to the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant. These results suggest that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidine from the host to support bacterial growth and fire blight disease development, although de novo pyrimidine synthesis by Erw. amylovora is required for full symptom development in fruits. Significance and impact of the study: This study provides information about the fire blight host-pathogen interaction. Although the Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant was strictly auxotrophic for pyrimidine, it grew as well as the wild-type in immature pear and apple fruits and caused severe fire blight disease in apple trees. This suggests that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidines from host tissue to support growth and fire blight disease development. This situation contrasts with findings in some human bacterial pathogens, which require de novo pyrimidine synthesis for growth in host blood, for example.

  2. Catabolism of serine by Pediococcus acidilactici and Pediococcus pentosaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmler, Stefan; Bavan, Tharmatha; Oberli, Andrea; Roetschi, Alexandra; Badertscher, René; Guggenbühl, Barbara; Berthoud, Hélène

    2013-02-01

    The ability to produce diacetyl from pyruvate and l-serine was studied in various strains of Pediococcus pentosaceus and Pediococcus acidilactici isolated from cheese. After being incubated on both substrates, only P. pentosaceus produced significant amounts of diacetyl. This property correlated with measurable serine dehydratase activity in cell extracts. A gene encoding the serine dehydratase (dsdA) was identified in P. pentosaceus, and strains that showed no serine dehydratase activity carried mutations that rendered the gene product inactive. A functional dsdA was cloned from P. pentosaceus FAM19132 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme catalyzed the formation of pyruvate from L- and D-serine and was active at low pH and elevated NaCl concentrations, environmental conditions usually present in cheese. Analysis of the amino acid profiles of culture supernatants from dsdA wild-type and dsdA mutant strains of P. pentosaceus did not show differences in serine levels. In contrast, P. acidilactici degraded serine. Moreover, this species also catabolized threonine and produced alanine and α-aminobutyrate.

  3. Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Restrains Systemic Catabolism during Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver is critical for maintaining systemic energy balance during starvation. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation on this process, we generated mice with a liver-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2L−/−, an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. Fasting induced hepatic steatosis and serum dyslipidemia with an absence of circulating ketones, while blood glucose remained normal. Systemic energy homeostasis was largely maintained in fasting Cpt2L−/− mice by adaptations in hepatic and systemic oxidative gene expression mediated in part by Pparα target genes including procatabolic hepatokines Fgf21, Gdf15, and Igfbp1. Feeding a ketogenic diet to Cpt2L−/− mice resulted in severe hepatomegaly, liver damage, and death with a complete absence of adipose triglyceride stores. These data show that hepatic fatty acid oxidation is not required for survival during acute food deprivation but essential for constraining adipocyte lipolysis and regulating systemic catabolism when glucose is limiting.

  4. Lipid catabolism of invertebrate predator indicates widespread wetland ecosystem degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anteau, Michael J.; Afton, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Animals frequently undergo periods when they accumulate lipid reserves for subsequent energetically expensive activities, such as migration or breeding. During such periods, daily lipid-reserve dynamics (DLD) of sentinel species can quantify how landscape modifications affect function, health, and resilience of ecosystems. Aythya affinis (Eyton 1838; lesser scaup; diving duck) are macroinvertebrate predators; they migrate through an agriculturally dominated landscape in spring where they select wetlands with the greatest food density to refuel and accumulate lipid reserves for subsequent reproduction. We index DLD by measuring plasma-lipid metabolites of female scaup (n = 459) that were refueling at 75 spring migration stopover areas distributed across the upper Midwest, USA. We also indexed DLD for females (n = 44) refueling on a riverine site (Pool 19) south of our upper Midwest study area. We found that mean DLD estimates were significantly (Plipid reserves throughout the upper Midwest. Moreover, levels of lipid catabolism are alarming, because scaup use the best quality wetlands available within a given stopover area. Accordingly, these results provide evidence of wetland ecosystem degradation across this large agricultural landscape and document affects that are carried-up through several trophic levels. Interestingly, storing of lipids by scaup at Pool 19 likely reflects similar ecosystem perturbations as observed in the upper Midwest because wetland drainage and agricultural runoff nutrifies the riverine habitat that scaup use at Pool 19. Finally, our results underscore how using this novel technique to monitor DLD, of a carefully selected sentinel species, can index ecosystem health at a landscape scale.

  5. Inactivity amplifies the catabolic response of skeletal muscle to cortisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Stuart, C. A.; Sheffield-Moore, M.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    Severe injury or trauma is accompanied by both hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity or bed rest (BR). Trauma and BR alone each result in a loss of muscle nitrogen, albeit through different metabolic alterations. Although BR alone can result in a 2-3% loss of lean body mass, the effects of severe trauma can be 2- to 3-fold greater. We investigated the combined effects of hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity on muscle protein metabolism in healthy volunteers. Six males were studied before and after 14 days of strict BR using a model based on arteriovenous sampling and muscle biopsy. Fractional synthesis and breakdown rates of skeletal muscle protein were also directly calculated. Each assessment of protein metabolism was conducted during a 12-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (120 microg/kg x h), resulting in blood cortisol concentrations that mimic severe injury (approximately 31 microg/dL). After 14 days of strict BR, hypercortisolemia increased phenylalanine efflux from muscle by 3-fold (P catabolic effects of hypercortisolemia. Furthermore, these effects on healthy volunteers are analogous to those seen after severe injury.

  6. Thyroid hormone stimulates hepatic lipid catabolism via activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; You, Seo-Hee; Zhou, Jin; Siddique, Mobin M; Bay, Boon-Huat; Zhu, Xuguang; Privalsky, Martin L; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Stevens, Robert D; Summers, Scott A; Newgard, Christopher B; Lazar, Mitchell A; Yen, Paul M

    2012-07-01

    For more than a century, thyroid hormones (THs) have been known to exert powerful catabolic effects, leading to weight loss. Although much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms used by TH receptors (TRs) to regulate gene expression, little is known about the mechanisms by which THs increase oxidative metabolism. Here, we report that TH stimulation of fatty acid β-oxidation is coupled with induction of hepatic autophagy to deliver fatty acids to mitochondria in cell culture and in vivo. Furthermore, blockade of autophagy by autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) siRNA markedly decreased TH-mediated fatty acid β-oxidation in cell culture and in vivo. Consistent with this model, autophagy was altered in livers of mice expressing a mutant TR that causes resistance to the actions of TH as well as in mice with mutant nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). These results demonstrate that THs can regulate lipid homeostasis via autophagy and help to explain how THs increase oxidative metabolism.

  7. Increase in sphingolipid catabolic enzyme activity during aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh J SACKET; Hae-young CHUNG; Fumikazu OKAJIMA; Dong-soon IM

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To understand the contribution of sphingolipid metabolism and its metabolites to development and aging.Methods: A systemic analysis on the changes in activity of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes in kidney, liver and brain tissues during development and aging was conducted. The study was conducted using tissues from 1-day-old to 720-day-old rats.Results: Catabolic enzyme activities as well as the level of sphingomyelinase (SMase) and ceramidase (CDase) were higher than that of anabolic enzyme activities, sphingomyelin synthase and ceramide synthase. This suggested an accumulation of ceramide and sphingosine during development and aging. The liver showed the highest neutral-SMase activity among the tested enzymes while the kidney and brain exhibited higher neutral-SMase and ceramidase activities, indicating a high production of ceramide in liver and ceramide/sphingosine in the kidney and brain. The activities of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes were significantly elevated in all tested tissues during development and aging, although the onset of significant increase in activity varied on the tissue and enzyme type. During aging, 18 out of 21 enzyme activities were further increased on day 720 compared to day 180.Conclusion: Differential increases in sphingolipid metabolic enzyme activities suggest that sphingolipids including ceramide and sphingosine might play important and dynamic roles in proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis during development and aging.

  8. A product of heme catabolism modulates bacterial function and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Nobles

    Full Text Available Bilirubin is the terminal metabolite in heme catabolism in mammals. After deposition into bile, bilirubin is released in large quantities into the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI tract. We hypothesized that intestinal bilirubin may modulate the function of enteric bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of bilirubin on two enteric pathogens; enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, a Gram-negative that causes life-threatening intestinal infections, and E. faecalis, a Gram-positive human commensal bacterium known to be an opportunistic pathogen with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. We demonstrate that bilirubin can protect EHEC from exogenous and host-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS through the absorption of free radicals. In contrast, E. faecalis was highly susceptible to bilirubin, which causes significant membrane disruption and uncoupling of respiratory metabolism in this bacterium. Interestingly, similar results were observed for other Gram-positive bacteria, including B. cereus and S. aureus. A model is proposed whereby bilirubin places distinct selective pressure on enteric bacteria, with Gram-negative bacteria being protected from ROS (positive outcome and Gram-positive bacteria being susceptible to membrane disruption (negative outcome. This work suggests bilirubin has differential but biologically relevant effects on bacteria and justifies additional efforts to determine the role of this neglected waste catabolite in disease processes, including animal models.

  9. Catabolism of Phenol and Its Derivatives in Bacteria: Genes, Their Regulation, and Use in the Biodegradation of Toxic Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nešvera, Jan; Rucká, Lenka; Pátek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Phenol and its derivatives (alkylphenols, halogenated phenols, nitrophenols) are natural or man-made aromatic compounds that are ubiquitous in nature and in human-polluted environments. Many of these substances are toxic and/or suspected of mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. Bioremediation of the polluted soil and water using various bacteria has proved to be a promising option for the removal of these compounds. In this review, we describe a number of peripheral pathways of aerobic and anaerobic catabolism of various natural and xenobiotic phenolic compounds, which funnel these substances into a smaller number of central catabolic pathways. Finally, the metabolites are used as carbon and energy sources in the citric acid cycle. We provide here the characteristics of the enzymes that convert the phenolic compounds and their catabolites, show their genes, and describe regulatory features. The genes, which encode these enzymes, are organized on chromosomes and plasmids of the natural bacterial degraders in various patterns. The accumulated data on similarities and the differences of the genes, their varied organization, and particularly, an astonishingly broad range of intricate regulatory mechanism may be read as an exciting adventurous book on divergent evolutionary processes and horizontal gene transfer events inscribed in the bacterial genomes. In the end, the use of this wealth of bacterial biodegradation potential and the manipulation of its genetic basis for purposes of bioremediation is exemplified. It is envisioned that the integrated high-throughput techniques and genome-level approaches will enable us to manipulate systems rather than separated genes, which will give birth to systems biotechnology.

  10. Amino acid efflux by asexual blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and its utility in interrogating the kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Seema; Klemba, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The endocytosis and catabolism of large quantities of host cell hemoglobin is a hallmark of the intraerythrocytic asexual stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is known that the parasite's production of amino acids from hemoglobin far exceeds its metabolic needs. Here, we show that P. falciparum effluxes large quantities of certain non-polar (Ala, Leu, Val, Pro, Phe, Gly) and polar (Ser, Thr, His) amino acids to the external medium. That these amino acids originate from hemoglobin catabolism is indicated by the strong correlation between individual amino acid efflux rates and their abundances in hemoglobin, and the ability of the food vacuole falcipain inhibitor E-64d to greatly suppress efflux rates. We then developed a rapid, sensitive and precise method for quantifying flux through the hemoglobin endocytic-catabolic pathway that is based on leucine efflux. Optimization of the method involved the generation of a novel amino acid-restricted RPMI formulation as well as the validation of D-norvaline as an internal standard. The utility of this method was demonstrated by characterizing the effects of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and dihydroartemisinin on the kinetics of Leu efflux. Both compounds rapidly inhibited Leu efflux, which is consistent with a role for phosphtidylinositol-3-phosphate production in the delivery of hemoglobin to the food vacuole; however, wortmannin inhibition was transient, which was likely due to the instability of this compound in culture medium. The simplicity, convenience and non-invasive nature of the Leu efflux assay described here makes it ideal for characterizing the in vivo kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism, for inhibitor target validation studies, and for medium-throughput screens to identify novel inhibitors of cytostomal endocytosis.

  11. FoxO-dependent atrogenes vary among catabolic conditions and play a key role in muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, Lorenza; Toniolo, Luana; Reggiani, Carlo; Bottinelli, Roberto; Sandri, Marco; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2017-02-15

    Muscle atrophy is a debilitating condition that affects a high percentage of the population with a negative impact on quality of life. Dissecting the molecular level of the atrophy process, and the similarities/dissimilarities among different catabolic conditions, is a necessary step for designing specific countermeasures to attenuate/prevent muscle loss. The FoxO family transcription factors represent one of the most important regulators of atrophy programme stimulating the expression of many atrophy-related genes. The findings of the present study clearly indicate that the signalling network controlling the atrophy programme is specific for each catabolic condition. Muscle atrophy is a complex process that is in common with many different catabolic diseases including disuse/inactivity and ageing. The signalling pathways that control the atrophy programme in the different disuse/inactivity conditions have not yet been completely dissected. The inhibition of FoxO is considered to only partially spare muscle mass after denervation. The present study aimed: (i) to determine the involvement of FoxOs in hindlimb suspension disuse model; (ii) to define whether the molecular events of protein breakdown are shared among different unloaded muscles; and finally (iii) to compare the data obtained in this model with another model of inactivity such as denervation. Both wild-type and muscle-specific FoxO1,3,4 knockout (FoxO1,3,4(-/-) ) mice were unloaded for 3 and 14 days and muscles were characterized by functional, morphological, biochemical and molecular assays. The data obtained show that FoxOs are required for muscle loss and force drop during unloading. Moreover, we found that FoxO-dependent atrogenes vary in different unloaded muscles and that they diverge from denervation. The findings of the present study clearly indicate that the signalling network that controls the atrophy programme is specific for each catabolic condition. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of

  12. Design,Synthesis,and Hypnotic Activity of Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Qing WANG; Lin FANG; Xiu Jie LIU; Kang ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of the Zaleplon structure, novel pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines were designed and prepared for studies on their hypnotic activity.This paper reported the synthesis of twelve new 5-methyl-7-substituted-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3-carbonitrile derivatives by using simple starting materials such as propane dinitrile and triethyl orthoformate.The structures of the derived target compounds were confirmed by their IR and 1H-NMR spectroscopic data.The preliminary pharmacological evaluations indicated that some compounds showed hypnotic activity, while derivative 1c was the most potent one.

  13. Heteroaryl ethers by oxidative palladium catalysis of pyridotriazol-1-yloxy pyrimidines with arylboronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Sujata; Wacharasindhu, Sumrit; Wan, Zhao-Kui; Mansour, Tarek S

    2009-06-18

    The oxidative palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling of pyrimidines containing pyridotriazol-1-yloxy (OPt) as either a urea or an amide functional group with arylboronic acids in the presence of Cs(2)CO(3) in DME containing 0.6-1.0% H(2)O is described for the preparation of heteroaryl ethers. The bromo substitution in the case of 3-(5-bromo-pyrimidin-2-yloxy)-3H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-b]pyridine 1 could serve as a handle for further elaborations such as Suzuki coupling for attaching varied aryl groups.

  14. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid catabolon, a catabolic unit for degradation of biogenic amines tyramine and dopamine in Pseudomonas putida U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos, Mario; Olivera, Elías R; Arias, Sagrario; Naharro, Germán; Luengo, José M

    2010-06-01

    Degradation of tyramine and dopamine by Pseudomonas putida U involves the participation of twenty one proteins organized in two coupled catabolic pathways, Tyn (tynABFEC tynG tynR tynD, 12 338 bp) and Hpa (hpaR hpaBC hpaHI hpaX hpaG1G2EDF hpaA hpaY, 12 722 bp). The Tyn pathway catalyses the conversion of tyramine and dopamine into 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4HPA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4HPA) respectively. Together, the Tyn and Hpa pathways constitute a complex catabolic unit (the 3,4HPA catabolon) in which 3,4HPA is the central intermediate. The genes encoding Tyn proteins are organized in four consecutive transcriptional units (tynABFEC, tynG, tynR and tynD), whereas those encoding Hpa proteins constitute consecutive operons (hpaBC, hpaG1G2EDF, hpaX, hpaHI) and three independent units (hpaA, hpaR and hpaY). Genetic engineering approaches were used to clone tyn and hpa genes and then express them, either individually or in tandem, in plasmids and/or bacterial chromosomes, resulting in recombinant bacterial strains able to eliminate tyramine and dopamine from different media. These results enlarge our biochemical and genetic knowledge of the microbial catabolic routes involved in the degradation of aromatic bioamines. Furthermore, they provide potent biotechnological tools to be used in food processing and fermentation as well as new strategies that could be used for pharmacological and gene therapeutic applications in the near future.

  15. Changes in substrate utilisation and protein catabolism during multiday cycling in well-trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Avidon, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have evaluated substrate utilisation and protein catabolism during multiday strenuous exercise in athletes. Eleven well-trained male cyclists completed 3 h of race-simulated cycling on 4 consecutive days. Cyclist exercised 2 h postprandially and with carbohydrate supplementation (~50 g · h(-1)) during exercise. Whole body substrate utilisation was measured by indirect calorimetry, protein catabolism from sweat and urine urea excretion, and blood metabolite concentration was evaluated. Protein catabolism during exercise was significantly greater on days 2-4 (29.9 ± 8.8; 34.0 ± 11.2; 32.0 ± 7.3 g for days 2, 3, and 4, respectively) compared to day 1 (23.3 ± 7.6 g), P catabolism on all successive days.

  16. Irritability rather than depression during interferon treatment is linked to increased tryptophan catabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, S; Kema, IP; Haagsma, EB; Boon, JC; Willemse, PHB; Den Boer, JA; De Vries, EGE; Korf, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Treatment with recombinant interferon is associated with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. We investigated the relation between catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan, being rate-limiting of peripheral and cerebral serotonin formation, and psychiatric symptoms in patients

  17. House sparrows (Passer domesticus) increase protein catabolism in response to water restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Alexander R; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2011-04-01

    Birds primarily rely on fat for energy during fasting and to fuel energetically demanding activities. Proteins are catabolized supplemental to fat, the function of which in birds remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that birds may increase the catabolism of body protein under dehydrating conditions as a means to maintain water balance, because catabolism of wet protein yields more total metabolic and bound water (0.155·H(2)O(-1)·kJ(-1)) than wet lipids (0.029 g·H(2)O(-1)·kJ(-1)). On the other hand, protein sparing should be important to maintain function of muscles and organs. We used quantitative magnetic resonance body composition analysis and hygrometry to investigate the effect of water restriction on fat and lean mass catabolism during short-term fasting at rest and in response to a metabolic challenge (4-h shivering) in house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Water loss at rest and during shivering was compared with water gains from the catabolism of tissue. At rest, water-restricted birds had significantly greater lean mass loss, higher plasma uric acid concentration, and plasma osmolality than control birds. Endogenous water gains from lean mass catabolism offset losses over the resting period. Water restriction had no effect on lean mass catabolism during shivering, as water gains from fat oxidation appeared sufficient to maintain water balance. These data provide direct evidence supporting the hypothesis that water stress can increase protein catabolism at rest, possibly as a metabolic strategy to offset high rates of evaporative water loss.

  18. Effect of gold nanoparticles and ciprofloxacin on microbial catabolism: a community-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kela P; Petersen, Elijah J; Bissegger, Sonja; Koch, Iris; Zhang, Jun; Reimer, Kenneth J; Rehmann, Lars; Slawson, Robin M; Legge, Raymond L; O'Carroll, Denis M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and ciprofloxacin on the catabolism of microbial communities was assessed. This was accomplished through an ex situ methodology designed to give a priori knowledge on the potential for nanoparticles, or other emerging contaminants, to affect the catabolic capabilities of microbial communities in the environment. Microbial communities from a variety of sources were incubated with 31 prespecified carbon sources and either National Institute of Standards and Technology reference material 10-nm AuNPs or ciprofloxacin on 96-well microtiter plates. From the ciprofloxacin study, dose-response curves were generated and exemplified how this method can be used to assess the effect of a toxicant on overall catabolic capabilities of microbial communities. With 10-nm AuNPs at concentrations ranging from 0.01 µg/mL to 0.5 µg/mL, rhizosphere communities from Typha roots were only slightly catabolically inhibited at a single concentration (0.05 µg/mL); no effects were seen on wetland water communities, and a minor positive (i.e., enhanced catabolic capabilities) effect was observed for loamy soil communities. This positive effect might have been because of a thin layer of citrate found on these AuNPs that initiated cometabolism with some of the carbon sources studied. Under the conditions considered, the possible adverse effects of AuNPs on the catabolic capabilities of microbial communities appears to be minimal. © 2013 SETAC.

  19. The Renaissance of Metal-Pyrimidine Nucleobase Coordination Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Bernhard; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J

    2016-08-16

    The significance of metal ions for the function and properties of DNA and RNA, long seen primarily under biological aspects and medicinal uses, has recently gained a renewed momentum. This is a consequence of the advent of novel applications in the fields of materials science, biotechnology, and analytical sensor chemistry that relate to the designed incorporation of transition metal ions into nucleic acid base pairs. Ag(+) and Hg(2+) ions, binding to pyrimidine (pym) nucleobases, represent major players in this development. Interestingly, these metal ions were the ones that some 60 years ago started the field! At the same time, the mentioned metal ions had demonstrated a "special relationship" with the pym nucleobases cytosine, thymine, and uracil! Parallel work conducted with oligonucleotides and model nucleobases fostered numerous significant details of these interactions, in particular when X-ray crystallography was involved, correcting earlier views occasionally. Our own activities during the past three to four decades have focused on, among others, the coordination chemistry of transition and main-group metal ions with pym model nucleobases, with an emphasis on Pt(II) and Pd(II). It has always been our goal to deduce, if possible, the potential relevance of our findings for biological processes. It is interesting to put our data, in particular for trans-a2Pt(II) (a = NH3 or amine), into perspective with those of other metal ions, notably Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Irrespective of major differences in kinetics and lability/inertness between d(8) and d(10) metal ions, there is also a lot of similarity in structural aspects as a result of the preferred linear coordination geometry of these species. Moreover, the apparent clustering of metal ions to the pym nucleobases, which is presumably essential for the formation of nanoclusters on oligonucleotide scaffolds, is impressively reflected in model systems, as are reasons for inter-nucleobase cross-links containing more

  20. Degradation of Benzene by Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2 and 1YB2 Is Catalyzed by Enzymes Encoded in Distinct Catabolism Gene Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima-Morales, Daiana; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Jáuregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2, a benzene and toluene degrader, and Pseudomonas veronii 1YB2, a benzene degrader, have previously been shown to be key players in a benzene-contaminated site. These strains harbor unique catabolic pathways for the degradation of benzene comprising a gene cluster encoding an isopropylbenzene dioxygenase where genes encoding downstream enzymes were interrupted by stop codons. Extradiol dioxygenases were recruited from gene clusters comprising genes encoding a 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase necessary for benzene degradation but typically absent from isopropylbenzene dioxygenase-encoding gene clusters. The benzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase-encoding gene was not clustered with any other aromatic degradation genes, and the encoded protein was only distantly related to dehydrogenases of aromatic degradation pathways. The involvement of the different gene clusters in the degradation pathways was suggested by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. PMID:26475106

  1. Substrate Specificity of Atrazine Chlorohydrolase and Atrazine-Catabolizing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Gilbert; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial atrazine catabolism is initiated by the enzyme atrazine chlorohydrolase (AtzA) in Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Other triazine herbicides are metabolized by bacteria, but the enzymological basis of this is unclear. Here we begin to address this by investigating the catalytic activity of AtzA by using substrate analogs. Purified AtzA from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP catalyzed the hydrolysis of an atrazine analog that was substituted at the chlorine substituent by fluorine. AtzA did not catalyze the hydrolysis of atrazine analogs containing the pseudohalide azido, methoxy, and cyano groups or thiomethyl and amino groups. Atrazine analogs with a chlorine substituent at carbon 2 and N-alkyl groups, ranging in size from methyl to t-butyl, all underwent dechlorination by AtzA. AtzA catalyzed hydrolytic dechlorination when one nitrogen substituent was alkylated and the other was a free amino group. However, when both amino groups were unalkylated, no reaction occurred. Cell extracts were prepared from five strains capable of atrazine dechlorination and known to contain atzA or closely homologous gene sequences: Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, Rhizobium strain PATR, Alcaligenes strain SG1, Agrobacterium radiobacter J14a, and Ralstonia picketti D. All showed identical substrate specificity to purified AtzA from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Cell extracts from Clavibacter michiganensis ATZ1, which also contains a gene homologous to atzA, were able to transform atrazine analogs containing pseudohalide and thiomethyl groups, in addition to the substrates used by AtzA from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. This suggests that either (i) another enzyme(s) is present which confers the broader substrate range or (ii) the AtzA itself has a broader substrate range. PMID:11010866

  2. Genetic diversity of arginine catabolic mobile element in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Miragaia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone USA300 contains a novel mobile genetic element, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME, that contributes to its enhanced capacity to grow and survive within the host. Although ACME appears to have been transferred into USA300 from S. epidermidis, the genetic diversity of ACME in the latter species remains poorly characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess the prevalence and genetic diversity of ACME, 127 geographically diverse S. epidermidis isolates representing 86 different multilocus sequence types (STs were characterized. ACME was found in 51% (65/127 of S. epidermidis isolates. The vast majority (57/65 of ACME-containing isolates belonged to the predominant S. epidermidis clonal complex CC2. ACME was often found in association with different allotypes of staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec which also encodes the recombinase function that facilities mobilization ACME from the S. epidermidis chromosome. Restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR scanning and DNA sequencing allowed for identification of 39 distinct ACME genetic variants that differ from one another in gene content, thereby revealing a hitherto uncharacterized genetic diversity within ACME. All but one ACME variants were represented by a single S. epidermidis isolate; the singular variant, termed ACME-I.02, was found in 27 isolates, all of which belonged to the CC2 lineage. An evolutionary model constructed based on the eBURST algorithm revealed that ACME-I.02 was acquired at least on 15 different occasions by strains belonging to the CC2 lineage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ACME-I.02 in diverse S. epidermidis isolates were nearly identical in sequence to the prototypical ACME found in USA300 MRSA clone, providing further evidence for the interspecies transfer of ACME from S. epidermidis into USA300.

  3. Morphine enhances purine nucleotide catabolism in rive and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang LIU; Jian-kai LIU; Mu-jie KAN; Lin GAO; Hai-ying FU; Hang ZHOU; Min HONG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect and mechanism of morphine on purine nucleotide catabolism. Methods: The rat model of morphine dependence and withdrawal and rat C6 glioma cells in culture were used. Concentrations of uric acid in the plasma were measured by the uricase-rap method, adenosine deaminase (ADA) and xan- thine oxidase (XO) in the plasma and tissues were measured by the ADA and XO test kit. RT-PCR and RT-PCR-Southern blotting were used to examine the relative amount of ADA and XO gene transcripts in tissues and C6 cells. Results: (i) the concentration of plasma uric acid in the morphine-administered group was signifi-cantly higher (P<0.05) than the control group; (ii) during morphine administration and withdrawal periods, the ADA and XO concentrations in the plasma increased significantly (P<0.05); (iii) the amount of ADA and XO in the parietal lobe, liver, small intestine, and skeletal muscles of the morphine-administered groups increased, while the level of ADA and XO in those tissues of the withdrawal groups decreased; (iv) the transcripts of the ADA and XO genes in the parietal lobe, liver, small intestine, and skeletal muscles were higher in the morphine-administered group. The expression of the ADA and XO genes in those tissues returned to the control level during morphine withdrawal, with the exception of the skeletal muscles; and (v) the upregulation of the expression of the ADA and XO genes induced by morphine treatment could be reversed by naloxone. Conclusion: The effects of morphine on purine nucleotide metabolism might be an important, new biochemical pharmacological mechanism of morphine action.

  4. New insights into {gamma}-aminobutyric acid catabolism: Evidence for {gamma}-hydroxybutyric acid and polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Benoît; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Lepoutre, Jean-Paul; Rossignol, Tristan; Blondin, Bruno; Dequin, Sylvie; Camarasa, Carole

    2009-07-01

    The gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) shunt, an alternative route for the conversion of alpha-ketoglutarate to succinate, involves the glutamate decarboxylase Gad1p, the GABA transaminase Uga1p and the succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase Uga2p. This pathway has been extensively described in plants and animals, but its function in yeast remains unclear. We show that the flux through Gad1p is insignificant during fermentation in rich sugar-containing medium, excluding a role for this pathway in redox homeostasis under anaerobic conditions or sugar stress. However, we found that up to 4 g of exogenous GABA/liter was efficiently consumed by yeast. We studied the fate of this consumed GABA. Most was converted into succinate, with a reaction yield of 0.7 mol/mol. We also showed that a large proportion of GABA was stored within cells, indicating a possible role for this molecule in stress tolerance mechanisms or nitrogen storage. Furthermore, based on enzymatic and metabolic evidence, we identified an alternative route for GABA catabolism, involving the reduction of succinate-semialdehyde into gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and the polymerization of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid to form poly-(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-4-hydroxybutyric acid). This study provides the first demonstration of a native route for the formation of this polymer in yeast. Our findings shed new light on the GABA pathway and open up new opportunities for industrial applications.

  5. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  6. The Photochemistry of Pyrimidine in Pure H2O Ice Subjected to Different Radiation Environments and the Formation of Uracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuevo, M.; Chen, Y.-J.; Materese. C. K..; Hu, W.-J.; Qiu, J.-M.; Wu, S.-R.; Fung, H.-S.; Sandford, S. A.; Chu, C.-C.; Yih, T.-S.; Wu, R.; Ip, W.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleobases are N-heterocycles which are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. They include pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in several meteorites, although no Nheterocycles have been observed in space to data. Laboratory experiments showed that the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ice at low temperature (<=20 K) leads to the formation of pyrimidine derivatives including the nucleobase uracil and its precursor 4(3H)-pyrimidone. These results were confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. When pyrimidine is mixed with combinations of H2O, NH3, CH3OH, and CH4 ices under similar conditions, uracil and cytosine are formed. In the present work we study the formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil from the irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O ice with high-energy UV photons (Lyman , He I, and He II lines) provided by a synchrotron source. The photo-destruction of pyrimidine in these H2O ices as well as the formation yields for 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil are compared with our previous results in order to study the photo-stability of pyrimidine and the production efficiency of uracil as a function of the photon energy.

  7. Novel inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth based on modified pyrimidine nucleosides and their analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmalenyuk, E. R.; Kochetkov, S. N.; Alexandrova, L. A.

    2013-09-01

    The review summarizes data on the synthesis and antituberculosis activity of pyrimidine nucleoside derivatives and their analogues. Enzymes from M. tuberculosis as promising targets for prototypes of new-generation drugs are considered. Nucleosides as inhibitors of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains are characterized. The bibliography includes 101 references.

  8. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of imidazo [1,2-a] pyrimidine derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Pei Zhou; Yi Wei Ding; Hui Bin Zhang; Lian Xu; Yue Dai

    2008-01-01

    A series of imidazo [1,2-a] pyrimidine derivatives substituted adjacently with two aryls at positions 2 and 3 were designed and synthesized in order to improve their anti-inflammatory activities. Biological tests suggested that these compounds have antiinflammatory activities with COX-2 selectivity to some extent.

  9. Ring transformations in reactions of pyrimidine and N-alkyl-pyridinium salts with nucleophiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostveen, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    Paper IOn treatment with liquid ammonia at -33°C, the quaternary pyrimidinium salts, i.e. 1-methylpyrimidinium methyl sulfate, 1,2-dimethylpyrimidinium iodide, 1,4,6-trimethyl-pyrimidinium iodide and 1,2,4,6-tetramethylpyrimidinium iodide demethylate yielding pyrimidine. 2-methyl-, 4,6-dimethyl- and

  10. Quantifying the effects of halogen bonding by haloaromatic donors on the acceptor pyrimidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Thomas L; Reves, Peyton L; Simms, Briana L; Wilson, Jamey L; Watkins, Davita L; Tschumper, Gregory S; Hammer, Nathan I

    2017-02-28

    The effects of intermolecular interactions by a series of haloaromatic halogen bond donors on the normal modes and chemical shifts of the acceptor pyrimidine are investigated by Raman and NMR spectroscopies and electronic structure computations. Halogen bond interactions with pyrimidine's nitrogen atoms shift normal modes to higher energy and shift 1H and 13C NMR peaks upfield in adjacent nuclei. This perturbation of vibrational normal modes is reminiscent of the effects of hydrogen bonded networks of water, methanol, or silver on pyrimidine. The unexpected observation of vibrational red shifts and downfield 13C NMR shifts in some complexes suggests that other intermolecular forces such as pi-interactions are competing with halogen bonding. Natural bond orbital analyses indicate a wide range of charge transfer from pyrimidine to different haloaromatic donors is possible and computed halogen bond binding energies can be larger than a typical hydrogen bond. These results emphasize the importance in strategic selection of substituents and electron withdrawing groups in developing supramolecular structures based on halogen bonding.

  11. Rapid and efficient synthesis of fused heterocyclic pyrimidines under ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosslemin, Mohammad Hossein; Nateghi, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Some fused heterocyclic pyrimidines have been synthesized in high yields using ultrasound irradiation in a one-pot, three-component and efficient process by condensation reaction of barbituric acids, aldehydes and a series of enamines in water. Prominent among the advantages of this new method are operational simplicity, good yields in short reaction times and easy work-up procedures employed.

  12. Removal of pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated spores of Dictyostelium discoideum during germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okaichi, K.; Tano, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Nozu, K.

    1985-06-01

    The spores of Dictyostelium discoideum TW-8 (radC) are about twice as sensitive to UV than the parental strain NC-4 spores at a 10% survival level. Ultraviolet irradiation apparently suppressed the emergence of amoebae from swollen TW-8 spores as compared with NC-4 spores, though the conversion of spores into swollen spores was not affected by UV irradiation in either strain. About 85% removal of pyrimidine dimers was detected in UV-irradiated NC-4 spores at 200 J/m/sup 2/ during spore germination for 9 h, but no removal of pyrimidine dimers was detected in TW-8 spores under the same conditions. The removal of pyrimidine dimers from the NC-4 spores began at around 2 h germination when the spores have become swollen. The number of enzyme-sensitive sites (ESS) detected by Micrococcus luteus endonuclease in the DNA of UV-irradiated NC-4 spores also began to decrease at about 2 h into germination. The decrease in ESS, however, was hardly detectable in UV-irradiated TW-8 spores at any step during germination. Cycloheximide inhibited both decrease in the number of pyrimidine dimers, and decrease in the number of ESS of UV-irradiated NC-4 spores. It is suggested that UV-specific endonuclease is newly synthesized in swollen spores of NC-4. (author).

  13. Formation of Nucleobases from the UV Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleobases are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. They consist of Nheterocycles that belong to either the pyrimidine-base group (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) or the purinebase group (adenine and guanine). Several nucleobases, mostly purine bases, have been detected in meteorites [1-3], with isotopic signatures consistent with an extraterrestrial origin [4]. Uracil is the only pyrimidine-base compound formally reported in meteorites [2], though the presence of cytosine cannot be ruled out [5,6]. However, the actual process by which the uracil was made and the reasons for the non-detection of thymine in meteorites have yet to be fully explained. Although no N-heterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM [7,8], the positions of the 6.2-µm interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present [9]. In this work we study the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including the three nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in ices consisting of several combinations of H(sub2)O, NH(sub3), CH(sub3)OH, and CH(sub4) at low temperature, in order to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the interstellar medium, in the protosolar nebula, and on icy bodies of the Solar System.

  14. An efficient and green preparation of 5-aminophosphonate substituted pyrimidine nucleosides under solvent-free conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Ying Zhang; Ying Ying Qu; Xue Sen Fan

    2010-01-01

    An environmentally benign and highly efficient one-pot preparation of α-aminophosphonates under solvent-free conditions was developed.By employing this method,5-aminophosphonate substituted pyrimidine nucleosides were synthesized in good to excellent yields starting from 5-formyl-2'-deoxyuridine,aniline and dimethylphosphite.

  15. An Efficient and Facile Methodology for Bromination of Pyrimidine and Purine Nucleosides with Sodium Monobromoisocyanurate (SMBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Stromberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and facile strategy has been developed for bromination of nucleosides using sodium monobromoisocyanurate (SMBI. Our methodology demonstrates bromination at the C-5 position of pyrimidine nucleosides and the C-8 position of purine nucleosides. Unprotected and also several protected nucleosides were brominated in moderate to high yields following this procedure.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of new 4,6-disubstituted pyrimidine, pyrazoline, and pyran derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiz, Mahmoud M M; El-Sayed, Wael A; El-Tantawy, Asmaa I; Abdel-Rahman, Adel A-H

    2010-05-01

    A number of new 2,6-didisubstituted pyrimidine, pyrazoline, and pyran derivatives were synthesized starting from their chalcone derivative. The synthesized compounds displayed different degrees of antimicrobial activity against Bscillus subtilis (Gram-positive), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Gram-negative), and Streptomyces species (Actinomycetes).

  17. Tumour radiosensitization with the halogenated pyrimidines 5'-bromo-and 5'-iododeoxyuridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, A.H.; Cook, J.A.; Goffman, T. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)); Glatstein, E. (Texas Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Southwestern Medical Center)

    1993-02-01

    The authors review studies of the use of iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) and bromodeoxyuridine as radiosensitizers and attempt to correlate the clinical outcome for patients treated with radiation and IdUrd with the extent of halogenated pyrimidine cellular uptake and incorporation. (U.K.).

  18. Inwerking van stikstofhoudende nucleofielen op enige 15N-gemerkte pyrimidine- en chinazolinederivaten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, A.P.

    1974-01-01

    In this thesis an investigation is described on the mechanism of aminations of pyrimidine- and quinazoline derivatives with nitrogen containing bases.In the introduction a survey is given of investigations, reported in the literature, concerning σ-complex formation on azahetarenes and their derivati

  19. Zebrafish 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 is important for glucocorticoid catabolism in stress response.

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    Janina Tokarz

    Full Text Available Stress, the physiological reaction to a stressor, is initiated in teleost fish by hormone cascades along the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal (HPI axis. Cortisol is the major stress hormone and contributes to the appropriate stress response by regulating gene expression after binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. Cortisol is inactivated when 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD type 2 catalyzes its oxidation to cortisone. In zebrafish, Danio rerio, cortisone can be further reduced to 20β-hydroxycortisone. This reaction is catalyzed by 20β-HSD type 2, recently discovered by us. Here, we substantiate the hypothesis that 20β-HSD type 2 is involved in cortisol catabolism and stress response. We found that hsd11b2 and hsd20b2 transcripts were up-regulated upon cortisol treatment. Moreover, a cortisol-independent, short-term physical stressor led to the up-regulation of hsd11b2 and hsd20b2 along with several HPI axis genes. The morpholino-induced knock down of hsd20b2 in zebrafish embryos revealed no developmental phenotype under normal culture conditions, but prominent effects were observed after a cortisol challenge. Reporter gene experiments demonstrated that 20β-hydroxycortisone was not a physiological ligand for the zebrafish glucocorticoid or mineralocorticoid receptor but was excreted into the fish holding water. Our experiments show that 20β-HSD type 2, together with 11β-HSD type 2, represents a short pathway in zebrafish to rapidly inactivate and excrete cortisol. Therefore, 20β-HSD type 2 is an important enzyme in stress response.

  20. Increased ophthalmic acid production is supported by amino acid catabolism under fasting conditions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Sho; Lee, Jaeyong; Takao, Toshifumi; Fujii, Junichi

    2017-09-23

    Glutathione (GSH) plays pivotal roles in antioxidation and detoxification. The transsulfuration pathway, in conjunction with methionine metabolism, produces equimolar amounts of cysteine (Cys) and 2-oxobutyric acid (2OB). The resulting 2OB is then converted into 2-aminobutyric acid (2AB) by a transaminase and is utilized as a substitute for Cys by the GSH-synthesizing machinery to produce ophthalmic acid (OPT). By establishing a method for simultaneously measuring Cys, GSH, and OPT by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found that fasting causes an elevation in OPT levels in the liver and blood plasma, even though the levels of Cys and GSH are decreased. Autophagy was activated, but the levels of GSH/OPT-synthesizing enzymes remained unchanged. After 6 h of fasting, the mice were given 1% 2AB and/or 5% glucose in the drinking water for an additional 24 h and the above metabolites analyzed. 2AB administration caused an increase in OPT levels, and, when glucose was co-administered with 2AB, the levels of OPT were elevated further but GSH levels were decreased somewhat. These results suggest that, while Cys is utilized for glyconeogenesis under fasting conditions, reaching levels that were insufficient for the synthesis of GSH, 2OB was preferentially converted to 2AB via amino acid catabolism and was utilized as a building block for OPT. Thus the consumption of Cys and the parallel elevation of 2AB under fasting conditions appeared to force γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase to form γ-glutamyl-2AB, despite the fact that the enzyme has a higher Km value for 2AB than Cys. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The enzymology of cytosolic pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidases: functional analysis and physiopathological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Giulio; Amici, Adolfo; Orsomando, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, cellular 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT) activity (EC 3.1.3.5) encompasses a number of genetically and structurally distinct enzyme forms, either membrane-bound or soluble, mainly cytosolic, that are characterized by broad specificity towards nucleoside 5'-monophosphate substrates differing in base (purine/pyrimidine) and/or sugar (oxy/deoxy-ribose) moieties. In particular, among the cytosolic 5'-NTs active towards pyrimidine nucleotides are cN-III and cdN, ubiquitously distributed in mammalian tissues and treated as a single entity in the early days. cN-III was first linked to a genetic defect , hereditary pyrimidine nucleotidase deficiency, associated to a nonspherocyt ic hemolytic anemia disorder of still unclear mechanism but metabolically characterized by abnormally high levels of pyrimidine compounds and ribonucleoproteins in erythrocytes, as evidenced by occurrence of basophilic stippling on blood smearings. Since the first review on pyrimidine-specific nucleotidases (Amici, A.; Magni, G., Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 2002, 397(2), 184- 190), excellent overviews on the topic appeared in the literature. In the present contribution, the major findings on these two enzymatic proteins, cN-III and cdN, will be described with particular emphasis on the relationships between their structure and function, as well as on their roles in normal and pathological conditions. The catalytic mechanism of both specific hydrolytic and phosphotransferase activities, possessed by both enzymes, will be discussed also in the light of recent solution of both cN-III and cdN three-dimensional structures. This review also focuses on possible therapeutic approaches involving cellular 5'-NTs in detoxifying common antiviral and antineoplastic drugs.

  2. Medicinal attributes of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine based scaffold derivatives targeting kinases as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser S.M. Ismail

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrazolo pyrimidines are fused heterocyclic ring systems which known as bioisosteres of adenine, that are necessary for every aspect of cell life. Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines derivatives have been explored for their inhibitory activity towards a variety of protein kinase enzymes and their function as anticancer agents. This review to the best of our knowledge is the first assemblage on synthesis and medicinal aspects including structure activity relationships of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines reported to date.

  3. Homeostatic imbalance of purine catabolism in first-episode neuroleptic-naïve patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jeffrey K; Dougherty, George G; Reddy, Ravinder D; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Montrose, Debra M; Matson, Wayne R; McEvoy, Joseph; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2010-03-03

    Purine catabolism may be an unappreciated, but important component of the homeostatic response of mitochondria to oxidant stress. Accumulating evidence suggests a pivotal role of oxidative stress in schizophrenia pathology. Using high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with a coulometric multi-electrode array system, we compared 6 purine metabolites simultaneously in plasma between first-episode neuroleptic-naïve patients with schizophrenia (FENNS, n = 25) and healthy controls (HC, n = 30), as well as between FENNS at baseline (BL) and 4 weeks (4w) after antipsychotic treatment. Significantly higher levels of xanthosine (Xant) and lower levels of guanine (G) were seen in both patient groups compared to HC subjects. Moreover, the ratios of G/guanosine (Gr), uric acid (UA)/Gr, and UA/Xant were significantly lower, whereas the ratio of Xant/G was significantly higher in FENNS-BL than in HC. Such changes remained in FENNS-4w with exception that the ratio of UA/Gr was normalized. All 3 groups had significant correlations between G and UA, and Xan and hypoxanthine (Hx). By contrast, correlations of UA with each of Xan and Hx, and the correlation of Xan with Gr were all quite significant for the HC but not for the FENNS. Finally, correlations of Gr with each of UA and G were significant for both HC and FENNS-BL but not for the FENNS-4w. During purine catabolism, both conversions of Gr to G and of Xant to Xan are reversible. Decreased ratios of product to precursor suggested a shift favorable to Xant production from Xan, resulting in decreased UA levels in the FENNS. Specifically, the reduced UA/Gr ratio was nearly normalized after 4 weeks of antipsychotic treatment. In addition, there are tightly correlated precursor and product relationships within purine pathways; although some of these correlations persist across disease or medication status, others appear to be lost among FENNS. Taken together, these results suggest that the potential for steady formation of

  4. Imbalanced protein expression patterns of anabolic, catabolic, anti-catabolic and inflammatory cytokines in degenerative cervical disc cells: new indications for gene therapeutic treatments of cervical disc diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demissew S Mern

    Full Text Available Degenerative disc disease (DDD of the cervical spine is common after middle age and can cause loss of disc height with painful nerve impingement, bone and joint inflammation. Despite the clinical importance of these problems, in current publications the pathology of cervical disc degeneration has been studied merely from a morphologic view point using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, without addressing the issue of biological treatment approaches. So far a wide range of endogenously expressed bioactive factors in degenerative cervical disc cells has not yet been investigated, despite its importance for gene therapeutic approaches. Although degenerative lumbar disc cells have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches, the quantities of disc cells and the concentrations of gene therapeutic factors used in animal models differ extremely. These indicate lack of experimentally acquired data regarding disc cell proliferation and levels of target proteins. Therefore, we analysed proliferation and endogenous expression levels of anabolic, catabolic, ant-catabolic, inflammatory cytokines and matrix proteins of degenerative cervical disc cells in three-dimensional cultures. Preoperative MRI grading of cervical discs was used, then grade III and IV nucleus pulposus (NP tissues were isolated from 15 patients, operated due to cervical disc herniation. NP cells were cultured for four weeks with low-glucose in collagen I scaffold. Their proliferation rates were analysed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Their protein expression levels of 28 therapeutic targets were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During progressive grades of degeneration NP cell proliferation rates were similar. Significantly decreased aggrecan and collagen II expressions (P<0.0001 were accompanied by accumulations of selective catabolic and inflammatory cytokines (disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4

  5. Determining Chemical Reactivity Driving Biological Activity from SMILES Transformations: The Bonding Mechanism of Anti-HIV Pyrimidines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the molecular mechanism of a chemical-biological interaction and bonding stands as the ultimate goal of any modern quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR study. To this end the present work employs the main chemical reactivity structural descriptors (electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical power, electrophilicity to unfold the variational QSAR though their min-max correspondence principles as applied to the Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry System (SMILES transformation of selected uracil derivatives with anti-HIV potential with the aim of establishing the main stages whereby the given compounds may inhibit HIV infection. The bonding can be completely described by explicitly considering by means of basic indices and chemical reactivity principles two forms of SMILES structures of the pyrimidines, the Longest SMILES Molecular Chain (LoSMoC and the Branching SMILES (BraS, respectively, as the effective forms involved in the anti-HIV activity mechanism and according to the present work, also necessary intermediates in molecular pathways targeting/docking biological sites of interest.

  6. Determining chemical reactivity driving biological activity from SMILES transformations: the bonding mechanism of anti-HIV pyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Mihai V; Dudaş, Nicoleta A

    2013-07-30

    Assessing the molecular mechanism of a chemical-biological interaction and bonding stands as the ultimate goal of any modern quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study. To this end the present work employs the main chemical reactivity structural descriptors (electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical power, electrophilicity) to unfold the variational QSAR though their min-max correspondence principles as applied to the Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry System (SMILES) transformation of selected uracil derivatives with anti-HIV potential with the aim of establishing the main stages whereby the given compounds may inhibit HIV infection. The bonding can be completely described by explicitly considering by means of basic indices and chemical reactivity principles two forms of SMILES structures of the pyrimidines, the Longest SMILES Molecular Chain (LoSMoC) and the Branching SMILES (BraS), respectively, as the effective forms involved in the anti-HIV activity mechanism and according to the present work, also necessary intermediates in molecular pathways targeting/docking biological sites of interest.

  7. Methanesulfonate (MSA) Catabolic Genes from Marine and Estuarine Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Ana C; De Marco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Quantitatively, methanesulfonate (MSA) is a very relevant compound in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle. Its utilization by bacteria as a source of carbon and energy has been described and a specific enzyme, methanesulfonate monooxygenase (MSAMO), has been found to perform the first catabolic step of its oxidation. Other proteins seemingly involved in the import of MSA into bacterial cells have been reported. In this study, we obtained novel sequences of genes msmA and msmE from marine, estuary and soil MSA-degraders (encoding the large subunit of the MSAMO enzyme and the periplasmic component of the import system, respectively). We also obtained whole-genome sequences of two novel marine Filomicrobium strains, Y and W, and annotated two full msm operons in these genomes. Furthermore, msmA and msmE sequences were amplified from North Atlantic seawater and analyzed. Good conservation of the MsmA deduced protein sequence was observed in both cultured strains and metagenomic clones. A long spacer sequence in the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding motif within MsmA was found to be conserved in all instances, supporting the hypothesis that this feature is specific to the large (α) subunit of the MSAMO enzyme. The msmE gene was more difficult to amplify, from both cultivated isolates and marine metagenomic DNA. However, 3 novel msmE sequences were obtained from isolated strains and one directly from seawater. With both genes, our results combined with previous metagenomic analyses seem to imply that moderate to high-GC strains are somehow favored during enrichment and isolation of MSA-utilizing bacteria, while the majority of msm genes obtained by cultivation-independent methods have low levels of GC%, which is a clear example of the misrepresentation of natural populations that culturing, more often than not, entails. Nevertheless, the data obtained in this work show that MSA-degrading bacteria are abundant in surface seawater, which suggests ecological

  8. Assay Methods for H2S Biogenesis and Catabolism Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ruma; Chiku, Taurai; Kabil, Omer; Libiad, Marouane; Motl, Nicole; Yadav, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    H2S is produced from sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and homocysteine, or a catabolite, 3-mercaptopyruvate, by three known enzymes: cystathionine β-synthase, γ-cystathionase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. Of these, the first two enzymes reside in the cytoplasm and comprise the transsulfuration pathway, while the third enzyme is found both in the cytoplasm and in the mitochondrion. The following mitochondrial enzymes oxidize H2S: sulfide quinone oxidoreductase, sulfur dioxygenase, rhodanese, and sulfite oxidase. The products of the sulfide oxidation pathway are thiosulfate and sulfate. Assays for enzymes involved in the production and oxidative clearance of sulfide to thiosulfate are described in this chapter. PMID:25725523

  9. Characterization and gene cloning of l-xylulose reductase involved in l-arabinose catabolism from the pentose-fermenting fungus Rhizomucor pusillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki-Yashiki, Shino; Komeda, Hidenobu; Hoshino, Kazuhiro; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-08-01

    l-Xylulose reductase (LXR) catalyzes the reduction of l-xylulose to xylitol in the fungal l-arabinose catabolic pathway. LXR (RpLXR) was purified from the pentose-fermenting zygomycetous fungus Rhizomucor pusillus NBRC 4578. The native RpLXR is a homotetramer composed of 29 kDa subunits and preferred NADPH as a coenzyme. The Km values were 8.71 mM for l-xylulose and 3.89 mM for dihydroxyacetone. The lxr3 (Rplxr3) gene encoding RpLXR consists of 792 bp and encodes a putative 263 amino acid protein (Mr = 28,341). The amino acid sequence of RpLXR showed high similarity to 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase. The Rplxr3 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant RpLXR exhibited properties similar to those of native RpLXR. Transcription of the Rplxr3 gene in R. pusillus NBRC 4578 was induced in the presence of l-arabinose and inhibited in the presence of d-glucose, d-xylose, and d-mannitol, indicating that RpLXR is involved in the l-arabinose catabolic pathway.

  10. Activated ADI pathway: the initiator of intermediate vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin-Ee; Neoh, Hui-Min; Looi, Mee-Lee; Chin, Siok Fong; Cui, Longzhu; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Hussin, Salasawati; Jamal, Rahman

    2017-03-01

    Comparative proteomic profiling between 2 vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) strains, Mu50Ω-vraSm and Mu50Ω-vraSm-graRm, and vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA) strain Mu50Ω revealed upregulated levels of catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ArcB) of the arginine catabolism pathway in VISA strains. Subsequent analyses showed that the VISA strains have higher levels of cellular ATP and ammonia, which are by-products of arginine catabolism, and displayed thicker cell walls. We postulate that elevated cytoplasmic ammonia and ATP molecules, resulting from activated arginine catabolism upon acquisition of vraS and graR mutations, are important requirements facilitating cell wall biosynthesis, thereby contributing to thickened cell wall and consequently reduced vancomycin susceptibility in VISA strains.

  11. Simple approach to thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidines as new scaffolds of antimicrobial activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafez Hend N.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 6ʹ-(4-Chlorophenyl-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2ʹ-thieno[3,2-d][1,3] oxazin]-4ʹ(1ʹH-one (1 was synthesized and used as a starting material for the synthesis of a novel series of spiro compounds having biologically active sulfonamide 2a-e and 3ʹ-(4-acetylphenyl-6ʹ- (4-chlorophenyl-1ʹH-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2ʹ-thieno[3,2-d] pyrimidine-4ʹ(3ʹH-one (3. Compound 2a was used as a key intermediate for the synthesis of sulfonyl carbothioamide derivatives 4a-c. Also, compound 3 was used as an intermediate for the synthesis of 3ʹH-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2ʹ-thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin]-3ʹ-yl] phenyl}-2-imino-4-(substituted phenyl and/or thienyl-1,2-dihydropyridine- 3-carbonitrile derivatives 5a-e, 3ʹH-spiro[cyclohexane- 1,2ʹ- thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin]-3ʹ-yl]phenyl}-2-oxo-4-(substituted phenyl and/or thienyl-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile derivatives 6a-e, and 4-[(2Z-3-substituted-arylprop-2-enoyl] phenyl-1ʹH-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2ʹ-thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives 7a-e. Cyclocondensation of 7a-e with hydrazine hydrate produced 6ʹ-(4-chlorophenyl-3ʹ-[4-(5-substituted aryl-4,5-dihydro- 1H-pyrazol-3-ylphenyl]-1ʹH-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2ʹ-thieno- [3,2-d]pyrimidin]-4ʹ(3ʹH-ones 8a-e but with hydroxylamine hydrochloride afforded the corresponding isoxazoline derivatives 9a-e. Also, cyclocondensation by thiourea afforded 2-thioxo-1,2- dihydropyrimidin-4-yl-phenyl-spiro-{cyclohexanethieno[3,2-d] pyrimidin}-4-one derivatives 10a-e. The new compounds were investigated for antimicrobial activity. Compounds 2c, 8b,c, 9b and 10b were the most potent ones against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Compound 8c exhibited higher antifungal activity towards the examined fungi with MIC of 1-2 μmol mL-1 compared to ketoconazole (MIC 2-3 μmol mL-1 .

  12. Understanding Sugar Catabolism in Unicellular Cyanobacteria Toward the Application in Biofuel and Biomaterial Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Iijima, Hiroko; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a model species of the cyanobacteria that undergo oxygenic photosynthesis, and has garnered much attention for its potential biotechnological applications. The regulatory mechanism of sugar metabolism in this cyanobacterium has been intensively studied and recent omics approaches have revealed the changes in transcripts, proteins, and metabolites of sugar catabolism under different light and nutrient conditions. Several transcriptional regulators that control the gene expression of enzymes related to sugar catabolism have been identified in the past 10 years, including a sigma factor, transcription factors, and histidine kinases. The modification of these genes can lead to alterations in the primary metabolism as well as the levels of high-value products such as bioplastics and hydrogen. This review summarizes recent studies on sugar catabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, emphasizing the importance of elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cyanobacterial metabolism for biotechnological applications.

  13. Flight at low ambient humidity increases protein catabolism in migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Alexander R; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2011-09-09

    Although fat is the primary fuel for migratory flight in birds, protein is also used. Catabolism of tissue protein yields five times as much water per kilojoule as fat, and so one proposed function of protein catabolism is to maintain water balance during nonstop flights. To test the protein-for-water hypothesis, we flew Swainson's thrushes (Catharus ustulatus) in a climatic wind tunnel under high- and low-humidity conditions at 18°C for up to 5 hours. Flight under dry conditions increased the rates of lean mass loss and endogenous water production and also increased plasma uric acid concentration. These data demonstrate that atmospheric humidity influences fuel composition in flight and suggest that protein deposition and catabolism during migration are, in part, a metabolic strategy to maintain osmotic homeostasis during flight.

  14. Arginine catabolism in Lactobacillus sake isolated from meat.

    OpenAIRE

    Montel, M C; Champomier, M C

    1987-01-01

    Lactobacillus sake isolated from meat can hydrolyze arginine via the arginine deiminase pathway. Two enzymes, arginine deiminase and ornithine transcarbamylase, have been revealed by detection of their reaction products, citrulline and ornithine, respectively. The production of citrulline depends on the concentration of glucose in a synthetic medium; it does not occur when the concentration of glucose is 27.5 mM or higher.

  15. Synthesis, and Fluorescence Properties of Coumarin and Benzocoumarin Derivatives Conjugated Pyrimidine Scaffolds for Biological Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masoudi, Najim A; Al-Salihi, Niran J; Marich, Yossra A; Markus, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Series of coumarin and 5,6-benzomcomarin substituted pyrimidine derivatives 11-15 and 22-25 were synthesized, aiming to develop new imaging fluorescent agents. Analogously, treatment of 4-chloropyrimidine analog 16 with coumarin 3-carbohyrazide 5 under MWI condition followed by boiling with NH4OAc in HOAc furnished coumarin-1,2,4-triazolo-pyrimidine analog 18. The fluorescence property was investigated spectrophotometrically in MeOH with Rhodamine 6G as standard dye. All the compounds showed emission in the region between 331 and 495 nm. The quantum yield of all the compounds were found to be weak, except methyl benzocoumarin 3-carboxylate 22 which showed (ΦF = 0.98) in comparison to Rhodamine 6G as standard (ΦF = 0.95).

  16. Excision of pyrimidine dimers from nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid in ultraviolet-irradiated Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, J.M.; Deering, R.A.

    1987-02-01

    A sensitive endonuclease assay was used to study the fate of pyrimidine dimers introduced by ultraviolet irradiation into the nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid of the cellular slime mold Dictyostellium discoideum. Analysis of the frequency of T4 endonuclease V-induced single-strand breaks by alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation showed that strain NC4 (rad/sup +/) removed >98% of the dimers induced by irradiation at 40 J/m/sup 2/ (254 nm) within 215 min after irradiation. HPS104 (radC44), a mutant sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation, removed 91% under these conditions, although at a significantly slower rate than NC4: only 8% were removed during the 10- to 15- min period immediately after irradiation, whereas NC4 excised 64% during this interval. HPS104 thus appears to be deficient in the activity(ies) responsible for rapidly incising ultraviolet-irradiated nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid at the sites of pyrimidine dimers.

  17. The effect of purine and pyrimidine analogues and virazole on adenovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, P; Haghchenas, D; Wigand, R

    1975-04-01

    The multiplication of adenovirus 19 in HeLa cells was inhibited by various purine and pyrimidine analogues and by virazole. The formation of infectious virus and of capsid proteins (haemagglutin, group-specific complement-fixing antigen) was inhibited to the same degree, while the viral cytopathic effect (CPE) was not inhibited. The reversibility of the inhibition after removal of the substances was more complete for purine than for pyrimidine analogues. The inhibition was counteracted by simulataneous addition of the corresponding nucleosides. Adenosine was more effected than guanosine against purine analogues; both were partially effective against virazole, but none of them against arabinofuranosyladenine. The time-dependence of inhibition, the ensuing eclipse period after removal of the inhibitors, and the successive application of two inhibitors led to the conclusion that most of them affect the viral multiplication mainly by inhibition of DNA synthesis. Azacytidine inhibits the synthesis of structural proteins as well.

  18. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  19. cis-Aquadichlorido[pyrimidin-2(1H-one-κN3]copper(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guy Orpen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [CuCl2(C4H4N2O(H2O], the CuII cation is coordinated by two chloride anions, one pyrimidin-2-one N atom and one water molecule, giving a slightly distorted square-planar geometry. In the crystal structure, the pyrimidin-2-one rings stack along the b axis, with an interplanar distance of 3.306 Å, as do the copper coordination planes (interplanar spacing = 2.998 Å. The coordination around the Jahn–Teller-distorted CuII ion is completed by long Cu...O [3.014 (5 Å] and Cu...Cl [3.0194 (15 Å] interactions with adjacent molecules involved in this stacking. Several N—H...Cl, O—H...Cl and O—H...O intermolecular hydrogen bonds form a polar three-dimensional network.

  20. Oxygen-dependent catabolism of indole-3-acetic acid in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebo, L A; Nielsen, S V; Jochimsen, B U

    1991-01-01

    Some strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum have the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Examination of this catabolism in strain 110 by in vivo experiments has revealed an enzymatic activity catalyzing the degradation of IAA and 5-hydroxy-indole-3-acetic acid. The activity requires...... an oxygen-consuming opening of the indole ring analogous to the one catalyzed by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. The pattern of metabolite usage by known tryptophan-auxotrophic mutants and studies of metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography indicate that anthranilic acid is a terminal degradation...

  1. 3-({5-Bromo-4-[pyrrolidin-1-yl]pyrimidin-2-yl}aminophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M. Jones

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Re-investigation of the 1H-NMR spectrum reported for 15-bromo-4-oxa-2,9-diaza-1(2,4-pyrimidine-3(1,3-benzenacyclononaphane (2 prepared via a Mitsunobu- mediated macroether cyclisation led to a proposed structural isomer (3. The title compound (3 was prepared via a two-step protocol and assigned using 1H, 13C-NMR and LC-MS.

  2. A Facile Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Some Fused Pyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Al-Issa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The highly accelerated synthesis of thienopyrimidinones, theino- pyrimidines,thioxotheinopyrimidinones and a thienotriazolopyrimidinone derivatives under microwave irradiation is reported. Compared to conventional conditions, microwaves method offered several advantage likes short time, good yields, simple procedure, mild conditions and easy workup. The structure of synthesized compounds have been characterized on the basis of their elemental analysis and spectral data, and screened for their antimicrobial activity.

  3. Photoreactivation of pyrimidine dimers in DNA from thyroid cells of the teleost, Poecilia formosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achey, P.M.; Woodhead, A.D.; Setlow, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    We have developed and used a simple technique to estimate the quantity of pyrimidine dimers in unlabeled cellular DNA. DNA is extracted from cells, treated with an endonuclease specific for dimers, and its molecular weight estimated by its electrophoretic mobility on alkaline agarose slab gels. The technique is used to show that cells from thyroid tissue of the fish Poecilia formosa have photoreactivating activity towards dimmers in the cellular DNA.

  4. Dichloridobis[2-methyl-sulfanyl-4-(pyridin-2-yl)pyrimidine-κN,N]cobalt(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Na

    2011-09-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [CoCl(2)(C(10)H(9)N(3)S)(2)], contains one half-mol-ecule with the Co(II) atom situtated on a twofold rotational axis. The Co(II) atom, in an octa-hedral enviroment, is coordinated by four N atoms from two 2-methyl-sulfanyl-4-(pyridin-2-yl)pyrimidine ligands and two Cl atoms.

  5. The photochemistry of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ices and the production of nucleobases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A., E-mail: michel.nuevo-1@nasa.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Nucleobases, together with deoxyribose/ribose and phosphoric acid, are the building blocks of DNA and RNA for all known life. The presence of nucleobase-like compounds in carbonaceous chondrites delivered to the Earth raises the question of an extraterrestrial origin for the molecules that triggered life on our planet. Whether these molecules are formed in interstellar/protostellar environments, in small parent bodies in the solar system, or both, is currently unclear. Recent experiments show that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}) in H{sub 2}O-rich ice mixtures that contain NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}OH, or CH{sub 4} leads to the formation of the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we discuss the low-temperature UV irradiation of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ice mixtures containing H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}OH, and NH{sub 3}, with or without CH{sub 4}, to search for the production of nucleobases and other prebiotic compounds. These experiments show the presence of uracil, urea, glycerol, hexamethylenetetramine, small amino acids, and small carboxylic acids in all samples. Cytosine was only found in one sample produced from ices irradiated with a higher UV dose, while thymine was not found in any sample, even after irradiation with a higher UV dose. Results are discussed to evaluate the role of the photochemistry of pyrimidine in the inventory of organic molecules detected in meteorites and their astrophysical/astrobiological implications.

  6. The genome of Variovorax paradoxus strain TBEA6 provides new understandings for the catabolism of 3,3'-thiodipropionic acid and hence the production of polythioesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Hiessl, Sebastian; Meinert, Christina; Poehlein, Anja; Schuldes, Jörg; Daniel, Rolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2015-09-10

    The betaproteobacterium Variovorax paradoxus strain TBEA6 is capable of using 3,3'-thiodipropionic acid (TDP) as sole carbon and energy source for growth. This thioether is employed for several industrial applications. It can be applied as precursor for the biotechnical production of polythioesters (PTE), which represent persistent bioplastics. Consequently, the genome of V. paradoxus strain TBEA6 was sequenced. The draft genome sequence comprises approximately 7.2Mbp and 6852 predicted open reading frames. Furthermore, transposon mutagenesis to unravel the catabolism of TDP in strain TBEA6 was performed. Screening of 20,000 mutants mapped the insertions of Tn5::mob in 32 mutants, which all showed no growth with TDP as sole carbon source. Based on the annotated genome sequence together with transposon-induced mutagenesis, defined gene deletions, in silico analyses and comparative genomics, a comprehensive pathway for the catabolism of TDP is proposed: TDP is imported via the tripartite tricarboxcylate transport system and/or the TRAP-type dicarboxylate transport system. The initial cleavage of TDP into 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) and 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3MP), which serves as precursor substrate for PTE synthesis, is most probably performed by the FAD-dependent oxidoreductase Fox. 3HP is presumably catabolized via malonate semialdehyde, whereas 3MP is oxygenated by the 3MP-dioxygenase Mdo yielding 3-sulfinopropionic acid (3SP). Afterwards, 3SP is linked to coenzyme A. The next step is the abstraction of sulfite by a desulfinase, and the resulting propionyl-CoA enters the central metabolism. Sulfite is oxidized to sulfate by the sulfite-oxidizing enzyme SoeABC and is subsequently excreted by the cells by the sulfate exporter Pse.

  7. Acute cold and exercise training up-regulate similar aspects of fatty acid transport and catabolism in house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Carter, Travis; Eyster, Kathleen; Swanson, David L

    2015-12-01

    Summit maximum thermoregulatory metabolic rate (Msum) and maximum exercise metabolic rate (MMR) both increase in response to acute cold or exercise training in birds. Because lipids are the main fuel supporting both thermogenesis and exercise in birds, adjustments to lipid transport and catabolic capacities may support elevated energy demands from cold and exercise training. To examine a potential mechanistic role for lipid transport and catabolism in organismal cross-training effects (exercise effects on both exercise and thermogenesis, and vice versa), we measured enzyme activities and mRNA and protein expression in pectoralis muscle for several key steps of lipid transport and catabolism pathways in house sparrows (Passer domesticus) during acute exercise and cold training. Both training protocols elevated pectoralis protein levels of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), cytosolic fatty acid-binding protein, and citrate synthase (CS) activity. However, mRNA expression of FAT/CD36 and both mRNA and protein expression of plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein did not change for either training group. CS activities in supracoracoideus, leg and heart, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) and β-hydroxyacyl CoA-dehydrogenase activities in all muscles did not vary significantly with either training protocol. Both Msum and MMR were significantly positively correlated with CPT and CS activities. These data suggest that up-regulation of trans-sarcolemmal and intramyocyte lipid transport capacities and cellular metabolic intensities, along with previously documented increases in body and pectoralis muscle masses and pectoralis myostatin (a muscle growth inhibitor) levels, are common mechanisms underlying the training effects of both exercise and shivering in birds.

  8. Functional characterization and expression analysis of rice δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase provide new insight into the regulation of proline and arginine catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    While intracellular proline accumulation in response to various stress conditions has been investigated in great detail, the biochemistry and physiological relevance of proline degradation in plants is much less understood. Moreover, the second and last step in proline catabolism, the oxidation of δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) to glutamate, is shared with arginine catabolism. Little information is available to date concerning the regulatory mechanisms coordinating these two pathways. Expression of the gene coding for P5C dehydrogenase was analyzed in rice by real-time PCR either following the exogenous supply of amino acids of the glutamate family, or under hyperosmotic stress conditions. The rice enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and the affinity-purified protein was thoroughly characterized with respect to structural and functional properties. A tetrameric oligomerization state was observed in size exclusion chromatography, which suggests a structure of the plant enzyme different from that shown for the bacterial P5C dehydrogenases structurally characterized to date. Kinetic analysis accounted for a preferential use of NAD(+) as the electron acceptor. Cations were found to modulate enzyme activity, whereas anion effects were negligible. Several metal ions were inhibitory in the micromolar range. Interestingly, arginine also inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to P5C. This implies that millimolar levels of arginine would increase the affinity of P5C dehydrogenase toward its specific substrate. Results are discussed in view of the involvement of the enzyme in either proline or arginine catabolism.

  9. Fluorescent property of 3-hydroxymethyl imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine and pyrimidine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velázquez-Olvera Stephania

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines and pyrimidines are important organic fluorophores which have been investigated as biomarkers and photochemical sensors. The effect on the luminescent property by substituents in the heterocycle and phenyl rings, have been studied as well. In this investigation, series of 3-hydroxymethyl imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines and pyrimidines were synthesized and evaluated in relation to fluorescence emission, based upon the hypothesis that the hydroxymethyl group may act as an enhancer of fluorescence intensity. Results Compounds of both series emitted light in organic solvents dilutions as well as in acidic and alkaline media. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy determined that both fused heterocycles fluoresced more intensely than the parent unsubstituted imidazo[1,2-a]azine fluorophore. In particular, 3-hydroxymethyl imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines fluoresced more intensely than 3-hydroxymethyl imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidines, the latter emitting blue light at longer wavelengths, whereas the former emitted purple light. Conclusion It was concluded that in most cases the hydroxymethyl moiety did act as an enhancer of the fluorescence intensity, however, a comparison made with the fluorescence emitted by 2-aryl imidazo[1,2-a]azines revealed that in some cases the hydroxymethyl substituent decreased the fluorescence intensity.

  10. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of pyrimidine by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael [Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 9, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Mašín, Zdeněk [Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, Max-Born-Straße 2A, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Gorfinkiel, Jimena D. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for electron-impact electronic excitation of pyrimidine, both as a function of electron energy up to 18 eV, and of scattering angle up to 180°. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. The differential cross sections were summed to obtain integral cross sections. These are compared to results of R-matrix calculations, which successfully reproduce both the magnitude of the cross section and the major resonant features. Comparison of the experiment to the calculated contributions of different symmetries to the integral cross section permitted assignment of several features to specific core-excited resonances. Comparison of the resonant structure of pyrimidine with that of benzene revealed pronounced similarities and thus a dominant role of π–π{sup ∗} excited states and resonances. Electron energy loss spectra were measured as a preparation for the cross section measurements and vibrational structure was observed for some of the triplet states. A detailed analysis of the electronic excited states of pyrimidine is also presented.

  11. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite Using Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth s prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. These compounds dominate terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine, as well as the pyrimidine uracil, have previously been detected in water or formic acid extracts of Murchison using ion-exclusion chromatography and ultraviolet spectroscopy. However, even after purification of these extracts, the accurate identification and quantification of nucleobases is difficult due to interfering UV absorbing compounds. In order to reduce these effects, we have developed an extraction technique using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from other non-volatile organic compounds in Murchison acid extracts.

  12. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY (United Kingdom); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  13. Advancing viral RNA structure prediction: measuring the thermodynamics of pyrimidine-rich internal loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Andy; Mailey, Katherine; Sakai, Jessica; Gu, Xiaobo; Schroeder, Susan J

    2017-02-17

    Accurate thermodynamic parameters improve RNA structure predictions and thus accelerate understanding of RNA function and the identification of RNA drug binding sites. Many viral RNA structures, such as internal ribosome entry sites, have internal loops and bulges that are potential drug target sites. Current models used to predict internal loops are biased towards small, symmetric purine loops, and thus poorly predict asymmetric, pyrimidine-rich loops with more than 6 nucleotides that occur frequently in viral RNA. This paper presents new thermodynamic data for 40 pyrimidine loops, many of which can form UU or protonated CC base pairs. Protonated cytosine and uracil base pairs stabilize asymmetric internal loops. Accurate prediction rules are presented that account for all thermodynamic measurements of RNA asymmetric internal loops. New loop initiation terms for loops with more than 6 nucleotides are presented that do not follow previous assumptions that increasing asymmetry destabilizes loops. Since the last 2004 update, 126 new loops with asymmetry or sizes greater than 2x2 have been measured (Mathews 2004). These new measurements significantly deepen and diversify the thermodynamic database for RNA. These results will help better predict internal loops that are larger, pyrimidine-rich, and occur within viral structures such as internal ribosome entry sites.

  14. SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF IMIDAZOLE DERIVED CHALCONES AND IT’S PYRIMIDINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar Padarthi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial contribution increasing rapidly due to invasion by the pathogenic organisms like bacteria, fungi and virus in the present disease burden of human health. To treat these diseases many potent and broad spectrum antibiotics were discovered e.g., ampicillin, amoxicillin, carbenicillin, ofloxacin and tetracycline etc., Even though antibiotics are life saving drugs in therapeutics but they are potentially harmful. These harmful effects include allergic and anaphylactic reaction, development of resistance, destruction of normal non-pathogenic bacterial flora and selective toxicity like aplastic anemia, kidney damage. As the microbial resistance make anti-microbial therapy very complex, there is a definite need of novel anti-microbials or drugs for combination therapy with standard antibiotics. Our aim was to synthesize and explore the anti-microbial activity of chalcones and its derived pyrimidines against various pathological micro organisms. Novel imidazole derived chalcones were synthesized and characterization was carried out by analyzing melting point, IR, 1H NMR data. The synthesized chalcones and pyrimidines are tested for their antimicrobial activity against various bacteria as well as fungi. Further synthesis of novel heterocyclic chalcones, structural elucidation, spectral analysis, biological activity of synthesized chalcones and its derived pyrimidines gives a hope for enhanced biological action using QSAR Studies.

  15. Rim2, a pyrimidine nucleotide exchanger, is needed for iron utilization in mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heeyong; Zhang, Yan; Pain, Jayashree; Lyver, Elise R.; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Pain, Debkumar; Dancis, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria transport and utilize iron for the synthesis of haem and Fe–S clusters. Although many proteins are known to be involved in these processes, additional proteins are likely to participate. To test this hypothesis, in the present study we used a genetic screen looking for yeast mutants that are synthetically lethal with the mitochondrial iron carriers Mrs3 and Mrs4. Several genes were identified, including an isolate mutated for Yfh1, the yeast frataxin homologue. All such triple mutants were complemented by increased expression of Rim2, another mitochondrial carrier protein. Rim2 overexpression was able to enhance haem and Fe–S cluster synthesis in wild-type or Δmrs3/Δmrs4 backgrounds. Conversely Rim2 depletion impaired haem and Fe–S cluster synthesis in wild-type or Δmrs3/Δmrs4 backgrounds, indicating a unique requirement for this mitochondrial transporter for these processes. Rim2 was previously shown to mediate pyrimidine exchange in and out of vesicles. In the present study we found that isolated mitochondria lacking Rim2 exhibited concordant iron defects and pyrimidine transport defects, although the connection between these two functions is not explained. When organellar membranes were ruptured to bypass iron transport, haem synthesis from added iron and porphyrin was still markedly deficient in Rim2-depleted mitochondrial lysate. The results indicate that Rim2 is a pyrimidine exchanger with an additional unique function in promoting mitochondrial iron utilization. PMID:21777202

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-I fails to reverse corticosteroid-induced protein catabolism in growing piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellstern, G; Reijngoud, DJ; Stellaard, F; Okken, A

    1996-01-01

    Corticosteroids such as dexamethasone (DEX) increase leucine turnover and oxidation in humans and animals, indicating whole body protein catabolism. Recently, interest has been growing in the use of recombinant polypeptides such as GH and IGF-I in reversing various states of catabolism. The aim of o

  17. Epoxy Coenzyme A Thioester pathways for degradation of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Wael; Gescher, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Aromatic compounds (biogenic and anthropogenic) are abundant in the biosphere. Some of them are well-known environmental pollutants. Although the aromatic nucleus is relatively recalcitrant, microorganisms have developed various catabolic routes that enable complete biodegradation of aromatic compounds. The adopted degradation pathways depend on the availability of oxygen. Under oxic conditions, microorganisms utilize oxygen as a cosubstrate to activate and cleave the aromatic ring. In contrast, under anoxic conditions, the aromatic compounds are transformed to coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters followed by energy-consuming reduction of the ring. Eventually, the dearomatized ring is opened via a hydrolytic mechanism. Recently, novel catabolic pathways for the aerobic degradation of aromatic compounds were elucidated that differ significantly from the established catabolic routes. The new pathways were investigated in detail for the aerobic bacterial degradation of benzoate and phenylacetate. In both cases, the pathway is initiated by transforming the substrate to a CoA thioester and all the intermediates are bound by CoA. The subsequent reactions involve epoxidation of the aromatic ring followed by hydrolytic ring cleavage. Here we discuss the novel pathways, with a particular focus on their unique features and occurrence as well as ecological significance.

  18. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  19. Mechanical ventilation induces myokine expression and catabolism in peripheral skeletal muscle in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endotoxin (LPS)-induced sepsis increases circulating cytokines which have been associated with skeletal muscle catabolism. During critical illness, it has been postulated that muscle wasting associated with mechanical ventilation (MV) occurs due to inactivity. We hypothesize that MV and sepsis promo...

  20. Branched-chain amino acid catabolism fuels adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Courtney R; Wallace, Martina; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Phillips, Susan A; Murphy, Anne N; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Metallo, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays important roles in regulating carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis, but less is known about the regulation of amino acid metabolism in adipocytes. Here we applied isotope tracing to pre-adipocytes and differentiated adipocytes to quantify the contributions of different substrates to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism and lipogenesis. In contrast to proliferating cells, which use glucose and glutamine for acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) generation, differentiated adipocytes showed increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic flux such that leucine and isoleucine from medium and/or from protein catabolism accounted for as much as 30% of lipogenic AcCoA pools. Medium cobalamin deficiency caused methylmalonic acid accumulation and odd-chain fatty acid synthesis. Vitamin B12 supplementation reduced these metabolites and altered the balance of substrates entering mitochondria. Finally, inhibition of BCAA catabolism compromised adipogenesis. These results quantitatively highlight the contribution of BCAAs to adipocyte metabolism and suggest that BCAA catabolism has a functional role in adipocyte differentiation.

  1. The activation of hepatic and muscle polyamine catabolism improves glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Taina; Cerrada-Gimenez, Marc; Pirinen, Eija; Hohtola, Esa; Paananen, Jussi; Vuohelainen, Susanna; Tusa, Maija; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Heikkinen, Sami; Virkamäki, Antti; Uimari, Anne; Alhonen, Leena; Laakso, Markku

    2012-02-01

    The mitochondrial biogenesis and energy expenditure regulator, PGC-1α, has been previously reported to be induced in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver of mice overexpressing spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT). The activation of PGC-1α in these mouse lines leads to increased number of mitochondria, improved glucose homeostasis, reduced WAT mass and elevated basal metabolic rate. The constant activation of polyamine catabolism produces a futile cycle that greatly reduces the ATP pools and induces 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which in turn activates PGC-1α in WAT. In this study, we have investigated the effects of activated polyamine catabolism on the glucose and energy metabolisms when targeted to specific tissues. For that we used a mouse line overexpressing SSAT under the endogenous SSAT promoter, an inducible SSAT overexpressing mouse model using the metallothionein I promoter (MT-SSAT), and a mouse model with WAT-specific SSAT overexpression (aP2-SSAT). The results demonstrated that WAT-specific SSAT overexpression was sufficient to increase the number of mitochondria, reduce WAT mass and protect the mice from high-fat diet-induced obesity. However, the improvement in the glucose homeostasis is achieved only when polyamine catabolism is enhanced at the same time in the liver and skeletal muscle. Our results suggest that the tissue-specific targeting of activated polyamine catabolism may reveal new possibilities for the development of drugs boosting mitochondrial metabolism and eventually for treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  2. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  3. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Mancebo Mazzetto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region. We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado, pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage. The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types. The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale.

  4. Chronic Drought Decreases Anabolic and Catabolic BVOC Emissions of Quercus pubescens in a Mediterranean Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, Amélie; Ormeño, Elena; Wortham, Henri; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Lecareux, Caroline; Boissard, Christophe; Fernandez, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted by plants can originate from both anabolism (metabolite production through anabolic processes) and catabolism (metabolite degradation by oxidative reactions). Drought can favor leaf oxidation by increasing the oxidative pressure in plant cells. Thus, under the precipitation decline predicted for the Mediterranean region, it can be expected both strong oxidation of anabolic BVOC within leaves and, as a result, enhanced catabolic BVOC emissions. Using an experimental rain exclusion device in a natural forest, we compared the seasonal course of the emissions of the main anabolic BVOC released by Q. pubescens (isoprene and methanol) and their catabolic products (MACR+MVK+ISOPOOH and formaldehyde, respectively) after 3 years of precipitation restriction (−30% of rain). Thus, we assume that this repetitive amplified drought promoted a chronic drought. BVOC emissions were monitored, on-line, with a PTR-ToF-MS. Amplified drought decreased all BVOC emissions rates in spring and summer by around 40–50 %, especially through stomatal closure, with no effect in autumn. Moreover, ratios between catabolic and anabolic BVOC remained unchanged with amplified drought, suggesting a relative stable oxidative pressure in Q. pubescens under the water stress applied. Moreover, these results suggest a quite good resilience of this species under the most severe climate change scenario in the Mediterranean region. PMID:28228762

  5. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetto, Andre Mancebo; Feigl, Brigitte Josefine; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region). We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado), pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved) and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage). The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas) and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types). The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale.

  6. Ischemic nucleotide breakdown increases during cardiac development due to drop in adenosine anabolism/catabolism ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. de Jong (Jan Willem); E. Keijzer (Elisabeth); T. Huizer (Tom); B. Schoutsen

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Our earlier work on reperfusion showed that adult rat hearts released almost twice as much purine nucleosides and oxypurines as newborn hearts did [Am J Physiol 254 (1988) H1091]. A change in the ratio anabolism/catabolism of adenosine could be responsible for this effect.

  7. Coumestrol Counteracts Interleukin-1β-Induced Catabolic Effects by Suppressing Inflammation in Primary Rat Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae-Seek; Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok; Oh, Ji-Su; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Su-Gwan; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Im, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-catabolic effects of coumestrol, a phytoestrogen derived from herbal plants, against interleukin-1β-induced cartilage degeneration in primary rat chondrocytes and articular cartilage. Coumestrol did not affect the viability of human normal oral keratinocytes and primary rat chondrocytes treated for 24 h and 21 days, respectively. Although coumestrol did not significantly increase the proteoglycan contents in long-term culture, it abolished the interleukin-1β-induced loss of proteoglycans in primary rat chondrocytes and knee articular cartilage. Furthermore, coumestrol suppressed the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinase-13, -3, and -1 in primary rat chondrocytes stimulated with interleukin-1β. Moreover, the expression of catabolic factors such as nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2, and inflammatory cytokines in interleukin-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes was suppressed by coumestrol. In summary, these results indicate that coumestrol counteracts the catabolic effects induced by interleukin-1β through the suppression of inflammation. Therefore, based on its biological activity and safety profile, coumestrol could be used as a potential anti-catabolic biomaterial for osteoarthritis.

  8. Genetic manipulation of the metabolism of polyamines in poplar cells. The regulation of putrescine catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the catabolism of putrescine (Put) in a non-transgenic (NT) and a transgenic cell line of poplar (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) expressing a mouse (Mus musculus) ornithine (Orn) decarboxylase (odc) cDNA. The transgenic cells produce 3- to 4-fold higher amounts of Put than the NT...

  9. Engineering Bacteria to Catabolize the Carbonaceous Component of Sarin: Teaching E. coli to Eat Isopropanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Margaret E.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D.

    2016-01-01

    We report an engineered strain of Escherichia coli that catabolizes the carbonaceous component of the extremely toxic chemical warfare agent sarin. Enzymatic decomposition of sarin generates isopropanol waste that, with this engineered strain, is then transformed into acetyl-CoA by enzymatic conv...

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Three β-Lactam-Catabolizing Soil Proteobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crofts, Terence S.; Wang, Bin; Spivak, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Most antibiotics are derived from the soil, but their catabolism there, which is necessary to close the antibiotic carbon cycle, remains uncharacterized. We report the first draft genome sequences of soil Proteobacteria identified for subsisting solely on β-lactams as their carbon sources. The ge...

  11. CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PHTHALATE CATABOLISM REGION OF PRE1 OF ARTHROBACTER KEYSERI 12B

    Science.gov (United States)

    o-Phthalate (benzene-1,2-dicarboxylate) is a central intermediate in the bacterial degradation of phthalate ester plasticizers as well as of a number of fused-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in fossil fuels. In Arthrobacter keyseri 12B, the genes encoding catabolism o...

  12. Seed storage oil catabolism: a story of give and take.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoulou, Frederica L; Eastmond, Peter J

    2012-06-01

    The transition from seed to seedling is an important step in the life cycle of plants, which is fuelled primarily by the breakdown of triacylglycerol (TAG) in 'oilseed' species. TAG is stored within cytosolic oil bodies, while the pathway for fatty acid β-oxidation resides in the peroxisome. Although the enzymology of fatty acid β-oxidation has been relatively well characterised, the processes by which fatty acids are liberated from oil bodies and enter the peroxisome are less well understood and, together with metabolite, cofactor and co-substrate transporters, represent key targets for future research in order to understand co-ordination of peroxisomal metabolism with that of other subcellular compartments.

  13. Catabolism and biotechnological applications of cholesterol degrading bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J L; Uhía, I; Galán, B

    2012-11-01

    Cholesterol is a steroid commonly found in nature with a great relevance in biology, medicine and chemistry, playing an essential role as a structural component of animal cell membranes. The ubiquity of cholesterol in the environment has made it a reference biomarker for environmental pollution analysis and a common carbon source for different microorganisms, some of them being important pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This work revises the accumulated biochemical and genetic knowledge on the bacterial pathways that degrade or transform this molecule, given that the characterization of cholesterol metabolism would contribute not only to understand its role in tuberculosis but also to develop new biotechnological processes that use this and other related molecules as starting or target materials.

  14. Chronic heart failure: Ca(2+), catabolism, and catastrophic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Geoffrey W; Altamirano, Francisco; Hill, Joseph A

    2016-04-01

    Robust successes have been achieved in recent years in conquering the acutely lethal manifestations of heart disease. Many patients who previously would have died now survive to enjoy happy and productive lives. Nevertheless, the devastating impact of heart disease continues unabated, as the spectrum of disease has evolved with new manifestations. In light of this ever-evolving challenge, insights that culminate in novel therapeutic targets are urgently needed. Here, we review fundamental mechanisms of heart failure, both with reduced (HFrEF) and preserved (HFpEF) ejection fraction. We discuss pathways that regulate cardiomyocyte remodeling and turnover, focusing on Ca(2+) signaling, autophagy, and apoptosis. In particular, we highlight recent insights pointing to novel connections among these events. We also explore mechanisms whereby potential therapeutic approaches targeting these processes may improve morbidity and mortality in the devastating syndrome of heart failure.

  15. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Some New Pyrazole, Fused Pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine and Pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]- triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Miqdad

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrazonyl bromides 2a,b reacted with active methylene compounds (dibenzoylmethane, acetylacetone, ethyl acetoacetate, phenacyl cyanide, acetoacetanilide, ethyl cyanoacetate, cyanoacetamide and malononitrile to afford the corresponding 1,3,4,5- tetrasubstituted pyrazole derivatives 5-12a,b. Reaction of 12a,b with formamide, formic acid and triethyl orthoformate give the pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine, pyrazolo[3,4- d]pyrimidin-4(3Hone and 5-ethoxymethylene-aminopyrazole-4-carbo-nitrile derivatives 13-15a,b, respectively. Compounds 15a,b reacted with benzhydrazide and hydrazine hydrate to afford pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine and [4-iminopyrazolo- [3,4-d]pyrimidin-5-yl]amine derivatives 16a,b and 17a,b. Reactions of compounds 17a,b with triethyl orthoformate and carbon disulfide give the corresponding pyrazolo[4,3-e]- [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine derivatives 18a,b and 19a,b, respectively.

  16. The mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 is required for amino acid catabolism during carbohydrate starvation and embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D; Browning, Luke W; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2014-05-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine.

  17. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  18. Intracellular growth is dependent on tyrosine catabolism in the dimorphic fungal pathogen Penicillium marneffei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Kylie J; McLauchlan, Alisha; Schreider, Lena; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2015-03-01

    During infection, pathogens must utilise the available nutrient sources in order to grow while simultaneously evading or tolerating the host's defence systems. Amino acids are an important nutritional source for pathogenic fungi and can be assimilated from host proteins to provide both carbon and nitrogen. The hpdA gene of the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei, which encodes an enzyme which catalyses the second step of tyrosine catabolism, was identified as up-regulated in pathogenic yeast cells. As well as enabling the fungus to acquire carbon and nitrogen, tyrosine is also a precursor in the formation of two types of protective melanin; DOPA melanin and pyomelanin. Chemical inhibition of HpdA in P. marneffei inhibits ex vivo yeast cell production suggesting that tyrosine is a key nutrient source during infectious growth. The genes required for tyrosine catabolism, including hpdA, are located in a gene cluster and the expression of these genes is induced in the presence of tyrosine. A gene (hmgR) encoding a Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor is present within the cluster and is required for tyrosine induced expression and repression in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source. AreA, the GATA-type transcription factor which regulates the global response to limiting nitrogen conditions negatively regulates expression of cluster genes in the absence of tyrosine and is required for nitrogen metabolite repression. Deletion of the tyrosine catabolic genes in the cluster affects growth on tyrosine as either a nitrogen or carbon source and affects pyomelanin, but not DOPA melanin, production. In contrast to other genes of the tyrosine catabolic cluster, deletion of hpdA results in no growth within macrophages. This suggests that the ability to catabolise tyrosine is not required for macrophage infection and that HpdA has an additional novel role to that of tyrosine catabolism and pyomelanin production during growth in host cells.

  19. Genetic examination of initial amino acid oxidation and glutamate catabolism in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokooji, Yuusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2013-05-01

    Amino acid catabolism in Thermococcales is presumed to proceed via three steps: oxidative deamination of amino acids by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) or aminotransferases, oxidative decarboxylation by 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (KOR), and hydrolysis of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) by ADP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Here, we performed a genetic examination of enzymes involved in Glu catabolism in Thermococcus kodakarensis. Examination of amino acid dehydrogenase activities in cell extracts of T. kodakarensis KUW1 (ΔpyrF ΔtrpE) revealed high NADP-dependent GDH activity, along with lower levels of NAD-dependent activity. NADP-dependent activities toward Gln/Ala/Val/Cys and an NAD-dependent threonine dehydrogenase activity were also detected. In KGDH1, a gene disruption strain of T. kodakarensis GDH (Tk-GDH), only threonine dehydrogenase activity was detected, indicating that all other activities were dependent on Tk-GDH. KGDH1 could not grow in a medium in which growth was dependent on amino acid catabolism, implying that Tk-GDH is the only enzyme that can discharge the electrons (to NADP(+)/NAD(+)) released from amino acids in their oxidation to 2-oxoacids. In a medium containing excess pyruvate, KGDH1 displayed normal growth, but higher degrees of amino acid catabolism were observed compared to those for KUW1, suggesting that Tk-GDH functions to suppress amino acid oxidation and plays an anabolic role under this condition. We further constructed disruption strains of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and succinyl-CoA synthetase. The two strains displayed growth defects in both media compared to KUW1. Succinate generation was not observed in these strains, indicating that the two enzymes are solely responsible for Glu catabolism among the multiple KOR and ACS enzymes in T. kodakarensis.

  20. Defective branched chain amino acid catabolism contributes to cardiac dysfunction and remodeling following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Fuyang; Xia, Yunlong; Zhao, Shihao; Yan, Wenjun; Wang, Helin; Lee, Yan; Li, Congye; Zhang, Ling; Lian, Kun; Gao, Erhe; Cheng, Hexiang; Tao, Ling

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac metabolic remodeling is a central event during heart failure (HF) development following myocardial infarction (MI). It is well known that myocardial glucose and fatty acid dysmetabolism contribute to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. However, the role of amino acid metabolism in post-MI HF remains elusive. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are an important group of essential amino acids and function as crucial nutrient signaling in mammalian animals. The present study aimed to determine the role of cardiac BCAA metabolism in post-MI HF progression. Utilizing coronary artery ligation-induced murine MI models, we found that myocardial BCAA catabolism was significantly impaired in response to permanent MI, therefore leading to an obvious elevation of myocardial BCAA abundance. In MI-operated mice, oral BCAA administration further increased cardiac BCAA levels, activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, and exacerbated cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. These data demonstrate that BCAAs act as a direct contributor to post-MI cardiac pathologies. Furthermore, these BCAA-mediated deleterious effects were improved by rapamycin cotreatment, revealing an indispensable role of mTOR in BCAA-mediated adverse effects on cardiac function/structure post-MI. Of note, pharmacological inhibition of branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase kinase (BDK), a negative regulator of myocardial BCAA catabolism, significantly improved cardiac BCAA catabolic disorders, reduced myocardial BCAA levels, and ameliorated post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. In conclusion, our data provide the evidence that impaired cardiac BCAA catabolism directly contributes to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. Moreover, improving cardiac BCAA catabolic defects may be a promising therapeutic strategy against post-MI HF.

  1. A role for TNFα in intervertebral disc degeneration: A non-recoverable catabolic shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purmessur, D.; Walter, B.A. [Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Roughley, P.J. [Shriners Hospital for Children, Montreal, QC (Canada); Laudier, D.M.; Hecht, A.C. [Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Iatridis, James, E-mail: james.iatridis@mssm.edu [Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► TNFα induced catabolic changes similar to human intervertebral disc degeneration. ► The metabolic shift induced by TNFα was sustained following removal. ► TNFα induced changes suggestive of cell senescence without affecting cell viability. ► Interventions are required to stimulate anabolism and increase cell proliferation. -- Abstract: This study examines the effect of TNFα on whole bovine intervertebral discs in organ culture and its association with changes characteristic of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) in order to inform future treatments to mitigate the chronic inflammatory state commonly found with painful IDD. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα contribute to disc pathology and are implicated in the catabolic phenotype associated with painful IDD. Whole bovine discs were cultured to examine cellular (anabolic/catabolic gene expression, cell viability and senescence using β-galactosidase) and structural (histology and aggrecan degradation) changes in response to TNFα treatment. Control or TNFα cultures were assessed at 7 and 21 days; the 21 day group also included a recovery group with 7 days TNFα followed by 14 days in basal media. TNFα induced catabolic and anti-anabolic shifts in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) at 7 days and this persisted until 21 days however cell viability was not affected. Data indicates that TNFα increased aggrecan degradation products and suggests increased β-galactosidase staining at 21 days without any recovery. TNFα treatment of whole bovine discs for 7 days induced changes similar to the degeneration processes that occur in human IDD: aggrecan degradation, increased catabolism, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nerve growth factor expression. TNFα significantly reduced anabolism in cultured IVDs and a possible mechanism may be associated with cell senescence. Results therefore suggest that successful treatments must promote anabolism and cell proliferation in

  2. Detection of catabolic genes in indigenous microbial consortia isolated from a diesel-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milcic-Terzic, J.; Saval, S. [National University of Mexico, Coyocan (Mexico). Institute of Engineering; Lopez-Vidal, Y. [National University of Mexico (Mexico). FAculty of Medicine; Vrvic, M.M. [University of Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Chemistry

    2001-05-01

    Bioremediation is often used for in situ remediation of petroleum-contaminated sites. The primary focus of this study was on understanding the indigenous microbial community which can survive in contaminated environment and is responsible for the degradation. Diesel, toluene and naphthalene-degrading microbial consortia were isolated from diesel-contaminated soil by growing on selective hydrocarbon substrates. The presence and frequency of the catabolic genes responsible for aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation (xylE, ndoB) within the isolated consortia were screened using polymerase chain reaction PCR and DNA-DNA colony hybridization. The diesel DNA-extract possessed both the xylE catabolic gene for toluene, and the nah catabolic gene for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation. The toluene DNA-extract possessed only the xylE catabolic gene, while the naphthalene DNA-extract only the ndoB gene. Restriction enzyme analysis with HaeIII indicated similar restriction patterns for the xylE gene fragment between toluene DNA-extract and a type strain, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 23973. A substantial proportion (74%) of the colonies from the diesel-consortium possessed the xylE gene, and the ndoB gene (78%), while a minority (29%) of the toluene-consortium harbored the xylE gene. 59% of the colonies from the naphthalene-consortium had the ndoB gene, and did not have the xylE gene. These results indicate that the microbial population has been naturally enriched in organisms carrying genes for aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and that significant aromatic biodegradative potential exists at the site. Characterization of the population genotype constitutes a molecular diagnosis which permits the determination of the catabolic potential of the site to degrade the contaminant present. (author)

  3. Identification and engineering of cholesterol oxidases involved in the initial step of sterols catabolism in Mycobacterium neoaurum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kang; Wang, Feng-Qing; Zhang, Huai-Cheng; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been modified to transform sterols to produce valuable steroids. Here, we demonstrated that the oxidation of sterols to sterones is a rate-limiting step in the catabolic pathway of sterols in Mycobacterium neoaurum. Two cholesterol oxidases ChoM1 and ChoM2 involved in the step were identified in M. neoaurum and the ChoM2 shared up to 45% identity with other cholesterol oxidases. We demonstrated that the combination of ChoM1 and ChoM2 plays a significant role in this step. Accordingly, we developed a strategy to overcome this rate-limiting step by augmenting the activity of cholesterol oxidases in M. neoaurum strains to enhance their transformation productivity of sterols to valuable steroids. Our results indicated that the augmentation of ChoM2 achieved 5.57g/l androst-1,4-diene-3,17-dione in M. neoaurum NwIB-01MS and 6.85g/l androst-4-ene-3,17-dione in M. neoaurum NwIB-R10, greatly higher than the original yield, 3.87g/l androst-1,4-diene-3,17-dione and 4.53g/l androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic regulation is sufficient for global and robust coordination of glucose uptake, catabolism, energy production and growth in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Millard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of microorganisms is regulated through two main mechanisms: changes of enzyme capacities as a consequence of gene expression modulation ("hierarchical control" and changes of enzyme activities through metabolite-enzyme interactions. An increasing body of evidence indicates that hierarchical control is insufficient to explain metabolic behaviors, but the system-wide impact of metabolic regulation remains largely uncharacterized. To clarify its role, we developed and validated a detailed kinetic model of Escherichia coli central metabolism that links growth to environment. Metabolic control analyses confirm that the control is widely distributed across the network and highlight strong interconnections between all the pathways. Exploration of the model solution space reveals that several robust properties emerge from metabolic regulation, from the molecular level (e.g. homeostasis of total metabolite pool to the overall cellular physiology (e.g. coordination of carbon uptake, catabolism, energy and redox production, and growth, while allowing a large degree of flexibility at most individual metabolic steps. These properties have important physiological implications for E. coli and significantly expand the self-regulating capacities of its metabolism.

  5. N-acetylaspartate catabolism determines cytosolic acetyl-CoA levels and histone acetylation in brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokesch, A; Pelzmann, H J; Pessentheiner, A R; Huber, K; Madreiter-Sokolowski, C T; Drougard, A; Schittmayer, M; Kolb, D; Magnes, C; Trausinger, G; Graier, W F; Birner-Gruenberger, R; Pospisilik, J A; Bogner-Strauss, J G

    2016-04-05

    Histone acetylation depends on the abundance of nucleo-cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA. Here, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is a highly abundant brain metabolite catabolized by aspartoacylase yielding aspartate and acetate. The latter can be further used for acetyl-CoA production. Prior to this work, the presence of NAA has not been described in adipocytes. Here, we show that accumulation of NAA decreases the brown adipocyte phenotype. We increased intracellular NAA concentrations in brown adipocytes via media supplementation or knock-down of aspartoacylase and measured reduced lipolysis, thermogenic gene expression, and oxygen consumption. Combinations of approaches to increase intracellular NAA levels showed additive effects on lipolysis and gene repression, nearly abolishing the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16, and Ppara. Transcriptome analyses of aspartoacylase knock-down cells indicate deficiencies in acetyl-CoA and lipid metabolism. Concordantly, cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA levels and global histone H3 acetylation were decreased. Further, activating histone marks (H3K27ac and H3K9ac) in promoters/enhancers of brown marker genes showed reduced acetylation status. Taken together, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. Thereby, we mechanistically connect the NAA pathway to the epigenomic regulation of gene expression, modulating the phenotype of brown adipocytes.

  6. Metabolomic and proteomic insights into carbaryl catabolism by Burkholderia sp. C3 and degradation of ten N-methylcarbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jong-Su; Keum, Young-Soo; Li, Qing X

    2013-11-01

    Burkholderia sp. C3, an efficient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degrader, can utilize nine of the ten N-methylcarbamate insecticides including carbaryl as a sole source of carbon. Rapid hydrolysis of carbaryl in C3 is followed by slow catabolism of the resulting 1-naphthol. This study focused on metabolomes and proteomes in C3 cells utilizing carbaryl in comparison to those using glucose or nutrient broth. Sixty of the 867 detected proteins were involved in primary metabolism, adaptive sensing and regulation, transport, stress response, and detoxification. Among the 41 proteins expressed in response to carbaryl were formate dehydrogenase, aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase and ethanolamine utilization protein involved in one carbon metabolism. Acetate kinase and phasin were 2 of the 19 proteins that were not detected in carbaryl-supported C3 cells, but detected in glucose-supported C3 cells. Down-production of phasin and polyhydroxyalkanoates in carbaryl-supported C3 cells suggests insufficient carbon sources and lower levels of primary metabolites to maintain an ordinary level of metabolism. Differential metabolomes (~196 identified polar metabolites) showed up-production of metabolites in pentose phosphate pathways and metabolisms of cysteine, cystine and some other amino acids, disaccharides and nicotinate, in contract to down-production of most of the other amino acids and hexoses. The proteomic and metabolomic analyses showed that carbaryl-supported C3 cells experienced strong toxic effects, oxidative stresses, DNA/RNA damages and carbon nutrient deficiency.

  7. Catabolism of volatile sulfur compounds precursors by Brevibacterium linens and Geotrichum candidum, two microorganisms of the cheese ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfi, Kenza; Amárita, Felix; Spinnler, Henry-Eric; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2003-11-01

    Two Brevibacterium linens strains and the cheese-ripening yeast Geotrichum candidum were compared with regard to their ability to produce volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) from three different precursors namely L-methionine, 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (KMBA) and 4-methylthio-2-hydroxybutyric acid (HMBA). All microorganisms were able to convert these precursors to VSCs. However, although all were able to produce VSCs from L-methionine, only G. candidum accumulated KMBA when cultivated on this amino acid, contrary to B. linens suggesting that the transamination pathway is not active in this microorganism. Conversely, a L-methionine gamma-lyase activity--which catalyses the one step L-methionine to methanethiol (MTL) degradation route--was only found in B. linens strains. Several other enzymatic activities involved in the catabolism of the precursors tested were investigated. KMBA transiently accumulated in G. candidum cultures, and was then reduced to HMBA by a KMBA dehydrogenase (KDH) activity. This activity was not detected in B. linens. Despite no HMBA dehydrogenase (HDH) was found in G. candidum, a strong HMBA oxidase (HOX) activity was measured in this microorganism. This latter activity was weakly active in B. linens. KMBA and HMBA demethiolating activities were found in all the microorganisms. Our results illustrate the metabolic diversity between cheese-ripening microorganisms of the cheese ecosystem.

  8. HPLC analysis for the clinical-biochemical diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism of purines and pyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Amorini, Angela Maria; Di Pietro, Valentina; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The determination of purines and pyrimidines in biofluids is useful for the clinical-biochemical characterization of acute and chronic pathological states that induce transient or permanent alterations of metabolism. In particular, the diagnosis of several inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) is accomplished by the analysis of circulating and excreted purines and pyrimidines. It is certainly advantageous to simultaneously determine the full purine and pyrimidine profile, as well as to quantify other compounds of relevance (e.g., organic acids, amino acids, sugars) in various metabolic hereditary diseases, in order to screen for a large number of IEMs using a reliable and sensitive analytical method characterized by mild to moderate costs. Toward this end, we have developed an ion-pairing HPLC method with diode array detection for the synchronous separation of several purines and pyrimidines. This method also allows the quantification of additional compounds such as N-acetylated amino acids and dicarboxylic acids, the concentrations of which are profoundly altered in different IEMs. The application of the method in the analysis of biological samples from patients with suspected purine and pyrimidine disorders is presented to illustrate its applicability for the clinical-biochemical diagnosis of IEM.

  9. Poly purine.pyrimidine sequences upstream of the beta-galactosidase gene affect gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmachari Samir K

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly purine.pyrimidine sequences have the potential to adopt intramolecular triplex structures and are overrepresented upstream of genes in eukaryotes. These sequences may regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction of transcription factors with DNA sequences upstream of genes. Results A poly purine.pyrimidine sequence with the potential to adopt an intramolecular triplex DNA structure was designed. The sequence was inserted within a nucleosome positioned upstream of the β-galactosidase gene in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, between the cycl promoter and gal 10Upstream Activating Sequences (UASg. Upon derepression with galactose, β-galactosidase gene expression is reduced 12-fold in cells carrying single copy poly purine.pyrimidine sequences. This reduction in expression is correlated with reduced transcription. Furthermore, we show that plasmids carrying a poly purine.pyrimidine sequence are not specifically lost from yeast cells. Conclusion We propose that a poly purine.pyrimidine sequence upstream of a gene affects transcription. Plasmids carrying this sequence are not specifically lost from cells and thus no additional effort is needed for the replication of these sequences in eukaryotic cells.

  10. Two new Pb coordination polymers derived from pyrimidine-2-thiolate: Synthesis, methyl substitution-induced effect and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Si-Zhe; Zhou, Rui-Sha; Hu, Tuo-Ping; Shao, Jia; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Two new coordination compounds, {Pb(pymt)2}∞ (1) and {Pb(mpymt)2}∞ (2) (pymt = pyrimidine-2-thiolate and mpymt = 4-methyl-pyrimidine-2-thione) have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In compounds 1 and 2, pymt- and mpymt- adopt the same coordination modes (μ-1 κN, S and μ2-1 κN, S: 2 κS, N) to interacted with Pb2+, however, different topology structures for compounds 1 and 2 are obtained. Compound 1 displays a one-dimensional (1D) ribbon with square cavity constructed from two double concentric chains of [Pb-S]∞ and [Pb-Pyrimidine] ∞ sharing Pb1 ions. Compound 2 shows 1D polymeric single chain constructed by [Pb-S]∞ and [Pb-methyl-pyrimidine]∞ chains. The results revealed that the methyl groups don't influence the coordination modes of pyrimidine-2-thiolate but directed the structural variations. Moreover, the fluorescent properties of compounds 1 and 2 were investigated.

  11. Heteroaromatization with 4-Hydroxycoumarin Part II: Synthesis of Some New Pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidines, [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidines and Pyrimido[1,6-b]-[1,2,4]triazine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Bedair

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available A variety of novel [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine-13-ones (4a-f and (5b-d could be obtained via reaction of 9-amino-7-(4’-chlorophenyl-8,9-dihydro-8-imino-6H,7H-[1]benzopyrano[3`,4`:5,6]pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidine-6-one (3 with a variety of reagents. Pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidine-6-ones 5a, 8a-c and pyrimido[1,6-b][1,2,4]-triazine-3,14-dione (6 were also prepared. The antimicrobial activity of some of the synthesized compounds was tested.

  12. Studies on Synthesis of Some Novel Heterocyclic Chalcone, Pyrazoline, Pyrimidine - 2 - One, Pyrimidine - 2 - Thione, para-Acetanilide Sulphonyl and Benzoyl Derivatives and their Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh N. Mistry

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available 1, 2 - Dichloro benzene on chlorosulphonation by chlorosulphonic acid gives 1, 2 - [dichloro] - benzene sulphonyl chloride which on condensation with p –amino acetophenone gives 1-[acetyl] - 1’ , 2’ - [dichloro] - dibenz sulphonamide derivative. This derivative undergo condensation with 2,4- dichloro benzaldehyde gives 1- [3” - (sub. phenyl - 2” - propene - 1” - one] - 1’ , 2’ - [dichloro] - dibenz sulphonamide derivative which on reaction with 99% hydrazine hydrate and glacial acetic acid gives 1-[acetyl]-3- [1’ , 2’ - (dichloro - dibenz sulphonamide] -5 - [2” , 4” - dichloro phenyl] - 2 - pyrazoline derivative. This derivative reacts with various substituted aldehydes to give corresponding substituted chalcone derivatives [1(a-j]. Now, these chalcone derivatives [1(a-j] on condensation with urea gives corresponding substituted pyrimidine - 2 - one derivatives [2(a-j] and on condensation with thio-urea gives corresponding substituted pyrimidine- 2 -thione derivatives [3(a-j]. Further, these chalcone derivatives [1(a-j] on reaction with 99% hydrazine hydrate gives 1 - [1’ - (H - 5’ - (sub. phenyl - 2’ - pyrazoline]- 3 - [1” , 2” - (dichloro - dibenz sulphonamide] - 5 - [2’’’ , 4’’’ - dichloro phenyl]-2- pyrazoline derivatives [4(a-j] as an intermediate compounds, which on condensation with p-acetanilide sulphonyl chloride gives corresponding substituted p - acetanilide sulphonyl derivatives [5(a-j] and on condensation with benzoyl chloride gives corresponding substituted benzoyl derivatives [6(a-j]. Structure elucidation of synthesised compounds has been made on the basis of elemental analysis, I.R. spectral studies and 1H N.M.R. spectral studies. The antimicrobial activity of the synthesised compounds has been studied against the cultures “Staphylococcus aureus”, “Escherichia coli” and “Candela albicans”.

  13. An unusual correlation between ppGpp pool size and rate of ribosome synthesis during partial pyrimidine starvation of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Pedersen, Steen; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli was exposed to partial pyrimidine starvation by feeding a pyrBI strain orotate as the only pyrimidine source. Subsequently, differential rates of synthesis of rRNA and of a few ribosome-associated proteins as well as the pool sizes of nucleoside triphosphates and ppGpp were...

  14. 1-(2-Ethoxyethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidines as potent phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Michael B; Acker, Brad A; Jacobsen, E J; Hughes, Robert O; Walker, John K; Fox, David N A; Palmer, Michael J; Freeman, Sandra K; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R

    2010-05-15

    1H-Pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidines are a class of potent and selective second generation phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. This work explores the potency, selectivity and efficacy of 1-(2-ethoxyethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidines as PDE5 inhibitors resulting in the advancement of a clinical candidate.

  15. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of some Tetrahydro Quinolone Diones and Pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidine Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Masoume; Foroughifar, Naser; Mobinikhaledi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    There has been special interest in the chemistry of quinolone and pyrimidine derivatives due to their diverse biological activities such as anticonvulsant, anti-malarial agents, antibacterial, antiviral, cytostatic, antithelemintic, antigenotoxic, anti-cancer agents. These compounds are also used as targeting delayed-type hypersensivity and anti-convulsant agents. As a part of our research works in the synthesis of pyrimidine derivatives containing biological activities, a series of novel pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives 2 and tetrahydro quinolone dione derivatives 3 were synthesized via reaction of tetrahydrobenzo[b]pyrano derivatives 1 with different reagents in suitable yields. The characterization of these synthesized compounds was established by IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic data. Furthermore, all compounds were subsequently evaluated for their in-vitro antibacterial activity against three bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus (ATTC-25923), Escherichia Coli (ATTC-25922) and Bacillus anthracic (ATTC-25924). PMID:26330864

  16. A study of the valence shell photoionisation dynamics of pyrimidine and pyrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, D.M.P., E-mail: david.holland@stfc.ac.uk [Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Potts, A.W. [Department of Physics, King' s College, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Karlsson, L. [Department of Physics, Uppsala University, Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Stener, M.; Decleva, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienze e Tecnologia dei Materiali, INSTM, Unita' di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); CNR-IOM, Area Science Park - Basovizza, Strada Statale 14 km 163,5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2011-11-18

    Graphical abstract: The complete valence shell photoelectron spectra of pyrimidine and pyrazine have been recorded with synchrotron radiation and interpreted with the aid of vertical ionisation energies and relative spectral intensities calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Valence shell photoelectron spectra of pyrimidine and pyrazine have been recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many-body effects are important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoionisation dynamics are affected by shape resonances. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical predictions for single-hole ionic states are satisfactory. - Abstract: The complete valence shell photoelectron spectra of pyrimidine and pyrazine have been recorded with synchrotron radiation and the observed structure has been interpreted with the aid of vertical ionisation energies and relative spectral intensities calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. The theoretical predictions for the single-hole ionic states due to outer valence shell ionisation agree satisfactorily with the experimental results. Ionisation from the inner valence orbitals is strongly influenced by many-body effects and the intensity associated with a particular orbital is spread amongst numerous satellites. Photoelectron angular distributions and partial cross sections have been determined both experimentally and theoretically, and demonstrate that shape resonances affect the valence shell photoionisation dynamics. In addition to shape resonances occurring a few eV above the ionisation threshold, the calculations indicate that many of the orbitals are influenced by shape resonant processes at much higher energies. Some of these higher energy resonances have been confirmed through a comparison between the relevant theoretical and experimental photoelectron asymmetry parameters. The spectral behaviour of asymmetry parameters associated with {pi}-orbitals has been shown to

  17. Irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ice with high-energy ultraviolet photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuevo, Michel; Chen, Yu-Jung; Hu, Wei-Jie; Qiu, Jun-Ming; Wu, Shang-Ruei; Fung, Hok-Sum; Chu, Ching-Chi; Yih, Tai-Sone; Ip, Wing-Huen; Wu, C-Y Robert

    2014-02-01

    The detection of nucleobases, the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, in several meteorites suggests that these compounds of biological interest were formed via astrophysical, abiotic processes. This hypothesis is in agreement with recent laboratory studies of irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ices with vacuum UV photons emitted by an H2-discharge lamp in the 6.9-11.3 eV (110-180 nm) range at low temperature, shown to lead to the abiotic formation of several compounds including the nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we irradiated H2O:pyrimidine ice mixtures under astrophysically relevant conditions (14 K, ≤10(-9) torr) with high-energy UV photons provided by a synchrotron source in three different ranges: the 0(th) order light (4.1-49.6 eV, 25-300 nm), the He i line (21.2 eV, 58.4 nm), and the He ii line (40.8 eV, 30.4 nm). The photodestruction of pyrimidine was monitored with IR spectroscopy, and the samples recovered at room temperature were analyzed with liquid and gas chromatographies. Uracil and its precursor 4(3H)-pyrimidone were found in all samples, with absolute and relative abundances varying significantly from one sample to another. These results support a scenario in which compounds of biological interest can be formed and survive in environments subjected to high-energy UV radiation fields.

  18. Synthesis, solid-state fluorescence properties, and computational analysis of novel 2-aminobenzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidine 5,5-dioxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichirou Yokota

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available New fluorescent compounds, benzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidine 5,5-dioxides (3a–g, 2-amino-4-methylsulfanylbenzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidine (6, and 2-amino-4-methylsulfanyl-7-methoxybenzo[4,5]furo[3,2-d]pyrimidine (7, were synthesized in good yields from heterocyclic ketene dithioacetals (1a–c and guanidine carbonate (2a or (S-methylisothiourea sulfate (2b in pyridine under reflux. Among the fused pyrimidine derivatives, compound 3c, which has an amino group at the 2-position and a benzylamino group at the 4-position of the pyrimidine ring, showed the strongest solid-state fluorescence. The absorption and emission properties of the compounds were quantitatively reproduced by a series of ab initio quantum-chemical calculations.

  19. Measurement of small scalar and dipolar couplings in purine and pyrimidine bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zídek, L; Wu, H; Feigon, J; Sklenár, V

    2001-10-01

    A suite of spin-state-selective excitation (S3E) NMR experiments for the measurements of small one-bond (13C-13C, 15N-13C) and two-bond (1H-13C, 1H-15N) coupling constants in 13C,15N labeled purine and pyrimidine bases is presented. The incorporation of band-selective shaped pulses, elimination of the cross talk between alpha and beta sub-spectra, and accuracy and precision of the proposed approach are discussed. Merits of using S3E rather than alpha/beta-half-filter are demonstrated using results obtained on isotopically labeled DNA oligonucleotides.

  20. Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor. Part 6: Further optimization of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Roger J; Bamford, Samantha J; Clay, Alex; Gaur, Suneel; Haymes, Tim; Jackson, Philip S; Jordan, Allan M; Klenke, Burkhard; Leonardi, Stefania; Liu, Jeanette; Mansell, Howard L; Ng, Sean; Saadi, Mona; Simmonite, Heather; Stratton, Gemma C; Todd, Richard S; Williamson, Douglas S; Yule, Ian A

    2009-09-15

    Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor have been reported to have potential therapeutic benefit in the alleviation of the symptoms associated with neurodegenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. As part of our efforts to discover potent and selective antagonists of this receptor, we herein describe the detailed optimization and structure-activity relationships of a series of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides. These optimized derivatives display desirable physiochemical and pharmacokinetic profiles, which have led to promising oral activity in clinically relevant models of Parkinson's disease.

  1. Methylpalladium complexes with pyrimidine-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Summary A series of methylpalladium(II) complexes with pyrimidine-NHC ligands carrying different aryl- and alkyl substituents R ([((pym)^(NHC-R))PdII(CH3)X] with X = Cl, CF3COO, CH3) has been prepared by transmetalation reactions from the corresponding silver complexes and chloro(methyl)(cyclooctadiene)palladium(II). The dimethyl(1-(2-pyrimidyl)-3-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazolin-2-ylidene)palladium(II) complex was synthesized via the free carbene route. All complexes were fully characterized by standard methods and in three cases also by a solid state structure. PMID:27559406

  2. Synthesis, in vitro antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of novel pyrimidine-benzimidazol combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng-Ju; Yang, Ang; Gu, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Song; Shao, Kun-Peng; Xue, Deng-Qi; He, Peng; Jiang, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Qiu-Rong; Liu, Hong-Min

    2014-06-15

    A series of novel 4-substituted-2-{[(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)methyl] thio}-6-methylpyrimidine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against four human cancer cell lines and inhibitory activities against five type culture strains in vitro. Some of synthetic pyrimidine-benzimidazol combinations showed good inhibitory activities against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, especially compounds 7b and 7c. Compounds 7a and 7d exhibited enhanced activities against MGC-803 in vitro, when compared to 5-Fu.

  3. Polymerization in Liquid Crystal Medium: Preparation of Polythiophene Derivatives Bearing a Bulky Pyrimidine Substituent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromasa Goto

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We carried out polycondensation of monomers bearing a bulky pyrimidine substituent in a liquid crystal solvent. The resultant polymers formed nematic liquid crystals. The polymers prepared in liquid crystals had higher coplanarity than the polymers prepared in toluene. This can be due to the fact that the ordered medium of the liquid crystal produces an aggregated structure with well-developed π-stacking between the main chains. The present results demonstrated that polymerization of bulky monomers is possible in liquid crystal solvents.

  4. [Quantum-chemical investigation of the elementary molecular mechanisms of pyrimidine-purine transversions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', O O; Govorun D M

    2010-01-01

    Purine-purine mispairs of DNA (thus involving template base in anti-conformation along the glycosidic bond and base of the incoming nucleotide - in syn-conformation) leading to pyrimidine-purine "transversions"-type point mutations were revealed and characterized at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in vacuum approach adequately modeling hydrophobic environment of the active centre of high-fidelity replicative DNA-polymerases.

  5. Efficient and Selective Construction of Pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Ping; Wu, Jing; Hu, Yanggen; Li, Zaifang; Hou, Qiufei; Wang, Yanling; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Erli [Hubei Univ. of Arts and Science, Xiangyang (China)

    2014-02-15

    An efficient and selective method for the synthesis of ethyl 2-amino/aryloxy-3-aryl-4-oxo-5-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-3H-pyrrolo[3,2-d] pyrimidine-7-carboxylate derivatives has been developed. The main process involved the reaction of diethyl 1-phenyl-3-((triphenylphosphoranylidene)amino)-1H-pyrrole-2,4-dicarboxylate and aromatic isocyanates, followed by addition of amines/phenols in the presence of catalytic amount of sodium ethoxide or solid potassium carbonate.

  6. An Efficient Microwave-assisted Synthesis of Pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Shujiang; WU Shanshan; HAN Zhengguo; HAO Wenjuan

    2009-01-01

    A series of new pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives were synthesized by multi-component reactions of equi-molar amount of aromatic aldehydes with barbituric acids (barbituric acid or 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid) and 5-amino-2-methylbenzo[d]thiazol in mixed solvent of glacial acetic acid and ethylene glycol without catalyst under microwave irradiation. This one-pot method has the advantage of good yields (90%-93%), simple workup proce-dure and short reaction time (5 min).

  7. Photoselected electron transfer pathways in DNA photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytkova, Tatiana R; Beratan, David N; Skourtis, Spiros S

    2007-01-16

    Cyclobutane dimer photolyases are proteins that bind to UV-damaged DNA containing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesions. They repair these lesions by photo-induced electron transfer. The electron donor cofactor of a photolyase is a two-electron-reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH(-)). When FADH(-) is photo-excited, it transfers an electron from an excited pi --> pi* singlet state to the pyrimidine dimer lesion of DNA. We compute the lowest excited singlet states of FADH(-) using ab initio (time-dependent density functional theory and time-dependent Hartree-Fock), and semiempirical (INDO/S configuration interaction) methods. The calculations show that the two lowest pi --> pi* singlet states of FADH(-) are localized on the side of the flavin ring that is proximal to the dimer lesion of DNA. For the lowest-energy donor excited state of FADH(-), we compute the conformationally averaged electronic coupling to acceptor states of the thymine dimer. The coupling calculations are performed at the INDO/S level, on donor-acceptor cofactor conformations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. These calculations demonstrate that the localization of the (1)FADH(-)* donor state on the flavin ring enhances the electronic coupling between the flavin and the dimer by permitting shorter electron-transfer pathways to the dimer that have single through-space jumps. Therefore, in photolyase, the photo-excitation itself enhances the electron transfer rate by moving the electron towards the dimer.

  8. Knockout of the murine cysteine dioxygenase gene results in severe impairment in ability to synthesize taurine and an increased catabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Iori; Roman, Heather B.; Valli, Alessandro; Fieselmann, Krista; Lam, Jimmy; Peters, Rachel; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine homeostasis is dependent on the regulation of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) in response to changes in sulfur amino acid intake. CDO oxidizes cysteine to cysteinesulfinate, which is further metabolized to either taurine or to pyruvate plus sulfate. To gain insight into the physiological function of CDO and the consequence of a loss of CDO activity, mice carrying a null CDO allele (CDO+/− mice) were crossed to generate CDO−/−, CDO+/−, and CDO+/+ mice. CDO−/− mice exhibited postnatal mortality, growth deficit, and connective tissue pathology. CDO−/− mice had extremely low taurine levels and somewhat elevated cysteine levels, consistent with the lack of flux through CDO-dependent catabolic pathways. However, plasma sulfate levels were slightly higher in CDO−/− mice than in CDO+/− or CDO+/+ mice, and tissue levels of acid-labile sulfide were elevated, indicating an increase in cysteine catabolism by cysteine desulfhydration pathways. Null mice had lower hepatic cytochrome c oxidase levels, suggesting impaired electron transport capacity. Supplementation of mice with taurine improved survival of male pups but otherwise had little effect on the phenotype of the CDO−/− mice. H2S has been identified as an important gaseous signaling molecule as well as a toxicant, and pathology may be due to dysregulation of H2S production. Control of cysteine levels by regulation of CDO may be necessary to maintain low H2S/sulfane sulfur levels and facilitate the use of H2S as a signaling molecule. PMID:21693692

  9. Structure and Mechanism of PhnP, a Phosphodiesterase of the Carbon-Phosphorus Lyase Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Shu-Mei; Wathier, Matthew; Podzelinska, Kateryna;

    2011-01-01

    PhnP is a phosphodiesterase that plays an important role within the bacterial carbon-phosphorus lyase (CP-lyase) pathway by recycling a "dead-end" intermediate, 5-phospho-α-d-ribosyl 1,2-cyclic phosphate, that is formed during organophosphonate catabolism. As a member of the metallo-β-lactamase s...

  10. Amyloid beta-protein and lipid rafts: focused on biogenesis and catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Wataru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is thought to play a key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three secretases (β-, γ-, and α-secretase) are proteases that control the production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein. Increasing evidence suggests that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains termed 'lipid rafts' are involved in the biogenesis and accumulation of Aβ as well as Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity. γ-Secretase is enriched in lipid rafts, which are considered an important site for Aβ generation. Additionally, Aβ-degrading peptidases located in lipid rafts, such as neprilysin, appear to play a role in Aβ catabolism. This mini-review focuses on the roles of lipid rafts in the biogenesis and catabolism of Aβ, covering recent research on the relationship between lipid rafts and the three secretases or Aβ-degrading peptidases. Furthermore, the significance of lipid rafts in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity is briefly summarized.

  11. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease.

  12. Transcriptional Analysis of Prebiotic Uptake and Catabolism by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract can be positively modulated by dietary supplementation of probiotic bacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates. Here differential transcriptomics and functional genomics were used to identify genes in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM involved in the uptake...... and catabolism of 11 potential prebiotic compounds consisting of α- and β- linked galactosides and glucosides. These oligosaccharides induced genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS), galactoside pentose hexuronide (GPH) permease, and ATP-binding cassette (ABC......-phospho-β-glucosidases implicated in the catabolism of gentiobiose and cellobiose. These findings highlight the broad oligosaccharide metabolic repertoire of L. acidophilus NCFM and establish a platform for selection and screening of both probiotic bacteria and prebiotic compounds that may positively...

  13. T-lymphocytes from AIDS patients are unable to synthesize ribonucleotides de novo in response to mitogenic stimulation. Impaired pyrimidine responses are already evident at early stages of HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofill, M; Fairbanks, L D; Ruckemann, K; Lipman, M; Simmonds, H A

    1995-12-15

    Proliferative defects have been reported at the level of DNA synthesis, even in T-lymphocytes from asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus type-1+ (HIV-1+) patients. Since purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotide availability is crucial for proliferation, we compared the ability of HIV-1- and HIV-1+ T-lymphocytes (> 95% CD4+ and CD8+) to activate de novo biosynthetic and salvage pathways following phytohemagglutinin stimulation using 14C-labeled precursors. The striking abnormality already detectable in asymptomatic patients' cells was the impaired ability of CTP, UDP-Glc, and UTP pools to expand over 72 h (44-70% of control), although ATP and GTP pools and responses were normal. In symptomatic patients, resting T-cells showed markedly reduced pyrimidine pools (53-74% of control) with no change following activation. Relatively normal ATP, GTP, and NAD pools masked the same impaired response of de novo synthesis to activation, with ATP and GTP being reduced by 50% at 48 h. Purine salvage was more active than the control in unstimulated HIV-1+ cells. This impaired de novo synthesis in HIV-1+ T-lymphocytes severely restricts the availability of ribonucleotides for vital growth-related activities such as membrane expansion and strand break repair as well as DNA and RNA synthesis. The data indicate that resting T-lymphocytes from symptomatic patients survive through enhanced salvage, but the stimulation induces metabolic cell death, and provide an explanation for the activation-associated lymphocyte death seen in HIV-1+ T-lymphocytes.

  14. Catabolism of glucose and lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-12-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-(13)Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-(13)Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-(13)C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by (13)C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only

  15. Catabolism of exogenous lactate reveals it as a legitimate metabolic substrate in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Kelly M; Scarbrough, Peter M.; Anthony Ribeiro; Rachel Richardson; Hong Yuan; Pierre Sonveaux; Landon, Chelsea D.; Jen-Tsan Chi; Salvatore Pizzo; Thies Schroeder; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Lactate accumulation in tumors has been associated with metastases and poor overall survival in cancer patients. Lactate promotes angiogenesis and metastasis, providing rationale for understanding how it is processed by cells. The concentration of lactate in tumors is a balance between the amount produced, amount carried away by vasculature and if/how it is catabolized by aerobic tumor or stromal cells. We examined lactate metabolism in human normal and breast tumor cell lines and rat breast ...

  16. A Program for the Study of Skeletal Muscle Catabolism Following Physical Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-06

    amino acids ( BCAA - leucine, isoleucine, and valine) are the only essential amino acids that are primarily oxidized in skeletal muscle (16). The amino...it is clear that BCAA (primarily leucine) can reduce net protein degradation in vitro, the effect of amino acid formulas supplemented with additional... BCAA on skeletal muscle breakdown in catabolic patients remains controversial. For example, Freund and Cerra have administered solutions containing up

  17. Characterization of genes involved in erythritol catabolism in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Christopher K; Rath, Amber M; Noel, Tanya C; Hynes, Michael F

    2006-07-01

    A genetic locus encoding erythritol uptake and catabolism genes was identified in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, and shown to be plasmid encoded in a wide range of R. leguminosarum strains. A Tn5-B22 mutant (19B-3) unable to grow on erythritol was isolated from a mutant library of R. leguminosarum strain VF39SM. The mutated gene eryF was cloned and partially sequenced, and determined to have a high homology to permease genes of ABC transporters. A cosmid complementing the mutation (pCos42) was identified and was shown to carry all the genes necessary to restore the ability to grow on erythritol to a VF39SM strain cured of pRleVF39f. In the genomic DNA sequence of strain 3841, the gene linked to the mutation in 19B-3 is flanked by a cluster of genes with high homology to the known erythritol catabolic genes from Brucella spp. Through mutagenesis studies, three distinct operons on pCos42 that are required for growth on erythritol were identified: an ABC-transporter operon (eryEFG), a catabolic operon (eryABCD) and an operon (deoR-tpiA2-rpiB) that encodes a gene with significant homology to triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA2). These genes all share high sequence identity to genes in the erythritol catabolism region of Brucella spp., and clustalw alignments suggest that horizontal transfer of the erythritol locus may have occurred between R. leguminosarum and Brucella. Transcription of the eryABCD operon is repressed by EryD and is induced by the presence of erythritol. Mutant 19B-3 was impaired in its ability to compete against wild-type for nodulation of pea plants but was still capable of forming nitrogen-fixing nodules.

  18. Increased fat catabolism sustains water balance during fasting in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Joanna; Sadowska, Edyta T; Cichoń, Mariusz; Bauchinger, Ulf

    2016-09-01

    Patterns of physiological flexibility in response to fasting are well established, but much less is known about the contribution of water deprivation to the observed effects. We investigated body composition and energy and water budget in three groups of zebra finches: birds with access to food and water, food-deprived birds having access to drinking water and food-and-water-deprived birds. Animals were not stimulated by elevated energy expenditure and they were in thermoneutral conditions; thus, based on previous studies, water balance of fasting birds was expected to be maintained by increased catabolism of proteins. In contrast to this expectation, we found that access to water did not prevent reduction of proteinaceous tissue, but it saved fat reserves of the fasting birds. Thus, water balance of birds fasting without access to water seemed to be maintained by elevated fat catabolism, which generated 6 times more metabolic water compared with that in birds that had access to water. Therefore, we revise currently established views and propose fat to serve as the primary source for metabolic water production. Previously assumed increased protein breakdown for maintenance of water budget would occur if fat stores were depleted or if fat catabolism reached its upper limits due to high energy demands. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Review article: hyperammonaemic and catabolic consequences of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Damink, S W M; Dejong, C H C; Jalan, R

    2009-04-15

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding in patients with cirrhosis of the liver induces hyperammonaemia and leads to a catabolic cascade that precipitates life-threatening complications. The haemoglobin molecule is unique because it lacks the essential amino acid isoleucine and contains high amounts of leucine and valine. UGI bleed therefore presents the gut with protein of very low biologic value, which may be the stimulus to induce net catabolism. To describe the hyperammonaemic and catabolic consequences of UGI bleeding in cirrhosis. A semi-structured literature search was performed using PubMed and article references. It has recently been proven that ('simulation of ') a UGI bleed in patients with cirrhosis leads to impaired protein synthesis that can be restored by intravenous infusion of isoleucine. This may have therapeutic implications for the function of rapidly dividing cells and short half-life proteins such as clotting factors. Renal and small bowel ammoniagenesis were shown to be the most prominent causes for the hyperammonaemia that resulted from a UGI bleed. This provides an explanation for the therapeutic failure of the current clinical therapies that are aimed at large bowel-derived ammonia production. Isoleucine infusion did not diminish renal ammoniagenesis. New pharmacological therapies to diminish postbleeding hyperammonaemia should target the altered inter-organ ammonia metabolism and promote ammonia excretion and/or increase the excretion of precursors of ammoniagenesis, e.g. l-ornithine-phenylacetate.

  20. Increased glutamine catabolism mediates bone anabolism in response to WNT signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karner, Courtney M; Esen, Emel; Okunade, Adewole L; Patterson, Bruce W; Long, Fanxin

    2015-02-01

    WNT signaling stimulates bone formation by increasing both the number of osteoblasts and their protein-synthesis activity. It is not clear how WNT augments the capacity of osteoblast progenitors to meet the increased energetic and synthetic needs associated with mature osteoblasts. Here, in cultured osteoblast progenitors, we determined that WNT stimulates glutamine catabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and consequently lowers intracellular glutamine levels. The WNT-induced reduction of glutamine concentration triggered a general control nonderepressible 2-mediated (GCN2-mediated) integrated stress response (ISR) that stimulated expression of genes responsible for amino acid supply, transfer RNA (tRNA) aminoacylation, and protein folding. WNT-induced glutamine catabolism and ISR were β-catenin independent, but required mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. In a hyperactive WNT signaling mouse model of human osteosclerosis, inhibition of glutamine catabolism or Gcn2 deletion suppressed excessive bone formation. Together, our data indicate that glutamine is both an energy source and a protein-translation rheostat that is responsive to WNT and suggest that manipulation of the glutamine/GCN2 signaling axis may provide a valuable approach for normalizing deranged protein anabolism associated with human diseases.

  1. Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almada Anthony

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examined whether supplementing the diet with a commercial supplement containing zinc magnesium aspartate (ZMA during training affects zinc and magnesium status, anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and/or training adaptations. Forty-two resistance trained males (27 ± 9 yrs; 178 ± 8 cm, 85 ± 15 kg, 18.6 ± 6% body fat were matched according to fat free mass and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner either a dextrose placebo (P or ZMA 30–60 minutes prior to going to sleep during 8-weeks of standardized resistance-training. Subjects completed testing sessions at 0, 4, and 8 weeks that included body composition assessment as determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, 1-RM and muscular endurance tests on the bench and leg press, a Wingate anaerobic power test, and blood analysis to assess anabolic/catabolic status as well as markers of health. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results indicated that ZMA supplementation non-significantly increased serum zinc levels by 11 – 17% (p = 0.12. However, no significant differences were observed between groups in anabolic or catabolic hormone status, body composition, 1-RM bench press and leg press, upper or lower body muscular endurance, or cycling anaerobic capacity. Results indicate that ZMA supplementation during training does not appear to enhance training adaptations in resistance trained populations.

  2. Plant-bacteria partnership: phytoremediation of hydrocarbons contaminated soil and expression of catabolic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamna Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum hydrocarbons are harmful to living organisms when they are exposed in natural environment. Once they come in contact, it is not an easy to remove them because many of their constituents are persistent in nature. To achieve this target, different approaches have been exploited by using plants, bacteria, and plant-bacteria together. Among them, combined use of plants and bacteria has gained tremendous attention as bacteria possess set of catabolic genes which produce catabolic enzymes to decontaminate hydrocarbons. In return, plant ooze out root exudates containing nutrients and necessary metabolites which facilitate the microbial colonization in plant rhizosphere. This results into high gene abundance and gene expression in the rhizosphere and, thus, leads to enhanced degradation. Moreover, high proportions of beneficial bacteria helps plant to gain more biomass due to their plant growth promoting activities and production of phytohromones. This review focuses functioning and mechanisms of catabolic genes responsible for degradation of straight chain and aromatic hydrocarbons with their potential of degradation in bioremediation. With the understanding of expression mechanisms, rate of degradation can be enhanced by adjusting environmental factors and acclimatizing plant associated bacteria in plant rhizosphere.

  3. Plant-bacteria partnership: phytoremediation of hydrocarbons contaminated soil and expression of catabolic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamna Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum hydrocarbons are harmful to living organisms when they are exposed in natural environment. Once they come in contact, it is not an easy to remove them because many of their constituents are persistent in nature. To achieve this target, different approaches have been exploited by using plants, bacteria, and plant-bacteria together. Among them, combined use of plants and bacteria has gained tremendous attention as bacteria possess set of catabolic genes which produce catabolic enzymes to decontaminate hydrocarbons. In return, plant ooze out root exudates containing nutrients and necessary metabolites which facilitate the microbial colonization in plant rhizosphere. This results into high gene abundance and gene expression in the rhizosphere and, thus, leads to enhanced degradation. Moreover, high proportions of beneficial bacteria helps plant to gain more biomass due to their plant growth promoting activities and production of phytohromones. This review focuses functioning and mechanisms of catabolic genes responsible for degradation of straight chain and aromatic hydrocarbons with their potential of degradation in bioremediation. With the understanding of expression mechanisms, rate of degradation can be enhanced by adjusting environmental factors and acclimatizing plant associated bacteria in plant rhizosphere.

  4. Polyamine catabolism is involved in response to salt stress in soybean hypocotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campestre, María Paula; Bordenave, Cesar Daniel; Origone, Andrea Cecilia; Menéndez, Ana Bernardina; Ruiz, Oscar Adolfo; Rodríguez, Andrés Alberto; Maiale, Santiago Javier

    2011-07-15

    The possible relationship between polyamine catabolism mediated by copper-containing amine oxidase and the elongation of soybean hypocotyls from plants exposed to NaCl has been studied. Salt treatment reduced values of all hypocotyl growth parameters. In vitro, copper-containing amine oxidase activity was up to 77-fold higher than that of polyamine oxidase. This enzyme preferred cadaverine over putrescine and it was active even under the saline condition. On the other hand, saline stress increased spermine and cadaverine levels, and the in vivo copper-containing amine oxidase activity in the elongation zone of hypocotyls. The last effect was negatively modulated by the addition of the copper-containing amine oxidase inhibitor N,N'-diaminoguanidine. In turn, plants treated with the inhibitor showed a significant reduction of reactive oxygen species in the elongation zone, even in the saline situation. In addition, plants grown in cadaverine-amended culture medium showed increased hypocotyl length either in saline or control conditions and this effect was also abolished by N,N'-diaminoguanidine. Taken together, our results suggest that the activity of the copper-containing amine oxidase may be partially contributing to hypocotyl growth under saline stress, through the production of hydrogen peroxide by polyamine catabolism and reinforce the importance of polyamine catabolism and hydrogen peroxide production in the induction of salt tolerance in plants.

  5. Detection of norfloxacin and monitoring its effect on caffeine catabolism in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Bharati; Chandra, Pranjal; Goyal, Rajendra N; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2013-09-15

    A multi-walled carbon nano tube (MWCNT) modified pyrolytic graphite (MPG) electrode is prepared and applied to detect norfloxacin (NFX) based on its electrochemical reduction. The experimental parameters affecting the NFX determination were optimized in terms of MWCNT amount, pH, reaction time, and square wave frequency. The dynamic range for the NFX analysis ranged between 1.2 and 1000µM with a detection limit of 40.6±3.3nM. The effect of NFX on the catabolism of caffeine has been studied by determining its concentration in the urine samples after the prolonged administration of NFX using the MPG electrode. The results show that the catabolism of caffeine is inhibited by ~65% after five days of NFX administration, consequently the caffeine concentration in the urine sample is increased, which is reflected in terms of ~2.5 times increase in the peak current of caffeine. The determinations of NFX and caffeine were selective and the method was successfully applied in biological fluids and pharmaceutical tablets for the test compound analysis. In future this method can be useful for the selective determination of NFX and studying its effect on caffeine catabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The oxylipin pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, Robert A; Mulpuri, Rao

    2002-01-01

    Oxylipins are acyclic or cyclic oxidation products derived from the catabolism of fatty acids which regulate many defense and developmental pathways in plants. The dramatic increase in the volume of publications and reviews on these compounds since 1997 documents the increasing interest in this compound and its role in plants. Research on this topic has solidified our understanding of the chemistry and biosynthetic pathways for oxylipin production. However, more information is still needed on how free fatty acids are produced and the role of beta-oxidation in the biosynthetic pathway for oxylipins. It is also becoming apparent that oxylipin content and composition changes during growth and development and during pathogen or insect attack. Oxylipins such as jasmonic acid (JA) or 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid modulate the expression of numerous genes and influence specific aspects of plant growth, development and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Although oxylipins are believed to act alone, several examples were presented to illustrate that JA-induced responses are modulated by the type and the nature of crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as ethylene and salicylic acid. How oxylipins cause changes in gene expression and instigate a physiological response is becoming understood with the isolation of mutations in both positive and negative regulators in the jasmonate signaling pathway and the use of cDNA microarrays.

  7. The influence of environmental parameters on the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids by Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus carnosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Stahnke, Louise Heller

    2004-01-01

    detection (GC/FID). Main volatile catabolic products of leucine, isoleucine and valine were 3-methylbutanoic, 2-methylbutanoic and 2-methylpropanoic acids, respectively. The generation of branched flavour compounds was influenced significantly by most of the investigated environmental parameters...

  8. Simple generic model for dynamic experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in continuous culture. Decoupling between anabolism and catabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duboc, Philippe Jean; von Stockar, U.; Villadsen, John

    1998-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to a sudden increase in the dilution rate has been successfully modelled for anaerobic growth on glucose, and for aerobic growth on acetate, on ethanol, and on glucose. The catabolism responded by an immediate jump...... whereas biosynthesis did not. Thus catabolism was in excess to anabolism. The model considers the decoupling between biosynthesis and catabolism, both types of reactions being modelled by first-order kinetic expressions evolving towards maximal values. Yield parameters and maximal reaction rates were...... identified in steady state continuous cultures or during batch experiments. Only the time constant of biosynthesis regeneration, tau(x), and the time constant of catabolic capacity regeneration, tau(cat), had to be identified during transient experiments. In most experiments 7, was around 3 h, and tau...

  9. The phn Genes of Burkholderia sp. Strain RP007 Constitute a Divergent Gene Cluster for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Cloning and molecular ecological studies have underestimated the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) catabolic genes by emphasizing classical nah-like (nah, ndo, pah, and dox) sequences. Here we report the description of a divergent set of PAH catabolic genes, the phn genes, which although isofunctional to the classical nah-like genes, show very low homology. This phn locus, which contains nine open reading frames (ORFs), was isolated on an 11.5-kb HindIII fragment from phenant...

  10. Stabilities and Spectroscopy of Hydrogen Bonding Complexes Formed by 2,4-Bis(acrylamido)pyrimidines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ye; LI Ting; TENG Qi-Wen

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds play important roles to living organisms containing pyrimidine-based derivatives.The electronic structures of the hydrogen bonding complexes formed by 2,4-bis(acrylamido)pyrimidine (2,4-BAAP) derivatives with 1-substituted uracil were studied using Austin Model 1 (AMl) and density function theory (DFT) methods.The UV and NMR spectra of the complexes were calculated with the INDO/CIS (configuration interaction for singlet in intermediate neglect of differential overlap) and B3LYP/6-31G(d)methods.It was shown that the complexes could be formed via the triple hydrogen bonding between two monomers owing to the negative binding energies.The binding energies of the complexes were weakened in the presence of substituents,but this weakening effect depended on the simultaneous influence of the electronic and steric effects.The binding energies of the complexes were also decreased owing to the formation of the isomeric complexes in the presence of piperidyl on 2,4-BAAP.The energy gaps of the complexes were lessened in the presence of electron-donating groups.Holes and electrons were easily injected to the complexes due to the extension of the conjugation chain.The first UV absorptions of the complexes relative to those of the parent compound were red-shifted because of the narrow energy gaps.The chemical shifts of the carbon atoms on the C=O bonds in the complexes were changed downfield.

  11. Formation of Nucleobases from the UV Photo-Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, S. N.; Nuevo, M.; Sandford, S. A.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Astrochemistry laboratory simulations have shown that complex organic molecules including compounds of astrobiological interest can be formed under interstellarl/circumstellar conditions from the vacuum UV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs containing H2O, CO, CO2, CH3OH, NH13, etc. Of all prebiotic compounds, the formation of amino acids under such experimental conditions has been the most extensively studied. Although the presence of amino acids in the interstellar medium (ISM) has yet to be confirmed, they have been detected in meteorites, indicating that biomolecules and/or their precursors can be formed under extraterrestrial, abiotic conditions. Nucleobases, the building blocks of DNA and RNA, as well as other 1V-heterocycles, have also been detected in meteorites, but like amino acids, they have yet to be observed in the ISM. In this work, we present an experimental study of the formation of pyrimidine-based compounds from the UV photo-irradiation of pyrimidine in ice mixtures containing H2O, NH3, and/or CH3OH at low temperature and pressure.

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of a classical 2,4-diamino-5-substituted-furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine and a 2-amino-4-oxo-6-substituted-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine as antifolates☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangjee, Aleem; Yang, Jie; McGuire, John J.; Kisliuk, Roy L.

    2013-01-01

    Two classical antifolates, a 2,4-diamino-5-substituted furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine and a 2-amino-4-oxo-6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine, were synthesized as potential inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TS). The syntheses were accomplished by condensation of 2,6-diamino-3(H)-4-oxo-pyrimidine with α-chloro-ketone 21 to afford two key intermediates 23 and 24, followed by hydrolysis, coupling with l-glutamate diethyl ester and saponification of the diethyl ester to afford the classical antifolates 13 and 14. Compounds 13 and 14 with a single carbon atom bridge are both substrates for folylpoly-γ-glutamate synthetase (FPGS), the enzyme responsible for forming critical poly-γ-glutamate antifolate metabolites with increased potency and/or increased cell retention. Compound 14 is a highly efficient FPGS substrate demonstrating that 2,4-diamino-5-substituted furo[2,3-d]pyrimidines are important lead structures for the design of antifolates with FPGS substrate activity. It retains inhibitory potency for DHFR and TS compared to the two atom bridged analog 5. Compound 13 is a poor inhibitor of purified DHFR and TS, and both 13 and 14 are poor inhibitors of the growth of CCRF-CEM human leukemia cells in culture, indicating that single carbon bridged compounds in these series though conducive to FPGS substrate activity were not potent inhibitors. PMID:16990006

  13. Role of the pentose phosphate pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in glucose metabolism of Gluconobacter oxydans 621H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richhardt, Janine; Bringer, Stephanie; Bott, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Glucose catabolism by the obligatory aerobic acetic acid bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans 621H proceeds in two phases comprising rapid periplasmic oxidation of glucose to gluconate (phase I) and oxidation of gluconate to 2-ketogluconate or 5-ketogluconate (phase II). Only a small amount of glucose and part of the gluconate is taken up into the cells. To determine the roles of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP) for intracellular glucose and gluconate catabolism, mutants defective in either the PPP (Δgnd, Δgnd zwf*) or the EDP (Δedd-eda) were characterized under defined conditions of pH 6 and 15 % dissolved oxygen. In the presence of yeast extract, neither of the two pathways was essential for growth with glucose. However, the PPP mutants showed a reduced growth rate in phase I and completely lacked growth in phase II. In contrast, the EDP mutant showed the same growth behavior as the reference strain. These results demonstrate that the PPP is of major importance for cytoplasmic glucose and gluconate catabolism, whereas the EDP is dispensable. Reasons for this difference are discussed.

  14. Elucidating the mechanism of cytochrome P450-mediated pyrimidine ring conversion to pyrazole metabolites with the BACE1 inhibitor GNE-892 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryan; Ma, Shuguang; Deese, Alan; Yue, Qin; Kim-Kang, Heasook; Yi, Yijun; Siu, Michael; Hunt, Kevin W; Kallan, Nicholas C; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Liu, Xingrong; Khojasteh, S Cyrus

    2014-05-01

    We investigated an uncommon biotransformation of pyrimidine during the metabolism of GNE-892 ((R)-2-amino-1,3',3'-trimethyl-7'-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-3',4'-dihydro-2'H-spiro[imidazole-4,1'-naphthalen]-5(1H)-one), a β-secretase 1 inhibitor. Three novel metabolites, formed by conversion of pyrimidine to pyrazole, were observed in the (14)C-radiolabeled mass balance study in rats. Their structures were characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. Although these metabolites accounted for pyrazole-containing metabolites were formed in vitro with rat hepatocytes and liver microsomes, which supported that they were formed during hepatic metabolism. Further, their generation was inhibited by 1-aminobenzotriazole, indicating involvement of cytochrome P450s. Studies with rat recombinant enzymes identified that CYP2D2 generated the N-hydroxypyrazole metabolite from GNE-892. This biotransformation proceeded through multiple steps from the likely precursor, pyrimidine N-oxide. On the basis of these data, we propose a mechanism in which the pyrimidine is activated via N-oxidation, followed by a second oxidative process that opens the pyrimidine ring to form a formamide intermediate. After hydrolysis of the formamide, a carbon is lost as formic acid, together with ring closure to form the pyrazole ring. This article highlights a mechanistic approach for determining the biotransformation of the pyrimidine to a pyrazole for GNE-892.

  15. [Effect of hydroxylated pyrimidine derivatives on activities of thiamine-dependent enzymes and some parameters of lipid metabolism in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, D A; Gorenshteĭn, B I; Karaedova, L M; Naruta, E E; Zabrodskaia, S V; Rudiak, T V; Akat'ev, V E; Larin, F S

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that hydroxylated pyrimidine derivatives actively participate in metabolic proceeds related to functioning of vitamin B1-dependent enzymes (transketolase, 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase). Hydroxypyrimidines also induce a significant increase in the levels of total lipids and cholesterol in the mice liver, not changing the phospholipid content.

  16. Synthesis, structural, conformational and DFT studies of N-3 and O-4 alkylated regioisomers of 5-(hydroxypropyl)pyrimidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihović, Mirsada; Osmanović, Amar; Špirtović-Halilović, Selma; Roca, Sunčica; Meščić, Andrijana; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Trifunović, Snežana; Završnik, Davorka; Sofić, Emin

    2015-07-01

    Because of the great pharmacological potential of the pyrimidine motif, novel C-5 substituted N-3 acyclic and O-4 acyclic pyrimidine derivatives were prepared as an interesting class of compounds for biological evaluation. Introduction of the 2,3-dihydroxypropyl (DHP) and penciclovir (PCV)-like side chains to 2-methoxypyrimidin-4-one (2) afforded a mixture of N- and O-acyclic pyrimidine nucleosides in the ratio of 54: 29 (3:4) and 57:21 (5:6) with N-3 isomer being dominant. Distinction between N- and O-alkylated pyrimidine moiety was deduced from extensive experimental FT-IR, HPLC-MS and 1D (1H, 13C) and 2D (COSY, HMQC and HMBC) NMR analyses. The N-, O-regioisomers were also examined by computational method at density functional theory (DFT) RB3LYP/6-31G(d), 6-31G∗∗ and 6-31+G∗ levels. DFT global chemical reactivity descriptors (total energy, chemical hardness, electronic chemical potential and electrophilicity) were calculated for the isomers and used to predict and describe their relative stability and reactivity. The chemical reactivity indices were related to the C2sbnd N3sbnd C4 bond angle. Theoretical predictions can be used to compare chemical reactivity and stability with future biological evaluation and behaviour of these compounds.

  17. A microenvironment-sensitive fluorescent pyrimidine ribonucleoside analogue: synthesis, enzymatic incorporation, and fluorescence detection of a DNA abasic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanpure, Arun A; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2011-11-04

    Base-modified fluorescent ribonucleoside-analogue probes are valuable tools in monitoring RNA structure and function because they closely resemble the structure of natural nucleobases. Especially, 2-aminopurine, a highly environment-sensitive adenosine analogue, is the most extensively utilized fluorescent nucleoside analogue. However, only a few isosteric pyrimidine ribonucleoside analogues that are suitable for probing the structure and recognition properties of RNA molecules are available. Herein, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of a small series of base-modified pyrimidine ribonucleoside analogues derived from tagging indole, N-methylindole, and benzofuran onto the 5-position of uracil. One of the analogues, based on a 5-(benzofuran-2-yl)pyrimidine core, shows emission in the visible region with a reasonable quantum yield and, importantly, displays excellent solvatochromism. The corresponding triphosphate substrate is effectively incorporated into oligoribonucleotides by T7 RNA polymerase to produce fluorescent oligoribonucleotide constructs. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic studies with fluorescent oligoribonucleotide constructs demonstrate that the fluorescent ribonucleoside photophysically responds to subtle changes in its environment brought about by the interaction of the chromophore with neighboring bases. In particular, the emissive ribonucleoside, if incorporated into an oligoribonucleotide, positively reports the presence of a DNA abasic site with an appreciable enhancement in fluorescence intensity. The straightforward synthesis, amicability to enzymatic incorporation, and sensitivity to changes in the microenvironment highlight the potential of the benzofuran-conjugated pyrimidine ribonucleoside as an efficient fluorescent probe to investigate nucleic acid structure, dynamics, and recognition events.

  18. Prodrugs of purine and pyrimidine analogues for the intestinal di/tri-peptide transporter PepT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anne Engelbrecht; Friedrichsen, Gerda Marie; Sørensen, Arne Hagsten

    2003-01-01

    A general drug delivery approach for increasing oral bioavailability of purine and pyrimidine analogues such as acyclovir may be to link these compounds reversibly to stabilized dipeptide pro-moieties with affinity for the human intestinal di/tri-peptide transporter, hPepT1. In the present study...

  19. The role of pyrimidine and water as underlying molecular constituents for describing radiation damage in living tissue: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M. C.; Ellis-Gibbings, L. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Brunger, M. J. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avenida Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Muñoz, A. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Limão-Vieira, P. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); García, G., E-mail: g.garcia@csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2015-06-07

    Water is often used as the medium for characterizing the effects of radiation on living tissue. However, in this study, charged-particle track simulations are employed to quantify the induced physicochemical and potential biological implications when a primary ionising particle with energy 10 keV strikes a medium made up entirely of water or pyrimidine. Note that pyrimidine was chosen as the DNA/RNA bases cytosine, thymine, and uracil can be considered pyrimidine derivatives. This study aims to assess the influence of the choice of medium on the charged-particle transport, and identify how appropriate it is to use water as the default medium to describe the effects of ionising radiation on living tissue. Based on the respective electron interaction cross sections, we provide a model, which allows the study of radiation effects not only in terms of energy deposition (absorbed dose and stopping power) but also in terms of the number of induced molecular processes. Results of these parameters for water and pyrimidine are presented and compared.

  20. Hyperosmolarity enhanced susceptibility to renal tubular fibrosis by modulating catabolism of type I transforming growth factor-beta receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Tai-An; Yang, Yu-Lin; Yang, Ya-Ying; Hu, Min-Hsiu; Wu, Pei-Fen; Liu, Shu-Fen; Huang, Ruay-Ming; Liao, Tung-Nan; Hung, Chien-Ya; Hung, Tsung-Jen; Lee, Tao-Chen

    2010-03-01

    Hyperosmolarity plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of diabetic tubular fibrosis. However, the mechanism of the involvement of hyperosmolarity remains unclear. In this study, mannitol was used to evaluate the effects of hyperosmolarity on a renal distal tubule cell line (MDCK). We investigated transforming growth factor-beta receptors and their downstream fibrogenic signal proteins. We show that hyperosmolarity significantly enhances the susceptibility to exogenous transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, as mannitol (27.5 mM) significantly enhanced the TGF-beta1-induced increase in fibronectin levels compared with control experiments (5.5 mM). Specifically, hyperosmolarity induced tyrosine phosphorylation on TGF-beta RII at 336 residues in a time (0-24 h) and dose (5.5-38.5 mM) dependent manner. In addition, hyperosmolarity increased the level of TGF-beta RI in a dose- and time-course dependent manner. These observations may be closely related to decreased catabolism of TGF-beta RI. Hyperosmolarity significantly downregulated the expression of an inhibitory Smad (Smad7), decreased the level of Smurf 1, and reduced ubiquitination of TGF-beta RI. In addition, through the use of cycloheximide and the proteasome inhibitor MG132, we showed that hyperosmolarity significantly increased the half-life and inhibited the protein level of TGF-beta RI by polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Taken together, our data suggest that hyperosmolarity enhances cellular susceptibility to renal tubular fibrosis by activating the Smad7 pathway and increasing the stability of type I TGF-beta receptors by retarding proteasomal degradation of TGF-beta RI. This study clarifies the mechanism underlying hyperosmotic-induced renal fibrosis in renal distal tubule cells. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Identification and pharmacological induction of autophagy in the larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus: an active catabolic process in calcareous corpuscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Julia A; Caparros, Pedro A; Nicolao, María Celeste; Denegri, Guillermo M; Cumino, Andrea C

    2014-06-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental catabolic pathway conserved from yeast to mammals, but which remains unknown in parasite cestodes. In this work, the pharmacological induction of autophagy was cellularly and molecularly analysed in the larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus. Metacestode sensitivity to rapamycin and TORC1 expression in protoscoleces and metacestodes were shown. Ultrastructural studies showed that treated parasites had an isolation membrane, autophagosomes and autolysosomes, all of which evidenced the autophagic flux. Genes coding for key autophagy-related proteins were also identified in the Echinococcus genome. These genes were involved in autophagosome formation and transcriptional over-expression of Eg-atg5, Eg-atg6, Eg-atg8, Eg-atg12, Eg-atg16 and Eg-atg18 was shown in presence of rapamycin or arsenic trioxide. Thus, Echinococcus autophagy could be regulated by non-transcriptional inhibition through TOR and by transcription-dependent up-regulation via FoxO-like transcription factors and/or TFEB proteins. An increase in the punctate pattern and Eg-Atg8 polypeptide level in the tegument, parenchyma cells and excretory system of protoscoleces and in vesicularised parasites was detected after rapamycin treatment. This suggests the occurrence of basal autophagy in the larval stages and during vesicular development. In arsenic-treated protoscoleces, high Eg-Atg8 polypeptide levels within the free cytoplasmic matrix of calcareous corpuscles were observed, thus verifying the occurrence of autophagic events. These experiments also confirmed that the calcareous corpuscles are sites of arsenic trioxide accumulation. The detection of the autophagic machinery in this parasite represents a basic starting point to unravel the role of autophagy under both physiological and stress conditions which will allow identification of new strategies for drug discovery against neglected parasitic diseases caused by cestodes.

  2. Structural modifications leading to changes in supramolecular aggregation of thiazolo[3, 2-]pyrimidines: Insights into their conformational features

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Nagarajaiah; Noor Shahina Begum

    2014-09-01

    The compounds, 7-methyl-3,5-diphenyl-5-thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (1), 3-amino-2-cyano-7-methyl-5-phenyl-5-thiazolo[3,2-]pyrimidine-6-carboxylic acid methyl ester (2), 2-dimethylaminomethylene-7-methyl-3-oxo-5-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-5-thiazolo[3,2-]pyrimidine-6-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (3), 2-(3-cyano-benzylidene)-5-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-7-methyl-3-oxo-2,3-dihydro-5-thiazolo[3,2-]pyrimidine-6-carboxylic acid methyl ester; with ,-dimethyl-formamide (4) and 3-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-5-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-7-methyl-5-thiazolo[3,2-]pyrimidine-6-carboxylic acid methyl ester (5) have been synthesized and their structures evaluated crystallographically. Compound 1 crystallizes in the space group $\\bar{ı}$ with Z=8, with four molecules in the asymmetric unit. Compound 2 also crystallizes in the space group $\\bar{ı}$ with Z=4 wherein asymmetric unit accommodates two molecules. Compound 3 belongs to 21/ with Z=4, compound 4 crystallizes in bc21 with Z= 4 and compound 5 belongs to $\\bar{ı}$ with Z=2. In all the above compounds, the aryl ring positioned at C5 of thiazolopyrimidine ring is almost perpendicular. In the case of compounds with substituted phenyl ring, aryl group-up conformation predominates. However, for compounds with unsubstituted phenyl ring, aryl group-down conformation is adopted. By varying the substituents at positions C2, C3, C6 and on the aryl at C5 in the main molecular scaffold of (1-5), we have observed significant differences in the intermolecular interaction patterns. The packing features of the compounds are controlled by C-H…O, C-H…N, N-H…N O-H…N, C-H$\\ldots$ and $\\ldots$ weak interactions.

  3. Supramolecular systems based on novel mono- and dicationic pyrimidinic amphiphiles and oligonucleotides: a self-organization and complexation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Lucia; Voronin, Mikhail; Semenov, Vyacheslav; Gabdrakhmanov, Dinar; Syakaev, Victor; Gogolev, Yuri; Giniyatullin, Rashit; Lukashenko, Svetlana; Reznik, Vladimir; Latypov, Shamil; Konovalov, Alexander; Zuev, Yuri

    2012-02-01

    Novel mono- and dicationic pyrimidinic surfactants are synthesized and their aggregation behavior is studied by methods of tensiometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) self-diffusion. To estimate their potentiality as gene delivery agents, the complexation with oligonucleotides (ONus) is explored by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta-potential titration methods and ethidium bromide exclusion experiments. Bola-type pyrimidinic amphiphile (BPM) demonstrates rather a weak affinity to ONus. Although it induces mixed associations with ONus, only slight charge compensation changes occur at a large excess of bola, with no recharging reached. Similarly, the ethydium bromide exclusion study reveals a slow increase in the binding capacity toward an ONu with an increment in BPM concentration. The monocationic pyrimidinic surfactant (MPM) and its gemini analogue (GPM-1) are ranked as intermediates in both their aggregative activity and complexing properties toward ONus. They both form mixed associates with ONus well below the critical micelle concentrations (cmcs) of 2 and 15 mM respectively. However, GPM-1 has a much lower isoelectric point at the molar ratio surfactant/ONu r~1 compared to r~3 for MPM. This probably indicates a larger electrostatic contribution to the ONu complexation in the case of GPM-1. The most hydrophobic pyrimidinic surfactant (GPM-2), bearing three alkyl tails, demonstrates enhanced aggregative activity and binding capacity toward ONus as compared to former pyrimidinic surfactants. Due to effective aggregative (low cmc of 0.04 mM) plus binding properties (fraction of bound ONu β=0.76 at r=2.5), GPM-2 may be ranked as a promising agent for wider biological applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization pathways in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overbeek Ross

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbohydrates are a primary source of carbon and energy for many bacteria. Accurate projection of known carbohydrate catabolic pathways across diverse bacteria with complete genomes constitutes a substantial challenge due to frequent variations in components of these pathways. To address a practically and fundamentally important challenge of reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization machinery in any microorganism directly from its genomic sequence, we combined a subsystems-based comparative genomic approach with experimental validation of selected bioinformatic predictions by a combination of biochemical, genetic and physiological experiments. Results We applied this integrated approach to systematically map carbohydrate utilization pathways in 19 genomes from the Shewanella genus. The obtained genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization includes ~170 protein families (mostly metabolic enzymes, transporters and transcriptional regulators spanning 17 distinct pathways with a mosaic distribution across Shewanella species providing insights into their ecophysiology and adaptive evolution. Phenotypic assays revealed a remarkable consistency between predicted and observed phenotype, an ability to utilize an individual sugar as a sole source of carbon and energy, over the entire matrix of tested strains and sugars. Comparison of the reconstructed catabolic pathways with E. coli identified multiple differences that are manifested at various levels, from the presence or absence of certain sugar catabolic pathways, nonorthologous gene replacements and alternative biochemical routes to a different organization of transcription regulatory networks. Conclusions The reconstructed sugar catabolome in Shewanella spp includes 62 novel isofunctional families of enzymes, transporters, and regulators. In addition to improving our knowledge of genomics and functional organization of carbohydrate utilization in Shewanella, this study led to a

  5. Association of CAD, a multifunctional protein involved in pyrimidine synthesis, with mLST8, a component of the mTOR complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background mTOR is a genetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, which controls cell growth, proliferation, and survival. A multifunctional protein CAD, catalyzing the initial three steps in de novo pyrimidine synthesis, is regulated by the phosphorylation reaction with different protein kinases, but the relationship with mTOR protein kinase has not been known. Results CAD was recovered as a binding protein with mLST8, a component of the mTOR complexes, from HEK293 cells transfected with the FLAG-mLST8 vector. Association of these two proteins was confirmed by the co-immuoprecipitaiton followed by immunoblot analysis of transfected myc-CAD and FLAG-mLST8 as well as that of the endogenous proteins in the cells. Analysis using mutant constructs suggested that CAD has more than one region for the binding with mLST8, and that mLST8 recognizes CAD and mTOR in distinct ways. The CAD enzymatic activity decreased in the cells depleted of amino acids and serum, in which the mTOR activity is suppressed. Conclusion The results obtained indicate that mLST8 bridges between CAD and mTOR, and plays a role in the signaling mechanism where CAD is regulated in the mTOR pathway through the association with mLST8. PMID:23594158

  6. Methionine catabolism in Arabidopsis cells is initiated by a gamma-cleavage process and leads to S-methylcysteine and isoleucine syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rébeillé, Fabrice; Jabrin, Samuel; Bligny, Richard; Loizeau, Karen; Gambonnet, Bernadette; Van Wilder, Valérie; Douce, Roland; Ravanel, Stéphane

    2006-10-17

    Despite recent progress in elucidating the regulation of methionine (Met) synthesis, little is known about the catabolism of this amino acid in plants. In this article, we present several lines of evidence indicating that the cleavage of Met catalyzed by Met gamma-lyase is the first step in this process. First, we cloned an Arabidopsis cDNA coding a functional Met gamma-lyase (AtMGL), a cytosolic enzyme catalyzing the conversion of Met into methanethiol, alpha-ketobutyrate, and ammonia. AtMGL is present in all of the Arabidopsis organs and tissues analyzed, except in quiescent dry mature seeds, thus suggesting that AtMGL is involved in the regulation of Met homeostasis in various situations. Also, we demonstrated that the expression of AtMGL was induced in Arabidopsis cells in response to high Met levels, probably to bypass the elevated Km of the enzyme for Met. Second, [13C]-NMR profiling of Arabidopsis cells fed with [13C]Met allowed us to identify labeled S-adenosylmethionine, S-methylmethionine, S-methylcysteine (SMC), and isoleucine (Ile). The unexpected production of SMC and Ile was directly associated to the function of Met gamma-lyase. Indeed, we showed that part of the methanethiol produced during Met cleavage could react with an activated form of serine to produce SMC. The second product of Met cleavage, alpha-ketobutyrate, entered the pathway of Ile synthesis in plastids. Together, these data indicate that Met catabolism in Arabidopsis cells is initiated by a gamma-cleavage process and can result in the formation of the essential amino acid Ile and a potential storage form for sulfide or methyl groups, SMC.

  7. Effects of human growth hormone on the catabolic state after surgical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara-Thorbeck, R; Ruiz-Requena, E; Guerrero-Fernández, J A

    1996-01-01

    The aims of our studies were: (1) to determine if the protein catabolic response after a major or moderate surgical trauma can be restrained by the administration of exogenous human growth hormone (hGH); (2) to determine if the administration of hGH can improve systemic host defenses, thus reducing the risk of infection, and (3) given that the postoperative fatigue syndrome (POF) is mediated by the endocrino-metabolic response to surgery we attempt to determine if the administration of hGH can prevent or reduce POF. Therefore, we performed three placebo-controlled randomized double-blind trials on 216 patients. Major gastrointestinal surgery was treated only with total parenteral nutrition (TPN; n = 20) or TPN plus 4 IU hGH (n = 18). Patients with moderate surgical trauma received either hypocaloric parenteral nutrition (HPN; n = 93) or HPN and 8 IU hGH (n = 87). In this study, we also determined the evolution of the systemic host defenses and thereby the risk of infection. In 48 patients who underwent cholecystectomy treated (n = 26) either with HPN or HPN plus 8 IU hGH, we measured the protein catabolic response, postoperative fatigue and anthropometric modifications. The treatment with hGH together with HPN or TPN (1) overcomes the protein catabolic effects of the trauma response induced by major or moderate surgery by increasing protein synthesis, (2) improves humoral and cellular systemic host defenses, thus reducing the risk of infection, (3) preserves or increases lean body mass and reduces adipose tissue and (4) minimizes POF.

  8. Involvement of Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the regulation of proline catabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie eLeprince

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant adaptation to abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity involves complex regulatory processes. Deciphering the signalling components that are involved in stress signal transduction and cellular responses is of importance to understand how plants cope with salt stress. Accumulation of osmolytes such as proline is considered to participate in the osmotic adjustment of plant cells to salinity. Proline accumulation results from a tight regulation between its biosynthesis and catabolism. Lipid signal components such as phospholipases C and D have previously been shown to be involved in the regulation of proline metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we demonstrate that proline metabolism is also regulated by class-III Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, VPS34, which catalyses the formation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P from phosphatidylinositol. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we show that the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, affects PI3P levels in vivo and that it triggers a decrease in proline accumulation in response to salt treatment of A. thaliana seedlings. The lower proline accumulation is correlated with a lower transcript level of Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase 1 biosynthetic enzyme and higher transcript and protein levels of Proline dehydrogenase 1 (ProDH1, a key-enzyme in proline catabolism. We also found that the ProDH1 expression is induced in a pi3k-hemizygous mutant, further demonstrating that PI3K is involved in the regulation of proline catabolism through transcriptional regulation of ProDH1. A broader metabolomic analysis indicates that LY294002 also reduced other metabolites, such as hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids and sugars like raffinose.

  9. Comparison of human erythrocyte purine nucleotide metabolism and blood purine and pyrimidine degradation product concentrations before and after acute exercise in trained and sedentary subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinska, Wioleta; Suska, M; Lubkowska, A; Jakubowska, K; Olszewska, M; Safranow, K; Chlubek, D

    2017-04-21

    This study aimed at evaluating the concentration of erythrocyte purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP) in trained and sedentary subjects before and after maximal physical exercise together with measuring the activity of purine metabolism enzymes as well as the concentration of purine (hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid) and pyrimidine (uridine) degradation products in blood. The study included 15 male elite rowers [mean age 24.3 ± 2.56 years; maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) 52.8 ± 4.54 mL/kg/min; endurance and strength training 8.2 ± 0.33 h per week for 6.4 ± 2.52 years] and 15 sedentary control subjects (mean age 23.1 ± 3.41 years; VO2max 43.2 ± 5.20 mL/kg/min). Progressive incremental exercise testing until refusal to continue exercising was conducted on a bicycle ergometer. The concentrations of ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP and the activities of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase (PRPP-S) were determined in erythrocytes. The concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and uridine were determined in the whole blood before exercise, after exercise, and 30 min after exercise testing. The study demonstrated a significantly higher concentration of ATP in the erythrocytes of trained subjects which, in part, may be explained by higher metabolic activity on the purine re-synthesis pathway (significantly higher PRPP-S, APRT and HGPRT activities). The ATP concentration, just as the ATP/ADP ratio, as well as an exercise-induced increase in this ratio, correlates with the VO2max level in these subjects which allows them to be considered as the important factors characterising physical capacity and exercise tolerance. Maximal physical exercise in the group of trained subjects results not only in a lower post-exercise increase in the concentration of hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid but also in that of uridine. This indicates the possibility of

  10. Alterations of pyrimidine and nucleic acid synthesis during adaptive growth of liver induced by nafenopin, a peroxisome proliferator. An in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, J.; Mostecka, H. (Institute of Pharmacology, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1989-08-01

    The de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides in the rat liver after administration of nafenopin (NFP) was studied with the aid of (14C)orotic acid; the utilization of preformed nucleosides (salvage pathways) was followed using the (14C)cytidine and (14C)thymidine. A single dose (400 mg/kg) as well as repeated doses (100 mg/kg/day) of NFP increased the concentration of the cytidine and uridine components of the acid-soluble extract (ASE) of rat liver. Increase in the concentration of the cytidine components preceded the increase in the uridine components. The uptake of (14C)cytidine by the liver of rats that had been given a single dose of NFP was observed 24 h after the administration of the drug and a decrease followed after this period. The specific activity of RNA and DNA cytosine paralleled the changes of the specific activity of ASE. A single dose of NFP had no marked effect on the uptake of (14C)orotic acid. The specific activity of the uridine components of ASE remained unaltered for 2 days. After this period it decreased because of an increase in the amount of the soluble uridine components. A mild drop of the specific activity of cytidine components of ASE occurred on the second day, the total radioactivity of cytidine components increased 24 h after the administration of NFP. The specific activity of DNA pyrimidines was markedly increased 24 h after administration of the drug. On the fourth day the specific activity of DNA cytosine in the experimental group was the same as in the control group, whereas the activity of DNA thymine was lower. Following repeated administration of NFP (100 mg/kg/day) a decreased uptake of (14C)orotic acid was observed; its utilization for the synthesis of the uridine components of ASE, expressed as total radioactivity of soluble uridine components, was continuously suppressed. No changes in the specific activity of cytidine components were observed.

  11. Alterations of pyrimidine and nucleic acid synthesis during adaptive growth of liver induced by nafenopin, a peroxisome proliferator. An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, J; Mostecká, H

    1989-08-01

    The de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides in the rat liver after administration of nafenopin (NFP) was studied with the aid of [14C]orotic acid; the utilization of preformed nucleosides (salvage pathways) was followed using the [14C]cytidine and [14C]thymidine. A single dose (400 mg/kg) as well as repeated doses (100 mg/kg/day) of NFP increased the concentration of the cytidine and uridine components of the acid-soluble extract (ASE) of rat liver. Increase in the concentration of the cytidine components preceded the increase in the uridine components. The uptake of [14C]cytidine by the liver of rats that had been given a single dose of NFP was observed 24 h after the administration of the drug and a decrease followed after this period. The specific activity of RNA and DNA cytosine paralleled the changes of the specific activity of ASE. A single dose of NFP had no marked effect on the uptake of [14C]orotic acid. The specific activity of the uridine components of ASE remained unaltered for 2 days. After this period it decreased because of an increase in the amount of the soluble uridine components. A mild drop of the specific activity of cytidine components of ASE occurred on the second day, the total radioactivity of cytidine components increased 24 h after the administration of NFP. The specific activity of DNA pyrimidines was markedly increased 24 h after administration of the drug. On the fourth day the specific activity of DNA cytosine in the experimental group was the same as in the control group, whereas the activity of DNA thymine was lower. Following repeated administration of NFP (100 mg/kg/day) a decreased uptake of [14C]orotic acid was observed; its utilization for the synthesis of the uridine components of ASE, expressed as total radioactivity of soluble uridine components, was continuously suppressed. No changes in the specific activity of cytidine components were observed. The specific activity of DNA cytosine and thymine was distributed unevenly

  12. The Steroid Catabolic Pathway of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Is Important for Pathogenesis and a Target for Vaccine Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geize, R.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Hessels, G. I.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause

  13. The Steroid Catabolic Pathway of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Is Important for Pathogenesis and a Target for Vaccine Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geize, R.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Hessels, G. I.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pu

  14. Lysosomal glycosphingolipid catabolism by acid ceramidase: formation of glycosphingoid bases during deficiency of glycosidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Appelman, Monique D; Verhoek, Marri; Strijland, Anneke; Mirzaian, Mina; Scheij, Saskia; Ouairy, Cécile M; Lahav, Daniel; Wisse, Patrick; Overkleeft, Herman S; Boot, Rolf G; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-03-01

    Glycosphingoid bases are elevated in inherited lysosomal storage disorders with deficient activity of glycosphingolipid catabolizing glycosidases. We investigated the molecular basis of the formation of glucosylsphingosine and globotriaosylsphingosine during deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (Gaucher disease) and α-galactosidase A (Fabry disease). Independent genetic and pharmacological evidence is presented pointing to an active role of acid ceramidase in both processes through deacylation of lysosomal glycosphingolipids. The potential pathophysiological relevance of elevated glycosphingoid bases generated through this alternative metabolism in patients suffering from lysosomal glycosidase defects is discussed.

  15. Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA) Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Almada Anthony; Greenwood Mike C; Rasmussen Christopher J; Marcello Brandon M; Taylor Lem W; Campbell Bill I; Kerksick Chad M; Wilborn Colin D; Kreider Richard B

    2004-01-01

    Abstract This study examined whether supplementing the diet with a commercial supplement containing zinc magnesium aspartate (ZMA) during training affects zinc and magnesium status, anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and/or training adaptations. Forty-two resistance trained males (27 ± 9 yrs; 178 ± 8 cm, 85 ± 15 kg, 18.6 ± 6% body fat) were matched according to fat free mass and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner either a dextrose placebo (P) or ZMA 30–60 minutes prior...

  16. D-Allose catabolism of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tim S.; Chang, Ying-Ying; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1999-01-01

    Genes involved in allose utilization of Escherichia coli K-12 are organized in at least two operons, alsRBACE and alsI, located next to each other on the chromosome but divergently transcribed. Mutants defective in alsI (allose 6-phosphate isomerase gene) and alsE (allulose 6-phosphate epimerase...... gene) were Als-. Transcription of the two allose operons, measured as β-galactosidase activity specified by alsI-lacZ+ or alsE-lacZ+ operon fusions, was induced by allose. Ribose also caused derepression of expression of the regulon under conditions in which ribose phosphate catabolism was impaired....

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrimidine-benzimidazol hybrids as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Kun-Peng; Zhang, Xu-Yao; Chen, Peng-Ju; Xue, Deng-Qi; He, Peng; Ma, Li-Ying; Zheng, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Qiu-Rong; Liu, Hong-Min

    2014-08-15

    A series of pyrimidine-benzimidazol hybrids was synthesized and evaluated for anticancer activity on four human cancer cell lines including MCF-7, MGC-803, EC-9706 and SMMC-7721. Some of the synthesized compounds exhibited moderate to potent activity against MGC-803 and MCF-7. Among them, compounds 5a-b and 6a-b showed most effective activity. Compounds 5b and 6b were more cytotoxic than 5-fluorouracil against all tested four human cancer cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 2.03 to 10.55 μM and 1.06 to 12.89 μM, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that treatment of MGC-803 with 6b led to cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase accompanied by an increase in apoptotic cell death.

  18. Design, synthesis and antifungal activities of novel strobilurin derivatives containing pyrimidine moieties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang; Geo, Yongxin; Liu, Huijun; Guo, Baoyuan; Wang, Huili [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences/Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-04-15

    Strobilurins are one of the most important classes of agricultural fungicides. To discover new strobilurin derivatives with high activity against resistant pathogens, a series of novel β-methoxy acrylate analogues were designed and synthesized by integrating substituted pyrimidine with a strobilurin pharmacophore. The compounds were confirmed and characterized by infrared, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance, elemental analysis and mass spectroscopy. The bioassays indicated that most of the compounds (1a-1h) exhibited potent antifungal activities against Colletotrichum orbicular, Botrytis cinerea Pers and Protoporphyria caps ici Leon ian at the concentration of 50 μg/mL. Exhilaratingly, compound 1d (R=3-trifluoromethylphenyl) showed better antifungal activity against all the tested fungi than the commercial stilbenetriol fungicide azoxystrobin.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial screening of hybrid molecules containing quinoline, pyrimidine and morpholine analogues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N C Desai; K M Rajpara; V V Joshi; H V Vaghani; H M Satodiya

    2013-03-01

    In an attempt to find new bio-active molecules, a series of compounds -(4-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl)-6-(aryl)pyrimidin-2-yl)-2-morpholinoacetamides (5a-l) were synthesized by multistep reactions. Compounds were characterized by IR, NMR and mass spectra. Antimicrobial screening of title compounds (5a-l) was carried out against Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes), Gramnegative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungi (Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus clavatus) using serial broth dilution method. On the basis of statistical analysis, it is observed that these compounds gave significant co-relation. Newly synthesized compounds 5e, 5f, 5g, 5i and 5l showed significant potency against different microbial strains.

  20. Syntheses and anti-microbial evaluation of new quinoline scaffold derived pyrimidine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha S. Dave

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of diversely substituted chalcones derived from a quinoline scaffold, e.g. (E-3-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl prop-2-en-1-one and its pyrimidine analogues e.g. 2-[2-amino-6-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl-5,6-dihydropyrimidin-4-yl]phenols have been prepared by condensation of 2-chloro-3-formyl quinoline with differently substituted 2-hydroxy acetophenones and further treatment with guanidine carbonate. All the newly synthesized compounds have been evaluated for their in vitro growth inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus typhi, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Pseudomonas chrysogenum.